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Sample records for biped locomotion controller

  1. Modeling, Control and Simulation of Three-Dimensional Robotic Systems with Applications to Biped Locomotion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuan-Fang

    A three-dimensional, five link biped system is established. Newton-Euler state space formulation is employed to derive the equations of the system. The constraint forces involved in the equations can be eliminated by projection onto a smaller state space system for deriving advanced control laws. A model-referenced adaptive control scheme is developed to control the system. Digital computer simulations of point to point movement are carried out to show that the model-referenced adaptive control increases the dynamic range and speeds up the response of the system in comparison with linear and nonlinear feedback control. Further, the implementation of the controller is simpler. Impact effects of biped contact with the environment are modeled and studied. The instant velocity change at the moment of impact is derived as a function of the biped state and contact speed. The effects of impact on the state, as well as constraints are studied in biped landing on heels and toes simultaneously or on toes first. Rate and nonlinear position feedback are employed for stability of the biped after the impact. The complex structure of the foot is properly modeled. A spring and dashpot pair is suggested to represent the action of plantar fascia during the impact. This action prevents the arch of the foot from collapsing. A mathematical model of the skeletal muscle is discussed. A direct relationship between the stimulus rate and the active state is established. A piecewise linear relation between the length of the contractile element and the isometric force is considered. Hill's characteristic equation is maintained for determining the actual output force during different shortening velocities. A physical threshold model is proposed for recruitment which encompasses the size principle, its manifestations and exceptions to the size principle. Finally the role of spindle feedback in stability of the model is demonstrated by study of a pair of muscles.

  2. Visuo-locomotor coordination for direction changes in a manual wheelchair as compared to biped locomotion in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Charette, Caroline; Routhier, François; McFadyen, Bradford J

    2015-02-19

    The visual system during walking provides travel path and environmental information. Although the manual wheelchair (MWC) is also a frequent mode of locomotion, its underlying visuo-locomotor control is not well understood. This study begins to understand the visuo-locomotor coordination for MWC navigation in relation to biped gait during direction changes in healthy subjects. Eight healthy male subjects (26.9±6.4 years) were asked to walk as well as to propel a MWC straight ahead and while changing direction by 45° to the right guided by a vertical pole. Body and MWC movement (speed, minimal clearance, point of deviation, temporal body coordination, relative timing of body rotations) and gaze behavior were analysed. There was a main speed effect for direction and a direction by mode interaction with slower speeds for MWC direction change. Point of deviation was later for MWC direction change and always involved a counter movement (seen for vehicular control) with greater minimal distance from the vertical pole as compared to biped gait. In straight ahead locomotion, subjects predominantly fixed their gaze on the end target for both locomotor modes while there was a clear trend for subjects to fixate on the vertical pole more for MWC direction change. When changing direction, head movement always preceded gaze changes, which was followed by trunk movement for both modes. Yet while subjects turned the trunk at the same time during approach regardless of locomotor mode, head movement was earlier for MWC locomotion. These results suggest that MWC navigation combines both biped locomotor and vehicular-based movement control. Head movement to anticipate path deviations and lead steering for locomotion appears to be stereotypic across locomotor modes, while specific gaze behavior predominantly depends on the environmental demands. PMID:25562632

  3. A new biarticular actuator design facilitates control of leg function in BioBiped3.

    PubMed

    Sharbafi, Maziar Ahmad; Rode, Christian; Kurowski, Stefan; Scholz, Dorian; Möckel, Rico; Radkhah, Katayon; Zhao, Guoping; Rashty, Aida Mohammadinejad; Stryk, Oskar von; Seyfarth, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Bioinspired legged locomotion comprises different aspects, such as (i) benefiting from reduced complexity control approaches as observed in humans/animals, (ii) combining embodiment with the controllers and (iii) reflecting neural control mechanisms. One of the most important lessons learned from nature is the significant role of compliance in simplifying control, enhancing energy efficiency and robustness against perturbations for legged locomotion. In this research, we investigate how body morphology in combination with actuator design may facilitate motor control of leg function. Inspired by the human leg muscular system, we show that biarticular muscles have a key role in balancing the upper body, joint coordination and swing leg control. Appropriate adjustment of biarticular spring rest length and stiffness can simplify the control and also reduce energy consumption. In order to test these findings, the BioBiped3 robot was developed as a new version of BioBiped series of biologically inspired, compliant musculoskeletal robots. In this robot, three-segmented legs actuated by mono- and biarticular series elastic actuators mimic the nine major human leg muscle groups. With the new biarticular actuators in BioBiped3, novel simplified control concepts for postural balance and for joint coordination in rebounding movements (drop jumps) were demonstrated and approved. PMID:27367459

  4. Stability and control of a frontal four-link biped system.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, K; Hemami, H; Simon, S

    1993-10-01

    A conceptual model for studying the involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) in the performance of lateral swaying movements is described. The model is based on a four-link planar biped that approximates gross human locomotion in the frontal plane. The viscoelastic function of the musculoskeletal system provides a linear controller for the system. Such an intrinsic controller can effectively duplicate simple well-learned tasks in the absence of higher level CNS feedback. This hypothesis is supported by comparing the proposed controller with two neurophysiologically involved linear decoupling schemes. Reference trajectories for swaying commands are recorded from experiments conducted in the Gait Analysis Laboratory of the Ohio State University Hospitals. These reference trajectories are inputs to all three controllers. The viability of intrinsic feedback scheme in the execution of swaying tasks is demonstrated via comparison of responses from the three controllers. PMID:8294125

  5. Foot and body control of biped robots to walk on irregularly protruded uneven surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Eung Seo

    2009-02-01

    This correspondence proposes a control method for biped robots walking on a geometrically uneven surface with irregular protrusions. The focus is to maintain robot stability in leg and foot motions in order to adapt the foot to uneven terrains. Under the assumption that contact sensors are evenly installed at the foot soles, the geometric information under the landing foot is represented by a terrain matrix, whose elements represent the height of protruded cones. The control strategy of a landing phase (LP) is to form a large polygon with the contact points between the foot and the ground, based on the current zero-moment point (ZMP) and the locations of contact points during the transition from the LP to the stable double-support phase. The center of the polygon formed by the contact points at the end of the LP is to be used as the ZMP when the trajectory for the next step is generated. The gravity-compensated inverted-pendulum-mode-based trajectory is modified based on the newly located ZMP position and is interpolated to remove any trajectory discontinuity and to ensure a smooth transition. A series of computer simulations of a 28-degree-of-freedom (DOF) biped robot with a six-DOF environment model using SimMechanics shows that a stable compliant locomotion on uneven surfaces is successfully achieved with the proposed method. PMID:19068443

  6. Sensor-based control of a nine-link biped

    SciTech Connect

    Furusho, J.; Sano, A. )

    1990-04-01

    The authors aimed to realize smooth 3D biped walking in a robot through control based on information obtained from various sensors. They employed a method to control walking by dividing it into motions in the sagittal plane and in the lateral plane. They treated motion in the lateral plane as a regulator problem with two equilibrium states. They also used relatively low gain feedback coefficients obtained from the optimal regulator theory. For motion in the sagittal plane, they put the body speed close to the smooth speed function given in advance by controlling the ankle torque. The effectiveness of the proposed control method was examined by computer simulation and proved by experiments with out BLR-G2 walking robot. The BLR-G2 is equipped with foot pressure and ankle torque sensors to provide information about the condition of contact with the floor. The sole and ankle driving actuators undergo force/torque feedback control based on the sensor information. These contributed toward realizing smooth walking with the sole firmly gripping the floor.

  7. Regularity in an environment produces an internal torque pattern for biped balance control.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Haruhisa

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, we present a control method for achieving biped static balance under unknown periodic external forces whose periods are only known. In order to maintain static balance adaptively in an uncertain environment, it is essential to have information on the ground reaction forces. However, when the biped is exposed to a steady environment that provides an external force periodically, uncertain factors on the regularity with respect to a steady environment are gradually clarified using learning process, and finally a torque pattern for balancing motion is acquired. Consequently, static balance is maintained without feedback from ground reaction forces and achieved in a feedforward manner. PMID:15789225

  8. Robust disturbance rejection control of a biped robotic system using high-order extended state observer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fonseca, Nadhynee; Castañeda, Luis Ángel; Uranga, Agustín; Luviano-Juárez, Alberto; Chairez, Isaac

    2016-05-01

    This study addressed the problem of robust control of a biped robot based on disturbance estimation. Active disturbance rejection control was the paradigm used for controlling the biped robot by direct active estimation. A robust controller was developed to implement disturbance cancelation based on a linear extended state observer of high gain class. A robust high-gain scheme was proposed for developing a state estimator of the biped robot despite poor knowledge of the plant and the presence of uncertainties. The estimated states provided by the state estimator were used to implement a feedback controller that was effective in actively rejecting the perturbations as well as forcing the trajectory tracking error to within a small vicinity of the origin. The theoretical convergence of the tracking error was proven using the Lyapunov theory. The controller was implemented by numerical simulations that showed the convergence of the tracking error. A comparison with a high-order sliding-mode-observer-based controller confirmed the superior performance of the controller using the robust observer introduced in this study. Finally, the proposed controller was implemented on an actual biped robot using an embedded hardware-in-the-loop strategy. PMID:26928517

  9. SVR versus neural-fuzzy network controllers for the sagittal balance of a biped robot.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João P; Crisóstomo, Manuel M; Coimbra, A Paulo

    2009-12-01

    The real-time balance control of an eight-link biped robot using a zero moment point (ZMP) dynamic model is difficult due to the processing time of the corresponding equations. To overcome this limitation, two alternative intelligent computing control techniques were compared: one based on support vector regression (SVR) and another based on a first-order Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK)-type neural-fuzzy (NF) network. Both methods use the ZMP error and its variation as inputs and the output is the correction of the robot's torso necessary for its sagittal balance. The SVR and the NF were trained based on simulation data and their performance was verified with a real biped robot. Two performance indexes are proposed to evaluate and compare the online performance of the two control methods. The ZMP is calculated by reading four force sensors placed under each robot's foot. The gait implemented in this biped is similar to a human gait that was acquired and adapted to the robot's size. Some experiments are presented and the results show that the implemented gait combined either with the SVR controller or with the TSK NF network controller can be used to control this biped robot. The SVR and the NF controllers exhibit similar stability, but the SVR controller runs about 50 times faster. PMID:19840908

  10. Controlling legs for locomotion-insights from robotics and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Thomas; Ewald, Alexander; von Twickel, Arndt; Büschges, Ansgar

    2015-08-01

    Walking is the most common terrestrial form of locomotion in animals. Its great versatility and flexibility has led to many attempts at building walking machines with similar capabilities. The control of walking is an active research area both in neurobiology and robotics, with a large and growing body of work. This paper gives an overview of the current knowledge on the control of legged locomotion in animals and machines and attempts to give walking control researchers from biology and robotics an overview of the current knowledge in both fields. We try to summarize the knowledge on the neurobiological basis of walking control in animals, emphasizing common principles seen in different species. In a section on walking robots, we review common approaches to walking controller design with a slight emphasis on biped walking control. We show where parallels between robotic and neurobiological walking controllers exist and how robotics and biology may benefit from each other. Finally, we discuss where research in the two fields diverges and suggest ways to bridge these gaps. PMID:26119450

  11. Walking motion generation, synthesis, and control for biped robot by using PGRL, LPI, and fuzzy logic.

    PubMed

    Li, Tzuu-Hseng S; Su, Yu-Te; Lai, Shao-Wei; Hu, Jhen-Jia

    2011-06-01

    This paper proposes the implementation of fuzzy motion control based on reinforcement learning (RL) and Lagrange polynomial interpolation (LPI) for gait synthesis of biped robots. First, the procedure of a walking gait is redefined into three states, and the parameters of this designed walking gait are determined. Then, the machine learning approach applied to adjusting the walking parameters is policy gradient RL (PGRL), which can execute real-time performance and directly modify the policy without calculating the dynamic function. Given a parameterized walking motion designed for biped robots, the PGRL algorithm automatically searches the set of possible parameters and finds the fastest possible walking motion. The reward function mainly considered is first the walking speed, which can be estimated from the vision system. However, the experiment illustrates that there are some stability problems in this kind of learning process. To solve these problems, the desired zero moment point trajectory is added to the reward function. The results show that the robot not only has more stable walking but also increases its walking speed after learning. This is more effective and attractive than manual trial-and-error tuning. LPI, moreover, is employed to transform the existing motions to the motion which has a revised angle determined by the fuzzy motion controller. Then, the biped robot can continuously walk in any desired direction through this fuzzy motion control. Finally, the fuzzy-based gait synthesis control is demonstrated by tasks and point- and line-target tracking. The experiments show the feasibility and effectiveness of gait learning with PGRL and the practicability of the proposed fuzzy motion control scheme. PMID:21095871

  12. Patterned control of human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Zago, Myrka

    2012-05-15

    There is much experimental evidence for the existence of biomechanical constraints which simplify the problem of control of multi-segment movements. In addition, it has been hypothesized that movements are controlled using a small set of basic temporal components or activation patterns, shared by several different muscles and reflecting global kinematic and kinetic goals. Here we review recent studies on human locomotion showing that muscle activity is accounted for by a combination of few basic patterns, each one timed at a different phase of the gait cycle. Similar patterns are involved in walking and running at different speeds, walking forwards or backwards, and walking under different loading conditions. The corresponding weights of distribution to different muscles may change as a function of the condition, allowing highly flexible control. Biomechanical correlates of each activation pattern have been described, leading to the hypothesis that the co-ordination of limb and body segments arises from the coupling of neural oscillators between each other and with limb mechanical oscillators. Muscle activations need only intervene during limited time epochs to force intrinsic oscillations of the system when energy is lost. PMID:22411012

  13. Spinal circuitry of sensorimotor control of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, David A

    2001-01-01

    During locomotion many segmental hindlimb reflex pathways serve not only to regulate the excitability of local groups of motoneurones, but also to control the basic operation of the central pattern-generating circuitry responsible for locomotion. This is accomplished through a reorganization of reflexes that includes the suppression of reflex pathways operating at rest and the recruitment during locomotion of previously unrecognized types of spinal interneurones. In addition presynaptic inhibition of transmission from segmental afferents serves to regulate the gain of segmental reflexes and may contribute to the selection of particular reflex pathways during locomotion. The fictive locomotion preparation in adult decerebrate cats has proved to be an important tool in understanding reflex pathway reorganization. Further identification of the spinal interneurones involved in locomotor-dependent reflexes will contribute to our understanding not only of reflex pathway organization but also of the organization of the mammalian central pattern generator. PMID:11351011

  14. Evolution of neural controllers for salamanderlike locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijspeert, Auke J.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents an experiment in which evolutionary algorithms are used for the development of neural controllers for salamander locomotion. The aim of the experiment is to investigate which kind of neural circuitry can produce the typical swimming and trotting gaits of the salamander, and to develop a synthetic approach to neurobiology by using genetic algorithms as design tool. A 2D bio-mechanical simulation of the salamander's body is developed whose muscle contraction is determined by the locomotion controller simulated as continuous-time neural networks. While the connectivity of the neural circuitry underlying locomotion in the salamander has not been decoded for the moment, the general organization of the designed neural circuits corresponds to that hypothesized by neurobiologist for the real animal. In particular, the locomotion controllers are based on a body central pattern generator (CPG) corresponding to a lamprey-like swimming controller as developed by Ekeberg, and are extended with a limb CPG for controlling the salamander's body. A genetic algorithm is used to instantiate synaptic weights of the connections within the limb CPG and from the limb CPG to the body CPG given a high level description of the desired gaits. A set of biologically plausible controllers are thus developed which can produce a neural activity and locomotion gaits very similar to those observed in the real salamander. By simply varying the external excitation applied to the network, the speed, direction and type of gait can be varied.

  15. Pareto Design of State Feedback Tracking Control of a Biped Robot via Multiobjective PSO in Comparison with Sigma Method and Genetic Algorithms: Modified NSGAII and MATLAB's Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodabadi, M. J.; Taherkhorsandi, M.; Bagheri, A.

    2014-01-01

    An optimal robust state feedback tracking controller is introduced to control a biped robot. In the literature, the parameters of the controller are usually determined by a tedious trial and error process. To eliminate this process and design the parameters of the proposed controller, the multiobjective evolutionary algorithms, that is, the proposed method, modified NSGAII, Sigma method, and MATLAB's Toolbox MOGA, are employed in this study. Among the used evolutionary optimization algorithms to design the controller for biped robots, the proposed method operates better in the aspect of designing the controller since it provides ample opportunities for designers to choose the most appropriate point based upon the design criteria. Three points are chosen from the nondominated solutions of the obtained Pareto front based on two conflicting objective functions, that is, the normalized summation of angle errors and normalized summation of control effort. Obtained results elucidate the efficiency of the proposed controller in order to control a biped robot. PMID:24616619

  16. Adaptive, Fast Walking in a Biped Robot under Neuronal Control and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kulvicius, Tomas; Porr, Bernd; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2007-01-01

    Human walking is a dynamic, partly self-stabilizing process relying on the interaction of the biomechanical design with its neuronal control. The coordination of this process is a very difficult problem, and it has been suggested that it involves a hierarchy of levels, where the lower ones, e.g., interactions between muscles and the spinal cord, are largely autonomous, and where higher level control (e.g., cortical) arises only pointwise, as needed. This requires an architecture of several nested, sensori–motor loops where the walking process provides feedback signals to the walker's sensory systems, which can be used to coordinate its movements. To complicate the situation, at a maximal walking speed of more than four leg-lengths per second, the cycle period available to coordinate all these loops is rather short. In this study we present a planar biped robot, which uses the design principle of nested loops to combine the self-stabilizing properties of its biomechanical design with several levels of neuronal control. Specifically, we show how to adapt control by including online learning mechanisms based on simulated synaptic plasticity. This robot can walk with a high speed (>3.0 leg length/s), self-adapting to minor disturbances, and reacting in a robust way to abruptly induced gait changes. At the same time, it can learn walking on different terrains, requiring only few learning experiences. This study shows that the tight coupling of physical with neuronal control, guided by sensory feedback from the walking pattern itself, combined with synaptic learning may be a way forward to better understand and solve coordination problems in other complex motor tasks. PMID:17630828

  17. 49 CFR 229.15 - Remote control locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remote control locomotives. 229.15 Section 229.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.15 Remote control locomotives. (a) Design and operation. (1)...

  18. Locomotion control of hybrid cockroach robots

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Carlos J.; Chiu, Chen-Wei; Zhou, Yan; González, Jorge M.; Vinson, S. Bradleigh; Liang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Natural systems retain significant advantages over engineered systems in many aspects, including size and versatility. In this research, we develop a hybrid robotic system using American (Periplaneta americana) and discoid (Blaberus discoidalis) cockroaches that uses the natural locomotion and robustness of the insect. A tethered control system was firstly characterized using American cockroaches, wherein implanted electrodes were used to apply an electrical stimulus to the prothoracic ganglia. Using this approach, larger discoid cockroaches were engineered into a remotely controlled hybrid robotic system. Locomotion control was achieved through electrical stimulation of the prothoracic ganglia, via a remotely operated backpack system and implanted electrodes. The backpack consisted of a microcontroller with integrated transceiver protocol, and a rechargeable battery. The hybrid discoid roach was able to walk, and turn in response to an electrical stimulus to its nervous system with high repeatability of 60%. PMID:25740855

  19. Locomotion control of hybrid cockroach robots.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos J; Chiu, Chen-Wei; Zhou, Yan; González, Jorge M; Vinson, S Bradleigh; Liang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Natural systems retain significant advantages over engineered systems in many aspects, including size and versatility. In this research, we develop a hybrid robotic system using American (Periplaneta americana) and discoid (Blaberus discoidalis) cockroaches that uses the natural locomotion and robustness of the insect. A tethered control system was firstly characterized using American cockroaches, wherein implanted electrodes were used to apply an electrical stimulus to the prothoracic ganglia. Using this approach, larger discoid cockroaches were engineered into a remotely controlled hybrid robotic system. Locomotion control was achieved through electrical stimulation of the prothoracic ganglia, via a remotely operated backpack system and implanted electrodes. The backpack consisted of a microcontroller with integrated transceiver protocol, and a rechargeable battery. The hybrid discoid roach was able to walk, and turn in response to an electrical stimulus to its nervous system with high repeatability of 60%. PMID:25740855

  20. Intermittent locomotion as an optimal control strategy

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, P.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Birds, fish and other animals routinely use unsteady effects to save energy by alternating between phases of active propulsion and passive coasting. Here, we construct a minimal model for such behaviour that can be couched as an optimal control problem via an analogy to travelling with a rechargeable battery. An analytical solution of the optimal control problem proves that intermittent locomotion has lower energy requirements relative to steady-state strategies. Additional realistic hypotheses, such as the assumption that metabolic cost at a given power should be minimal (the fixed gear hypothesis), a nonlinear dependence of the energy storage rate on propulsion and/or a preferred average speed, allow us to generalize the model and demonstrate the flexibility of intermittent locomotion with implications for biological and artificial systems. PMID:24711718

  1. Reinforcement learning for a biped robot based on a CPG-actor-critic method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yutaka; Mori, Takeshi; Sato, Masa-aki; Ishii, Shin

    2007-08-01

    Animals' rhythmic movements, such as locomotion, are considered to be controlled by neural circuits called central pattern generators (CPGs), which generate oscillatory signals. Motivated by this biological mechanism, studies have been conducted on the rhythmic movements controlled by CPG. As an autonomous learning framework for a CPG controller, we propose in this article a reinforcement learning method we call the "CPG-actor-critic" method. This method introduces a new architecture to the actor, and its training is roughly based on a stochastic policy gradient algorithm presented recently. We apply this method to an automatic acquisition problem of control for a biped robot. Computer simulations show that training of the CPG can be successfully performed by our method, thus allowing the biped robot to not only walk stably but also adapt to environmental changes. PMID:17412559

  2. 49 CFR 229.13 - Control of locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... coupled in remote or multiple control, the propulsion system, the sanders, and the power brake system of each locomotive shall respond to control from the cab of the controlling locomotive. If a dynamic brake or regenerative brake system is in use, that portion of the system in use shall respond to...

  3. Environmental engineering simplifies subterranean locomotion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Monaenkova, Darya; Goodisman, Michael A. D.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2013-03-01

    We hypothesize that ants engineer habitats which reduce locomotion control requirements. We studied tunnel construction, and locomotion, in fire ants (Solenopsis invicta, body length L = 0 . 35 +/- 0 . 05). In their daily life, ants forage for food above ground and return resources to the nest. This steady-state tunnel traffic enables high-throughput biomechanics studies of tunnel climbing. In a laboratory experiment we challenged fire ants to climb through 8 cm long glass tunnels (D = 0.1 - 0.9 cm) that separated a nest from an open arena with food and water. During ascending and descending climbs we induced falls by a motion-activated rapid, short, downward translation of the tunnels. Normalized tunnel diameter (D / L) determined the ability of ants to rapidly recover from perturbations. Fall arrest probability was unity for small D / L , and zero for large D / L . The transition from successful to unsuccessful arrest occurred at D / L = 1 . 4 +/- 0 . 3 . Through X-Ray computed tomography study we show that the diameter of ant-excavated tunnels is independent of soil-moisture content (studied from 1-20%) and particle size (50-595 μm diameter), and has a mean value of D / L = 1 . 06 +/- 0 . 23 . Thus fire ants construct tunnels of diameter near the onset of fall instability.

  4. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing—the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized—has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed. PMID:25009490

  5. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing-the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized-has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed. PMID:25009490

  6. Hydrodynamics and control of microbial locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jorn; Kantsler, Vasily; Polin, Marco; Wioland, Hugo; Goldstein, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    Interactions between swimming cells, surfaces and fluid flow are essential to many microbiological processes, from the formation of biofilms to the fertilization of human egg cells. Yet, relatively little remains known quantitatively about the physical mechanisms that govern the response of bacteria, algae and sperm cells to flow velocity gradients and solid surfaces. A better understanding of cell-surface and cell-flow interactions promises new biological insights and may advance microfluidic techniques for controlling microbial and sperm locomotion, with potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutic protein synthesis. Here, we report new experimental measurements that quantify surface interactions of bacteria, unicellular green algae and mammalian spermatozoa. These experiments show that the subtle interplay of hydrodynamics and surface interactions can stabilize collective bacterial motion, that direct ciliary contact interactions dominate surface scattering of eukaryotic biflagellate algae, and that rheotaxis combined with steric surface interactions provides a robust long-range navigation mechanism for sperm cells.

  7. Goal Directed Locomotion and Balance Control in Autistic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernazza-Martin, S.; Martin, N.; Vernazza, A.; Lepellec-Muller, A.; Rufo, M.; Massion, J.; Assaiante, C.

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on postural anticipation and multi-joint coordination during locomotion in healthy and autistic children. Three questions were addressed: (1) Are gait parameters modified in autistic children? (2) Is equilibrium control affected in autistic children? (3) Is locomotion adjusted to the experimenter-imposed goal? Six healthy…

  8. Dynamic legged locomotion in robots and animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raibert, Marc; Playter, Robert; Ringrose, Robert; Bailey, Dave; Leeser, Karl

    1995-01-01

    This report documents our study of active legged systems that balance actively and move dynamically. The purpose of this research is to build a foundation of knowledge that can lead both to the construction of useful legged vehicles and to a better understanding of how animal locomotion works. In this report we provide an update on progress during the past year. Here are the topics covered in this report: (1) Is cockroach locomotion dynamic? To address this question we created three models of cockroaches, each abstracted at a different level. We provided each model with a control system and computer simulation. One set of results suggests that 'Groucho Running,' a type of dynamic walking, seems feasible at cockroach scale. (2) How do bipeds shift weight between the legs? We built a simple planar biped robot specifically to explore this question. It shifts its weight from one curved foot to the other, using a toe-off and toe-on strategy, in conjunction with dynamic tipping. (3) 3D biped gymnastics: The 3D biped robot has done front somersaults in the laboratory. The robot changes its leg length in flight to control rotation rate. This in turn provides a mechanism for controlling the landing attitude of the robot once airborne. (4) Passively stabilized layout somersault: We have found that the passive structure of a gymnast, the configuration of masses and compliances, can stabilize inherently unstable maneuvers. This means that body biomechanics could play a larger role in controlling behavior than is generally thought. We used a physical 'doll' model and computer simulation to illustrate the point. (5) Twisting: Some gymnastic maneuvers require twisting. We are studying how to couple the biomechanics of the system to its control to produce efficient, stable twisting maneuvers.

  9. Maneuvers during legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindrich, Devin L.; Qiao, Mu

    2009-06-01

    Maneuverability is essential for locomotion. For animals in the environment, maneuverability is directly related to survival. For humans, maneuvers such as turning are associated with increased risk for injury, either directly through tissue loading or indirectly through destabilization. Consequently, understanding the mechanics and motor control of maneuverability is a critical part of locomotion research. We briefly review the literature on maneuvering during locomotion with a focus on turning in bipeds. Walking turns can use one of several different strategies. Anticipation can be important to adjust kinematics and dynamics for smooth and stable maneuvers. During running, turns may be substantially constrained by the requirement for body orientation to match movement direction at the end of a turn. A simple mathematical model based on the requirement for rotation to match direction can describe leg forces used by bipeds (humans and ostriches). During running turns, both humans and ostriches control body rotation by generating fore-aft forces. However, whereas humans must generate large braking forces to prevent body over-rotation, ostriches do not. For ostriches, generating the lateral forces necessary to change movement direction results in appropriate body rotation. Although ostriches required smaller braking forces due in part to increased rotational inertia relative to body mass, other movement parameters also played a role. Turning performance resulted from the coordinated behavior of an integrated biomechanical system. Results from preliminary experiments on horizontal-plane stabilization support the hypothesis that controlling body rotation is an important aspect of stable maneuvers. In humans, body orientation relative to movement direction is rapidly stabilized during running turns within the minimum of two steps theoretically required to complete analogous maneuvers. During straight running and cutting turns, humans exhibit spring-mass behavior in the

  10. Visuomotor Control of Human Adaptive Locomotion: Understanding the Anticipatory Nature

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    To maintain balance during locomotion, the central nervous system (CNS) accommodates changes in the constraints of spatial environment (e.g., existence of an obstacle or changes in the surface properties). Locomotion while modifying the basic movement patterns in response to such constraints is referred to as adaptive locomotion. The most powerful means of ensuring balance during adaptive locomotion is to visually perceive the environmental properties at a distance and modify the movement patterns in an anticipatory manner to avoid perturbation altogether. For this reason, visuomotor control of adaptive locomotion is characterized, at least in part, by its anticipatory nature. The purpose of the present article is to review the relevant studies which revealed the anticipatory nature of the visuomotor control of adaptive locomotion. The anticipatory locomotor adjustments for stationary and changeable environment, as well as the spatio-temporal patterns of gaze behavior to support the anticipatory locomotor adjustments are described. Such description will clearly show that anticipatory locomotor adjustments are initiated when an object of interest (e.g., a goal or obstacle) still exists in far space. This review also show that, as a prerequisite of anticipatory locomotor adjustments, environmental properties are accurately perceived from a distance in relation to individual’s action capabilities. PMID:23720647

  11. Advanced underground Vehicle Power and Control: The locomotive Research Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Vehicle Projects LLC

    2003-01-28

    Develop a fuelcell mine locomotive with metal-hydride hydrogen storage. Test the locomotive for fundamental limitations preventing successful commercialization of hydride fuelcells in underground mining. During Phase 1 of the DOE-EERE sponsored project, FPI and its partner SNL, completed work on the development of a 14.4 kW fuelcell power plant and metal-hydride energy storage. An existing battery-electric locomotive with similar power requirements, minus the battery module, was used as the base vehicle. In March 2001, Atlas Copco Wagner of Portland, OR, installed the fuelcell power plant into the base vehicle and initiated integration of the system into the vehicle. The entire vehicle returned to Sandia in May 2001 for further development and integration. Initial system power-up took place in December 2001. A revision to the original contract, Phase 2, at the request of DOE Golden Field Office, established Vehicle Projects LLC as the new prime contractor,. Phase 2 allowed industry partners to conduct surface tests, incorporate enhancements to the original design by SNL, perform an extensive risk and safety analysis, and test the fuelcell locomotive underground under representative production mine conditions. During the surface tests one of the fuelcell stacks exhibited reduced power output resulting in having to replace both fuelcell stacks. The new stacks were manufactured with new and improved technology resulting in an increase of the gross power output from 14.4 kW to 17 kW. Further work by CANMET and Hatch Associates, an engineering consulting firm specializing in safety analysis for the mining industry, both under subcontract to Vehicle Projects LLC, established minimum requirements for underground testing. CANMET upgraded the Programmable Logic Control (PLC) software used to monitor and control the fuelcell power plant, taking into account locomotive operator's needs. Battery Electric, a South Africa manufacturer, designed and manufactured (at no cost to

  12. Decoding the organization of spinal circuits that control locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Unravelling the functional operation of neuronal networks and linking cellular activity to specific behavioural outcomes are among the biggest challenges in neuroscience. In this broad field of research, substantial progress has been made in studies of the spinal networks that control locomotion. Through united efforts using electrophysiological and molecular genetic network approaches and behavioural studies in phylogenetically diverse experimental models, the organization of locomotor networks has begun to be decoded. The emergent themes from this research are that the locomotor networks have a modular organization with distinct transmitter and molecular codes and that their organization is reconfigured with changes to the speed of locomotion or changes in gait. PMID:26935168

  13. [Locomotion and control study on autonomous interventional diagnostic micro-robots].

    PubMed

    Gu, Da-qiang; Zhou, Yong

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces the locomotion control and the research status of the autonomous interventional diagnostic micro-robots in detail, outlines technical problems and difficulties now existing, and discusses the developing trend of locomotion control. PMID:19119659

  14. Optimizing Locomotion Controllers Using Biologically-Based Actuators and Objectives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack M.; Hamner, Samuel R.; Delp, Scott L.; Koltun, Vladlen

    2015-01-01

    We present a technique for automatically synthesizing walking and running controllers for physically-simulated 3D humanoid characters. The sagittal hip, knee, and ankle degrees-of-freedom are actuated using a set of eight Hill-type musculotendon models in each leg, with biologically-motivated control laws. The parameters of these control laws are set by an optimization procedure that satisfies a number of locomotion task terms while minimizing a biological model of metabolic energy expenditure. We show that the use of biologically-based actuators and objectives measurably increases the realism of gaits generated by locomotion controllers that operate without the use of motion capture data, and that metabolic energy expenditure provides a simple and unifying measurement of effort that can be used for both walking and running control optimization. PMID:26251560

  15. Guineafowl with a twist: asymmetric limb control in steady bipedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kambic, Robert E; Roberts, Thomas J; Gatesy, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    In avian bipeds performing steady locomotion, right and left limbs are typically assumed to act out of phase, but with little kinematic disparity. However, outwardly appearing steadiness may harbor previously unrecognized asymmetries. Here, we present marker-based XROMM data showing that guineafowl on a treadmill routinely yaw away from their direction of travel using asymmetrical limb kinematics. Variation is most strongly reflected at the hip joints, where patterns of femoral long-axis rotation closely correlate to degree of yaw divergence. As yaw deviations increase, hip long-axis rotation angles undergo larger excursions and shift from biphasic to monophasic patterns. At large yaw angles, the alternately striding limbs exhibit synchronous external and internal femoral rotations of substantial magnitude. Hip coordination patterns resembling those used during sidestep maneuvers allow birds to asymmetrically modulate their mediolateral limb trajectories and thereby advance using a range of body orientations. PMID:26632457

  16. Controlled regular locomotion of algae cell microrobots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuangxi; Jiao, Niandong; Tung, Steve; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-06-01

    Algae cells can be considered as microrobots from the perspective of engineering. These organisms not only have a strong reproductive ability but can also sense the environment, harvest energy from the surroundings, and swim very efficiently, accommodating all these functions in a body of size on the order of dozens of micrometers. An interesting topic with respect to random swimming motions of algae cells in a liquid is how to precisely control them as microrobots such that they swim according to manually set routes. This study developed an ingenious method to steer swimming cells based on the phototaxis. The method used a varying light signal to direct the motion of the cells. The swimming trajectory, speed, and force of algae cells were analyzed in detail. Then the algae cell could be controlled to swim back and forth, and traverse a crossroad as a microrobot obeying specific traffic rules. Furthermore, their motions along arbitrarily set trajectories such as zigzag, and triangle were realized successfully under optical control. Robotize algae cells can be used to precisely transport and deliver cargo such as drug particles in microfluidic chip for biomedical treatment and pharmacodynamic analysis. The study findings are expected to bring significant breakthrough in biological drives and new biomedical applications. PMID:27206511

  17. Tendon Based Full Size Biped Humanoid Robot Walking Platform Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chung-Hsien; Chiou, Kuo-Wei

    Actuators and gear trains of most biped humanoid robots are divergently allocated on the links of two legs. Disadvantages of such a mechanical design are complicated wiring of power cord and sensing/ control signal bundles and imprecise kinetics models of mixed link-and-actuator structures. Based on these drawbacks, this paper proposes a tendon-driven mechanism to develop a lower body structure of a full-size biped humanoid robot. The actuators are compacted as an actuator module, and they are placed at a distal site. A 12 degree-of-freedom mechanical structure is proposed with 100 cm in height and 45 kg in weight. The gait planning module is simulated and evaluated using the Matlab software. At the same time, an ARM7 based controller is developed to automatically generate walking patterns as well as to control the motors. Finally, a tendon-driven biped humanoid robot prototype is realized for practical waling control in the future.

  18. Support afferentation in the posture and locomotion control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Anatoly; Tomilovskaya, Elena; Kozlovskaya, Inesa

    Mechanisms of support afferentation contribution in posture and locomotion control, which were uncertain up to now, became the point of intensive studies recently. This became possible since the space flights era started which created the conditions for simulated microgravity experiments under conditions of dry immersion and bedrest. The results of neurophysiological studies performed under the conditions of supportlessness have shown that decline or elimination of support loads is followed by deep and fast developing alterations in postural tonic system, including development of postural muscle atonia, changes of recruitment order of motoneurons innervating the shin muscles, spinal hyperreflexia development etc. (Kozlovskaya I.B. et al., 1987). It has been also shown that application of artificial support stimulation in the regimen of natural locomotion under these conditions decreases significantly or even eliminates the development of mentioned changes. The results of these studies laid down the basis for a new hypothesis on the trigger role of support afferentation in postural tonic system and its role in organization and control of postural synergies (Grigoriev A.I. et al., 2004). According to this hypothesis the muscle reception is considered to be the leading afferent input in the control of locomotion. However the data of recent studies pointed out strongly to the participation of support afferentation in definition of cognitive strategies and motor programs of locomotor movements (Chernikova L.A. et al., 2013) and, consequently, in the processes of their initiation (Gerasimenko Yu.P. et al., 2012). The cortical locomotor reflex composes apparently the basis of these processes. The receptive field of this reflex is located in the support zones of the soles and the central part is located in the posterior parietal areas (IPL) of brain cortex. The study is supported by RFBR grant N 13-04-12091 OFI-m.

  19. Investigation of the impact of locomotive creep control on wear under changing contact conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Liu, Sheng; Daniel, William(Bill) J. T.; Meehan, Paul A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the locomotive traction controller performance with respect to the track wear under different operation conditions. In particular, an investigation into the dynamic response of a locomotive under changing wheel-rail friction conditions is performed with an aim to determine the effect of controller setting on track wear. Simulation using a full-scale longitudinal-vertical locomotive dynamic model shows that the appropriately designed creep threshold, controller, settings can effectively maintain a high tractive effort while avoiding excessive rail damage due to wear, especially during acceleration under low speed.

  20. A Specific Population of Reticulospinal Neurons Controls the Termination of Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Juvin, Laurent; Grätsch, Swantje; Trillaud-Doppia, Emilie; Gariépy, Jean-François; Büschges, Ansgar; Dubuc, Réjean

    2016-06-14

    Locomotion requires the proper sequencing of neural activity to start, maintain, and stop it. Recently, brainstem neurons were shown to specifically stop locomotion in mammals. However, the cellular properties of these neurons and their activity during locomotion are still unknown. Here, we took advantage of the lamprey model to characterize the activity of a cell population that we now show to be involved in stopping locomotion. We find that these neurons display a burst of spikes that coincides with the end of swimming activity. Their pharmacological activation ends ongoing swimming, whereas the inactivation of these neurons dramatically impairs the rapid termination of swimming. These neurons are henceforth referred to as stop cells, because they play a crucial role in the termination of locomotion. Our findings contribute to the fundamental understanding of motor control and provide important details about the cellular mechanisms involved in locomotor termination. PMID:27264174

  1. Locomotion training of legged robots using hybrid machine learning techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, William E.; Doerschuk, Peggy I.; Zhang, Wen-Ran; Li, Andrew L.

    1995-01-01

    In this study artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic are used to control the jumping behavior of a three-link uniped robot. The biped locomotion control problem is an increment of the uniped locomotion control. Study of legged locomotion dynamics indicates that a hierarchical controller is required to control the behavior of a legged robot. A structured control strategy is suggested which includes navigator, motion planner, biped coordinator and uniped controllers. A three-link uniped robot simulation is developed to be used as the plant. Neurocontrollers were trained both online and offline. In the case of on-line training, a reinforcement learning technique was used to train the neurocontroller to make the robot jump to a specified height. After several hundred iterations of training, the plant output achieved an accuracy of 7.4%. However, when jump distance and body angular momentum were also included in the control objectives, training time became impractically long. In the case of off-line training, a three-layered backpropagation (BP) network was first used with three inputs, three outputs and 15 to 40 hidden nodes. Pre-generated data were presented to the network with a learning rate as low as 0.003 in order to reach convergence. The low learning rate required for convergence resulted in a very slow training process which took weeks to learn 460 examples. After training, performance of the neurocontroller was rather poor. Consequently, the BP network was replaced by a Cerebeller Model Articulation Controller (CMAC) network. Subsequent experiments described in this document show that the CMAC network is more suitable to the solution of uniped locomotion control problems in terms of both learning efficiency and performance. A new approach is introduced in this report, viz., a self-organizing multiagent cerebeller model for fuzzy-neural control of uniped locomotion is suggested to improve training efficiency. This is currently being evaluated for a possible

  2. The hippocampus participates in the control of locomotion speed.

    PubMed

    López Ruiz, J R; Osuna Carrasco, L P; López Valenzuela, C L; Franco Rodríguez, N E; de la Torre Valdovinos, B; Jiménez Estrada, I; Dueñas Jiménez, J M; Dueñas Jiménez, S H

    2015-12-17

    The hippocampus role in sensory-motor integration remains unclear. In these experiments we study its function in the locomotor control. To establish the connection between the hippocampus and the locomotor system, electrical stimulation in the CA1 region was applied and EMG recordings were obtained. We also evaluated the hindlimbs and forelimbs kinematic patterns in rats with a penetrating injury (PI) in the hippocampus as well as in a cortex-injured group (CI), which served as control. After the PI, tamoxifen a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that has been described as a neuroprotector and antiinflammatory drug, or vehicle was administered. Electrical stimulation in the hippocampus produces muscle contractions in the contralateral triceps, when 6 Hz or 8 Hz pulse trains were applied. The penetrating injury in the hippocampus reduced the EMG amplitude after the electrical stimulation. At 7 DPI (days post-injury) we observed an increase in the strides speed in all four limbs of the non-treated group, decreasing the correlation percentage of the studied joints. After 15 DPI the strides speed in the non-treated returned to normal. These changes did not occur in the tamoxifen group nor in cortex-injured group. After 30 days, the nontreated group presented a reduction in the number of pyramidal cell layer neurons at the injury site, in comparison to the tam-treated group. The loss of neurons, may cause the interruption of the trisynaptic circuit and changes in the locomotion speed. Tamoxifen preserves the pyramidal neurons after the injury, probably resulting in the strides speed recovery. PMID:26597762

  3. A hybrid active/passive exhaust noise control system for locomotives.

    PubMed

    Remington, Paul J; Knight, J Scott; Hanna, Doug; Rowley, Craig

    2005-01-01

    A prototype hybrid system consisting of active and passive components for controlling far-field locomotive exhaust noise has been designed, assembled, and tested on a locomotive. The system consisted of a resistive passive silencer for controlling high-frequency broadband noise and a feedforward multiple-input, multiple-output active control system for suppressing low-frequency tonal noise. The active system used ten roof-mounted bandpass speaker enclosures with 2-12-in. speakers per enclosure as actuators, eight roof-mounted electret microphones as residual sensors, and an optical tachometer that sensed locomotive engine speed as a reference sensor. The system was installed on a passenger locomotive and tested in an operating rail yard. Details of the system are described and the near-field and far-field noise reductions are compared against the design goal. PMID:15704399

  4. Anticipatory control using substrate manipulation enables trajectory control of legged locomotion on heterogeneous granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feifei; Goldman, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Legged robots must traverse complex terrain consisting of particles of varying size, shape and texture. While much is known about how robots can effectively locomote on hard ground and increasingly on homogeneous granular media, principles of locomotion over heterogeneous granular substrates are relatively unexplored. To systematically discover how substrate heterogeneity affects ambulatory locomotion, we investigate how the presence of a single boulder (3D printed convex objects of different geometries) embedded in fine granular media affects the trajectory of a small (150 g) six legged robot. Using an automated system to collect thousands of locomotion trials, we observed that trajectories were straight before the interaction with the boulder, and scattered to different angles after the interaction depending on the leg-boulder contact positions. However, this dependence of scattering angle upon contact zone was relatively insensitive to boulder shape, orientation and roughness.1 Inspired by this insensitivity, here we develop an anticipatory control scheme which uses the scattering information in coordination with a tail induced substrate jamming. Our scheme allows the robot to "envision" outcomes of the interaction such that the robot can prevent trajectory deviation before the scattering occurs. We hypothesize that (particularly during rapid running or in the presence of noisy sensors) appropriate substrate manipulation can allow a robot to remain in a favorable locomotor configuration and avoid catastrophic interactions.

  5. A biologically inspired modular structure to control the sit-to-stand transfer of a biped robot.

    PubMed

    Andani, M Emadi; Bahrami, F; Maralani, P Jabedar

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a biologically inspired control structure to control the sit-to-stand (STS) transfer from a chair is developed and simulated. STS movement is consisted of two main phases. First phase of the movement is before leaving the seat (seat-off moment). In this phase seat reactions forces act on the body parts which are in contact with the seat. The second phase is after seat-off, where the only external forces acting on the body are ground reaction forces. A proper control algorithm of the STS transfer needs to consider switching between these two phases, which correspond to two different dynamical structures. The control structure developed and discussed in this work is based on the MOSAIC structure, proposed first by Wolpert and Kawato [1]. Original MOSAIC structure has a modular architecture which is based on multiple pairs of forward and inverse models of the dynamical system to be controlled, and each module is trained separately to learn one part of a given task. The number of effective modules is predetermined. We have developed a new method to train all modules simultaneously. This method is based on reinforcement and cooperative competitive learning, and the number of effective modules is determined automatically. In this study, the simulation was begun with four modules. Our results showed that only two modules out of four were selected to control the STS task. Responsibility of controlling the task was switched between the two modules around the seat-off moment. PMID:18002630

  6. Robotic and mathematical modeling reveal general principles of appendage control and coordination in terrestrial locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInroe, Benjamin; Astley, Henry; Gong, Chaohui; Kawano, Sandy; Schiebel, Perrin; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    The transition from aquatic to terrestrial life presented new challenges to early walkers, necessitating robust locomotion on complex, flowable substrates (e.g. sand, mud). Locomotion on such substrates is sensitive to limb morphology and kinematics. Although early walker morphologies are known, principles of appendage control remain elusive. To reveal limb control strategies that facilitated the invasion of land, we study both robotic and mathematical models. Robot experiments show that an active tail is critical for robust locomotion on granular media, enabling locomotion even with poor foot placement and limited ability to lift the body. Using a granular resistive force theory model, we construct connection vector fields that reveal how appendage coordination and terrain inclination impact locomotor performance. This model replicates experimental results, showing that moving limbs/tail in phase is most effective (suggesting a locomotor template). Varying limb trajectories and contacts, we find gaits for which tail use can be neutral or harmful, suggesting limb-tail coordination to be a nontrivial aspect of locomotion. Our findings show that robot experiments coupled with geometric mechanics provide a general framework to reveal principles of robust terrestrial locomotion. This work was supported by NSF PoLS.

  7. Locomotion Control of MEMS Micro Robot Using Pulse-Type Hardware Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ken; Okazaki, Kazuto; Ogiwara, Tatsuya; Takato, Minami; Saeki, Katsutoshi; Sekine, Yoshifumi; Uchikoba, Fumio

    This paper presents the locomotion control of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) micro robot. MEMS micro robot demonstrates the locomotion control by the pulse-type hardware neural networks (P-HNN). P-HNN generates oscillatory patterns of electrical activity such as living organisms. The basic component of P-HNN is pulse-type hardware neuron model (P-HNM). P-HNM has same basic features of biological neurons such as threshold, refractory period, spatio-temporal summation characteristics and enables the generation of continuous action potentials. P-HNN was constructed by MOSFETs, can be integrated by CMOS technology. Same as the living organisms P-HNN realized the robot control without using software programs, or A/D converters. The size of micro robot fabricated by the MEMS technology was 4×4×3.5 [mm]. The frame of robot was made of silicon wafer, equipped with rotary type actuators, link mechanisms and 6 legs. MEMS micro robot emulated the locomotion method and the neural networks of the insect by rotary actuators, link mechanisms and P-HNN. As a result, we show that P-HNN can control the forward and backward locomotion of fabricated MEMS micro robot, and also switched the direction by inputting the external trigger pulse. The locomotion speed was 19.5 [mm/min] and the step width was 1.3 [mm].

  8. Limb and Trunk Mechanisms for Balance Control during Locomotion in Quadrupeds

    PubMed Central

    Musienko, Pavel E.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.; Gerasimenko, Yury P.; Orlovsky, Grigori N.

    2014-01-01

    In quadrupeds, the most critical aspect of postural control during locomotion is lateral stability. However, neural mechanisms underlying lateral stability are poorly understood. Here, we studied lateral stability in decerebrate cats walking on a treadmill with their hindlimbs. Two destabilizing factors were used: a brief lateral push of the cat and a sustained lateral tilt of the treadmill. It was found that the push caused considerable trunk bending and twisting, as well as changes in the stepping pattern, but did not lead to falling. Due to postural reactions, locomotion with normal body configuration was restored in a few steps. It was also found that the decerebrate cat could keep balance during locomotion on the laterally tilted treadmill. This postural adaptation was based on the transformation of the symmetrical locomotor pattern into an asymmetrical one, with different functional lengths of the right and left limbs. Then, we analyzed limb and trunk neural mechanisms contributing to postural control during locomotion. It was found that one of the limb mechanisms operates in the transfer phase and secures a standard (relative to the trunk) position for limb landing. Two other limb mechanisms operate in the stance phase; they counteract distortions of the locomotor pattern by regulating the limb stiffness. The trunk configuration mechanism controls the body shape on the basis of sensory information coming from trunk afferents. We suggest that postural reactions generated by these four mechanisms are integrated, thus forming a response of the whole system to perturbation of balance during locomotion. PMID:24741060

  9. Contribution of different limb controllers to modulation of motor cortex neurons during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, P. V.; Deliagina, T. G.; Orlovsky, G. N.; Karayannidou, A.; Dasgupta, N. M.; Sirota, M. G.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    2011-01-01

    During locomotion, neurons in motor cortex exhibit profound step-related frequency modulation. The source of this modulation is unclear. The aim of this study was to reveal the contribution of different limb controllers (locomotor mechanisms of individual limbs) to the periodic modulation of motor cortex neurons during locomotion. Experiments were conducted in chronically instrumented cats. The activity of single neurons was recorded during regular quadrupedal locomotion (control), as well as when only one pair of limbs (fore, hind, right, or left) was walking while another pair was standing. Comparison of the modulation patterns in these neurons (their discharge profile with respect to the step cycle) during control and different bipedal locomotor tasks revealed several groups of neurons that receive distinct combinations of inputs from different limb controllers. In the majority (73%) of neurons from the forelimb area of motor cortex, modulation during control was determined exclusively by forelimb controllers (right, left or both), while in the minority (27%) hindlimb controllers also contributed. By contrast, only in 30% of neurons from the hindlimb area was modulation determined exclusively by hindlimb controllers (right or both), while in 70% of them, the controllers of forelimbs also contributed. We suggest that such organization of inputs allows the motor cortex to contribute to the right-left limbs coordination within each of the girdles during locomotion, and that it also allows hindlimb neurons to participate in coordination of the movements of the hindlimbs with those of the forelimbs. PMID:21430163

  10. Simplified and advanced modelling of traction control systems of heavy-haul locomotives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Wolfs, Peter; Szanto, Frank; Cole, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Improving tractive effort is a very complex task in locomotive design. It requires the development of not only mechanical systems but also power systems, traction machines and traction algorithms. At the initial design stage, traction algorithms can be verified by means of a simulation approach. A simple single wheelset simulation approach is not sufficient because all locomotive dynamics are not fully taken into consideration. Given that many traction control strategies exist, the best solution is to use more advanced approaches for such studies. This paper describes the modelling of a locomotive with a bogie traction control strategy based on a co-simulation approach in order to deliver more accurate results. The simplified and advanced modelling approaches of a locomotive electric power system are compared in this paper in order to answer a fundamental question. What level of modelling complexity is necessary for the investigation of the dynamic behaviours of a heavy-haul locomotive running under traction? The simulation results obtained provide some recommendations on simulation processes and the further implementation of advanced and simplified modelling approaches.

  11. Adaptation to a cortex controlled robot attached at the pelvis and engaged during locomotion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiguo; Giszter, Simon F.

    2011-01-01

    Brain Machine Interfaces (BMIs) should ideally show robust adaptation of the BMI across different tasks and daily activities. Most BMIs have used over-practiced tasks. Little is known about BMIs in dynamic environments. How are mechanically body-coupled BMIs integrated into ongoing rhythmic dynamics, e.g., in locomotion? To examine this we designed a novel BMI using neural discharge in the hindlimb/trunk motor cortex in rats during locomotion to control a robot attached at the pelvis. We tested neural adaptation when rats experienced (a) control locomotion, (b) ‘simple elastic load’ (a robot load on locomotion without any BMI neural control) and (c) ‘BMI with elastic load’ (in which the robot loaded locomotion and a BMI neural control could counter this load). Rats significantly offset applied loads with the BMI while preserving more normal pelvic height compared to load alone. Adaptation occurred over about 100–200 step cycles in a trial. Firing rates increased in both the loaded conditions compared to baseline. Mean phases of cells’ discharge in the step cycle shifted significantly between BMI and the simple load condition. Over time more BMI cells became positively correlated with the external force and modulated more deeply, and neurons’ network correlations on a 100ms timescale increased. Loading alone showed none of these effects. The BMI neural changes of rate and force correlations persisted or increased over repeated trials. Our results show that rats have the capacity to use motor adaptation and motor learning to fairly rapidly engage hindlimb/trunk coupled BMIs in their locomotion. PMID:21414932

  12. Effects of locomotion mode recognition errors on volitional control of powered above-knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Ming; Huang, He

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported various methods that recognize amputees' intent regarding locomotion modes, which is potentially useful for volitional control of powered artificial legs. However, occasional errors in locomotion mode recognition are inevitable. When these intent recognition decisions are used for volitional prosthesis control, the effects of the decision errors on the operation of the prosthesis and user's task performance is unknown. Hence, the goals of this study were to 1) systematically investigate the effects of locomotion mode recognition errors on volitional control of powered prosthetic legs and the user's gait stability, and 2) identify the critical mode recognition errors that impact safe and confident use of powered artificial legs in lower limb amputees. Five able-bodied subjects and two above-knee (AK) amputees were recruited and tested when wearing a powered AK prosthesis. Four types of locomotion mode recognition errors with different duration and at different gait phases were purposely applied to the prosthesis control. The subjects' gait stabilities were subjectively and objectively quantified. The results showed that not all of the mode recognition errors in volitional prosthesis control disturb the subjects' gait stability. The effects of errors on the user's balance depended on 1) the gait phase when the errors happened and 2) the amount of mechanical work change applied on the powered knee caused by the errors. Based on the study results, "critical errors" were defined and suggested as a new index to evaluate locomotion mode recognition algorithms for artificial legs. The outcome of this study might aid the future design of volitionally-controlled powered prosthetic legs that are reliable and safe for practice. PMID:25486645

  13. CPG-inspired workspace trajectory generation and adaptive locomotion control for quadruped robots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengju; Chen, Qijun; Wang, Danwei

    2011-06-01

    This paper deals with the locomotion control of quadruped robots inspired by the biological concept of central pattern generator (CPG). A control architecture is proposed with a 3-D workspace trajectory generator and a motion engine. The workspace trajectory generator generates adaptive workspace trajectories based on CPGs, and the motion engine realizes joint motion imputes. The proposed architecture is able to generate adaptive workspace trajectories online by tuning the parameters of the CPG network to adapt to various terrains. With feedback information, a quadruped robot can walk through various terrains with adaptive joint control signals. A quadruped platform AIBO is used to validate the proposed locomotion control system. The experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control architecture. A comparison by experiments shows the superiority of the proposed method against the traditional CPG-joint-space control method. PMID:21216715

  14. A Modular Approach for Trajectory Generation in Biped Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Carla M. A.; Rocha, Diana; Santos, Cristina P.; Matos, Vítor

    2011-09-01

    Robot locomotion has been a major research issue in the last decades. In particular, humanoid robotics has had a major breakthrough. The motivation for this study is that bipedal locomotion is superior to wheeled approaches on real terrain and situations where robots accompany or replace humans. Some examples are, on the development of human assisting device, such as prosthetics, orthotics, and devices for rehabilitation, rescue of wounded troops, help at the office, help as maidens, accompany and assist elderly people, amongst others. Generating trajectories online for these robots is a hard process, that includes different types of movements, i.e., distinct motor primitives. In this paper, we consider two motor primitives: rhythmic and discrete. We study the effect on a bipeds robots' gaits of inserting the discrete part as an offset of the rhythmic primitive, in synaptic and diffusive couplings. Numerical results show that amplitude and frequency of the periodic solution, corresponding to the gait run are almost constant in all cases studied here.

  15. FPGA implementation of a configurable neuromorphic CPG-based locomotion controller.

    PubMed

    Barron-Zambrano, Jose Hugo; Torres-Huitzil, Cesar

    2013-09-01

    Neuromorphic engineering is a discipline devoted to the design and development of computational hardware that mimics the characteristics and capabilities of neuro-biological systems. In recent years, neuromorphic hardware systems have been implemented using a hybrid approach incorporating digital hardware so as to provide flexibility and scalability at the cost of power efficiency and some biological realism. This paper proposes an FPGA-based neuromorphic-like embedded system on a chip to generate locomotion patterns of periodic rhythmic movements inspired by Central Pattern Generators (CPGs). The proposed implementation follows a top-down approach where modularity and hierarchy are two desirable features. The locomotion controller is based on CPG models to produce rhythmic locomotion patterns or gaits for legged robots such as quadrupeds and hexapods. The architecture is configurable and scalable for robots with either different morphologies or different degrees of freedom (DOFs). Experiments performed on a real robot are presented and discussed. The obtained results demonstrate that the CPG-based controller provides the necessary flexibility to generate different rhythmic patterns at run-time suitable for adaptable locomotion. PMID:23631905

  16. Receptors and Other Signaling Proteins Required for Serotonin Control of Locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gürel, Güliz; Gustafson, Megan A.; Pepper, Judy S.; Horvitz, H. Robert; Koelle, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of signaling by the neurotransmitter serotonin is required to assess the hypothesis that defects in serotonin signaling underlie depression in humans. Caenorhabditis elegans uses serotonin as a neurotransmitter to regulate locomotion, providing a genetic system to analyze serotonin signaling. From large-scale genetic screens we identified 36 mutants of C. elegans in which serotonin fails to have its normal effect of slowing locomotion, and we molecularly identified eight genes affected by 19 of the mutations. Two of the genes encode the serotonin-gated ion channel MOD-1 and the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptor SER-4. mod-1 is expressed in the neurons and muscles that directly control locomotion, while ser-4 is expressed in an almost entirely non-overlapping set of sensory and interneurons. The cells expressing the two receptors are largely not direct postsynaptic targets of serotonergic neurons. We analyzed animals lacking or overexpressing the receptors in various combinations using several assays for serotonin response. We found that the two receptors act in parallel to affect locomotion. Our results show that serotonin functions as an extrasynaptic signal that independently activates multiple receptors at a distance from its release sites and identify at least six additional proteins that appear to act with serotonin receptors to mediate serotonin response. PMID:23023001

  17. Motoneuronal and muscle synergies involved in cat hindlimb control during fictive and real locomotion: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Markin, Sergey N; Lemay, Michel A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A

    2012-04-01

    We compared the activity profiles and synergies of spinal motoneurons recorded during fictive locomotion evoked in immobilized decerebrate cat preparations by midbrain stimulation to the activity profiles and synergies of the corresponding hindlimb muscles obtained during forward level walking in cats. The fictive locomotion data were collected in the Spinal Cord Research Centre, University of Manitoba, and provided by Dr. David McCrea; the real locomotion data were obtained in the laboratories of M. A. Lemay and B. I. Prilutsky. Scatterplot representation and minimum spanning tree clustering algorithm were used to identify the possible motoneuronal and muscle synergies operating during both fictive and real locomotion. We found a close similarity between the activity profiles and synergies of motoneurons innervating one-joint muscles during fictive locomotion and the profiles and synergies of the corresponding muscles during real locomotion. However, the activity patterns of proximal nerves controlling two-joint muscles, such as posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) and rectus femoris (RF), were not uniform in fictive locomotion preparations and differed from the activity profiles of the corresponding two-joint muscles recorded during forward level walking. Moreover, the activity profiles of these nerves and the corresponding muscles were unique and could not be included in the synergies identified in fictive and real locomotion. We suggest that afferent feedback is involved in the regulation of locomotion via motoneuronal synergies controlled by the spinal central pattern generator (CPG) but may also directly affect the activity of motoneuronal pools serving two-joint muscles (e.g., PBSt and RF). These findings provide important insights into the organization of the spinal CPG in mammals, the motoneuronal and muscle synergies engaged during locomotion, and their afferent control. PMID:22190626

  18. Motoneuronal and muscle synergies involved in cat hindlimb control during fictive and real locomotion: a comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Markin, Sergey N.; Lemay, Michel A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the activity profiles and synergies of spinal motoneurons recorded during fictive locomotion evoked in immobilized decerebrate cat preparations by midbrain stimulation to the activity profiles and synergies of the corresponding hindlimb muscles obtained during forward level walking in cats. The fictive locomotion data were collected in the Spinal Cord Research Centre, University of Manitoba, and provided by Dr. David McCrea; the real locomotion data were obtained in the laboratories of M. A. Lemay and B. I. Prilutsky. Scatterplot representation and minimum spanning tree clustering algorithm were used to identify the possible motoneuronal and muscle synergies operating during both fictive and real locomotion. We found a close similarity between the activity profiles and synergies of motoneurons innervating one-joint muscles during fictive locomotion and the profiles and synergies of the corresponding muscles during real locomotion. However, the activity patterns of proximal nerves controlling two-joint muscles, such as posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) and rectus femoris (RF), were not uniform in fictive locomotion preparations and differed from the activity profiles of the corresponding two-joint muscles recorded during forward level walking. Moreover, the activity profiles of these nerves and the corresponding muscles were unique and could not be included in the synergies identified in fictive and real locomotion. We suggest that afferent feedback is involved in the regulation of locomotion via motoneuronal synergies controlled by the spinal central pattern generator (CPG) but may also directly affect the activity of motoneuronal pools serving two-joint muscles (e.g., PBSt and RF). These findings provide important insights into the organization of the spinal CPG in mammals, the motoneuronal and muscle synergies engaged during locomotion, and their afferent control. PMID:22190626

  19. Robustness of a distributed neural network controller for locomotion in a hexapod robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiel, Hillel J.; Beer, Randall D.; Quinn, Roger D.; Espenschied, Kenneth S.

    1992-01-01

    A distributed neural-network controller for locomotion, based on insect neurobiology, has been used to control a hexapod robot. How robust is this controller? Disabling any single sensor, effector, or central component did not prevent the robot from walking. Furthermore, statically stable gaits could be established using either sensor input or central connections. Thus, a complex interplay between central neural elements and sensor inputs is responsible for the robustness of the controller and its ability to generate a continuous range of gaits. These results suggest that biologically inspired neural-network controllers may be a robust method for robotic control.

  20. Aerial and terrestrial locomotion control of lift assisted insect biobots.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Alper; Lal, Amit; Gilmour, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents results on remote control navigation of moths implanted with neuromuscular probes. We have previously demonstrated that the technique of metamorphosis based surgical insertions enables the concept of "insect-based" centimeter scale biobots. Here, we demonstrate for the first time, the control of gait with a radio controlled, balloon-suspended, electrode-instrumented Manduca sexta by altering the direction of turn through applied neuromuscular pulses. We also present sustained flight control in Manduca sexta with demonstration of take-off, controlled yaw, and controlled landing. The assist of the helium balloon for lifting payloads allows for a wide-range of application space where insect biobots can be deployed. PMID:19964777

  1. 49 CFR 229.15 - Remote control locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OCU is equipped with a tilt bypass system that permits the tilt protection feature to be temporarily... functions shall remain active. The remote control system shall be designed so that if the signal from the OCU to the RCL is interrupted for a set period not to exceed five seconds, the remote control...

  2. Locomotive safety device

    SciTech Connect

    Kleffman, D.R.; Phiffer, L.V.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes the environment of a longitudinally extending and diesel engine type railroad locomotive classified under a stopped and ''blue flag'' condition, the locomotive having its traction wheels powerable from a high-voltage main-generator. The locomotive is also equipped with a low-voltage auxiliary-generator having electrical circuitry connected to locomotive installed alarm means, to at least one fuel valve for the diesel engine, to locomotive forward-rearward motive directional control, and to locomotive acceleration control. The low-voltage electrical circuitry extends the locomotive longitudinal length and terminates as two endward multi-pins receptacles. The improvement of a locomotive safety device tending to enforce upon would be the locomotive operators ''blue flag'' condition. The locomotive safety device is adapted to removably engaged with a locomotive multipins receptacle and comprises a multi-perforate plug including electrically conductive bushings adapted to be removably inserted into electrically conductive relationship with appropriately selected individual pins of the multi-pins receptacle.

  3. Full-Body Gaze Control Mechanisms Elicited During Locomotion: Effects Of VOR Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Houser, J.; Peters, B.; Miller, C.; Richards, J.; Marshburn, A.; Brady, R.; Cohen, H.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    Control of locomotion requires precise interaction between several sensorimotor subsystems. During locomotion the performer must satisfy two performance criteria: maintain stable forward translation and to stabilize gaze (McDonald, et al., 1997). Precise coordination demands integration of multiple sensorimotor subsystems for fulfilling both criteria. In order to test the general hypothesis that the whole body can serve as an integrated gaze stabilization system, we have previously investigated how the multiple, interdependent full-body sensorimotor subsystems respond to changes in gaze stabilization task constraints during locomotion (Mulavara and Bloomberg, 2003). The results suggest that the full body contributes to gaze stabilization during locomotion, and that its different functional elements respond to changes in visual task constraints. The goal of this study was to determine how the multiple, interdependent, full-body sensorimotor subsystems aiding gaze stabilization during locomotion are functionally coordinated after the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain has been altered. We investigated the potential of adaptive remodeling of the full-body gaze control system following exposure to visual-vestibular conflict known to adaptively reduce the VOR. Subjects (n=14) walked (6.4 km/h) on the treadmill before and after they were exposed to 0.5X manifying lenses worn for 30 minutes during self-generated sinusoidal vertical head rotations performed while seated. In this study we measured: temporal parameters of gait, full body sagittal plane segmental kinematics of the head, trunk, thigh, shank and foot, accelerations along the vertical axis at the head and the shank, and the vertical forces acting on the support surface. Results indicate that, following exposure to the 0.5X minifying lenses, there was a significant increase in the duration of stance and stride times, alteration in the amplitude of head movement with respect to space and a significant increase in

  4. Vestibular-Somatosensory Convergence in Head Movement Control During Locomotion after Long-Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Ruttley, Tara; Cohen, Helen; Peters, Brian; Miller, Chris; Brady, Rachel; Merkle, Lauren; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight induces adaptive modification in the control of vestibular-mediated reflexive head movement during locomotion after space flight. Space flight causes astronauts to be exposed to somatosensory adaptation in both the vestibular and body load-sensing (BLS) systems. The goal of these studies was to examine the contributions of vestibular and BLS-mediated somatosensory influences on head movement control during locomotion after long-duration space flight. Subjects were asked to walk on a treadmill driven at 1.8 m/s while performing a visual acuity task. Data were collected using the same testing protocol from three independent subject groups; 1) normal subjects before and after exposure to 30 minutes of 40% bodyweight unloaded treadmill walking, 2) bilateral labyrinthine deficient (LD) patients and 3) astronauts who performed the protocol before and after long duration space flight. Motion data from head and trunk segmental motion data were obtained to calculate the angular head pitch (HP) movements during walking trials while subjects performed the visual task, to estimate the contributions of vestibular reflexive mechanisms in HP movements. Results showed that exposure to unloaded locomotion caused a significant increase in HP movements, whereas in the LD patients the HP movements were significantly decreased. Astronaut subjects results showed a heterogeneous response of both increases and decreases in the amplitude of HP movement. We infer that BLS-mediated somatosensory input centrally modulates vestibular input and can adaptively modify head-movement control during locomotion. Thus, space flight may cause a central adaptation mediated by the converging vestibular and body load-sensing somatosensory systems.

  5. Control of Vertebrate Respiration and Locomotion: A Brief Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jack L.; Grillner, Sten

    1983-01-01

    Areas considered in this discussion include: activation/modulation of movement; control of motoneuronal discharge by excitation/inhibition; neural generation of movement synergies (considering interaction of central/peripheral elements, phasic gating of reflex effects, and neuronal organization of central pattern generators); protean nature of…

  6. Initial experiments in thrusterless locomotion control of a free-flying robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasper, W. J.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A two-arm free-flying robot has been constructed to study thrusterless locomotion in space. This is accomplished by pushing off or landing on a large structure in a coordinated two-arm maneuver. A new control method, called system momentum control, allows the robot to follow desired momentum trajectories and thus leap or crawl from one structure to another. The robot floats on an air-cushion, simulating in two dimensions the drag-free zero-g environment of space. The control paradigm has been verified experimentally by commanding the robot to push off a bar with both arms, rotate 180 degrees, and catch itself on another bar.

  7. Controlled locomotion of robots driven by a vibrating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; Lynch, Kevin M.

    Robots typically derive their powers of movement from onboard actuators and power sources, but other scenarios are possible where the external environment provides part or all of the necessary forcing and control. I will discuss details of a system where the ``robots'' are just planar solid objects and the requisite driving forces originate from frictional sliding-interactions with a periodically oscillated and nominally horizontal surface. For the robots to move, the temporal symmetry of the frictional forces must be broken, which is achieved here by modulating the normal force using vertical acceleration of the surface. Independent of the initial conditions and vibration waveform, a sliding locomotor reaches a unique velocity limit cycle at a given position. Its resulting motion can be described in terms of velocity fields which specify the robot's cycle-averaged velocity as a function of position. Velocity fields with non-zero spatial divergence can be generated by combining translational and rotational surface motions; this allows the simultaneous and open-loop collection, dispersal, and transport of multiple robots. Fields and field sequences can simultaneously move multiple robots between arbitrary positions and, potentially, along arbitrary trajectories. Supported by NSF CMMI #0700537.

  8. Neural control and adaptive neural forward models for insect-like, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion of walking machines.

    PubMed

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs) and sensory feedback (afferent-based control) but also on internal forward models (efference copies). They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines. PMID:23408775

  9. Neural control and adaptive neural forward models for insect-like, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion of walking machines

    PubMed Central

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs) and sensory feedback (afferent-based control) but also on internal forward models (efference copies). They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines. PMID:23408775

  10. Experiments in thrusterless robot locomotion control for space applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasper, Warren Joseph

    1990-01-01

    While performing complex assembly tasks or moving about in space, a space robot should minimize the amount of propellant consumed. A study is presented of space robot locomotion and orientation without the use of thrusters. The goal was to design a robot control paradigm that will perform thrusterless locomotion between two points on a structure, and to implement this paradigm on an experimental robot. A two arm free flying robot was constructed which floats on a cushion of air to simulate in 2-D the drag free, zero-g environment of space. The robot can impart momentum to itself by pushing off from an external structure in a coordinated two arm maneuver, and can then reorient itself by activating a momentum wheel. The controller design consists of two parts: a high level strategic controller and a low level dynamic controller. The control paradigm was verified experimentally by commanding the robot to push off from a structure with both arms, rotate 180 degs while translating freely, and then to catch itself on another structure. This method, based on the computed torque, provides a linear feedback law in momentum and its derivatives for a system of rigid bodies.

  11. Closed-loop neuromodulation of spinal sensorimotor circuits controls refined locomotion after complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Bonizzato, Marco; DiGiovanna, Jack; Musienko, Pavel; Morari, Manfred; Micera, Silvestro; Courtine, Grégoire

    2014-09-24

    Neuromodulation of spinal sensorimotor circuits improves motor control in animal models and humans with spinal cord injury. With common neuromodulation devices, electrical stimulation parameters are tuned manually and remain constant during movement. We developed a mechanistic framework to optimize neuromodulation in real time to achieve high-fidelity control of leg kinematics during locomotion in rats. We first uncovered relationships between neuromodulation parameters and recruitment of distinct sensorimotor circuits, resulting in predictive adjustments of leg kinematics. Second, we established a technological platform with embedded control policies that integrated robust movement feedback and feed-forward control loops in real time. These developments allowed us to conceive a neuroprosthetic system that controlled a broad range of foot trajectories during continuous locomotion in paralyzed rats. Animals with complete spinal cord injury performed more than 1000 successive steps without failure, and were able to climb staircases of various heights and lengths with precision and fluidity. Beyond therapeutic potential, these findings provide a conceptual and technical framework to personalize neuromodulation treatments for other neurological disorders. PMID:25253676

  12. Walking biped humanoids that perform manual labour.

    PubMed

    Hirukawa, Hirohisa

    2007-01-15

    The Humanoid Robotics Project of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan realized that biped humanoid robots can perform manual labour. The project developed humanoid robot platforms, consisting of humanoid robot hardware and a package of fundamental software, and explored applications of humanoid robots on them. The applications include maintenance tasks of industrial plants, teleoperation of industrial vehicles, cooperative tasks with a human, guarding the home and office and the care of patients in beds. PMID:17148050

  13. The role of reafference in recalibration of limb movement control and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lackner, J R; DiZio, P

    1997-01-01

    The reafference model has frequently been used to explain spatial constancy during eye and head movements. We have found that its basic concepts also form part of the information processing necessary for the control and recalibration of reaching movements. Reaching was studied in a novel force environment--a rotating room that creates centripetal forces of the type that could someday substitute for gravity in space flight, and Coriolis forces which are side effects of rotation. We found that inertial, noncontacting Coriolis forces deviate the path and endpoint of reaching movements, a finding that shows the inadequacy of equilibrium position models of movement control. Repeated movements in the rotating room quickly lead to normal movement patterns and to a failure to perceive the perturbing forces. The first movements made after rotation stops, without Coriolis forces present, show mirror-image deviations and evoke perception of a perturbing force even though none is present. These patterns of sensorimotor control and adaptation can largely be explained on the basis of comparisons of efference copy, reafferent muscle spindle, and cutaneous mechanoreceptor signals. We also describe experiments on human locomotion using an apparatus similar to that which Mittelstaedt used to study the optomotor response of the Eristalis fly. These results show that the reafference principle relates as well to the perception of the forces acting on and exerted by the body during voluntary locomotion. PMID:9218244

  14. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion. I. Rhythm generation

    PubMed Central

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Locomotion in mammals is controlled by a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) coupled to a biomechanical limb system, with afferent feedback to the spinal circuits and CPG closing the control loop. We have considered a simplified model of this system, in which the CPG establishes a rhythm when a supra-spinal activating drive is present and afferent signals from a single-joint limb feed back to affect CPG operation. Using dynamical systems methods, in a series of two papers, we analyze the mechanisms by which this model produces oscillations, and the characteristics of these oscillations, in the closed and open loop regimes. In this first paper, we analyze the phase transition mechanisms operating within the CPG and use the results to explain how afferent feedback allows oscillations to occur at a wider range of drive values to the CPG than the range over which oscillations occur in the CPG without feedback and to comment on why stronger feedback leads to faster oscillations. Linking these transitions to structure in the phase plane associated with the limb segment clarifies how increased weights of afferent feedback to the CPG can restore locomotion after removal of supra-spinal drive to simulate spinal cord injury. PMID:22058274

  15. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: I. Rhythm generation.

    PubMed

    Spardy, Lucy E; Markin, Sergey N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-12-01

    Locomotion in mammals is controlled by a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) coupled to a biomechanical limb system, with afferent feedback to the spinal circuits and CPG closing the control loop. We have considered a simplified model of this system, in which the CPG establishes a rhythm when a supra-spinal activating drive is present and afferent signals from a single-joint limb feed back to affect CPG operation. Using dynamical system methods, in a series of two papers we analyze the mechanisms by which this model produces oscillations, and the characteristics of these oscillations, in the closed- and open-loop regimes. In this first paper, we analyze the phase transition mechanisms operating within the CPG and use the results to explain how afferent feedback allows oscillations to occur at a wider range of drive values to the CPG than the range over which oscillations occur in the CPG without feedback, and then to comment on why stronger feedback leads to faster oscillations. Linking these transitions to structures in the phase plane associated with the limb segment clarifies how increased weights of afferent feedback to the CPG can restore locomotion after removal of supra-spinal drive to simulate spinal cord injury. PMID:22058274

  16. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: I. Rhythm generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-10-01

    Locomotion in mammals is controlled by a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) coupled to a biomechanical limb system, with afferent feedback to the spinal circuits and CPG closing the control loop. We have considered a simplified model of this system, in which the CPG establishes a rhythm when a supra-spinal activating drive is present and afferent signals from a single-joint limb feed back to affect CPG operation. Using dynamical system methods, in a series of two papers we analyze the mechanisms by which this model produces oscillations, and the characteristics of these oscillations, in the closed- and open-loop regimes. In this first paper, we analyze the phase transition mechanisms operating within the CPG and use the results to explain how afferent feedback allows oscillations to occur at a wider range of drive values to the CPG than the range over which oscillations occur in the CPG without feedback, and then to comment on why stronger feedback leads to faster oscillations. Linking these transitions to structures in the phase plane associated with the limb segment clarifies how increased weights of afferent feedback to the CPG can restore locomotion after removal of supra-spinal drive to simulate spinal cord injury.

  17. Unsteady locomotion: integrating muscle function with whole body dynamics and neuromuscular control

    PubMed Central

    Biewener, Andrew A.; Daley, Monica A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary By integrating studies of muscle function with analysis of whole body and limb dynamics, broader appreciation of neuromuscular function can be achieved. Ultimately, such studies need to address non-steady locomotor behaviors relevant to animals in their natural environments. When animals move slowly they likely rely on voluntary coordination of movement involving higher brain centers. However, when moving fast, their movements depend more strongly on responses controlled at more local levels. Our focus here is on control of fast-running locomotion. A key observation emerging from studies of steady level locomotion is that simple spring-mass dynamics, which help to economize energy expenditure, also apply to stabilization of unsteady running. Spring-mass dynamics apply to conditions that involve lateral impulsive perturbations, sudden changes in terrain height, and sudden changes in substrate stiffness or damping. Experimental investigation of unsteady locomotion is challenging, however, due to the variability inherent in such behaviors. Another emerging principle is that initial conditions associated with postural changes following a perturbation define different context-dependent stabilization responses. Distinct stabilization modes following a perturbation likely result from proximo-distal differences in limb muscle architecture, function and control strategy. Proximal muscles may be less sensitive to sudden perturbations and appear to operate, in such circumstances, under feed-forward control. In contrast, multiarticular distal muscles operate, via their tendons, to distribute energy among limb joints in a manner that also depends on the initial conditions of limb contact with the ground. Intrinsic properties of these distal muscle–tendon elements, in combination with limb and body dynamics, appear to provide rapid initial stabilizing mechanisms that are often consistent with spring-mass dynamics. These intrinsic mechanisms likely help to simplify the

  18. Locomotion and Control of a Self-Propelled Shape-Changing Body in a Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambrion, Thomas; Munnier, Alexandre

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we study the locomotion of a shape-changing body swimming in a two-dimensional perfect fluid of infinite extent. The shape changes are prescribed as functions of time satisfying constraints ensuring that they result from the work of internal forces only: conditions necessary for the locomotion to be termed self-propelled. The net rigid motion of the body results from the exchange of momentum between these shape changes and the surrounding fluid. The aim of this paper is three-fold. First, it describes a rigorous framework for the study of animal locomotion in fluid. Our model differs from previous ones mostly in that the number of degrees of freedom related to the shape changes is infinite. The Euler-Lagrange equation is obtained by applying the least action principle to the system body fluid. The formalism of Analytic Mechanics provides a simple way to handle the strong coupling between the internal dynamics of the body causing the shape changes and the dynamics of the fluid. The Euler-Lagrange equation takes the form of a coupled system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and partial differential equations (PDEs). The existence and uniqueness of solutions for this system are rigorously proved. Second, we are interested in making clear the connection between shape changes and internal forces. Although classical, it can be quite surprising to select the shape changes to play the role of control because the internal forces they are due to seem to be a more natural and realistic choice. We prove that, when the number of degrees of freedom relating to the shape changes is finite, both choices are actually equivalent in the sense that there is a one-to-one relation between shape changes and internal forces. Third, we show how the control problem, consisting in associating with each shape change the resulting trajectory of the swimming body, can be analysed within the framework of geometric control theory. This allows us to take advantage of the

  19. Functional Coordination of a Full-Body Gaze Control Mechanisms Elicited During Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Cohen, Helen S.

    2003-01-01

    Control of locomotion requires precise interaction between several sensorimotor subsystems. Exposure to the microgravity environment of spaceflight leads to postflight adaptive alterations in these multiple subsystems leading to postural and gait disturbances. Countermeasures designed to mitigate these postflight gait alterations will need to be assessed with a new generation of functional tests that evaluate the interaction of various elements central to locomotor control. The goal of this study is to determine how the multiple, interdependent, full- body sensorimotor subsystems aiding gaze stabilization during locomotion are functionally coordinated. To explore this question two experiments were performed. In the first study (Study 1) we investigated how alteration in gaze tasking changes full-body locomotor control strategies. Subjects (n=9) performed two discreet gaze stabilization tasks while walking at 6.4 km/hr on a motorized treadmill: 1) focusing on a central point target; 2) reading numeral characters; both presented at 2m in front at eye level. The second study (Study 2) investigated the potential of adaptive remodeling of the full-body gaze control systems following exposure to visual-vestibular conflict. Subjects (n=14) walked (6.4 km/h) on the treadmill before and after they were exposed to 0.5X minifying lenses worn for 30 minutes during self-generated sinusoidal vertical head rotations performed while seated. In both studies we measured: temporal parameters of gait, full body sagittal plane segmental kinematics of the head, trunk, thigh, shank and foot, accelerations along the vertical axis at the head and the shank, and the vertical forces acting on the support surface. Results from Study 1 showed that while reading numeral characters as compared to the central point target: 1) compensatory head pitch movements were on average 22% greater 2) the peak acceleration measured at the head was significantly reduced by an average of 13% in four of the six

  20. Adaptation to a cortex-controlled robot attached at the pelvis and engaged during locomotion in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiguo; Giszter, Simon F

    2011-02-23

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) should ideally show robust adaptation of the BMI across different tasks and daily activities. Most BMIs have used overpracticed tasks. Little is known about BMIs in dynamic environments. How are mechanically body-coupled BMIs integrated into ongoing rhythmic dynamics, for example, in locomotion? To examine this, we designed a novel BMI using neural discharge in the hindlimb/trunk motor cortex in rats during locomotion to control a robot attached at the pelvis. We tested neural adaptation when rats experienced (1) control locomotion, (2) "simple elastic load" (a robot load on locomotion without any BMI neural control), and (3) "BMI with elastic load" (in which the robot loaded locomotion and a BMI neural control could counter this load). Rats significantly offset applied loads with the BMI while preserving more normal pelvic height compared with load alone. Adaptation occurred over ∼100-200 step cycles in a trial. Firing rates increased in both the loaded conditions compared with baseline. Mean phases of the discharge of cells in the step cycle shifted significantly between BMI and the simple load condition. Over time, more BMI cells became positively correlated with the external force and modulated more deeply, and the network correlations of neurons on a 100 ms timescale increased. Loading alone showed none of these effects. The BMI neural changes of rate and force correlations persisted or increased over repeated trials. Our results show that rats have the capacity to use motor adaptation and motor learning to fairly rapidly engage hindlimb/trunk-coupled BMIs in their locomotion. PMID:21414932

  1. 76 FR 2199 - Locomotive Safety Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... October 19, 2007 (72 FR 59216). FRA continued to utilize the RSAC process to address additional locomotive... to reach consensus on the issues related to remote control locomotives, cab temperature, and... proposals related to remote control locomotives, alerters, and locomotive cab temperature, issues that...

  2. Learning tensegrity locomotion using open-loop control signals and coevolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Iscen, Atil; Caluwaerts, Ken; Bruce, Jonathan; Agogino, Adrian; SunSpiral, Vytas; Tumer, Kagan

    2015-01-01

    Soft robots offer many advantages over traditional rigid robots. However, soft robots can be difficult to control with standard control methods. Fortunately, evolutionary algorithms can offer an elegant solution to this problem. Instead of creating controls to handle the intricate dynamics of these robots, we can simply evolve the controls using a simulation to provide an evaluation function. In this article, we show how such a control paradigm can be applied to an emerging field within soft robotics: robots based on tensegrity structures. We take the model of the Spherical Underactuated Planetary Exploration Robot ball (SUPERball), an icosahedron tensegrity robot under production at NASA Ames Research Center, develop a rolling locomotion algorithm, and study the learned behavior using an accurate model of the SUPERball simulated in the NASA Tensegrity Robotics Toolkit. We first present the historical-average fitness-shaping algorithm for coevolutionary algorithms to speed up learning while favoring robustness over optimality. Second, we use a distributed control approach by coevolving open-loop control signals for each controller. Being simple and distributed, open-loop controllers can be readily implemented on SUPERball hardware without the need for sensor information or precise coordination. We analyze signals of different complexities and frequencies. Among the learned policies, we take one of the best and use it to analyze different aspects of the rolling gait, such as lengths, tensions, and energy consumption. We also discuss the correlation between the signals controlling different parts of the tensegrity robot. PMID:25951199

  3. Revisiting the stability of 2D passive biped walking: Local behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, James A.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Granata, Kevin P.; Ross, Shane D.

    2008-12-01

    Models of biped walking have demonstrated that stable walking motions are possible without active control. Stability of these motions has typically been quantified by studying the stability of an associated Poincaré map (orbital stability). However, additional insight may be obtained by examining how perturbations evolve over the short-term (local stability). For example, there may be regions where small perturbations actually diverge from the unperturbed trajectory, even if over the entire cycle small (but perhaps not large) perturbations are dissipated. We present techniques to calculate local stability, and demonstrate the utility of these techniques by examining the local stability of the 2D compass biped. These techniques are relevant to the design of controllers to maintain stability in robots, and in understanding how the neuromuscular system maintains stability in humans.

  4. Distinct Thalamo-Cortical Controls for Shoulder, Elbow, and Wrist during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Beloozerova, Irina N.; Stout, Erik E.; Sirota, Mikhail G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent data from this laboratory on differential controls for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist exerted by the thalamo-cortical network during locomotion is presented, based on experiments involving chronically instrumented cats walking on a flat surface and along a horizontal ladder. The activity of the following three groups of neurons is characterized: (1) neurons of the motor cortex that project to the pyramidal tract (PTNs), (2) neurons of the ventrolateral thalamus (VL), many identified as projecting to the motor cortex (thalamo-cortical neurons, TCs), and (3) neurons of the reticular nucleus of thalamus (RE), which inhibit TCs. Neurons were grouped according to their receptive field into shoulder-, elbow-, and wrist/paw-related categories. During simple locomotion, shoulder-related PTNs were most active in the late stance and early swing, and on the ladder, often increased activity and stride-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically remained similar on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing, and on the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration. In the VL, shoulder-related neurons were more active during the transition from swing-to-stance. Elbow-related cells tended to be more active during the transition from stance-to-swing and on the ladder often decreased their activity and increased modulation. Wrist-related neurons were more active throughout the stance phase. In the RE, shoulder-related cells had low discharge rates and depths of modulation and long periods of activity distributed evenly across the cycle. In sharp contrast, wrist/paw-related cells discharged synchronously during the end of stance and swing with short periods of high activity, high modulation, and frequent sleep-type bursting. We conclude that thalamo-cortical network processes information related to different segments of the

  5. Kinesthetic Force Feedback and Belt Control for the Treadport Locomotion Interface.

    PubMed

    Hejrati, Babak; Crandall, Kyle L; Hollerbach, John M; Abbott, Jake J

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an improved control system for the Treadport immersive locomotion interface, with results that generalize to any treadmill that utilizes an actuated tether to enable self-selected walking speed. A new belt controller is implemented to regulate the user's position; when combined with the user's own volition, this controller also enables the user to naturally self-select their walking speed as they would when walking over ground. A new kinesthetic-force-feedback controller is designed for the tether that applies forces to the user's torso. This new controller is derived based on maintaining the user's sense of balance during belt acceleration, rather than by rendering an inertial force as was done in our prior work. Based on the results of a human-subjects study, the improvements in both controllers significantly contribute to an improved perception of realistic walking on the Treadport. The improved control system uses intuitive dynamic-system and anatomical parameters and requires no ad hoc gain tuning. The control system simply requires three measurements to be made for a given user: the user's mass, the user's height, and the height of the tether attachment point on the user's torso. PMID:25720019

  6. The activity of isolated snail neurons controlling locomotion is affected by glucose

    PubMed Central

    Dyakonova, Varvara; Hernádi, László; Ito, Etsuro; Dyakonova, Taisia; Zakharov, Igor; Sakharov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of serotonin in mediating hunger-related changes in behavioral state has been described in many invertebrates. However, the mechanisms by which hunger signals to serotonergic cells remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that serotonergic neurons can directly sense the concentration of glucose, a metabolic indicator of nutritional state. In the snail Lymnaea stagnalis, we demonstrate that completely isolated pedal serotonergic neurons that control locomotion changed their biophysical characteristics in response to glucose application by lowering membrane potential and decreasing the firing rate. Additionally, the excitatory response of the isolated serotonergic neurons to the neuroactive microenvironment of the pedal ganglia was significantly lowered by glucose application. Because hunger has been reported to increase the activity of select neurons and their responses to the pedal ganglia microenvironment, these responses to glucose are in accordance with the hypothesis that direct glucose signaling is involved in the mediation of the hunger-related behavioral state. PMID:27493515

  7. 49 CFR 1242.67 - Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and...; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power purchased/produced for motive power... distribution of freight and passenger yard-switching hours in those yards common to both freight and...

  8. 49 CFR 1242.67 - Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and...; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power purchased/produced for motive power... distribution of freight and passenger yard-switching hours in those yards common to both freight and...

  9. 49 CFR 1242.67 - Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and...; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power purchased/produced for motive power... distribution of freight and passenger yard-switching hours in those yards common to both freight and...

  10. 49 CFR 1242.67 - Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and...; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power purchased/produced for motive power... distribution of freight and passenger yard-switching hours in those yards common to both freight and...

  11. 49 CFR 1242.67 - Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switch crews; controlling operations; yard and...; yard and terminal clerical; locomotive fuel; electric power purchased/produced for motive power... distribution of freight and passenger yard-switching hours in those yards common to both freight and...

  12. The Role of Visual and Nonvisual Information in the Control of Locomotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, Richard M.; Wann, John P.

    2005-01-01

    During locomotion, retinal flow, gaze angle, and vestibular information can contribute to one's perception of self-motion. Their respective roles were investigated during active steering: Retinal flow and gaze angle were biased by altering the visual information during computer-simulated locomotion, and vestibular information was controlled…

  13. The control of ventilation is dissociated from locomotion during walking in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Haouzi, Philippe; Chenuel, Bruno; Chalon, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the frequency response of the systems controlling the motor activity of breathing and walking in quadrupeds is compatible with the idea that supra-spinal locomotor centres could proportionally drive locomotion and ventilation. The locomotor and the breath-by-breath ventilatory and gas exchange (CO2 output (V̇CO2) and O2 uptake (V̇CO2)) responses were studied in five sheep spontaneously walking on a treadmill. The speed of the treadmill was changed in a sinusoidal pattern of various periods (from 10 to 1 minute) and in a step-like manner. The frequency and amplitude of the limb movements, oscillating at the same period as the treadmill speed changes, had a constant gain with no phase lag (determined by Fourier analysis) regardless the periods of oscillations. In marked contrast, when the periods of speed oscillations decreased, the amplitude (peak-to-mean) of minute ventilation (V̇E) oscillations decreased sharply and significantly (from 6.1 ± 0.4 l min−1 to 1.9 ± 0.2 l min−1) and the phase lag between ventilation and treadmill speed oscillations increased (to 105 ± 25 ° during the 1 min oscillation periods). V̇E response followed V̇CO2 very closely. The drop in V̇E amplitude ratio was proportional to that in V̇CO2 (from 149 ± 48 ml min−1 to 38 ± 5 ml min−1) with a slightly longer phase lag for ventilation than for V̇CO2. These results show that beyond the onset period of a locomotor activity, the amplitude and phase lag of the V̇E response depends on the period of the walking speed oscillations, tracking the gas exchange rate, regardless of the amplitude of the motor act of walking. Locomotion thus appears unlikely to cause a simple parallel and proportional increase in ventilation in walking sheep. PMID:15235099

  14. Feed forward and feedback control for over-ground locomotion in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, K A; Holinski, B J; Everaert, D G; Stein, R B; Etienne-Cummings, R; Mushahwar, V K

    2012-04-01

    The biological central pattern generator (CPG) integrates open and closed loop control to produce over-ground walking. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically based algorithm capable of mimicking the biological system to control multiple joints in the lower extremities for producing over-ground walking. The algorithm used state-based models of the step cycle each of which produced different stimulation patterns. Two configurations were implemented to restore over-ground walking in five adult anaesthetized cats using intramuscular stimulation (IMS) of the main hip, knee and ankle flexor and extensor muscles in the hind limbs. An open loop controller relied only on intrinsic timing while a hybrid-CPG controller added sensory feedback from force plates (representing limb loading), and accelerometers and gyroscopes (representing limb position). Stimulation applied to hind limb muscles caused extension or flexion in the hips, knees and ankles. A total of 113 walking trials were obtained across all experiments. Of these, 74 were successful in which the cats traversed 75% of the 3.5 m over-ground walkway. In these trials, the average peak step length decreased from 24.9 ± 8.4 to 21.8 ± 7.5 (normalized units) and the median number of steps per trial increased from 7 (Q1 = 6, Q3 = 9) to 9 (8, 11) with the hybrid-CPG controller. Moreover, within these trials, the hybrid-CPG controller produced more successful steps (step length ≤ 20 cm; ground reaction force ≥ 12.5% body weight) than the open loop controller: 372 of 544 steps (68%) versus 65 of 134 steps (49%), respectively. This supports our previous preliminary findings, and affirms that physiologically based hybrid-CPG approaches produce more successful stepping than open loop controllers. The algorithm provides the foundation for a neural prosthetic controller and a framework to implement more detailed control of locomotion in the future. PMID:22328615

  15. Feed forward and feedback control for over-ground locomotion in anaesthetized cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, K. A.; Holinski, B. J.; Everaert, D. G.; Stein, R. B.; Etienne-Cummings, R.; Mushahwar, V. K.

    2012-04-01

    The biological central pattern generator (CPG) integrates open and closed loop control to produce over-ground walking. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically based algorithm capable of mimicking the biological system to control multiple joints in the lower extremities for producing over-ground walking. The algorithm used state-based models of the step cycle each of which produced different stimulation patterns. Two configurations were implemented to restore over-ground walking in five adult anaesthetized cats using intramuscular stimulation (IMS) of the main hip, knee and ankle flexor and extensor muscles in the hind limbs. An open loop controller relied only on intrinsic timing while a hybrid-CPG controller added sensory feedback from force plates (representing limb loading), and accelerometers and gyroscopes (representing limb position). Stimulation applied to hind limb muscles caused extension or flexion in the hips, knees and ankles. A total of 113 walking trials were obtained across all experiments. Of these, 74 were successful in which the cats traversed 75% of the 3.5 m over-ground walkway. In these trials, the average peak step length decreased from 24.9 ± 8.4 to 21.8 ± 7.5 (normalized units) and the median number of steps per trial increased from 7 (Q1 = 6, Q3 = 9) to 9 (8, 11) with the hybrid-CPG controller. Moreover, within these trials, the hybrid-CPG controller produced more successful steps (step length ≤ 20 cm ground reaction force ≥ 12.5% body weight) than the open loop controller: 372 of 544 steps (68%) versus 65 of 134 steps (49%), respectively. This supports our previous preliminary findings, and affirms that physiologically based hybrid-CPG approaches produce more successful stepping than open loop controllers. The algorithm provides the foundation for a neural prosthetic controller and a framework to implement more detailed control of locomotion in the future.

  16. Mechatronic design and locomotion control of a robotic thunniform swimmer for fast cruising.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yonghui; Liang, Jianhong; Wang, Tianmiao

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents mechatronic design and locomotion control of a biomimetic robotic fish that swims using thunniform kinematics for fast cruising. Propulsion of the robotic fish is realized with a parallel four-bar propulsive mechanism that delivers combined translational and rotational motion to a lunate caudal fin. A central pattern generator controller, composed of two unidirectionally coupled Hopf oscillators, is employed to generate robust, smooth and coordinated oscillatory control signals for the tail joints. In order to maintain correct phase relation between joints during fast tail beating, a novel phase adjusting mechanism is proposed and incorporated into the controller. The attitude of the robotic fish in fast swimming is stabilized using an attitude and heading reference system unit and a pair of pitching pectoral fins. The maximum speed of the robotic fish can reach 2.0 m s(-1), which is the fastest speed that robotic fishes have achieved. Its outstanding swimming performance presents possibilities for deployment to real-world exploration, probe and survey missions. PMID:25822708

  17. Dynamical analysis and performance evaluation of a biped robot under multi-source random disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chun-Biao; Ding, Chang-Tao; Yang, Shi-Xi

    2014-12-01

    During bipedal walking, it is critical to detect and adjust the robot postures by feedback control to maintain its normal state amidst multi-source random disturbances arising from some unavoidable uncertain factors. The radical basis function (RBF) neural network model of a five-link biped robot is established, and two certain disturbances and a randomly uncertain disturbance are then mixed with the optimal torques in the network model to study the performance of the biped robot by several evaluation indices and a specific Poincaré map. In contrast with the simulations, the response varies as desired under optimal inputting while the output is fluctuating in the situation of disturbance driving. Simulation results from noise inputting also show that the dynamics of the robot is less sensitive to the disturbance of knee joint input of the swing leg than those of the other three joints, the response errors of the biped will be increasing with higher disturbance levels, and especially there are larger output fluctuations in the knee and hip joints of the swing leg.

  18. A mm-sized wirelessly powered and remotely controlled locomotive implant.

    PubMed

    Pivonka, Daniel; Yakovlev, Anatoly; Poon, Ada S Y; Meng, Teresa

    2012-12-01

    A wirelessly powered and controlled implantable device capable of locomotion in a fluid medium is presented. Two scalable low-power propulsion methods are described that achieve roughly an order of magnitude better performance than existing methods in terms of thrust conversion efficiency. The wireless prototype occupies 0.6 mm × 1 mm in 65 nm CMOS with an external 2 mm × 2 mm receive antenna. The IC consists of a matching network, a rectifier, a bandgap reference, a regulator, a demodulator, a digital controller, and high-current drivers that interface directly with the propulsion system. It receives 500 μW from a 2 W 1.86 GHz power signal at a distance of 5 cm. Asynchronous pulse-width modulation on the carrier allows for data rates from 2.5-25 Mbps with energy efficiency of 0.5 pJ/b at 10 Mbps. The received data configures the propulsion system drivers, which are capable of driving up to 2 mA at 0.2 V and can achieve speed of 0.53 cm/sec in a 0.06 T magnetic field. PMID:23853253

  19. Three machine learning techniques for automatic determination of rules to control locomotion.

    PubMed

    Jonić, S; Janković, T; Gajić, V; Popović, D

    1999-03-01

    Automatic prediction of gait events (e.g., heel contact, flat foot, initiation of the swing, etc.) and corresponding profiles of the activations of muscles is important for real-time control of locomotion. This paper presents three supervised machine learning (ML) techniques for prediction of the activation patterns of muscles and sensory data, based on the history of sensory data, for walking assisted by a functional electrical stimulation (FES). Those ML's are: 1) a multilayer perceptron with Levenberg-Marquardt modification of backpropagation learning algorithm; 2) an adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS); and 3) a combination of an entropy minimization type of inductive learning (IL) technique and a radial basis function (RBF) type of artificial neural network with orthogonal least squares learning algorithm. Here we show the prediction of the activation of the knee flexor muscles and the knee joint angle for seven consecutive strides based on the history of the knee joint angle and the ground reaction forces. The data used for training and testing of ML's was obtained from a simulation of walking assisted with an FES system [39]. The ability of generating rules for an FES controller was selected as the most important criterion when comparing the ML's. Other criteria such as generalization of results, computational complexity, and learning rate were also considered. The minimal number of rules and the most explicit and comprehensible rules were obtained by ANFIS. The best generalization was obtained by the IL and RBF network. PMID:10097465

  20. A test of a dual central pattern generator hypothesis for subcortical control of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Guadagnoli, M A; Etnyre, B; Rodrigue, M L

    2000-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the nature of neural circuits involved in subcortical inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation mechanisms of locomotion. These circuits, called central pattern generators (CPGs), are believed to receive tonic input and generate rhythmically alternating sets of commands. Although CPGs have been theorized to exist in humans, their potential dual role in inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation is unclear. In the present study, nine participants walked on a treadmill, timing their heel-strikes to a metronome which varied the phase lag from 0.5 to 1.0 pi radians (0.1 pi intervals). A stimulus was delivered to the sural nerve and reflexes were measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral lower extremities through electromyography. The similarity between phase lag conditions for both temporal coordination (i.e., relative timing aspects between muscles and/or limbs) and reflex intensities suggested that they may be controlled by the same subcortical circuitry. Two plausible explanations exist: (1) a single CPG coordinates muscular contractions and phasically alters proprioceptive reflex modulation, as well as cutaneous input, using feed-forward control; (2) two separate circuits are strongly entrained, producing synchronous outputs for inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation. The out-of-phase task used in this study was limited in discerning such a difference, if it exists. PMID:10969197

  1. Future path and tangent point models in the visual control of locomotion in curve driving.

    PubMed

    Lappi, Otto

    2014-01-01

    Studying human behavior in the natural context of everyday visual tasks--including locomotor tasks such as driving--can reveal visual strategies or even suggest underlying visual mechanisms. This paper reviews empirical and theoretical work in the past 20 years (1994-2014) on the visual control of steering a vehicle along a winding path-one of the most comprehensively studied forms of visually guided locomotion in humans. The focus is on on-road studies of visual behavior and what they can reveal about the visual strategies in curve driving. Theoretical models and results from simulator studies are discussed where they have direct relevance to the interpretation of on-road data. For the past 20 years, the point of departure in studies of curve driving has been tangent point orientation, and tangent point models (models based on tracking the tangent point) have become established as the default account of how vision is used in curve negotiation. More recent studies have questioned the generality of the tangent point hypothesis, however, arguing that in addition to (or instead of) the tangent point, drivers target visual reference points on their future path. Ecological validity of real-world studies often comes at the cost of methodological challenges that make the data difficult to interpret in terms of underlying mechanisms, and the limitations of existing data and the complementary roles of real-world and laboratory studies are discussed. PMID:25761280

  2. How do treadmill speed and terrain visibility influence neuromuscular control of guinea fowl locomotion?

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Joanne C.; Rankin, Jeffery W.; Daley, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Locomotor control mechanisms must flexibly adapt to both anticipated and unexpected terrain changes to maintain movement and avoid a fall. Recent studies revealed that ground birds alter movement in advance of overground obstacles, but not treadmill obstacles, suggesting context-dependent shifts in the use of anticipatory control. We hypothesized that differences between overground and treadmill obstacle negotiation relate to differences in visual sensory information, which influence the ability to execute anticipatory manoeuvres. We explored two possible explanations: (1) previous treadmill obstacles may have been visually imperceptible, as they were low contrast to the tread, and (2) treadmill obstacles are visible for a shorter time compared with runway obstacles, limiting time available for visuomotor adjustments. To investigate these factors, we measured electromyographic activity in eight hindlimb muscles of the guinea fowl (Numida meleagris, N=6) during treadmill locomotion at two speeds (0.7 and 1.3 m s−1) and three terrain conditions at each speed: (i) level, (ii) repeated 5 cm low-contrast obstacles (<10% contrast, black/black), and (iii) repeated 5 cm high-contrast obstacles (>90% contrast, black/white). We hypothesized that anticipatory changes in muscle activity would be higher for (1) high-contrast obstacles and (2) the slower treadmill speed, when obstacle viewing time is longer. We found that treadmill speed significantly influenced obstacle negotiation strategy, but obstacle contrast did not. At the slower speed, we observed earlier and larger anticipatory increases in muscle activity and shifts in kinematic timing. We discuss possible visuomotor explanations for the observed context-dependent use of anticipatory strategies. PMID:26254324

  3. Forebrain dopamine neurons project down to a brainstem region controlling locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Grätsch, Swantje; Auclair, François; Dubé, Catherine; Bergeron, Saskia; Alpert, Michael H.; Cone, Jackson J.; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Alford, Simon; Dubuc, Réjean

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of dopamine (DA) to locomotor control is traditionally attributed to ascending dopaminergic projections from the substantia nigra pars compacta and the ventral tegmental area to the basal ganglia, which in turn project down to the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR), a brainstem region controlling locomotion in vertebrates. However, a dopaminergic innervation of the pedunculopontine nucleus, considered part of the MLR, was recently identified in the monkey. The origin and role of this dopaminergic input are unknown. We addressed these questions in a basal vertebrate, the lamprey. Here we report a functional descending dopaminergic pathway from the posterior tuberculum (PT; homologous to the substantia nigra pars compacta and/or ventral tegmental area of mammals) to the MLR. By using triple labeling, we found that dopaminergic cells from the PT not only project an ascending pathway to the striatum, but send a descending projection to the MLR. In an isolated brain preparation, PT stimulation elicited excitatory synaptic inputs into patch-clamped MLR cells, accompanied by activity in reticulospinal cells. By using voltammetry coupled with electrophysiological recordings, we demonstrate that PT stimulation evoked DA release in the MLR, together with the activation of reticulospinal cells. In a semi-intact preparation, stimulation of the PT elicited reticulospinal activity together with locomotor movements. Microinjections of a D1 antagonist in the MLR decreased the locomotor output elicited by PT stimulation, whereas injection of DA had an opposite effect. It appears that this descending dopaminergic pathway has a modulatory role on MLR cells that are known to receive glutamatergic projections and promotes locomotor output. PMID:23918379

  4. Online Fronto-cortical Control of Simple and Attention-Demanding Locomotion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Holtzer, Roee; Mahoney, Jeannette R.; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Wang, Cuiling; England, Sarah; Verghese, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of online functional brain mechanisms of locomotion is scarce due to technical limitations of traditional neuroimaging methods. Using functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) we evaluated task-related changes in oxygenated hemoglobin levels (HbO2) in real-time over the pre-frontal-cortex (PFC) regions during simple (Normal Walk; NW) and attention-demanding (Walking While Talking; WWT) locomotion tasks in a large cohort of non-demented older adults. Results revealed that the assessment of task-related changes in HbO2 was internally consistent. Imposing greater demands on the attention system during locomotion resulted in robust bilateral PFC increases in HbO2 levels during WWT compared to NW and the cognitive interference tasks. Elevated PFC oxygenation levels were maintained throughout the course of WWT but not during the NW condition. Increased oxygenation levels in the PFC were related to greater stride length and better cognitive performance but not to faster gait velocity in WWT. These findings elucidate online brain mechanisms of locomotion, and confer significant implications for risk assessment and intervention for major mobility outcomes. PMID:25765257

  5. Muscarinic control of rostromedial tegmental nucleus GABA neurons and morphine-induced locomotion.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, David I; Tan, Joel M J; Kim, Jun Chul; Yeomans, John S

    2016-07-01

    Opioids induce rewarding and locomotor effects by inhibiting rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons that express μ-opioid and nociceptin receptors. These GABA neurons then strongly inhibit dopamine neurons. Opioid-induced reward, locomotion and dopamine release also depend on pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental cholinergic and glutamate neurons, many of which project to and activate ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. Here we show that laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine cholinergic neurons project to both rostromedial tegmental nucleus and ventral tegmental area, and that M4 muscarinic receptors are co-localized with μ-opioid receptors associated with rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons. To inhibit or excite rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons, we utilized adeno-associated viral vectors and DREADDs to express designed muscarinic receptors (M4D or M3D respectively) in GAD2::Cre mice. In M4D-expressing mice, clozapine-N-oxide increased morphine-induced, but not vehicle-induced, locomotion. In M3D-expressing mice, clozapine-N-oxide blocked morphine-induced, but not vehicle-induced, locomotion. We propose that cholinergic inhibition of rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons via M4 muscarinic receptors facilitates opioid inhibition of the same neurons. This model explains how mesopontine cholinergic systems and muscarinic receptors in the rostromedial tegmental nucleus and ventral tegmental area are important for dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent opioid-induced rewards and locomotion. PMID:26990801

  6. Numerical Simulations of Level-Ground Walking Based on Passive Walk for Planar Biped Robots with Torso by Hip Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukawa, Terumasa; Takahashi, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazuo

    This study aims at a design technique of energy-efficient biped walking robots on level ground with simple mechanisms. To do this, we focus on the passive dynamic walkers which can walk stably down a shallow slope without actuators and controllers. On level ground, active walking should be studied because the mechanical energy is mainly lost through the swing-leg impacts with the ground. In this paper, numerical simulations show that planar biped robots with torso can walk efficiently on level ground over a wide range of speed by only using hip actuators. The hip actuators are used for a torso and swing-leg control based on passive-dynamic walking. The torso is used to generate active power replacing gravity used in the case of the passive walk. The swing-leg control is introduced to walk stably over a wide range of speed.

  7. Compensations during Unsteady Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mu; Jindrich, Devin L

    2014-12-01

    Locomotion in a complex environment is often not steady, but the mechanisms used by animals to power and control unsteady locomotion (stability and maneuverability) are not well understood. We use behavioral, morphological, and impulsive perturbations to determine the compensations used during unsteady locomotion. At the level both of the whole-body and of joints, quasi-stiffness models are useful for describing adjustments to the functioning of legs and joints during maneuvers. However, alterations to the mechanics of legs and joints often are distinct for different phases of the step cycle or for specific joints. For example, negotiating steps involves independent changes of leg stiffness during compression and thrust phases of stance. Unsteady locomotion also involves parameters that are not part of the simplest reduced-parameter models of locomotion (e.g., the spring-loaded inverted pendulum) such as moments of the hip joint. Extensive coupling among translational and rotational parameters must be taken into account to stabilize locomotion or maneuver. For example, maneuvers with morphological perturbations (increased rotational inertial turns) involve changes to several aspects of movement, including the initial conditions of rotation and ground-reaction forces. Coupled changes to several parameters may be employed to control maneuvers on a trial-by-trial basis. Compensating for increased rotational inertia of the body during turns is facilitated by the opposing effects of several mechanical and behavioral parameters. However, the specific rules used by animals to control translation and rotation of the body to maintain stability or maneuver have not been fully characterized. We initiated direct-perturbation experiments to investigate the strategies used by humans to maintain stability following center-of-mass (COM) perturbations. When walking, humans showed more resistance to medio-lateral perturbations (lower COM displacement). However, when running, humans

  8. 40 CFR 1033.652 - Special provisions for exported locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Special Compliance Provisions § 1033.652 Special provisions for exported locomotives. (a) Uncertified locomotives. Locomotives covered by an export exemption under 40 CFR 1068.230 may be introduced into U.S. commerce prior to being exported, but may not...

  9. 40 CFR 1033.652 - Special provisions for exported locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Special Compliance Provisions § 1033.652 Special provisions for exported locomotives. (a) Uncertified locomotives. Locomotives covered by an export exemption under 40 CFR 1068.230 may be introduced into U.S. commerce prior to being exported, but may not...

  10. Foot placement modification for a biped humanoid robot with narrow feet.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Hattori, Kentaro; Otani, Takuya; Lim, Hun-Ok; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a walking stabilization control for a biped humanoid robot with narrow feet. Most humanoid robots have larger feet than human beings to maintain their stability during walking. If robot's feet are as narrow as humans, it is difficult to realize a stable walk by using conventional stabilization controls. The proposed control modifies a foot placement according to the robot's attitude angle. If a robot tends to fall down, a foot angle is modified about the roll axis so that a swing foot contacts the ground horizontally. And a foot-landing point is also changed laterally to inhibit the robot from falling to the outside. To reduce a foot-landing impact, a virtual compliance control is applied to the vertical axis and the roll and pitch axes of the foot. Verification of the proposed method is conducted through experiments with a biped humanoid robot WABIAN-2R. WABIAN-2R realized a knee-bended walking with 30 mm breadth feet. Moreover, WABIAN-2R mounted on a human-like foot mechanism mimicking a human's foot arch structure realized a stable walking with the knee-stretched, heel-contact, and toe-off motion. PMID:24592154

  11. Foot Placement Modification for a Biped Humanoid Robot with Narrow Feet

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Kentaro; Otani, Takuya; Lim, Hun-Ok; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a walking stabilization control for a biped humanoid robot with narrow feet. Most humanoid robots have larger feet than human beings to maintain their stability during walking. If robot's feet are as narrow as humans, it is difficult to realize a stable walk by using conventional stabilization controls. The proposed control modifies a foot placement according to the robot's attitude angle. If a robot tends to fall down, a foot angle is modified about the roll axis so that a swing foot contacts the ground horizontally. And a foot-landing point is also changed laterally to inhibit the robot from falling to the outside. To reduce a foot-landing impact, a virtual compliance control is applied to the vertical axis and the roll and pitch axes of the foot. Verification of the proposed method is conducted through experiments with a biped humanoid robot WABIAN-2R. WABIAN-2R realized a knee-bended walking with 30 mm breadth feet. Moreover, WABIAN-2R mounted on a human-like foot mechanism mimicking a human's foot arch structure realized a stable walking with the knee-stretched, heel-contact, and toe-off motion. PMID:24592154

  12. Does deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius affect postural control and locomotion in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Pinter, M M; Murg, M; Alesch, F; Freundl, B; Helscher, R J; Binder, H

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of unilateral stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius (VIM) on parkinsonian signs like postural stability and locomotion with respect to the severity of Parkinson's disease (PD). Seven patients with idiopathic PD were included in the study. Changes in visual cues on postural stability and step initiation were assessed on a fixed platform system with VIM stimulation switched either on (VIM ON) or off (VIM OFF), and compared with a control group of seven age-matched normal individuals. Sway scores (area and path) were significantly (p <0.05) higher in the parkinsonian patients with VIM OFF than with VIM ON as well as compared with the control subjects. No correlation was obtained between extent of sway scores and severity of contralateral tremor after cessation of VIM stimulation. Locomotion parameters, by contrast, were not influenced by VIM stimulation: latency until step initiation and walking-cycle time were the same among parkinsonian patients as among normal individuals, both in the presence and in the absence of VIM stimulation. In conclusion, our results indicate that tremor suppression by VIM stimulation improves postural stability. PMID:10584670

  13. Torsional locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Bigoni, D.; Dal Corso, F.; Misseroni, D.; Bosi, F.

    2014-01-01

    One edge of an elastic rod is inserted into a friction-less and fitting socket head, whereas the other edge is subjected to a torque, generating a uniform twisting moment. It is theoretically shown and experimentally proved that, although perfectly smooth, the constraint realizes an expulsive axial force on the elastic rod, which amount is independent of the shape of the socket head. The axial force explains why screwdrivers at high torque have the tendency to disengage from screw heads and demonstrates torsional locomotion along a perfectly smooth channel. This new type of locomotion finds direct evidence in the realization of a ‘torsional gun’, capable of transforming torque into propulsive force. PMID:25383038

  14. 40 CFR 92.214 - Production locomotives and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Production locomotives and engines. 92... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Certification Provisions § 92.214 Production locomotives and engines. Any manufacturer or remanufacturer obtaining...

  15. 40 CFR 92.214 - Production locomotives and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Production locomotives and engines. 92... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Certification Provisions § 92.214 Production locomotives and engines. Any manufacturer or remanufacturer obtaining...

  16. Contribution of cutaneous inputs from the hindpaw to the control of locomotion in rats.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Artur S P; Filipe, Vítor M

    2007-01-25

    The influence of reduced feedback from the cutaneous receptors in the hindpaw in rat locomotion is still unclear. To evaluate this question, we conducted a detailed hindlimb kinematic analysis in animals, which suffered complete loss of thermal sensation. Two-dimensional hindlimb kinematics, temporal and spatial measurements, and walking track analysis were performed in rats before and during hypothermic anesthesia. The walking velocity, duration of the step cycle and stance phase, and stride length between the two testing conditions were statistically indistinguishable. Swing phase duration was significantly decreased during sensory loss. Analysis of angular motion revealed an increased hip and knee extension and an ankle joint with increased flexion during the step cycle under plantar anesthesia. Also after plantar cooling, the hip and knee angular velocity was significantly affected along the step cycle. The remarkably geometric similarity of the angle-angle plots obtained in our experiments reflected an interjoint coordination; however, the interpretation of the cyclogram perimeter revealed a larger excursion by the ankle and hip in their respective joint spaces in rats deprived of sensation. Examination of the horizontal position of the ankle with respect to the hip and the extension before toe-off revealed no major changes, whereas, there was a slight decrease in distance of the hip to the ground during sensory loss. Also, the walking tracks revealed a significant functional deficit following reduced cutaneous information of the plantar aspect of the hindpaw. We therefore conclude that sensory feedback from the hindpaw is important in the maintenance of normal rat locomotion. PMID:17084913

  17. The role of vibrissal sensing in forelimb position control during travelling locomotion in the rat (Rattus norvegicus, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Niederschuh, Sandra J; Witte, Hartmut; Schmidt, Manuela

    2015-02-01

    In the stem lineage of therians, a comprehensive reorganization of limb and body mechanics took place to provide dynamic stability for rapid locomotion in a highly structured environment. At what was probably the same time, mammals developed an active sense of touch in the form of movable mystacial vibrissae. The rhythmic movements of the limbs and vibrissae are controlled by central pattern-generating networks which might interact with each other in sensorimotor control. To test this possible interaction, we studied covariation between the two by investigating speed-dependent adjustments in temporal and spatial parameters of forelimb and vibrissal kinematics in the rat. Furthermore, the possible role of carpal vibrissae in connecting the two oscillating systems was explored. We compared locomotion on continuous and discontinuous substrates in the presence and absence of the mystacial or/and carpal vibrissae across a speed range of 0.2-0.5m/s and found that a close coupling of the kinematics of the two oscillating systems appears to be precluded by their differential dependence on the animal's speed. Speed-related changes in forelimb kinematics mainly occur in temporal parameters, whereas vibrissae change their spatial excursion. However, whisking frequency is always high enough that at least one whisk cycle falls into the swing phase of the limb, which is the maximum critical period for sensing the substrate on which the forepaw will be placed. The influence of tactile cues on forelimb positional control is more subtle than expected. Tactile cues appear to affect the degree of parameter variation but not average parameters or the failure rate of limbs during walking on a perforated treadmill. The carpal vibrissae appear to play a role in sensing the animal's speed by measuring the duration of the stance phase. The absence of this cue significantly reduces speed-related variation in stride frequency and vibrissal protraction. PMID:25547567

  18. Locomotion- and mechanics-mediated tactile sensing: antenna reconfiguration simplifies control during high-speed navigation in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Mongeau, Jean-Michel; Demir, Alican; Lee, Jusuk; Cowan, Noah J; Full, Robert J

    2013-12-15

    Animals can expend energy to acquire sensory information by emitting signals and/or moving sensory structures. We propose that the energy from locomotion itself could permit control of a sensor, whereby animals use the energy from movement to reconfigure a passive sensor. We investigated high-speed, antenna-mediated tactile navigation in the cockroach Periplaneta americana. We discovered that the passive antennal flagellum can assume two principal mechanical states, such that the tip is either projecting backward or forward. Using a combination of behavioral and robotic experiments, we demonstrate that a switch in the antenna's state is mediated via the passive interactions between the sensor and its environment, and this switch strongly influences wall-tracking control. When the tip of the antenna is projected backward, the animals maintain greater body-to-wall distance with fewer body collisions and less leg-wall contact than when the tip is projecting forward. We hypothesized that distally pointing mechanosensory hairs at the tip of the antenna mediate the switch in state by interlocking with asperities in the wall surface. To test this hypothesis, we performed laser ablation of chemo-mechanosensory hairs and added artificial hairs to a robotic antenna. In both the natural and artificial systems, the presence of hairs categorically increased an antenna's probability of switching state. Antennal hairs, once thought to only play a role in sensing, are sufficient for mechanically reconfiguring the state of the entire antenna when coupled with forward motion. We show that the synergy between antennal mechanics, locomotion and the environment simplifies tactile sensing. PMID:24307709

  19. Brain-wide mapping of neural activity controlling zebrafish exploratory locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Timothy W; Mu, Yu; Narayan, Sujatha; Randlett, Owen; Naumann, Eva A; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Schier, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of salient sensory cues to guide behavior, animals must still execute sequences of motor actions in order to forage and explore. How such successive motor actions are coordinated to form global locomotion trajectories is unknown. We mapped the structure of larval zebrafish swim trajectories in homogeneous environments and found that trajectories were characterized by alternating sequences of repeated turns to the left and to the right. Using whole-brain light-sheet imaging, we identified activity relating to the behavior in specific neural populations that we termed the anterior rhombencephalic turning region (ARTR). ARTR perturbations biased swim direction and reduced the dependence of turn direction on turn history, indicating that the ARTR is part of a network generating the temporal correlations in turn direction. We also find suggestive evidence for ARTR mutual inhibition and ARTR projections to premotor neurons. Finally, simulations suggest the observed turn sequences may underlie efficient exploration of local environments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12741.001 PMID:27003593

  20. Compliant Synergies in Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travers, Matthew; Choset, Howie; Goldman @ Georgia Tech. Physics Department Collaboration

    Biological systems appear to have natural mechanisms that allow them to readily compensate for unexpected environmental variations when compared to their mechanical (i.e., robotic) counterparts. We hypothesize that the basis for this discrepancy is almost innate: what biology appears to be born with, built-in mechanisms for coordinating their many degrees of freedom, we struggle to ``program.'' We therefore look toward biology for inspiration. In particular, we are interested in kinematic synergies, low-dimensional representations that explicitly encode the underlying structure of how systems coordinate their internal degrees of freedom to achieve high-level tasks. In this work, we derive parametric representations of kinematic synergies and present a new compliant locomotion control framework that enables the parameters to be directly controlled in response to external disturbances. We present results of this framework implemented on two separate platforms, a snake-like and hexapod robot. Our results show that, using synergies, the locomotion control of these very different systems can be reduced to simple, extremely capable, and common forms, thus offering new insights into both robotic as well as biological locomotion in complex terrains.

  1. Advanced robot locomotion.

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

  2. Perception of gait patterns that deviate from normal and symmetric biped locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Handžić, Ismet; Reed, Kyle B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the range of gait patterns that are perceived as healthy and human-like with the goal of understanding how much asymmetry is allowable in a gait pattern before other people start to notice a gait impairment. Specifically, this study explores if certain abnormal walking patterns can be dismissed as unimpaired or not uncanny. Altering gait biomechanics is generally done in the fields of prosthetics and rehabilitation, however the perception of gait is often neglected. Although a certain gait can be functional, it may not be considered as normal by observers. On the other hand, an abnormally perceived gait may be more practical or necessary in some situations, such as limping after an injury or stroke and when wearing a prosthesis. This research will help to find the balance between the form and function of gait. Gait patterns are synthetically created using a passive dynamic walker (PDW) model that allows gait patterns to be systematically changed without the confounding influence from human sensorimotor feedback during walking. This standardized method allows the perception of specific changes in gait to be studied. The PDW model was used to produce walking patterns that showed a degree of abnormality in gait cadence, knee height, step length, and swing time created by changing the foot roll-over-shape, knee damping, knee location, and leg masses. The gait patterns were shown to participants who rated them according to separate scales of impairment and uncanniness. The results indicate that some pathological and asymmetric gait patterns are perceived as unimpaired and normal. Step time and step length asymmetries less than 5%, small knee location differences, and gait cadence changes of 25% do not result in a change in perception. The results also show that the parameters of a pathologically or uncanny perceived gait can be beneficially altered by increasing other independent parameters, in some sense masking the initial pathology. PMID:25774144

  3. Biped walking robot based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhihuai; Yao, Yan'an; Kong, Xianwen

    2014-03-01

    Existing biped robots mainly fall into two categories: robots with left and right feet and robots with upper and lower feet. The load carrying capability of a biped robot is quite limited since the two feet of a walking robot supports the robot alternatively during walking. To improve the load carrying capability, a novel biped walking robot is proposed based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism. The biped walking robot is composed of two identical platforms(feet) and four limbs, including two UPU(universal-prismatic-universal serial chain) limbs and two UU limbs. To enhance its terrain adaptability like articulated vehicles, the two feet of the biped walking robot are designed as two vehicles in detail. The conditions that the geometric parameters of the feet must satisfy are discussed. The degrees-of-freedom of the mechanism is analyzed by using screw theory. Gait analysis, kinematic analysis and stability analysis of the mechanism are carried out to verify the structural design parameters. The simulation results validate the feasibility of walking on rugged terrain. Experiments with a physical prototype show that the novel biped walking robot can walk stably on smooth terrain. Due to its unique feet design and high stiffness, the biped walking robot may adapt to rugged terrain and is suitable for load-carrying.

  4. Finite state control of a variable impedance hybrid neuroprosthesis for locomotion after paralysis.

    PubMed

    Bulea, Thomas C; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L; Schnellenberger, John R; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported on a novel variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM). The VIKM was designed as a component of a hybrid neuroprosthesis to regulate knee flexion. The hybrid neuroprosthesis is a device that uses a controllable brace to support the body against collapse while stimulation provides power for movement. The hybrid neuroprosthesis requires a control system to coordinate the actions of the VIKM with the stimulation system; the development and evaluation of such a controller is presented. Brace mounted sensors and a baseline open loop stimulation pattern are utilized as control signals to activate the VIKM during stance phase while simultaneously modulating muscle stimulation in an on-off fashion. The objective is twofold: reduce the amount of stimulation necessary for walking while simultaneously restoring more biologically correct knee motion during stance using the VIKM. Custom designed hardware and software components were developed for controller implementation. The VIKM hybrid neuroprosthesis (VIKM-HNP) was evaluated during walking in one participant with thoracic level spinal cord injury. In comparison to walking with functional neuromuscular stimulation alone, the VIKM-HNP restored near normal stance phase knee flexion during loading response and pre-swing phases while decreasing knee extensor stimulation by up to 40%. PMID:23193320

  5. Finite State Control of a Variable Impedance Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for Locomotion after Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kobetic, R.; Audu, M.L.; Schnellenberger, J.; Triolo, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported on a novel variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM). The VIKM was designed as a component of a hybrid neuroprosthesis to regulate knee flexion. The hybrid neuroprosthesis is a device that uses a controllable brace to support the body against collapse while stimulation provides power for movement. The hybrid neuroprosthesis requires a control system to coordinate the actions of the VIKM with the stimulation system; the development and evaluation of such a controller is presented. Brace mounted sensors and a baseline open loop stimulation pattern are utilized as control signals to activate the VIKM during stance phase while simultaneously modulating muscle stimulation in an on-off fashion. The objective is twofold: reduce the amount of stimulation necessary for walking while simultaneously restoring more biologically correct knee motion during stance using the VIKM. Custom designed hardware and software components were developed for controller implementation. The VIKM hybrid neuroprosthesis (VIKM-HNP) was evaluated during walking in one participant with thoracic level spinal cord injury. In comparison to walking with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) alone, the VIKM-HNP restored near normal stance phase knee flexion during loading response and pre-swing phases while decreasing knee extensor stimulation by up to 40%. PMID:23193320

  6. Circalunidian clocks control tidal rhythms of locomotion in the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus

    PubMed Central

    Chabot, Christopher C.; Ramberg-Pihl, Nicole C.; Watson, Winsor H.

    2016-01-01

    While many intertidal animals exhibit circatidal rhythms, the nature of the underlying endogenous clocks that control these rhythms has been controversial. In this study American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, were used to test the circalunidian hypothesis by exposing them to four different tidal regimes. Overall, the results obtained support the circalunidian hypothesis: each of the twice-daily rhythms of activity appears to be controlled by a separate clock, each with an endogenous period of approximately 24.8h. First, spontaneous “skipping” of one of the daily bouts was observed under several different conditions. Second, the presence of two bouts of activity/day, with different periods, was observed. Lastly, we were able to separately synchronize bouts of activity to two artificial tidal regimes with different periods. These results, taken together, argue in favor of two separate circalunidian clocks in Limulus, each of which controls one of the two bouts of their daily tidal activity rhythms. PMID:27559270

  7. Electrokinetic Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Jeffrey Lawrence

    occurring in the interfacial layer near the particle/solution interface, which play a key role in the locomotion. The model enables one to understand how the rods' motion depends on the properties of their environment, such as hydrogen peroxide concentration, solution electrical conductivity, and solution viscosity. The numerical simulations are complemented with a scaling analysis based on the governing equations, which makes definite, verifiable predictions of these dependences. One of the most important trends that has been observed experimentally is the significant decrease in speed induced by adding sub-millimolar concentrations of inert electrolyte. It is important to understand the physical reasons for the electrolyte-induced speed decrease, in order to know whether it is fundamental to this propulsion mechanism, or if there is some feasible means to circumvent it. Successful completion of this research will result in an improved understanding of the capabilities, as well as the risks and limits of applicability, of the bimetallic nanomotors for applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Potential applications of the rods include the targeted delivery of drugs in the human body, sensing of chemical impurities in drinking water, and as engines to drive fabrication of microscale structures.

  8. Neural Computation Scheme of Compound Control: Tacit Learning for Bipedal Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Shingo; Kimura, Hidenori

    The growing need for controlling complex behaviors of versatile robots working in unpredictable environment has revealed the fundamental limitation of model-based control strategy that requires precise models of robots and environments before their operations. This difficulty is fundamental and has the same root with the well-known frame problem in artificial intelligence. It has been a central long standing issue in advanced robotics, as well as machine intelligence, to find a prospective clue to attack this fundamental difficulty. The general consensus shared by many leading researchers in the related field is that the body plays an important role in acquiring intelligence that can conquer unknowns. In particular, purposeful behaviors emerge during body-environment interactions with the help of an appropriately organized neural computational scheme that can exploit what the environment can afford. Along this line, we propose a new scheme of neural computation based on compound control which represents a typical feature of biological controls. This scheme is based on classical neuron models with local rules that can create macroscopic purposeful behaviors. This scheme is applied to a bipedal robot and generates the rhythm of walking without any model of robot dynamics and environments.

  9. Anticipatory control and spatial cognition in locomotion and navigation through typical development and in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Belmonti, Vittorio; Cioni, Giovanni; Berthoz, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Behavioural evidence, summarized in this narrative review, supports a developmental model of locomotor control based on increasing neural integration of spatial reference frames. Two consistent adult locomotor behaviours are head stabilization and head anticipation: the head is stabilized to gravity and leads walking direction. This cephalocaudal orienting organization aligns gaze and vestibula with a reference frame centred on the upcoming walking direction, allowing anticipatory control on body kinematics, but is not fully developed until adolescence. Walking trajectories and those of hand movements share many aspects, including power laws coupling velocity to curvature, and minimized spatial variability. In fact, the adult brain can code trajectory geometry in an allocentric reference frame, irrespective of the end effector, regulating body kinematics thereafter. Locomotor trajectory formation, like head anticipation, matures in early adolescence, indicating common neurocomputational substrates. These late-developing control mechanisms can be distinguished from biomechanical problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Children's performance on a novel navigation test, the Magic Carpet, indicates that typical navigation development consists of the increasing integration of egocentric and allocentric reference frames. In CP, right-brain impairment seems to reduce navigation performance due to a maladaptive left-brain sequential egocentric strategy. Spatial integration should be considered more in rehabilitation. PMID:27027604

  10. Adaptation to elastic loads and BMI robot controls during rat locomotion examined with point-process GLMs.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiguo; Cajigas, Iahn; Brown, Emery N; Giszter, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Currently little is known about how a mechanically coupled BMI system's actions are integrated into ongoing body dynamics. We tested a locomotor task augmented with a BMI system driving a robot mechanically interacting with a rat under three conditions: control locomotion (BL), "simple elastic load" (E) and "BMI with elastic load" (BMI/E). The effect of the BMI was to allow compensation of the elastic load as a function of the neural drive. Neurons recorded here were close to one another in cortex, all within a 200 micron diameter horizontal distance of one another. The interactions of these close assemblies of neurons may differ from those among neurons at longer distances in BMI tasks and thus are important to explore. A point process generalized linear model (GLM), was used to examine connectivity at two different binning timescales (1 ms vs. 10 ms). We used GLM models to fit non-Poisson neural dynamics solely using other neurons' prior neural activity as covariates. Models at different timescales were compared based on Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit and parsimony. About 15% of cells with non-Poisson firing were well fitted with the neuron-to-neuron models alone. More such cells were fitted at the 1 ms binning than 10 ms. Positive connection parameters ("excitation" ~70%) exceeded negative parameters ("inhibition" ~30%). Significant connectivity changes in the GLM determined networks of well-fitted neurons occurred between the conditions. However, a common core of connections comprising at least ~15% of connections persisted between any two of the three conditions. Significantly almost twice as many connections were in common between the two load conditions (~27%), compared to between either load condition and the baseline. This local point process GLM identified neural correlation structure and the changes seen across task conditions in the rats in this neural subset may be intrinsic to cortex or due to feedback and input reorganization in adaptation

  11. A feasibility study on the design and walking operation of a biped locomotor via dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingfeng; Ceccarelli, Marco; Carbone, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    A feasibility study on the mechanical design and walking operation of a Cassino biped locomotor is presented in this paper. The biped locomotor consists of two identical 3 degrees-of-freedom tripod leg mechanisms with a parallel manipulator architecture. Planning of the biped walking gait is performed by coordinating the motions of the two leg mechanisms and waist. A threedimensional model is elaborated in SolidWorks® environment in order to characterize a feasible mechanical design. Dynamic simulation is carried out in MSC.ADAMS® environment with the aims of characterizing and evaluating the dynamic walking performance of the proposed design. Simulation results show that the proposed biped locomotor with proper input motions of linear actuators performs practical and feasible walking on flat surfaces with limited actuation and reaction forces between its feet and the ground. A preliminary prototype of the biped locomotor is built for the purpose of evaluating the operation performance of the biped walking gait of the proposed locomotor.

  12. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion. II. Phase asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper, we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself. PMID:22058275

  13. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Spardy, Lucy E; Markin, Sergey N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself. PMID:22058275

  14. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself.

  15. Simulation of a Hybrid Locomotion Robot Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, P.

    2002-10-01

    This study describes a simulation process of a mobile robot. The focus is in kinematic and dynamic behavior simulations of hybrid locomotion robot vehicles. This research is motivated by the development needs of the WorkPartner field service robot. The whole robot system consists of a mobile platform and a two-hand manipulator. The robot platform, called Hybtor, is a hybrid locomotion robot capable of walking and driving by wheels as well as combining these two locomotion modes. This study describes first the general problems and their solutions in the dynamic simulation of mobile robots. A kinematic and dynamic virtual model of the Hybtor robot was built and simulations were carried out using one commercial simulation tool. Walking, wheel driven and rolking mode locomotion, which is a special hybrid locomotion style, has been simulated and analyzed. Position and force control issues during obstacle overrun and climbing were also studied.

  16. Brainstem control of locomotion and muscle tone with special reference to the role of the mesopontine tegmentum and medullary reticulospinal systems.

    PubMed

    Takakusaki, Kaoru; Chiba, Ryosuke; Nozu, Tsukasa; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2016-07-01

    The lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum contains functionally important structures involved in the control of posture and gait. Specifically, the mesencephalic locomotor region, which may consist of the cuneiform nucleus and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN), occupies the interest with respect to the pathophysiology of posture-gait disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the mechanisms involved in the control of postural muscle tone and locomotion by the mesopontine tegmentum and the pontomedullary reticulospinal system. To make interpretation and discussion more robust, the above issue is considered largely based on our findings in the experiments using decerebrate cat preparations in addition to the results in animal experimentations and clinical investigations in other laboratories. Our investigations revealed the presence of functional topographical organizations with respect to the regulation of postural muscle tone and locomotion in both the mesopontine tegmentum and the pontomedullary reticulospinal system. These organizations were modified by neurotransmitter systems, particularly the cholinergic PPN projection to the pontine reticular formation. Because efferents from the forebrain structures as well as the cerebellum converge to the mesencephalic and pontomedullary reticular formation, changes in these organizations may be involved in the appropriate regulation of posture-gait synergy depending on the behavioral context. On the other hand, abnormal signals from the higher motor centers may produce dysfunction of the mesencephalic-reticulospinal system. Here we highlight the significance of elucidating the mechanisms of the mesencephalic-reticulospinal control of posture and locomotion so that thorough understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of posture-gait disorders can be made. PMID:26497023

  17. 40 CFR 92.707 - Notification to locomotive or locomotive engine owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 92. These standards or family emission limits, as defined in 40 CFR part 92 were established to protect the public health or welfare from the dangers of air pollution.” (2) A statement that... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES...

  18. 40 CFR 92.707 - Notification to locomotive or locomotive engine owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 92. These standards or family emission limits, as defined in 40 CFR part 92 were established to protect the public health or welfare from the dangers of air pollution.” (2) A statement that... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES...

  19. 40 CFR 92.707 - Notification to locomotive or locomotive engine owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 92. These standards or family emission limits, as defined in 40 CFR part 92 were established to protect the public health or welfare from the dangers of air pollution.” (2) A statement that... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES...

  20. Neuromusculoskeletal models based on the muscle synergy hypothesis for the investigation of adaptive motor control in locomotion via sensory-motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro

    2016-03-01

    Humans and animals walk adaptively in diverse situations by skillfully manipulating their complicated and redundant musculoskeletal systems. From an analysis of measured electromyographic (EMG) data, it appears that despite complicated spatiotemporal properties, muscle activation patterns can be explained by a low dimensional spatiotemporal structure. More specifically, they can be accounted for by the combination of a small number of basic activation patterns. The basic patterns and distribution weights indicate temporal and spatial structures, respectively, and the weights show the muscle sets that are activated synchronously. In addition, various locomotor behaviors have similar low dimensional structures and major differences appear in the basic patterns. These analysis results suggest that neural systems use muscle group combinations to solve motor control redundancy problems (muscle synergy hypothesis) and manipulate those basic patterns to create various locomotor functions. However, it remains unclear how the neural system controls such muscle groups and basic patterns through neuromechanical interactions in order to achieve adaptive locomotor behavior. This paper reviews simulation studies that explored adaptive motor control in locomotion via sensory-motor coordination using neuromusculoskeletal models based on the muscle synergy hypothesis. Herein, the neural mechanism in motor control related to the muscle synergy for adaptive locomotion and a potential muscle synergy analysis method including neuromusculoskeletal modeling for motor impairments and rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:26616311

  1. Muscle emulation with DC motor and neural networks for biped robots.

    PubMed

    Serhan, Hayssam; Nasr, Chaiban G; Henaff, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    This paper shows how to use a DC motor and its PID controller, to behave analogously to a muscle. A model of the muscle that has been learned by a NNARX (Neural Network Auto Regressive eXogenous) structure is used. The PID parameters are tuned by an MLP Network with a special indirect online learning algorithm. The calculation of the learning algorithm is performed based on a mathematical equation of the DC motor or with a Neural Network identification of the motor. For each of the two algorithms, the output of the muscle model is used as a reference for the DC motor control loop. The results show that we succeeded in forcing the physical system to behave in the same way as the muscle model with acceptable margin of error. An implementation in the knees of a simulated biped robot is realized. Simulation compares articular trajectories with and without the muscle emulator and shows that with muscle emulator, articular trajectories become closer to the human being ones and that total power consumption is reduced. PMID:20726042

  2. Electrical stimulation of the sural cutaneous afferent nerve controls the amplitude and onset of the swing phase of locomotion in the spinal cat

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Krupka, Alexander J.; AuYong, Nicholas; Miller, Kassi; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory feedback plays a crucial role in the control of locomotion and in the recovery of function after spinal cord injury. Investigations in reduced preparations have shown that the locomotor cycle can be modified through the activation of afferent feedback at various phases of the gait cycle. We investigated the effect of phase-dependent electrical stimulation of a cutaneous afferent nerve on the locomotor pattern of trained spinal cord-injured cats. Animals were first implanted with chronic nerve cuffs on the sural and sciatic nerves and electromyographic electrodes in different hindlimb muscles. Cats were then transected at T12 and trained daily to locomote on a treadmill. We found that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve can enhance the ongoing flexion phase, producing higher (+129%) and longer (+17.4%) swing phases of gait even at very low threshold of stimulation. Sural nerve stimulation can also terminate an ongoing extension and initiate a flexion phase. A higher prevalence of early switching to the flexion phase was observed at higher stimulation levels and if stimulation was applied in the late stance phase. All flexor muscles were activated by the stimulation. These results suggest that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve may be used to increase the magnitude of the swing phase and control the timing of its onset after spinal cord injury and locomotor training. PMID:21389308

  3. Electrical stimulation of the sural cutaneous afferent nerve controls the amplitude and onset of the swing phase of locomotion in the spinal cat.

    PubMed

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Krupka, Alexander J; AuYong, Nicholas; Miller, Kassi; Prilutsky, Boris I; Lemay, Michel A

    2011-05-01

    Sensory feedback plays a crucial role in the control of locomotion and in the recovery of function after spinal cord injury. Investigations in reduced preparations have shown that the locomotor cycle can be modified through the activation of afferent feedback at various phases of the gait cycle. We investigated the effect of phase-dependent electrical stimulation of a cutaneous afferent nerve on the locomotor pattern of trained spinal cord-injured cats. Animals were first implanted with chronic nerve cuffs on the sural and sciatic nerves and electromyographic electrodes in different hindlimb muscles. Cats were then transected at T12 and trained daily to locomote on a treadmill. We found that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve can enhance the ongoing flexion phase, producing higher (+129%) and longer (+17.4%) swing phases of gait even at very low threshold of stimulation. Sural nerve stimulation can also terminate an ongoing extension and initiate a flexion phase. A higher prevalence of early switching to the flexion phase was observed at higher stimulation levels and if stimulation was applied in the late stance phase. All flexor muscles were activated by the stimulation. These results suggest that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve may be used to increase the magnitude of the swing phase and control the timing of its onset after spinal cord injury and locomotor training. PMID:21389308

  4. Biped 4R2C six-bar mechanism with inner and outer feet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Hao; Yao, Yan-an

    2016-01-01

    Most current biped robots are equipped with two feet arranged in the right and left which inspired by the human body system. Different from the existing configurations, a novel biped robot with inner and outer feet based on a spatial six-bar 4R2C(R and C denote revolute and cylindric joints, respectively) mechanism is proposed. It can move along a line or a curve by three walking modes that are dwell adjustment mode, limit position adjustment mode and any position adjustment mode. Kinematic, gait planning and stability analyses are performed respectively, and a prototype is developed. Lastly, a potential application is considered and two manipulating modes(sphere and cylinder manipulating modes) are carried out. This interesting mechanism feathering its single closed-chain structure and unique work performance is expected to motivate the configuration creation of biped robots.

  5. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed.

  6. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed. PMID:19566263

  7. Spatiotemporal synchronization of biped walking patterns with multiple external inputs by style-phase adaptation.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takamitsu; Uchikata, Akimasa; Morimoto, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework for generating coordinated periodic movements of robotic systems with multiple external inputs. We developed an adaptive pattern generator model that is composed of a two-factor observation model with a style parameter and phase dynamics with a phase variable. The style parameter controls the spatial patterns of the generated trajectories, and the phase variable manages its temporal profiles. By exploiting the style-phase separation in the pattern generation, we can independently design adaptation schemes for the spatial and temporal profiles of the pattern generator to multiple external inputs. To validate the effectiveness of our proposed method, we applied it to a user-exoskeleton model to achieve user-adaptive walking assistance for which the exoskeleton robot's movements need to be coordinated with the user walking patterns and environment. As a result, the exoskeleton robot successfully performed stable biped walking behaviors for walking assistance even when the style of the observed walking pattern and the period were suddenly changed. PMID:26459123

  8. BIPES, a cost-effective high-throughput method for assessing microbial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Wei; Li, Dong-Fang; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee; Jiang, Xiao-Tao; Zhang, Hai; Sheng, Hua-Fang; Qin, Jin; Liu, Xiao; Zou, Fei

    2011-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA (16S) variable tags has become the most popular method for assessing microbial diversity, but the method remains costly for the evaluation of large numbers of environmental samples with high sequencing depths. We developed a barcoded Illumina paired-end (PE) sequencing (BIPES) method that sequences each 16S V6 tag from both ends on the Illumina HiSeq 2000, and the PE reads are then overlapped to obtain the V6 tag. The average accuracy of Illumina single-end (SE) reads was only 97.9%, which decreased from ∼99.9% at the start of the read to less than 85% at the end of the read; nevertheless, overlapping of the PE reads significantly increased the sequencing accuracy to 99.65% by verifying the 3′ end of each SE in which the sequencing quality was degraded. After the removal of tags with two or more mismatches within the medial 40–70 bases of the reads and of tags with any primer errors, the overall base sequencing accuracy of the BIPES reads was further increased to 99.93%. The BIPES reads reflected the amounts of the various tags in the initial template, but long tags and high GC tags were underestimated. The BIPES method yields 20–50 times more 16S V6 tags than does pyrosequencing in a single-flow cell run, and each of the BIPES reads costs less than 1/40 of a pyrosequencing read. As a laborsaving and cost-effective method, BIPES can be routinely used to analyze the microbial ecology of both environmental and human microbiomes. PMID:20962877

  9. Impact of locomotion training with a neurologic controlled hybrid assistive limb (HAL) exoskeleton on neuropathic pain and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic SCI: a case study (.).

    PubMed

    Cruciger, Oliver; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Meindl, Renate C; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schwenkreis, Peter; Citak, Mustafa; Aach, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain (CNP) is a common condition associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) and has been reported to be severe, disabling and often treatment-resistant and therefore remains a clinical challenge for the attending physicians. The treatment usually includes pharmacological and/or nonpharmacological approaches. Body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and locomotion training with driven gait orthosis (DGO) have evolved over the last decades and are now considered to be an established part in the rehabilitation of SCI patients. Conventional locomotion training goes along with improvements of the patients' walking abilities in particular speed and gait pattern. The neurologic controlled hybrid assistive limb (HAL®, Cyberdyne Inc., Ibraki, Japan) exoskeleton, however, is a new tailored approach to support motor functions synchronously to the patient's voluntary drive. This report presents two cases of severe chronic and therapy resistant neuropathic pain due to chronic SCI and demonstrates the beneficial effects of neurologic controlled exoskeletal intervention on pain severity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Both of these patients were engaged in a 12 weeks period of daily HAL®-supported locomotion training. In addition to improvements in motor functions and walking abilities, both show significant reduction in pain severity and improvements in all HRQoL domains. Although various causal factors likely contribute to abatement of CNP, the reported results occurred due to a new approach in the rehabilitation of chronic spinal cord injury patients. These findings suggest not only the feasibility of this new approach but in conclusion, demonstrate the effectiveness of neurologic controlled locomotion training in the long-term management of refractory neuropathic pain. Implications for Rehabilitation CNP remains a challenge in the rehabilitation of chronic SCI patients. Locomotion training with the HAL exoskeleton seems to improve CNP

  10. A contribution about ferrofluid based flow manipulation and locomotion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, K.; Zeidis, I.; Bohm, V.; Popp, J.

    2009-02-01

    With the background of developing apedal bionic inspired locomotion systems for future application fields like autonomous (swarm) robots, medical engineering and inspection systems, this article presents a selection of locomotion systems with bifluidic flow control using ferrofluid. By controlling the change of shape, position and pressure of the ferrofluid in a secondary low viscous fluid by magnetic fields locomotion of objects or the ferrofluid itself can be realised. The locomotion of an object is caused in the first example by a ferrofluid generated flow of the secondary fluid and in the second and third case by the direct alteration of the ferrofluid position.

  11. Stability of underwater periodic locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Fangxu; Kanso, Eva

    2013-07-01

    Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of periodic swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed periodic heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that periodic locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping.We obtain closedform solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. This efficiency analysis results in optimal parameter values that are in agreement with values reported for some carangiform fish. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) periodic locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This suggests that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.

  12. 40 CFR 1033.230 - Grouping locomotives into engine families.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... families. 1033.230 Section 1033.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Certifying Engine Families § 1033.230 Grouping locomotives into engine families. (a) Divide your product line into engine families of...

  13. 40 CFR 1033.230 - Grouping locomotives into engine families.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... families. 1033.230 Section 1033.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Certifying Engine Families § 1033.230 Grouping locomotives into engine families. (a) Divide your product line into engine families of...

  14. 40 CFR 1033.230 - Grouping locomotives into engine families.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... families. 1033.230 Section 1033.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Certifying Engine Families § 1033.230 Grouping locomotives into engine families. (a) Divide your product line into engine families of...

  15. 40 CFR 1033.230 - Grouping locomotives into engine families.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... families. 1033.230 Section 1033.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Certifying Engine Families § 1033.230 Grouping locomotives into engine families. (a) Divide your product line into engine families of...

  16. 49 CFR 236.509 - Two or more locomotives coupled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Two or more locomotives coupled. 236.509 Section... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.509 Two or more locomotives coupled. The automatic train stop, train control or cab signal apparatus shall be arranged so that when two...

  17. Sensory feedback in cockroach locomotion: current knowledge and open questions.

    PubMed

    Ayali, A; Couzin-Fuchs, E; David, I; Gal, O; Holmes, P; Knebel, D

    2015-09-01

    The American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, provides a successful model for the study of legged locomotion. Sensory regulation and the relative importance of sensory feedback vs. central control in animal locomotion are key aspects in our understanding of locomotive behavior. Here we introduce the cockroach model and describe the basic characteristics of the neural generation and control of walking and running in this insect. We further provide a brief overview of some recent studies, including mathematical modeling, which have contributed to our knowledge of sensory control in cockroach locomotion. We focus on two sensory mechanisms and sense organs, those providing information related to loading and unloading of the body and the legs, and leg-movement-related sensory receptors, and present evidence for the instrumental role of these sensory signals in inter-leg locomotion control. We conclude by identifying important open questions and indicate future perspectives. PMID:25432627

  18. Lateral oscillations of the center of mass of bipeds as they walk. Inverted pendulum model with two degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H Goldsztein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    The use of inverted pendulum models to study the bio-mechanics of biped walkers is a common practice. In its simplest form, the inverted pendulum consists of a point mass, which models the center of mass of the biped, attached to two straight mass-less legs. Most works using the simplest inverted pendulum model constrain the mass and the legs to the sagittal plane (the plane that contains the direction perpendicular to the ground and the direction toward the biped is walking). In this article, we remove this constrain and use this unconstrained inverted pendulum model to study the oscillations the mass experiences in the direction perpendicular to the sagittal plane as the biped walks. While small, these oscillations are unavoidable and of importance in the understanding of balance and stability of walkers, as well as walkers induced oscillations in pedestrian bridges.

  19. A study of the passive gait of a compass-like biped robot: Symmetry and chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Espiau, B.; Thuilot, B.

    1998-12-01

    The focus of this work is a systematic study of the passive gait of a compass-like planar, biped robot on inclined slopes. The robot is kinematically equivalent to a double pendulum, possessing two kneeless legs with point masses and a third point mass at the hip joint. Three parameters, namely, the ground-slope angle and the normalized mass and length of the robot describe its gait. The authors show that in response to a continuous change in any one of its parameters, the symmetric and steady stable gait of the unpowered robot gradually evolves through a regime of bifurcations characterized by progressively complicated asymmetric gaits, eventually arriving at an apparently chaotic gait where not two steps are identical. The robot can maintain this gait indefinitely. A necessary (but not sufficient) condition for the stability of such gaits is the contraction of the phase-fluid volume. For this frictionless robot, the volume contraction, which the authors compute, is caused by the dissipative effects of the ground-impact model. In the chaotic regime, the fractal dimension of the robot`s strange attractor (2.07) compared to its state-space dimension (4) also reveals strong contraction. The authors present a novel graphical technique based on the first return map that compactly captures the entire evolution of the gait, from symmetry to chaos. Additional passive dissipative elements in the robot joint results in a significant improvement in the stability and the versatility of the gait, and provide a rich repertoire for simple controls laws.

  20. The Need for Speed in Rodent Locomotion Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Batka, Richard J.; Brown, Todd J.; Mcmillan, Kathryn P.; Meadows, Rena M.; Jones, Kathryn J.; Haulcomb, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Locomotion analysis is now widely used across many animal species to understand the motor defects in disease, functional recovery following neural injury, and the effectiveness of various treatments. More recently, rodent locomotion analysis has become an increasingly popular method in a diverse range of research. Speed is an inseparable aspect of locomotion that is still not fully understood, and its effects are often not properly incorporated while analyzing data. In this hybrid manuscript, we accomplish three things: (1) review the interaction between speed and locomotion variables in rodent studies, (2) comprehensively analyze the relationship between speed and 162 locomotion variables in a group of 16 wild-type mice using the CatWalk gait analysis system, and (3) develop and test a statistical method in which locomotion variables are analyzed and reported in the context of speed. Notable results include the following: (1) over 90% of variables, reported by CatWalk, were dependent on speed with an average R2 value of 0.624, (2) most variables were related to speed in a nonlinear manner, (3) current methods of controlling for speed are insufficient, and (4) the linear mixed model is an appropriate and effective statistical method for locomotion analyses that is inclusive of speed-dependent relationships. Given the pervasive dependency of locomotion variables on speed, we maintain that valid conclusions from locomotion analyses cannot be made unless they are analyzed and reported within the context of speed. PMID:24890845

  1. Diel vertical migration and nutrient transport of the dinoflagellate Peridinium bipes f. occultatum in a thermally stratified reservoir.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Iseri, Y

    2012-01-01

    Field observations were conducted with respect to the vertical migration of the dinoflagellate Peridinium bipes and its influence on vertical nutrient transport in a stratified reservoir. P. bipes migrated vertically with circadian rhythms; that is, P. bipes migrated downward and accumulated in the top layer of the hypolimnion from evening to night and then migrated upward and accumulated in the epilimnion in the early morning. In the top layer of the hypolimnion, a rapid decrease in nutrient concentration was observed in the evening, presumably due to uptake by P. bipes. Active migration from the epilimnion to the top of the hypolimnion was also suggested by estimation of the descent velocity of P. bipes, which was advantageous for the uptake of nutrients. Moreover, based on the equilibrium of forces during migration, the energy cost of vertical migration could be inferred to be negligible. The results suggest that active vertical migration of P. bipes played an important role in nutrient transport between the hypolimnion and the epilimnion in a stratified reservoir. PMID:22828297

  2. Fuelcell Prototype Locomotive

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Barnes

    2007-09-28

    An international industry-government consortium is developing a fuelcell hybrid switcher locomotive for commercial railway applications and power-to-grid generation applications. The current phase of this on-going project addresses the practicalities of on-board hydrogen storage, fuelcell technology, and hybridity, all with an emphasis on commercially available products. Through practical evaluation using designs from Vehicle Projects’ Fuelcell-Powered Underground Mine Loader Project, the configuration of the fuelcell switcher locomotive changed from using metal-hydride hydrogen storage and a pure fuelcell power plant to using compressed hydrogen storage, a fuelcell-battery hybrid power plant, and fuelcell stack modules from Ballard Power Systems that have been extensively used in the Citaro bus program in Europe. The new overall design will now use a RailPower battery hybrid Green Goat™ as the locomotive platform. Keeping the existing lead-acid batteries, we will replace the 205 kW diesel gen-set with 225 kW of net fuelcell power, remove the diesel fuel tank, and place 14 compressed hydrogen cylinders, capable of storing 70 kg of hydrogen at 350 bar, on the roof. A detailed design with associated CAD models will allow a complete build of the fuelcell-battery hybrid switcher locomotive in the next funded phase.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 92 - Emission Related Locomotive and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission Related Locomotive and Engine Parameters and Specifications I Appendix I to Part 92 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Pt. 92, App. I Appendix I to...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 92 - Emission Related Locomotive and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission Related Locomotive and Engine Parameters and Specifications I Appendix I to Part 92 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Pt. 92, App. I Appendix I to...

  5. Operation analysis of a Chebyshev-Pantograph leg mechanism for a single DOF biped robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Conghui; Ceccarelli, Marco; Takeda, Yukio

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, operation analysis of a Chebyshev-Pantograph leg mechanism is presented for a single degree of freedom (DOF) biped robot. The proposed leg mechanism is composed of a Chebyshev four-bar linkage and a pantograph mechanism. In contrast to general fully actuated anthropomorphic leg mechanisms, the proposed leg mechanism has peculiar features like compactness, low-cost, and easy-operation. Kinematic equations of the proposed leg mechanism are formulated for a computer oriented simulation. Simulation results show the operation performance of the proposed leg mechanism with suitable characteristics. A parametric study has been carried out to evaluate the operation performance as function of design parameters. A prototype of a single DOF biped robot equipped with two proposed leg mechanisms has been built at LARM (Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics). Experimental test shows practical feasible walking ability of the prototype, as well as drawbacks are discussed for the mechanical design.

  6. Novel locomotion via biological inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Roger D.; Boxerbaum, Alexander; Palmer, Luther; Chiel, Hillel; Diller, Eric; Hunt, Alexander; Bachmann, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Animal behavioral, physiological and neurobiological studies are providing a wealth of inspirational data for robot design and control. Several very different biologically inspired mobile robots will be reviewed. A robot called DIGbot is being developed that moves independent of the direction of gravity using Distributed Inward Gripping (DIG) as a rapid and robust attachment mechanism observed in climbing animals. DIGbot is an 18 degree of freedom hexapod with onboard power and control systems. Passive compliance in its feet, which is inspired by the flexible tarsus of the cockroach, increases the robustness of the adhesion strategy and enables DIGbot to execute large steps and stationary turns while walking on mesh screens. A Whegs™ robot, inspired by insect locomotion principles, is being developed that can be rapidly reconfigured between tracks and wheel-legs and carry GeoSystems Zipper Mast. The mechanisms that cause it to passively change its gait on irregular terrain have been integrated into its hubs for a compact and modular design. The robot is designed to move smoothly on moderately rugged terrain using its tracks and run on irregular terrain and stairs using its wheel-legs. We are also developing soft bodied robots that use peristalsis, the same method of locomotion earthworms use. We present a technique of using a braided mesh exterior to produce fluid waves of motion along the body of the robot that increase the robot's speed relative to previous designs. The concept is highly scalable, for endoscopes to water, oil or gas line inspection.

  7. Human locomotion and heat loss: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Humans are unique in many respects including being furless, striding bipeds that excel at walking and running long distances in hot conditions. This review summarizes what we do and do not know about the evolution of these characteristics, and how they are related. Although many details remain poorly known, the first hominins (species more closely related to humans than to chimpanzees) apparently diverged from the chimpanzee lineage because of selection for bipedal walking, probably because it improved their ability to forage efficiently. However, because bipedal hominins are necessarily slow runners, early hominins in open habitats likely benefited from improved abilities to dump heat in order to forage safely during times of peak heat when predators were unable to hunt them. Endurance running capabilities evolved later, probably as adaptations for scavenging and then hunting. If so, then there would have been strong selection for heat-loss mechanisms, especially sweating, to persistence hunt, in which hunters combine endurance running and tracking to drive their prey into hyperthermia. As modern humans dispersed into a wide range of habitats over the last few hundred thousand years, recent selection has helped populations cope better with a broader range of locomotor and thermoregulatory challenges, but all humans remain essentially adapted for long distance locomotion rather than speed, and to dump rather than retain heat. PMID:25589265

  8. Judgments of Path, Not Heading, Guide Locomotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, Richard M.; Wann, John P.

    2006-01-01

    To steer a course through the world, people are almost entirely dependent on visual information, of which a key component is optic flow. In many models of locomotion, heading is described as the fundamental control variable; however, it has also been shown that fixating points along or near one's future path could be the basis of an efficient…

  9. A Review of Locomotion Systems for Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lejie; Towfighian, Shahrzad; Hila, Amine

    2015-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy for gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a modern technology that has the potential to replace conventional endoscopy techniques. Capsule endoscopy is a pill-shaped device embedded with a camera, a coin battery, and a data transfer. Without a locomotion system, this capsule endoscopy can only passively travel inside the GI tract via natural peristalsis, thus causing several disadvantages such as inability to control and stop, and risk of capsule retention. Therefore, a locomotion system needs to be added to optimize the current capsule endoscopy. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art locomotion methods along with the desired locomotion features such as size, speed, power, and temperature and compares the properties of different methods. In addition, properties and motility mechanisms of the GI tract are described. The main purpose of this review is to understand the features of GI tract and diverse locomotion methods in order to create a future capsule endoscopy compatible with GI tract properties. PMID:26292162

  10. Interactions between locomotion and ventilation in tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Dona F

    2002-10-01

    Interactions between locomotion and ventilation have now been studied in several species of reptiles, birds and mammals, from a variety of perspectives. Among these perspectives are neural interactions of separate but linked central controllers; mechanical impacts of locomotion upon ventilatory pressures and flows; and the extent to which the latter may affect gas exchange and the energetics of exercise. A synchrony, i.e. 1:1 pattern of coordination, is observed in many running mammals once they achieve galloping speeds, as well as in flying bats, some flying birds and hopping marsupials. Other, non-1:1, patterns of coordination are seen in trotting and walking quadrupeds, as well as running bipedal humans and running and flying birds. There is evidence for an energetic advantage to coordination of locomotor and respiratory cycles for flying birds and running mammals. There is evidence for a mechanical constraint upon ventilation by locomotion for some reptiles (e.g. iguana), but not for others (e.g. varanids and crocodilians). In diving birds the impact of wing flapping or foot paddling on differential air sac pressures enhances gas exchange during the breath hold by improving diffusive and convective movement of air sac oxygen to parabronchi. This paper will review the current state of our knowledge of such influences of locomotion upon respiratory system function. PMID:12208300

  11. Passive mechanics in jellyfish-like locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Megan; Eldredge, Jeff

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this work is to identify possible benefits of passive flexibility in biologically-inspired locomotion. Substantial energy savings are likely achieved in natural locomotion by allowing a mix of actively controlled and passively responsive deformation. The jellyfish is a useful target of study, due to its relatively simple structure and the availability of recent kinematics and flow-field measurements. In this investigation, the jellyfish consists of a two-dimensional articulated system of rigid bodies linked by hinges. The kinematics -- expressed via the hinge angles -- are adapted from experimentally measured motion. The free swimming system is explored via high-fidelity numerical simulation with a viscous vortex particle method with coupled body dynamics. The computational tool allows the arbitrary designation of individual hinges as ``active'' or ``passive,'' to introduce a mix of flexibility into the system. In some cases, replacing an active hinge with a passive spring can enhance the mean swimming speed, thus reducing the power requirements of the system. Varying the stiffness and damping coefficients of the spring yield different locomotive results. The numerical solution is used to compute the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) throughout the field. The FTLE fields reveal manifolds in the flow that act as transport barriers, uncovering otherwise unseen geometric characteristics of the flow field that add new insight into the locomotion mechanics.

  12. Locomotion: dealing with friction.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, V

    1998-05-12

    To move on land, in water, or in the air, even at constant speed and at the same level, always requires an expenditure of energy. The resistance to motion that has to be overcome is of many different kinds depending on size, speed, and the characteristics of the medium, and is a fascinating subject in itself. Even more interesting are nature's stratagems and solutions toward minimizing the effort involved in the locomotion of different types of living creatures, and humans' imitations and inventions in an attempt to do at least as well. PMID:9576902

  13. Locomotion: Dealing with friction

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, V.

    1998-01-01

    To move on land, in water, or in the air, even at constant speed and at the same level, always requires an expenditure of energy. The resistance to motion that has to be overcome is of many different kinds depending on size, speed, and the characteristics of the medium, and is a fascinating subject in itself. Even more interesting are nature’s stratagems and solutions toward minimizing the effort involved in the locomotion of different types of living creatures, and humans’ imitations and inventions in an attempt to do at least as well. PMID:9576902

  14. Terrestrial locomotion in arachnids.

    PubMed

    Spagna, Joseph C; Peattie, Anne M

    2012-05-01

    In this review, we assess the current state of knowledge on terrestrial locomotion in Arachnida. Arachnids represent a single diverse (>100,000 species) clade containing well-defined subgroups (at both the order and subordinal levels) that vary morphologically around a basic body plan, yet exhibit highly disparate limb usage, running performance, and tarsal attachment mechanisms. Spiders (Araneae), scorpions (Scorpiones), and harvestmen (Opiliones) have received the most attention in the literature, while some orders have never been subject to rigorous mechanical characterization. Most well-characterized taxa move with gaits analogous to the alternating tripod gaits that characterize fast-moving Insecta - alternating tetrapods or alternating tripods (when one pair of legs is lifted from the ground for some other function). However, between taxa, there is considerable variation in the regularity of phasing between legs. Both large and small spiders appear to show a large amount of variation in the distribution of foot-ground contact, even between consecutive step-cycles of a single run. Mechanisms for attachment to vertical surfaces also vary, and may depend on tufts of adhesive hairs, fluid adhesives, silks, or a combination of these. We conclude that Arachnida, particularly with improvements in microelectronic force sensing technology, can serve as a powerful study system for understanding the kinematics, dynamics, and ecological correlates of sprawled-posture locomotion. PMID:22326455

  15. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Gong, Chaohui; Serrano, Miguel M.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    By propagating waves from head to tail, limbless organisms like snakes can traverse terrain composed of rocks, foliage, soil and sand. Previous research elucidated how rigid obstacles influence snake locomotion by studying a model terrain-symmetric lattices of pegs placed in hard ground. We want to understand how different substrate-body interaction modes affect performance in desert-adapted snakes during transit of substrates composed of both rigid obstacles and granular media (GM). We tested Chionactis occipitalis, the Mojave shovel-nosed snake, in two laboratory treatments: lattices of 0 . 64 cm diameter obstacles arrayed on both a hard, slick substrate and in a GM of ~ 0 . 3 mm diameter glass particles. For all lattice spacings, d, speed through the hard ground lattices was less than that in GM lattices. However, maximal undulation efficiencies ηu (number of body lengths advanced per undulation cycle) in both treatments were comparable when d was intermediate. For other d, ηu was lower than this maximum in hard ground lattices, while on GM, ηu was insensitive to d. To systematically explore such locomotion, we tested a physical robot model of the snake; performance depended sensitively on base substrate, d and body wave parameters.

  16. A Locomotion Intent Prediction System Based on Multi-Sensor Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baojun; Zheng, Enhao; Wang, Qining

    2014-01-01

    Locomotion intent prediction is essential for the control of powered lower-limb prostheses to realize smooth locomotion transitions. In this research, we develop a multi-sensor fusion based locomotion intent prediction system, which can recognize current locomotion mode and detect locomotion transitions in advance. Seven able-bodied subjects were recruited for this research. Signals from two foot pressure insoles and three inertial measurement units (one on the thigh, one on the shank and the other on the foot) are measured. A two-level recognition strategy is used for the recognition with linear discriminate classifier. Six kinds of locomotion modes and ten kinds of locomotion transitions are tested in this study. Recognition accuracy during steady locomotion periods (i.e., no locomotion transitions) is 99.71% ± 0.05% for seven able-bodied subjects. During locomotion transition periods, all the transitions are correctly detected and most of them can be detected before transiting to new locomotion modes. No significant deterioration in recognition performance is observed in the following five hours after the system is trained, and small number of experiment trials are required to train reliable classifiers. PMID:25014097

  17. Electrophysiological responses of the Naupactus bipes beetle to essential oils from Piperaceae species.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Clécio S; Soares, Marisi G; da Silva, Adalberto M; Batista-Pereira, Luciane G; Corrêa, Arlene G; Kato, Massuo J

    2012-08-01

    Electrophysiological responses based on electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) and electroantennography (EAG) analysis of Naupactus bipes beetles (Germar, 1824) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Brachycerinae) were used to test volatile oils of Piper gaudichaudianum, P. regnellii and P. hispidum. In the EAG experiments, female and male beetles showed significant EAG response to the three volatile oils of Piper species, with the females' responses slightly higher than the males'. The experiments with GC-EAD revealed that some terpenoids (namely, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, myrcene, alpha-copaene and germacrene) present in the leaf essential oils of the Piper species are perceptible to female and male beetles. PMID:22978240

  18. Scaling macroscopic aquatic locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Argentina, Mederic; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2014-11-01

    Inertial aquatic swimmers that use undulatory gaits range in length L from a few millimeters to 30 meters, across a wide array of biological taxa. Using elementary hydrodynamic arguments, we uncover a unifying mechanistic principle characterizing their locomotion by deriving a scaling relation that links swimming speed U to body kinematics (tail beat amplitude A and frequency ω) and fluid properties (kinematic viscosity ν). This principle can be simply couched as the power law Re ~ Swα , where Re = UL / ν >> 1 and Sw = ωAL / ν , with α = 4 / 3 for laminar flows, and α = 1 for turbulent flows. Existing data from over 1000 measurements on fish, amphibians, larvae, reptiles, mammals and birds, as well as direct numerical simulations are consistent with our scaling. We interpret our results as the consequence of the convergence of aquatic gaits to the performance limits imposed by hydrodynamics.

  19. Scaling macroscopic aquatic locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Argentina, Médéric; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-10-01

    Inertial aquatic swimmers that use undulatory gaits range in length L from a few millimetres to 30 metres, across a wide array of biological taxa. Using elementary hydrodynamic arguments, we uncover a unifying mechanistic principle characterizing their locomotion by deriving a scaling relation that links swimming speed U to body kinematics (tail beat amplitude A and frequency ω) and fluid properties (kinematic viscosity ν). This principle can be simply couched as the power law Re ~ Swα, where Re = UL/ν >> 1 and Sw = ωAL/ν, with α = 4/3 for laminar flows, and α = 1 for turbulent flows. Existing data from over 1,000 measurements on fish, amphibians, larvae, reptiles, mammals and birds, as well as direct numerical simulations are consistent with our scaling. We interpret our results as the consequence of the convergence of aquatic gaits to the performance limits imposed by hydrodynamics.

  20. 77 FR 21311 - Locomotive Safety Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    .... Brakes, General E. Locomotive Cab Temperature F. Headlights G. Alerters H. Locomotive Electronics I... a minimum permissible locomotive cab temperature. FRA also independently developed a proposal for... in the NPRM and retains it in this final rule. Locomotive Cab Temperature In 1998, FRA led an...

  1. Postural stability of biped robots and the foot-rotation indicator (FRI) point

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.

    1999-06-01

    The focus of this paper is the problem of foot rotation in biped robots during the single-support phase. Foot rotation is an indication of postural instability, which should be carefully treated in a dynamically stable walk and avoided altogether in a statically stable walk. The author introduces the foot-rotation indicator (FRI) point, which is a point on the foot/ground-contact surface where the net ground-reaction force would have to act to keep the foot stationary. To ensure no foot rotation, the FRI point must remain within the convex hull of the foot-support area. In contrast with the ground projection of the center of mass (GCoM), which is a static criterion, the FRI point incorporates robot dynamics. As opposed to the center of pressure (CoP) -- better known as the zero-moment point (ZMP) in the robotics literature -- which may not leave the support area, the FRI point may leave the area. In fact, the position of the FRI point outside the footprint indicates the direction of the impending rotation and the magnitude of rotational moment acting on the foot. Owing to these important properties, the FRI point helps not only to monitor the state of postural stability of a biped robot during the entire gait cycle, but indicates the severity of instability of the gait as well. In response to a recent need, the paper also resolves the misconceptions surrounding the CoP/ZMP equivalence.

  2. Disparity and convergence in bipedal archosaur locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Bates, K. T.; Schachner, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate functional disparity in the locomotor apparatus of bipedal archosaurs. We use reconstructions of hindlimb myology of extant and extinct archosaurs to generate musculoskeletal biomechanical models to test hypothesized convergence between bipedal crocodile-line archosaurs and dinosaurs. Quantitative comparison of muscle leverage supports the inference that bipedal crocodile-line archosaurs and non-avian theropods had highly convergent hindlimb myology, suggesting similar muscular mechanics and neuromuscular control of locomotion. While these groups independently evolved similar musculoskeletal solutions to the challenges of parasagittally erect bipedalism, differences also clearly exist, particularly the distinct hip and crurotarsal ankle morphology characteristic of many pseudosuchian archosaurs. Furthermore, comparative analyses of muscle design in extant archosaurs reveal that muscular parameters such as size and architecture are more highly adapted or optimized for habitual locomotion than moment arms. The importance of these aspects of muscle design, which are not directly retrievable from fossils, warns against over-extrapolating the functional significance of anatomical convergences. Nevertheless, links identified between posture, muscle moments and neural control in archosaur locomotion suggest that functional interpretations of osteological changes in limb anatomy traditionally linked to postural evolution in Late Triassic archosaurs could be constrained through musculoskeletal modelling. PMID:22112652

  3. Autonomous locomotion of capsule endoscope in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungwook; Park, Kitae; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Tae Song; Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Autonomous locomotion in gastrointestinal (GI) tracts is achieved with a paddling-based capsule endoscope. For this, a miniaturized encoder module was developed utilizing a MEMS fabrication technology to monitor the position of paddles. The integrated encoder module yielded the high resolution of 0.0025 mm in the linear motion of the paddles. In addition, a PID control method was implemented on a DSP to control the stroke of the paddles accurately. As a result, the average accuracy and the standard deviation were measured to be 0.037 mm and 0.025 mm by a laser position sensor for the repetitive measurements. The locomotive performance was evaluated via ex-vivo tests according to various strokes in paddling. In an in-vivo experiment with a living pig, the locomotion speed was improved by 58% compared with the previous control method relying on a given timer value for reciprocation of the paddles. Finally, the integrated encoder module and the control system allow consistent paddling during locomotion even under loads in GI tract. It provides the autonomous locomotion without intervention in monitoring and controlling the capsule endoscope. PMID:22255866

  4. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about interactions between an animal body and complex terrestrial terrain like sand and boulders during legless, undulatory travel (e.g. snake locomotion). We study the locomotor performance of Mojave shovel-nosed snakes (Chionactisoccipitalis , ~ 35 cm long) using a simplified model of heterogeneous terrain: symmetric lattices of obstacles. To quantify performance we measure mean forward speed and slip angle, βs, defined as the angle between the instantaneous velocity and tangent vectors at each point on the body. We find that below a critical peg density the presence of granular media results in high speed (~ 60 cm/s), low average slip (βs ~6°) snake performance as compared to movement in the same peg densities on hard ground (~ 25 cm/s and βs ~15°). Above this peg density, performance on granular and hard substrates converges. Speed on granular media decreases with increasing peg density to that of the speed on hard ground, while speed on hard ground remains constant. Conversely, βs on hard ground trends toward that on granular media as obstacle density increases.

  5. 40 CFR 1033.625 - Special certification provisions for non-locomotive-specific engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special certification provisions for non-locomotive-specific engines. 1033.625 Section 1033.625 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Special Compliance Provisions § 1033.625...

  6. Kinetics of bipedal locomotion during load carrying in capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jandy B; Schmitt, Daniel; Wright, Kristin; Eshchar, Yonat; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Fragaszy, Dorothy

    2015-08-01

    Facultative bipedalism during load transport in nonhuman primates has been argued to be an important behavior potentially leading to the evolution of obligate, extended limb bipedalism. Understanding the biomechanics of such behavior may lead to insights about associated morphology, which may translate to interpretation of features in the fossil record. Some populations of bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) spontaneously carry heavy loads bipedally during foraging activities. This study provides the first data on all three components of ground reaction force for spontaneous bipedalism during load carriage in a nonhuman primate. Five individual S. libidinosus (mean body mass = 2.4 kg ± 0.96) were videorecorded during bipedalism while carrying a stone (0.93 kg) under natural conditions. A force plate was embedded in the path of the monkeys. Spatiotemporal and force data for all three components of the ground reaction force were recorded for 28 steps. Capuchins exhibited a mean vertical peak force per total weight (Vpk) for the hindlimb of 1.19 (sd = 0.13), consistent with those of unloaded capuchins in the laboratory and for other bipedal primates, including humans. Vertical force records suggest that capuchins, along with most nonhuman primates, maintain a relatively compliant leg during both unloaded and loaded locomotion. Like all other primates, loaded capuchins maintained laterally (outward) directed medio-lateral forces, presumably to stabilize side-to-side movements of the center of mass. Medio-lateral forces suggest that at near-running speeds dynamic stability diminishes the need to generate high lateral forces. Vertical force traces exhibited a measurable impact spike at foot contact in 85% of the steps recorded. An impact spike is common in human walking and running but has not been reported in other bipedal primates. This spike in humans is thought to lead to bone and cartilage damage. The earliest biped may have experienced similar

  7. Bipedal locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsbury, Mark; Zhang, Tingnan; Goldman, Daniel

    Bipedal walking, locomotion characterized by alternating swing and double support phase, is well studied on ground where feet do not penetrate the substrate. On granular media like sand however, intrusion and extrusion phases also occur. In these phases, relative motion of the two feet requires that one or both feet slip through the material, degrading performance. To study walking in these phases, we designed and studied a planarized bipedal robot (1.6 kg, 42 cm) that walked in a fluidized bed of poppy seeds. We also simulated the robot in a multibody software environment (Chrono) using granular resistive force theory (RFT) to calculate foot forces. In experiment and simulation, the robot experienced slip during the intrusion phase, with the experiment presenting additional slip due to motor control error during the double support phase. This exaggerated slip gave insight (through analysis of ground reaction forces in simulation) into how slip occurs when relative motion exists between the two feet in the granular media, where the foot with higher relative drag forces (from its instantaneous orientation, rotation, relative direction of motion, and depth) remains stationary. With this relationship, we generated walking gaits for the robot to walk with minimal slip.

  8. Interaction of ARF-1.1 and neuronal calcium sensor-1 in the control of the temperature-dependency of locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Paul A. C.; McCue, Hannah V.; Haynes, Lee P.; Barclay, Jeff W.; Burgoyne, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) mediates changes in cellular function by regulating various target proteins. Many potential targets have been identified but the physiological significance of only a few has been established. Upon temperature elevation, Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits reversible paralysis. In the absence of NCS-1, worms show delayed onset and a shorter duration of paralysis. This phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of ncs-1 in AIY neurons. Mutants with defects in four potential NCS-1 targets (arf-1.1, pifk-1, trp-1 and trp-2) showed qualitatively similar phenotypes to ncs-1 null worms, although the effect of pifk-1 mutation on time to paralysis was considerably delayed. Inhibition of pifk-1 also resulted in a locomotion phenotype. Analysis of double mutants showed no additive effects between mutations in ncs-1 and trp-1 or trp-2. In contrast, double mutants of arf-1.1 and ncs-1 had an intermediate phenotype, consistent with NCS-1 and ARF-1.1 acting in the same pathway. Over-expression of arf-1.1 in the AIY neurons was sufficient to rescue partially the phenotype of both the arf-1.1 and the ncs-1 null worms. These findings suggest that ARF-1.1 interacts with NCS-1 in AIY neurons and potentially pifk-1 in the Ca2+ signaling pathway that leads to inhibited locomotion at an elevated temperature. PMID:27435667

  9. Interaction of ARF-1.1 and neuronal calcium sensor-1 in the control of the temperature-dependency of locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Todd, Paul A C; McCue, Hannah V; Haynes, Lee P; Barclay, Jeff W; Burgoyne, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) mediates changes in cellular function by regulating various target proteins. Many potential targets have been identified but the physiological significance of only a few has been established. Upon temperature elevation, Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits reversible paralysis. In the absence of NCS-1, worms show delayed onset and a shorter duration of paralysis. This phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of ncs-1 in AIY neurons. Mutants with defects in four potential NCS-1 targets (arf-1.1, pifk-1, trp-1 and trp-2) showed qualitatively similar phenotypes to ncs-1 null worms, although the effect of pifk-1 mutation on time to paralysis was considerably delayed. Inhibition of pifk-1 also resulted in a locomotion phenotype. Analysis of double mutants showed no additive effects between mutations in ncs-1 and trp-1 or trp-2. In contrast, double mutants of arf-1.1 and ncs-1 had an intermediate phenotype, consistent with NCS-1 and ARF-1.1 acting in the same pathway. Over-expression of arf-1.1 in the AIY neurons was sufficient to rescue partially the phenotype of both the arf-1.1 and the ncs-1 null worms. These findings suggest that ARF-1.1 interacts with NCS-1 in AIY neurons and potentially pifk-1 in the Ca(2+) signaling pathway that leads to inhibited locomotion at an elevated temperature. PMID:27435667

  10. Hamiltonian mechanics and planar fishlike locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Scott; Xiong, Hailong; Burgoyne, Will

    2007-11-01

    A free deformable body interacting with a system of point vortices in the plane constitutes a Hamiltonian system. A free Joukowski foil with variable camber shedding point vortices in an ideal fluid according to a periodically applied Kutta condition provides a model for fishlike locomotion which bridges the gap between inviscid analytical models that sacrifice realism for tractability and viscous computational models inaccessible to tools from nonlinear control theory. We frame such a model in the context of Hamiltonian mechanics and describe its relevance both to the study of hydrodynamic interactions within schools of fish and to the realization of model-based control laws for biomimetic autonomous robotic vehicles.

  11. Locomotion in ornithischian dinosaurs: an assessment using three-dimensional computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Maidment, Susannah C R; Bates, Karl T; Falkingham, Peter L; VanBuren, Collin; Arbour, Victoria; Barrett, Paul M

    2014-08-01

    Ornithischian dinosaurs were primitively bipedal with forelimbs modified for grasping, but quadrupedalism evolved in the clade on at least three occasions independently. Outside of Ornithischia, quadrupedality from bipedal ancestors has only evolved on two other occasions, making this one of the rarest locomotory transitions in tetrapod evolutionary history. The osteological and myological changes associated with these transitions have only recently been documented, and the biomechanical consequences of these changes remain to be examined. Here, we review previous approaches to understanding locomotion in extinct animals, which can be broadly split into form-function approaches using analogy based on extant animals, limb-bone scaling, and computational approaches. We then carry out the first systematic attempt to quantify changes in locomotor muscle function in bipedal and quadrupedal ornithischian dinosaurs. Using three-dimensional computational modelling of the major pelvic locomotor muscle moment arms, we examine similarities and differences among individual taxa, between quadrupedal and bipedal taxa, and among taxa representing the three major ornithischian lineages (Thyreophora, Ornithopoda, Marginocephalia). Our results suggest that the ceratopsid Chasmosaurus and the ornithopod Hypsilophodon have relatively low moment arms for most muscles and most functions, perhaps suggesting poor locomotor performance in these taxa. Quadrupeds have higher abductor moment arms than bipeds, which we suggest is due to the overall wider bodies of the quadrupeds modelled. A peak in extensor moment arms at more extended hip angles and lower medial rotator moment arms in quadrupeds than in bipeds may be due to a more columnar hindlimb and loss of medial rotation as a form of lateral limb support in quadrupeds. We are not able to identify trends in moment arm evolution across Ornithischia as a whole, suggesting that the bipedal ancestry of ornithischians did not constrain the

  12. SIMULTANEOUS CONTROL OF AN ANKLE-FOOT PROSTHESIS MODEL USING A VIRTUAL CONSTRAINT

    PubMed Central

    Nanjangud, Akshay; Gregg, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Amputee locomotion can benefit from recent advances in robotic prostheses, but their control systems design poses challenges. Prosthesis control typically discretizes the nonlinear gait cycle into phases, with each phase controlled by different linear controllers. Unfortunately, real-time identification of gait phases and tuning of controller parameters limit implementation. Recently, biped robots have used phase variables and virtual constraints to characterize the gait cycle as a whole. Although phase variables and virtual constraints could solve issues with discretizing the gait cycle, the virtual constraints method from robotics does not readily translate to prosthetics because of hard-to-measure quantities, like the interaction forces between the user and prosthesis socket, and prosthesis parameters which are often altered by a clinician even for a known patient. We use the simultaneous stabilization approach to design a low-order, linear time-invariant controller for ankle prostheses independent of such quantities to enforce a virtual constraint. We show in simulation that this controller produces suitable walking gaits for a simplified amputee model. PMID:25554734

  13. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locomotive horn. 229.129 Section 229.129 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Cabs and Cab Equipment § 229.129 Locomotive horn. (a) Each...

  14. Insects Use Two Distinct Classes of Steps during Unrestrained Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Theunissen, Leslie M.; Dürr, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Background Adaptive, context-dependent control of locomotion requires modulation of centrally generated rhythmic motor patterns through peripheral control loops and postural reflexes. Thus assuming that the modulation of rhythmic motor patterns accounts for much of the behavioural variability observed in legged locomotion, investigating behavioural variability is a key to the understanding of context-dependent control mechanisms in locomotion. To date, the variability of unrestrained locomotion is poorly understood, and virtually nothing is known about the features that characterise the natural statistics of legged locomotion. In this study, we quantify the natural variability of hexapedal walking and climbing in insects, drawing from a database of several thousand steps recorded over two hours of walking time. Results We show that the range of step length used by unrestrained climbing stick insects is large, showing that step length can be changed substantially for adaptive locomotion. Step length distributions were always bimodal, irrespective of leg type and walking condition, suggesting the presence of two distinct classes of steps: short and long steps. Probability density of step length was well-described by a gamma distribution for short steps, and a logistic distribution for long steps. Major coefficients of these distributions remained largely unaffected by walking conditions. Short and long steps differed concerning their spatial occurrence on the walking substrate, their timing within the step sequence, and their prevalent swing direction. Finally, ablation of structures that serve to improve foothold increased the ratio of short to long steps, indicating a corrective function of short steps. Conclusions Statistical and functional differences suggest that short and long steps are physiologically distinct classes of leg movements that likely reflect distinct control mechanisms at work. PMID:24376877

  15. Activity of motor cortex neurons during backward locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Deliagina, T. G.; Orlovsky, G. N.; Karayannidou, A.; Stout, E. E.; Sirota, M. G.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    2011-01-01

    Forward walking (FW) and backward walking (BW) are two important forms of locomotion in quadrupeds. Participation of the motor cortex in the control of FW has been intensively studied, whereas cortical activity during BW has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze locomotion-related activity of the motor cortex during BW and compare it with that during FW. For this purpose, we recorded activity of individual neurons in the cat during BW and FW. We found that the discharge frequency in almost all neurons was modulated in the rhythm of stepping during both FW and BW. However, the modulation patterns during BW and FW were different in 80% of neurons. To determine the source of modulating influences (forelimb controllers vs. hindlimb controllers), the neurons were recorded not only during quadrupedal locomotion but also during bipedal locomotion (with either forelimbs or hindlimbs walking), and their modulation patterns were compared. We found that during BW (like during FW), modulation in some neurons was determined by inputs from limb controllers of only one girdle, whereas the other neurons received inputs from both girdles. The combinations of inputs could depend on the direction of locomotion. Most often (in 51% of forelimb-related neurons and in 34% of the hindlimb-related neurons), the neurons received inputs only from their own girdle when this girdle was leading and from both girdles when this girdle was trailing. This reconfiguration of inputs suggests flexibility of the functional roles of individual cortical neurons during different forms of locomotion. PMID:21430283

  16. 40 CFR 1033.515 - Discrete-mode steady-state emission tests of locomotives and locomotive engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test... the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures (including engine and... way you choose to warm it up prior to beginning the sample preconditioning specified in 40 CFR...

  17. 40 CFR 1033.515 - Discrete-mode steady-state emission tests of locomotives and locomotive engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test... the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures (including engine and... way you choose to warm it up prior to beginning the sample preconditioning specified in 40 CFR...

  18. 40 CFR 1033.515 - Discrete-mode steady-state emission tests of locomotives and locomotive engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test... the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures (including engine and... way you choose to warm it up prior to beginning the sample preconditioning specified in 40 CFR...

  19. 40 CFR 1033.515 - Discrete-mode steady-state emission tests of locomotives and locomotive engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test... the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures (including engine and... way you choose to warm it up prior to beginning the sample preconditioning specified in 40 CFR...

  20. 40 CFR 1033.515 - Discrete-mode steady-state emission tests of locomotives and locomotive engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test... the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures (including engine and... way you choose to warm it up prior to beginning the sample preconditioning specified in 40 CFR...

  1. Stretch reflex improves rolling stability during hopping of a decerebrate biped system.

    PubMed

    Rosendo, Andre; Liu, Xiangxiao; Shimizu, Masahiro; Hosoda, Koh

    2015-01-01

    When humans hop, attitude recovery can be observed in both the sagittal and frontal planes. While it is agreed that the brain plays an important role in leg placement, the role of low-level feedback (the stretch reflex) on frontal plane stabilization remains unclear. Seeking to better understand the contribution of the soleus stretch reflex to rolling stability, we performed experiments on a biomimetic humanoid hopping robot. Various reflex responses to touching the floor, ranging from no response to long muscle activations, were examined, and the effect of a delay upon touching the floor was also examined. We found that the stretch reflex brought the system closer to stable, straight hopping. The presence of a delay did not affect the results; both the cases with and without a delay outperformed the case without a reflex response. The results of this study highlight the importance of low-level control in locomotion for which body stabilization does not require higher-level signals. PMID:25599138

  2. Proprioceptive Actuation Design for Dynamic Legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangbae; Wensing, Patrick; Biomimetic Robotics Lab Team

    Designing an actuator system for highly-dynamic legged locomotion exhibited by animals has been one of the grand challenges in robotics research. Conventional actuators designed for manufacturing applications have difficulty satisfying challenging requirements for high-speed locomotion, such as the need for high torque density and the ability to manage dynamic physical interactions. It is critical to introduce a new actuator design paradigm and provide guidelines for its incorporation in future mobile robots for research and industry. To this end, we suggest a paradigm called proprioceptive actuation, which enables highly- dynamic operation in legged machines. Proprioceptive actuation uses collocated force control at the joints to effectively control contact interactions at the feet under dynamic conditions. In the realm of legged machines, this paradigm provides a unique combination of high torque density, high-bandwidth force control, and the ability to mitigate impacts through backdrivability. Results show that the proposed design provides an impact mitigation factor that is comparable to other quadruped designs with series springs to handle impact. The paradigm is shown to enable the MIT Cheetah to manage the application of contact forces during dynamic bounding, with results given down to contact times of 85ms and peak forces over 450N. As a result, the MIT Cheetah achieves high-speed 3D running up to 13mph and jumping over an 18-inch high obstacle. The project is sponsored by DARPA M3 program.

  3. Railroad and locomotive technology roadmap.

    SciTech Connect

    Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L.; Energy Systems

    2003-02-24

    Railroads are important to the U.S. economy. They transport freight efficiently, requiring less energy and emitting fewer pollutants than other modes of surface transportation. While the railroad industry has steadily improved its fuel efficiency--by 16% over the last decade--more can, and needs to, be done. The ability of locomotive manufacturers to conduct research into fuel efficiency and emissions reduction is limited by the small number of locomotives manufactured annually. Each year for the last five years, the two North American locomotive manufacturers--General Electric Transportation Systems and the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors--have together sold about 800 locomotives in the United States. With such a small number of units over which research costs can be spread, outside help is needed to investigate all possible ways to reduce fuel usage and emissions. Because fuel costs represent a significant portion of the total operating costs of a railroad, fuel efficiency has always been an important factor in the design of locomotives and in the operations of a railroad. However, fuel efficiency has recently become even more critical with the introduction of strict emission standards by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to be implemented in stages (Tiers 0, 1, and 2) between 2000 and 2005. Some of the technologies that could be employed to meet the emission standards may negatively affect fuel economy--by as much as 10-15% when emissions are reduced to Tier 1 levels. Lowering fuel economy by that magnitude would have a serious impact on the cost to the consumer of goods shipped by rail, on the competitiveness of the railroad industry, and on this country's dependence on foreign oil. Clearly, a joint government/industry R&D program is needed to help catalyze the development of advanced technologies that will substantially reduce locomotive engine emissions while also improving train system energy efficiency. DOE convened an industry

  4. 21st Century Locomotive Technology: 2003 Annual Technical Status Report DOE/AL68284-TSR03

    SciTech Connect

    Lembit Salasoo

    2004-01-09

    The 21st Century Locomotive program objective is to develop 25% more efficient freight locomotives by 2010. Diesel engine-related research addresses advanced fuel injection, electric turbocharger and abradable seals. Assembly of a common rail fuel injection test system is underway, and a CFD combustion model has been validated. An electrically assisted turbocharger has been constructed and operated, meeting the generator mode design rating. System characterization and optimization is ongoing. Candidate abradable seal materials have been identified and test coupons prepared. Locomotive system-related research addresses capturing, storing and utilizing regenerative braking energy in a hybrid locomotive, and fuel optimization control. Hybrid locomotive energy storage requirements have been identified and studies on specific energy storage solutions are in progress. Energy management controls have been defined and testing initiated. Train and track parameter identification necessary for fuel optimization has been demonstrated.

  5. Local reflexive mechanisms essential for snakes' scaffold-based locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kano, Takeshi; Sato, Takahide; Kobayashi, Ryo; Ishiguro, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Most robots are designed to work in predefined environments, and irregularities that exist in the environment interfere with their operation. For snakes, irregularities play the opposite role: snakes actively utilize terrain irregularities and move by effectively pushing their body against the scaffolds that they encounter. Autonomous decentralized control mechanisms could be the key to understanding this locomotion. We demonstrate through modelling and simulations that only two local reflexive mechanisms, which exploit sensory information about the stretching of muscles and the pressure on the body wall, are crucial for realizing locomotion. This finding will help develop robots that work in undefined environments and shed light on the understanding of the fundamental principles underlying adaptive locomotion in animals. PMID:22918023

  6. Finite state model of locomotion for functional electrical stimulation systems.

    PubMed

    Popović, D B

    1993-01-01

    A finite state model of locomotion was developed to simplify a controller design for motor activities of handicapped humans. This paper presents a model developed for real time control of locomotion with functional electrical stimulation (FES) assistive systems. Hierarchical control of locomotion was adopted with three levels: voluntary, coordination and actuator level. This paper deals only with coordination level of control. In our previous studies we demonstrated that a skill-based expert system can be used for coordination level of control in multi-joint FES systems. Basic elements in this skill-based expert system are production rules. Production rules have the form of If-Then conditional expressions. A technique of automatic determination of these conditional expressions is presented in this paper. This technique for automatic synthesis of production rules uses fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks (ANN). The special class of fuzzy logic elements used in this research is called preferential neurons. The preferential neurons were used to estimate the relevance of each of the sensory inputs to the recognition of patterns defined as finite states. The combination of preferential neurons forms a preferential neural network. The preferential neural network belongs to a class of ANNs. The preferential neural network determined the set of finite states convenient for a skill-based expert system for different modalities of locomotion. PMID:8234764

  7. Guiding locomotion in complex, dynamic environments.

    PubMed

    Fajen, Brett R

    2013-01-01

    Locomotion in complex, dynamic environments is an integral part of many daily activities, including walking in crowded spaces, driving on busy roadways, and playing sports. Many of the tasks that humans perform in such environments involve interactions with moving objects-that is, they require people to coordinate their own movement with the movements of other objects. A widely adopted framework for research on the detection, avoidance, and interception of moving objects is the bearing angle model, according to which observers move so as to keep the bearing angle of the object constant for interception and varying for obstacle avoidance. The bearing angle model offers a simple, parsimonious account of visual control but has several significant limitations and does not easily scale up to more complex tasks. In this paper, I introduce an alternative account of how humans choose actions and guide locomotion in the presence of moving objects. I show how the new approach addresses the limitations of the bearing angle model and accounts for a variety of behaviors involving moving objects, including (1) choosing whether to pass in front of or behind a moving obstacle, (2) perceiving whether a gap between a pair of moving obstacles is passable, (3) avoiding a collision while passing through single or multiple lanes of traffic, (4) coordinating speed and direction of locomotion during interception, (5) simultaneously intercepting a moving target while avoiding a stationary or moving obstacle, and (6) knowing whether to abandon the chase of a moving target. I also summarize data from recent studies that support the new approach. PMID:23885238

  8. Coal-fueled diesel locomotive test

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, B.D.; McDowell, R.E.; Confer, G.L.; Basic, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    The biggest challenges to the development of a commercially-acceptable coal-fueled diesel-electric locomotive are integrating all systems into a working unit that can be operated in railroad service. This involves mainly the following three systems: (1) the multi-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine, (2) the locomotive and engine controls, and (3) the CWS fuel supply system. Consequently, a workable 12-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine was considered necessary at this stage to evolve the required locomotive support systems, in addition to gaining valuable multi-cylinder engine operating experience. The CWS fuel used during this project was obtained from Otisca, Inc. (Syracuse, NY). It was prepared from micronized and deashed Kentucky Blue Gem coal to 49.0% coal loading by weight, with less than 1% ash and 5 micron mean diameter particle size. Its higher heating value was analyzed at approximately 34630 kJ/k. Anti-agglomerating additive Triton X-114 was added to the CWS at GE Transportation Systems at 2% of coal weight. The nature of the Otisca CWS fuel makes it inherently more difficult to store, pump, and inject than diesel fuel, since concepts which govern Newtonian or normally viscous liquids do not apply entirely to CWS. Otisca CWS tends to be unstable and to settle in tanks and lines after a period of time, making it necessary to provide a means of agitation during storage. To avoid long term settling problems and to minimize losses, piping velocities were designed to be in the 60-90 m/min range.

  9. Exposure to noise on board locomotives.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Baily

    2003-01-01

    Personal and area noise dosimetry measurements were taken in the cabs of leading and trailing locomotives on 48 trips, under winter and summer conditions, on 9 different routes. The mean equivalent sound level (L(EQ), 3 dB exchange rate, 50 dBA threshold) of the engineers and conductors was 84 dBA during winter and 88 dBA during summer. The corresponding time-weighted average levels (L(TWA), 5 dB exchange rate, 80 dBA threshold) were 80 and 84 dBA respectively. The L(EQ) of 56% of the engineers sampled was > or =85 dBA and of 13% was > or =90 dBA. Plots of L(EQ) time history show that under normal operating conditions L(EQ) reaches its steady-state value in about 3 hours. The mean noise levels in the trailing cabs were lower than the personal exposure levels of the engineers and conductors. The mean L(EQ) on the engineer and conductor sides was 80 dBA during winter, and 85 dBA during summer. Locomotive configuration has a significant effect on the noise levels in the trailing cab. The forward-backward configuration resulted in higher noise levels than the forward-forward configuration. Octave and one-third octave band spectra taken during a variety of locomotive operating conditions are presented. The octave band centered at 31.5 Hz contains nearly 46% of the acoustical energy, and those centered at and below 250 Hz contain nearly 99% of the acoustical energy. Wheel-rail interaction appears to be the predominant source of the low frequency noise. Recommendations for controlling exposure are made. PMID:14521423

  10. Quantifying coordination between the head and the trunk during locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.

    This study developed unique measures of coordination between the head and the trunk during the combined tasks of locomotion and gaze fixation of visual targets. These measures will be used to determine the effects of long-duration space flight on sensorimotor function. This will enable evaluation of the efficacy of countermeasures and postflight rehabilitation programs. Indices were proposed as composite measures reflecting the functional aspects of the control system involved in gaze fixation during locomotion. The stiffness index (Nm/deg) was calculated as the ratio between the change in the magnitude of the net relative moments to the change in magnitude of the relative angular motion. The viscosity index (Nm-sec/deg) was calculated as the ratio between the change in the magnitude of the net relative moments to the change in magnitude of the relative angular velocity. These coordination measures were used to evaluate the normal dynamic pattern of coordination between the head and the trunk with respect to the events occurring in a gait cycle. The indices were evaluated for three discrete speeds of locomotion for the same gaze fixation task and for three discrete gaze fixation tasks at the same speed of locomotion. The indices were found to be repeatable measures reflecting inter-segmental coordination strategies while performing an activity of daily living. These indices showed that the coordination of the head with respect to the trunk was significantly different between the events of heel strike and swing phases during the gait cycle. These indices showed no significant differences between the different gaze fixation tasks. The speed of locomotion had a significant effect on the magnitude of these indices. The results indicate that the CNS dynamically modulates head motion with respect to the trunk dependent on the events occurring during the gait cycle. This modulation is appropriate for stabilizing gaze during locomotion. The results support the hypothesis

  11. 40 CFR 1033.335 - Remanufactured locomotives: installation audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 1033. We have not changed production processes or quality-control procedures for... family by that installer. (f) An engine family is determined to have failed an audit, if at any time during the model year, you determine that the three locomotives audited are found to have had...

  12. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In our first article on scaling in theropod dinosaurs, the longitudinal stress in the leg bones due to supporting the weight of the animal was studied and found not to control the dimensions of the femur. As a continuation of our study of elasticity in dinosaur bones, we now examine the transverse stress in the femur due to locomotion and find…

  13. Differential gating of thalamo-cortical signals by reticular nucleus of thalamus during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Marlinski, Vladimir; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Beloozerova, Irina N.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The thalamic reticular nucleus (RE) provides inhibition to the dorsal thalamus, and forms a crucial interface between thalamo-cortical and cortico-thalamic signals. Whereas there has been significant interest in the role of the RE in organizing thalamo-cortical signaling, information on the activity of the RE in the awake animal is scant. Here we investigated the activity of neurons within the ‘motor’ compartment of the RE in the awake, unrestrained cat during simple locomotion on a flat surface and complex locomotion along a horizontal ladder that required visual control of stepping. The activity of 88% of neurons in this region was modulated during locomotion. Neurons with receptive fields on the shoulder were located dorsally in the nucleus and had regular discharges; during locomotion they had relatively low activity and modest magnitudes of stride-related modulation, and their group activity was distributed over the stride. In contrast, neurons with receptive fields on the wrist/paw were located more ventrally, often discharged sleep-type bursts during locomotion, were very active and profoundly modulated, and their group activity was concentrated in the swing and end of stance. 75% of RE neurons had different activity during the two locomotion tasks. We conclude that during locomotion the RE differentially gates thalamo-cortical signals transmitted during different phases of the stride, in relation to different parts of the limb, and the type of locomotion task. PMID:23136421

  14. [Locomotion disturbances in Huntington's disease].

    PubMed

    Delval, A; Krystkowiak, P

    2010-02-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD), perturbed locomotion occurs early in the course of the disease and presents numerous clinical features. The gait disorders in HD might best be defined as a timing disorder; however, hypokinesia (i.e. a decrease in stride length) also plays an important role in disturbed locomotion as HD progresses. Gait impairments are particularly important because they lead to an increased risk of falls. Falls risk factors and consequences depend on the stage of the disease. A satisfactory therapeutic strategy for gait impairments is a serious challenge: the use of a metronome during gait in HD patients does not effectively improve their gait. Attention deficits in HD may be a major determinant of this failure. The effect of antichoreic medications on gait is still controversial because of the absence of specific evaluation of these medications on gait disturbances. PMID:19604530

  15. Locomotive Emission and Engine Idle Reduction Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Archer

    2005-03-14

    In response to a United States Department of Energy (DOE) solicitation, the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), in partnership with CSX Transportation, Inc. (CSXT), submitted a proposal to DOE to support the demonstration of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) technology on fifty-six CSXT locomotives. The project purpose was to demonstrate the idle fuel savings, the Nitrous Oxide (NOX) emissions reduction and the noise reduction capabilities of the APU. Fifty-six CSXT Baltimore Division locomotives were equipped with APUs, Engine Run Managers (ERM) and communications equipment to permit GPS tracking and data collection from the locomotives. Throughout the report there is mention of the percent time spent in the State of Maryland. The fifty-six locomotives spent most of their time inside the borders of Maryland and some spent all their time inside the state borders. Usually when a locomotive traveled beyond the Maryland State border it was into an adjoining state. They were divided into four groups according to assignment: (1) Power Unit/Switcher Mate units, (2) Remote Control units, (3) SD50 Pusher units and (4) Other units. The primary data of interest were idle data plus the status of the locomotive--stationary or moving. Also collected were main engine off, idling or working. Idle data were collected by county location, by locomotive status (stationary or moving) and type of idle (Idle 1, main engine idling, APU off; Idle 2, main engine off, APU on; Idle 3, main engine off, APU off; Idle 4, main engine idle, APU on). Desirable main engine idle states are main engine off and APU off or main engine off and APU on. Measuring the time the main engine spends in these desirable states versus the total time it could spend in an engine idling state allows the calculation of Percent Idle Management Effectiveness (%IME). IME is the result of the operation of the APU plus the implementation of CSXT's Warm Weather Shutdown Policy. It is difficult to separate the two. The units

  16. Lunar Balance and Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Balance control and locomotor patterns were altered in Apollo crewmembers on the lunar surface, owing, presumably, to a combination of sensory-motor adaptation during transit and lunar surface operations, decreased environmental affordances associated with the reduced gravity, and restricted joint mobility as well as altered center-of-gravity caused by the EVA pressure suits. Dr. Paloski will discuss these factors, as well as the potential human and mission impacts of falls and malcoordination during planned lunar sortie and outpost missions. Learning objectives: What are the potential impacts of postural instabilities on the lunar surface? CME question: What factors affect balance control and gait stability on the moon? Answer: Sensory-motor adaptation to the lunar environment, reduced mechanical and visual affordances, and altered biomechanics caused by the EVA suit.

  17. 49 CFR 229.209 - Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs... Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.209 Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs. (a... locomotive crashworthiness designs which are not consistent with any FRA-approved locomotive...

  18. Fish locomotion: insights from both simple and complex mechanical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauder, George

    2015-11-01

    Fishes are well-known for their ability to swim and maneuver effectively in the water, and recent years have seen great progress in understanding the hydrodynamics of aquatic locomotion. But studying freely-swimming fishes is challenging due to difficulties in controlling fish behavior. Mechanical models of aquatic locomotion have many advantages over studying live animals, including the ability to manipulate and control individual structural or kinematic factors, easier measurement of forces and torques, and the ability to abstract complex animal designs into simpler components. Such simplifications, while not without their drawbacks, facilitate interpretation of how individual traits alter swimming performance and the discovery of underlying physical principles. In this presentation I will discuss the use of a variety of mechanical models for fish locomotion, ranging from simple flexing panels to complex biomimetic designs incorporating flexible, actively moved, fin rays on multiple fins. Mechanical devices have provided great insight into the dynamics of aquatic propulsion and, integrated with studies of locomotion in freely-swimming fishes, provide new insights into how fishes move through the water.

  19. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-06-28

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  20. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal locomotion-potential target for rehabilitation approaches.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Larry M; McVagh, J R; Noga, B R; Cabaj, A M; Majczyński, H; Sławińska, Urszula; Provencher, J; Leblond, H; Rossignol, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a "hyper-cholinergic" state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in suppressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed by our experiments

  1. 40 CFR 92.707 - Notification to locomotive or locomotive engine owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 92. These standards or family emission limits, as defined in 40 CFR part 92 were... performance or operability of the locomotive or locomotive engine. (6) A description of the adverse effects, if any, that such nonconformity would have on the performance or operability of the locomotive...

  2. 40 CFR 92.707 - Notification to locomotive or locomotive engine owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR part 92. These standards or family emission limits, as defined in 40 CFR part 92 were... performance or operability of the locomotive or locomotive engine. (6) A description of the adverse effects, if any, that such nonconformity would have on the performance or operability of the locomotive...

  3. 49 CFR 238.209 - Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Forward end structure of locomotives, including... SAFETY STANDARDS Specific Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.209 Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives. (a)(1) The skin covering the forward-facing end of...

  4. Kinematics of treadmill versus overground locomotion in horses.

    PubMed

    Buchner, H H; Savelberg, H H; Schamhardt, H C; Merkens, H W; Barneveld, A

    1994-05-01

    A kinematic analysis was carried out to compare treadmill and overground locomotion in horses at the trot. Stride variables and limb and trunk movements of 10 Dutch Warmblood horses were measured using the CODA-3 gait analysis system. Overground recordings were made on a rubber ground surface and on an asphalt track. Treadmill recordings were taken after a controlled habituation programme and at the same velocities as measured overground. On asphalt, a shorthened stride duration and a decreased vertical displacement of the withers were found compared with those on rubber ground. On the treadmill, stance duration of the forelimbs was longer than for either overground condition. Correspondingly, the hind limbs were placed earlier than the forelimbs in making diagonal ground contact in overground locomotion, but this changed to preceding forelimbs on the treadmill. Both forelimbs and hind limbs were moved more caudally during the retraction phase on the treadmill, while no differences were found in the protraction angle. The vertical movement of the hooves as well as the withers was smaller on the treadmill than on rubber ground. Treadmill belt velocity decreased by 9% during the stance phase. This is supposed to be an important reason for the differences in biomechanics and kinematics between treadmill and overground locomotion, which must be kept in mind when data obtained during treadmill locomotion have to be extrapolated to overground conditions. PMID:7801509

  5. Human locomotion and workload for simulated lunar and Martian environments.

    PubMed

    Newman, D J; Alexander, H L

    1993-08-01

    Human locomotion in simulated lunar and Martian environments is investigated. A unique human-rated underwater treadmill and an adjustable ballasting harness simulate partial gravity in order to better understand how gravity determines the biomechanics and energetics of human locomotion. This study has two research aspects, biomechanics and energetics. The fundamental biomechanics measurements are continuously recorded vertical forces as exerted by subjects of the treadmill which is instrumented with a force platform. Experimental results indicate that peak vertical force and stride frequency decrease as the gravity level is reduced. Foot contact time is independent of gravity level. Oxygen uptake measurements, VO2, constitute the energetics, or workload, data for this study. As theory predicts, locomotion energy requirements for lunar (1/6-g) and Martian (3/8-g) gravity levels are significantly less than at 1-g. The observed variation in workload with gravity level is nonmonotonic, however, in over half the subject population. The hypothesis is offered that energy expenditure increases for lunar, as compared with Martian, locomotion due to the subject "wasting energy" for stability and posture control in simulated lunar gravity. Biomechanics data could influence advanced spacesuit design and planetary habitat design, while workload data will help define oxygen requirements for planetary life support systems. PMID:11541642

  6. Regulation of two motor patterns enables the gradual adjustment of locomotion strategy in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hums, Ingrid; Riedl, Julia; Mende, Fanny; Kato, Saul; Kaplan, Harris S; Latham, Richard; Sonntag, Michael; Traunmüller, Lisa; Zimmer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In animal locomotion a tradeoff exists between stereotypy and flexibility: fast long-distance travelling (LDT) requires coherent regular motions, while local sampling and area-restricted search (ARS) rely on flexible movements. We report here on a posture control system in C. elegans that coordinates these needs. Using quantitative posture analysis we explain worm locomotion as a composite of two modes: regular undulations versus flexible turning. Graded reciprocal regulation of both modes allows animals to flexibly adapt their locomotion strategy under sensory stimulation along a spectrum ranging from LDT to ARS. Using genetics and functional imaging of neural activity we characterize the counteracting interneurons AVK and DVA that utilize FLP-1 and NLP-12 neuropeptides to control both motor modes. Gradual regulation of behaviors via this system is required for spatial navigation during chemotaxis. This work shows how a nervous system controls simple elementary features of posture to generate complex movements for goal-directed locomotion strategies. PMID:27222228

  7. Biomechanics of locomotion in subgravity.

    PubMed

    Margaria, R

    1973-01-01

    The speed of walking or running on the moon as compared with earth is appreciably reduced, in spite of mechanisms of compensation taking place such a forward leaning of the body and an increase of the horizontal component of the push of the foot on the ground. However on the moon the same speed of locomotion as on earth can be reached by shifting to a different mechanism of locomotion, i. e. progression by jumps, which becomes possible on the moon because of the reduction of the body weight. The energy cost of locomotion is certainly less on the moon than on earth, about 1/6. Were the subject not restrained by the space suit, progression by jumps at 20 km hr-1 on the moon would cost no more than 10 ml kg-1 min-1 of oxygen, the same as walking on earth at 6 km hr-1. Maximal acceleration of the body as in sprinting, or deceleration as in stopping, attains much higher values on earth than on the moon. While sprinting on earth may involve the maximal muscular power, sprinting or progressing at the highest speed on the moon involves only a fraction of the maximal power, mainly because of the reduced maximal frequency of the steps (or jumps). The maximal height of the jump on both feet on the moon could attain 4 m in the unrestricted subject. An analysis is wanted on the restriction of the movements brought about by the space suit and on the energy cost of progression. PMID:12523382

  8. Descending Command Neurons in the Brainstem that Halt Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Julien; Caggiano, Vittorio; Leiras, Roberto; Caldeira, Vanessa; Bellardita, Carmelo; Balueva, Kira; Fuchs, Andrea; Kiehn, Ole

    2015-11-19

    The episodic nature of locomotion is thought to be controlled by descending inputs from the brainstem. Most studies have largely attributed this control to initiating excitatory signals, but little is known about putative commands that may specifically determine locomotor offset. To link identifiable brainstem populations to a potential locomotor stop signal, we used developmental genetics and considered a discrete neuronal population in the reticular formation: the V2a neurons. We find that those neurons constitute a major excitatory pathway to locomotor areas of the ventral spinal cord. Selective activation of V2a neurons of the rostral medulla stops ongoing locomotor activity, owing to an inhibition of premotor locomotor networks in the spinal cord. Moreover, inactivation of such neurons decreases spontaneous stopping in vivo. Therefore, the V2a "stop neurons" represent a glutamatergic descending pathway that favors immobility and may thus help control the episodic nature of locomotion. PMID:26590422

  9. 49 CFR 212.215 - Locomotive inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... applicable sections of the Safety Glazing Standards (49 CFR part 223), Locomotive Safety Standards (49 CFR part 229), Safety Appliance Standards (49 CFR part 231) and Power Brake Standards (49 CFR part 232), to... four years of experience in locomotive construction or maintenance. A bachelor's degree in...

  10. 49 CFR 212.215 - Locomotive inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... applicable sections of the Safety Glazing Standards (49 CFR part 223), Locomotive Safety Standards (49 CFR part 229), Safety Appliance Standards (49 CFR part 231) and Power Brake Standards (49 CFR part 232), to... four years of experience in locomotive construction or maintenance. A bachelor's degree in...

  11. 49 CFR 212.215 - Locomotive inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... applicable sections of the Safety Glazing Standards (49 CFR part 223), Locomotive Safety Standards (49 CFR part 229), Safety Appliance Standards (49 CFR part 231) and Power Brake Standards (49 CFR part 232), to... four years of experience in locomotive construction or maintenance. A bachelor's degree in...

  12. 49 CFR 212.215 - Locomotive inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... applicable sections of the Safety Glazing Standards (49 CFR part 223), Locomotive Safety Standards (49 CFR part 229), Safety Appliance Standards (49 CFR part 231) and Power Brake Standards (49 CFR part 232), to... four years of experience in locomotive construction or maintenance. A bachelor's degree in...

  13. 76 FR 8699 - Locomotive Safety Standards; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... NPRM related to locomotive safety standards. See 76 FR 2200. The NPRM established a public docket to... the proposed rule published January 12, 2011, at 76 FR 2200, remains March 14, 2011. FOR FURTHER... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Parts 229 and 238 RIN 2130-AC16 Locomotive Safety...

  14. 30 CFR 56.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Locomotives. 56.6203 Section 56.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation § 56.6203 Locomotives. Explosive material shall not...

  15. 30 CFR 56.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Locomotives. 56.6203 Section 56.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation § 56.6203 Locomotives. Explosive material shall not...

  16. 30 CFR 56.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Locomotives. 56.6203 Section 56.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation § 56.6203 Locomotives. Explosive material shall not...

  17. 30 CFR 56.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Locomotives. 56.6203 Section 56.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation § 56.6203 Locomotives. Explosive material shall not...

  18. 30 CFR 56.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Locomotives. 56.6203 Section 56.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation § 56.6203 Locomotives. Explosive material shall not...

  19. Trunk orientation causes asymmetries in leg function in small bird terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Andrada, Emanuel; Rode, Christian; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A.; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the upright trunk in humans, trunk orientation in most birds is almost horizontal (pronograde). It is conceivable that the orientation of the heavy trunk strongly influences the dynamics of bipedal terrestrial locomotion. Here, we analyse for the first time the effects of a pronograde trunk orientation on leg function and stability during bipedal locomotion. For this, we first inferred the leg function and trunk control strategy applied by a generalized small bird during terrestrial locomotion by analysing synchronously recorded kinematic (three-dimensional X-ray videography) and kinetic (three-dimensional force measurement) quail locomotion data. Then, by simulating quail gaits using a simplistic bioinspired numerical model which made use of parameters obtained in in vivo experiments with real quail, we show that the observed asymmetric leg function (left-skewed ground reaction force and longer leg at touchdown than at lift-off) is necessary for pronograde steady-state locomotion. In addition, steady-state locomotion becomes stable for specific morphological parameters. For quail-like parameters, the most common stable solution is grounded running, a gait preferred by quail and most of the other small birds. We hypothesize that stability of bipedal locomotion is a functional demand that, depending on trunk orientation and centre of mass location, constrains basic hind limb morphology and function, such as leg length, leg stiffness and leg damping. PMID:25377449

  20. Trunk orientation causes asymmetries in leg function in small bird terrestrial locomotion.

    PubMed

    Andrada, Emanuel; Rode, Christian; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-12-22

    In contrast to the upright trunk in humans, trunk orientation in most birds is almost horizontal (pronograde). It is conceivable that the orientation of the heavy trunk strongly influences the dynamics of bipedal terrestrial locomotion. Here, we analyse for the first time the effects of a pronograde trunk orientation on leg function and stability during bipedal locomotion. For this, we first inferred the leg function and trunk control strategy applied by a generalized small bird during terrestrial locomotion by analysing synchronously recorded kinematic (three-dimensional X-ray videography) and kinetic (three-dimensional force measurement) quail locomotion data. Then, by simulating quail gaits using a simplistic bioinspired numerical model which made use of parameters obtained in in vivo experiments with real quail, we show that the observed asymmetric leg function (left-skewed ground reaction force and longer leg at touchdown than at lift-off) is necessary for pronograde steady-state locomotion. In addition, steady-state locomotion becomes stable for specific morphological parameters. For quail-like parameters, the most common stable solution is grounded running, a gait preferred by quail and most of the other small birds. We hypothesize that stability of bipedal locomotion is a functional demand that, depending on trunk orientation and centre of mass location, constrains basic hind limb morphology and function, such as leg length, leg stiffness and leg damping. PMID:25377449

  1. Locomotion concerns with moral usefulness: When liberals endorse binding moral foundations.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, James F M; Higgins, E Tory

    2014-01-01

    Moral Foundations Theory has provided a framework for understanding the endorsement of different moral beliefs. Our research investigated whether there are other reasons to endorse moral foundations in addition to epistemic concerns; specifically, the perceived social usefulness of moral foundations. In Study 1, we demonstrate that those showing stronger locomotion concerns for controlling movement tend toward a higher endorsement of binding foundations, and that this effect is stronger among political liberals who otherwise do not typically endorse these foundations. In Study 2, we show that priming participants with assessment concerns (emphasizing truth) rather than locomotion concerns (emphasizing control) reduces the response variance among liberals and also removes the association between locomotion and the binding foundations. In Study 3, we directly ask participants to focus on moral truth versus moral usefulness, with moral truth replicating the Study 2 effect of assessment priming, and moral usefulness replicating the effect of locomotion priming. PMID:24347681

  2. Locomotion concerns with moral usefulness: When liberals endorse binding moral foundations

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, James F. M.; Higgins, E. Tory

    2013-01-01

    Moral Foundations Theory has provided a framework for understanding the endorsement of different moral beliefs. Our research investigated whether there are other reasons to endorse moral foundations in addition to epistemic concerns; specifically, the perceived social usefulness of moral foundations. In Study 1, we demonstrate that those showing stronger locomotion concerns for controlling movement tend toward a higher endorsement of binding foundations, and that this effect is stronger among political liberals who otherwise do not typically endorse these foundations. In Study 2, we show that priming participants with assessment concerns (emphasizing truth) rather than locomotion concerns (emphasizing control) reduces the response variance among liberals and also removes the association between locomotion and the binding foundations. In Study 3, we directly ask participants to focus on moral truth versus moral usefulness, with moral truth replicating the Study 2 effect of assessment priming, and moral usefulness replicating the effect of locomotion priming. PMID:24347681

  3. 21st Century Locomotive Technology: Quarterly Technical Status Report 8 DOE/AL68284-TSR08

    SciTech Connect

    Lembit Salasoo; Jennifer Topinka; Anthony Furman; Raj Bharadwaj

    2005-02-16

    Completed high pressure common rail system performance mapping at notch 8 to establish advanced fuel injection fuel savings entitlement. Investigated performance differences of several abradable coatings between full-scale tests and rub test coupons using post-run micrographic analysis. Demonstrated implementation of advanced energy management controls on hybrid locomotive. Began advanced energy storage detailed design; continued life-cycle subscale energy storage testing. Formulated trip optimization problem with hybrid locomotive, and evaluated first implementation to produce an optimal driving plan.

  4. Kinematics of treadmill locomotion in mice raised in hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Bojados, Mickael; Herbin, Marc; Jamon, Marc

    2013-05-01

    The study compared the motor performance of adult C57Bl/6J mice previously exposed to a 2G gravity environment during different periods of their development. 12 mice were housed in a large diameter centrifuge from the conception to Postnatal day 10 (P10). Another group of 10 mice was centrifuged form P10 to P30, and a third group of 9 mice was centrifuged from conception to P30. Their gait parameters, and kinematics of joint excursions were compared with 11 control mice, at the age of 2 months using a video-radiographic apparatus connected to a motorized treadmill. The mice that returned to Earth gravity level at the age of P10 showed a motor pattern similar to control mice. At variance the two groups that were centrifuged from P10 to P30 showed a different motor pattern with smaller and faster strides to walk at the same velocity as controls. On the other hand all the centrifuged mice showed significant postural changes, particularly with a more extended ankle joint, but the mice centrifuged during the whole experimental period differed even more. Our results showed that the exposure to hypergravity before P10 sufficed to modify the posture, suggesting that postural control starts before the onset of locomotion, whereas the gravity constraint perceived between P10 and P30 conditioned the tuning of quadruped locomotion with long term consequences. These results support the existence of a critical period in the acquisition of locomotion in mice. PMID:23352767

  5. Towards realization of multi-terrestrial locomotion: decentralized control of a sheet-like robot based on the scaffold-exploitation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kano, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yuki; Ishiguro, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Autonomous decentralized control is an attractive concept for designing robots that can exhibit highly adaptive animal-like behaviour. However, despite its appeal, previous robots based on this scheme could only adapt to a limited number of environments. Our hypothesis it that this problem can be overcome by simply implementing a scaffold-exploitation mechanism. We draw our inspiration from flatworms, which move over various terrains using their two-dimensional sheet-like body, and we design an autonomous decentralized control scheme for a similar robot based on the scaffold-exploitation mechanism. Simulation results show that a robot with the proposed control scheme can move efficiently over various irregular terrains. Our control scheme is not specific to a certain environment, but will be applicable in any environment; it could thus form the basis for developing a multi-terrestrial robot whose working area covers land, sea and even air. PMID:23093049

  6. The primate pedunculopontine nucleus region: towards a dual role in locomotion and waking state.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Laurent; Piallat, Brigitte; Bhattacharjee, Manik; Mathieu, Hervé; David, Olivier; Chabardès, Stéphan

    2016-07-01

    The mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF) mainly composed by the pedunculopontine and the cuneiform nuclei is involved in the control of several fundamental brain functions such as locomotion, rapid eye movement sleep and waking state. On the one hand, the role of MRF neurons in locomotion has been investigated for decades in different animal models, including in behaving nonhuman primate (NHP) using extracellular recordings. On the other hand, MRF neurons involved in the control of waking state have been consistently shown to constitute the cholinergic component of the reticular ascending system. However, a dual control of the locomotion and waking state by the same groups of neurons in NHP has never been demonstrated in NHP. Here, using microelectrode recordings in behaving NHP, we recorded 38 neurons in the MRF that were followed during transition between wakefulness (TWS) and sleep, i.e., until the emergence of sleep episodes characterized by typical cortical slow wave activity (SWA). We found that the MRF neurons, mainly located in the pedunculopontine nucleus region, modulated their activity during TWS with a decrease in firing rate during SWA. Of interest, we could follow some MRF neurons from locomotion to SWA and found that they also modulated their firing rate during locomotion and TWS. These new findings confirm the role of MRF neurons in both functions. They suggest that the MRF is an integration center that potentially allows to fine tune waking state and locomotor signals in order to establish an efficient locomotion. PMID:27216823

  7. Central Pattern Generator for Locomotion: Anatomical, Physiological, and Pathophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on major innovations over the past century in research on the spinal cord and, specifically, on specialized spinal circuits involved in the control of rhythmic locomotor pattern generation and modulation. Pioneers such as Charles Sherrington and Thomas Graham Brown have conducted experiments in the early twentieth century that changed our views of the neural control of locomotion. Their seminal work supported subsequently by several decades of evidence has led to the conclusion that walking, flying, and swimming are largely controlled by a network of spinal neurons generally referred to as the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion. It has been subsequently demonstrated across all vertebrate species examined, from lampreys to humans, that this CPG is capable, under some conditions, to self-produce, even in absence of descending or peripheral inputs, basic rhythmic, and coordinated locomotor movements. Recent evidence suggests, in turn, that plasticity changes of some CPG elements may contribute to the development of specific pathophysiological conditions associated with impaired locomotion or spontaneous locomotor-like movements. This article constitutes a comprehensive review summarizing key findings on the CPG as well as on its potential role in Restless Leg Syndrome, Periodic Leg Movement, and Alternating Leg Muscle Activation. Special attention will be paid to the role of the CPG in a recently identified, and uniquely different neurological disorder, called the Uner Tan Syndrome. PMID:23403923

  8. Sensory adaptation in human balance control: lessons for biomimetic robotic bipeds.

    PubMed

    Mahboobin, Arash; Loughlin, Patrick J; Redfern, Mark S; Anderson, Stuart O; Atkeson, Christopher G; Hodgins, Jessica K

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes mechanisms used by humans to stand on moving platforms, such as a bus or ship, and to combine body orientation and motion information from multiple sensors including vision, vestibular, and proprioception. A simple mechanism, sensory re-weighting, has been proposed to explain how human subjects learn to reduce the effects of inconsistent sensors on balance. Our goal is to replicate this robust balance behavior in bipedal robots. We review results exploring sensory re-weighting in humans and describe implementations of sensory re-weighting in simulation and on a robot. PMID:18555957

  9. 49 CFR 238.223 - Locomotive fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locomotive fuel tanks. 238.223 Section 238.223... Equipment § 238.223 Locomotive fuel tanks. Locomotive fuel tanks shall comply with either the following or....21: (a) External fuel tanks. External locomotive fuel tanks shall comply with the...

  10. 49 CFR 238.223 - Locomotive fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locomotive fuel tanks. 238.223 Section 238.223... Equipment § 238.223 Locomotive fuel tanks. Locomotive fuel tanks shall comply with either the following or....21: (a) External fuel tanks. External locomotive fuel tanks shall comply with the...

  11. 49 CFR 229.209 - Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs... Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.209 Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs. (a... design standard. (b) Petitions for FRA approval of alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs....

  12. 49 CFR 229.209 - Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs... Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.209 Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs. (a... design standard. (b) Petitions for FRA approval of alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs....

  13. 49 CFR 229.209 - Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs... Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.209 Alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs. (a... design standard. (b) Petitions for FRA approval of alternative locomotive crashworthiness designs....

  14. 49 CFR 230.21 - Steam locomotive number change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam locomotive number change. 230.21 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS General Recordkeeping Requirements § 230.21 Steam locomotive number change. When a steam locomotive number is...

  15. 49 CFR 230.106 - Steam locomotive frame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam locomotive frame. 230.106 Section 230.106..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.106 Steam locomotive frame. (a) Maintenance...

  16. 49 CFR 230.21 - Steam locomotive number change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam locomotive number change. 230.21 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS General Recordkeeping Requirements § 230.21 Steam locomotive number change. When a steam locomotive number is...

  17. 49 CFR 230.21 - Steam locomotive number change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steam locomotive number change. 230.21 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS General Recordkeeping Requirements § 230.21 Steam locomotive number change. When a steam locomotive number is...

  18. 49 CFR 230.106 - Steam locomotive frame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam locomotive frame. 230.106 Section 230.106..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.106 Steam locomotive frame. (a) Maintenance...

  19. 49 CFR 230.106 - Steam locomotive frame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam locomotive frame. 230.106 Section 230.106..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.106 Steam locomotive frame. (a) Maintenance...

  20. 49 CFR 230.21 - Steam locomotive number change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam locomotive number change. 230.21 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS General Recordkeeping Requirements § 230.21 Steam locomotive number change. When a steam locomotive number is...

  1. 49 CFR 230.21 - Steam locomotive number change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam locomotive number change. 230.21 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS General Recordkeeping Requirements § 230.21 Steam locomotive number change. When a steam locomotive number is...

  2. 49 CFR 230.106 - Steam locomotive frame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steam locomotive frame. 230.106 Section 230.106..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.106 Steam locomotive frame. (a) Maintenance...

  3. 49 CFR 230.106 - Steam locomotive frame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam locomotive frame. 230.106 Section 230.106..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.106 Steam locomotive frame. (a) Maintenance...

  4. 49 CFR 238.223 - Locomotive fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locomotive fuel tanks. 238.223 Section 238.223... Equipment § 238.223 Locomotive fuel tanks. Locomotive fuel tanks shall comply with either the following or....21: (a) External fuel tanks. External locomotive fuel tanks shall comply with the...

  5. The primate semicircular canal system and locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Spoor, Fred; Garland, Theodore; Krovitz, Gail; Ryan, Timothy M.; Silcox, Mary T.; Walker, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The semicircular canal system of vertebrates helps coordinate body movements, including stabilization of gaze during locomotion. Quantitative phylogenetically informed analysis of the radius of curvature of the three semicircular canals in 91 extant and recently extinct primate species and 119 other mammalian taxa provide support for the hypothesis that canal size varies in relation to the jerkiness of head motion during locomotion. Primate and other mammalian species studied here that are agile and have fast, jerky locomotion have significantly larger canals relative to body mass than those that move more cautiously. PMID:17576932

  6. The Kinematics of Treadmill Locomotion in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Cavanagh, P. R.; Buczek, F. L.; Burgess-Milliron, M. J.; Davis, B. L.

    1997-01-01

    Locomotion on a treadmill in 0 G will probably remain a centerpiece of NASA's exercise countermeasures programme. This form of physical activity has the potential to cause large bone and muscle forces as well as loading during a period of continuous treadmill exercise. A critical concern is the provision of a treadmill which can approximate 1 G performance in space. At this point, no adequate objective measurements of in-flight treadmill kinetics or of the human response to this activity have been made. Interpretation of the results obtained in the present study is limited by the following: (1) bungee tensions were not measured; (2) ground reaction forces were not measured in parallel with the kinematic measurements; and (3) the instrumentation used to film the astronauts could itself have been affected by microgravity. Despite these shortcomings, what is apparent is that exercise during NASA missions STS 7 and STS 8 resulted in leg motions that were similar to those found during 1 G locomotion on an inclined passive treadmill and on an active treadmill at an even steeper grade. In addition, it was apparent that the majority of the loads were transmitted through the forefoot, and one can surmise that this style of running would result in physiologically significant tensions in the calf musculature and resultant ankle compressive loading. Further speculation regarding limb loading is complicated by the fact that varying amounts of force are transmitted through (1) the treadmill handle and (2) bungee cords that act as a tether. New generations of treadmills are being manufactured that could provide I important information for planners of long-duration space missions. If these types of treadmill are flown on future missions, it will be possible to control bungee tensions more precisely, control for grade and speed, and, most importantly, provide data on the rates and magnitudes of limb loading. These data could then be incorporated into biomechanical models of the

  7. Characteristics of undulatory locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Pak, On Shun; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2016-03-01

    Undulatory locomotion is ubiquitous in nature and observed in different media, from the swimming of flagellated microorganisms in biological fluids, to the slithering of snakes on land, or the locomotion of sandfish lizards in sand. Despite the similarity in the undulating pattern, the swimming characteristics depend on the rheological properties of different media. Analysis of locomotion in granular materials is relatively less developed compared with fluids partially due to a lack of validated force models but recently a resistive force theory in granular media has been proposed and shown useful in studying the locomotion of a sand-swimming lizard. Here we employ the proposed model to investigate the swimming characteristics of a slender filament, of both finite and infinite length, undulating in a granular medium and compare the results with swimming in viscous fluids. In particular, we characterize the effects of drifting and pitching in terms of propulsion speed and efficiency for a finite sinusoidal swimmer. We also find that, similar to Lighthill's results using resistive force theory in viscous fluids, the sawtooth swimmer is the optimal waveform for propulsion speed at a given power consumption in granular media. The results complement our understanding of undulatory locomotion and provide insights into the effective design of locomotive systems in granular media.

  8. Characterization of undulatory locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Pak, On Shun; Elfring, Gwynn

    2015-11-01

    Undulatory locomotion is ubiquitous in nature, from the swimming of flagellated microorganisms in biological fluids, to the slithering of snakes on land, or the locomotion of sandfish lizards in sand. Analysis of locomotion in granular materials is relatively less developed compared with fluids partially due to a lack of validated force models but a recently proposed resistive force theory (RFT) in granular media has been shown useful in studying the locomotion of a sand-swimming lizard. Here we employ this model to investigate the swimming characteristics of an undulating slender filament of both finite and infinite length. For infinite swimmers, similar to results in viscous fluids, the sawtooth waveform is found to be optimal for propulsion speed at a given power consumption. We also compare the swimming characteristics of sinusoidal and sawtooth swimmers with swimming in viscous fluids. More complex swimming dynamics emerge when the assumption of an infinite swimmer is removed. In particular, we characterize the effects of drifting and pitching in terms of propulsion speed and efficiency for a finite sinusoidal swimmer. The results complement our understanding of undulatory locomotion and provide insights into the effective design of locomotive systems in granular media.

  9. Push-Pull Locomotion for Vehicle Extrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creager, Colin M.; Johnson, Kyle A.; Plant, Mark; Moreland, Scott J.; Skonieczny, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    For applications in which unmanned vehicles must traverse unfamiliar terrain, there often exists the risk of vehicle entrapment. Typically, this risk can be reduced by using feedback from on-board sensors that assess the terrain. This work addressed the situations where a vehicle has already become immobilized or the desired route cannot be traversed using conventional rolling. Specifically, the focus was on using push-pull locomotion in high sinkage granular material. Push-pull locomotion is an alternative mode of travel that generates thrust through articulated motion, using vehicle components as anchors to push or pull against. It has been revealed through previous research that push-pull locomotion has the capacity for generating higher net traction forces than rolling, and a unique optical flow technique indicated that this is the result of a more efficient soil shearing method. It has now been found that pushpull locomotion results in less sinkage, lower travel reduction, and better power efficiency in high sinkage material as compared to rolling. Even when starting from an "entrapped" condition, push-pull locomotion was able to extricate the test vehicle. It is the authors' recommendation that push-pull locomotion be considered as a reliable back-up mode of travel for applications where terrain entrapment is a possibility.

  10. Reversal of the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in cat spinal motoneurons during fictive locomotion.

    PubMed

    Brownstone, Robert M; Krawitz, Sherry; Jordan, Larry M

    2011-03-01

    In spinal motoneurons, late spike frequency adaptation (SFA) is defined as the slowing of the firing rate over tens of seconds and can be seen during sustained or intermittent current injection. Although the function of late SFA is not known, it may result in a decrease in force production over time, or muscle fatigue. Because locomotion can persist for long periods of time without fatigue, late SFA was studied using intracellular recordings from adult cat motoneurons during fictive locomotion. Of eight lumbar motoneurons studied, all showed late adaptation during control conditions, but none demonstrated late adaptation during locomotor activity. The most consistent properties that correlated with the presence or absence of late SFA were those related to availability of fast, inactivating sodium channels, particularly action potential rate of rise. Evidence of the reversal of late SFA during locomotion was present for several minutes following locomotor trials, consistent with the suggestion that SFA is modulated through slow metabotropic pathways. The abolition of late adaptation in spinal motoneurons during fictive locomotion is an example of a state-dependent change in the "intrinsic" properties of mammalian motoneurons. This change contributes to increased excitability of motoneurons during locomotion and results in robust firing during sustained locomotion. PMID:21177992

  11. The critical role of locomotion mechanics in decoding sensory systems.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Noah J; Fortune, Eric S

    2007-01-31

    How do neural systems process sensory information to control locomotion? The weakly electric knifefish Eigenmannia, an ideal model for studying sensorimotor control, swims to stabilize the sensory image of a sinusoidally moving refuge. Tracking performance is best at stimulus frequencies less than approximately 1 Hz. Kinematic analysis, which is widely used in the study of neural control of movement, predicts commensurately low-pass sensory processing for control. The inclusion of Newtonian mechanics in the analysis of the behavior, however, categorically shifts the prediction: this analysis predicts that sensory processing is high pass. The counterintuitive prediction that a low-pass behavior is controlled by a high-pass neural filter nevertheless matches previously reported but poorly understood high-pass filtering seen in electrosensory afferents and downstream neurons. Furthermore, a model incorporating the high-pass controller matches animal behavior, whereas the model with the low-pass controller does not and is unstable. Because locomotor mechanics are similar in a wide array of animals, these data suggest that such high-pass sensory filters may be a general mechanism used for task-level locomotion control. Furthermore, these data highlight the critical role of mechanical analyses in addition to widely used kinematic analyses in the study of neural control systems. PMID:17267567

  12. Locomotion in a turbulent world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M.

    2014-11-01

    When organisms swim or crawl in aquatic habitats, the water through which they travel is usually moving. Therefore, an important part of understanding how aquatic organisms locomote is determining how they interact with the fluctuating turbulent water currents through which they move. The research systems we have been using to address this question are microscopic marine animals swimming in turbulent, wavy water flow or crawling on surfaces in spatially-complex habitats exposed to such flow. Using a combination of field studies, wave-flume experiments, experiments in fluidic devices, and mathematical modeling, we have discovered that small organisms swimming or crawling in turbulent flow are not subjected to steady velocities. The shears, accelerations, and odor concentrations encountered by small swimmers and crawlers fluctuate rapidly, with peaks much higher than mean values. Although microscopic organisms swim slowly relative to ambient water flow, their locomotory behavior in response to the rapidly-fluctuating shears and odors they encounter can affect where they are transported by ambient water movement. Furthermore, the ability of small organisms to walk on surfaces without being dislodged by pulses of rapid flow constrains the microhabitats in which they can forage. Supported by NSF Grant #IOS-0842685.

  13. Gravitational Effects upon Locomotion Posture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John K.; Bentley, Jason R.; Edwards, W. Brent; Perusek, Gail P.; Samorezov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Researchers use actual microgravity (AM) during parabolic flight and simulated microgravity (SM) obtained with horizontal suspension analogs to better understand the effect of gravity upon gait. In both environments, the gravitational force is replaced by an external load (EL) that returns the subject to the treadmill. However, when compared to normal gravity (N), researchers consistently find reduced ground reaction forces (GRF) and subtle kinematic differences (Schaffner et al., 2005). On the International Space Station, the EL is applied by elastic bungees attached to a waist and shoulder harness. While bungees can provide EL approaching body weight (BW), their force-length characteristics coupled with vertical oscillations of the body during gait result in a variable load. However, during locomotion in N, the EL is consistently equal to 100% body weight. Comparisons between AM and N have shown that during running, GRF are decreased in AM (Schaffner et al, 2005). Kinematic evaluations in the past have focussed on joint range of motion rather than joint posture at specific instances of the gait cycle. The reduced GRF in microgravity may be a result of differing hip, knee, and ankle positions during contact. The purpose of this investigation was to compare joint angles of the lower extremities during walking and running in AM, SM, and N. We hypothesized that in AM and SM, joints would be more flexed at heel strike (HS), mid-stance (MS) and toe-off (TO) than in N.

  14. 49 CFR 238.209 - Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... locomotive, including a cab car and an MU locomotive, shall be: (i) Equivalent to a 1/2-inch steel plate with a yield strength of 25,000 pounds-per-square-inch—material of a higher yield strength may be used to decrease the required thickness of the material provided at least an equivalent level of strength...

  15. 49 CFR 238.209 - Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... locomotive, including a cab car and an MU locomotive, shall be: (i) Equivalent to a 1/2-inch steel plate with a yield strength of 25,000 pounds-per-square-inch—material of a higher yield strength may be used to decrease the required thickness of the material provided at least an equivalent level of strength...

  16. 49 CFR 238.209 - Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... locomotive, including a cab car and an MU locomotive, shall be: (i) Equivalent to a 1/2-inch steel plate with a yield strength of 25,000 pounds-per-square-inch—material of a higher yield strength may be used to decrease the required thickness of the material provided at least an equivalent level of strength...

  17. 49 CFR 238.209 - Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives. 238.209 Section 238.209 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Specific Requirements...

  18. Legged-locomotion on inclined granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieser, Jennifer; Qian, Feifei; Goldman, Daniel

    Animals traverse a wide variety of complex environments, including situations in which the ground beneath them can yield (e.g. dry granular media in desert dunes). Locomotion strategies that are effective on level granular media can fail when traversing a granular slope. Taking inspiration from successful legged-locomotors in sandy, uneven settings, we explore the ability of a small (15 cm long, 100 g), six-c-shaped legged robot to run uphill in a bed of 1-mm-diameter poppy seeds, using an alternating tripod gait. Our fully automated experiments reveal that locomotor performance can depend sensitively on both environmental parameters such as the inclination angle and volume fraction of the substrate, and robot morphology and control parameters like leg shape, step frequency, and the friction between the feet of the robot and the substrate. We assess performance by measuring the average speed of the robot, and we find that the robot tends to perform better at higher step frequency and lower inclination angles, and that average speed decreases more rapidly with increasing angle for higher step frequency.

  19. Water surface locomotion in tropical canopy ants.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, S P; Frederick, D N

    2014-06-15

    Upon falling onto the water surface, most terrestrial arthropods helplessly struggle and are quickly eaten by aquatic predators. Exceptions to this outcome mostly occur among riparian taxa that escape by walking or swimming at the water surface. Here we document sustained, directional, neustonic locomotion (i.e. surface swimming) in tropical arboreal ants. We dropped 35 species of ants into natural and artificial aquatic settings in Peru and Panama to assess their swimming ability. Ten species showed directed surface swimming at speeds >3 body lengths s(-1), with some swimming at absolute speeds >10 cm s(-1). Ten other species exhibited partial swimming ability characterized by relatively slow but directed movement. The remaining species showed no locomotory control at the surface. The phylogenetic distribution of swimming among ant genera indicates parallel evolution and a trend toward negative association with directed aerial descent behavior. Experiments with workers of Odontomachus bauri showed that they escape from the water by directing their swimming toward dark emergent objects (i.e. skototaxis). Analyses of high-speed video images indicate that Pachycondyla spp. and O. bauri use a modified alternating tripod gait when swimming; they generate thrust at the water surface via synchronized treading and rowing motions of the contralateral fore and mid legs, respectively, while the hind legs provide roll stability. These results expand the list of facultatively neustonic terrestrial taxa to include various species of tropical arboreal ants. PMID:24920838

  20. Visualizing the spinal neuronal dynamics of locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kalpathi R.; Bashor, D. P.; Miller, M. T.; Foster, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    Modern imaging and simulation techniques have enhanced system-level understanding of neural function. In this article, we present an application of interactive visualization to understanding neuronal dynamics causing locomotion of a single hip joint, based on pattern generator output of the spinal cord. Our earlier work visualized cell-level responses of multiple neuronal populations. However, the spatial relationships were abstract, making communication with colleagues difficult. We propose two approaches to overcome this: (1) building a 3D anatomical model of the spinal cord with neurons distributed inside, animated by the simulation and (2) adding limb movements predicted by neuronal activity. The new system was tested using a cat walking central pattern generator driving a pair of opposed spinal motoneuron pools. Output of opposing motoneuron pools was combined into a single metric, called "Net Neural Drive", which generated angular limb movement in proportion to its magnitude. Net neural drive constitutes a new description of limb movement control. The combination of spatial and temporal information in the visualizations elegantly conveys the neural activity of the output elements (motoneurons), as well as the resulting movement. The new system encompasses five biological levels of organization from ion channels to observed behavior. The system is easily scalable, and provides an efficient interactive platform for rapid hypothesis testing.

  1. Relationship between osteology and aquatic locomotion in birds: determining modes of locomotion in extinct Ornithurae.

    PubMed

    Hinić-Frlog, S; Motani, R

    2010-02-01

    The evolutionary history of aquatic invasion in birds would be incomplete without incorporation of extinct species. We show that aquatic affinities in fossil birds can be inferred by multivariate analysis of skeletal features and locomotion of 245 species of extant birds. Regularized discriminant analyses revealed that measurements of appendicular skeletons successfully separated diving birds from surface swimmers and flyers, while also discriminating among different underwater modes of swimming. The high accuracy of this method allows detection of skeletal characteristics that are indicative of aquatic locomotion and inference of such locomotion in bird species with insufficient behavioural information. Statistical predictions based on the analyses confirm qualitative assessments for both foot-propelled (Hesperornithiformes) and wing-propelled (Copepteryx) underwater locomotion in fossil birds. This is the first quantitative inference of underwater modes of swimming in fossil birds, enabling future studies of locomotion in extinct birds and evolutionary transitions among locomotor modes in avian lineage. PMID:20021550

  2. Dynamic primitives in the control of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Neville; Sternad, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    Humans achieve locomotor dexterity that far exceeds the capability of modern robots, yet this is achieved despite slower actuators, imprecise sensors, and vastly slower communication. We propose that this spectacular performance arises from encoding motor commands in terms of dynamic primitives. We propose three primitives as a foundation for a comprehensive theoretical framework that can embrace a wide range of upper- and lower-limb behaviors. Building on previous work that suggested discrete and rhythmic movements as elementary dynamic behaviors, we define submovements and oscillations: as discrete movements cannot be combined with sufficient flexibility, we argue that suitably-defined submovements are primitives. As the term “rhythmic” may be ambiguous, we define oscillations as the corresponding class of primitives. We further propose mechanical impedances as a third class of dynamic primitives, necessary for interaction with the physical environment. Combination of these three classes of primitive requires care. One approach is through a generalized equivalent network: a virtual trajectory composed of simultaneous and/or sequential submovements and/or oscillations that interacts with mechanical impedances to produce observable forces and motions. Reliable experimental identification of these dynamic primitives presents challenges: identification of mechanical impedances is exquisitely sensitive to assumptions about their dynamic structure; identification of submovements and oscillations is sensitive to their assumed form and to details of the algorithm used to extract them. Some methods to address these challenges are presented. Some implications of this theoretical framework for locomotor rehabilitation are considered. PMID:23801959

  3. Advantage of straight walk instability in turning maneuver of multilegged locomotion: a robotics approach

    PubMed Central

    Aoi, Shinya; Tanaka, Takahiro; Fujiki, Soichiro; Funato, Tetsuro; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Multilegged locomotion improves the mobility of terrestrial animals and artifacts. Using many legs has advantages, such as the ability to avoid falling and to tolerate leg malfunction. However, many intrinsic degrees of freedom make the motion planning and control difficult, and many contact legs can impede the maneuverability during locomotion. The underlying mechanism for generating agile locomotion using many legs remains unclear from biological and engineering viewpoints. The present study used a centipede-like multilegged robot composed of six body segments and twelve legs. The body segments are passively connected through yaw joints with torsional springs. The dynamic stability of the robot walking in a straight line changes through a supercritical Hopf bifurcation due to the body axis flexibility. We focused on a quick turning task of the robot and quantitatively investigated the relationship between stability and maneuverability in multilegged locomotion by using a simple control strategy. Our experimental results show that the straight walk instability does help the turning maneuver. We discuss the importance and relevance of our findings for biological systems and propose a design principle for a simple control scheme to create maneuverable locomotion of multilegged robots. PMID:27444746

  4. Advantage of straight walk instability in turning maneuver of multilegged locomotion: a robotics approach.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Shinya; Tanaka, Takahiro; Fujiki, Soichiro; Funato, Tetsuro; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Multilegged locomotion improves the mobility of terrestrial animals and artifacts. Using many legs has advantages, such as the ability to avoid falling and to tolerate leg malfunction. However, many intrinsic degrees of freedom make the motion planning and control difficult, and many contact legs can impede the maneuverability during locomotion. The underlying mechanism for generating agile locomotion using many legs remains unclear from biological and engineering viewpoints. The present study used a centipede-like multilegged robot composed of six body segments and twelve legs. The body segments are passively connected through yaw joints with torsional springs. The dynamic stability of the robot walking in a straight line changes through a supercritical Hopf bifurcation due to the body axis flexibility. We focused on a quick turning task of the robot and quantitatively investigated the relationship between stability and maneuverability in multilegged locomotion by using a simple control strategy. Our experimental results show that the straight walk instability does help the turning maneuver. We discuss the importance and relevance of our findings for biological systems and propose a design principle for a simple control scheme to create maneuverable locomotion of multilegged robots. PMID:27444746

  5. Advantage of straight walk instability in turning maneuver of multilegged locomotion: a robotics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, Shinya; Tanaka, Takahiro; Fujiki, Soichiro; Funato, Tetsuro; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-07-01

    Multilegged locomotion improves the mobility of terrestrial animals and artifacts. Using many legs has advantages, such as the ability to avoid falling and to tolerate leg malfunction. However, many intrinsic degrees of freedom make the motion planning and control difficult, and many contact legs can impede the maneuverability during locomotion. The underlying mechanism for generating agile locomotion using many legs remains unclear from biological and engineering viewpoints. The present study used a centipede-like multilegged robot composed of six body segments and twelve legs. The body segments are passively connected through yaw joints with torsional springs. The dynamic stability of the robot walking in a straight line changes through a supercritical Hopf bifurcation due to the body axis flexibility. We focused on a quick turning task of the robot and quantitatively investigated the relationship between stability and maneuverability in multilegged locomotion by using a simple control strategy. Our experimental results show that the straight walk instability does help the turning maneuver. We discuss the importance and relevance of our findings for biological systems and propose a design principle for a simple control scheme to create maneuverable locomotion of multilegged robots.

  6. The Role of Adaptation in Body Load-Regulating Mechanisms During Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, Tara; Holt, Christopher; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Body loading is a fundamental parameter that modulates motor output during locomotion, and is especially important for controlling the generation of stepping patterns, dynamic balance, and termination of locomotion. Load receptors that regulate and control posture and stance in locomotion include the Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles at the hip, knee, and ankle joints, and the Ruffini endings and the Pacinian corpuscles in the soles of the feet. Increased body weight support (BWS) during locomotion results in an immediate reorganization of locomotor control, such as a reduction in stance and double support duration and decreased hip, ankle, and knee angles during the gait cycle. Previous studies on the effect during exposure to increased BWS while walking showed a reduction in lower limb joint angles and gait cycle timing that represents a reorganization of locomotor control. Until now, no studies have investigated how locomotor control responds after a period of exposure to adaptive modification in the body load sensing system. The goal of this research was to determine the adaptive properties of body load-regulating mechanisms in locomotor control during locomotion. We hypothesized that body load-regulating mechanisms contribute to locomotor control, and adaptive changes in these load-regulating mechanisms require reorganization to maintain forward locomotion. Head-torso coordination, lower limb movement patterns, and gait cycle timing were evaluated before and after a 30-minute adaptation session during which subjects walked on a treadmill at 5.4 km/hr with 40% body weight support (BWS). Before and after the adaptation period, head-torso and lower limb 3D kinematic data were obtained while performing a goal directed task during locomotion with 0% BWS using a video-based motion analysis system, and gait cycle timing parameters were collected by foot switches positioned under the heel and toe of the subjects shoes. Subjects showed adaptive modification in

  7. Locomotion gaits of a rotating cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Novati, Guido; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    Using 2D numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate that a simple pair of rotating cylinders can display a range of locomotion patterns of biological and engineering interest. Steadily counter-rotating the cylinders causes the pair to move akin to a vortex dipole for low rotation rates, but as the rotational velocity is increased the direction of motion reverses. Unsteady rotations lead to different locomotion gaits that resemble jellyfish (for in-phase rotations) and undulating swimmers (for out-of-phase rotations). The small number of parameters for this simple system allows us to systematically map the phase space of these gaits, and allows us to understand the underlying physical mechanisms using a minimal model with implications for biological locomotion and engineered analogs.

  8. Passive appendages aid locomotion through symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Mazzino, Andrea; Kellay, Hamid; Brosse, Nicolas; Lundell, Fredrik; Ingremeau, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins, and other types of appendages to aid locomotion. Despite their enormous variation, passive appendages may contribute to locomotion by exploiting the same physical mechanism. We present a new mechanism that applies to body appendages surrounded by a separated flow, which often develops behind moving bodies larger than a few millimeters. We use theory, experiments, and numerical simulations to show that bodies with protrusions turn and drift by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in flowing fluid is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming fluid flow direction. The discovery suggests a new mechanism of locomotion that may be relevant for certain organisms; for example, how plumed seeds may drift without wind and how motile animals may passively reorient themselves.

  9. Operating a locomotive on liquid methane fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, J.L. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports that several years ago, Burlington Northern Railroad looked into the feasibility of operating a diesel railroad locomotive to also run on compressed natural gas in a dual-fuel mode. Recognizing the large volume of on-board storage required and other limitations of CNG in the application, a program was begun to fuel a locomotive with liquefied natural gas. Because natural gas composition can vary with source and processing, it was considered desirable to use essentially pure liquid methane as the engine fuel. Initial testing results show the locomotive system achieved full diesel-rated power when operating on liquid methane and with equivalent fuel efficiency. Extended testing, including an American Association of Railroad 500-hour durability test, was undertaken to obtain information on engine life, wear rate and lubrication oil life.

  10. A novel device for studying weight supported, quadrupedal overground locomotion in spinal cord injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Marvin; Traughber, Terrance; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; de Leon, Ray D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Providing weight support facilitates locomotion in spinal cord injured animals. To control weight support, robotic systems have been developed for treadmill stepping and more recently for overground walking. New Method We developed a novel device, the body weight supported ambulatory rodent trainer (i.e. BART). It has a small pneumatic cylinder that moves along a linear track above the rat. When air is supplied to the cylinder, the rats are lifted as they perform overground walking. We tested the BART device in rats that received a moderate spinal cord contusion injury and in normal rats. Locomotor training with the BART device was not performed. Results All of the rats learned to walk in the BART device. In the contused rats, significantly greater paw dragging and dorsal stepping occurred in the hindlimbs compared to normal. Providing weight support significantly raised hip position and significantly reduced locomotor deficits. Hindlimb stepping was tightly coupled to forelimb stepping but only when the contused rats stepped without weight support. Three weeks after the contused rats received a complete spinal cord transection, significantly fewer hindlimb steps were performed. Comparison with Existing Methods Relative to rodent robotic systems, the BART device is a simpler system for studying overground locomotion. The BART device lacks sophisticated control and sensing capability, but it can be assembled relatively easily and cheaply. Conclusions These findings suggest that the BART device is a useful tool for assessing quadrupedal, overground locomotion which is a more natural form of locomotion relative to treadmill locomotion. PMID:25794460

  11. 8. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE NO. 6734 ON TURNTABLE, adjacent to Erecting Shop and Machine Shop - Juniata Shops, Turntable, South of Sixth Street at Third Avemue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  12. 5. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE NO. 6734 ON TURNTABLE, adjacent to Erecting Shop and Machine Shop - Juniata Shops, Turntable, South of Sixth Street at Third Avemue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  13. 6. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE NO. 6734 ON TURNTABLE, adjacent to Erecting Shop and Machine Shop - Juniata Shops, Turntable, South of Sixth Street at Third Avemue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  14. 4. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE NO. 6734 ON TURNTABLE, adjacent to Erecting Shop and Machine Shop - Juniata Shops, Turntable, South of Sixth Street at Third Avemue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  15. 7. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE NO. 6734 ON TURNTABLE, adjacent to Erecting Shop and Machine Shop - Juniata Shops, Turntable, South of Sixth Street at Third Avemue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  16. 9. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SHUNT LOCOMOTIVE NO. 9072 POSITIONING ELECTRIC DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE NO. 6734 ON TURNTABLE, adjacent to Erecting Shop and Machine Shop - Juniata Shops, Turntable, South of Sixth Street at Third Avemue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  17. 7. Detail of the Grant Locomotive Works Erecting Shop looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail of the Grant Locomotive Works Erecting Shop looking southwest showing ruined wall and entrance of a single story addition. - Grant Locomotive Works, Market & Spruce Streets, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  18. 40 CFR 92.214 - Production locomotives and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under this part shall supply to the Administrator, upon his/her request, a reasonable number of... locomotives or locomotive engines that may be supplied to the Administrator is five per model year....

  19. 40 CFR 92.214 - Production locomotives and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... under this part shall supply to the Administrator, upon his/her request, a reasonable number of... locomotives or locomotive engines that may be supplied to the Administrator is five per model year....

  20. 40 CFR 92.214 - Production locomotives and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... under this part shall supply to the Administrator, upon his/her request, a reasonable number of... locomotives or locomotive engines that may be supplied to the Administrator is five per model year....

  1. 1. AERIAL VIEW SHOWING ARCHEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS OF LOCOMOTIVE PITS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW SHOWING ARCHEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS OF LOCOMOTIVE PITS IN FORMER ERECTING SHOP. MACHINE SHOP IS BUILDING AT RIGHT. - Grant Locomotive Works, Market & Spruce Streets, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  2. 2. CLOSE IN AERIAL VIEW OF ARCHEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS OF LOCOMOTIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CLOSE IN AERIAL VIEW OF ARCHEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS OF LOCOMOTIVE PITS IN FORMER ERECTING SHOP. MACHINE SHOP IS BUILDING AT RIGHT. - Grant Locomotive Works, Market & Spruce Streets, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  3. 49 CFR 236.927 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following elements must be addressed: (1) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or...

  4. 49 CFR 236.1047 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or enter data to, the system, such as consist data, and...

  5. 49 CFR 236.927 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... following elements must be addressed: (1) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or...

  6. 49 CFR 236.1047 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or enter data to, the system, such as consist data, and...

  7. 49 CFR 236.1047 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or enter data to, the system, such as consist data, and...

  8. 49 CFR 236.927 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... following elements must be addressed: (1) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or...

  9. 49 CFR 236.927 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... following elements must be addressed: (1) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or...

  10. 49 CFR 236.1047 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or enter data to, the system, such as consist data, and...

  11. 49 CFR 236.1047 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or enter data to, the system, such as consist data, and...

  12. 49 CFR 236.927 - Training specific to locomotive engineers and other operating personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... following elements must be addressed: (1) Familiarization with train control equipment onboard the locomotive and the functioning of that equipment as part of the system and in relation to other onboard systems under that person's control; (2) Any actions required of the onboard personnel to enable, or...

  13. Locomotion of Paramecium in patterned environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eun-Jik; Eddins, Aja; Kim, Junil; Yang, Sung; Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan

    2011-10-01

    Ciliary organisms like Paramecium Multimicronucleatum locomote by synchronized beating of cilia that produce metachronal waves over their body. In their natural environments they navigate through a variety of environments especially surfaces with different topology. We study the effects of wavy surfaces patterned on the PDMS channels on the locomotive abilities of Paramecium by characterizing different quantities like velocity amplitude and wavelength of the trajectories traced. We compare this result with the swimming characteristics in straight channels and draw conclusions about the effects of various patterned surfaces.

  14. Large and limbless: the locomotion of snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, David

    2008-03-01

    In efforts to understand snake locomotion, we consider one of their various gaits. By contracting and extending their bodies unidirectionally like a slinky, large snakes propel themselves in a straight line. In a combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we here report on the dynamics of a boa constrictor alongside the analysis of an n-linked extensible crawler model. Constraints on their locomotion are quantified and discussed, such as the elasticity, frictional anisotropy and abrasive wear of their skin. Also presented are certain snake behaviors that culminate in their tying themselves into knots.

  15. Bio-inspired Optimal Locomotion Reconfigurability of Quadruped Rovers using Central Pattern Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohra, Murtaza

    Legged rovers are often considered as viable solutions for traversing unknown terrain. This work addresses the optimal locomotion reconfigurability of quadruped rovers, which consists of obtaining optimal locomotion modes, and transitioning between them. A 2D sagittal plane rover model is considered based on a domestic cat. Using a Genetic Algorithm, the gait, pose and control variables that minimize torque or maximize speed are found separately. The optimization approach takes into account the elimination of leg impact, while considering the entire variable spectrum. The optimal solutions are consistent with other works on gait optimization, and are similar to gaits found in quadruped animals as well. An online model-free gait planning framework is also implemented, that is based on Central Pattern Generators is implemented. It is used to generate joint and control trajectories for any arbitrarily varying speed profile, and shown to regulate locomotion transition and speed modulation, both endogenously and continuously.

  16. Locomotion via paralyzed leg muscles: feasibility study for a leg-propelled vehicle.

    PubMed

    Glaser, R M; Gruner, J A; Feinberg, S D; Collins, S R

    1983-07-01

    Functional electrical stimulation has been used to restore some degree of controllable movement to paralyzed muscle. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using electrically stimulated paralyzed leg muscles to propel a wheelchair-type vehicle. For this, a conventional manual wheelchair was modified by the addition of a drive system which permits forward propulsion by reciprocating movements of the legs. A battery-powered electrical stimulator using surface electrodes over the quadriceps muscles controls locomotive characteristics. This vehicle has been successfully operated by paraplegic and quadriplegic test subjects. Advantages of using paralyzed leg muscles for locomotion may include improvement in locomotive capability, circulation in the lower extremities, cardiovascular and respiratory fitness, strength and size of the exercised muscles and bones, and self-image. PMID:6101225

  17. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott

    2015-02-01

    In our first article1 on scaling in theropod dinosaurs, the longitudinal stress in the leg bones due to supporting the weight of the animal was studied and found not to control the dimensions of the femur. As a continuation of our study of elasticity in dinosaur bones, we now examine the transverse stress in the femur due to locomotion and find that this effect is important for the geometry of the bone. We find that larger theropods (including Tyrannosaurus rex) were less athletic than smaller theropods.

  18. Locomotive micro-implant with active electromagnetic propulsion.

    PubMed

    Pivonka, Daniel; Poon, Ada S Y; Meng, Teresa H

    2009-01-01

    An active locomotive technique requiring only an external power source and a static magnetic field is presented, and its operation is analyzed and simulated. For a modest static MRI magnetic field of 1 T, the results show that a 1-mm cube achieves roughly 3 cm/sec of lateral motion using less than 20.4 microW of power. Current-carrying wires generate the forces, resulting in highly controllable motion. Existing solutions trade off size and power: passive solutions are small but impractical, and mechanical solutions are inefficient and large. The presented solution captures the advantages of both systems, and has much better scalability. PMID:19964695

  19. 49 CFR 229.141 - Body structure, MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Body structure, MU locomotives. 229.141 Section... Cab Equipment § 229.141 Body structure, MU locomotives. (a) MU locomotives built new after April 1... body structure designed to meet or exceed the following minimum specifications: (1) The body...

  20. 49 CFR 229.141 - Body structure, MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Body structure, MU locomotives. 229.141 Section 229.141 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.141 Body...

  1. 49 CFR 231.29 - Road locomotives with corner stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Road locomotives with corner stairways. 231.29... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.29 Road locomotives with corner stairways. After September 30, 1979, road locomotives with corner stairway openings must...

  2. 49 CFR 231.29 - Road locomotives with corner stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Road locomotives with corner stairways. 231.29... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.29 Road locomotives with corner stairways. After September 30, 1979, road locomotives with corner stairway openings must...

  3. 49 CFR 231.29 - Road locomotives with corner stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Road locomotives with corner stairways. 231.29... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.29 Road locomotives with corner stairways. After September 30, 1979, road locomotives with corner stairway openings must...

  4. 49 CFR 231.29 - Road locomotives with corner stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Road locomotives with corner stairways. 231.29... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.29 Road locomotives with corner stairways. After September 30, 1979, road locomotives with corner stairway openings must...

  5. 49 CFR 231.29 - Road locomotives with corner stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Road locomotives with corner stairways. 231.29... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.29 Road locomotives with corner stairways. After September 30, 1979, road locomotives with corner stairway openings must...

  6. 49 CFR 229.141 - Body structure, MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Body structure, MU locomotives. 229.141 Section... Design Requirements § 229.141 Body structure, MU locomotives. (a) MU locomotives built new after April 1... body structure designed to meet or exceed the following minimum specifications: (1) The body...

  7. 49 CFR 230.101 - Steam locomotive driving journal boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. 230.101... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.101 Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. (a) Driving journal boxes. Driving journal boxes shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Not...

  8. 49 CFR 230.101 - Steam locomotive driving journal boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. 230.101... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.101 Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. (a) Driving journal boxes. Driving journal boxes shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Not...

  9. 49 CFR 230.101 - Steam locomotive driving journal boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. 230.101... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.101 Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. (a) Driving journal boxes. Driving journal boxes shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Not...

  10. 49 CFR 230.101 - Steam locomotive driving journal boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. 230.101... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.101 Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. (a) Driving journal boxes. Driving journal boxes shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Not...

  11. 49 CFR 230.101 - Steam locomotive driving journal boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. 230.101... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.101 Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. (a) Driving journal boxes. Driving journal boxes shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Not...

  12. Relation between observed locomotion traits and locomotion score in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Schlageter-Tello, Andrés; Bokkers, Eddie A M; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W G; Van Hertem, Tom; Viazzi, Stefano; Romanini, Carlos E B; Halachmi, Ilan; Bahr, Claudia; Berckmans, Daniël; Lokhorst, Kees

    2015-12-01

    Lameness is still an important problem in modern dairy farming. Human observation of locomotion, by looking at different traits in one go, is used in practice to assess locomotion. The objectives of this article were to determine which individual locomotion traits are most related to locomotion scores in dairy cows, and whether experienced raters are capable of scoring these individual traits consistently. Locomotion and 5 individual locomotion traits (arched back, asymmetric gait, head bobbing, reluctance to bear weight, and tracking up) were scored independently on a 5-level scale for 58 videos of different cows. Videos were shown to 10 experienced raters in 2 different scoring sessions. Relations between locomotion score and traits were estimated by 3 logistic regression models aiming to calculate the size of the fixed effects on the probability of scoring a cow in 1 of the 5 levels of the scale (model 1) and the probability of classifying a cow as lame (locomotion score ≥3; model 2) or as severely lame (locomotion score ≥4; model 3). Fixed effects were rater, session, traits, and interactions among fixed effects. Odds ratios were calculated to estimate the relative probability to classify a cow as lame when an altered (trait score ≥3) or severely altered trait (trait score ≥4) was present. Overall intrarater and interrater reliability and agreement were calculated as weighted kappa coefficient (κw) and percentage of agreement, respectively. Specific intrarater and interrater agreement for individual levels within a 5-level scale were calculated. All traits were significantly related to the locomotion score when scored with a 5-level scale and when classified as (severely) lame or nonlame. Odds ratios for altered and severely altered traits were 10.8 and 14.5 for reluctance to bear weight, 6.5 and 7.2 for asymmetric gait, and 4.8 and 3.2 for arched back, respectively. Raters showed substantial variation in reliability and agreement values when scoring

  13. Metastable legged locomotion: methods to quantify and optimize reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglam, Cenk O.; Byl, Katie

    2015-05-01

    Measuring the stability of highly-dynamic bipedal locomotion is a challenging but essential task for more capable human-like walking. By discretizing the walking dynamics, we treat the system as a Markov chain, which lends itself to an easy quantification of failure rates by the expected number of steps before falling. This meaningful and intuitive metric is then used for optimizing and benchmarking given controllers. While this method is applicable to any controller scheme, we illustrate the results with two case demonstrations. One scheme is the now-familiar hybrid zero dynamics approach and the other is a method using piece-wise reference trajectories with a sliding mode control. We optimize low-level controllers, to minimize failure rates for any one gait, and we adopt a hierarchical control structure to switch among low-level gaits, providing even more dramatic improvements on the system performance.

  14. 49 CFR 210.9 - Movement of a noise defective locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Movement of a noise defective locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars. 210.9 Section 210.9 Transportation Other Regulations... locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars. A locomotive, rail car, or consist of...

  15. 49 CFR 210.9 - Movement of a noise defective locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Movement of a noise defective locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars. 210.9 Section 210.9 Transportation Other Regulations... locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars. A locomotive, rail car, or consist of...

  16. 49 CFR 210.9 - Movement of a noise defective locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Movement of a noise defective locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars. 210.9 Section 210.9 Transportation Other Regulations... locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars. A locomotive, rail car, or consist of...

  17. 49 CFR 210.9 - Movement of a noise defective locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Movement of a noise defective locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars. 210.9 Section 210.9 Transportation Other Regulations... locomotive, rail car, or consist of a locomotive and rail cars. A locomotive, rail car, or consist of...

  18. When locomotion is used to interact with the environment: investigation of the link between emotions and the twofold goal-directed locomotion in humans.

    PubMed

    Vernazza-Martin, S; Longuet, S; Damry, T; Chamot, J M; Dru, V

    2015-10-01

    Walking as a means to interact with the environment has a twofold goal: body displacement (intermediate goal) and the future action on the environment (final representational goal). This involves different processes that plan, program, and control goal-directed locomotion linked to motivation as an "emotional state," which leads to achieving this twofold goal. The aim of the present study was to determine whether emotional valence associated with the final representational goal influences these processes or whether they depend more on the emotional valence associated with the intermediate goal in young adults. Twenty subjects, aged 18-35 years, were instructed to erase an emotional picture that appeared on a wall as soon as they saw it. They had to press a stop button located 5 m in front of them with their right hand. Their gait was analyzed using a force platform and the Vicon system. The main results suggest that the emotional valence of the intermediate goal has the greatest effect on the processes that organize and modulate goal-directed locomotion. A positive valence facilitates cognitive processes involved in the temporal organization of locomotion. A negative valence disturbs the cognitive processes involved in the spatial organization of the locomotion and online motor control, leading to a deviating trajectory and a final body position that is more distant from the stop button. These results are discussed in line with the motivational direction hypothesis and with the affective meaning of the intended response goal. PMID:26126802

  19. Locomotion and Body Shape Changes of Metabolically Different C.elegans in Fluids with Varying Viscosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rachel; Brenowitz, Noah; Shen, Amy

    2010-11-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C.elegans) are soil dwelling roundworms that have served as model organisms for studying a multitude of biological and engineering phenomena. On agar, the locomotion of the worm is sinusoidal, while in water, the swimming motion of the worm appears more episodic. The efficiency of the worm locomotion is tested by placing the worm in four fluids with varying viscosities. We quantify the locomotion pattern variations by categorizing the swimming kinematics and shapes of the C.elegans. The locomotion of two mutants C.elegans and a control C.elegans was tested: daf2, nhr49, and N2 Wildtype. The metabolic effects of the worms are evaluated by focusing on the forward swimming velocity, wavelength, amplitude and swimming frequency were compared. Using these measured values, we were able to quantify the efficiency, the speed of propagation of the wave along the body resulting in forward movement (wave velocity), and transverse velocity, defined as the amplitude times the frequency, of the worm locomotion. It was shown that C.elegans has a preferential swimming shape that adapts as the environment changes regardless of its efficiency.

  20. Diencephalic regulation of respiration and arterial pressure during actual and fictive locomotion in cat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Eldridge, F L; Waldrop, T G; Kiley, J P

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine by experimentation the hypothesis that the respiratory and circulatory responses during exercise are attributable to command signals that emanate from the suprapontine brain. We studied the relations between locomotion (exercise) and phrenic nerve activity and arterial pressure in cats that walked or ran on a treadmill and in animals during fictive locomotion, i.e., locomotor activity in motor nerves to legs. Anesthetized cats with intact brains and unanesthetized decorticated cats were used. All preparations exhibited spontaneous actual and fictive locomotion. Electrical stimulation or microinjection of picrotoxin, a GABA antagonist, of the subthalamic locomotor areas always caused locomotion to develop. Phrenic nerve activity and arterial pressure increased in proportion to the level of locomotor activity despite control or ablation of feedback signals from chemoreceptors and vagal receptors. Similar relations were measured during fictive locomotion despite the absence of muscular contraction and limb movement and the lack of change in metabolic rate. These findings provide experimental support for the central command hypothesis for the genesis of the respiratory hyperpnea and increased cardiovascular function that occur during exercise. We believe that the command signals emanate from the subthalamic locomotor area of the diencephalon. PMID:3652403

  1. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... defectives equal to an AQL of 1% or less, as set forth in 7 CFR part 43. (2) Each locomotive built before... ambient air temperature is between 32 degrees and 104 degrees Fahrenheit inclusively; relative humidity is.... The observer shall not stand between the microphone and the horn. (8) Background noise shall...

  2. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... defectives equal to an AQL of 1% or less, as set forth in 7 CFR part 43. (2) Each locomotive built before... ambient air temperature is between 32 degrees and 104 degrees Fahrenheit inclusively; relative humidity is.... The observer shall not stand between the microphone and the horn. (8) Background noise shall...

  3. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... defectives equal to an AQL of 1% or less, as set forth in 7 CFR part 43. (2) Each locomotive built before... ambient air temperature is between 32 degrees and 104 degrees Fahrenheit inclusively; relative humidity is.... The observer shall not stand between the microphone and the horn. (8) Background noise shall...

  4. 77 FR 23159 - Locomotive Safety Standards; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... rule related to locomotive safety standards. See 77 FR 21312. The final rule established a public... safety standards and comments on such petitions. That final rule mistakenly lists FR-2009- 0095... is FRA-2009-0094. The final rule issued on April 9, 2012, incorrectly identified docket number...

  5. 49 CFR 229.129 - Locomotive horn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... defectives equal to an AQL of 1% or less, as set forth in 7 CFR part 43. (2) Each locomotive built before... Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 61672-1 (2002-05) for a Class 2 instrument. (2) An acoustic calibrator... with the acoustic calibrator immediately before and after compliance tests. Any change in the...

  6. Learning in the Development of Infant Locomotion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.

    1997-01-01

    Examined how infants acquire adaptive locomotion in the novel task of going up and down slopes. Found that infants' judgments became increasingly accurate and exploration became increasingly efficient, with no transfer over the transition from crawling to walking. Infants learned to gauge their abilities on-line as they encountered each hill at…

  7. Evidence for Motor Simulation in Imagined Locomotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunz, Benjamin R.; Creem-Regehr, Sarah H.; Thompson, William B.

    2009-01-01

    A series of experiments examined the role of the motor system in imagined movement, finding a strong relationship between imagined walking performance and the biomechanical information available during actual walking. Experiments 1 through 4 established the finding that real and imagined locomotion differ in absolute walking time. We then tested…

  8. Energetics and mechanics for partial gravity locomotion.

    PubMed

    Newman, D J; Alexander, H L; Webbon, B W

    1994-09-01

    The role of gravitational acceleration on human locomotion is not clearly understood. It is hypothesized that the mechanics and energetics of locomotion depend upon the prevailing gravity level. A unique human-rated underwater treadmill and an adjustable ballasting harness were used to stimulate partial gravity environments. This study has two research aspects, biomechanics and energetics. Vertical forces which are exerted by subjects on the treadmill-mounted, split-plate force platform show that peak vertical force and stride frequency significantly decrease (p < 0.05) as the gravity level is reduced, while ground contact time is independent of gravity level. A loping gait is employed over a wide range of speeds (approximately 1.5 m/s to approximately 2.3 m/s) suggesting a change in the mechanics for lunar (1/6 G) and Martian (3/8 G) locomotion. As theory predicts, locomotion energy requirements for partial gravity levels are significantly less than at 1 G (p < 0.05). PMID:7818450

  9. The role of locomotion in psychological development

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David I.; Campos, Joseph J.; Witherington, David C.; Dahl, Audun; Rivera, Monica; He, Minxuan; Uchiyama, Ichiro; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The psychological revolution that follows the onset of independent locomotion in the latter half of the infant's first year provides one of the best illustrations of the intimate connection between action and psychological processes. In this paper, we document some of the dramatic changes in perception-action coupling, spatial cognition, memory, and social and emotional development that follow the acquisition of independent locomotion. We highlight the range of converging research operations that have been used to examine the relation between locomotor experience and psychological development, and we describe recent attempts to uncover the processes that underlie this relation. Finally, we address three important questions about the relation that have received scant attention in the research literature. These questions include: (1) What changes in the brain occur when infants acquire experience with locomotion? (2) What role does locomotion play in the maintenance of psychological function? (3) What implications do motor disabilities have for psychological development? Seeking the answers to these questions can provide rich insights into the relation between action and psychological processes and the general processes that underlie human development. PMID:23888146

  10. 30 CFR 57.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Locomotives. 57.6203 Section 57.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6203...

  11. 30 CFR 57.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Locomotives. 57.6203 Section 57.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6203...

  12. 30 CFR 57.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Locomotives. 57.6203 Section 57.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6203...

  13. 30 CFR 57.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Locomotives. 57.6203 Section 57.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6203...

  14. 30 CFR 57.6203 - Locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Locomotives. 57.6203 Section 57.6203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6203...

  15. Lizard locomotion in heterogeneous granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Goldman, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Locomotion strategies in heterogeneous granular environments (common substrates in deserts), are relatively unexplored. The zebra-tailed lizard (C. draconoides) is a useful model organism for such studies owing to its exceptional ability to navigate a variety of desert habitats at impressive speed (up to 50 body-lengths per second) using both quadrapedal and bidepal gaits. In laboratory experiments, we challenge the lizards to run across a field of boulders (2.54 cm diameter glass spheres or 3.8 cm 3D printed spheres) placed in a lattice pattern and embedded in a loosely packed granular medium of 0.3 mm diameter glass particles. Locomotion kinematics of the lizard are recorded using high speed cameras, with and without the scatterers. The data reveals that unlike the lizard's typical quadrupedal locomotion using a diagonal gait, when scatterers are present the lizard is most successful when using a bipedal gait, with a raised center of mass (CoM). We propose that the kinematics of bipedal running in conjunction with the lizard's long toes and compliant hind foot are the keys to this lizard's successful locomotion in the presence of such obstacles. NSF PoLS

  16. Hybrid magnetic mechanism for active locomotion based on inchworm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic robots have been studied in the past. Insect-type micro-robots are used in various biomedical applications; researchers have developed inchworm micro-robots for endoscopic use. A biological inchworm has a looping locomotion gait. However, most inchworm micro-robots depend on a general bending, or bellows, motion. In this paper, we introduce a new robotic mechanism using magnetic force and torque control in a rotating magnetic field for a looping gait. The proposed robot is controlled by the magnetic torque, attractive force, and body mechanisms (two stoppers, flexible body, and different frictional legs). The magnetic torque generates a general bending motion. In addition, the attractive force and body mechanisms produce the robot’s looping motion within a rotating magnetic field and without the use of an algorithm for field control. We verified the device’s performance and analyzed the motion through simulations and various experiments. The robot mechanism can be applied to active locomotion for various medical robots, such as wireless endoscopes.

  17. 49 CFR 229.207 - New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-approved locomotive crashworthiness design standards. (a) General. The following procedures govern... approval of a locomotive crashworthiness design standard must be titled “Petition for FRA Approval of a New... petition for approval of a substantive change to an FRA-approved locomotive crashworthiness design...

  18. 49 CFR 1242.60 - Locomotive fuel, electric power purchased/produced for motive power and servicing locomotives...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locomotive fuel, electric power purchased/produced for motive power and servicing locomotives (accounts XX-51-67, XX-51-68 and XX-51-69). 1242.60 Section...-Transportation § 1242.60 Locomotive fuel, electric power purchased/produced for motive power and...

  19. 49 CFR 229.207 - New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false New locomotive crashworthiness design standards... Design Requirements § 229.207 New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA... consideration and action upon requests for FRA approval of new locomotive crashworthiness design standards...

  20. 49 CFR 1242.60 - Locomotive fuel, electric power purchased/produced for motive power and servicing locomotives...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locomotive fuel, electric power purchased/produced for motive power and servicing locomotives (accounts XX-51-67, XX-51-68 and XX-51-69). 1242.60 Section...-Transportation § 1242.60 Locomotive fuel, electric power purchased/produced for motive power and...

  1. Discordance in recovery between altered locomotion and muscle atrophy induced by simulated microgravity in rats.

    PubMed

    Tajino, Junichi; Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Zhang, Xiangkai; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to a microgravity environment leads to adverse effects in motion and musculoskeletal properties. However, few studies have investigated the recovery of altered locomotion and muscle atrophy simultaneously. The authors investigated altered locomotion in rats submitted to simulated microgravity by hindlimb unloading for 2 weeks. Motion deficits were characterized by hyperextension of the knees and ankle joints and forward-shifted limb motion. Furthermore, these locomotor deficits did not revert to their original form after a 2-week recovery period, although muscle atrophy in the hindlimbs had recovered, implying discordance in recovery between altered locomotion and muscle atrophy, and that other factors such as neural drives might control behavioral adaptations to microgravity. PMID:25789843

  2. [Changes in the parameters of locomotion following partial extirpation of the motor cortex in white rats].

    PubMed

    Lenkov, D N; Vereshchak, N I

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative locomotion changes have been studied in the norm and in different periods after local ablation of motor projection of hind paw in the right hemisphere of 5-16 weeks white rats. The length and width of step gradually increase with the age, and coefficients of gait asymmetry reflecting individual characteristics, are relatively stable in intact animals. Local decortication is accompanied by significant shifts of all locomotion parameters clearly expressed in the first days after ablation. The most sensitive characteristic of gait anomaly is the standard deviation of half-step. In 5 weeks after ablation a lag is observed of operated rats behind the control ones in all parameters. Load application contributes to revealing of locomotion parameters shifts from the norm in later periods after decortication. In 9 and 11 weeks after surgery, the signs of supercompensation are observed in a number of parameters. PMID:2735116

  3. Stepper motor drive for on load tapchanger in electric locomotive

    SciTech Connect

    Aruna Kumar, G.V.D.; Kumar, S.; Mishra, P.; Wadhonkar, N.K.

    1995-12-31

    Indian Railways have a fleet of 2,200 electrical locomotives running on 25 KV ac traction. An on-load tap changer is used to select voltage for speed control of dc traction motor. A four stroke reciprocating type air motor is used presently to drive the tap changer (GR). Complex gear and camshaft mechanism is used to move tap changer and to generate various logic signals for safe loco operation. The annual failure rate for tap changer and its drive is of the order of 20%. A microprocessor controlled stepper motor drive has been designed and constructed to drive the on-load tap changer. A current controlled chopper is used to drive the motor and control logic has been generated through an optimum hardware and software combination. The assembly has been tested on a prototype tap changer in the laboratory.

  4. Climbing, falling, and jamming during ant locomotion in confined environments

    PubMed Central

    Gravish, Nick; Monaenkova, Daria; Goodisman, Michael A. D.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    Locomotion emerges from effective interactions of an individual with its environment. Principles of biological terrestrial locomotion have been discovered on unconfined vertical and horizontal substrates. However, a diversity of organisms construct, inhabit, and move within confined spaces. Such animals are faced with locomotor challenges including limited limb range of motion, crowding, and visual sensory deprivation. Little is known about how these organisms accomplish their locomotor tasks, and such environments challenge human-made devices. To gain insight into how animals move within confined spaces, we study the locomotion of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta, which constructs subterranean tunnel networks (nests). Laboratory experiments reveal that ants construct tunnels with diameter, D, comparable to body length, L = 3.5 ± 0.5 mm. Ants can move rapidly (> 9 bodylengths per s) within these environments; their tunnels allow for effective limb, body, and antennae interaction with walls, which facilitate rapid slip-recovery during ascending and descending climbs. To examine the limits of slip-recovery in artificial tunnels, we perform perturbations consisting of rapid downward accelerations of the tunnels, which induce falls. Below a critical tunnel diameter, Ds = 1.31 ± 0.02 L, falls are always arrested through rapid interaction of appendages and antennae with tunnel walls to jam the falls. Ds is comparable to the size of incipient nest tunnels (D = 1.06 ± 0.23 L), supporting our hypothesis that fire ants construct environments that simplify their control task when moving through the nest, likely without need for rapid nervous system intervention. PMID:23690589

  5. Climbing, falling, and jamming during ant locomotion in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Monaenkova, Daria; Goodisman, Michael A D; Goldman, Daniel I

    2013-06-11

    Locomotion emerges from effective interactions of an individual with its environment. Principles of biological terrestrial locomotion have been discovered on unconfined vertical and horizontal substrates. However, a diversity of organisms construct, inhabit, and move within confined spaces. Such animals are faced with locomotor challenges including limited limb range of motion, crowding, and visual sensory deprivation. Little is known about how these organisms accomplish their locomotor tasks, and such environments challenge human-made devices. To gain insight into how animals move within confined spaces, we study the locomotion of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta, which constructs subterranean tunnel networks (nests). Laboratory experiments reveal that ants construct tunnels with diameter, D, comparable to body length, L = 3.5 ± 0.5 mm. Ants can move rapidly (> 9 bodylengths per s) within these environments; their tunnels allow for effective limb, body, and antennae interaction with walls, which facilitate rapid slip-recovery during ascending and descending climbs. To examine the limits of slip-recovery in artificial tunnels, we perform perturbations consisting of rapid downward accelerations of the tunnels, which induce falls. Below a critical tunnel diameter, Ds = 1.31 ± 0.02 L, falls are always arrested through rapid interaction of appendages and antennae with tunnel walls to jam the falls. Ds is comparable to the size of incipient nest tunnels (D = 1.06 ± 0.23 L), supporting our hypothesis that fire ants construct environments that simplify their control task when moving through the nest, likely without need for rapid nervous system intervention. PMID:23690589

  6. Fuel-free locomotion of Janus motors: magnetically induced thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Baraban, Larysa; Streubel, Robert; Makarov, Denys; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy; Schmidt, Oliver G; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-02-26

    We present fuel-free locomotion of magnetic spherical Janus motors driven by magnetically induced thermophoresis--a self-diffusive propulsion of an object in any liquid media due to a local temperature gradient. Within this approach an ac magnetic field is applied to induce thermophoretic motion of the objects via heating a magnetic cap of the particles, while an additional dc magnetic field is used to orient Janus motors and guide their motion on a long time scale. Full control over the motion is achieved due to specific properties of ultrathin 100-nm-thick Permalloy (Py, Fe₁₉Ni₈₁ alloys) magnetic films resulting in a topologically stable magnetic vortex state in the cap structure of Janus motors. Realized here magnetically induced thermophoretic locomotion does not require catalytic chemical reactions that imply toxic reagents. In this respect, we addressed and successfully solved one of the main shortcomings in the field of artificial motors, namely being fully controlled and remain biocompatible. Therefore, our approach is attractive for biotechnological in vitro assays and even in vivo operations, since the functioning of Janus motors offers low toxicity; it is not dependent on the presence of the fuel molecules in solution. Furthermore, the suggested magnetic ac excitation is superior compared to the previously proposed optically induced heating using lasers as it does not require transparent packaging. PMID:23268780

  7. Locomotion in the rat after 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Clarke, K A; Parker, A J; Stirk, G C

    1984-02-17

    Previous work has shown that administration of 5HTP in amounts substantially less than those required to elicit 'serotonin syndrome' to rats pretreated witha peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor, produced increases in locomotion, measured by whole body movements. The purpose of the present work was to study the cyclic shifts of weights from side to side which underly the progress of locomotion and to see whether these change after 5HTP. From the reciprocal of the interval for one complete cycle was calculated the weight transferral frequency (WTF). The modal WTF for control and treated rats were in the ranges 1-1.49 and 2-2.49 Hz respectively, while the medians were in the ranges 2-2.49 and 2.5-2.99 Hz respectively. Testing of goodness of fit between the frequency distribution curves in control and treated animals showed significant differences. It is concluded that after 5HTP treatment, basic locomotor patterns are shifted towards higher frequencies. PMID:6609078

  8. 49 CFR 236.1006 - Equipping locomotives operating in PTC territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... segment equipped with a PTC system shall be controlled by a locomotive equipped with an onboard PTC... shall include in its PTCIP specific goals for progressive implementation of onboard systems and... operative PTC onboard equipment. The PTCIP shall include a brief but sufficient explanation of how...

  9. 49 CFR 236.1006 - Equipping locomotives operating in PTC territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... segment equipped with a PTC system shall be controlled by a locomotive equipped with an onboard PTC... shall include in its PTCIP specific goals for progressive implementation of onboard systems and... operative PTC onboard equipment. The PTCIP shall include a brief but sufficient explanation of how...

  10. 49 CFR 236.1006 - Equipping locomotives operating in PTC territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... segment equipped with a PTC system shall be controlled by a locomotive equipped with an onboard PTC... shall include in its PTCIP specific goals for progressive implementation of onboard systems and... operative PTC onboard equipment. The PTCIP shall include a brief but sufficient explanation of how...

  11. 49 CFR 236.1006 - Equipping locomotives operating in PTC territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... segment equipped with a PTC system shall be controlled by a locomotive equipped with an onboard PTC... shall include in its PTCIP specific goals for progressive implementation of onboard systems and... operative PTC onboard equipment. The PTCIP shall include a brief but sufficient explanation of how...

  12. 49 CFR 236.1006 - Equipping locomotives operating in PTC territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... segment equipped with a PTC system shall be controlled by a locomotive equipped with an onboard PTC... shall include in its PTCIP specific goals for progressive implementation of onboard systems and... operative PTC onboard equipment. The PTCIP shall include a brief but sufficient explanation of how...

  13. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  14. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  15. Pyramidal tract neurons receptive to different forelimb joints act differently during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Erik E.

    2012-01-01

    During locomotion, motor cortical neurons projecting to the pyramidal tract (PTNs) discharge in close relation to strides. How their discharges vary based on the part of the body they influence is not well understood. We addressed this question with regard to joints of the forelimb in the cat. During simple and ladder locomotion, we compared the activity of four groups of PTNs with somatosensory receptive fields involving different forelimb joints: 1) 45 PTNs receptive to movements of shoulder, 2) 30 PTNs receptive to movements of elbow, 3) 40 PTNs receptive to movements of wrist, and 4) 30 nonresponsive PTNs. In the motor cortex, a relationship exists between the location of the source of afferent input and the target for motor output. On the basis of this relationship, we inferred the forelimb joint that a PTN influences from its somatosensory receptive field. We found that different PTNs tended to discharge differently during locomotion. During simple locomotion shoulder-related PTNs were most active during late stance/early swing, and upon transition from simple to ladder locomotion they often increased activity and stride-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically did not change activity, modulation, or discharge duration on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing and upon transition to the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration. These data suggest that during locomotion the motor cortex uses distinct mechanisms to control the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. PMID:22236716

  16. Regulation of two motor patterns enables the gradual adjustment of locomotion strategy in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hums, Ingrid; Riedl, Julia; Mende, Fanny; Kato, Saul; Kaplan, Harris S; Latham, Richard; Sonntag, Michael; Traunmüller, Lisa; Zimmer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In animal locomotion a tradeoff exists between stereotypy and flexibility: fast long-distance travelling (LDT) requires coherent regular motions, while local sampling and area-restricted search (ARS) rely on flexible movements. We report here on a posture control system in C. elegans that coordinates these needs. Using quantitative posture analysis we explain worm locomotion as a composite of two modes: regular undulations versus flexible turning. Graded reciprocal regulation of both modes allows animals to flexibly adapt their locomotion strategy under sensory stimulation along a spectrum ranging from LDT to ARS. Using genetics and functional imaging of neural activity we characterize the counteracting interneurons AVK and DVA that utilize FLP-1 and NLP-12 neuropeptides to control both motor modes. Gradual regulation of behaviors via this system is required for spatial navigation during chemotaxis. This work shows how a nervous system controls simple elementary features of posture to generate complex movements for goal-directed locomotion strategies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14116.001 PMID:27222228

  17. Locomotion of chemically powered autonomous nanowire motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Longqiu; Li, Tianlong; Zhang, Guangyu; Sun, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Physical insights on the hydrodynamics and locomotion of self-propelled nanowire motor under nonequilibrium steady state are investigated using finite element method in accordance with hybrid molecular dynamics/multiparticle collision dynamics and rigid body dynamics. Nanowire motor is discretized into finite segments, and forces of solvent molecule acting on the motor are assumed to be the sum of forces acting on all segments of the motor. We show that the locomotion of nanowire motor is mainly determined by the imbalance forces acting on the catalytic and noncatalytic segments. The average velocity along the axis increases significantly as a function of time prior to reaching equilibrium. The length of nanowire motor shows negligible effect on the velocity of the motor. Preliminary experimental results are provided to validate the current model.

  18. Differences in gaze anticipation for locomotion with and without vision.

    PubMed

    Authié, Colas N; Hilt, Pauline M; N'Guyen, Steve; Berthoz, Alain; Bennequin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown a spontaneous anticipation of locomotor trajectory by the head and gaze direction during human locomotion. This anticipatory behavior could serve several functions: an optimal selection of visual information, for instance through landmarks and optic flow, as well as trajectory planning and motor control. This would imply that anticipation remains in darkness but with different characteristics. We asked 10 participants to walk along two predefined complex trajectories (limaçon and figure eight) without any cue on the trajectory to follow. Two visual conditions were used: (i) in light and (ii) in complete darkness with eyes open. The whole body kinematics were recorded by motion capture, along with the participant's right eye movements. We showed that in darkness and in light, horizontal gaze anticipates the orientation of the head which itself anticipates the trajectory direction. However, the horizontal angular anticipation decreases by a half in darkness for both gaze and head. In both visual conditions we observed an eye nystagmus with similar properties (frequency and amplitude). The main difference comes from the fact that in light, there is a shift of the orientations of the eye nystagmus and the head in the direction of the trajectory. These results suggest that a fundamental function of gaze is to represent self motion, stabilize the perception of space during locomotion, and to simulate the future trajectory, regardless of the vision condition. PMID:26106313

  19. Numerical Model for Fish-Like Locomotion in Potential Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melli-Huber, Juan; Rowley, Clarence; Rufat, Dzhelil; Kanso, Eva; Marsden, Jerrold

    2004-11-01

    An accurate yet tractable model of fish-like locomotion is essential for the design and control of underwater vehicles with advanced swimming capabilities and improved efficiency. Our emphasis is on developing a model that predicts forces and moments accurately, yet is simple enough to apply mathematical tools for analyzing robotic locomotion. We focus on modeling thunniform-type swimming in which a high-aspect ratio tail moves relative to a fairly rigid body. The fish is modeled as a discrete number of rigid bodies, which may represent the body, peduncle and tail. We have developed a numerical model to simulate the motion of rigid bodies in an inviscid, incompressible two-dimensional potential flow with no pre-existing vorticity. Although the flow is inviscid and there is no vorticity or mechanism for generating vorticity, the motion of the bodies will be coupled due to their added inertia terms. Unlike previous models, this work is not restricted to small amplitude motions, does not assume that the bodies are hydrodynamically decoupled and allows for arbitrary body geometry. We present gaits to achieve steering and forward motion and compare the result to a hydrodynamically decoupled model.

  20. Multi-limbed locomotion systems for space construction and maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, K. J.; Klein, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    A well developed technology of coordination of multi-limbed locomotory systems is now available. Results from a NASA sponsored study of several years ago are presented. This was a simulation study of a three-limbed locomotion/manipulation system. Each limb had six degrees of freedom and could be used either as a locomotory grasping hand-holds, or as a manipulator. The focus of the study was kinematic coordination algorithms. The presentation will also include very recent results from the Adaptive Suspension Vehicle Project. The Adaptive Suspension Vehicle (ASV) is a legged locomotion system designed for terrestrial use which is capable of operating in completely unstructured terrain in either a teleoperated or operator-on-board mode. Future development may include autonomous operation. The ASV features a very advanced coordination and control system which could readily be adapted to operation in space. An inertial package with a vertical gyro, and rate gyros and accelerometers on three orthogonal axes provides body position information at high bandwidth. This is compared to the operator's commands, injected via a joystick to provide a commanded force system on the vehicle's body. This system is, in turn, decomposed by a coordination algorithm into force commands to those legs which are in contact with the ground.

  1. Testosterone attenuates and the selective estrogen receptor modulator, raloxifene, potentiates amphetamine-induced locomotion in male rats.

    PubMed

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Boerrigter, Danny; Allen, Katherine; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Karl, Tim; Djunaidi, Vanezha; Double, Kay L; Desai, Reena; Handelsman, David J; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2015-04-01

    Although sex steroids are known to modulate brain dopamine, it is still unclear how testosterone modifies locomotor behaviour controlled, at least in part, by striatal dopamine in adolescent males. Our previous work suggests that increasing testosterone during adolescence may bias midbrain neurons to synthesise more dopamine. We hypothesised that baseline and amphetamine-induced locomotion would differ in adult males depending on testosterone exposure during adolescence. We hypothesised that concomitant stimulation of estrogen receptor signaling, through a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), raloxifene, can counter testosterone effects on locomotion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at postnatal day 45 were gonadectomised (G) or sham-operated (S) prior to the typical adolescent testosterone increase. Gonadectomised rats were either given testosterone replacement (T) or blank implants (B) for six weeks and sham-operated (i.e. intact or endogenous testosterone group) were given blank implants. Subgroups of sham-operated, gonadectomised and gonadectomised/testosterone-replaced rats were treated with raloxifene (R, 5mg/kg) or vehicle (V), daily for the final four weeks. There were six groups (SBV, GBV, GTV, SBR, GBR, GTR). Saline and amphetamine-induced (1.25mg/kg) locomotion in the open field was measured at PND85. Gonadectomy increased amphetamine-induced locomotion compared to rats with endogenous or with exogenous testosterone. Raloxifene increased amphetamine-induced locomotion in rats with either endogenous or exogenous testosterone. Amphetamine-induced locomotion was negatively correlated with testosterone and this relationship was abolished by raloxifene. Lack of testosterone during adolescence potentiates and testosterone exposure during adolescence attenuates amphetamine-induced locomotion. Treatment with raloxifene appears to potentiate amphetamine-induced locomotion and to have an opposite effect to that of testosterone in male rats. PMID:25747465

  2. Kinematic adaptations to tripedal locomotion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Goldner, B; Fuchs, A; Nolte, I; Schilling, N

    2015-05-01

    Limb amputation often represents the only treatment option for canine patients with certain diseases or injuries of the appendicular system. Previous studies have investigated adaptations to tripedal locomotion in dogs but there is a lack of understanding of biomechanical compensatory mechanisms. This study evaluated the kinematic differences between quadrupedal and tripedal locomotion in nine healthy dogs running on a treadmill. The loss of the right pelvic limb was simulated using an Ehmer sling. Kinematic gait analysis included spatio-temporal comparisons of limb, joint and segment angles of the remaining pelvic and both thoracic limbs. The following key parameters were compared between quadrupedal and tripedal conditions: angles at touch-down and lift-off, minimum and maximum joint angles, plus range of motion. Significant differences in angular excursion were identified in several joints of each limb during both stance and swing phases. The most pronounced differences concerned the remaining pelvic limb, followed by the contralateral thoracic limb and, to a lesser degree, the ipsilateral thoracic limb. The thoracic limbs were, in general, more retracted, consistent with pelvic limb unloading and previous observations of bodyweight re-distribution in amputees. Proximal limb segments showed more distinct changes than distal ones. Particularly, the persistently greater anteversion of the pelvis probably affects the axial system. Overall, tripedal locomotion requires concerted kinematic adjustments of both the appendicular and axial systems, and consequently preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitative care of canine amputees should involve the whole musculoskeletal apparatus. PMID:25862392

  3. Shark skin: function in locomotion.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, S A; Vosburgh, F; Hebrank, J H

    1978-11-17

    Hydrostatic pressure under the skin of sharks varies with swimming speed. Stress in the skin varies with the internal pressure, and the skin stress controls skin stiffness. Locomotory muscles attach to the skin which is thus a whole-body exotendon whose mechanical advantage in transmitting muscular contraction is greater than that of the endoskeleton. PMID:17807247

  4. System Design and Locomotion of Superball, an Untethered Tensegrity Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Andrew P.; Bruce, Jonathan; Caluwaerts, Ken; Manovi, Pavlo; Firoozi, Roya Fallah; Dobi, Sarah; Agogino, Alice M.; Sunspiral, Vytas

    2015-01-01

    The Spherical Underactuated Planetary Exploration Robot ball (SUPERball) is an ongoing project within NASA Ames Research Center's Intelligent Robotics Group and the Dynamic Tensegrity Robotics Lab (DTRL). The current SUPERball is the first full prototype of this tensegrity robot platform, eventually destined for space exploration missions. This work, building on prior published discussions of individual components, presents the fully-constructed robot. Various design improvements are discussed, as well as testing results of the sensors and actuators that illustrate system performance. Basic low-level motor position controls are implemented and validated against sensor data, which show SUPERball to be uniquely suited for highly dynamic state trajectory tracking. Finally, SUPERball is shown in a simple example of locomotion. This implementation of a basic motion primitive shows SUPERball in untethered control.

  5. Electric field-induced chemical locomotion of conducting objects.

    PubMed

    Loget, Gabriel; Kuhn, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Externally triggered motion of small objects has potential in applications ranging from micromachines, to drug delivery, and self-assembly of superstructures. Here we present a new concept for the controlled propulsion of conducting objects with sizes ranging from centimetres to hundreds of micrometres. It is based on their polarization, induced by an electric field, which triggers spatially separated oxidation and reduction reactions involving asymmetric gas bubble formation. This in turn leads to a directional motion of the objects. Depending on the implied redox chemistry and the device design, the speed can be controlled and the motion can be switched from linear to rotational. This type of chemical locomotion is an alternative to existing approaches based on other principles. PMID:22086336

  6. Locomotion with flexible propulsors: I. Experimental analysis of pectoral fin swimming in sunfish.

    PubMed

    Lauder, George V; Madden, Peter G A; Mittal, Rajat; Dong, Haibo; Bozkurttas, Meliha

    2006-12-01

    A full understanding of the mechanics of locomotion can be achieved by incorporating descriptions of (1) three-dimensional kinematics of propulsor movement, (2) material properties of the propulsor, (3) power input and control and (4) the fluid dynamics effects of propulsor motion into (5) a three-dimensional computational framework that models the complexity of propulsors that deform and change area. In addition, robotic models would allow for further experimental investigation of changes to propulsor design and for testing of hypothesized relationships between movement and force production. Such a comprehensive suite of data is not yet available for any flexible propulsor. In this paper, we summarize our research program with the goal of producing a comprehensive data set for each of the five components noted above through a study of pectoral fin locomotion in one species of fish: the bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus. Many fish use pectoral fins exclusively for locomotion, and pectoral fins in most fish are integral to generating force during maneuvering. Pectoral fins are complex structures composed of jointed bony supports that are under active control via pectoral fin musculature. During propulsion in sunfish, the fin deforms considerably, has two leading edges, and sunfish can rotate the whole fin or just control individual sections to vector thrust. Fin material properties vary along the length of fin rays and among rays. Experimental fluid dynamic analysis of sunfish pectoral fin locomotion reveals that the fin generates thrust throughout the fin beat cycle, and that the upper and lower edges each produce distinct simultaneous leading edge vortices. The following companion paper provides data on the computational approach taken to understand locomotion using flexible pectoral fins. PMID:17671315

  7. From Beetles in Nature to the Laboratory: Actuating Underwater Locomotion on Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinchasik, Bat-El; Steinkühler, Jan; Wuytens, Pieter; Skirtach, Andre G; Fratzl, Peter; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2015-12-29

    The controlled wetting and dewetting of surfaces is a primary mechanism used by beetles in nature, such as the ladybird and the leaf beetle for underwater locomotion.1 Their adhesion to surfaces underwater is enabled through the attachment of bubbles trapped in their setae-covered legs. Locomotion, however, is performed by applying mechanical forces in order to move, attach, and detach the bubbles in a controlled manner. Under synthetic conditions, however, when a bubble is bound to a surface, it is nearly impossible to maneuver without the use of external stimuli. Thus, actuated wetting and dewetting of surfaces remain challenges. Here, electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) is used for the manipulation of bubble-particle complexes on unpatterned surfaces. Bubbles nucleate on catalytic Janus disks adjacent to a hydrophobic surface. By changing the wettability of the surface through electrowetting, the bubbles show a variety of reactions, depending on the shape and periodicity of the electrical signal. Time-resolved (μs) imaging of bubble radial oscillations reveals possible mechanisms for the lateral mobility of bubbles on a surface under electrowetting: bubble instability is induced when electric pulses are carefully adjusted. This instability is used to control the surface-bound bubble locomotion and is described in terms of the change in surface energy. It is shown that a deterministic force applied normal can lead to a random walk of micrometer-sized bubbles by exploiting the phenomenon of contact angle hysteresis. Finally, bubble use in nature for underwater locomotion and the actuated bubble locomotion presented in this study are compared. PMID:26633751

  8. An ontogenetic framework linking locomotion and trabecular bone architecture with applications for reconstructing hominin life history.

    PubMed

    Raichlen, David A; Gordon, Adam D; Foster, Adam D; Webber, James T; Sukhdeo, Simone M; Scott, Robert S; Gosman, James H; Ryan, Timothy M

    2015-04-01

    The ontogeny of bipedal walking is considered uniquely challenging, due in part to the balance requirements of single limb support. Thus, locomotor development in humans and our bipedal ancestors may track developmental milestones including the maturation of the neuromuscular control system. Here, we examined the ontogeny of locomotor mechanics in children aged 1-8, and bone growth and development in an age-matched skeletal sample to identify bony markers of locomotor development. We show that step-to-step variation in mediolateral tibia angle relative to the vertical decreases with age, an indication that older children increase stability. Analyses of trabecular bone architecture in the distal tibia of an age-matched skeletal sample (the Norris Farms #36 archaeological skeletal collection) show a bony signal of this shift in locomotor stability. Using a grid of eleven cubic volumes of interest (VOI) in the distal metaphysis of each tibia, we show that the degree of anisotropy (DA) of trabecular struts changes with age. Intra-individual variation in DA across these VOIs is generally high at young ages, likely reflecting variation in loading due to kinematic instability. With increasing age, mean DA converges on higher values and becomes less variable across the distal tibia. We believe the ontogeny of distal tibia trabecular architecture reflects the development of locomotor stability in bipeds. We suggest this novel bony marker of development may be used to assess the relationship between locomotor development and other life history milestones in fossil hominins. PMID:25743432

  9. Walking Robot Locomotion System Conception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatova, D.; Abadjieva, E.; Abadjiev, V.; Vatzkitchev, Al.

    2014-09-01

    This work is a brief analysis on the application and perspective of using the walking robots in different areas in practice. The most common characteristics of walking four legs robots are presented here. The specific features of the applied actuators in walking mechanisms are also shown in the article. The experience of Institute of Mechanics - BAS is illustrated in creation of Spiroid and Helicon1 gears and their assembly in actuation of studied robots. Loading on joints reductors of robot legs is modelled, when the geometrical and the walking parameters of the studied robot are preliminary defined. The obtained results are purposed for designing the control of the loading of reductor type Helicon in the legs of the robot, when it is experimentally tested.

  10. Industry review: Locomotive dynamic characterization test-analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Data are given relative to tests performed on locomotive components. Dynamic characteristics related to safety are described. Suspension systems, shock absorbers, data processing, bearings, and damping are discussed.

  11. Feedback Control of Floor Reaction Force Based on Force-Reflecting-Type Multilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kazuki; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Real-world haptics is being studied not only for improving feedback on real-world haptic information in teleoperation but also for developing key technologies for future human support. For the remote operating of systems at distant places, haptic information is required in addition to visual information. The haptic information around a work environment can be the floor reaction force, which can be obtained using a movement-type haptic device. The floor reaction force from the environment that the mobile haptic device touches is fed back accurately to the operator. First, this paper proposes a general force-reflecting-type multilateral control. Second, this paper extends the control to feedback control of the floor reaction force by using force-reflecting-type multilateral control and a novel haptic device employing a biped robot with a slave system. The position response of a master system is transformed to a leg tip position command for the biped-type haptic device. In addition, the floor reaction force determined by the biped-type haptic device is fed back to the master system. The proposed method can determine the force feedback to the sole of the foot, which is not possible with a conventional stationary system. As a result, the floor reaction force from a large area can be obtained, and the operability of the control system is improved by using the proposed system.

  12. Impact of pre-exposure of tail suspension on behavioural parameters like locomotion, exploration, and anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Kale, Pravin Popatrao; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu; Ghadawale, Shalaka Ramesh

    2013-09-01

    The tail suspension test (TST) is a valid tool for assessing antidepressant activity. Association between depression and lower locomotion and exploration activities is also reported. In the present study, photoactometer, hole board and elevated plus maze tests were performed to evaluate locomotion, exploration and anxiety activities on animals of first and second set, however animals of second set were pre-exposed to TST. The comparison between these two sets will help in understanding the impact of pre-exposure to TST on behavioural parameters. In both sets, swiss albino mice were treated with caffeine (10 mg/kg, ip), bupropion (10 mg/kg, ip), duloxetine (10 mg/kg, ip), nicotine (0.8 mg/kg, sc) and normal saline. Control group of second set showed significant decrease in locomotion, exploration and increase in anxiety when compared against control group of first set. In second set, duloxetine, bupropion, and nicotine treated groups showed significant increase in locomotion when compared against control group of same set. Overall, pre-exposure to TST leads to significant decrease in locomotion, exploration activities and increase in anxiety level. Further studies demonstrating it's time bound impact on brain monoamine levels with correlation to behavioural paradigms may help to validate these outcomes. PMID:24377133

  13. Quadrupedal Robot Locomotion: A Biologically Inspired Approach and Its Hardware Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Espinal, A.; Rostro-Gonzalez, H.; Carpio, M.; Guerra-Hernandez, E. I.; Ornelas-Rodriguez, M.; Puga-Soberanes, H. J.; Sotelo-Figueroa, M. A.; Melin, P.

    2016-01-01

    A bioinspired locomotion system for a quadruped robot is presented. Locomotion is achieved by a spiking neural network (SNN) that acts as a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) producing different locomotion patterns represented by their raster plots. To generate these patterns, the SNN is configured with specific parameters (synaptic weights and topologies), which were estimated by a metaheuristic method based on Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE). The system has been implemented and validated on two robot platforms; firstly, we tested our system on a quadruped robot and, secondly, on a hexapod one. In this last one, we simulated the case where two legs of the hexapod were amputated and its locomotion mechanism has been changed. For the quadruped robot, the control is performed by the spiking neural network implemented on an Arduino board with 35% of resource usage. In the hexapod robot, we used Spartan 6 FPGA board with only 3% of resource usage. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed system in both cases. PMID:27436997

  14. Quadrupedal Robot Locomotion: A Biologically Inspired Approach and Its Hardware Implementation.

    PubMed

    Espinal, A; Rostro-Gonzalez, H; Carpio, M; Guerra-Hernandez, E I; Ornelas-Rodriguez, M; Puga-Soberanes, H J; Sotelo-Figueroa, M A; Melin, P

    2016-01-01

    A bioinspired locomotion system for a quadruped robot is presented. Locomotion is achieved by a spiking neural network (SNN) that acts as a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) producing different locomotion patterns represented by their raster plots. To generate these patterns, the SNN is configured with specific parameters (synaptic weights and topologies), which were estimated by a metaheuristic method based on Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE). The system has been implemented and validated on two robot platforms; firstly, we tested our system on a quadruped robot and, secondly, on a hexapod one. In this last one, we simulated the case where two legs of the hexapod were amputated and its locomotion mechanism has been changed. For the quadruped robot, the control is performed by the spiking neural network implemented on an Arduino board with 35% of resource usage. In the hexapod robot, we used Spartan 6 FPGA board with only 3% of resource usage. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed system in both cases. PMID:27436997

  15. Continuous Locomotion-Mode Identification for Prosthetic Legs Based on Neuromuscular–Mechanical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Hargrove, Levi J.; Dou, Zhi; Rogers, Daniel R.; Englehart, Kevin B.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we developed an algorithm based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion to continuously recognize a variety of locomotion modes performed by patients with transfemoral (TF) amputations. Electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from gluteal and residual thigh muscles and ground reaction forces/moments measured from the prosthetic pylon were used as inputs to a phase-dependent pattern classifier for continuous locomotion-mode identification. The algorithm was evaluated using data collected from five patients with TF amputations. The results showed that neuromuscular–mechanical fusion outperformed methods that used only EMG signals or mechanical information. For continuous performance of one walking mode (i.e., static state), the interface based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion and a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm produced 99% or higher accuracy in the stance phase and 95% accuracy in the swing phase for locomotion-mode recognition. During mode transitions, the fusion-based SVM method correctly recognized all transitions with a sufficient predication time. These promising results demonstrate the potential of the continuous locomotion-mode classifier based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion for neural control of prosthetic legs. PMID:21768042

  16. Artificial spider: eight-legged arachnid and autonomous learning of locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshurafa, Nabil I.; Harmon, Justin T.

    2006-05-01

    Evolution has produced organisms whose locomotive agility and adaptivity mock the difficulty faced by robotic scientists. The problem of locomotion, which nature has solved so well, is surprisingly complex and difficult. We explore the ability of an artificial eight-legged arachnid, or animat, to autonomously learn a locomotive gait in a three-dimensional environment. We take a physics-based approach at modeling the world and the virtual body of the animat. The arachnid-like animat learns muscular control functions using simulated annealing techniques, which attempts to maximize forward velocity and minimize energy expenditure. We experiment with varying the weight of these parameters and the resulting locomotive gaits. We perform two experiments in which the first is a naive physics model of the body and world which uses point-masses and idealized joints and muscles. The second experiment is a more realistic simulation using rigid body elements with distributed mass, friction, motors, and mechanical joints. By emphasizing physical aspects we wish to minimize, a number of interesting gaits emerge.

  17. Optimal locomotion of mechanical rectifier systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Justin T.

    Vehicles utilizing animal locomotion mechanisms may possess increased performance parameters and the ability to overcome more difficult terrain than conventional wheel or propeller driven vehicles. The essential mechanism underlying animal locomotion can be viewed as mechanical rectification that converts periodic body movements to thrust force through interactions with the environment. This dissertation defines a general class of mechanical rectifiers as multi-body systems equipped with such thrust generation mechanisms. A general model is developed from the Euler-Lagrange equation and simplified by assuming small body oscillations around a given nominal posture. The model reveals that the rectifying dynamics can be captured by a bilinear (but not linear) term of body shape variables. An optimal gait problem is formulated for the bilinear rectifier model as a minimization of a quadratic cost function over the set of periodic functions subject to a constraint on the average locomotion velocity. We prove that a globally optimal solution is given by a harmonic gait that can be found by generalized eigenvalue computation with a line search over cycle frequencies. We verify the solution method through case studies of a two dimensional chain of links for which snake-like undulations and jellyfish-like flapping gaits are found to be optimal, and obtain analytical insights into determinants of optimal gaits from a simple disk-mass rectifier system. Lastly, we develop a dynamic model for batoid swimming featuring a 6 degree-of-freedom main body (position and orientation), with independent wing deformation (described as the motion of many discrete points in the body-fixed coordinate frame), and calculate various gaits. Multiple wing shapes and optimality criteria are considered, such as the maximum thrust to deflection ratio or minimum input power, and the resulting gaits are compared.

  18. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin's motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force. PMID:21797399

  19. Scaling Relations for Wheeled Locomotion in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slonaker, James; Kamrin, Ken

    Vehicular wheel design for use on granular material has not currently been perfected. Resistive Force Theory (RFT) is a reduced-order empirical model for granular drag, which shows promise to help simulate and understand locomotion processes to design more efficient wheels. Here we explore the fundamental scaling relations derived from RFT and their experimental validation. Similar to the non-dimensional scaling relations in fluid mechanics, the relative simplicity of RFT asserts that only one material parameter, the ''grain-structure coefficient'', is required, which reduces the complexity of the non-dimensional groups implied by the system. Therefore, wheels with differing input design parameters like size, mass, shape and even gravity, can be tested and their performance related to each other in predictable ways. We experimentally confirmed these relations by testing with 3D printed wheel geometries in a controlled sand bed.

  20. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin’s motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force.

  1. Structured variability in Purkinje cell activity during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Britton A.; Lubenov, Evgueniy V.; Siapas, Athanassios G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cerebellum is a prominent vertebrate brain structure that is critically involved in sensorimotor function. During locomotion, cerebellar Purkinje cells are rhythmically active, shaping descending signals and coordinating commands from higher brain areas with the step cycle. However, the variation in this activity across steps has not been studied, and its statistical structure, afferent mechanisms, and relationship to behavior remain unknown. Here, using multi-electrode recordings in freely moving rats, we show that behavioral variables systematically influence the shape of the step-locked firing rate. This effect depends strongly on the phase of the step cycle and reveals a functional clustering of Purkinje cells. Furthermore, we find a pronounced disassociation between patterns of variability driven by the parallel and climbing fibers. These results suggest that Purkinje cell activity not only represents step phase within each cycle, but is also shaped by behavior across steps, facilitating control of movement under dynamic conditions. PMID:26291165

  2. Stable Gait Generation of a Quasi-Passive Biped Walking Robot Based on Mode Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Itaru

    A passive walker is a robot which can walk down a shallow slope without active control or energy input, being powered only by gravity. This paper proposes a control law that can stabilize the gait of a quasi-passive walker by manipulating torque at the hip joint. The motion of the quasi-passive walker is divided into two modes: one is a sinusoidal mode and the other a hyperbolic sinusoidal mode. The controller is designed with a servo system which forces the motion of the sinusoidal mode to track the reference input signal obtained from the phase-plane trajectory of the hyperbolic sinusoidal mode. The generated gait is quite natural, because the input of the servo system is made based on the system dynamics. The results of simulations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed control law.

  3. Biomedical perspectives on locomotion in null gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    A number of important features of various locomotor activities are discussed, and approaches to the study of these activities in the context of space flight are suggested. In particular, the magnitude of peak forces and the rates of change of force during terrestrial cycling, walking, and running are compared. It is shown that subtle changes in the conditions and techniques of locomotion can have a major influence on the biomechanical consequences to the skeleton. The various hypotheses that identify locomotor exercise as a countermeasure to bone demineralization during weightlessness deserve to be tested with some degree of biomechanical rigor. Various approaches for achieving such scrutiny are discussed.

  4. Intelligent mobility research for robotic locomotion in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentini, Michael; Beckman, Blake; Digney, Bruce; Vincent, Isabelle; Ricard, Benoit

    2006-05-01

    The objective of the Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section of Defence R&D Canada - Suffield is best described by its mission statement, which is "to augment soldiers and combat systems by developing and demonstrating practical, cost effective, autonomous intelligent systems capable of completing military missions in complex operating environments." The mobility requirement for ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings must increase significantly if robotic technology is to augment human efforts in these roles and environments. The intelligence required for autonomous systems to operate in complex environments demands advances in many fields of robotics. This has resulted in large bodies of research in areas of perception, world representation, and navigation, but the problem of locomotion in complex terrain has largely been ignored. In order to achieve its objective, the Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section is pursuing research that explores the use of intelligent mobility algorithms designed to improve robot mobility. Intelligent mobility uses sensing, control, and learning algorithms to extract measured variables from the world, control vehicle dynamics, and learn by experience. These algorithms seek to exploit available world representations of the environment and the inherent dexterity of the robot to allow the vehicle to interact with its surroundings and produce locomotion in complex terrain. The primary focus of the paper is to present the intelligent mobility research within the framework of the research methodology, plan and direction defined at Defence R&D Canada - Suffield. It discusses the progress and future direction of intelligent mobility research and presents the research tools, topics, and plans to address this critical research gap. This research will create effective intelligence to improve the mobility of ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings to assist the Canadian Forces in their future urban operations.

  5. A neural circuitry that emphasizes spinal feedback generates diverse behaviours of human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seungmoon; Geyer, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks along the spinal cord contribute substantially to generating locomotion behaviours in humans and other legged animals. However, the neural circuitry involved in this spinal control remains unclear. We here propose a specific circuitry that emphasizes feedback integration over central pattern generation. The circuitry is based on neurophysiologically plausible muscle-reflex pathways that are organized in 10 spinal modules realizing limb functions essential to legged systems in stance and swing. These modules are combined with a supraspinal control layer that adjusts the desired foot placements and selects the leg that is to transition into swing control during double support. Using physics-based simulation, we test the proposed circuitry in a neuromuscular human model that includes neural transmission delays, musculotendon dynamics and compliant foot–ground contacts. We find that the control network is sufficient to compose steady and transitional 3-D locomotion behaviours including walking and running, acceleration and deceleration, slope and stair negotiation, turning, and deliberate obstacle avoidance. The results suggest feedback integration to be functionally more important than central pattern generation in human locomotion across behaviours. In addition, the proposed control architecture may serve as a guide in the search for the neurophysiological origin and circuitry of spinal control in humans. PMID:25920414

  6. A Multi-Sample Investigation of the Assessment and Locomotion Scales in a Population of Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodis, Flaviu A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding human motivation requires gauging individuals' strivings to be effective in controlling goal pursuits and establishing the truth about themselves and their experiences. Two constructs, assessment and locomotion, capture well truth and control strivings, respectively. The validation process of the instruments measuring assessment…

  7. Locomotion Induced by Spatial Restriction in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila adults display an unwillingness to enter confined spaces but the behaviors induced by spatial restriction in Drosophila are largely unknown. We developed a protocol for high-throughput analysis of locomotion and characterized features of locomotion in a restricted space. We observed intense and persistent locomotion of flies in small circular arenas (diameter 1.27 cm), whereas locomotion was greatly reduced in large circular arenas (diameter 3.81 cm). The increased locomotion induced by spatial restriction was seen in male flies but not female flies, indicating sexual dimorphism of the response to spatial restriction. In large arenas, male flies increased locomotion in arenas previously occupied by male but not female individuals. In small arenas, such pre-conditioning had no effect on male flies, which showed intense and persistent locomotion similar to that seen in fresh arenas. During locomotion with spatial restriction, wildtype Canton-S males traveled slower and with less variation in speed than the mutant w1118 carrying a null allele of white gene. In addition, wildtype flies showed a stronger preference for the boundary than the mutant in small arenas. Genetic analysis with a series of crosses revealed that the white gene was not associated with the phenotype of boundary preference in wildtype flies. PMID:26351842

  8. Looking north toward Locomotive Shop (2 tracks on left), Car ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north toward Locomotive Shop (2 tracks on left), Car Shop on right, and flat car in foreground. Note locomotive and car tires leaning on stock shed at left - East Broad Top Railroad & Coal Company, State Route 994, West of U.S. Route 522, Rockhill Furnace, Huntingdon County, PA

  9. Economic assessment of coal-burning locomotives: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    The General Electric Company embarked upon a study to evaluate various alternatives for the design and manufacture a coal fired locomotive considering various prime movers, but retaining the electric drive transmission. The initial study was supported by the Burlington-Northern and Norfolk-Southern railroads, and included the following alternatives: coal fired diesel locomotive; direct fired gas turbine locomotives; direct fired gas turbine locomotive with steam injection; raw coal gasifier gas turbine locomotive; and raw coal fluid bed steam turbine locomotive. All alternatives use the electric drive transmission and were selected for final evaluation. The first three would use a coal water slurry as a fuel, which must be produced by new processing plants. Therefore, use of a slurry would require a significant plant capital investment. The last two would use classified run-of-the-mine (ROM) coal with much less capital expenditure. Coal fueling stations would be required but are significantly lower in capital cost than a coal slurry plant. For any coal fired locomotive to be commercially viable, it must pass the following criteria: be technically feasible and environmentally acceptable; meet railroads' financial expectations; and offer an attractive return to the locomotive manufacturer. These three criteria are reviewed in the report.

  10. 49 CFR 232.105 - General requirements for locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reservoir on locomotives and related piping shall be zero, unless the system is capable of maintaining the... equalizing-reservoir leakage can be corrected. On locomotives equipped with electronic brakes, if the system logs or displays a fault related to equalizing reservoir leakage, the train may be moved only to...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Switcher Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Switcher Locomotives A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Provisions Pt. 201, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201—Switcher Locomotives Type...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Switcher Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Switcher Locomotives A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Provisions Pt. 201, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201—Switcher Locomotives Type...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Switcher Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Switcher Locomotives A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Provisions Pt. 201, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201—Switcher Locomotives Type...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Switcher Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Switcher Locomotives A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Provisions Pt. 201, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201—Switcher Locomotives Type...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Switcher Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Switcher Locomotives A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Provisions Pt. 201, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 201—Switcher Locomotives Type...

  16. 49 CFR 232.105 - General requirements for locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT AND OTHER NON-PASSENGER... reservoir on locomotives and related piping shall be zero, unless the system is capable of maintaining the... equalizing-reservoir leakage can be corrected. On locomotives equipped with electronic brakes, if the...

  17. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air filters... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Locomotive and engine testing....104 Locomotive and engine testing; overview. (a) The test procedures described here...

  18. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air filters... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Locomotive and engine testing....104 Locomotive and engine testing; overview. (a) The test procedures described here...

  19. 49 CFR 229.213 - Locomotive manufacturing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locomotive manufacturing information. 229.213 Section 229.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Design Requirements § 229.213 Locomotive manufacturing information. (a) Each railroad operating...

  20. 49 CFR 229.213 - Locomotive manufacturing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locomotive manufacturing information. 229.213 Section 229.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Design Requirements § 229.213 Locomotive manufacturing information. (a) Each railroad operating...

  1. 49 CFR 229.213 - Locomotive manufacturing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locomotive manufacturing information. 229.213 Section 229.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Design Requirements § 229.213 Locomotive manufacturing information. (a) Each railroad operating...

  2. 49 CFR 229.213 - Locomotive manufacturing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locomotive manufacturing information. 229.213 Section 229.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Design Requirements § 229.213 Locomotive manufacturing information. (a) Each railroad operating...

  3. 49 CFR 229.213 - Locomotive manufacturing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locomotive manufacturing information. 229.213 Section 229.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Design Requirements § 229.213 Locomotive manufacturing information. (a) Each railroad operating...

  4. 77 FR 30047 - Petition for Alternative Locomotive Crashworthiness Design

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Petition for Alternative Locomotive Crashworthiness Design In accordance... design for an electric locomotive, Model ACS-64, built by Siemens Industry, Inc. This request is made in...-0036. The alternative design incorporates crash energy management features, detailed in the...

  5. Job Grading Standard for Locomotive Engineer WG-6004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Bureau of Policies and Standards.

    The standard is used to grade the nonsupervisory work of operating all types of locomotives and trains to transport supplies, equipment, conveyances, and personnel. The work involves skill in operating locomotives under various conditions, and knowledge of the layout of a track system and the safety, signalling, and track use requirements or…

  6. 49 CFR 231.30 - Locomotives used in switching service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... classification of cars according to commodity or destination; assembling of cars for train movements; changing... constitute a road movement. However, this term does not include movement of a train or part of a train within yard limits by the road locomotive and the placement of locomotives or cars in a train or their...

  7. 49 CFR 231.30 - Locomotives used in switching service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... classification of cars according to commodity or destination; assembling of cars for train movements; changing... constitute a road movement. However, this term does not include movement of a train or part of a train within yard limits by the road locomotive and the placement of locomotives or cars in a train or their...

  8. Turning and maneuverability during sidewinding locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Henry; Goldman, Daniel; Hu, David

    2014-03-01

    Sidewinding is an unusual form of snake locomotion used to move rapidly on yielding substrates such as desert sands. Posteriorly propagating waves alternate between static contact with the substrate and elevated motion, resulting in a ``stepping'' motion of body segments. Unlike lateral undulation, the direction of travel is not collinear with the axis of the body wave, and posterior body segments do not follow the path of anterior segments. Field observations indicate that sidewinding snakes are highly maneuverable, but the mechanisms by which these snakes change direction during this complex movement are unknown. Motion capture data from three Colorado Desert sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes laterorepens) shows a variety of turn magnitudes and behaviors. Additionally, sidewinders are capable of ``reversals'' in which the snakes halts forward progress and begins locomotion in the opposite direction without rotation of the body. Because the head is re-oriented with respect to the body during these reversals, the snake is able to reverse direction without rotation yet continue moving in the new direction without impediment to perception or mechanics, a rare level of maneuverability in animals.

  9. Locomotion of a flapping flexible plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Ru-Nan; Zhu, Luoding; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2013-12-01

    The locomotion of a flapping flexible plate in a viscous incompressible stationary fluid is numerically studied by an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the fluid and a finite element method for the plate. When the leading-edge of the flexible plate is forced to heave sinusoidally, the entire plate starts to move freely as a result of the fluid-structure interaction. Mechanisms underlying the dynamics of the plate are elucidated. Three distinct states of the plate motion are identified and can be described as forward, backward, and irregular. Which state to occur depends mainly on the heaving amplitude and the bending rigidity of the plate. In the forward motion regime, analysis of the dynamic behaviors of the flapping flexible plate indicates that a suitable degree of flexibility can improve the propulsive performance. Moreover, there exist two kinds of vortex streets in the downstream of the plate which are normal and deflected wake. Further the forward motion is compared with the flapping-based locomotion of swimming and flying animals. The results obtained in the present study are found to be consistent with the relevant observations and measurements and can provide some physical insights into the understanding of the propulsive mechanisms of swimming and flying animals.

  10. Bipedal and quadrupedal locomotion in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A; Rodman, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) habitually walk both bipedally and quadrupedally, and have been a common point of reference for understanding the evolution of bipedal locomotion in early ape-like hominins. Here we compare the kinematics, kinetics, and energetics of bipedal and quadrupedal walking and running in a sample of five captive chimpanzees. Kinematics were recorded using sagittal-plane digital high-speed video of treadmill trials. Kinetics were recorded via a forceplate. Metabolic energy cost was measured via steady-state oxygen consumption during treadmill trials. Consistent with previous work on chimpanzees and other hominoids, we found that the spatiotemporal characteristics, joint angles, ground reaction forces, and metabolic cost of bipedal and quadrupedal locomotion are similar in chimpanzees. Notable differences include hip and trunk angles, which reflected a more orthograde trunk posture during bipedalism, and mediolateral ground reaction forces, which were larger during bipedal walking. Stride frequencies were also higher (and step lengths shorter) during bipedal trials. Bipedal and quadrupedal walking among chimpanzees was similar to that reported for bonobos, gibbons, and other primates. The similarity in cost between bipedal and quadrupedal trials suggests that the adoption of bipedal walking would have had no effect on walking costs for early ape-like hominins. However, habitual bipedalism may have favored modifications of the hip to allow a more orthograde posture, and of the hind limb abductor mechanisms to efficiently exert mediolateral ground forces. PMID:24315239

  11. Delayed and lasting effects of deep brain stimulation on locomotion in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuter, Anne; Modolo, Julien

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a variety of motor signs affecting gait, postural stability, and tremor. These symptoms can be improved when electrodes are implanted in deep brain structures and electrical stimulation is delivered chronically at high frequency (>100 Hz). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) onset or cessation affects PD signs with different latencies, and the long-term improvements of symptoms affecting the body axis and those affecting the limbs vary in duration. Interestingly, these effects have not been systematically analyzed and modeled. We compare these timing phenomena in relation to one axial (i.e., locomotion) and one distal (i.e., tremor) signs. We suggest that during DBS, these symptoms are improved by different network mechanisms operating at multiple time scales. Locomotion improvement may involve a delayed plastic reorganization, which takes hours to develop, whereas rest tremor is probably alleviated by an almost instantaneous desynchronization of neural activity in subcortical structures. Even if all PD patients develop both distal and axial symptoms sooner or later, current computational models of locomotion and rest tremor are separate. Furthermore, a few computational models of locomotion focus on PD and none exploring the effect of DBS was found in the literature. We, therefore, discuss a model of a neuronal network during DBS, general enough to explore the subcircuits controlling locomotion and rest tremor simultaneously. This model accounts for synchronization and plasticity, two mechanisms that are believed to underlie the two types of symptoms analyzed. We suggest that a hysteretic effect caused by DBS-induced plasticity and synchronization modulation contributes to the different therapeutic latencies observed. Such a comprehensive, generic computational model of DBS effects, incorporating these timing phenomena, should assist in developing a more efficient, faster, durable treatment of

  12. PSO-SVM-Based Online Locomotion Mode Identification for Rehabilitation Robotic Exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Long, Yi; Du, Zhi-Jiang; Wang, Wei-Dong; Zhao, Guang-Yu; Xu, Guo-Qiang; He, Long; Mao, Xi-Wang; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Locomotion mode identification is essential for the control of a robotic rehabilitation exoskeletons. This paper proposes an online support vector machine (SVM) optimized by particle swarm optimization (PSO) to identify different locomotion modes to realize a smooth and automatic locomotion transition. A PSO algorithm is used to obtain the optimal parameters of SVM for a better overall performance. Signals measured by the foot pressure sensors integrated in the insoles of wearable shoes and the MEMS-based attitude and heading reference systems (AHRS) attached on the shoes and shanks of leg segments are fused together as the input information of SVM. Based on the chosen window whose size is 200 ms (with sampling frequency of 40 Hz), a three-layer wavelet packet analysis (WPA) is used for feature extraction, after which, the kernel principal component analysis (kPCA) is utilized to reduce the dimension of the feature set to reduce computation cost of the SVM. Since the signals are from two types of different sensors, the normalization is conducted to scale the input into the interval of [0, 1]. Five-fold cross validation is adapted to train the classifier, which prevents the classifier over-fitting. Based on the SVM model obtained offline in MATLAB, an online SVM algorithm is constructed for locomotion mode identification. Experiments are performed for different locomotion modes and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm with an accuracy of 96.00% ± 2.45%. To improve its accuracy, majority vote algorithm (MVA) is used for post-processing, with which the identification accuracy is better than 98.35% ± 1.65%. The proposed algorithm can be extended and employed in the field of robotic rehabilitation and assistance. PMID:27598160

  13. A noncontact capacitive sensing system for recognizing locomotion modes of transtibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Enhao; Wang, Long; Wei, Kunlin; Wang, Qining

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a noncontact capacitive sensing system (C-Sens) for locomotion mode recognition of transtibial amputees. C-Sens detects changes in physical distance between the residual limb and the prosthesis. The sensing front ends are built into the prosthetic socket without contacting the skin. This novel signal source improves the usability of locomotion mode recognition systems based on electromyography (EMG) signals and systems based on capacitance signals obtained from skin contact. To evaluate the performance of C-Sens, we carried out experiments among six transtibial amputees with varying levels of amputation when they engaged in six common locomotive activities. The capacitance signals were consistent and stereotypical for different locomotion modes. Importantly, we were able to obtain sufficiently informative signals even for amputees with severe muscle atrophy (i.e., amputees lacking of quality EMG from shank muscles for mode classification). With phase-dependent quadratic classifier and selected feature set, the proposed system was capable of making continuous judgments about locomotion modes with an average accuracy of 96.3% and 94.8% for swing phase and stance phase, respectively (Experiment 1). Furthermore, the system was able to achieve satisfactory recognition performance after the subjects redonned the socket (Experiment 2). We also validated that C-Sens was robust to load bearing changes when amputees carried 5-kg weights during activities (Experiment 3). These results suggest that noncontact capacitive sensing is capable of circumventing practical problems of EMG systems without sacrificing performance and it is, thus, promising for automatic recognition of human motion intent for controlling powered prostheses. PMID:25014949

  14. Cat hindlimb motoneurons during locomotion. III. Functional segregation in sartorius.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, J A; Loeb, G E; Sugano, N; Marks, W B; O'Donovan, M J; Pratt, C A

    1987-02-01

    Cat sartorius has two distinct anatomical portions, anterior (SA-a) and medial (SA-m). SA-a acts to extend the knee and also to flex the hip. SA-m acts to flex both the knee and the hip. The objective of this study was to investigate how a "single motoneuron pool" is used to control at least three separate functions mediated by the two anatomical portions of one muscle. Discharge patterns of single motoneurons projecting to the sartorius muscle were recorded using floating microelectrodes implanted in the L5 ventral root of cats. The electromyographic activity generated by the anterior and medial portions of sartorius was recorded with chronically implanted electrodes. The muscle portion innervated by each motoneuron was determined by spike-triggered averaging of the EMGs during walking on a motorized treadmill. During normal locomotion, SA-a exhibited two bursts of EMG activity per step cycle, one during the stance phase and one during the late swing phase. In contrast, every recorded motoneuron projecting to SA-a discharged a single burst of action potentials per step cycle. Some SA-a motoneurons discharged only during the stance phase, whereas other motoneurons discharged only during the late swing phase. In all cases, the instantaneous frequencygram of the motoneuron was well fit by the rectified smoothed EMG envelope generated by SA-a during the appropriate phase of the step cycle. During normal locomotion, SA-m exhibited a single burst of EMG activity per step cycle, during the swing phase. The temporal characteristics of the EMG bursts recorded from SA-m differed from the swing-phase EMG bursts generated by SA-a.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3559692

  15. A predictive model of muscle excitations based on muscle modularity for a large repertoire of human locomotion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Sartori, Massimo; Dosen, Strahinja; Torricelli, Diego; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Humans can efficiently walk across a large variety of terrains and locomotion conditions with little or no mental effort. It has been hypothesized that the nervous system simplifies neuromuscular control by using muscle synergies, thus organizing multi-muscle activity into a small number of coordinative co-activation modules. In the present study we investigated how muscle modularity is structured across a large repertoire of locomotion conditions including five different speeds and five different ground elevations. For this we have used the non-negative matrix factorization technique in order to explain EMG experimental data with a low-dimensional set of four motor components. In this context each motor components is composed of a non-negative factor and the associated muscle weightings. Furthermore, we have investigated if the proposed descriptive analysis of muscle modularity could be translated into a predictive model that could: (1) Estimate how motor components modulate across locomotion speeds and ground elevations. This implies not only estimating the non-negative factors temporal characteristics, but also the associated muscle weighting variations. (2) Estimate how the resulting muscle excitations modulate across novel locomotion conditions and subjects. The results showed three major distinctive features of muscle modularity: (1) the number of motor components was preserved across all locomotion conditions, (2) the non-negative factors were consistent in shape and timing across all locomotion conditions, and (3) the muscle weightings were modulated as distinctive functions of locomotion speed and ground elevation. Results also showed that the developed predictive model was able to reproduce well the muscle modularity of un-modeled data, i.e., novel subjects and conditions. Muscle weightings were reconstructed with a cross-correlation factor greater than 70% and a root mean square error less than 0.10. Furthermore, the generated muscle excitations matched

  16. Whole-body vibration and ergonomic study of US railroad locomotives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanning, Eckardt; Landsbergis, Paul; Fischer, Siegfried; Christ, Eberhard; Göres, Benno; Luhrman, Raymond

    2006-12-01

    US locomotive operators have exposure to multi-axis whole-body vibration (WBV) and shocks while seated. This study assessed operator-related and ergonomic seating design factors that may have confounding or mitigating influence on WBV exposure and its effects. Vibration exposure was measured according to international guidelines (ISO 2631-1; 1997); ergonomic work place factors and vibration effects were studied with a cross-sectional survey instrument distributed to a randomly selected group of railroad engineers ( n=2546) and a control group; and during vehicle inspections. The survey response rate was 47% for the RR engineers ( n=1195) and 41% for the controls ( n=323). Results of the mean basic vibration measurements were for the x, y, z-direction and vector sum 0.14, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.49 m/s 2 respectively; almost all crest factors (CF), MTVV and VDV values were above the critical ratios given in ISO 2631-1. The prevalence of serious neck and lower back disorders among locomotive engineers was found to be nearly double that of the sedentary control group without such exposure. Railroad engineers rated their seats mostly unacceptable regarding different adjustment and comfort aspects (3.02-3.51; scale 1=excellent to 4=unacceptable), while the control group rated their chairs more favorably (1.96-3.44). Existing cab and seat design in locomotives can result in prolonged forced awkward spinal posture of the operator combined with WBV exposure. In a logistic regression analysis, time at work being bothered by vibration (h/day) was significantly associated with an increased risk of low back pain, shoulder and neck pain, and sciatic pain among railroad engineers. Customized vibration attenuation seats and improved cab design of the locomotive controls should be further investigated.

  17. Bone-free: soft mechanics for adaptive locomotion.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, B A; Lin, Huai-ti

    2014-12-01

    Muscular hydrostats (such as mollusks), and fluid-filled animals (such as annelids), can exploit their constant-volume tissues to transfer forces and displacements in predictable ways, much as articulated animals use hinges and levers. Although larval insects contain pressurized fluids, they also have internal air tubes that are compressible and, as a result, they have more uncontrolled degrees of freedom. Therefore, the mechanisms by which larval insects control their movements are expected to reveal useful strategies for designing soft biomimetic robots. Using caterpillars as a tractable model system, it is now possible to identify the biomechanical and neural strategies for controlling movements in such highly deformable animals. For example, the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, can stiffen its body by increasing muscular tension (and therefore body pressure) but the internal cavity (hemocoel) is not iso-barometric, nor is pressure used to directly control the movements of its limbs. Instead, fluid and tissues flow within the hemocoel and the body is soft and flexible to conform to the substrate. Even the gut contributes to the biomechanics of locomotion; it is decoupled from the movements of the body wall and slides forward within the body cavity at the start of each step. During crawling the body is kept in tension for part of the stride and compressive forces are exerted on the substrate along the axis of the caterpillar, thereby using the environment as a skeleton. The timing of muscular activity suggests that crawling is coordinated by proleg-retractor motoneurons and that the large segmental muscles produce anterograde waves of lifting that do not require precise timing. This strategy produces a robust form of locomotion in which the kinematics changes little with orientation. In different species of caterpillar, the presence of prolegs on particular body segments is related to alternative kinematics such as "inching." This suggests a mechanism for the

  18. Photo-induced locomotion of chemo-responsive polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Pratyush; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2009-03-01

    The need to translate chemical energy into a mechanical response, a characteristic of many biological processes, has motivated the study of stimuli-responsive polymer gels. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that by coupling the mechanical properties of the gel with the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction it is possible to induce self-sustained oscillations in the gel. One of the means for controlling these chemical oscillations is using light as an external stimulus. To study the effect of light on the mechanical behavior of the gel, we use our recently developed a 3D gel lattice spring model (gLSM) which couples the BZ reaction kinetics to the gel dynamics. In this model, the polymer-solvent interactions were taken into account by adding a coupling term to the Flory-Huggins free energy. By virtue of this coupling term, the swelling---de-swelling behavior of the gel was captured in 3D. In order to include the effect of the polymer on the reaction kinetics, the Oregonator model for the photo-sensitive BZ reaction was also modified. Using gLSM model, we probed the effect of non-uniform light irradiation on the gel dynamics. We were able to manipulate the direction and velocity of locomotion of the gel using light as a control parameter. This ability to control the movement of the gel can be utilized in a variety of applications, ranging from bio-actuators to controlled drug release systems.

  19. Cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex; Walker, Vyvyca J; Feng, Zhaoyang; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine, a potent addictive substance, is an inhibitor of monoamine transporters, including DAT (dopamine transporter), SERT (serotonin transporter) and NET (norepinephrine transporter). Cocaine administration induces complex behavioral alterations in mammals, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we tested the effect of cocaine on C. elegans behavior. We show for the first time that acute cocaine treatment evokes changes in C. elegans locomotor activity. Interestingly, the neurotransmitter serotonin, rather than dopamine, is required for cocaine response in C. elegans. The C. elegans SERT MOD-5 is essential for the effect of cocaine, consistent with the role of cocaine in targeting monoamine transporters. We further show that the behavioral response to cocaine is primarily mediated by the ionotropic serotonin receptor MOD-1. Thus, cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans primarily by impinging on its serotoninergic system. PMID:19536276

  20. Locomotion of C elegans in structured environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Keaveny, Eric; Shelley, Michael; Zhang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    We have established a combined experimental and numerical platform to study the swimming dynamics of an undulating worm in structured environments (fluid-filled micro-pillar arrays). We have shown that the worm (C. elegans) swims with different velocity and frequency depending on the lattice spacing and our purely mechanistic simulations (elastically linked bead-chain) reproduce the experimental results qualitatively and quantitatively, including ``life-like'' trajectories the worm exhibits. We build upon this platform to investigate more complex environments, such as linear and radial lattices, with gradients in spacing. In addition, we study C. elegans mutants to investigate the role of length of the worm, frequency of undulations, and mechano-sensation on the resultant dynamics. We also examine the worm moving through a lattice with random distribution of obstacles - a model soil-like environment. Our combined experimental and simulations approach allows us to gain insights into the dynamics of locomotion of undulating microorganisms in realistic complex environments.

  1. Locomotion by Tandem and Parallel Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanida, Yoshimichi

    A two-dimensional analysis was carried out on the locomotion by tandem and parallel wings in relation to the free flight of dragonflies and beetles, remarking the mutual interference between fore and hind wings. The results obtained are summarized as follows: In the case of tandem wings, (1)High thrust and propulsive efficiency can be achieved when the forewing oscillates with a definite phase lag behind the hindwing, as in the case of real dragonflies, (2)Somewhat smaller amplitude of hindwing leads to optimum condition for work sharing of two wings, (3)The hard forewing does not serve for the thrust and propulsive efficiency, whereas the hard hindwing does for the augmentation of them; In the case of parallel wings, (4)The hard wing placed near the soft wing acts nearly as an infinite plate, as for the ground effect, increasing both thrust and propulsive efficiency.

  2. Undulatory Locomotion of Magnetic Multilink Nanoswimmers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bumjin; Gutman, Emiliya; Stucki, Nicolai; Seitz, Benedikt F; Wendel-García, Pedro D; Newton, Taylor; Pokki, Juho; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Pané, Salvador; Or, Yizhar; Nelson, Bradley J

    2015-07-01

    Micro- and nanorobots operating in low Reynolds number fluid environments require specialized swimming strategies for efficient locomotion. Prior research has focused on designs mimicking the rotary corkscrew motion of bacterial flagella or the planar beating motion of eukaryotic flagella. These biologically inspired designs are typically of uniform construction along their flagellar axis. This work demonstrates for the first time planar undulations of composite multilink nanowire-based chains (diameter 200 nm) induced by a planar-oscillating magnetic field. Those chains comprise an elastic eukaryote-like polypyrrole tail and rigid magnetic nickel links connected by flexible polymer bilayer hinges. The multilink design exhibits a high swimming efficiency. Furthermore, the manufacturing process enables tuning the geometrical and material properties to specific applications. PMID:26029795

  3. Fish locomotion: recent advances and new directions.

    PubMed

    Lauder, George V

    2015-01-01

    Research on fish locomotion has expanded greatly in recent years as new approaches have been brought to bear on a classical field of study. Detailed analyses of patterns of body and fin motion and the effects of these movements on water flow patterns have helped scientists understand the causes and effects of hydrodynamic patterns produced by swimming fish. Recent developments include the study of the center-of-mass motion of swimming fish and the use of volumetric imaging systems that allow three-dimensional instantaneous snapshots of wake flow patterns. The large numbers of swimming fish in the oceans and the vorticity present in fin and body wakes support the hypothesis that fish contribute significantly to the mixing of ocean waters. New developments in fish robotics have enhanced understanding of the physical principles underlying aquatic propulsion and allowed intriguing biological features, such as the structure of shark skin, to be studied in detail. PMID:25251278

  4. Fish Locomotion: Recent Advances and New Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauder, George V.

    2015-01-01

    Research on fish locomotion has expanded greatly in recent years as new approaches have been brought to bear on a classical field of study. Detailed analyses of patterns of body and fin motion and the effects of these movements on water flow patterns have helped scientists understand the causes and effects of hydrodynamic patterns produced by swimming fish. Recent developments include the study of the center-of-mass motion of swimming fish and the use of volumetric imaging systems that allow three-dimensional instantaneous snapshots of wake flow patterns. The large numbers of swimming fish in the oceans and the vorticity present in fin and body wakes support the hypothesis that fish contribute significantly to the mixing of ocean waters. New developments in fish robotics have enhanced understanding of the physical principles underlying aquatic propulsion and allowed intriguing biological features, such as the structure of shark skin, to be studied in detail.

  5. Biofluiddynamics of balistiform and gymnotiform locomotion: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinkle, Brennan; Bale, Rahul; Singh, Amneet; Chen, Nelson; Maciver, Malcom; Patankar, Neelesh

    2015-11-01

    Gymnotiform and balistiform swimmers are those which have an undulatory fin affixed to a rigid body unlike anguilliforms who undulate their entire body. Is there a mechanical advantage to gymnotiform and balistiform swimming? This question was investigated by Lighthill & Blake in a four paper series Biofluiddynamics of balistiform and gymnotiform locomotion. We revisit this work using fully resolved numerical simulations of the types of swimmers considered by Lighthill & Blake to interrogate the issue of mechanical advantage for rigid body swimmers. In doing so, we find that while there is advantage to rigid body swimming, the mechanism of `momentum enhancement,' proposed by Lighthill and Blake, is not the cause. Further, we use our results and simulations to explain why some gymnotiform and balistiform swimmers have their propulsor attached to their bodies at an angle. This work was supported in part by NSF grants CBET-0828749, CMMI-0941674 and CBET-1066575. Computational resources were provided by Northwestern University High Performance Computing System-Quest.

  6. The Effect of Increasing Mass upon Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Hagan, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if increasing body mass while maintaining bodyweight would affect ground reaction forces and joint kinetics during walking and running. It was hypothesized that performing gait with increased mass while maintaining body weight would result in greater ground reaction forces, and would affect the net joint torques and work at the ankle, knee and hip when compared to gait with normal mass and bodyweight. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten subjects (5M/5F) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on a treadmill. Subjects completed one minute of locomotion at normal mass and bodyweight and at four added mass (AM) conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of body mass) in random order. Three-dimensional joint position data were collected via videography. Walking and running were analyzed separately. The addition of mass resulted in several effects. Peak impact forces and loading rates increased during walking, but decreased during running. Peak propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased and hip extensor angular impulse and positive work increased as mass was added for both styles of locomotion. Work increased at a greater rate during running than walking. The adaptations to additional mass that occur during walking are different than during running. Increasing mass during exercise in microgravity may be beneficial to increasing ground reaction forces during walking and strengthening hip musculature during both walking and running. Future study in true microgravity is required to determine if the adaptations found would be similar in a weightless environment.

  7. Mutually opposing forces during locomotion can eliminate the tradeoff between maneuverability and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Noah; Sefati, Shahin; Neveln, Izaak; Roth, Eatai; Mitchell, Terence; Snyder, James; Maciver, Malcolm; Fortune, Eric

    A surprising feature of animal locomotion is that organisms typically produce substantial forces in directions other than what is necessary to move the animal through its environment, such as perpendicular to, or counter to, the direction of travel. The effect of these forces has been difficult to observe because they are often mutually opposing and therefore cancel out. Using a combination of robotic physical modeling, computational modeling, and biological experiments, we discovered that these forces serve an important role: to simplify and enhance the control of locomotion. Specifically, we examined a well-suited model system, the glass knifefish Eigenmannia virescens, which produces mutually opposing forces during a hovering behavior. By systematically varying the locomotor parameters of our biomimetic robot, and measuring the resulting forces and kinematics, we demonstrated that the production and differential control of mutually opposing forces is a strategy that generates passive stabilization while simultaneously enhancing maneuverability. Mutually opposing forces during locomotion are widespread across animal taxa, and these results indicate that such forces can eliminate the tradeoff between stability and maneuverability, thereby simplifying robotic and neural control.

  8. Mutually opposing forces during locomotion can eliminate the tradeoff between maneuverability and stability.

    PubMed

    Sefati, Shahin; Neveln, Izaak D; Roth, Eatai; Mitchell, Terence R T; Snyder, James B; Maciver, Malcolm A; Fortune, Eric S; Cowan, Noah J

    2013-11-19

    A surprising feature of animal locomotion is that organisms typically produce substantial forces in directions other than what is necessary to move the animal through its environment, such as perpendicular to, or counter to, the direction of travel. The effect of these forces has been difficult to observe because they are often mutually opposing and therefore cancel out. Indeed, it is likely that these forces do not contribute directly to movement but may serve an equally important role: to simplify and enhance the control of locomotion. To test this hypothesis, we examined a well-suited model system, the glass knifefish Eigenmannia virescens, which produces mutually opposing forces during a hovering behavior that is analogous to a hummingbird feeding from a moving flower. Our results and analyses, which include kinematic data from the fish, a mathematical model of its swimming dynamics, and experiments with a biomimetic robot, demonstrate that the production and differential control of mutually opposing forces is a strategy that generates passive stabilization while simultaneously enhancing maneuverability. Mutually opposing forces during locomotion are widespread across animal taxa, and these results indicate that such forces can eliminate the tradeoff between stability and maneuverability, thereby simplifying neural control. PMID:24191034

  9. Mutually opposing forces during locomotion can eliminate the tradeoff between maneuverability and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sefati, Shahin; Neveln, Izaak D.; Roth, Eatai; Mitchell, Terence R. T.; Snyder, James B.; MacIver, Malcolm A.; Fortune, Eric S.; Cowan, Noah J.

    2013-01-01

    A surprising feature of animal locomotion is that organisms typically produce substantial forces in directions other than what is necessary to move the animal through its environment, such as perpendicular to, or counter to, the direction of travel. The effect of these forces has been difficult to observe because they are often mutually opposing and therefore cancel out. Indeed, it is likely that these forces do not contribute directly to movement but may serve an equally important role: to simplify and enhance the control of locomotion. To test this hypothesis, we examined a well-suited model system, the glass knifefish Eigenmannia virescens, which produces mutually opposing forces during a hovering behavior that is analogous to a hummingbird feeding from a moving flower. Our results and analyses, which include kinematic data from the fish, a mathematical model of its swimming dynamics, and experiments with a biomimetic robot, demonstrate that the production and differential control of mutually opposing forces is a strategy that generates passive stabilization while simultaneously enhancing maneuverability. Mutually opposing forces during locomotion are widespread across animal taxa, and these results indicate that such forces can eliminate the tradeoff between stability and maneuverability, thereby simplifying neural control. PMID:24191034

  10. 49 CFR 230.108 - Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks. 230... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.108 Steam locomotive...

  11. 49 CFR 230.108 - Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks. 230... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.108 Steam locomotive...

  12. 49 CFR 230.108 - Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks. 230... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.108 Steam locomotive...

  13. 49 CFR 230.108 - Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks. 230... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.108 Steam locomotive...

  14. 49 CFR 230.108 - Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam locomotive leading and trailing trucks. 230... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.108 Steam locomotive...

  15. Impaired H-Reflex Gain during Postural Loaded Locomotion in Individuals Post-Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing Nong; Brown, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Successful execution of upright locomotion requires coordinated interaction between controllers for locomotion and posture. Our earlier research supported this model in the non-impaired and found impaired interaction in the post-stroke nervous system during locomotion. In this study, we sought to examine the role of the Ia afferent spinal loop, via the H-reflex response, under postural influence during a locomotor task. We tested the hypothesis that the ability to increase stretch reflex gain in response to postural loads during locomotion would be reduced post-stroke. Methods Fifteen individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis and 13 non-impaired controls pedaled on a motorized cycle ergometer with specialized backboard support system under (1) seated supported, and (2) non-seated postural-loaded conditions, generating matched pedal force outputs of two levels. H-reflexes were elicited at 90°crank angle. Results We observed increased H-reflex gain with postural influence in non-impaired individuals, but a lack of increase in individuals post-stroke. Furthermore, we observed decreased H-reflex gain at higher postural loads in the stroke-impaired group. Conclusion These findings suggest an impaired Ia afferent pathway potentially underlies the defects in the interaction between postural and locomotor control post-stroke and may explain reduced ability of paretic limb support during locomotor weight-bearing in individuals post-stroke. Significance These results support the judicious use of bodyweight support training when first helping individuals post-stroke to regain locomotor pattern generation and weight-bearing capability. PMID:26629996

  16. A Survey of Phase Variable Candidates of Human Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Dario J.; Gregg, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Studies show that the human nervous system is able to parameterize gait cycle phase using sensory feedback. In the field of bipedal robots, the concept of a phase variable has been successfully used to mimic this behavior by parameterizing the gait cycle in a time-independent manner. This approach has been applied to control a powered transfemoral prosthetic leg, but the proposed phase variable was limited to the stance period of the prosthesis only. In order to achieve a more robust controller, we attempt to find a new phase variable that fully parameterizes the gait cycle of a prosthetic leg. The angle with respect to a global reference frame at the hip is able to monotonically parameterize both the stance and swing periods of the gait cycle. This survey looks at multiple phase variable candidates involving the hip angle with respect to a global reference frame across multiple tasks including level-ground walking, running, and stair negotiation. In particular, we propose a novel phase variable candidate that monotonically parameterizes the whole gait cycle across all tasks, and does so particularly well across level-ground walking. In addition to furthering the design of robust robotic prosthetic leg controllers, this survey could help neuroscientists and physicians study human locomotion across tasks from a time-independent perspective. PMID:25570873

  17. Development of Self-Produced Locomotion in the First Year: Changes in Parent Perceptions and Infant Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Rebecca R.; Thompson, Ross A.

    2011-01-01

    Self-produced locomotion is regarded as a setting event for other developmental transitions in infancy with important implications for socioemotional development and parent-child interaction. Using an age-held-constant design, this study examined changes in reported infant behaviour and maternal proactive/reactive control and compared them with…

  18. Stability and Control of Constrained Three-Dimensional Robotic Systems with Application to Bipedal Postural Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallel, Hichem

    Three classes of postural adjustments are investigated with the view of a better understanding of the control mechanisms involved in human movement. The control mechanisms and responses of human or computer models to deliberately induced disturbances in postural adjustments are the focus of this dissertation. The classes of postural adjustments are automatic adjustments, (i.e. adjustments not involving voluntary deliberate movement), adjustments involving imposition of constraints for the purpose of maintaining support forces, and adjustments involving violation and imposition of constraints for the purpose of maintaining balance, (i.e. taking one or more steps). For each class, based on the physiological attributes of the control mechanisms in human movements, control strategies are developed to synthesize the desired postural response. The control strategies involve position and velocity feedback control, on line relegation control, and pre-stored trajectory control. Stability analysis for constrained and unconstrained maneuvers is carried out based on Lyapunov stability theorems. The analysis is based on multi-segment biped robots. Depending on the class of postural adjustments, different biped models are developed. An eight-segment three dimensional biped model is formulated for the study of automatic adjustments and adjustments for balance. For the study of adjustments for support, a four segment lateral biped model is considered. Muscle synergies in automatic adjustments are analyzed based on a three link six muscle system. The muscle synergies considered involve minimal muscle number and muscle co-activation. The role of active and passive feedback in these automatic adjustments is investigated based on the specified stiffness and damping of the segments. The effectiveness of the control strategies and the role of muscle synergies in automatic adjustments are demonstrated by a number of digital computer simulations.

  19. Theta oscillations regulate the speed of locomotion via a hippocampus to lateral septum pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Franziska; Gorbati, Maria; Cadavieco, Marta Carus; Denisova, Natalia; Gao, Xiaojie; Holman, Constance; Korotkova, Tatiana; Ponomarenko, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta oscillations support encoding of an animal's position during spatial navigation, yet longstanding questions about their impact on locomotion remain unanswered. Combining optogenetic control of hippocampal theta oscillations with electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that hippocampal theta oscillations regulate locomotion. In particular, we demonstrate that their regularity underlies more stable and slower running speeds during exploration. More regular theta oscillations are accompanied by more regular theta-rhythmic spiking output of pyramidal cells. Theta oscillations are coordinated between the hippocampus and its main subcortical output, the lateral septum (LS). Chemo- or optogenetic inhibition of this pathway reveals its necessity for the hippocampal regulation of running speed. Moreover, theta-rhythmic stimulation of LS projections to the lateral hypothalamus replicates the reduction of running speed induced by more regular hippocampal theta oscillations. These results suggest that changes in hippocampal theta synchronization are translated into rapid adjustment of running speed via the LS. PMID:26455912

  20. Theta oscillations regulate the speed of locomotion via a hippocampus to lateral septum pathway.

    PubMed

    Bender, Franziska; Gorbati, Maria; Cadavieco, Marta Carus; Denisova, Natalia; Gao, Xiaojie; Holman, Constance; Korotkova, Tatiana; Ponomarenko, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta oscillations support encoding of an animal's position during spatial navigation, yet longstanding questions about their impact on locomotion remain unanswered. Combining optogenetic control of hippocampal theta oscillations with electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that hippocampal theta oscillations regulate locomotion. In particular, we demonstrate that their regularity underlies more stable and slower running speeds during exploration. More regular theta oscillations are accompanied by more regular theta-rhythmic spiking output of pyramidal cells. Theta oscillations are coordinated between the hippocampus and its main subcortical output, the lateral septum (LS). Chemo- or optogenetic inhibition of this pathway reveals its necessity for the hippocampal regulation of running speed. Moreover, theta-rhythmic stimulation of LS projections to the lateral hypothalamus replicates the reduction of running speed induced by more regular hippocampal theta oscillations. These results suggest that changes in hippocampal theta synchronization are translated into rapid adjustment of running speed via the LS. PMID:26455912

  1. Towards Development of Robotic Aid for Rehabilitation of Locomotion-Impaired Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.

    2000-01-01

    Manual assistance of therapists to help movement of legs of spinal cord injured (SCI) subjects during stepping on a treadmill for locomotion rehabilitation has severe economic and technical limitations. Scientists at the Department of Physiological Science at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and roboticists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) initiated a joint effort to develop a robotic mechanism capable of performing controlled motions equivalent to the arm and hand motions of therapists assisting the stepping of locomotion impaired subjects on a treadmill, while the subjects' body weight is partially supported by an overhead harness. A first necessary technical step towards this development is to measure and understand the kinematics and dynamics of the therapists' arm and hand motions as they are reflected on the subjects' leg movement. This paper describes an initial measurement system developed for this purpose together with the related measurement results, and outlines the planned future technical work.

  2. Convergent evolution and locomotion through complex terrain by insects, vertebrates and robots.

    PubMed

    Ritzmann, Roy E; Quinn, Roger D; Fischer, Martin S

    2004-07-01

    Arthropods are the most successful members of the animal kingdom largely because of their ability to move efficiently through a range of environments. Their agility has not been lost on engineers seeking to design agile legged robots. However, one cannot simply copy mechanical and neural control systems from insects into robotic designs. Rather one has to select the properties that are critical for specific behaviors that the engineer wants to capture in a particular robot. Convergent evolution provides an important clue to the properties of legged locomotion that are critical for success. Arthropods and vertebrates evolved legged locomotion independently. Nevertheless, many neural control properties and mechanical schemes are remarkably similar. Here we describe three aspects of legged locomotion that are found in both insects and vertebrates and that provide enhancements to legged robots. They are leg specialization, body flexion and the development of a complex head structure. Although these properties are commonly seen in legged animals, most robotic vehicles have similar legs throughout, rigid bodies and rudimentary sensors on what would be considered the head region. We describe these convergent properties in the context of robots that we developed to capture the agility of insects in moving through complex terrain. PMID:18089044

  3. Development of an Environment-Aware Locomotion Mode Recognition System for Powered Lower Limb Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Ding; Helen Huang, He

    2016-04-01

    This paper aimed to develop and evaluate an environment-aware locomotion mode recognition system for volitional control of powered artificial legs. A portable terrain recognition (TR) module, consisting of an inertia measurement unit and a laser distance meter, was built to identify the type of terrain in front of the wearer while walking. A decision tree was used to classify the terrain types and provide either coarse or refined information about the walking environment. Then, the obtained environmental information was modeled as a priori probability and was integrated with a neuromuscular-mechanical-fusion-based locomotion mode (LM) recognition system. The designed TR module and environmental-aware LM recognition system was evaluated separately on able-bodied subjects and a transfemoral amputee online. The results showed that the TR module provided high quality environmental information: TR accuracy is above 98% and terrain transitions are detected over 500 ms before the time required to switch the prosthesis control mode. This enabled smooth locomotion mode transitions for the wearers. The obtained environmental information further improved the performance of LM recognition system, regardless of whether coarse or refined information was used. In addition, the environment-aware LM recognition system produced reliable online performance when the TR output was relatively noisy, which indicated the potential of this system to operate in unconstructed environment. This paper demonstrated that environmental information should be considered for operating wearable lower limb robotic devices, such as prosthetics and orthotics. PMID:25879962

  4. A 3D undulatory locomotion system inspired by nematode C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Xu, Jian-Xin

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an undulatory locomotion model inspired by C. elegans, whose nervous system and muscular structure are well studied. C. elegans is divided into 11 muscle segments according to its anatomical structure, and represented as a multi-joint rigid link model in this work. In each muscle segment, there are four pieces of muscles located in four quadrants. The muscles change their lengths according to the outputs of nervous system. In this work, the dynamic neural networks (DNN) are adopted to represent the nervous system. The DNN are divided into the head DNN and the body DNN. The head DNN produces the sinusoid waves to generate the forward and backward undulatory movements. The body DNN with 11 segments is responsible for passing the sinusoid wave and creating the phase lag. The 3D locomotion of this system are implemented by using the DNN to control the muscle lengths, and then using the muscle lengths to control the angles between two consecutive links on both horizontal and vertical planes. The test results show good performances of this model in both forward and backward locomotion in 3D, which could serve as a prototype of the micro-robot for clinical use. PMID:24211936

  5. A bioinspired autonomous swimming robot as a tool for studying goal-directed locomotion.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, L; Assaf, T; Mintchev, S; Marrazza, S; Capantini, L; Orofino, S; Ascari, L; Grillner, S; Wallén, P; Ekeberg, O; Stefanini, C; Dario, P

    2013-10-01

    The bioinspired approach has been key in combining the disciplines of robotics with neuroscience in an effective and promising fashion. Indeed, certain aspects in the field of neuroscience, such as goal-directed locomotion and behaviour selection, can be validated through robotic artefacts. In particular, swimming is a functionally important behaviour where neuromuscular structures, neural control architecture and operation can be replicated artificially following models from biology and neuroscience. In this article, we present a biomimetic system inspired by the lamprey, an early vertebrate that locomotes using anguilliform swimming. The artefact possesses extra- and proprioceptive sensory receptors, muscle-like actuation, distributed embedded control and a vision system. Experiments on optimised swimming and on goal-directed locomotion are reported, as well as the assessment of the performance of the system, which shows high energy efficiency and adaptive behaviour. While the focus is on providing a robotic platform for testing biological models, the reported system can also be of major relevance for the development of engineering system applications. PMID:24030051

  6. Synaptic representation of locomotion in single cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Kate; Mathy, Alexandre; Duguid, Ian; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in the regulation of locomotion, but how movement is represented at the synaptic level is not known. Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells. The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement. Surprisingly, the entire step sequence can be predicted from input EPSCs and output spikes of a single granule cell, suggesting that a robust gait code is present already at the cerebellar input layer and transmitted via the granule cell pathway to downstream Purkinje cells. Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.001 PMID:26083712

  7. EXTERIOR VIEW WITH HEART OF DIXIE MUSEUM'S HISTORIC LOCOMOTIVE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW WITH HEART OF DIXIE MUSEUM'S HISTORIC LOCOMOTIVE IN MUSEUM'S POWELL AVENUE YARD (BOTTOM) AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY BOXCAR ON ACTIVE TRACKAGE (ABOVE). - Heart of Dixie Railroad, Rolling Stock, 1800 Block Powell Avenue, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. 10. Locomotive smoke flue coming through Roundhouse roof with gable ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Locomotive smoke flue coming through Roundhouse roof with gable end of Machine Shop in background. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Roundhouse, Site Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  9. "Shower head" water connection for servicing railroad locomotives, perspective view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "Shower head" water connection for servicing railroad locomotives, perspective view looking NW across ATSF railyard. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  10. Breathing and locomotion: comparative anatomy, morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Klein, Wilfried; Codd, Jonathan R

    2010-08-31

    Using specialized respiratory structures such as gills, lungs and or a tracheal system, animals take up oxygen and release carbon dioxide. The efficiency of gas exchange, however, may be constrained by the morphology of the respiratory organ itself as well as by other aspects of an animal's physiology such as feeding, circulation or locomotion. Herein we discuss some aspects of the functional link between the respiratory and locomotor systems, such as gill morphology of sharks as a factor limiting maximum aerobic scope, respiratory constraints among legless lizards, lung morphology of testudines, trade-offs between locomotion and respiration among birds, reconstruction of the respiratory system of sauropods, respiration of mice during locomotion as well as some aspects of gas exchange among insects. Data covering such a broad spectrum of interactions between the locomotor and respiratory systems shall allow us to place breathing and locomotion into a wider context of evolution of oxygen. PMID:20417316

  11. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  12. EXTERIOR VIEW WITH HISTORIC LOCOMOTIVES, COAL AND PASSENGER CARS INCLUDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW WITH HISTORIC LOCOMOTIVES, COAL AND PASSENGER CARS INCLUDING THE WOODWARD IRON COMPANY NO. 38 LOCOMOTIVE AND TENDER LOCATED IN THE HEART OF DIXIE MUSEUM'S POWELL AVENUE YARD AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD BOXCARS ON ACTIVE TRACKS OF BIRMINGHAM'S RAILROAD RESERVATION. IN BACKGROUND AT RIGHT AND CENTER IS THE BIRMINGHAM CITY CENTER. - Heart of Dixie Railroad, Rolling Stock, 1800 Block Powell Avenue, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. The Geometry of Locomotive Behavioral States in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bjorness, Theresa; Greene, Robert; You, Young-Jai

    2013-01-01

    We develop a new hidden Markov model-based method to analyze C elegans locomotive behavior and use this method to quantitatively characterize behavioral states. In agreement with previous work, we find states corresponding to roaming, dwelling, and quiescence. However, we also find evidence for a continuum of intermediate states. We suggest that roaming, dwelling, and quiescence may best be thought of as extremes which, mixed in any proportion, define the locomotive repertoire of C elegans foraging and feeding behavior. PMID:23555813

  14. Modeling posture-dependent leg actuation in sagittal plane locomotion.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J; Clark, J

    2009-12-01

    The spring loaded inverted pendulum template has been shown to accurately model the steady locomotion dynamics of a variety of running animals, and has served as the inspiration for an entire class of dynamic running robots. While the template models the leg dynamics by an energy-conserving spring, insects and animals have structures that dissipate, store and produce energy during a stance phase. Recent investigations into the spring-like properties of limbs, as well as animal response to drop-step perturbations, suggest that animals use their legs to manage energy storage and dissipation, and that this management is important for gait stability. In this paper, we extend our previous analysis of control of the spring loaded inverted pendulum template via changes in the leg touch-down angle to include energy variations during the stance phase. Energy variations are incorporated through leg actuation that varies the force-free leg length during the stance phase, yet maintains qualitatively correct force and velocity profiles. In contrast to the partially asymptotically stable gaits identified in previous analyses, incorporating energy and leg angle variations in this manner produces complete asymptotic stability. Drop-step perturbation simulations reveal that the control strategy is rather robust, with gaits recovering from drops of up to 30% of the nominal hip height. PMID:19946148

  15. A Full Body Steerable Wind Display for a Locomotion Interface.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sandip D; Fisher, Charles J; Lefler, Price; Desai, Aditya; Chakravarthy, Shanthanu; Pardyjak, Eric R; Minor, Mark A; Hollerbach, John M

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the Treadport Active Wind Tunnel (TPAWT)-a full-body immersive virtual environment for the Treadport locomotion interface designed for generating wind on a user from any frontal direction at speeds up to 20 kph. The goal is to simulate the experience of realistic wind while walking in an outdoor virtual environment. A recirculating-type wind tunnel was created around the pre-existing Treadport installation by adding a large fan, ducting, and enclosure walls. Two sheets of air in a non-intrusive design flow along the side screens of the back-projection CAVE-like visual display, where they impinge and mix at the front screen to redirect towards the user in a full-body cross-section. By varying the flow conditions of the air sheets, the direction and speed of wind at the user are controlled. Design challenges to fit the wind tunnel in the pre-existing facility, and to manage turbulence to achieve stable and steerable flow, were overcome. The controller performance for wind speed and direction is demonstrated experimentally. PMID:26340038

  16. Rapid signalling in distinct dopaminergic axons during locomotion and reward.

    PubMed

    Howe, M W; Dombeck, D A

    2016-07-28

    Dopaminergic projection axons from the midbrain to the striatum are crucial for motor control, as their degeneration in Parkinson disease results in profound movement deficits. Paradoxically, most recording methods report rapid phasic dopamine signalling (~100-ms bursts) in response to unpredicted rewards, with little evidence for movement-related signalling. The leading model posits that phasic signalling in striatum-targeting dopamine neurons drives reward-based learning, whereas slow variations in firing (tens of seconds to minutes) in these same neurons bias animals towards or away from movement. However, current methods have provided little evidence to support or refute this model. Here, using new optical recording methods, we report the discovery of rapid phasic signalling in striatum-targeting dopaminergic axons that is associated with, and capable of triggering, locomotion in mice. Axons expressing these signals were largely distinct from those that responded to unexpected rewards. These results suggest that dopaminergic neuromodulation can differentially impact motor control and reward learning with sub-second precision, and indicate that both precise signal timing and neuronal subtype are important parameters to consider in the treatment of dopamine-related disorders. PMID:27398617

  17. Compensatory plasticity restores locomotion after chronic removal of descending projections

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Cynthia M.; Reilly, Melissa G.; Stewart, Christopher; Schlegel, Chantel; Morley, Emma; Puhl, Joshua G.; Nagel, Christian; Crisp, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity is an important attribute of neurons and their networks, enabling functional recovery after perturbation. Furthermore, the directed nature of this plasticity may hold a key to the restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury. Here we studied the recovery of crawling in the leech Hirudo verbana after descending cephalic fibers were surgically separated from crawl central pattern generators shown previously to be regulated by dopamine. We observed that immediately after nerve cord transection leeches were unable to crawl, but remarkably, after a day to weeks, animals began to show elements of crawling and intersegmental coordination. Over a similar time course, excessive swimming due to the loss of descending inhibition returned to control levels. Additionally, removal of the brain did not prevent crawl recovery, indicating that connectivity of severed descending neurons was not essential. After crawl recovery, a subset of animals received a second transection immediately below the anterior-most ganglion remaining. Similar to their initial transection, a loss of crawling with subsequent recovery was observed. These data, in recovered individuals, support the idea that compensatory plasticity directly below the site of injury is essential for the initiation and coordination of crawling. We maintain that the leech provides a valuable model to understand the neural mechanisms underlying locomotor recovery after injury because of its experimental accessibility, segmental organization, and dependence on higher-order control involved in the initiation, modulation, and coordination of locomotor behavior. PMID:25787951

  18. Serotonin Influences Locomotion in the Nudibranch Mollusc Melibe leonina

    PubMed Central

    LEWIS, STEFANIE L.; LYONS, DEBORAH E.; MEEKINS, TIFFANIE L.; NEWCOMB, JAMES M.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) influences locomotion in many animals, from flatworms to mammals. This study examined the effects of 5-HT on locomotion in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina (Gould, 1852). M. leonina exhibits two modes of locomotion, crawling and swimming. Animals were bath-immersed in a range of concentrations of 5-HT or injected with various 5-HT solutions into the hemolymph and then monitored for locomotor activity. In contrast to other gastropods studied, M. leonina showed no significant effect of 5-HT on the distance crawled or the speed of crawling. However, the highest concentration (10−3 mol l−1 for bath immersion and 10−5 mol l−1 for injection) significantly increased the time spent swimming and the swimming speed. The 5-HT receptor antagonist methysergide inhibited the influence of 5-HT on the overall amount of swimming but not on swimming speed. These results suggest that 5-HT influences locomotion at the behavioral level in M. leonina. In conjunction with previous studies on the neural basis of locomotion in M. leonina, these results also suggest that this species is an excellent model system for investigating the 5-HT modulation of locomotion. PMID:21712224

  19. Multi-modal locomotion: from animal to application.

    PubMed

    Lock, R J; Burgess, S C; Vaidyanathan, R

    2014-03-01

    The majority of robotic vehicles that can be found today are bound to operations within a single media (i.e. land, air or water). This is very rarely the case when considering locomotive capabilities in natural systems. Utility for small robots often reflects the exact same problem domain as small animals, hence providing numerous avenues for biological inspiration. This paper begins to investigate the various modes of locomotion adopted by different genus groups in multiple media as an initial attempt to determine the compromise in ability adopted by the animals when achieving multi-modal locomotion. A review of current biologically inspired multi-modal robots is also presented. The primary aim of this research is to lay the foundation for a generation of vehicles capable of multi-modal locomotion, allowing ambulatory abilities in more than one media, surpassing current capabilities. By identifying and understanding when natural systems use specific locomotion mechanisms, when they opt for disparate mechanisms for each mode of locomotion rather than using a synergized singular mechanism, and how this affects their capability in each medium, similar combinations can be used as inspiration for future multi-modal biologically inspired robotic platforms. PMID:24343102

  20. Running stability is enhanced by a proximo-distal gradient in joint neuromechanical control

    PubMed Central

    Daley, M. A.; Felix, G.; Biewener, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We currently know little about how animals achieve dynamic stability when running over uneven and unpredictable terrain, often characteristic of their natural environment. Here we investigate how limb and joint mechanics of an avian biped, the helmeted guinea fowl Numida meleagris, respond to an unexpected drop in terrain during running. In particular, we address how joint mechanics are coordinated to achieve whole limb dynamics. Based on muscle–tendon architecture and previous studies of steady and incline locomotion, we hypothesize a proximo-distal gradient in joint neuromechanical control. In this motor control strategy, (1) proximal muscles at the hip and knee joints are controlled primarily in a feedforward manner and exhibit load-insensitive mechanical performance, and (2) distal muscles at the ankle and tarsometatarso-phalangeal (TMP) joints are highly load-sensitive, due to intrinsic mechanical effects and rapid, higher gain proprioceptive feedback. Limb kinematics and kinetics during the unexpected perturbation reveal that limb retraction, controlled largely by the hip, remains similar to level running throughout the perturbed step, despite altered limb loading. Individual joints produce or absorb energy during both level and perturbed running steps, such that the net limb work depends on the balance of energy among the joints. The hip maintains the same mechanical role regardless of limb loading, whereas the ankle and TMP switch between spring-like or damping function depending on limb posture at ground contact. Initial knee angle sets limb posture and alters the balance of work among the joints, although the knee contributes little work itself. This distribution of joint function results in posture-dependent changes in work performance of the limb, which allow guinea fowl to rapidly produce or absorb energy in response to the perturbation. The results support the hypothesis that a proximo-distal gradient exists in limb neuromuscular performance

  1. Running stability is enhanced by a proximo-distal gradient in joint neuromechanical control.

    PubMed

    Daley, M A; Felix, G; Biewener, A A

    2007-02-01

    We currently know little about how animals achieve dynamic stability when running over uneven and unpredictable terrain, often characteristic of their natural environment. Here we investigate how limb and joint mechanics of an avian biped, the helmeted guinea fowl Numida meleagris, respond to an unexpected drop in terrain during running. In particular, we address how joint mechanics are coordinated to achieve whole limb dynamics. Based on muscle-tendon architecture and previous studies of steady and incline locomotion, we hypothesize a proximo-distal gradient in joint neuromechanical control. In this motor control strategy, (1) proximal muscles at the hip and knee joints are controlled primarily in a feedforward manner and exhibit load-insensitive mechanical performance, and (2) distal muscles at the ankle and tarsometatarso-phalangeal (TMP) joints are highly load-sensitive, due to intrinsic mechanical effects and rapid, higher gain proprioceptive feedback. Limb kinematics and kinetics during the unexpected perturbation reveal that limb retraction, controlled largely by the hip, remains similar to level running throughout the perturbed step, despite altered limb loading. Individual joints produce or absorb energy during both level and perturbed running steps, such that the net limb work depends on the balance of energy among the joints. The hip maintains the same mechanical role regardless of limb loading, whereas the ankle and TMP switch between spring-like or damping function depending on limb posture at ground contact. Initial knee angle sets limb posture and alters the balance of work among the joints, although the knee contributes little work itself. This distribution of joint function results in posture-dependent changes in work performance of the limb, which allow guinea fowl to rapidly produce or absorb energy in response to the perturbation. The results support the hypothesis that a proximo-distal gradient exists in limb neuromuscular performance and motor

  2. [Locomotive syndrome and frailty. Osteoporosis as an underlying disorder in the locomotive syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hagino, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Osteoporosis, a disorder related to locomotive syndrome, has been nicknamed "the silent disease" since it has no symptoms until fragility fracture occurs. However, a new fragility fracture cannot only reduce daily activity but can also increase fracture risk resulting in possible repetition of the fracture or other new fractures. As a result, daily living activities requiring mobility are often rapidly reduced and the quality of life can be considerably impaired. There are three strategies for preventing fragility fractures : prevention of falls, anti-osteoporosis treatment and hip protectors. A multidisciplinary approach including these strategies should be emphasized to impede the damaging process involved in fragility fracture. PMID:22460510

  3. Biomechanics of locomotion in Asian elephants.

    PubMed

    Genin, J J; Willems, P A; Cavagna, G A; Lair, R; Heglund, N C

    2010-03-01

    Elephants are the biggest living terrestrial animal, weighing up to five tons and measuring up to three metres at the withers. These exceptional dimensions provide certain advantages (e.g. the mass-specific energetic cost of locomotion is decreased) but also disadvantages (e.g. forces are proportional to body volume while supportive tissue strength depends on their cross-sectional area, which makes elephants relatively more fragile than smaller animals). In order to understand better how body size affects gait mechanics the movement of the centre of mass (COM) of 34 Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) was studied over their entire speed range of 0.4-5.0 m s(-1) with force platforms. The mass-specific mechanical work required to maintain the movements of the COM per unit distance is approximately 0.2 J kg(-1) m(-1) (about 1/3 of the average of other animals ranging in size from a 35 g kangaroo rat to a 70 kg human). At low speeds this work is reduced by a pendulum-like exchange between the kinetic and potential energies of the COM, with a maximum energy exchange of approximately 60% at 1.4 m s(-1). At high speeds, elephants use a bouncing mechanism with little exchange between kinetic and potential energies of the COM, although without an aerial phase. Elephants increase speed while reducing the vertical oscillation of the COM from about 3 cm to 1 cm. PMID:20154184

  4. Vestibular compensation and orientation during locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raphan, T.; Imai, T.; Moore, S. T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Body, head, and eye movements were studied in three dimensions while walking and turning to determine the role of the vestibular system in directing gaze and maintaining spatial orientation. The body, head, and eyes were represented as three-dimensional coordinate frames, and the movement of these frames was related to a trajectory frame that described the motion of the body on a terrestrial plane. The axis-angle of the body, head, and eye rotation were then compared to the axis-angle of the rotation of the gravitoinertial acceleration (GIA). We inferred the role of the vestibular system during locomotion and the contributions of the VCR and VOR by examining the interrelationship between these coordinate frames. Straight walking induced head and eye rotations in a compensatory manner to the linear accelerations, maintaining head pointing and gaze along the direction of forward motion. Turning generated a combination of compensation and orientation responses. The head leads and steers the turn while the eyes compensate to maintain stable horizontal gaze in space. Saccades shift horizontal gaze as the turn is executed. The head pitches, as during straight walking. It also rolls so that the head tends to align with the orientation of the GIA. Head orientation changes anticipate orientation changes of the GIA. Eye orientation follows the changes in GIA orientation so that the net orientation gaze is closer to the orientation of the GIA. The study indicates that the vestibular system utilizes compensatory and orienting mechanisms to stabilize spatial orientation and gaze during walking and turning.

  5. Nematode locomotion in unconfined and confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Alejandro; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Vanapalli, Siva A.; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2013-08-01

    The millimeter-long soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans propels itself by producing undulations that propagate along its body and turns by assuming highly curved shapes. According to our recent study [V. Padmanabhan et al., PLoS ONE 7, e40121 (2012), 10.1371/journal.pone.0040121] all these postures can be accurately described by a piecewise-harmonic-curvature model. We combine this curvature-based description with highly accurate hydrodynamic bead models to evaluate the normalized velocity and turning angles for a worm swimming in an unconfined fluid and in a parallel-wall cell. We find that the worm moves twice as fast and navigates more effectively under a strong confinement, due to the large transverse-to-longitudinal resistance-coefficient ratio resulting from the wall-mediated far-field hydrodynamic coupling between body segments. We also note that the optimal swimming gait is similar to the gait observed for nematodes swimming in high-viscosity fluids. Our bead models allow us to determine the effects of confinement and finite thickness of the body of the nematode on its locomotion. These effects are not accounted for by the classical resistive-force and slender-body theories.

  6. Stokesian locomotion in elastic fluids: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto; Lauga, Eric

    2010-11-01

    In many instances of biological relevance, self-propelled cells have to swim through non-Newtonian fluids. In order to provide fundamental understanding on the effect of such non-Newtonian stresses on locomotion, we have studied the motion an oscillating magnetic swimmer immersed in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids at small Reynolds numbers. The swimmer is made with a small rare earth (Neodymium-Iron-Boron) magnetic rod (3 mm) to which a flexible tail was glued. This array was immersed in cylindrical container (50 mm diameter) in which the test fluid was contained. A nearly uniform oscillating magnetic field was created with a Helmholtz coil (R=200mm) and a AC power supply. For the Newtonian case, a 30,000 cSt silicon oil was used. In the non-Newtonian case, a fluid with nearly constant viscosity and large first normal stress difference (highly elastic) was used; this fluid was made with Corn syrup with a small amount of polyacrylamide. The swimming speed was measured, for different amplitudes and frequencies, using a digital image analysis. The objective of the present investigation is to determine whether the elastic effects of the fluid improve or not the swimming performance. Some preliminary results will be presented and discussed.

  7. Stability versus maneuverability in aquatic locomotion.

    PubMed

    Weihs, Daniel

    2002-02-01

    The dictionary definition of stability as "Firmly established, not easily to be changed" immediately indicates the conflict between stability and maneuverability in aquatic locomotion. The present paper addresses several issues resulting from these opposing requirements. Classical stability theory for bodies moving in fluids is based on developments in submarine and airship motions. These have lateral symmetry, in common with most animals. This enables the separation of the equations of motion into two sets of 3 each. The vertical (longitudinal) set, which includes motions in the axial (surge), normal (heave) and pitching directions, can thus be separated from the lateral-horizontal plane which includes yaw, roll and sideslip motions. This has been found useful in the past for longitudinal stability studies based on coasting configurations but is not applicable to the analysis of turning, fast starts and vigorous swimming, where the lateral symmetry of the fish body is broken by bending motions. The present paper will also examine some of the aspects of the stability vs. maneuverability tradeoff for these asymmetric motions. An analysis of the conditions under which the separation of equations of motions into vertical and horizontal planes is justified, and a definition of the equations to be used in cases where this separation is not accurate enough is presented. PMID:21708701

  8. Drosophila melanogaster locomotion in cold thin air.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael E; Frazier, Melanie R

    2006-01-01

    The alpine environment is likely to challenge insect locomotion because of low mean temperatures and reduced barometric pressure. In this study, we measured the direct and interactive effects of these factors on walking and flight performance of wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that decreased temperature and decreased air pressure both reduced walking speed and flight performance. Flies walked more slowly at 18 degrees C and in the lowest air pressure treatment (34 kPa). This treatment, equivalent in air pressure to the top of Mount Everest, was the only air pressure that significantly reduced fly walking speed. Therefore, walking performance in the wild is likely limited by temperature, but not oxygen availability. In contrast to walking performance, low but ecologically realistic air pressures dramatically reduced overall flight performance. The effects of reduced air pressure on flight performance were more pronounced at colder temperatures. Reduced flight performance in high altitude conditions was primarily driven by an increased reluctance for flies to initiate flight rather than outright failure to fly. Such reluctance to fly in high altitude conditions may in part explain the prevalence of aptery and brachyptery in high altitude insects. The observed interactive effects of temperature and air pressure on flight performance confirm the importance of simultaneously manipulating both of these factors when studying the impact of altitudinal conditions on insect physiology and behavior. PMID:16391358

  9. Intramuscular Pressure Measurement During Locomotion in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Ricard E.

    1996-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of intramuscular pressure (IMP) measurement for studying muscle function during gait, IMP was recorded in the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of ten volunteers during, treadmill walking, and running using transducer-tipped catheters. Soleus IMP exhibited single peaks during late-stance phase of walking (181 +/- 69 mmHg, mean +/- S.E.) and running (269 +/- 95 mmHg). Tibialis anterior IMP showed a biphasic response, with the largest peak (90 +/- 15 mmHg during walking and 151 +/- 25 mmHg during running) occurring shortly after heel strike. IMP magnitude increased with gait speed in both muscles. Linear regression of soleus IMP against ankle joint torque obtained by a dynamometer in two subjects produced linear relationships (r = 0.97). Application of these relationships to IMP data yielded estimated peak soleus moment contributions of 0.95-165 Nm/Kg during walking, and 1.43-2.70 Nm/Kg during running. IMP results from local muscle tissue deformations caused by muscle force development and thus, provides a direct, practical index of muscle function during locomotion in humans.

  10. Leg intramuscular pressures during locomotion in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Murthy, G.; Holley, D. C.; Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of intramuscular pressure (IMP) measurement for studying muscle function during gait, IMP was recorded in the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of 10 volunteers during treadmill walking and running by using transducer-tipped catheters. Soleus IMP exhibited single peaks during late-stance phase of walking [181 +/- 69 (SE) mmHg] and running (269 +/- 95 mmHg). Tibialis anterior IMP showed a biphasic response, with the largest peak (90 +/- 15 mmHg during walking and 151 +/- 25 mmHg during running) occurring shortly after heel strike. IMP magnitude increased with gait speed in both muscles. Linear regression of soleus IMP against ankle joint torque obtained by a dynamometer produced linear relationships (n = 2, r = 0.97 for both). Application of these relationships to IMP data yielded estimated peak soleus moment contributions of 0.95-1.65 N . m/kg during walking, and 1.43-2.70 N . m/kg during running. Phasic elevations of IMP during exercise are probably generated by local muscle tissue deformations due to muscle force development. Thus profiles of IMP provide a direct, reproducible index of muscle function during locomotion in humans.

  11. EphA4-Mediated Ipsilateral Corticospinal Tract Misprojections Are Necessary for Bilateral Voluntary Movements But Not Bilateral Stereotypic Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Serradj, Najet; Paixão, Sónia; Sobocki, Tomasz; Feinberg, Mitchell; Klein, Rüdiger; Kullander, Klas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we took advantage of the reported role of EphA4 in determining the contralateral spinal projection of the corticospinal tract (CST) to investigate the effects of ipsilateral misprojections on voluntary movements and stereotypic locomotion. Null EphA4 mutations produce robust ipsilateral CST misprojections, resulting in bilateral corticospinal tracts. We hypothesize that a unilateral voluntary limb movement, not a stereotypic locomotor movement, will become a bilateral movement in EphA4 knock-out mice with a bilateral CST. However, in EphA4 full knock-outs, spinal interneurons also develop bilateral misprojections. Aberrant bilateral spinal circuits could thus transform unilateral corticospinal control signals into bilateral movements. We therefore studied mice with conditional forebrain deletion of the EphA4 gene under control by Emx1, a gene expressed in the forebrain that affects the developing CST but spares brainstem motor pathways and spinal motor circuits. We examined two conditional knock-outs targeting forebrain EphA4 during performance of stereotypic locomotion and voluntary movement: adaptive locomotion over obstacles and exploratory reaching. We found that the conditional knock-outs used alternate stepping, not hopping, during overground locomotion, suggesting normal central pattern generator function and supporting our hypothesis of minimal CST involvement in the moment-to-moment control of stereotypic locomotion. In contrast, the conditional knock-outs showed bilateral voluntary movements under conditions when single limb movements are normally produced and, as a basis for this aberrant control, developed a bilateral motor map in motor cortex that is driven by the aberrant ipsilateral CST misprojections. Therefore, a specific change in CST connectivity is associated with and explains a change in voluntary movement. PMID:24719100

  12. A highly adaptive magnetorheological fluid robotic leg for efficient terrestrial locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Sun, Shuaishuai; Ouyang, Yiming; Xu, Min; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Shiwu

    2016-09-01

    To survive in nature, animals adjust the characteristics of their legs or fins to adapt the motion to their environment. Inspired by the locomotion of animals, a study on the tunable stiffness and damping of a leg will help in the development of intelligent locomotion robots. In this paper we report on the development and experiment of a novel and simple robotic leg that can be adapted to the environment via a smart magnetorheological fluid (MRF). The robotic leg consists of a rotation MRF damper, a torsional spring, a ‘foot’ and a ‘leg’. The curved part of the ‘foot’ makes contact with the grounds while the other end is linked to an outer cylinder of the MRF damper with an inelastic cable. The variable force arm rising from the MRF damper and the torsional spring can help the leg adapt to a changing environment. The characteristics of the MRF damper have been investigated and a model is built to describe its mechanical features when different currents are applied to the MRF damper. A test on a linear dynamic test instrument has been conducted to verify the accuracy of the model. The robotic leg is installed in a locomotion platform to investigate the speed of its locomotion and the cost of the transport; the result demonstrated the feasibility and adaptability of the leg when walking on hard terrain. Its simple structure, high adaptability, and easy control of the MRF leg helped in the design and development of a high performance field robot that can adapt to various environments.

  13. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  14. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  15. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  16. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  17. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  18. Do altered energy metabolism or spontaneous locomotion 'mediate' decelerated senescence?

    PubMed

    Arum, Oge; Dawson, John Alexander; Smith, Daniel Larry; Kopchick, John J; Allison, David B; Bartke, Andrzej

    2015-06-01

    That one or multiple measures of metabolic rate may be robustly associated with, or possibly even causative of, the progression of aging-resultant phenotypes such as lifespan is a long-standing, well-known mechanistic hypothesis. To broach this hypothesis, we assessed metabolic function and spontaneous locomotion in two genetic and one dietary mouse models for retarded aging, and subjected the data to mediation analyses to determine whether any metabolic or locomotor trait could be identified as a mediator of the effect of any of the interventions on senescence. We do not test the hypothesis of causality (which would require some experiments), but instead test whether the correlation structure of certain variables is consistent with one possible pathway model in which a proposed mediating variable has a causal role. Results for metabolic measures, including oxygen consumption and respiratory quotient, failed to support this hypothesis; similar negative results were obtained for three behavioral motion metrics. Therefore, our mediation analyses did not find support that any of these correlates of decelerated senescence was a substantial mediator of the effect of either of these genetic alterations (with or without caloric restriction) on longevity. Further studies are needed to relate the examined phenotypic characteristics to mechanisms of aging and control of longevity. PMID:25720347

  19. Performance of skeleton-reinforced biomembranes in locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Shoele, Kourosh

    2008-11-01

    Skeleton-reinforced biomembranes are ubiquitous in nature and play critical roles in many biological functions. Representative examples include insect wings, cell membranes, and mollusk nacres. In this study we focus on the ray fins of fish and investigate the effects of anisotropic flexibility on their performance. Employing a fluid-structure interaction algorithm by coupling a boundary-element model with a nonlinear structural model, we examined the dynamics of a membrane that is geometrically and structurally similar to a caudal fin. Several locomotion modes that closely resemble caudal fin kinematics reported in the literature are applied. Our results show that the flexibility of the fin significantly increases its capacity of thrust generation, manifested as increased efficiency, reduced transverse force, and reduced sensitivity to kinematic parameters. This design also makes the fin more controllable and deployable. Despite simplifications made in this model in terms of fin geometry, internal structure, and kinematics, detailed features of the simulated flow field are consistent with observations and speculations based upon Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow around live fish.

  20. Vibration-induced changes in EMG during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Sabine M P; Swinnen, Stephan P; Desloovere, Kaat; Duysens, Jacques

    2003-03-01

    The present study was set up to examine the contribution of Ia afferent input in the generation of electromyographic (EMG) activity. Subjects walked blindfolded along a walkway while tendon vibration was applied continuously to a leg muscle. The effects of vibration were measured on mean EMG activity in stance and swing phase. The results show that vibration of the quadriceps femoris (Q) at the knee and of biceps femoris (BF) at the knee enhanced the EMG activity of these muscles and this occurred mainly in the stance phase of walking. These results suggest involvement of Ia afferent input of Q and BF in EMG activation during stance. In contrast, vibration of muscles at the ankle and hip had no significant effect on burst amplitude. Additionally, the onset time of tibialis anterior was measured to look at timing of phase transitions. Only vibration of quadriceps femoris resulted in an earlier onset of tibialis anterior within the gait cycle, suggesting involvement of these Ia afferents in the triggering of phase transitions. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest involvement of Ia afferent input in the control of muscle activity during locomotion in humans. A limited role in timing of phase transitions is proposed as well. PMID:12626612