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Sample records for bisbibenzyls induce growth

  1. Abscisic acid induces biosynthesis of bisbibenzyls and tolerance to UV-C in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Akito; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kosaku

    2015-09-01

    Environmental stresses are effective triggers for the biosynthesis of various secondary metabolites in plants, and phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and abscisic acid are known to mediate such responses in flowering plants. However, the detailed mechanism underlying the regulation of secondary metabolism in bryophytes remains unclear. In this study, the induction mechanism of secondary metabolites in the model liverwort Marchantia polymorpha was investigated. Abscisic acid (ABA) and ultraviolet irradiation (UV-C) were found to induce the biosynthesis of isoriccardin C, marchantin C, and riccardin F, which are categorized as bisbibenzyls, characteristic metabolites of liverworts. UV-C led to the significant accumulation of ABA. Overexpression of MpABI1, which encodes protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) as a negative regulator of ABA signaling, suppressed accumulation of bisbibenzyls in response to ABA and UV-C irradiation and conferred susceptibility to UV-C irradiation. These data show that ABA plays a significant role in the induction of bisbibenzyl biosynthesis, which might confer tolerance against UV-C irradiation in M. polymorpha. PMID:26055979

  2. Marchantin A, a cyclic bis(bibenzyl ether), isolated from the liverwort Marchantia emarginata subsp. tosana induces apoptosis in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Jan; Wu, Chia-Li; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chi, Li-Ling; Chen, Pen-Yuan; Chiu, Chun-Jung; Huang, Chung-Yang; Chen, Chia-Nan

    2010-05-01

    Liverwort constituents have been reported to exert a broad spectrum of biological activities. In this study, we used a bioactivity-guided separation of an extract from the liverwort species Marchantia emarginata subsp. tosana to determine its anticancer activity. A high level of the active ingredient was isolated from this liverwort and its chemical structure was identified and characterized by various spectra. It was found to be identical to a well-known compound, marchantin A, a cyclic bisbibenzyl ether. However, no anticancer activities of this compound have previously been reported. We found that marchantin A efficiently induced cell growth inhibition in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with an IC(50) of 4.0microg/mL. Fluorescence microscopy and a Western blot analysis indicated that marchantin A actively induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. The levels of cleaved caspase-8, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) increased. However, the level of Bid markedly decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also evaluated the anticancer activities of marchantin A on the regulation of cell cycle regulators such as p21, p27, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1. The p21 and p27 gene expressions increased markedly while cyclin B1 and D1 gene expression decreased markedly by treatment with marchantin A. Many report demonstrated that liverwort was suggested to possess potent antioxidant activity. Our results indicate that marchantin A possesses free radical-scavenging activity (EC(50)=20microg/mL). Taken together, for the first time, the compound marchantin A from liverworts demonstrated to be a potent inducer of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:19913353

  3. Dihydroptychantol A, a macrocyclic bisbibenzyl derivative, induces autophagy and following apoptosis associated with p53 pathway in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xia; Wu, William K.K.; Sun Bin; Cui Min; Liu Shanshan; Gao Jian; Lou Hongxiang

    2011-03-01

    Dihydroptychantol A (DHA), a novel macrocyclic bisbibenzyl compound extracted from liverwort Asterella angusta, has antifungal and multi-drug resistance reversal properties. Here, the chemically synthesized DHA was employed to test its anti-cancer activities in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Our results demonstrated that DHA induced autophagy followed by apoptotic cell death accompanied with G{sub 2}/M-phase cell cycle arrest in U2OS cells. DHA-induced autophagy was morphologically characterized by the formation of double membrane-bound autophagic vacuoles recognizable at the ultrastructural level. DHA also increased the levels of LC3-II, a marker of autophagy. Surprisingly, DHA-mediated apoptotic cell death was potentiated by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, suggesting that autophagy may play a protective role that impedes the eventual cell death. Furthermore, p53 was shown to be involved in DHA-meditated autophagy and apoptosis. In this connection, DHA increased nuclear expression of p53, induced p53 phosphorylation, and upregulated p53 target gene p21{sup Waf1/Cip1}. In contrast, cytoplasmic p53 was reduced by DHA, which contributed to the stimulation of autophagy. In relation to the cell cycle, DHA decreased the expression of cyclin B{sub 1}, a cyclin required for progression through the G{sub 2}/M phase. Taken together, DHA induces G{sub 2}/M-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U2OS cells. DHA-induced apoptosis was preceded by the induction of protective autophagy. DHA-mediated autophagy and apoptosis are associated with the cytoplasmic and nuclear functions of p53.

  4. Activity-guided isolation of cytotoxic bis-bibenzyl constituents from Dumortiera hirsuta.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Masao; Ikeda, Risa; Kenmoku, Hiromichi; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Activity-guided fractionation of the ether extract of Dumortiera hirsute (Japanese liverwort), using cytotoxicity testing with cultured HL 60 and KB cells, resulted in the isolation of a new cytotoxic bis-bibenzyl compound, along with the two known bis-bibenzyls: isomarchantin C and isoriccardin C. The structural determination of the new bis-bibenzyl through extensive NMR spectral data indicated a derivative of marchantin A, which has been isolated from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. The cytotoxicity of the bis-bibenzyls was evaluated by the MTT (3-(4,5-di-methylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay using cultured HL 60 and KB cells. PMID:23391534

  5. Structure-anti-MRSA activity relationship of macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hiromi; Onoda, Kenji; Morita, Daichi; Ishitsubo, Erika; Matsuno, Kenji; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Teruo; Miyachi, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-15

    We synthesized a series of macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl) derivatives, including riccardin-, isoplagiochin- and marchantin-class structures, and evaluated their antibacterial activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA activity). The structure-activity relationships and the results of molecular dynamics simulations indicated that bis(bibenzyl)s with potent anti-MRSA activity commonly have a 4-hydroxyl group at the D-benzene ring and a 2-hydroxyl group at the C-benzene ring in the hydrophilic part of the molecule, and an unsubstituted phenoxyphenyl group in the hydrophobic part of the molecule containing the A-B-benzene rings. Pharmacological characterization of the bis(bibenzyl) derivatives and 2-phenoxyphenol fragment 25, previously proposed as the minimum structure of riccardin C 1 for anti-MRSA activity, indicated that they have different action mechanisms: the bis(bibenzyl)s are bactericidal, while 25 is bacteriostatic, showing only weak bactericidal activity. PMID:24239015

  6. Antifungal dibenzofuran bis(bibenzyl)s from the liverwort Asterella angusta.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianbo; Xie, Chunfeng; Guo, Huaifang; Yu, Wentao; Lou, Hongxiang

    2007-07-01

    Bioactivity-guided separation of an antifungal extract from the liverwort Asterella angusta afforded four bis(bibenzyl)s, asterelin A (1), asterelin B (2), 11-O-demethyl marchantin I (3), and dihydroptychantol A (4), together with six known ones. Their structures were established by extensive spectroscopic analysis (1D and 2D-NMR, MS), and that of 2 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic diffraction analysis. Compounds 1 and 2 are the first examples of dibenzofuran bis(bibenzyl)s. The antifungal activity of the isolated bis(bibenzyl)s against the common clinical pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was evaluated using both the thin-layer chromatography bioautographic assay and the broth microdilution method. They showed moderate antifungal activities with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 16 microg/ml to 512 microg/ml. PMID:17570447

  7. Study of bis(bibenzyls) in bryophytes using electron ionization time-of-flight and electrospray ionization triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaifang; Xing, Jie; Xie, Chunfeng; Qu, Jianbo; Gao, Yanhui; Lou, Hongxiang

    2007-01-01

    A detailed analysis of mass spectra generated from bis(bibenzyl) compounds in bryophytes under electron ionization time-of-flight (EI-TOF) and electrospray ionization triple-quadrupole (ESI-TQ) mass spectrometry conditions is reported. Proposed structures of the fragment ions were obtained by tracking the functional groups of 15 bis(bibenzyls), the structures of which are similar except for some alkoxyl substituents and linkage sites of biphenyl ether bonds. The elucidation was aided by the use of accurate mass measurements. Attempts have been made to provide rational pathways for the formation of these fragment ions, and a generalized fragmentation mechanism is proposed. The bis(bibenzyls) mentioned in this study include three types according to their structure characteristics, i.e. one biphenyl ether bond (A-type), two biphenyl ether bonds (B-type), one biphenyl ether and one biphenyl bond (C-type). The three types display different EI-MS and ESI-MS/MS product profiles, by which the bis(bibenzyl) type and the number of alkoxyl substituents can be identified. Isomers of bis(bibenzyls) can be differentiated to some extent, while the linkage sites of biphenyl ether bonds are difficult to identify. The structure-fragmentation relationships will facilitate the characterization of other bis(bibenzyls) and this will be of value for the high-throughput screening of novel bis(bibenzyls) in bryophytes. PMID:17348087

  8. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel macrocyclic bisbibenzyl analogues as tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Li, Lin; Hu, Qing-Wen; Xie, Fei; Zheng, Hong-Bo; Niu, Huan-Min; Yuan, Hui-Qing; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    A series of novel macrocyclic bisbibenzyl analogues was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their antiproliferative activity in vitro. All of the compounds were tested in five anthropic cancer cell lines, including a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Among these novel molecules, compounds 88, 92 and 94 displayed excellent anticancer activity against Hela, k562, HCC1428, HT29, and PC-3/Doc cell lines, with average IC50 values ranging from 2.23 μM to 3.86 μM, and were more potent than the parental compound marchantin C and much more potent than the positive control Adriamycin. In addition, the mechanism of action of compound 88 was investigated by cell cycle analysis and a tubulin polymerization assay in HCC1482 cells. The binding mode of compound 88 to tubulin was also investigated utilizing a molecular docking study. In conclusion, the present study improves our understanding of the action of bisbibenzyl-based tubulin polymerization inhibitors and provides a new molecular scaffold for the further development of antitumor agents that target tubulin. PMID:27318123

  9. Molecular asymmetry of macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl)s, natural products from liverwort species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keserű, György M.; Kolossváry, István; Nógrádi, Mihály

    1995-10-01

    Conformation of marchantin H triacetate (1), a bis(diarylether)-type macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl), was studied by molecular mechanics calculations. The most stable enantiomeric conformations were found, but no direct path for the interconversion could be detected. Fast non-direct interconversion, however, was confirmed by chiral HPLC. Ring inversion of compounds containing the biphenyl moiety was investigated on plagiochin C tribenzyl ether (3). Enantiomers in both cases were separated by chiral HPLC and their CD spectra measured on-line. Conformational analysis of 3 was performed by molecular mechanics conformational search. Configuration of the minimum energy enantiomeric conformations was established by calculation of the rotatory strengths at the INDO/S level.

  10. Riccardin C derivatives as anti-MRSA agents: structure-activity relationship of a series of hydroxylated bis(bibenzyl)s.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hiromi; Okazaki, Miki; Morita, Daichi; Kuroda, Teruo; Matsuno, Kenji; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Miyachi, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-15

    Members of a series of macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl) riccardin-class derivatives were found to exhibit antibacterial activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA activity). Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were conducted, focusing on the number and position of the hydroxyl groups. The minimum essential structure for anti-MRSA activity was also investigated. PMID:23122868

  11. Bisbibenzyls, a New Type of Antifungal Agent, Inhibit Morphogenesis Switch and Biofilm Formation through Upregulation of DPP3 in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Chang, Wenqiang; Sun, Bin; Groh, Matthias; Speicher, Andreas; Lou, Hongxiang

    2011-01-01

    The yeast-to-hypha transition plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of C. albicans. Farnesol, a quorum sensing molecule (QSM) secreted by the fungal itself, could prevent the formation of hyphae and subsequently lead to the defect of biofilm formation. The DPP3, encoding phosphatase, is a key gene in regulating farnesol synthesis. In this study, we screened 24 bisbibenzyls and 2 bibenzyls that were isolated from bryophytes or chemically synthesized by using CLSI method for antifungal effect. Seven bisbibenzyls were found to have antifungal effects with IC80 less than 32 µg/ml, and among them, plagiochin F, isoriccardin C and BS-34 were found to inhibit the hyphae and biofilm formation of C. albicans in a dose-dependent manner. To uncover the underlying relationship between morphogenesis switch and QSM formation, we measured the farnesol production by HPLC-MS and quantified Dpp3 expression by detecting the fluorescent intensity of green fluorescent protein tagged strain using Confocal Laser Scanning microscopy and Multifunction Microplate Reader. The DPP3 transcripts were determined by real-time PCR. The data indicated that the bisbibenzyls exerted antifungal effects through stimulating the synthesis of farnesol via upregulation of Dpp3, suggesting a potential antifungal application of bisbibenzyls. In addition, our assay provides a novel, visual and convenient method to measure active compounds against morphogenesis switch. PMID:22174935

  12. Anti-MRSA activity of isoplagiochin-type macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl)s is mediated through cell membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Kenji; Sawada, Hiromi; Morita, Daichi; Fujii, Kana; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Teruo; Miyachi, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    We synthesized three geometrical isomers of a macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl) based on isoplagiochin, a natural product isolated from bryophytes, and evaluated their antibacterial activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA activity). The isomer containing a 1,4-linked ring (5) showed only weak activity, whereas the isomers containing a 1,3-linked (6) or 1,2-linked (7) C ring showed potent anti-MRSA activity. Molecular dynamics calculations indicated that these differences are probably due to differences in the conformational flexibility of the macrocyclic ring; the active compounds 6 and 7 were more rigid than 5. In order to understand the action mechanism of anti-MRSA activity, we investigated the cellular flux of a fluorescent DNA-binder, ethidium bromide (EtBr), in the presence and absence of these macrocycles. The active compound 6 increased the levels of EtBr inflow and outflow in S. aureus cells, as did our potent anti-MRSA riccardin derivative (4), indicating that these compounds increased the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane. Inactive 5 had no effect on EtBr inflow or outflow. Furthermore, compound 6 abrogated the normal intracellular concentration gradients of Na(+) and K(+) in S. aureus cells, increasing the intracellular Na(+) concentration and decreasing the K(+) concentration, while 5 had no such effect. These results indicate that anti-MRSA-active macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl) derivatives directly damage the gram-positive bacterial membrane, resulting in increased permeability. PMID:25999206

  13. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman W.

    1987-01-01

    New muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow embryonic skeletal myofibers which are able to differentiate into more adultlike myofibers. Studies on mechanical simulation of cultured muscle cell growth will now be more directly applicable to mechanically-induced growth in adult muscle, and lead to better models for understanding muscle tissue atrophy caused by disuse in the microgravity of space.

  14. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  15. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow skeletal myofibers which differentiate into more adult-like myofibers. Mechanical simulation studies of these muscle cells in a newly developed mechanical cell simulator can now be performed to study growth processes in skeletal muscle. Conditions in the mechanical cell simulator were defined where mechanical activity can either prevent muscle wasting or stimulate muscle growth. The role of endogenous and exogenous growth factors in tension-induced muscle growth is being investigated under the defined conditions of tissue culture.

  16. Surface-Step-Induced Oscillatory Oxide Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Luo, Langli; Ciston, Jim; Saidi, Wissam A.; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-09-01

    We report in situ atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations of the oxidation of stepped Cu surfaces. We find that the presence of surface steps both inhibits oxide film growth and leads to the oxide decomposition, thereby resulting in oscillatory oxide film growth. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the oscillatory oxide film growth is induced by oxygen adsorption on the lower terrace along the step edge, which destabilizes the oxide film formed on the upper terrace.

  17. Minimum structural requirements for cell membrane leakage-mediated anti-MRSA activity of macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl)s.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kana; Morita, Daichi; Onoda, Kenji; Kuroda, Teruo; Miyachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl)-type phenolic natural products, found exclusively in bryophytes, exhibit potent antibacterial activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA activity). Here, in order to identify the minimum essential structure for cell membrane leakage-mediated anti-MRSA activity of these compounds, we synthesized acyclic fragment structures and evaluated their anti-MRSA activity. The activities of all of the acyclic fragments tested exhibited similar characteristics to those of the macrocycles, i.e., anti-MRSA bactericidal activity, an enhancing effect on influx and efflux of ethidium bromide (EtBr: fluorescent DNA-binder) in Staphylococcus aureus cells, and bactericidal activity towards a Staphylococcus aureus strain resistant to 2-phenoxyphenol (4). The latter result suggests that they have a different mechanism of action from 4, which is a FabI inhibitor previously proposed to be the minimum active fragment of riccardin-type macrocycles. Thus, cyclic structure is not a necessary condition for cell membrane leakage-mediated anti-MRSA activity of macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl)s. PMID:26995530

  18. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Vasko, A. C.; Karpov, V. G.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-28

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  19. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, A. C.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  20. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The project investigated biochemical mechanisms to enhance skeletal muscle growth, and developed a computer based mechanical cell stimulator system. The biochemicals investigated in this study were insulin/(Insulin like Growth Factor) IGF-1 and Steroids. In order to analyze which growth factors are essential for stretch-induced muscle growth in vitro, we developed a defined, serum-free medium in which the differentiated, cultured avian muscle fibers could be maintained for extended periods of time. The defined medium (muscle maintenance medium, MM medium) maintains the nitrogen balance of the myofibers for 3 to 7 days, based on myofiber diameter measurements and myosin heavy chain content. Insulin and IGF-1, but not IGF-2, induced pronounced myofiber hypertrophy when added to this medium. In 5 to 7 days, muscle fiber diameters increase by 71 % to 98% compared to untreated controls. Mechanical stimulation of the avian muscle fibers in MM medium increased the sensitivity of the cells to insulin and IGF-1, based on a leftward shift of the insulin dose/response curve for protein synthesis rates. (54). We developed a ligand binding assay for IGF-1 binding proteins and found that the avian skeletal muscle cultures produced three major species of 31, 36 and 43 kD molecular weight (54) Stretch of the myofibers was found to have no significant effect on the efflux of IGF-1 binding proteins, but addition of exogenous collagen stimulated IGF-1 binding protein production 1.5 to 5 fold. Steroid hormones have a profound effect on muscle protein turnover rates in vivo, with the stress-related glucocorticoids inducing rapid skeletal muscle atrophy while androgenic steroids induce skeletal muscle growth. Exercise in humans and animals reduces the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids and may enhance the anabolic effects of androgenic steroids on skeletal muscle. In our continuing work on the involvement of exogenrus growth factors in stretch-induced avian skeletal muscle growth, we

  1. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  2. Origin of growth-induced water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, H.; Boyer, J.S.

    1987-03-01

    The authors developed a new method to measure the solute concentration in the apoplast of stem tissue involving pressurizing the roots of intact seedlings (Glycine max (L.) Merr. or Pisum sativum L.), collecting a small amount of exudate from the surface of the stem under saturating humidities, and determining the osmotic potential of the solution with a micro-osmometer capable of measuring small volumes (0.5 microliter). In the elongating region, the apoplast concentrations were very low (equivalent to osmotic potentials of -0.03 to -0.04 megapascal) and negligible compared to the water potential of the apoplast (-0.15 to -0.30 megapascal) measured directly by isopiestic psychrometry in intact plants. Most of the apoplast water potential consisted of a negative pressure that could be measured with a pressure chamber (-0.15 to -0.28 megapascal). Tests showed that earlier methods involving infiltration of intercellular spaces or pressurizing cut segments caused solute to be released to the apoplast and resulted in spuriously high concentrations. These results indicate that, although a small amount of solute is present in the apoplast, the major component is a tension that is part of a growth-induced gradient in water potential in the enlarging tissue. The gradient originates from the extension of the cell walls, which prevents turgor from reaching its maximum and creates a growth-induced water potential that causes water to move from the xylem at a rate that satisfies the rate of enlargement. The magnitude of the gradient implies that growing tissue contains a large resistance to water movement.

  3. Nutritionally-Induced Catch-Up Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Phillip, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is considered a leading cause of growth attenuation in children. When food is replenished, spontaneous catch-up (CU) growth usually occurs, bringing the child back to its original growth trajectory. However, in some cases, the CU growth is not complete, leading to a permanent growth deficit. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding the mechanism regulating nutrition and growth, including systemic factors, such as insulin, growth hormone, insulin- like growth factor-1, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-21, etc., and local mechanisms, including autophagy, as well as regulators of transcription, protein synthesis, miRNAs and epigenetics. Studying the molecular mechanisms regulating CU growth may lead to the establishment of better nutritional and therapeutic regimens for more effective CU growth in children with malnutrition and growth abnormalities. It will be fascinating to follow this research in the coming years and to translate the knowledge gained to clinical benefit. PMID:25594438

  4. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  5. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  6. Selective fishing induces density-dependent growth.

    PubMed

    Svedäng, Henrik; Hornborg, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, views on fisheries management have oscillated between alarm and trust in management progress. The predominant policy for remedying the world fishing crisis aims at maximum sustainable yield (MSY) by adjusting gear selectivity and fishing effort. Here we report a case study on how striving for higher yields from the Eastern Baltic cod stock by increasing selectivity has become exceedingly detrimental for its productivity. Although there is a successive increase in numbers of undersized fish, growth potential is severely reduced, and fishing mortality in fishable size has increased. Once density-dependent growth is introduced, the process is self-enforcing as long as the recruitment remains stable. Our findings suggest that policies focusing on maximum yield while targeting greater sizes are risky and should instead prioritize catch rates over yield. Disregarding the underlying population structure may jeopardize stock productivity, with dire consequences for the fishing industry and ecosystem structure and function. PMID:24920387

  7. Fractured Geothermal Growth Induced by Heat Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, J.W.; Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Potter, R.M.; Robinson, B.A.

    1989-02-01

    Field testing of a hydraulically stimulated, hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system at the Fenton Hill site in northern New Mexico indicated that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area that were observed during energy extraction operations that caused substantial thermal drawdown in portions of the reservoir. These temporal increases suggest that augmentation of reservoir hear-production capacity in an HDR system may be possible. [DJE 2005

  8. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  9. Radiation induced growth of micro crystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Meisel, D.

    1991-01-01

    Generation of colloidal particles during the radiolysis of aqueous solutions was already observed in the early days of radiation chemistry. Systematic studies using radiation chemistry techniques as synthetic tools in the preparation of colloidal particles, primarily metallic particles, were begun approximately a decade ago in conjunction since they were found to catalyze multi-electron redox processes. A large number of metallic colloidal particles were then synthesized, including silver, gold, platinum, iridium, nickel, cadmium, and others. More recently, attention has turned to semiconductor colloidal particles. The stimulus to these studies is the observation of quantum size effects in small semiconductor particles that exhibit hybrid properties between those of the molecular species and the solid state bulk material. In the following we discuss our own observations on the evolution of semiconductor particles whose growth has been initiated by pulse radiolysis. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Mechanically induced alterations in cultured skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Hatfaludy, S.; Karlisch, P.; Shansky, J.

    1991-01-01

    Model systems are available for mechanically stimulating cultured skeletal muscle cells by passive tensile forces which simulate those found in vivo. When applied to embryonic muscle cells in vitro these forces induce tissue organogenesis, metabolic adaptations, and muscle cell growth. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cell growth correlates with stretch-induced increases in the efflux of prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2(alpha) in a time and frequency dependent manner. These prostaglandins act as mechanical 'second messengers' regulating skeletal muscle protein turnover rates. Since they also effect bone remodelling in response to tissue loading and unloading, secreted prostaglandins may serve as paracrine growth factors, coordinating the growth rates of muscle and bone in response to external mechanical forces. Cell culture model systems will supplement other models in understanding mechanical transduction processes at the molecular level.

  11. Debris disc formation induced by planetary growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Löhne, T.

    2014-08-01

    Several hundred stars older than 10 million years have been observed to have infrared excesses. These observations are explained by dust grains formed by the collisional fragmentation of hidden planetesimals. Such dusty planetesimal discs are known as debris discs. In a dynamically cold planetesimal disc, collisional coagulation of planetesimals produces planetary embryos which then stir the surrounding leftover planetesimals. Thus, the collisional fragmentation of planetesimals that results from planet formation forms a debris disc. We aim to determine the properties of the underlying planetesimals in debris discs by numerically modelling the coagulation and fragmentation of planetesimal populations. The brightness and temporal evolution of debris discs depend on the radial distribution of planetesimal discs, the location of their inner and outer edges, their total mass, and the size of planetesimals in the disc. We find that a radially narrow planetesimal disc is most likely to result in a debris disc that can explain the trend of observed infrared excesses of debris discsvvv around G-type stars, for which planet formation occurs only before 100 million years. Early debris disc formation is induced by planet formation, while the later evolution is explained by the collisional decay of leftover planetesimals around planets that have already formed. Planetesimal discs with underlying planetesimals of radii ˜100 km at ≈30 au most readily explain the Spitzer Space Telescope 24 and 70 μm fluxes from debris discs around G-type stars.

  12. Growth dynamics of light-induced thrombi in microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Nikolai N.; Kondratyev, Alexander; Mikhailova, Irene

    1996-01-01

    Laser-induced thrombosis is one of the most adequate methods of studying of thrombus formation in mesenteric vessels. The in vivo simulation of different conditions of thrombi growth and the developed phenomenological theory of these processes confirm the concept of platelet activation time in treatment of the thrombi phenomenon.

  13. Investigation of plasmid-induced growth defect in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia; Sydow, Anne; Schempp, Florence; Becher, Daniela; Schewe, Hendrik; Schrader, Jens; Buchhaupt, Markus

    2016-08-10

    Genetic engineering in bacteria mainly relies on the use of plasmids. But despite their pervasive use for physiological studies as well as for the design and optimization of industrially used production strains, only limited information about plasmid induced growth defects is available for different replicons and organisms. Here, we present the identification and characterization of such a phenomenon for Pseudomonas putida transformants carrying the pBBR1-derived plasmid pMiS1. We identified the kanamycin resistance gene and the transcription factor encoding rhaR gene to be causal for the growth defect in P. putida. In contrast, this effect was not observed in Escherichia coli. The plasmid-induced growth defect was eliminated after introduction of a mutation in the plasmid-encoded rep gene, thus enabling construction of the non-toxic variant pMiS4. GFP reporters construct analyses and qPCR experiments revealed a distinctly lowered plasmid copy number for pMiS4, which is probably the reason for alleviation of the growth defect by this mutation. Our work expands the knowledge about plasmid-induced growth defects and provides a useful low-copy pBBR1 replicon variant. PMID:27287537

  14. Growth-induced electronic properties of epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, Phillip

    2012-02-01

    The growth of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is challenging to understand and control, yet rife with scientific and technological opportunities. This is due in part to different growth-induced structures such as the ``moire'' alignment of graphene layers in multilayer epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) and the formation of sidewall ribbons at natural and lithographically-defined SiC(0001) step-bunches (nanofacets). We apply scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to probe the local energy bands of such growth-induced structures. STS at cryogenic temperatures and large magnetic fields creates a comb of discrete Landau level energies that we use to quantitatively characterize the local electronic properties.

  15. Thermal spike model of ion-induced grain growth

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.E. ); Was, G.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    A thermal spike model has been developed to describe the phenomenon of ion irradiation-induced grain growth in metal alloy thin films. In single phase films where the driving force for grain growth is the reduction of grain boundary curvature, the model shows that ion-induced grain boundary mobility, M{sub ion}, is proportional to the quantity F{sub D}{sup 2}/{Delta}H{sub coh}{sup 3}, where F{sub D} is the deposited ion damage energy and {Delta}H{sub coh} is the cohesive energy of the element or alloy. Experimental strain growth results from ion irradiated coevaporated binary alloy films compare favorably with model predictions. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Local diffusion induced roughening in cobalt phthalocyanine thin film growth.

    PubMed

    Gedda, Murali; Subbarao, Nimmakayala V V; Goswami, Dipak K

    2014-07-29

    We have studied the kinetic roughening in the growth of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) thin films grown on SiO2/Si(001) surfaces as a function of the deposition time and the growth temperature using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have observed that the growth exhibits the formation of irregular islands, which grow laterally as well as vertically with coverage of CoPc molecules, resulting rough film formation. Our analysis further disclosed that such formation is due to an instability in the growth induced by local diffusion of the molecules following an anomalous scaling behavior. The instability relates the (ln(t))(1/2), with t as deposition time, dependence of the local surface slope as described in nonequilibrium film growth. The roughening has been characterized by calculating different scaling exponents α, β, and 1/z determined from the height fluctuations obtained from AFM images. We obtained an average roughness exponent α = 0.78 ± 0.04. The interface width (W) increases following a power law as W ∼ t(β), with growth exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.05 and lateral correlation length (ξ) grows as ξ ∼ t(1/z) with dynamic exponent 1/z = 0.23 ± 0.06. The exponents revealed that the growth belongs to a different class of universality. PMID:24992503

  17. The stochastic nature of growth of laser-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, C. W.; Cross, David A.; Liao, Zhi M.; Norton, Mary A.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and operational tempo of ICF systems operating in the UV are typically limited by the growth of laser- induced damage on their final optics (primarily silica optics). In the early 2000 time frame, studies of laser damage growth with relevant large area beams revealed that for some laser conditions damage sites located on the exit surface of a fused silica optic grew following an exponential growth rule: D(n) = D0 exp (n α(φ)), where D is final site diameter, D0 is the initial diameter of the site, φ is the laser fluence, α(φ) is the growth coefficient, and n is the number of exposures. In general α is a linear function of φ, with a threshold of φTH. In recent years, it has been found that that growth behavior is actually considerably more complex. For example, it was found that α is not a constant for a given fluence but follows a probability distribution with a mean equal to α(φ). This is complicated by observations that these distributions are actually functions of the pulse shape, damage site size, and initial morphology of damage initiation. In addition, there is not a fixed fluence threshold for damage sites growth, which is better described by a probability of growth which depends on site size, morphology and laser fluence. Here will review these findings and discuss implications for the operation of large laser systems.

  18. Transpiration- and growth-induced water potentials in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Westgate, M.E.; Boyer, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Recent evidence from leaves and stems indicates that gradients in water potential (psi/sub w/) necessary for water movement through growing tissues are larger than previously assumed. Because growth is sensitive to tissue psi/sub w/ and the behavior of these gradients has not been investigated in transpiring plants, the authors examined the water status of all the growing and mature vegetative tissues of maize (Zea mays L.) during high and low rates of transpiration. The psi/sub w/ measured in the mature regions of the plant responded primarily to transpiration, while the psi/sub w/ in the growing regions was affected both by transpiration and growth. The transpiration-induced potentials of the mature tissue formed a gradient of decreasing psi/sub w/ along the transpiration stream while the growth-induced potentials formed a gradient of decreasing psi/sub w/ from the transpiration stream to the expanding cells in the growing tissue. The growth-induced gradient in psi/sub w/ within the leaf remained fairly constant as the xylem psi/sub w/ decreased during the day and was associated with a decreased osmotic potential (psi/sub s/) of the growing region (osmotic adjustment). The growth-induced gradient in psi/sub w/ was not caused by excision of the tissue because intact maize stems exhibited a similar psi/sub w/. These observations support the concept that large gradients in psi/sub w/ are required to maintain water flow to expanding cells within all the vegetative tissues and suggest that the maintenance of a favorable gradient in psi/sub w/ for cell enlargement may be an important role for osmotic adjustment. 33 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  19. Early growth response 1 regulates glucose deprivation-induced necrosis

    PubMed Central

    JEON, HYUN MIN; LEE, SU YEON; JU, MIN KYUNG; KIM, CHO HEE; PARK, HYE GYEONG; KANG, HO SUNG

    2013-01-01

    Necrosis is commonly found in the core region of solid tumours due to metabolic stress such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation (GD) resulting from insufficient vascularization. Necrosis promotes tumour growth and development by releasing the tumour-promoting cytokine high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1); however, the molecular mechanism underlying necrotic cell death remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that early growth response 1 (Egr-1) is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner by GD in several cell lines such as A549, MDA-MB-231 and HepG2 cells that exhibit necrosis upon GD. We found that Egr-1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) prevented GD-induced necrosis and HMGB1 release. Necrosis-inhibiting activity of Egr-1 shRNA was also seen in multicellular tumour spheroids (MTSs), an in vitro tumour model system. In contrast, Egr-1 overexpression appeared to make tumour cells more susceptible to GD-induced necrosis. Finally, Egr-1 shRNA suppressed the growth of MTSs. These findings demonstrate that Egr-1 is implicated in GD-induced necrosis and tumour progression. PMID:23152075

  20. Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, Frances

    1998-10-03

    OAK B204 Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films. The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and hTi-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials.

  1. Placental Growth Factor Administration Abolishes Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Frank T; Tan, Adelene Y; Joo, Woo S; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia because placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and vascular endothelial growth factor are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to 4 groups: normal pregnant or RUPP±infusion of recombinant human PlGF (180 μg/kg per day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than normal pregnant rats. Infusion of recombinant human PlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that recombinant human PlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia. PMID:26831193

  2. A serum component mediates food restriction-induced growth attenuation.

    PubMed

    Pando, Rakefet; Shtaif, Biana; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2014-03-01

    Proper nutrition in terms of calories and essential food components is required to maximize longitudinal growth in children. Our previous study showed that prepubertal male rats subjected to 10 days of 40% food restriction (RES) exhibited a dramatic reduction in weight and epiphyseal growth plate height, as well as changes in gene expression and microRNAs (miRNAs) in the epiphyseal growth plate. These findings reversed rapidly after renewal of the regular food supply (catch-up [CU]). To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying the nutrition-growth association, serum collected from the RES and CU rats and control rats fed ad libitum (AL) was added to the culture medium of the chondrocyte cell line ATDC5 (instead of fetal calf serum). Serum from the RES group induced a reduction in cell viability (25%, P < .05) concomitant with an increase in cell differentiation compared with that for the AL group serum. The most interesting observation, in our opinion, was the significant reduction in the expression of specific miRNAs, including the chondro-specific miR-140. These effects were not observed for serum from refed (CU) rats. Serum levels of IGF-I, leptin, and fibroblast growth factor 21 were reduced by food restriction. The addition of IGF-I and leptin to the culture increased cell viability, whereas fibroblast growth factor 21 reduced it, suggesting the involvement of IGF-I, leptin, and possibly other still unidentified serum factors in chondrocyte cell growth. In conclusion, specific miRNAs respond to nutritional cues, and these effects are mediated by serum-borne factors. These results may promote the development of superior interventions for children with malnutrition and growth abnormalities. PMID:24456162

  3. Leptin-Induced JAK/STAT Signaling and Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Mullen, McKay; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben Rene

    2016-01-01

    Growth factor and cytokine signaling can influence the development of several cancer types. One of the key players in the development of cancer is the Janus kinas (JAK) signal transducer of activators of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway. The majority of growth factors and cytokine interactions with their membrane-bound receptors trigger JAK-STAT activation. The influential relationship between obesity and cancer is a fact. However, there is a complex sequence of events contributing to the regulation of this mechanism to promote tumor growth, yet to be fully elucidated. The JAK-STAT pathway is influenced by obesity-associated changes that have been shown to impact cancer growth and progression. This intricate process is highly regulated by a vast array of adipokines and cytokines that exert their pleiotropic effects on cancer cells to enhance metastasis to distant target sites. Leptin is a cytokine, or more precise, an adipokine secreted mainly by adipose tissue that requires JAK-STAT activation to exert its biological functions. Leptin is the central regulator of energy balance and appetite. Leptin binding to its receptor OB-R in turn activates JAK-STAT, which induces proliferation, angiogenesis, and anti-apoptotic events in normal cells and malignant cells expressing the receptor. Leptin also induces crosstalk with Notch and IL-1 (NILCO), which involves other angiogenic factors promoting tumor growth. Therefore, the existence of multiple novel classes of therapeutics that target the JAK/STAT pathway has significant clinical implications. Then, the identification of the signaling networks and factors that regulate the obesity-cancer link to which potential pharmacologic interventions can be implemented to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. In this review, we will discuss the specific relationship between leptin-JAK-STAT signaling and cancer. PMID:27472371

  4. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfeng; Li, Lena; Lian, Jihong; Schauer, Silvia; Vesely, Paul W; Kratky, Dagmar; Hoefler, Gerald; Lehner, Richard

    2016-04-12

    The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH) knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh(-/-) tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh(-/-) mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh(-/-) mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth. PMID:27050512

  5. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfeng; Li, Lena; Lian, Jihong; Schauer, Silvia; Vesely, Paul W.; Kratky, Dagmar; Hoefler, Gerald; Lehner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Summary The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH) knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh–/– tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth. PMID:27050512

  6. Nanopillar growth by focused helium ion-beam-induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; van Veldhoven, Emile; Sanford, Colin A; Salemink, Huub W M; Maas, Diederik J; Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D; Alkemade, Paul F A

    2010-11-12

    A 25 keV focused helium ion beam has been used to grow PtC nanopillars on a silicon substrate by beam-induced decomposition of a (CH(3))(3)Pt(C(P)CH(3)) precursor gas. The ion beam diameter was about 1 nm. The observed relatively high growth rates suggest that electronic excitation is the dominant mechanism in helium ion-beam-induced deposition. Pillars grown at low beam currents are narrow and have sharp tips. For a constant dose, the pillar height decreases with increasing current, pointing to depletion of precursor molecules at the beam impact site. Furthermore, the diameter increases rapidly and the total pillar volume decreases slowly with increasing current. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed with realistic values for the fundamental deposition processes. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. In particular, they reproduce the current dependences of the vertical and lateral growth rates and of the volumetric deposition efficiency. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the vertical pillar growth is due to type-1 secondary electrons and primary ions, while the lateral outgrowth is due to type-2 secondary electrons and scattered ions. PMID:20947951

  7. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:26489631

  8. Genetic analysis of growth-regulator-induced parthenocarpy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Vivian-Smith, A; Koltunow, A M

    1999-10-01

    In Arabidopsis, seedless silique development or parthenocarpy can be induced by the application of various plant growth regulators (PGRs) to unfertilized pistils. Ecotype-specific responses were observed in the Arabidopsis ecotypes Columbia and Landsberg relative to the type of PGR and level applied. The parthenocarpic response was greatest in ecotype Landsberg, and comparisons of fruit growth and morphology were studied primarily in this ecotype. Gibberellic acid application (10 micromol pistil(-1)) caused development similar to that in pollinated pistils, while benzyladenine (1 micromol pistil(-1)) and naphthylacetic acid (10 micromol pistil(-1)) treatment produced shorter siliques. Naphthylacetic acid primarily modified mesocarp cell expansion. Arabidopsis mutants were employed to examine potential dependencies on gibberellin biosynthesis (ga1-3, ga4-1, and ga5-1) and perception (spy-4 and gai) during parthenocarpic silique development. Emasculated spy-4 pistils were neither obviously parthenocarpic nor deficient in PGR perception. By contrast, emasculated gai mutants did not produce parthenocarpic siliques following gibberellic acid application, but silique development occurred following pollination or application of auxin and cytokinin. Pollinated gai siliques had decreased cell numbers and morphologically resembled auxin-induced parthenocarpic siliques. This shows that a number of independent and possibly redundant pathways can direct hormone-induced parthenocarpy, and that endogenous gibberellins play a role in regulating cell expansion and promoting cell division in carpels. PMID:10517835

  9. Lack of Collagen VI Promotes Wound-Induced Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiwen; Cescon, Matilde; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix molecule that is abundantly expressed in the skin. However, the role of collagen VI in hair follicle growth is unknown. Here, we show that collagen VI is strongly deposited in hair follicles, and is markedly upregulated by skin wounding. Lack of collagen VI in Col6a1(-/-) mice delays hair cycling and growth under physiological conditions, but promotes wound-induced hair regrowth without affecting skin regeneration. Conversely, addition of purified collagen VI rescues the abnormal wound-induced hair regrowth in Col6a1(-/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that the increased wound-induced hair regrowth of Col6a1(-/-) mice is triggered by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and is abolished by inhibition of this pathway. These findings highlight the essential relationships between extracellular matrix (ECM) and hair follicle regeneration, and suggest that collagen VI could be a potential therapeutic target for hair loss and other skin-related diseases. PMID:25989472

  10. Characterization of Alcohol-induced Filamentous Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Michael C.; Cutler, N. Shane; Heitman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Diploid cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae starved for nitrogen differentiate into a filamentous growth form. Poor carbon sources such as starches can also stimulate filamentation, whereas haploid cells undergo a similar invasive growth response in rich medium. Previous work has demonstrated a role for various alcohols, by-products of amino acid metabolism, in altering cellular morphology. We found that several alcohols, notably isoamyl alcohol and 1-butanol, stimulate filamentous growth in haploid cells in which this differentiation is normally repressed. Butanol also induces cell elongation and changes in budding pattern, leading to a pseudohyphal morphology, even in liquid medium. The filamentous colony morphology and cell elongation require elements of the pheromone-responsive MAPK cascade and TEC1, whereas components of the nutrient-sensing machinery, such as MEP2, GPA2, and GPR1, do not affect this phenomenon. A screen for 1-butanol–insensitive mutants identified additional proteins that regulate polarized growth (BUD8, BEM1, BEM4, and FIG1), mitochondrial function (MSM1, MRP21, and HMI1), and a transcriptional regulator (CHD1). Furthermore, we have also found that ethanol stimulates hyperfilamentation in diploid cells, again in a MAPK-dependent manner. Together, these results suggest that yeast may sense a combination of nutrient limitation and metabolic by-products to regulate differentiation. PMID:10637301

  11. The molecular dynamics simulation of ion-induced ripple growth

    SciTech Connect

    Suele, P.; Heinig, K.-H.

    2009-11-28

    The wavelength-dependence of ion-sputtering induced growth of repetitive nanostructures, such as ripples has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in Si. The early stage of the ion erosion driven development of ripples has been simulated on prepatterned Si stripes with a wavy surface. The time evolution of the height function and amplitude of the sinusoidal surface profile has been followed by simulated ion-sputtering. According to Bradley-Harper (BH) theory, we expect correlation between the wavelength of ripples and the stability of them. However, we find that in the small ripple wavelength ({lambda}) regime BH theory fails to reproduce the results obtained by molecular dynamics. We find that at short wavelengths ({lambda}<35 nm) the adatom yield drops hence no surface diffusion takes place which is sufficient for ripple growth. The MD simulations predict that the growth of ripples with {lambda}>35 nm is stabilized in accordance with the available experimental results. According to the simulations, few hundreds of ion impacts in {lambda} long and few nanometers wide Si ripples are sufficient for reaching saturation in surface growth for for {lambda}>35 nm ripples. In another words, ripples in the long wavelength limit seems to be stable against ion-sputtering. A qualitative comparison of our simulation results with recent experimental data on nanopatterning under irradiation is attempted.

  12. Protective Role of Growth Hormone against Hyperhomocysteinemia Induced Glomerular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Xia, Min; Abais, Justine M.; Liu, Xiaocheng; Li, Ningjun; Boini, Krishna M.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the protective role of growth hormone (GH) against hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys)-induced activations of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and consequent glomerular injury. A hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys) model was induced by folate free (FF) diet in mice. The urine protein excretion significantly increased while plasma GH levels dramatically decreased in hHcys. Real time RT-PCR showed that GH receptor (GHR) level increased in the cortex of hHcys mice, which mainly occurred in podocytes as shown by confocal microscopy. Recombinant mouse growth hormone (rmGH) treatment (0.02 mg/kg, once a day for 6 weeks) significantly restored the plasma GH, inhibited GHR up-regulation and attenuated proteinuria. Correspondingly, rmGH treatment also blocked hHcys-induced decrease in the expression of podocin, a podocyte slit diaphragm molecule, and inhibited the increases in the expression of desmin, a podocyte injury marker. It was also demonstrated that in hHcys the expression of epithelial markers, p-cadherin and ZO-1, decreased, while the expression of mesenchymal markers, FSP-1 and α-SMA, increased in podocytes, which together suggest the activation of EMT in podocytes. NADPH oxidase (Nox)-dependent superoxide anion (O2·−) and HIF-1α level in the hHcys mice cortex was markedly enhanced. These hHcys-induced EMT enhancement and Nox-dependant O2·−/HIF-1α activation were significantly attenuated by rmGH treatment. HIF-1α level increased in Hcys-treated cultured podocytes, which were blocked by rmGH treatment. Meanwhile, Hcys-induced EMT in cultured podocytes was significantly reversed by HIF-1α siRNA. All these results support the view that GH ameliorates hHcys-induced glomerular injury by reducing Nox-dependent O2·−/HIF-1α signal pathway and EMT. PMID:23529346

  13. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth.

    PubMed

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK. PMID:19932089

  14. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  15. Transforming growth factor-{beta}-inducible phosphorylation of Smad3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2009-04-10

    Smad proteins transduce the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signal at the cell surface into gene regulation in the nucleus. Upon TGF-beta treatment, the highly homologous Smad2 and Smad3 are phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the SSXS motif in the C-terminal tail. Here we show that in addition to the C-tail, three (S/T)-P sites in the Smad3 linker region, Ser(208), Ser(204), and Thr(179) are phosphorylated in response to TGF-beta. The linker phosphorylation peaks at 1 h after TGF-beta treatment, behind the peak of the C-tail phosphorylation. We provide evidence suggesting that the C-tail phosphorylation by the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the TGF-beta-induced linker phosphorylation. Although the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the linker phosphorylation, the receptor itself does not phosphorylate these sites. We further show that ERK is not responsible for TGF-beta-dependent phosphorylation of these three sites. We show that GSK3 accounts for TGF-beta-inducible Ser(204) phosphorylation. Flavopiridol, a pan-CDK inhibitor, abolishes TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208), suggesting that the CDK family is responsible for phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208) in response to TGF-beta. Mutation of the linker phosphorylation sites to nonphosphorylatable residues increases the ability of Smad3 to activate a TGF-beta/Smad-target gene as well as the growth-inhibitory function of Smad3. Thus, these observations suggest that TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 linker sites inhibits its antiproliferative activity. PMID:19218245

  16. Growth Hormone Induces Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein in Podocytes: Implications for Podocyte Depletion and Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Chitra, P Swathi; Swathi, T; Sahay, Rakesh; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Menon, Ram K; Kumar, P Anil

    2015-09-01

    The glomerular podocytes form a major size selective barrier for the filtration of serum proteins and reduced podocyte number is a critical event in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during diabetic nephropathy (DN). An elevated level of growth hormone (GH) is implicated as a causative factor in the development of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that podocytes express GH receptor and are a target for GH action. To elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of GH on podocyte depletion, we conducted PCR-array analyses for extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in podocytes. Our studies reveal that GH increases expression of a gene that encodes transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) expression. Similarly, microarray data retrieved from the Nephromine database revealed elevation of TGFBIp in patients with DN. Treatment with GH results in increased secretion of extracellular TGFBIp by podocytes. Both GH and TGFBIp induced apoptosis and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes. Exposure of podocytes to GH and TGFBIp resulted in increased migration of cells and altered podocyte permeability to albumin across podocyte monolayer. Administration of GH to rats induced EMT and apoptosis in the glomerular fraction of the kidney. Therefore, we conclude that the GH-dependent increase in TGFBIp in the podocyte is one of the mechanisms responsible for podocyte depletion in DN. PMID:25740786

  17. Cannabinoid-induced actomyosin contractility shapes neuronal morphology and growth

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Alexandre B; Ricobaraza, Ana; Carrel, Damien; Jordan, Benjamin M; Rico, Felix; Simon, Anne; Humbert-Claude, Marie; Ferrier, Jeremy; McFadden, Maureen H; Scheuring, Simon; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are recently recognized regulators of brain development, but molecular effectors downstream of type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R)-activation remain incompletely understood. We report atypical coupling of neuronal CB1Rs, after activation by endo- or exocannabinoids such as the marijuana component ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol, to heterotrimeric G12/G13 proteins that triggers rapid and reversible non-muscle myosin II (NM II) dependent contraction of the actomyosin cytoskeleton, through a Rho-GTPase and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). This induces rapid neuronal remodeling, such as retraction of neurites and axonal growth cones, elevated neuronal rigidity, and reshaping of somatodendritic morphology. Chronic pharmacological inhibition of NM II prevents cannabinoid-induced reduction of dendritic development in vitro and leads, similarly to blockade of endocannabinoid action, to excessive growth of corticofugal axons into the sub-ventricular zone in vivo. Our results suggest that CB1R can rapidly transform the neuronal cytoskeleton through actomyosin contractility, resulting in cellular remodeling events ultimately able to affect the brain architecture and wiring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03159.001 PMID:25225054

  18. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria. PMID:27191593

  19. X-ray-induced changes in growth of Mozambique tilapia

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, B.B.; Basu, M.

    1995-01-01

    Early fry (30 d postfertilization) and 7-8-week-old Mozambique tilapias (Tilapia mossambica) were exposed to X rays in dosages of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 roentgens and reared in outdoor culture tanks between May 1981 and October 1988. Fish of either sex that were irradiated as fry grew faster than controls at all test X-ray doses. Among fish irradiated at 7-8 weeks, males grew significantly faster, but females grew significantly slower, than controls at all test doses. X-ray-induced changes in growth were dose-dependent: growth rates of fry (both sexes) and of juvenile males rose relative to those of controls with increased radiation dose. The growth increase per unit of radiation dose was higher for fry than for older juveniles. The length-weight regression was steeper for irradiated males than for controls. The average weights of F{sub 1} offspring of irradiated fish were greatly reduced as compared with controls, which suggests the transfer of the detrimental effects of X rays from irradiated parents to their offspring. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Sugar-induced plant growth is dependent on brassinosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongqiang; He, Junxian

    2015-01-01

    Sugars, the end products of photosynthesis, not only fuel growth and development of plants as carbon and energy sources, but also function as signaling molecules to modulate a range of important processes during plant growth and development. We recently found that sugar can promote hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in darkness and this is largely dependent on brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of essential phytohormones involved in mediation of plant cell elongation. Sugars not only positively regulate the transcription of BZR1, the gene encoding the BR-activated transcription factor BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT1 (BRZ1), but also stabilize the BZR1 protein. Based on these results, we proposed that BZR1 may act as a converging node for crosstalk between BR and sugar signaling in regulating plant growth in darkness. In this short communication, we present some new data showing that HEXOKINASE1 (HXK1), the first identified glucose (Glc) sensor in plants, was positively involved in Glc promotion of hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in the dark. It appears that the function of HXK1 is dependent on the presence of BR, suggesting that BR may act downstream of HXK1 to positively regulate Glc-induced hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in darkness. PMID:26340221

  1. Nitroxoline induces apoptosis and slows glioma growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lazovic, Jelena; Guo, Lea; Nakashima, Jonathan; Mirsadraei, Leili; Yong, William; Kim, Hyun J.; Ellingson, Benjamin; Wu, Hong; Pope, Whitney B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nitroxoline is an FDA-approved antibiotic with potential antitumor activity. Here we evaluated whether nitroxoline has antiproliferative properties on glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo using glioma cell lines and a genetically engineered PTEN/KRAS mouse glioma model. Methods The effect of nitroxoline treatment on U87 and/or U251 glioma cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, invasion, and ability to induce an apoptotic cascade was determined in vitro. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure glioma volumes in genetically engineered PTEN/KRAS mice prior to and after nitroxoline therapy. Induction of apoptosis by nitroxoline was evaluated at the end of treatment using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TDT)-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results Nitroxoline inhibited the proliferation and invasion of glioblastoma cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in vitro. Growth inhibition was associated with cell-cycle arrest in G1/G0 phase and induction of apoptosis via caspase 3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In vivo, nitroxoline-treated mice had no increase in tumor volume after 14 days of treatment, whereas tumor volumes doubled in control mice. Histological examination revealed 15%–20% TUNEL-positive cells in nitroxoline-treated mice, compared with ∼5% in the control group. Conclusion Nitroxoline induces apoptosis and inhibits glioma growth in vivo and in vitro. As an already FDA-approved treatment for urinary tract infections with a known safety profile, nitroxoline could move quickly into clinical trials pending confirmatory studies. PMID:25074541

  2. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P < 0.05) in longitudinal bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the processes regulating new collagen accretion, bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  3. Methoxyacetic acid suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab R; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Patel, Neil K; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Shelya X; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Changde; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Methoxyacetic acid (MAA) is a primary metabolite of ester phthalates that are used in production of consumer products and pharmaceutical products. MAA causes embryo malformation and spermatocyte death through inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Little is known about MAA’s effects on cancer cells. In this study, two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines (RWPE-1 and pRNS-1-1) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with MAA at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis were performed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR, Western blot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. We found that MAA dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. MAA-induced apoptosis was due to down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, also named cIAP1), leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. MAA-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK2 expression at the late time. MAA up-regulated p21 expression through inhibition of HDAC activities, independently of p53/p63/p73. These findings demonstrate that MAA suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which suggests that MAA could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:25606576

  4. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces lung growth in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Drager, Luciano F.; Myers, Allen C.; Wise, Robert A.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Mitzner, Wayne; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which have been attributed to intermittent hypoxia (IH). The effects of IH on lung structure and function are unknown. We used a mouse model of chronic IH, which mimics the O2 profile in patients with OSA. We exposed adult C57BL/6J mice to 3 mo of IH with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) nadir of 5% 60 times/h during the 12-h light phase. Control mice were exposed to room air. Lung volumes were measured by quasistatic pressure-volume (PV) curves under anesthesia and by water displacement postmortem. Lungs were processed for morphometry, and the mean airspace chord length (Lm) and alveolar surface area were determined. Lung tissue was stained for markers of proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling), and type II alveolar epithelial cells (surfactant protein C). Gene microarrays were performed, and results were validated by real-time PCR. IH increased lung volumes by both PV curves (air vs. IH, 1.16 vs. 1.44 ml, P < 0.0001) and water displacement (P < 0.01) without changes in Lm, suggesting that IH increased the alveolar surface area. IH induced a 60% increase in cellular proliferation, but the number of proliferating type II alveolocytes tripled. There was no increase in apoptosis. IH upregulated pathways of cellular movement and cellular growth and development, including key developmental genes vascular endothelial growth factor A and platelet-derived growth factor B. We conclude that IH increases alveolar surface area by stimulating lung growth in adult mice. PMID:21131398

  5. Exercise‐Induced growth hormone during acute sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ritsche, Kevin; Nindl, Bradly C.; Wideman, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of acute (24‐h) sleep deprivation on exercise‐induced growth hormone (GH) and insulin‐like growth factor‐1 (IGF‐1) was examined. Ten men (20.6 ± 1.4 years) completed two randomized 24‐h sessions including a brief, high‐intensity exercise bout following either a night of sleep (SLEEP) or (24‐h) sleep deprivation (SLD). Anaerobic performance (mean power [MP], peak power [PP], minimum power [MinP], time to peak power [TTPP], fatigue index, [FI]) and total work per sprint [TWPS]) was determined from four maximal 30‐sec Wingate sprints on a cycle ergometer. Self‐reported sleep 7 days prior to each session was similar between SLEEP and SLD sessions (7.92 ± 0.33 vs. 7.98 ± 0.39 h, P =0.656, respectively) and during the actual SLEEP session in the lab, the total amount of sleep was similar to the 7 days leading up to the lab session (7.72 ± 0.14 h vs. 7.92 ± 0.33 h, respectively) (P =0.166). No differences existed in MP, PP, MinP, TTPP, FI, TWPS, resting GH concentrations, time to reach exercise‐induced peak GH concentration (TTP), or free IGF‐1 between sessions. GH area under the curve (AUC) (825.0 ± 199.8 vs. 2212.9 ± 441.9 μg/L*min, P <0.01), exercise‐induced peak GH concentration (17.8 ± 3.7 vs. 39.6 ± 7.1 μg/L, P <0.01) and ΔGH (peak GH – resting GH) (17.2 ± 3.7 vs. 38.2 ± 7.3 μg/L, P <0.01) were significantly lower during the SLEEP versus SLD session. Our results indicate that the exercise‐induced GH response was significantly augmented in sleep‐deprived individuals. PMID:25281616

  6. Salt-induced aggregation of lysozyme: Implications for crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lori J.

    1994-01-01

    Crystallization of proteins is a prerequisite for structural analysis by x-ray crystallography. While improvements in protein crystals have been obtained in microgravity onboard the U.S. Space Shuttle, attempts to improve the crystal growth process both on the ground and in space have been limited by our lack of understanding of the mechanisms involved. Almost all proteins are crystallized with the aid of a precipitating agent. Many of the common precipitating agents are inorganic salts. An understanding of the role of salts on the aggregation of protein monomers is the key to the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in protein crystallization. In order for crystallization to occur individual molecules must self-associate into aggregates. Detection and characterization of aggregates in supersaturated protein solutions is the first step in understanding salt-induced crystallization.

  7. Salt-induced aggregation of lysozyme: Implications for crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lori J.

    1994-10-01

    Crystallization of proteins is a prerequisite for structural analysis by x-ray crystallography. While improvements in protein crystals have been obtained in microgravity onboard the U.S. Space Shuttle, attempts to improve the crystal growth process both on the ground and in space have been limited by our lack of understanding of the mechanisms involved. Almost all proteins are crystallized with the aid of a precipitating agent. Many of the common precipitating agents are inorganic salts. An understanding of the role of salts on the aggregation of protein monomers is the key to the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in protein crystallization. In order for crystallization to occur individual molecules must self-associate into aggregates. Detection and characterization of aggregates in supersaturated protein solutions is the first step in understanding salt-induced crystallization.

  8. Nerve growth factor-induced migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Jean-Pierre; Rezvan, Amir; Allen, Fred D; Lazarovici, Philip; Lelkes, Peter I

    2005-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a well known neurotropic and neurotrophic agonist in the nervous system, which recently was shown to also induce angiogenic effects in endothelial cells (ECs). To measure NGF effects on the migration of cultured ECs, an important step in neoangiogenesis, we optimized an omnidirectional migration assay using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and validated the assay with human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) and human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF). The potencies of nerve growth factor purified from various species (viper, mouse, and recombinant human) to stimulate HAEC migration was similar to that of VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) (EC50 of approximately 0.5 ng/ml). Recombinant human bFGF was significantly more efficacious than either viper NGF or rhVEGF, both of which stimulated HAEC migration by approximately 30% over basal spontaneous migration. NGF-mediated stimulation of HAEC migration was completely blocked by the NGF/TrkA receptor antagonist K252a [(8R*,9S*,11S*)-(/)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-2,3,9,10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy-1H,-8H,11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo(a,g)cycloocta(c,d,e)trindene-1-one] (30 nM) but not by the VEGF/Flk receptor antagonist SU-5416 [3-[(2,4-dimethylpyrrol-5-yl) methylidenyl]-indolin-2-one] (250 nM), indicating a direct effect of NGF via TrkA receptor activation on HAEC migration. Viper NGF stimulation of HAEC migration was additively increased by either rhVEGF or rhbFGF, suggesting a potentiating interaction between their tyrosine kinase receptor signaling pathways. Viper NGF represents a novel pharmacological tool to investigate possible TrkA receptor subtypes in endothelial cells. The ability of NGF to stimulate migration of HAEC cells in vitro implies that this factor may play an important role in the cardiovascular system besides its well known effects in the nervous system. PMID:16123305

  9. Growth-induced mass flows in fungal networks

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Luke L. M.; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2010-01-01

    Cord-forming fungi form extensive networks that continuously adapt to maintain an efficient transport system. As osmotically driven water uptake is often distal from the tips, and aqueous fluids are incompressible, we propose that growth induces mass flows across the mycelium, whether or not there are intrahyphal concentration gradients. We imaged the temporal evolution of networks formed by Phanerochaete velutina, and at each stage calculated the unique set of currents that account for the observed changes in cord volume, while minimizing the work required to overcome viscous drag. Predicted speeds were in reasonable agreement with experimental data, and the pressure gradients needed to produce these flows are small. Furthermore, cords that were predicted to carry fast-moving or large currents were significantly more likely to increase in size than cords with slow-moving or small currents. The incompressibility of the fluids within fungi means there is a rapid global response to local fluid movements. Hence velocity of fluid flow is a local signal that conveys quasi-global information about the role of a cord within the mycelium. We suggest that fluid incompressibility and the coupling of growth and mass flow are critical physical features that enable the development of efficient, adaptive biological transport networks. PMID:20538649

  10. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capoen, Bruno; Chahadih, Abdallah; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Cristini, Odile; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  11. Aerosol-nutrient-induced picoplankton growth in Lake Tahoe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Hunter, Deborah; Fischer, Emily V.; Jiang, Yilun; Allen, Brant; Chen, Ying; Liston, Anne; Reuter, John; Schladow, Geoff; Paytan, Adina

    2013-07-01

    Tahoe is an oligotrophic lake appreciated for its transparent waters, yet the Lake's clarity has been declining for several decades due in part to eutrophication. At the same time, a shift from nitrogen (N) toward phosphorus (P) limitation of phytoplankton has occurred that could be due to atmospheric deposition of nutrients with high N:P ratios. Atmospheric particle samples collected during 2005-2006 had a mean soluble N:P ratio of 192:1, well above the Redfield ratio of 16:1 typically required by phytoplankton. Samples collected during the Angora Fire that occurred in 2007 were particularly enriched in N relative to P, with a mean ratio >2800:1. A bioassay incubation experiment was conducted using locally collected atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter. TSP samples with high ammonium (NH4+) and low P content favored the growth of picoplankton (cells <3 µm) and opportunistic filamentous cyanobacteria, whereas larger nanophytoplankton (cells 3-20 µm) were better competitors when more P was available. Picoplankton growth can increase primary productivity without causing a large increase in chlorophyll (chl a) or biomass. Aerosol-nutrient-induced picoplankton growth (together with shifts in grazing dynamics and stratification trends) may contribute to the uncoupling between primary productivity, chl a, and biomass that has been observed in Lake Tahoe in the last several decades and, in particular, following the Wheeler and Angora Fires. The chemical composition of aerosols has a marked impact on ecosystem dynamics in Lake Tahoe with potential consequences to lake productivity and microbial community dynamics.

  12. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  13. Progestin-induced hypersecretion of growth hormone: an introductory review.

    PubMed

    Rijnberk, A; Mol, J A

    1997-01-01

    In the 1970s acromegalic features were reported in some dogs used in long-term toxicity studies of progestins. In 1980 confirmation that progestagen administration can lead to increased circulating growth hormone (GH) concentrations was obtained. This phenomenon appeared not to be confined to exogenous progestins, for an excess of GH was also found in bitches during the luteal phase of the oestrous cycle. In bitches with a progestin-induced excess of GH, GH secretion could neither be inhibited nor stimulated by well-known regulatory neurohormones, indicating autonomous secretion. Because it could not be attributed to a neoplasm and was reversible, an extra-pituitary site of GH production was investigated. The progestin-induced GH was found to originate from the mammary gland. This phenomenon seems to play a role in the mammary development that occurs during the luteal phase of the oestrous cycle. The increase in cell proliferative activity may also be responsible for the susceptibility of the mammary gland to neoplastic transformation. The discovery of mammary GH in the dog has recently become of wider importance now that expression of the GH gene has also been demonstrated in other species, namely, humans and cats. PMID:9404303

  14. Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in Coronary Artery Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Carabello, Blaise; Mehta, Satish; Schlegel, Todd; Pellis, Neal; Ott, Mark; Pierson, Duane

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies on normal human lymphocytes have shown a five-fold increase (p less than 0.001) in angiogenic inducers such as Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in physiologically stressful environments such as modeled microgravity, a space analog. This suggests de-regulation of cardiovascular signalling pathways indicated by upregulation of PIGf. In the current study, we measured PIGf in the plasma of 33 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) to investigate whether such disease is associated with increased levels of PIGf. A control consisting of 31 sex matched apparently healthy subjects was also included in the study. We observed that the levels of PIGf in CAD patients were significantly increased compared to those in healthy control subjects (p less than 0.001) and usually increased beyond the clinical threshold level (greater than 27ng/L). The mechanisms leading to up-regulation of angiogenic factors and the adaptation of organisms to stressful environments such as isolation, high altitude, hypoxia, ischemia, microgravity, increased radiation, etc are presently unknown and require further investigation in spaceflight and these other physiologically stressed environments.

  15. Epidermal Growth Factor-induced Vacuolar (H+)-ATPase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanqing; Parmar, Amanda; Roux, Emmanuelle; Balbis, Alejandro; Dumas, Victor; Chevalier, Stephanie; Posner, Barry I.

    2012-01-01

    Using proteomics and immunofluorescence, we demonstrated epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced recruitment of extrinsic V1 subunits of the vacuolar (H+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) to rat liver endosomes. This was accompanied by reduced vacuolar pH. Bafilomycin, an inhibitor of V-ATPase, inhibited EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation as indicated by a decrease in eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding 1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) phosphorylation and kinase activity. There was no corresponding inhibition of EGF-induced Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation. Chloroquine, a neutralizer of vacuolar pH, mimicked bafilomycin effects. Bafilomycin did not inhibit the association of mTORC1 with Raptor nor did it affect AMP-activated protein kinase activity. Rather, the intracellular concentrations of essential but not non-essential amino acids were decreased by bafilomycin in EGF-treated primary rat hepatocytes. Cycloheximide, a translation elongation inhibitor known to augment intracellular amino acid levels, prevented the effect of bafilomycin on amino acids levels and completely reversed its inhibition of EGF-induced mTORC1 activation. In vivo administration of EGF stimulated the recruitment of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) but not mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to endosomes and lysosomes. This was inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Our results suggest a role for vacuolar acidification in EGF signaling to mTORC1. PMID:22689575

  16. Modeling photothermal and acoustical induced microbubble generation and growth.

    PubMed

    Krasovitski, Boris; Kislev, Hanoch; Kimmel, Eitan

    2007-12-01

    Previous experimental studies showed that powerful heating of nanoparticles by a laser pulse using energy density greater than 100 mJ/cm(2), could induce vaporization and generate microbubbles. When ultrasound is introduced at the same time as the laser pulse, much less laser power is required. For therapeutic applications, generation of microbubbles on demand at target locations, e.g. cells or bacteria can be used to induce hyperthermia or to facilitate drug delivery. The objective of this work is to develop a method capable of predicting photothermal and acoustic parameters in terms of laser power and acoustic pressure amplitude that are needed to produce stable microbubbles; and investigate the influence of bubble coalescence on the thresholds when the microbubbles are generated around nanoparticles that appear in clusters. We develop and solve here a combined problem of momentum, heat and mass transfer which is associated with generation and growth of a microbubble, filled with a mixture of non-vaporized gas (air) and water vapor. The microbubble's size and gas content vary as a result of three mechanisms: gas expansion or compression, evaporation or condensation on the bubble boundary, and diffusion of dissolved air in the surrounding water. The simulations predict that when ultrasound is applied relatively low threshold values of laser and ultrasound power are required to obtain a stable microbubble from a single nanoparticle. Even lower power is required when microbubbles are formed by coalescence around a cluster of 10 nanoparticles. Laser pulse energy density of 21 mJ/cm(2) is predicted for instance together with acoustic pressure of 0.1 MPa for a cluster of 10 or 62 mJ/cm(2) for a single nanoparticle. Those values are well within the safety limits, and as such are most appealing for targeted therapeutic purposes. PMID:17910969

  17. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  18. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    SciTech Connect

    Vesper, M.J. ); Cross, J.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 {mu}M) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 {mu}M. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of ({sup 3}H)IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of ({sup 3}H)IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H{sup +} secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth.

  19. Role of chloride ions in the promotion of auxin-induced growth of maize coleoptile segments

    PubMed Central

    Burdach, Zbigniew; Kurtyka, Renata; Siemieniuk, Agnieszka; Karcz, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The mechanism of auxin action on ion transport in growing cells has not been determined in detail. In particular, little is known about the role of chloride in the auxin-induced growth of coleoptile cells. Moreover, the data that do exist in the literature are controversial. This study describes experiments that were carried out with maize (Zea mays) coleoptile segments, this being a classical model system for studies of plant cell elongation growth. Methods Growth kinetics or growth and pH changes were recorded in maize coleoptiles using two independent measuring systems. The growth rate of the segments was measured simultaneously with medium pH changes. Membrane potential changes in parenchymal cells of the segments were also determined for chosen variants. The question of whether anion transport is involved in auxin-induced growth of maize coleoptile segments was primarily studied using anion channel blockers [anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A-9-C) and 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS)]. In addition, experiments in which KCl was replaced by KNO3 were also performed. Key Results Both anion channel blockers, added at 0·1 mm, diminished indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-induced elongation growth by ∼30 %. Medium pH changes measured simultaneously with growth indicated that while DIDS stopped IAA-induced proton extrusion, A-9-C diminished it by only 50 %. Addition of A-9-C to medium containing 1 mm KCl did not affect the characteristic kinetics of IAA-induced membrane potential changes, while in the presence of 10 mm KCl the channel blocker stopped IAA-induced membrane hyperpolarization. Replacement of KCl with KNO3 significantly decreased IAA-induced growth and inhibited proton extrusion. In contrast to the KCl concentration, the concentration of KNO3 did not affect the growth-stimulatory effect of IAA. For comparison, the effects of the cation channel blocker tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA-Cl) on IAA-induced growth and

  20. Lichen growth responses to stress induced by automobile exhaust pollution.

    PubMed

    Lawrey, J D; Hale, M E

    1979-04-27

    Growth rates were significantly suppressed in juvenile thalli (less than 0.1 square millimeter in initial size) of the saxicolous lichen Pseudoparmelia baltimorensis from a Potomac River island with high atmospheric lead burden as compared to the case for a similar island with a lower lead burden. However, larger thalli showed no significant changes in growth response as a result of atmospheric pollution stress. Disruptions in lichen growth thus appear to affect life stages when growth is most rapid andfood reserves are low. Once a minimnum thallus size is attained, the stress tolerance of the lichen increases. PMID:17758017

  1. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  2. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  3. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  4. Evidence that auxin-induced growth of soybean hypocotyls involves proton excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Rayle, D.L.; Cleland, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    The role of H/sup +/ excretion in auxin-induced growth of soybean hypocotyl tissues has been investigated, using tissues whose cuticle was rendered permeable to protons or buffers by scarification (scrubbing). Indoleacetic acid induces both elongation and H/sup +/ excretion after a lag of 10 to 12 minutes. Cycloheximide inhibits growth and causes the tissues to remove protons from the medium. Neutral buffers (pH 7.0) inhibit auxin-induced growth of scrubbed but not intact sections; the inhibition increases as the buffers strength is increased. Both live and frozen-thawed sections, in the absence of auxin, extend in response to exogenously supplied protons. Fusicoccin induces both elongation and H/sup +/ excretion at rates greater than does auxin. These results indicate that H/sup +/ excretion is involved in the initiation of auxin-induced elongation in soybean hypocotyl tissue.

  5. Characteristics and implications of prolonged fusicoccin-induced growth of Avena coleoptile sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    A study has been made of the prolonged growth of Avena coleoptile sections in response to fusicoccin (FC), a phytotoxin that promotes apoplastic acidification. The final amount of FC-induced growth is a function of the FC concentration. Removal of the epidermis speeds up the initial rate of elongation and shortens the duration of the response, without affecting the total amount of extension. A suboptimal FC concentration (7 x 10(-8) M) which induces the same rate of proton excretion as does optimal indoleacetic acid (IAA) (1 x 10(-5) M), causes elongation which is 60-75% of that induced by IAA in 4 h or 50-65% in 7 h. This suggests that acid-induced extension could make a major contribution to auxin-induced growth for at least 7 h.

  6. Auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles involves two mechanisms with different pH optima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Although rapid auxin-induced growth of coleoptile sections can persist for at least 18 hours, acid-induced growth lasts for a much shorter period of time. Three theories have been proposed to explain this difference in persistence. To distinguish between these theories, the pH dependence for auxin-induced growth of oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles has been determined early and late in the elongation process. Coleoptile sections from which the outer epidermis was removed to facilitate buffer entry were incubated, with or without 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid, in 20 millimolar buffers at pH 4.5 to 7.0 to maintain a fixed wall pH. During the first 1 to 2 hours after addition of auxin, elongation occurs by acid-induced extension (i.e. the pH optimum is <5 and the elongation varies inversely with the solution pH). Auxin causes no additional elongation because the buffers prevent further changes in wall pH. After 60 to 90 minutes, a second mechanism of auxin-induced growth, whose pH optimum is 5.5 to 6.0, predominates. It is proposed that rapid growth responses to changes in auxin concentration are mediated by auxin-induced changes in wall pH, whereas the prolonged, steady-state growth rate is controlled by a second, auxin-mediated process whose pH optimum is less acidic.

  7. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) antagonizes transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-induced collagen lattice contraction by human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, J S; Kim, J Y; Cho, J Y; Kang, J S; Yu, Y H

    2000-12-01

    Wound contraction plays an important role in healing, but in extreme conditions, it may lead to excessive scar formation and pathological wound contracture. To date, the key regulator of excessive contracture is known to be transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta1). In this study, we have evaluated epidermal growth factor (EGF) antagonism in fibroblast-populated collagen lattice (FPCL) gel contraction, which has been generally used as an in vitro model thought to mimic wound contraction in vivo. As expected, TGF-beta1 treatment enhanced normal fibroblast-induced collagen gel contraction in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, EGF did not affect normal gel formation, but significantly antagonized TGF-beta1-induced gel formation (p<0.05 at 100 ng/ml), whereas the other growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), did not altered either normal or TGF-beta1-induced gel contractions. Similarly, EGF treatment, but not PDGF, also significantly suppressed TGF-beta1 release that was autologously elicited by TGF-beta1 treatment (p<0.01 at 100 ng/ml). Therefore, the results suggest that EGF may negatively regulate the role of TGF-beta1 through attenuating autologous release of TGF-beta1. PMID:11145189

  8. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Chiaki; Watanabe, Shimpei; Nakamura, Motokazu; Norimoto, Hisayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine) is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH), a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF) in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control), a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in "itch-scratch" animal models is under investigation. PMID:26287150

  9. The threshold stress intensity for hydrogen-induced crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhurst, K. N.; Baker, T. J.

    1981-06-01

    The crack growth rates and threshold stress intensities, K TH, for a 3 1/2 NiCrMoV steel (0.2 pct proof stress 1200 MPa) have been measured in a hydrogen environment at various temperatures and hydrogen pressures. Fractographic evidence and the observation of alternating fast and slow crack growth near K TH suggests that the crack advances by the repeated nucleation of microcracks at microstructural features ahead of the main crack. Transient crack growth is observed following load increases just below K TH. Using the idea, from unstable cleavage fracture theory, that for fracture a critical stress must be exceeded over a critical distance ahead of the crack, and assuming that this critical stress is reduced in proportion to the local hydrogen concentration (in equilibrium with the external hydrogen at K TH), a theoretical dependence of K TH on hydrogen pressure is derived which compares well with the experimental evidence.

  10. Plant growth promotion induced by phosphate solubilizing endophytic Pseudomonas isolates

    PubMed Central

    Oteino, Nicholas; Lally, Richard D.; Kiwanuka, Samuel; Lloyd, Andrew; Ryan, David; Germaine, Kieran J.; Dowling, David N.

    2015-01-01

    The use of plant growth promoting bacterial inoculants as live microbial biofertilizers provides a promising alternative to chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Inorganic phosphate solubilization is one of the major mechanisms of plant growth promotion by plant associated bacteria. This involves bacteria releasing organic acids into the soil which solubilize the phosphate complexes converting them into ortho-phosphate which is available for plant up-take and utilization. The study presented here describes the ability of endophytic bacteria to produce gluconic acid (GA), solubilize insoluble phosphate, and stimulate the growth of Pisum sativum L. plants. This study also describes the genetic systems within three of these endophyte strains thought to be responsible for their effective phosphate solubilizing abilities. The results showed that many of the endophytic strains produced GA (14–169 mM) and have moderate to high phosphate solubilization capacities (~400–1300 mg L−1). When inoculated into P. sativum L. plants grown in soil under soluble phosphate limiting conditions, the endophytes that produced medium-high levels of GA displayed beneficial plant growth promotion effects. PMID:26257721

  11. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1-5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01-10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  12. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M.; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1–5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01–10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  13. p53 signaling is involved in leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, an adipokine predominantly produced from adipose tissue, is well known to induce tumor growth. However, underlying molecular mechanisms are not established yet. While p53 has long been well recognized as a potent tumor suppressor gene, accumulating evidence has also indicated its potential role in growth and survival of cancer cells depending on experimental environments. In the present study, we examined if p53 signaling is implicated in leptin-induced growth of cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrated that leptin treatment significantly increased p53 protein expression in both hepatic (HepG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells without significant effect on mRNA expression. Enhanced p53 expression by leptin was mediated via modulation of ubiquitination, in particular ubiquitin specific protease 2 (USP2)-dependent manner. Furthermore, gene silencing of p53 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells, indicating the role of p53 signaling in tumor growth by leptin. In addition, we also showed that knockdown of p53 restored suppression of caspase-3 activity by leptin through modulating Bax expression and prevented leptin-induced cell cycle progression, implying the involvement of p53 signaling in the regulation of both apoptosis and cell cycle progression in cancer cells treated with leptin. Taken together, the results in the present study demonstrated the potential role of p53 signaling in leptin-induced tumor growth. PMID:27610035

  14. p53 signaling is involved in leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Mohan; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, an adipokine predominantly produced from adipose tissue, is well known to induce tumor growth. However, underlying molecular mechanisms are not established yet. While p53 has long been well recognized as a potent tumor suppressor gene, accumulating evidence has also indicated its potential role in growth and survival of cancer cells depending on experimental environments. In the present study, we examined if p53 signaling is implicated in leptin-induced growth of cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrated that leptin treatment significantly increased p53 protein expression in both hepatic (HepG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells without significant effect on mRNA expression. Enhanced p53 expression by leptin was mediated via modulation of ubiquitination, in particular ubiquitin specific protease 2 (USP2)-dependent manner. Furthermore, gene silencing of p53 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells, indicating the role of p53 signaling in tumor growth by leptin. In addition, we also showed that knockdown of p53 restored suppression of caspase-3 activity by leptin through modulating Bax expression and prevented leptin-induced cell cycle progression, implying the involvement of p53 signaling in the regulation of both apoptosis and cell cycle progression in cancer cells treated with leptin. Taken together, the results in the present study demonstrated the potential role of p53 signaling in leptin-induced tumor growth. PMID:27610035

  15. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis. PMID:26309374

  16. Analysis of kicker noise induced beam emittance growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Blacker, I.M.; Brennan, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Huang, H.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Marr, G.; Mernick, K.; Mi, J.; Minty, M.; Naylor, C.; Roser, T.; Shrey, T.; van Kuik, B.; Zelenski, A.

    2012-05-20

    Over the last few years, physicists have occasionally observed the presence of noise acting on the RHIC beams leading to emittance growth at high beam energies. While the noise was sporadic in the past, it became persistent during the Run-11 setup period. An investigation diagnosed the source as originating from the RHIC dump kicker system. Once identified the issue was quickly resolved. We report in this paper the investigation result, circuit analysis, measured and simulated waveforms, solutions, and future plans.

  17. The epidermis coordinates auxin-induced stem growth in response to shade.

    PubMed

    Procko, Carl; Burko, Yogev; Jaillais, Yvon; Ljung, Karin; Long, Jeff A; Chory, Joanne

    2016-07-01

    Growth of a complex multicellular organism requires coordinated changes in diverse cell types. These cellular changes generate organs of the correct size, shape, and functionality. In plants, the growth hormone auxin induces stem elongation in response to shade; however, which cell types of the stem perceive the auxin signal and contribute to organ growth is poorly understood. Here, we blocked the transcriptional response to auxin within specific tissues to show that auxin signaling is required in many cell types for correct hypocotyl growth in shade, with a key role for the epidermis. Combining genetic manipulations in Arabidopsis thaliana with transcriptional profiling of the hypocotyl epidermis from Brassica rapa, we show that auxin acts in the epidermis in part by inducing activity of the locally acting, growth-promoting brassinosteroid pathway. Our findings clarify cell-specific auxin function in the hypocotyl and highlight the complexity of cell type interactions within a growing organ. PMID:27401556

  18. Cortical Folding Pattern and its Consistency Induced by Biological Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil Razavi, Mir; Zhang, Tuo; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-01

    Cortical folding, characterized by convex gyri and concave sulci, has an intrinsic relationship to the brain’s functional organization. Understanding the mechanism of the brain’s convoluted patterns can provide useful clues into normal and pathological brain function. In this paper, the cortical folding phenomenon is interpreted both analytically and computationally, and, in some cases, the findings are validated with experimental observations. The living human brain is modeled as a soft structure with a growing outer cortex and inner core to investigate its developmental mechanism. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into critical growth ratios for instability and crease formation of the developing brain. Since the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution of cortical complex convolution after instability, non-linear finite element models are employed to study the crease formation and secondary morphological folds of the developing brain. Results demonstrate that the growth ratio of the cortex to core of the brain, the initial thickness, and material properties of both cortex and core have great impacts on the morphological patterns of the developing brain. Lastly, we discuss why cortical folding is highly correlated and consistent by presenting an intriguing gyri-sulci formation comparison.

  19. Nur77 inhibits androgen-induced bladder cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Liu, Jun; Jia, Ruipeng; Song, Hongbin

    2013-12-01

    Currently, bladder cancer ranks as the second most common genitourinary malignancy which is exacting significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although there are abundant epidemiological and basic studies which strongly suggest the role of androgen hormone in bladder cancer, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In the current study, we sought to identify a new competitive inhibitor for androgen receptor in bladder cancer cells. Our results showed that Nur77 hyperexpression inhibits UM-UC-3 cell growth and cell cycle progression while Nur77 knockdown exerts the opposite effect. In our cell culture model, we also demonstrated that Nur77 competitively inhibits androgen-dependent transcription activity and more specifically, Nur77 competes with androgen receptor for binding to src-1, a well-known coactivator for steroids. More importantly, we also showed that a small molecule agonist for Nur77, Cytosporone B, significantly inhibits androgen-dependent bladder cancer cell growth in two different cell lines. These data provide a good proof-of-principle that Nur77 signaling machinery could be a new target for growth control of androgen-dependent bladder cancer cells. PMID:24299210

  20. Cortical Folding Pattern and its Consistency Induced by Biological Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jalil Razavi, Mir; Zhang, Tuo; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Cortical folding, characterized by convex gyri and concave sulci, has an intrinsic relationship to the brain’s functional organization. Understanding the mechanism of the brain’s convoluted patterns can provide useful clues into normal and pathological brain function. In this paper, the cortical folding phenomenon is interpreted both analytically and computationally, and, in some cases, the findings are validated with experimental observations. The living human brain is modeled as a soft structure with a growing outer cortex and inner core to investigate its developmental mechanism. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into critical growth ratios for instability and crease formation of the developing brain. Since the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution of cortical complex convolution after instability, non-linear finite element models are employed to study the crease formation and secondary morphological folds of the developing brain. Results demonstrate that the growth ratio of the cortex to core of the brain, the initial thickness, and material properties of both cortex and core have great impacts on the morphological patterns of the developing brain. Lastly, we discuss why cortical folding is highly correlated and consistent by presenting an intriguing gyri-sulci formation comparison. PMID:26404042

  1. Antioxidative activity and growth regulation of Brassicaceae induced by oxygen radical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Ono, Reoto; Shiratani, Masaharu; Yonesu, Akira

    2015-06-01

    The growth regulation characteristics of plants are investigated when plant seeds are irradiated with atmospheric discharge plasma. Enhancement of the germination and lengths of the stem and root of plants are observed after seeding. The total length of the stem and root increases approximately 1.6 times after a cultivation period of 72 h. The growth regulation effect is found to be maintained for 80 h of cultivation after seeding. The growth regulation originates from the change in the antioxidative activity of plant cells induced by active oxygen species generated in the oxygen plasma, which leads to the production of growth factor in plants.

  2. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yang, Licong; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  3. Gravity-induced asymmetric distribution of a plant growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Schulze, A.; Momonoki, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Dolk (1936) demonstrated that gravistimulation induced an asymmetric distribution of auxin in a horizontally-placed shoot. An attempt is made to determine where and how that asymmetry arises, and to demonstrate that the endogenous auxin, indole-3-acetic acid, becomes asymmetrically distributed in the cortical cells of the Zea mays mesocotyl during 3 min of geostimulation. Further, indole-3-acetic acid derived by hydrolysis of an applied transport form of the hormone, indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, becomes asymmetrically distributed within 15 min of geostimulus time. From these and prior data is developed a working theory that the gravitational stimulus induces a selective leakage, or secretion, of the hormone from the vascular tissue to the cortical cells of the mesocotyl.

  4. Plant Growth Biophysics: the Basis for Growth Asymmetry Induced by Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D.

    1985-01-01

    The identification and quantification of the physical properties altered by gravity when plant stems grow upward was studied. Growth of the stem in vertical and horizontal positions was recorded by time lapse photography. A computer program that uses a cubic spline fitting algorithm was used to calculate the growth rate and curvature of the stem as a function of time. Plant stems were tested to ascertain whether cell osmotic pressure was altered by gravity. A technique for measuring the yielding properties of the cell wall was developed.

  5. Chloroplasts Are Central Players in Sugar-Induced Leaf Growth.

    PubMed

    Van Dingenen, Judith; De Milde, Liesbeth; Vermeersch, Mattias; Maleux, Katrien; De Rycke, Riet; De Bruyne, Michiel; Storme, Véronique; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Dhondt, Stijn; Inzé, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Leaves are the plant's powerhouses, providing energy for all organs through sugar production during photosynthesis. However, sugars serve not only as a metabolic energy source for sink tissues but also as signaling molecules, affecting gene expression through conserved signaling pathways to regulate plant growth and development. Here, we describe an in vitro experimental assay, allowing one to alter the sucrose (Suc) availability during early Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development, with the aim to identify the affected cellular and molecular processes. The transfer of seedlings to Suc-containing medium showed a profound effect on leaf growth by stimulating cell proliferation and postponing the transition to cell expansion. Furthermore, rapidly after transfer to Suc, mesophyll cells contained fewer and smaller plastids, which are irregular in shape and contain fewer starch granules compared with control mesophyll cells. Short-term transcriptional responses after transfer to Suc revealed the repression of well-known sugar-responsive genes and multiple genes encoded by the plastid, on the one hand, and up-regulation of a GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER (GPT2), on the other hand. Mutant gpt2 seedlings showed no stimulation of cell proliferation and no repression of chloroplast-encoded transcripts when transferred to Suc, suggesting that GPT2 plays a critical role in the Suc-mediated effects on early leaf growth. Our findings, therefore, suggest that induction of GPT2 expression by Suc increases the import of glucose-6-phosphate into the plastids that would repress chloroplast-encoded transcripts, restricting chloroplast differentiation. Retrograde signaling from the plastids would then delay the transition to cell expansion and stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:26932234

  6. Mucosal wrinkling in animal antra induced by volumetric growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Surface wrinkling of animal mucosas is crucial for the biological functions of some tissues, and the change in their surface patterns is a phenotypic characteristic of certain diseases. Here we develop a biomechanical model to study the relationship between morphogenesis and volumetric growth, either physiological or pathological, of mucosas. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are performed to unravel the critical characteristics of mucosal wrinkling in a spherical antrum. It is shown that the thicknesses and elastic moduli of mucosal and submucosal layers dictate the surface buckling morphology. The results hold clinical relevance for such diseases as inflammation and gastritis.

  7. Fractured geothermal reservoir growth induced by heat extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, J.W.; Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Robinson, B.A.; Potter, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Field testing of a hydraulically-stimulated, hot dry rock geothermal system at the Fenton Hill site in northern New Mexico has indicated that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for documenting the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area that were observed during energy extraction operations which caused substantial thermal drawdown in portions of the reservoir. These temporal increases suggest that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock systems may be possible.

  8. In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ilyas M.; Francis, Lewis; Theobald, Peter S.; Perni, Stefano; Young, Robert D.; Prokopovich, Polina; Conlan, R. Steven; Archer, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Maturation involves gross morphological changes that occur through a process of synchronised growth and resorption of cartilage and generally ends at sexual maturity. The inability to induce maturation in biomaterial constructs designed for cartilage repair has been cited as a major cause for their failure in producing persistent cell-based repair of joint lesions. The combination of growth factors FGF2 and TGFβ1 induces accelerated articular cartilage maturation in vitro such that many molecular and morphological characteristics of tissue maturation are observable. We hypothesised that experimental growth factor-induced maturation of immature cartilage would result in a biophysical and biochemical composition consistent with a mature phenotype. Using native immature and mature cartilage as reference, we observed that growth factor-treated immature cartilages displayed increased nano-compressive stiffness, decreased surface adhesion, decreased water content, increased collagen content and smoother surfaces, correlating with a convergence to the mature cartilage phenotype. Furthermore, increased gene expression of surface structural protein collagen type I in growth factor-treated explants compared to reference cartilages demonstrates that they are still in the dynamic phase of the postnatal developmental transition. These data provide a basis for understanding the regulation of postnatal maturation of articular cartilage and the application of growth factor-induced maturation in vitro and in vivo in order to repair and regenerate cartilage defects. PMID:23182922

  9. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions. PMID:25380823

  10. Aerosol-induced mechanisms for cumulus congestus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Amanda M.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Heever, Susan C.

    2015-09-01

    Tropical convection has been observed to contain three cloud modes, the middle of which is cumulus congestus clouds. Congestus clouds act to moisten the tropical atmosphere, may be mixed-phase, and on occasion surpass the freezing level inversion from where they may develop into deeper convection. This study investigates the impacts of enhanced aerosol concentrations on the growth of congestus clouds produced in idealized cloud-resolving model simulations run under a state of radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). High-resolution, long-duration simulations were completed using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Aerosol concentrations between 2 and 4 km above ground level were varied from clean to polluted conditions in order to represent the advection of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean. The congestus populations within each aerosol simulation are statistically analyzed using 10 days of model output after the simulation reaches RCE. Results indicate that congestus in more polluted conditions produce greater amounts of cloud water and ice mass, enhanced updraft strengths, and an increase in the number of congestus cloud tops that extend above the freezing level. Enhanced vapor depositional growth on the populations of more numerous, smaller cloud droplets in the polluted conditions, and the subsequent increase in latent heat release in the warm phase regions of the cloud, is found to be important factors in convective invigoration of these cloud systems. Aerosol feedbacks associated with cold pools and condensate loading also influence the updraft strength and act in opposition to the warm phase invigoration processes.

  11. Warming-Induced Decline of Picea crassifolia Growth in the Qilian Mountains in Recent Decades

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Huang, Lei; Shao, Xuemei; Xiao, Fengjing; Wilmking, Martin; Zhang, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    Warming-induced drought has widely affected forest dynamics in most places of the northern hemisphere. In this study, we assessed how climate warming has affected Picea crassifolia (Qinghai spruce) forests using tree growth-climate relationships and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) along the Qilian Mountains, northeastern Tibet Plateau (the main range of Picea crassifolia). Based on the analysis on trees radial growth data from the upper tree line and the regional NDVI data, we identified a pervasive growth decline in recent decades, most likely caused by warming-induced droughts. The drought stress on Picea crassifolia radial growth were expanding from northeast to southwest and the favorable moisture conditions for tree growth were retreating along the identical direction in the study area over the last half century. Compared to the historical drought stress on tree radial growth in the 1920s, recent warming-induced droughts display a longer-lasting stress with a broader spatial distribution on regional forest growth. If the recent warming continues without the effective moisture increasing, then a notable challenge is developed for Picea crassifolia in the Qilian Mountains. Elaborate forest management is necessary to counteract the future risk of climate change effects in this region. PMID:26121479

  12. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  13. P53-dependent upregulation of neutral sphingomyelinase-2: role in doxorubicin-induced growth arrest

    PubMed Central

    Shamseddine, A A; Clarke, C J; Carroll, B; Airola, M V; Mohammed, S; Rella, A; Obeid, L M; Hannun, Y A

    2015-01-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase2) is a ceramide-generating enzyme that has been implicated in growth arrest, apoptosis and exosome secretion. Although previous studies have reported transcriptional upregulation of nSMase2 in response to daunorubicin, through Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors, the role of the DNA damage pathway in regulating nSMase2 remains unclear. In this study, we show that doxorubicin induces a dose-dependent induction of nSMase2 mRNA and protein with concomitant increases in nSMase activity and ceramide levels. Upregulation of nSMase2 was dependent on ATR, Chk1 and p53, thus placing it downstream of the DNA damage pathway. Moreover, overexpression of p53 was sufficient to transcriptionally induce nSMase2, without the need for DNA damage. DNA-binding mutants as well as acetylation mutants of p53 were unable to induce nSMase2, suggesting a role of nSMase2 in growth arrest. Moreover, knockdown of nSMase2 prevented doxorubicin-induced growth arrest. Finally, p53-induced nSMase2 upregulation appears to occur via a novel transcription start site upstream of exon 3. These results identify nSMase2 as a novel p53 target gene, regulated by the DNA damage pathway to induce cell growth arrest. PMID:26512957

  14. An expandable, inducible hemangioblast state regulated by fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Vereide, David T; Vickerman, Vernella; Swanson, Scott A; Chu, Li-Fang; McIntosh, Brian E; Thomson, James A

    2014-12-01

    During development, the hematopoietic and vascular lineages are thought to descend from common mesodermal progenitors called hemangioblasts. Here we identify six transcription factors, Gata2, Lmo2, Mycn, Pitx2, Sox17, and Tal1, that "trap" murine cells in a proliferative state and endow them with a hemangioblast potential. These "expandable" hemangioblasts (eHBs) are capable, once released from the control of the ectopic factors, to give rise to functional endothelial cells, multilineage hematopoietic cells, and smooth muscle cells. The eHBs can be derived from embryonic stem cells, from fetal liver cells, or poorly from fibroblasts. The eHBs reveal a central role for fibroblast growth factor, which not only promotes their expansion, but also facilitates their ability to give rise to endothelial cells and leukocytes, but not erythrocytes. This study serves as a demonstration that ephemeral progenitor states can be harnessed in vitro, enabling the creation of tractable progenitor cell lines. PMID:25458896

  15. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  16. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore » growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  17. Growth hormone resistance exacerbates cholestasis-induced murine liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Stiedl, Patricia; McMahon, Robert; Blaas, Leander; Stanek, Victoria; Svinka, Jasmin; Grabner, Beatrice; Zollner, Gernot; Kessler, Sonja M.; Claudel, Thierry; Müller, Mathias; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Bilban, Martin; Esterbauer, Harald; Eferl, Robert; Haybaeck, Johannes; Trauner, Michael; Casanova, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) resistance has been associated with liver cirrhosis in humans but its contribution to the disease remains controversial. In order to elucidate whether GH resistance plays a causal role in the establishment and development of liver fibrosis, or rather represents a major consequence thereof, we challenged mice lacking the Growth hormone receptor gene (Ghr-/-, a model for GH resistance) by crossing them with Mdr2 knockout mice (Mdr2-/-), a mouse model of inflammatory cholestasis and liver fibrosis. Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice showed elevated serum markers associated with liver damage and cholestasis, extensive bile duct proliferation and increased collagen deposition relative to Mdr2 -/- mice, thus suggesting a more severe liver fibrosis phenotype. Additionally, Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice had a pronounced down-regulation of hepato-protective genes Hnf6, Egfr and Igf-1, and significantly increased levels of ROS and apoptosis in hepatocytes, compared to control mice. Moreover, single knockout mice (Ghr-/-) fed with a diet containing 1% cholic acid displayed an increase in hepatocyte ROS production, hepatocyte apoptosis and bile infarcts compared to their wildtype littermates, indicating that loss of Ghr renders hepatocytes more susceptible to toxic bile acid accumulation. Surprisingly, and despite their severe fibrotic phenotype, Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice displayed a significant decrease in tumour incidence compared to Mdr2-/- mice, indicating that loss of Ghr signaling may slow the progression from fibrosis/cirrhosis to cancer in the liver. Conclusion Our findings suggest that GH resistance dramatically exacerbates liver fibrosis in a mouse model of inflammatory cholestasis, therefore suggesting that GH resistance plays a causal role in the disease and provides a novel target for the development of liver fibrosis treatments. PMID:25179284

  18. Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes on tips of cantilevers and nanowires

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Eres, Gyula; Wei, Yayi; Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida

    2004-06-29

    A method is described for catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructures on the tips of nanowires, cantilevers, conductive micro/nanometer structures, wafers and the like. The method can be used for production of carbon nanotube-anchored cantilevers that can significantly improve the performance of scaning probe microscopy (AFM, EFM etc). The invention can also be used in many other processes of micro and/or nanofabrication with carbon nanotubes/fibers. Key elements of this invention include: (1) Proper selection of a metal catalyst and programmable pulsed electrolytic deposition of the desired specific catalyst precisely at the tip of a substrate, (2) Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes/fibers at the catalyst-deposited tips, (3) Control of carbon nanotube/fiber growth pattern by manipulation of tip shape and growth conditions, and (4) Automation for mass production.

  19. Calcium influences sensitivity to growth inhibition induced by a cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While studies concerning mitogenic factors have been an important area of research for many years, much less is understood about the mechanisms of action of cell surface growth inhibitors. We have purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) which can reversibly inhibit the proliferation of diverse cell types. The studies discussed in this article show that three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibit sixty-fold greater sensitivity than other fibroblasts and epithelial-like cells to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. Growth inhibition induced by CeReS-18 treatment is a reversible process, and the three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibited either single or multiple cell cycle arrest points, although a predominantly G0/G1 cell cycle arrest point was exhibited in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The sensitivity of the mouse keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition was not affected by the degree of tumorigenic progression in the cell lines and was not due to differences in CeReS-18 binding affinity or number of cell surface receptors per cell. However, the sensitivity of both murine fibroblasts and keratinocytes could be altered by changing the extracellular calcium concentration, such that increased extracellular calcium concentrations resulted in decreased sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced proliferation inhibition. Thus the increased sensitivity of the murine keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18 could be ascribed to the low calcium concentration used in their propagation. Studies are currently under way investigating the role of calcium in CeReS-18-induced growth arrest. The CeReS-18 may serve as a very useful tool to study negative growth control and the signal transduction events associated with cell cycling.

  20. Expression of transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor receptor in rat lung neoplasms induced by plutonium-239

    SciTech Connect

    Stegelmeier, B.L.; Gillett, N.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Kelly, G.; Rebar, A.H.

    1994-11-01

    Ninety-two rat lung proliferative lesions and neoplasms induced by inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} were evaluated for aberrant expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-{alpha}) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Expression of TGF-{alpha} protein, measured by immunohistochemistry, was higher in 94% of the squamous cell carcinomas and 87% of the foci of alveolar epithelial squamous metaplasia than that exhibited by the normal-appearing, adjacent lung parenchyma. In contrast, only 20% of adenocarcinomas and foci of epithelial hyperplasia expressed elevated levels of TGF-{alpha}. Many neoplasms expressing TGF-{alpha} also expressed excessive levels of EGFR mRNA. Southern and DNA slot blot analyses showed that the elevated EGFR expression was not due to amplification of the EGFR gene. These data suggest that increased amounts of TGF-{alpha} were early alterations in the progression of plutonium-induced squamous cell carcinoma, and these increases may occur in parallel with overexpression of the receptor for this growth factor. Together, these alterations create a potential autocrine loop for sustaining clonal expansion of cells initiated by high-LET radiation. 44 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Ion-induced grain growth and texturing in refractory thin films-A low temperature process

    SciTech Connect

    Seita, M.; Reiser, A.; Spolenak, R.

    2012-12-17

    Selective grain growth can be promoted in thin films independently of the materials intrinsic properties, such as the melting temperature, by ion-irradiation. This enables the previously impossible evolution of large grain-sized microstructures with controlled crystallographic textures even in refractory metals, such as {alpha}-tantalum. Experimental results from materials with different crystal structure are compared on the basis of a theoretical model, which reveals the differences in ion-induced grain-growth dynamics.

  2. Growth Enhancement of Radish Sprouts Induced by Low Pressure O2 Radio Frequency Discharge Plasma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    We studied growth enhancement of radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus L.) induced by low pressure O2 radio frequency (RF) discharge plasma irradiation. The average length of radish sprouts cultivated for 7 days after O2 plasma irradiation is 30-60% greater than that without irradiation. O2 plasma irradiation does not affect seed germination. The experimental results reveal that oxygen related radicals strongly enhance growth, whereas ions and photons do not.

  3. Ultrasmooth growth of amorphous silicon films through ion-induced long-range surface correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Gago, R.; Vazquez, L.

    2011-01-03

    Ultrasmooth amorphous silicon films with a constant roughness below 0.2 nm were produced for film thickness up to {approx}1 {mu}m by magnetron sputtering under negative voltage substrate biasing (100-400 V). In contrast, under unbiased conditions the roughness of the resulting mounded films increased linearly with growth time due to shadowing effects. A detailed analysis of the amorphous film growth dynamics proves that the bias-induced ultrasmoothness is produced by a downhill mass transport process that leads to an extreme surface leveling inducing surface height correlations up to lateral distances close to 0.5 {mu}m.

  4. Exposure to Nerve Growth Factor Worsens Nephrotoxic Effect Induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lofaro, Danilo; Toteda, Giuseppina; Lupinacci, Simona; Leone, Francesca; Gigliotti, Paolo; Papalia, Teresa; Bonofiglio, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkANTR and p75NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A. PMID:24244623

  5. Irradiation-induced grain growth and defect evolution in nanocrystalline zirconia with doped grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sanchita; Mardinly, John; Wang, Yongqiang; Valdez, James A; Holesinger, Terry G; Uberuaga, Blas P; Ditto, Jeff J; Drazin, John W; Castro, Ricardo H R

    2016-06-22

    Grain boundaries are effective sinks for radiation-induced defects, ultimately impacting the radiation tolerance of nanocrystalline materials (dense materials with nanosized grains) against net defect accumulation. However, irradiation-induced grain growth leads to grain boundary area decrease, shortening potential benefits of nanostructures. A possible approach to mitigate this is the introduction of dopants to target a decrease in grain boundary mobility or a reduction in grain boundary energy to eliminate driving forces for grain growth (using similar strategies as to control thermal growth). Here we tested this concept in nanocrystalline zirconia doped with lanthanum. Although the dopant is observed to segregate to the grain boundaries, causing grain boundary energy decrease and promoting dragging forces for thermally activated boundary movement, irradiation induced grain growth could not be avoided under heavy ion irradiation, suggesting a different growth mechanism as compared to thermal growth. Furthermore, it is apparent that reducing the grain boundary energy reduced the effectiveness of the grain boundary as sinks, and the number of defects in the doped material is higher than in undoped (La-free) YSZ. PMID:27282392

  6. Ion-induced grain growth in multilayer and coevaporated metal alloy thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.E.; Was, G.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Rehn, L.E. )

    1990-09-01

    Irradiation experiments were conducted on multilayer (ML) and coevaporated (CO) thin films in order to examine the role that the heat of mixing ({Delta}H{sub mix}) has in ion-induced grain growth. Room temperature irradiations using 1.7 MeV Xe were performed in the High Voltage Electron Microscope at Argonne National Laboratory. The alloys studied (Pt-Ti, Pt-V, Pt-Ni, Au-Co and Ni-Al) spanned a large range of {Delta}H{sub mix} values. Comparison of grain growth rates between ML and CO films of a given alloy confirmed a heat of mixing effect. Differences in grain growth rates between ML and CO films scaled according to the sign and magnitude of {Delta}H{sub mix} of the system (with exception of the Pt-V system). Substantial variations in growth rates among CO alloy films experiencing similar irradiation damage demonstrated that a purely collisional approach is inadequate for describing ion-induced grain growth and consideration must also be given to material-specific properties. Results from CO alloy films were consistent with a thermal spike model of ion-induced grain growth. The grain boundary mobility was observed to be proportional to the thermal spike-related parameter, (F{sub D}{sup 2})/({Delta}H{sub coh}{sup 3}), where F{sub D} is the deposited damage energy and {Delta}H{sub coh} is the cohesive energy.

  7. GIDE is a mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase that induces apoptosis and slows growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bicheng; Huang, Jun; Li, Hong-Liang; Liu, Ting; Wang, Yan-Yi; Waterman, Paul; Mao, Ai-Ping; Xu, Liang-Guo; Zhai, Zhonghe; Liu, Depei; Marrack, Philippa; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2011-01-01

    We report here the identification of GIDE, a mitochondrially located E3 ubiquitin ligase. GIDE contains a C-terminal Ring finger domain, which is mostly conserved with those of the IAP family members, and which is required for its E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GIDE induces apoptosis via a pathway involving activation of caspases since the caspase inhibitors, XIAP and an inactive mutant of caspase-9 block GIDE-induced apoptosis. GIDE also activates JNK, and blockade of JNK activation inhibits GIDE-induced release of cytochrome c and Smac and apoptosis, suggesting that JNK activation precedes release of cytochrome c and Smac and is required for GIDE-induced apoptosis. These proapoptotic properties of GIDE require its E3 ligase activity. When somewhat over or underexpressed, GIDE slows or hastens cell growth respectively. These pro-apoptotic or growth rate effects of GIDE may account for its absence from tumor cells. PMID:18591963

  8. Thymosin β4 Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiomyocyte Growth by Regulating Wnt/WISP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Guleria, Rakeshwar S; Thakur, Suresh; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Pan, Jing; Baker, Kenneth M; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2016-08-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. However, the role of Tβ4 in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the cardio-protective effect of Tβ4 in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiomyocyte growth. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVM) were pretreated with Tβ4 followed by Ang II stimulation. Cell size, hypertrophy marker gene expression and Wnt signaling components, β-catenin, and Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and fluorescent microscopy. Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of cell size, hypertrophy marker genes and Wnt-associated gene expression, and protein levels; induced by Ang II in cardiomyocyte. WISP-1 was overexpressed in NRVM and, the effect of Tβ4 in Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte growth was evaluated. WISP-1 overexpression promoted cardiomyocytes growth and was reversed by pretreatment with Tβ4. This is the first report which demonstrates that Tβ4 targets Wnt/WISP-1 to protect Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1737-1744, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26627308

  9. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A; Reis, Rui M; Oliveira, Ana L; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Reis, Rui L

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials. PMID:27485515

  10. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P.; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Ana L.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Reis, Rui L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials. PMID:27485515

  11. Shear induced collateral artery growth modulated by endoglin but not by ALK1

    PubMed Central

    Seghers, Leonard; de Vries, Margreet R; Pardali, Evangelia; Hoefer, Imo E; Hierck, Beerend P; ten Dijke, Peter ten; Goumans, Marie Jose; Quax, Paul HA

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates both ischaemia induced angiogenesis and shear stress induced arteriogenesis by signalling through different receptors. How these receptors are involved in both these processes of blood flow recovery is not entirely clear. In this study the role of TGF-β receptors 1 and endoglin is assessed in neovascularization in mice. Unilateral femoral artery ligation was performed in mice heterozygous for either endoglin or ALK1 and in littermate controls. Compared with littermate controls, blood flow recovery, monitored by laser Doppler perfusion imaging, was significantly hampered by maximal 40% in endoglin heterozygous mice and by maximal 49% in ALK1 heterozygous mice. Collateral artery size was significantly reduced in endoglin heterozygous mice compared with controls but not in ALK1 heterozygous mice. Capillary density in ischaemic calf muscles was unaffected, but capillaries from endoglin and ALK1 heterozygous mice were significantly larger when compared with controls. To provide mechanistic evidence for the differential role of endoglin and ALK1 in shear induced or ischaemia induced neovascularization, murine endothelial cells were exposed to shear stress in vitro. This induced increased levels of endoglin mRNA but not ALK1. In this study it is demonstrated that both endoglin and ALK1 facilitate blood flow recovery. Importantly, endoglin contributes to both shear induced collateral artery growth and to ischaemia induced angiogenesis, whereas ALK1 is only involved in ischaemia induced angiogenesis. PMID:22436015

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  13. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed

    PubMed Central

    Rasher, Douglas B.; Hay, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral–seaweed–herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence. PMID:24403332

  14. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed.

    PubMed

    Rasher, Douglas B; Hay, Mark E

    2014-02-22

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral-seaweed-herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence. PMID:24403332

  15. Diacylglycerol production induced by growth hormone in Ob1771 preadipocytes arises from phosphatidylcholine breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Catalioto, R.M.; Ailhaud, G.; Negrel, R. )

    1990-12-31

    Growth Hormone has recently been shown to stimulate the formation of diacylglycerol in Ob1771 mouse preadipocyte cells without increasing inositol lipid turnover. Addition of growth hormone to Ob1771 cells prelabelled with ({sup 3}H)glycerol or ({sup 3}H)choline led to a rapid, transient and stoechiometric formation of labelled diacylglycerol and phosphocholine, respectively. In contrast, no change was observed in the level of choline and phosphatidic acid whereas the release of water-soluble metabolites in ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine prelabelled cells exposed to growth hormone was hardly detectable. Stimulation by growth hormone of cells prelabelled with (2-palmitoyl 9, 10 ({sup 3}H))phosphatidylcholine also induced the production of labelled diacyglycerol. Pertussis toxin abolished both diacylglycerol and phosphocholine formation induced by growth hormone. It is concluded that growth hormone mediates diacylglycerol production in Ob1771 cells by means of phosphatidylcholine breakdown involving a phospholipase C which is likely coupled to the growth hormone receptor via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein.

  16. Cancer drug troglitazone stimulates the growth and response of renal cells to hypoxia inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Taub, Mary

    2016-03-11

    Troglitazone has been used to suppress the growth of a number of tumors through apoptosis and autophagy. However, previous in vitro studies have employed very high concentrations of troglitazone (≥10(-5) M) in order to elicit growth inhibitory effects. In this report, when employing lower concentrations of troglitazone in defined medium, troglitazone was observed to stimulate the growth of primary renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. Rosiglitazone, like troglitazone, is a thiazolidinedione (TZD) that is known to activate Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Υ (PPARΥ). Notably, rosiglitazone also stimulates RPT cell growth, as does Υ-linolenic acids, another PPARΥ agonist. The PPARΥ antagonist GW9662 inhibited the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In addition, troglitazone stimulated transcription by a PPAR Response Element/Luciferase construct. These results are consistent with the involvement of PPARΥ as a mediator of the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In a number of tumor cells, the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is increased, promoting the expression of HIF inducible genes, and vascularization. Troglitazone was observed to stimulate transcription by a HIF/luciferase construct. These observations indicate that troglitazone not only promotes growth, also the survival of RPT cells under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:26869517

  17. A Histologically Distinctive Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by Overexpression of the Interleukin 6, Transforming Growth Factor β1, or Platelet-Derived Growth Factor B Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sakuma, Junko; Hayashi, Seiji; Abe, Kin'ya; Saito, Izumu; Harada, Shizuko; Sakatani, Mitsunoir; Yamamoto, Satoru; Matsumoto, Norinao; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Kishmoto, Tadamitsu

    1995-10-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is characterized by alveolitis with resulting fibrosis of the interstitium. To determine the relevance of humoral factors in the pathogenesis of interstitial pneumonia, we introduced expression vectors into Wistar rats via the trachea to locally overexpress humoral factors in the lungs. Human interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-6 receptor genes induced lymphocytic alveolitis without marked fibroblast proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of human transforming growth factor β1 or human platelet-derived growth factor B gene induced only mild or apparent cellular infiltration in the alveoli, respectively. However, both factors induced significant proliferation of fibroblasts and deposition of collagen fibrils. These histopathologic changes induced by the transforming growth factor β1 and platelet-derived growth factor B gene are partly akin to those changes seen in lung tissues from patients with pulmonary fibrosis and markedly contrast with the changes induced by overexpression of the IL-6 and IL-6 receptor genes that mimics lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

  18. Role of calcium in growth inhibition induced by a novel cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Westhoff, B. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Our laboratory has purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells. Evidence presented here demonstrates that sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition in BALB-c 3T3 cells is influenced by calcium, such that a decrease in the calcium concentration in the growth medium results in an increase in sensitivity to CeReS-18. Calcium did not alter CeReS-18 binding to its cell surface receptor and CeReS-18 does not bind calcium directly. Addition of calcium, but not magnesium, to CeReS-18-inhibited 3T3 cells results in reentry into the cell cycle. A greater than 3-hour exposure to increased calcium is required for escape from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. The calcium ionophore ionomycin could partially mimic the effect of increasing extracellular calcium, but thapsigargin was ineffective in inducing escape from growth inhibition. Increasing extracellular calcium 10-fold resulted in an approximately 7-fold increase in total cell-associated 45Ca+2, while free intracellular calcium only increased approximately 30%. However, addition of CeReS-18 did not affect total cell-associated calcium or the increase in total cell-associated calcium observed with an increase in extracellular calcium. Serum addition induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and influx across the plasma membrane in 3T3 cells, and pretreatment of 3T3 cells with CeReS-18 appeared to inhibit these calcium mobilization events. These results suggest that a calcium-sensitive step exists in the recovery from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. CeReS-18 may inhibit cell proliferation through a novel mechanism involving altering the intracellular calcium mobilization/regulation necessary for cell cycle progression.

  19. Implications of epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced egf receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Lund, K; Wiley, H S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the role of receptor aggregation in EGF binding, we construct a mathematical model describing receptor dimerization (and higher levels of aggregation) that permits an analysis of the influence of receptor aggregation on ligand binding. We answer two questions: (a) Can Scatchard plots of EGF binding data be analyzed productively in terms of two noninteracting receptor populations with different affinities if EGF induced receptor aggregation occurs? No. If two affinities characterize aggregated and monomeric EGF receptors, we show that the Scatchard plot should have curvature characteristic of positively cooperative binding, the opposite of that observed. Thus, the interpretation that the high affinity population represents aggregated receptors and the low affinity population nonaggregated receptors is wrong. If the two populations are interpreted without reference to receptor aggregation, an important determinant of Scatchard plot shape is ignored. (b) Can a model for EGF receptor aggregation and EGF binding be consistent with the "negative curvature" (i.e., curvature characteristic of negatively cooperative binding) observed in most Scatchard plots of EGF binding data? Yes. In addition, the restrictions on the model parameters required to obtain negatively curved Scatchard plots provide new information about binding and aggregation. In particular, EGF binding to aggregated receptors must be negatively cooperative, i.e., binding to a receptor in a dimer (or higher oligomer) having one receptor already bound occurs with lower affinity than the initial binding event. A third question we consider is whether the model we present can be used to detect the presence of mechanisms other than receptor aggregation that are contributing to Scatchard plot curvature. For the membrane and cell binding data we analyzed, the best least squares fits of the model to each of the four data sets deviate systematically from the data, indicating that additional factors are

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species are involved in BMP-Induced Dendritic Growth in Cultured Rat Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons. PMID:26079955

  1. Seismic characteristics of tensile fracture growth induced by hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W. S.; Van der Baan, M.; Boroumand, N.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a process of injecting high-pressure slurry into a rockmass to enhance its permeability. Variants of this process are used for unconventional oil and gas development, engineered geothermal systems and block-cave mining; similar processes occur within volcanic systems. Opening of hydraulic fractures is well documented by mineback trials and tiltmeter monitoring and is a physical requirement to accommodate the volume of injected fluid. Numerous microseismic monitoring investigations acquired in the audio-frequency band are interpreted to show a prevalence of shear-dominated failure mechanisms surrounding the tensile fracture. Moreover, the radiated seismic energy in the audio-frequency band appears to be a miniscule fraction (<< 1%) of the net injected energy, i.e., the integral of the product of fluid pressure and injection rate. We use a simple penny-shaped crack model as a predictive framework to describe seismic characteristics of tensile opening during hydraulic fracturing. This model provides a useful scaling relation that links seismic moment to effective fluid pressure within the crack. Based on downhole recordings corrected for attenuation, a significant fraction of observed microseismic events are characterized by S/P amplitude ratio < 5. Despite the relatively small aperture of the monitoring arrays, which precludes both full moment-tensor analysis and definitive identification of nodal planes or axes, this ratio provides a strong indication that observed microseismic source mechanisms have a component of tensile failure. In addition, we find some instances of periodic spectral notches that can be explained by an opening/closing failure mechanism, in which fracture propagation outpaces fluid velocity within the crack. Finally, aseismic growth of tensile fractures may be indicative of a scenario in which injected energy is consumed to create new fracture surfaces. Taken together, our observations and modeling provide evidence that

  2. Stress and the Hair Growth Cycle: Cortisol-Induced Hair Growth Disruption.

    PubMed

    Thom, Erling

    2016-08-01

    The stress hormone, cortisol, is known to affect the function and cyclic regulation of the hair follicle. When cortisol is present at high levels it has been demonstrated to reduce the synthesis and accelerate the degradation of important skin elements, namely hyaluronan and proteoglycans by approximately 40%. The following discussion outlines the relationship between stress, cortisol, and the effect on the normal function of the hair follicle. As a result of this connection, important correlations have been established in the literature to form a basis for novel, effective treatments of stress-related hair growth disorders.
    Amongst various treatment methods and substances, oral supplementation with a specific bioavailable proteoglycan stands out as a promising new therapeutic treatment method.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(8):1001-1004. PMID:27538002

  3. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  4. MECHANISMS OF ZN-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MECHANISMS OF Zn-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)
    James M. Samet*, Lee M. Graves? and Weidong Wu?. *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and ?Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North C...

  5. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. PMID:26496881

  6. Growth-induced anisotropy in bismuth - Rare-earth iron garnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Slusky, S. E. G.; Brandle, C. D.; Norelli, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnets, (R3-x-yBixPby)Fe5O12 (Bi:RIG, R = Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y), were prepared under constant growth conditions to investigate the influence of ionic species on the bismuth-based growth-induced uniaxial anisotropy K(u) exp g. The effect of ionic species on growth-induced anisotropy in Bi:RIG was not consistent with the ionic size model of site ordering. In particular, Bi:SmIG, Bi:EuIG, and Bi:TbIG displayed high growth-induced anisotropies, up to 331,000 erg/cu cm at room temperature for x of about 0.5. The temperature dependence of these K(u) exp gs was somewhat higher than that of the well studied Bi:YIG. The site ordering of Bi can be modeled by assuming that small, low-oxygen-coordination BiOw exp +3-2 w melt complexes have a strong site selectivity for small, high-oxygen coordination sites at the growth interface.

  7. Arctiin induces cell growth inhibition through the down-regulation of cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Youichirou; Koyama, Makoto; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Yokota, Tomoya; Kawanaka, Mayumi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Germain, Doris; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2008-03-01

    Arctiin is a major lignan constituent of Arctium lappa and has anti-cancer properties in animal models. It was recently reported that arctiin induces growth inhibition in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. However, the growth inhibitory mechanism of arctiin remains unknown. Herein we report that arctiin induces growth inhibition and dephosphorylates the tumor-suppressor retinoblastoma protein in human immortalized keratinocyte HaCaT cells. We also show that the growth inhibition caused by arctiin is associated with the down-regulation of cyclin D1 protein expression. Furthermore, the arctiin-induced suppression of cyclin D1 protein expression occurs in various types of human tumor cells, including osteosarcoma, lung, colorectal, cervical and breast cancer, melanoma, transformed renal cells and prostate cancer. Depletion of the cyclin D1 protein using small interfering RNA-rendered human breast cancer MCF-7 cells insensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of arctiin, implicates cyclin D1 as an important target of arctiin. Taken together, these results suggest that arctiin down-regulates cyclin D1 protein expression and that this at least partially contributes to the anti-proliferative effect of arctiin. PMID:18288407

  8. Investigation of Buckling Phenomenon Induced by Growth of Vertebral Bodies Using a Mechanical Spine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaoka, Ryu; Azegami, Hideyuki; Murachi, Shunji; Kitoh, Junzoh; Ishida, Yoshito; Kawakami, Noriaki; Makino, Mitsunori; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    A hypothesis that idiopathic scoliosis is a buckling phenomenon of the fourth or sixth mode, which is the second or third lateral bending mode, induced by the growth of vertebral bodies was presented in a previous paper by the authors using numerical simulations with a finite-element model of the spine. This paper presents experimental proof of the buckling phenomenon using mechanical spine models constructed with the geometrical data of the finite-element model used in a previous work. Using three spine mechanical models with different materials at intervertebral joints, the change in the natural vibration eigenvalue of the second lateral bending mode with the growth of vertebral bodies was measured by experimental modal analysis. From the result, it was observed that natural vibration eigenvalue decreased with the growth of vertebral bodies. Since the increase in primary factor inducing the buckling phenomenon decreases natural vibration eigenvalue, the obtained result confirms the buckling hypothesis.

  9. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O M Zack

    2014-12-28

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and anti-inflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  10. Lattice-mismatch-induced twinning for seeded growth of anisotropic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenni; Chen, Zhengzheng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Haijun; Jin, Mingshang; Wu, Chao; Yang, Deren; Yin, Yadong

    2015-03-24

    Synthesis of anisotropic nanostructures from materials with isotropic crystal structures often requires the use of seeds containing twin planes to break the crystalline symmetry and promote the preferential anisotropic growth. Controlling twinning in seeds is therefore critically important for high-yield synthesis of many anisotropic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a unique strategy to induce twinning in metal nanostructures for anisotropic growth by taking advantage of the large lattice mismatch between two metals. By using Au-Cu as an example, we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that deposition of Cu to the surface of single-crystalline Au seeds can build up strain energy, which effectively induces the formation of twin planes. Subsequent seeded growth allows the production of Cu nanorods with high shape anisotropy that is unachievable without the use of Au seeds. This work provides an effective strategy for the preparation of anisotropic metal nanostructures. PMID:25744113

  11. Growth signaling promotes chronological aging in budding yeast by inducing superoxide anions that inhibit quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Martin; Mesquita, Ana; Carroll, Timothy; Marks, Laura; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Zhaojie; Ludovico, Paula; Burhans, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of growth signaling pathways protects against aging and age-related diseases in parallel with reduced oxidative stress. The relationships between growth signaling, oxidative stress and aging remain unclear. Here we report that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alterations in growth signaling pathways impact levels of superoxide anions that promote chronological aging and inhibit growth arrest of stationary phase cells in G0/G1. Factors that decrease intracellular superoxide anions in parallel with enhanced longevity and more efficient G0/G1 arrest include genetic inactivation of growth signaling pathways that inhibit Rim15p, which activates oxidative stress responses, and downregulation of these pathways by caloric restriction. Caloric restriction also reduces superoxide anions independently of Rim15p by elevating levels of H2O2, which activates superoxide dismutases. In contrast, high glucose or mutations that activate growth signaling accelerate chronological aging in parallel with increased superoxide anions and reduced efficiency of stationary phase G0/G1 arrest. High glucose also activates DNA damage responses and preferentially kills stationary phase cells that fail to arrest growth in G0/G1. These findings suggest that growth signaling promotes chronological aging in budding yeast by elevating superoxide anions that inhibit quiescence and induce DNA replication stress. A similar mechanism likely contributes to aging and age-related diseases in complex eukaryotes. PMID:21076178

  12. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kanayo; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  13. PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, Marc Faes, Seraina Dormond-Meuwly, Anne Demartines, Nicolas Dormond, Olivier

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • PGE{sub 2} activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE{sub 2} directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE{sub 2} EP{sub 4} receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE{sub 2} increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE{sub 2}-induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth.

  14. Growth-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and clustering in Ni xPt 1- x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasumathi, D.; Shapiro, A. L.; Maranville, B. B.; Hellman, F.

    2001-02-01

    Polycrystalline and epitaxial (1 0 0), (1 1 0), and (1 1 1)-oriented Ni 3Pt, NiPt, and NiPt 3 films were deposited over a range of growth temperatures from 80°C to 700°C. Films grown at moderate temperatures (200-400°C) exhibit growth-induced properties similar to Co-Pt alloys: enhanced and broadened Curie temperature, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and large coercivity. As in Co-Pt, the magnetic properties suggest a clustering of Ni into platelets on the growth surface, as the films are being grown. Unlike Co-Pt, however, NiPt films exhibit a strong orientational dependence of anisotropy and enhanced Curie temperature, possibly resulting from different types of surface reconstructions which affect the growth surface.

  15. The Effect of Eectronic Energy Loss on Irradiation-Induced Grain Growth in Nanocrystalline Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra; Edmondson, P. D.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Jin, Ke; Ostrouchov, Christopher N.; Weber, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Grain growth of nanocrystalline materials is generally thermally activated, but can also be driven by irradiation at much lower temperature. In nanocrystalline ceria and zirconia, contributions from both displacement damage and ionization to the grain growth are identified. Our atomistic simulations have revealed fast grain boundary (GB) movements due to the high density of disorder near GBs. Our experimental results have shown that irradiation-induced grain growth is a function of total energy deposited, where the excitation of target electrons and displacement of lattice atoms both contribute to the overall disorder and both play important roles in grain growth. The coupling of energy deposition to the electronic and lattice structures should both be taken into consideration when engineering nanostructural materials.

  16. Hydrogen-induced effects on the CVD growth of high-quality graphene structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Jing; Li, Xianglong; Wang, Bin; Hao, Long; Liang, Minghui; Jin, Meihua; Zhi, Linjie

    2013-09-21

    In this work, the hydrogen-induced effects on the CVD growth of high-quality graphene have been systematically studied by regulating the growth parameters mainly related to hydrogen. Experimental results demonstrate that under a high hydrogen flow rate, the competitive etching effect during the growth process is more prominent and even shows macroscopic selectivity. Based on these understandings, the hexagonal graphene domains with diverse edge modalities are controllably synthesized on a large scale by elaborately managing the competitive etching effect of hydrogen that existed during the formation of graphene. This study not only contributes to the understanding of the mechanism of CVD growth, especially the effects of hydrogen used in the system, but also provides a facile method to synthesize high-quality graphene structures with trimmed edge morphologies. PMID:23715011

  17. Thermodynamic Self-Limiting Growth of Heteroepitaxial Islands Induced by Nonlinear Elastic Effect.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Niu, Xiaobin; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We investigate nonlinear elastic effect (NLEF) on the growth of heteroepitaxial islands, a topic of both scientific and technological significance for their applications as quantum dots. We show that the NLEF induces a thermodynamic self-limiting growth mechanism that hinders the strain relaxation of coherent island beyond a maximum size, which is in contrast to indefinite strain relaxation with increasing island size in the linear elastic regime. This self-limiting growth effect shows a strong dependence on the island facet angle, which applies also to islands inside pits patterned in a substrate surface with an additional dependence on the pit inclination angle. Consequently, primary islands nucleate and grow first in the pits and then secondary islands nucleate at the rim around the pits after the primary islands reach the self-limited maximum size. Our theory sheds new lights on understanding the heteroepitaxial island growth and explains a number of past and recent experimental observations. PMID:27203611

  18. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring. PMID:24753110

  19. Evaluation of h secretion relative to zeatin-induced growth of detached cucumber cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Ross, C W; Rayle, D L

    1982-11-01

    Cytokinins promote expansion of cotyledons detached from seedlings of more than a dozen species. The zeatin-enhanced expansion of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv Marketer) cotyledons was investigated. In addition, whether acid secretion is involved in wall loosening accompanying such accelerated growth was evaluated. For cotyledons abraded with carborundum or cut into either eight or 18 pieces, we detected no zeatin-enhanced acidification of the growth medium during growth periods of 3 days. Measurements of pH values on each surface of zeatin-treated, abraded cotyledons after 3 days of growth also showed no detectable acidification caused by the hormone. Furthermore, with several buffers at pH values ranging from 5 to 8, growth of nonabraded, abraded, or cut cotyledons with or without zeatin was independent of external pH. However, experiments restricted to about 12 hours indicated that certain acidic buffers enhanced growth of cotyledons cut into 18 pieces. Lastly, concentrations of fusicoccin that caused growth promotion equal to that of zeatin initiated substantial acidification of the medium. Collectively, these data suggest that zeatin-induced expansion of detached cucumber cotyledons is independent of H(+) secretion. PMID:16662700

  20. Control of Electron Beam-Induced Au Nanocrystal Growth Kinetics through Solution Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeung Hun; Schneider, Nicholas M; Grogan, Joseph M; Reuter, Mark C; Bau, Haim H; Kodambaka, Suneel; Ross, Frances M

    2015-08-12

    Measurements of solution-phase crystal growth provide mechanistic information that is helpful in designing and synthesizing nanostructures. Here, we examine the model system of individual Au nanocrystal formation within a defined liquid geometry during electron beam irradiation of gold chloride solution, where radiolytically formed hydrated electrons reduce Au ions to solid Au. By selecting conditions that favor the growth of well-faceted Au nanoprisms, we measure growth rates of individual crystals. The volume of each crystal increases linearly with irradiation time at a rate unaffected by its shape or proximity to neighboring crystals, implying a growth process that is controlled by the arrival of atoms from solution. Furthermore, growth requires a threshold dose rate, suggesting competition between reduction and oxidation processes in the solution. Above this threshold, the growth rate follows a power law with dose rate. To explain the observed dose rate dependence, we demonstrate that a reaction-diffusion model is required that explicitly accounts for the species H(+) and Cl(-). The model highlights the necessity of considering all species present when interpreting kinetic data obtained from beam-induced processes, and suggest conditions under which growth rates can be controlled with higher precision. PMID:26207841

  1. Evaluation of H+ Secretion Relative to Zeatin-Induced Growth of Detached Cucumber Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Cleon W.; Rayle, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Cytokinins promote expansion of cotyledons detached from seedlings of more than a dozen species. The zeatin-enhanced expansion of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv Marketer) cotyledons was investigated. In addition, whether acid secretion is involved in wall loosening accompanying such accelerated growth was evaluated. For cotyledons abraded with carborundum or cut into either eight or 18 pieces, we detected no zeatin-enhanced acidification of the growth medium during growth periods of 3 days. Measurements of pH values on each surface of zeatin-treated, abraded cotyledons after 3 days of growth also showed no detectable acidification caused by the hormone. Furthermore, with several buffers at pH values ranging from 5 to 8, growth of nonabraded, abraded, or cut cotyledons with or without zeatin was independent of external pH. However, experiments restricted to about 12 hours indicated that certain acidic buffers enhanced growth of cotyledons cut into 18 pieces. Lastly, concentrations of fusicoccin that caused growth promotion equal to that of zeatin initiated substantial acidification of the medium. Collectively, these data suggest that zeatin-induced expansion of detached cucumber cotyledons is independent of H+ secretion. PMID:16662700

  2. Pin1 promotes transforming growth factor-beta-induced migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Isao; Chiang, Keng-Nan; Lai, Chen-Yu; He, Dongming; Wang, Guannan; Ramkumar, Romila; Uchida, Takafumi; Ryo, Akihide; Lu, Kunping; Liu, Fang

    2010-01-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates a wide variety of biological activities. It induces potent growth-inhibitory responses in normal cells but promotes migration and invasion of cancer cells. Smads mediate the TGF-beta responses. TGF-beta binding to the cell surface receptors leads to the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in their C terminus as well as in the proline-rich linker region. The serine/threonine phosphorylation sites in the linker region are followed by the proline residue. Pin1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, recognizes phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline motifs. Here we show that Smad2/3 interacts with Pin1 in a TGF-beta-dependent manner. We further show that the phosphorylated threonine 179-proline motif in the Smad3 linker region is the major binding site for Pin1. Although epidermal growth factor also induces phosphorylation of threonine 179 and other residues in the Smad3 linker region the same as TGF-beta, Pin1 is unable to bind to the epidermal growth factor-stimulated Smad3. Further analysis suggests that phosphorylation of Smad3 in the C terminus is necessary for the interaction with Pin1. Depletion of Pin1 by small hairpin RNA does not significantly affect TGF-beta-induced growth-inhibitory responses and a number of TGF-beta/Smad target genes analyzed. In contrast, knockdown of Pin1 in human PC3 prostate cancer cells strongly inhibited TGF-beta-mediated migration and invasion. Accordingly, TGF-beta induction of N-cadherin, which plays an important role in migration and invasion, is markedly reduced when Pin1 is depleted in PC3 cells. Because Pin1 is overexpressed in many cancers, our findings highlight the importance of Pin1 in TGF-beta-induced migration and invasion of cancer cells. PMID:19920136

  3. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 induces apoptosis in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, T; Huynh, H; Pollak, M

    1997-08-28

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are known to have potent antiapoptotic activity. The antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) is a potent inhibitor of MCF7 human breast cancer cell growth and has recently been reported to act as an antiproliferative agent in part via upregulation of expression of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) -3 and -5, which attenuate the bioactivity of IGFs in many experimental systems. We show here that ICI and IGFBP-3 induce apoptosis in MCF7 cells. Treatment of MCF7 cells with 10 nM ICI or 36 nM recombinant human IGFBP. 3 for 72 hours increased apoptosis approximately 3.5-fold relative to control as quantitated by a cell death ELISA which measures DNA fragmentation. Long R3 IGF-I, an IGF-I analogue with greatly reduced affinity for IGFBPs yet similar affinity for IGF-I receptors, was a more potent inhibitor of IGFBP-3-induced and ICI-induced apoptosis than IGF-I. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 enhances apoptosis by reducing bioavailability of ligands for the IGF-I receptor and suggest that modulation of IGFBP-3 expression by ICI contributes to apoptosis induced by this compound. More generally, the data suggest that IGFBPs are regulators of apoptosis. PMID:9299428

  4. Intracellular insulin-like growth factor-1 induces Bcl-2 expression in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chand, Hitendra S; Harris, Jennifer Foster; Mebratu, Yohannes; Chen, Yangde; Wright, Paul S; Randell, Scott H; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2012-05-01

    Bcl-2, a prosurvival protein, regulates programmed cell death during development and repair processes, and it can be oncogenic when cell proliferation is deregulated. The present study investigated what factors modulate Bcl-2 expression in airway epithelial cells and identified the pathways involved. Microarray analysis of mRNA from airway epithelial cells captured by laser microdissection showed that increased expression of IL-1β and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) coincided with induced Bcl-2 expression compared with controls. Treatment of cultured airway epithelial cells with IL-1β and IGF-1 induced Bcl-2 expression by increasing Bcl-2 mRNA stability with no discernible changes in promoter activity. Silencing the IGF-1 expression using short hairpin RNA showed that intracellular IGF-1 (IC-IGF-1) was increasing Bcl-2 expression. Blocking epidermal growth factor receptor or IGF-1R activation also suppressed IC-IGF-1 and abolished the Bcl-2 induction. Induced expression and colocalization of IC-IGF-1 and Bcl-2 were observed in airway epithelial cells of mice exposed to LPS or cigarette smoke and of patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis but not in the respective controls. These studies demonstrate that IC-IGF-1 induces Bcl-2 expression in epithelial cells via IGF-1R and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways, and targeting IC-IGF-1 could be beneficial to treat chronic airway diseases. PMID:22461702

  5. Caloric Restriction Normalizes Obesity-Induced Alterations on Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Growth Signaling.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Cory M; Li, Ji; Williamson, David L

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the impact of caloric restriction on high fat diet-induced alterations on regulators of skeletal muscle growth. We hypothesized that caloric restriction would reverse the negative effects of high fat diet-induced obesity on REDD1 and mTOR-related signaling. Following an initial 8 week period of HF diet-induced obesity, caloric restriction (CR ~30 %) was employed while mice continued to consume either a low (LF) or high fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Western analysis of skeletal muscle showed that CR reduced (p < 0.05) the obesity-related effects on the lipogenic protein, SREBP1. Likewise, CR reduced (p < 0.05) the obesity-related effects on the hyperactivation of mTORC1 and ERK1/2 signaling to levels comparable to the LF mice. CR also reduced (p < 0.05) obesity-induced expression of negative regulators of growth, REDD1 and cleaved caspase 3. These findings have implications for on the reversibility of dysregulated growth signaling in obese skeletal muscle, using short-term caloric restriction. PMID:27289530

  6. Stress-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels: Effect on fatigue crack growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z.; Ahmed, M.

    1996-04-01

    This paper addresses the influence of cyclic stress-induced martensitic transformation on fatigue crack growth rates in metastable austenitic stainless steels. At low applied stress and mean stress values in AISI type 301 stainless steel, fatigue crack growth rate is substantially retarded due to a cyclic stress-induced γ-α' and γ-ɛ martensitic transformation occurring at the crack-tip plastic zone. It is suggested that the transformation products produce a compressive residual stress at the tip of the fatigue crack, which essentially lowers the effective stress intensity and hence retards the fatigue crack growth rate. At high applied stress or mean stress values, fatigue crack growth rates in AISI type 301 steels become almost equal to those of stable AISI type 302 alloy. As the amount of transformed products increases (with an increase in applied or mean stress), the strain-hardening effect brought about by the transformed martensite phase appears to accelerate fatigue crack growth, offsetting the contribution from the compressive residual stress produced by the positive volume change of γ → α' or ɛ transformation.

  7. Molecular-Orientation-Induced Rapid Roughening and Morphology Transition in Organic Semiconductor Thin-Film Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junliang; Yim, Sanggyu; Jones, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    We study the roughening process and morphology transition of organic semiconductor thin film induced by molecular orientation in the model of molecular semiconductor copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) using both experiment and simulation. The growth behaviour of F16CuPc thin film with the thickness, D, on SiO2 substrate takes on two processes divided by a critical thickness: (1) D ≤ 40 nm, F16CuPc thin films are composed of uniform caterpillar-like crystals. The kinetic roughening is confirmed during this growth, which is successfully analyzed by Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) model with scaling exponents α = 0.71 ± 0.12, β = 0.36 ± 0.03, and 1/z = 0.39 ± 0.12; (2) D > 40 nm, nanobelt crystals are formed gradually on the caterpillar-like crystal surface and the film growth shows anomalous growth behaviour. These new growth behaviours with two processes result from the gradual change of molecular orientation and the formation of grain boundaries, which conversely induce new molecular orientation, rapid roughening process, and the formation of nanobelt crystals. PMID:25801646

  8. Plant Pathogen-Induced Water-Soaking Promotes Salmonella enterica Growth on Tomato Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Potnis, Neha; Colee, James; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogen infection is a critical factor for the persistence of Salmonella enterica on plants. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of S. enterica on diseased tomato plants by using four diverse bacterial spot Xanthomonas species that differ in disease severities. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and X. gardneri infection fostered S. enterica growth, while X. perforans infection did not induce growth but supported the persistence of S. enterica. X. vesicatoria-infected leaves harbored S. enterica populations similar to those on healthy leaves. Growth of S. enterica was associated with extensive water-soaking and necrosis in X. euvesicatoria- and X. gardneri-infected plants. The contribution of water-soaking to the growth of S. enterica was corroborated by an increased growth of populations on water-saturated leaves in the absence of a plant pathogen. S. enterica aggregates were observed with bacterial spot lesions caused by either X. euvesicatoria or X. vesicatoria; however, more S. enterica aggregates formed on X. euvesicatoria-infected leaves as a result of larger lesion sizes per leaf area and extensive water-soaking. Sparsely distributed lesions caused by X. vesicatoria infection do not support the overall growth of S. enterica or aggregates in areas without lesions or water-soaking; S. enterica was observed as single cells and not aggregates. Thus, pathogen-induced water-soaking and necrosis allow S. enterica to replicate and proliferate on tomato leaves. The finding that the pathogen-induced virulence phenotype affects the fate of S. enterica populations in diseased plants suggests that targeting of plant pathogen disease is important in controlling S. enterica populations on plants. PMID:26386057

  9. Testosterone-induced adult neurosphere growth is mediated by sexually-dimorphic aromatase expression

    PubMed Central

    Ransome, Mark I.; Boon, Wah Chin

    2015-01-01

    We derived adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) from the sub-ventricular zone of male and female mice to examine direct responses to principal sex hormones. In the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) NSPCs of both sexes expressed nestin and sox2, and could be maintained as neurospheres without addition of any sex hormones. The reverse was not observed; neither testosterone (T), 17β-estradiol (E2) nor progesterone (P4) was able to support neurosphere growth in the absence of EGF and FGF2. Ten nanomolar T, E2 or P4 induced nestin(+) cell proliferation within 20 min and enhanced neurosphere growth over 7 days irrespective of sex, which was abolished by Erk inhibition with 20 μM U0126. Maintaining neurospheres with each sex hormone did not affect subsequent neuronal differentiation. However, 10 nM T, E2 or P4 added during differentiation increased βIII tubulin(+) neuron production with E2 being more potent compared to T and P4 in both sexes. Androgen receptor (AR) inhibition with 20 μM flutamide but not aromatase inhibition with 10 μM letrozole reduced basal and T-induced neurosphere growth in females, while only concurrent inhibition of AR and aromatase produced the same effect in males. This sex-specific effect was supported by higher aromatase expression in male neurospheres compared to females measured by Western blot and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Ten micromolar menadione induced oxidative stress, impaired neurosphere growth and up-regulated aromatase expression in both sexes. However, under oxidative stress letrozole significantly exacerbated impaired neurosphere growth in males only. While both E2 and T could prevent oxidative stress-induced growth reduction in both sexes, the effects of T were dependent on innate aromatase activity. We show for the first time that intrinsic androgen and estrogen signaling may impact the capacity of NSPCs to produce neural progenitors under pathological

  10. Measurement of longitudinal emittance growth using a laser-induced neutralization method

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.; Garcia, R.; Johnson, K.F.; Saadatmand, K.; Sander, O.R.; Sandoval, D.; Shinas, M.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced neutralization technique, LINDA, has been used to study the longitudinal emittance of the 5-MeV H{sup {minus}} beam exiting the drift-tube Linac (DTL) of the Los Alamos Accelerator Test Stand (ATS). By using multiple laser intersection points, longitudinal emittance growths over drift distances of 23.6 and 30.6 cm were measured. Subsequently, a beam transport line, which consisted of one arm of a beam funnel, was substituted for the drift space. Measurements show that the elements of the funnel constrain emittance growth while the H{sup {minus}} beam is contained within these transport elements.

  11. NOVEL ATYPICAL PKC INHIBITORS PREVENT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Titchenell, Paul M.; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Keil, Jason M.; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Charles D.; Antonetti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contribute to the loss of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and subsequent macular edema in various retinal pathologies. VEGF signaling requires conventional PKC (PKCβ) activity; however, PKCβ inhibition only partially prevents VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and does not affect pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced permeability suggesting the involvement of alternative signaling pathways. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling in VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and identify a novel class of inhibitors of aPKC that prevent BRB breakdown in vivo. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of aPKC isoforms were used to assess their contribution to endothelial permeability in culture. A chemical library was screened using an in vitro kinase assay to identify novel small molecule inhibitors and further medicinal chemistry was performed to delineate a novel pharmacophore. We demonstrate that aPKC isoforms are both sufficient and required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Furthermore, these specific, potent, non-competitive, small molecule inhibitors prevented VEGF-induced tight junction internalization and retinal endothelial permeability in response to VEGF in both primary culture and in rodent retina. These data suggest that aPKC inhibition with 2-amino-4-phenyl-thiophene derivatives may be developed to preserve the BRB in retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy or uveitis and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of brain tumors. PMID:22721706

  12. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  13. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Brady, Nathaniel F; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; Nag, Joyeeta; Prasankumar, Rohit P; Haglund, Richard F; Hilton, David J

    2016-03-31

    We report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of [Formula: see text] ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state. PMID:26932975

  14. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Nathaniel F.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; Nag, Joyeeta; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Haglund, Richard F., Jr.; Hilton, David J.

    2016-03-01

    We report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of 40.5+/- 2 ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state.

  15. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Nathaniel F.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; Nag, Joyeeta; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Haglund, Richard F.; Hilton, David J.

    2016-03-02

    Here we report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Lastly, above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of 40.5 ± 2 ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state.

  16. Hyposmotic stress induces cell growth arrest via proteasome activation and cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase degradation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Rott, Lusijah S; Lowe, Anson W; Omary, M Bishr

    2002-05-31

    Ordered cell cycle progression requires the expression and activation of several cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Hyperosmotic stress causes growth arrest possibly via proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclin D1. We studied the effect of hyposmotic conditions on three colonic (Caco2, HRT18, HT29) and two pancreatic (AsPC-1 and PaCa-2) cell lines. Hyposmosis caused reversible cell growth arrest of the five cell lines in a cell cycle-independent fashion, although some cell lines accumulated at the G(1)/S interface. Growth arrest was followed by apoptosis or by formation of multinucleated giant cells, which is consistent with cell cycle catastrophe. Hyposmosis dramatically decreased Cdc2, Cdk2, Cdk4, cyclin B1, and cyclin D3 expression in a time-dependent fashion, in association with an overall decrease in cellular protein synthesis. However, some protein levels remained unaltered, including cyclin E and keratin 8. Selective proteasome inhibition prevented Cdk and cyclin degradation and reversed hyposmotic stress-induced growth arrest, whereas calpain and lysosome enzyme inhibitors had no measurable effect on cell cycle protein degradation. Therefore, hyposmotic stress inhibits cell growth and, depending on the cell type, causes cell cycle catastrophe with or without apoptosis. The growth arrest is due to decreased protein synthesis and proteasome activation, with subsequent degradation of several cyclins and Cdks. PMID:11897780

  17. Growth of gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals induced by lysozyme protein in thin film conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowal, Ashim Chandra; Kundu, Sarathi

    2016-08-01

    Structures and growth behavior of gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals have been explored on thin films of globular protein lysozyme by using UV-vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A simple and one-step environment friendly method has been used to grow nanocrystals on protein surface from HAuCl4 solution. It has been found that if different interaction times are provided between lysozyme films and HAuCl4 solution, then initially formed tiny gold nanoclusters on protein surface transform into nanocrystals with the passage of time. XRD analysis shows the formation of faced-centered cubic lattice along (1 1 1) crystalline direction and AFM images confirm the presence of circular, rod-like, triangular and hexagonal crystal structures. Langmuir-like growth behavior has been identified for both the gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals formation induced by the lysozyme films, however, nanocrystal growth is relatively slower than nanocluster.

  18. Quantifying the Rates of Sn Whisker Growth and Plastic Strain Relaxation Using Thermally-Induced Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Fei; Bower, Allan F.; Chason, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Whiskers and hillocks that grow out of Sn-based coatings are a critical reliability issue in Pb-free electronics. Although their growth is widely regarded as a stress-relaxation mechanism, quantitative understanding of the relationship between the stress, growth kinetics, and strain relaxation is still lacking. In this work, the well-controlled strain induced by thermal-expansion mismatch was used to study the whiskering behavior of electroplated Sn films. Stress was quantified by monitoring wafer-curvature and the density of whiskers and hillocks was measured simultaneously by use of optical microscopy. Evolution of the volume of individual features was also measured by scanning electron microscopy after different periods of heating. The measurements were used to develop a model for temperature-dependent and stress-dependent growth kinetics of whiskers and hillocks and to determine the amount of strain relaxation which occurs as a result of their formation.

  19. Diverse Nitrogen Sources in Seminal Fluid Act in Synergy To Induce Filamentous Growth of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Francisco J.; Ryman, Kicki; Hooijmaijers, Cornelis; Bulone, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the leading cause of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). VVC represents a major quality-of-life issue for women during their reproductive years, a stage of life where the vaginal epithelium is subject to periodic hormonally induced changes associated with menstruation and concomitant exposure to serum as well as potential intermittent contact with seminal fluid. Seminal fluid potently triggers Candida albicans to switch from yeastlike to filamentous modes of growth, a developmental response tightly linked to virulence. Conversely, vaginal fluid inhibits filamentation. Here, we used artificial formulations of seminal and vaginal fluids that faithfully mimic genuine fluids to assess the contribution of individual components within these fluids to filamentation. The high levels of albumin, amino acids, and N-acetylglucosamine in seminal fluid act synergistically as potent inducers of filamentous growth, even at atmospheric levels of CO2 and reduced temperatures (30°C). Using a simplified in vitro model that mimics the natural introduction of seminal fluid into the vulvovaginal environment, a pulse of artificial seminal fluid (ASF) was found to exert an enduring potential to overcome the inhibitory efficacy of artificial vaginal fluid (AVF) on filamentation. These findings suggest that a transient but substantial change in the nutrient levels within the vulvovaginal environment during unprotected coitus can induce resident C. albicans cells to engage developmental programs associated with virulent growth. PMID:25662979

  20. Silibinin-mediated metabolic reprogramming attenuates pancreatic cancer-induced cachexia and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Surendra K.; Dasgupta, Aneesha; Mehla, Kamiya; Gunda, Venugopal; Vernucci, Enza; Souchek, Joshua; Goode, Gennifer; King, Ryan; Mishra, Anusha; Rai, Ibha; Nagarajan, Sangeetha; Chaika, Nina V.; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US. Cancer-associated cachexia is present in up to 80% of PDAC patients and is associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. In the present studies we evaluated an anti-cancer natural product silibinin for its effectiveness in targeting pancreatic cancer aggressiveness and the cachectic properties of pancreatic cancer cells and tumors. Our results demonstrate that silibinin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and reduces glycolytic activity of cancer cells. Our LC-MS/MS based metabolomics data demonstrates that silibinin treatment induces global metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells. Silibinin treatment diminishes c-MYC expression, a key regulator of cancer metabolism. Furthermore, we observed reduced STAT3 signaling in silibinin-treated cancer cells. Overexpression of constitutively active STAT3 was sufficient to substantially revert the silibinin-induced downregulation of c-MYC and the metabolic phenotype. Our in vivo investigations demonstrate that silibinin reduces tumor growth and proliferation in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and prevents the loss of body weight and muscle. It also improves physical activity including grip strength and latency to fall in tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, silibinin-induced metabolic reprogramming diminishes cell growth and cachectic properties of pancreatic cancer cells and animal models. PMID:26510913

  1. Action Spectrum for Growth Delay Induced in Escherichia coli B/r by Far-Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Takebe, Hiraku; Jagger, John

    1969-01-01

    An action spectrum for growth delay induced in Escherichia coli B/r by far-ultraviolet radiation (230 to 295 nm) was obtained. It resembles the action spectrum for killing obtained in the same experiments, indicating that the chromophore for growth delay is probably the same as the chromophore for killing. Another action spectrum for killing, obtained under conditions more suitable for chromophore identification, suggests that nucleic acid, either deoxyribonucleic acid or ribonucleic acid, is the chromophore for growth delay induced by far ultraviolet. Isoprenoid quinones, which seem to be important chromophores for growth delay induced by near-ultraviolet radiation (above 300 nm), appear to play a negligible role in growth delay induced by wavelengths below 300 nm. PMID:4891265

  2. Mechanical perturbation-induced ethylene releases apical dominance in Pharbitis nil by restricting shoot growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical perturbation (MP, rubbing) or internodes of Pharbitis nil shoots initiates release of lateral buds (LB) from apical dominance within 48 h. Evidence is presented which suggests that MP promotion of LB outgrowth is mediated by ethylene-induced restriction of main shoot growth. Ethylene production in the internodes is stimulated by MP within 2 h. Effects of MP are mimicked by treatments with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and are negated by the inhibitors of ethylene production or action, aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) and AgNO3. The fact that effects of MP, ACC, and ethylene inhibitors are observed to occur on main shoot growth at least 24 h before they are observed to occur on LB growth suggests a possible cause and effect relationship. MP also causes an increase in internode diameter. MP stimulation of ethylene production appears to be mediated by ACC synthase. The results of this study and our previous studies suggest that apical dominance may be released by any mechanism which induces ethylene restriction of main shoot growth.

  3. BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons requires p75(NTR) signaling.

    PubMed

    Courter, Lauren A; Shaffo, Frances C; Ghogha, Atefeh; Parrish, Diana J; Lorentz, Christina U; Habecker, Beth A; Lein, Pamela J

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic morphology is a critical determinant of neuronal connectivity, and in postganglionic sympathetic neurons, tonic activity correlates directly with the size of the dendritic arbor. Thus, identifying signaling mechanisms that regulate dendritic arborization of sympathetic neurons is important to understanding how functional neural circuitry is established and maintained in the sympathetic nervous system. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, downstream signaling events that link BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth are poorly characterized. We previously reported that BMP7 upregulates p75(NTR) mRNA in cultured sympathetic neurons. This receptor is implicated in controlling dendritic growth in central neurons but whether p75(NTR) regulates dendritic growth in peripheral neurons is not known. Here, we demonstrate that BMP7 increases p75(NTR) protein in cultured sympathetic neurons, and this effect is blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of signaling via BMP type I receptor. BMP7 does not trigger dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons dissociated from superior cervical ganglia (SCG) of p75(NTR) nullizygous mice, and overexpression of p75(NTR) in p75(NTR) -/- neurons is sufficient to cause dendritic growth even in the absence of BMP7. Morphometric analyses of SCG from wild-type versus p75(NTR) nullizygous mice at 3, 6, and 12 to 16 weeks of age indicated that genetic deletion of p75(NTR) does not prevent dendritic growth but does stunt dendritic maturation in sympathetic neurons. These data support the hypotheses that p75(NTR) is involved in downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that p75(NTR) signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in sympathetic neurons in vivo. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 1003-1013, 2016. PMID:26663679

  4. Hsp90 inhibitor celastrol reinstates growth plate angiogenesis in thiram-induced tibial dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Fazul; Shahzad, Muhammad; Liu, Jingying; Li, Kun; Han, Zhaoqing; Zhang, Ding; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Li, Jiakui

    2016-04-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is an important long bone defect of broiler chickens that disturbs the proximal growth plate and is characterized by non-vascularized cartilage, a distended growth plate and lameness. Celastrol, a medicinal root extract from the plant Tripterygium wilfordii, is reported widely as a well-known heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor. Recently, Hsp90 inhibition in chondrocyte differentiation and growth-plate vascularization were effective in restoring the morphology of the growth plate. The present study was aimed at investigating Hsp90 inhibition in TD using celastrol. The broiler chicks were divided into three groups; Control; TD induced (40 mg/kg thiram) and celastrol treatment. Hsp90, vascular endothelial growth factor and Flk-1 expressions were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and the protein levels of Hsp90 were measured by Western blot analysis. Antioxidant enzymes were determined to assess the liver damage caused by thiram and the protective effects of the medicine were evaluated by levels of serum biomarkers. The expression levels of Hsp90 and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA transcripts were increased while Flk-1 receptor was decreased in TD-affected chicks. Celastrol therapy inhibited Hsp90 mRNA and protein levels and up-regulated the expressions of receptor Flk-1 in TD-affected tibial growth plates significantly (P < 0.05) in addition to rectifying the damaging effects of thiram on the liver by decreasing the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and malondialdehyde and correcting the oxidative imbalance. In conclusion, administering celastrol to dyschondroplastic chicks prevented un-vascularized growth plate, lameness and reinstated angiogenesis. Celastrol may be efficacious for the treatment of TD through the inhibition of Hsp90 expression and limiting the liver damage caused by thiram in broiler chickens. PMID:26760966

  5. ENDOGLIN is dispensable for vasculogenesis, but required for vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Lebrin, Franck; Maring, Janita A; van den Driesche, Sander; van der Brink, Stieneke; van Dinther, Maarten; Thorikay, Midory; Martin, Sabrina; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Hawinkels, Lukas J A C; van Meeteren, Laurens A; Pardali, Evangelia; Korving, Jeroen; Letarte, Michelle; Arthur, Helen M; Theuer, Charles; Goumans, Marie-José; Mummery, Christine; ten Dijke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ENDOGLIN (ENG) is a co-receptor for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members that is highly expressed in endothelial cells and has a critical function in the development of the vascular system. Mutations in Eng are associated with the vascular disease known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type l. Using mouse embryonic stem cells we observed that angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), induce vasculogenesis in embryoid bodies even when Eng deficient cells or cells depleted of Eng using shRNA are used. However, ENG is required for the stem cell-derived endothelial cells to organize effectively into tubular structures. Consistent with this finding, fetal metatarsals isolated from E17.5 Eng heterozygous mouse embryos showed reduced VEGF-induced vascular network formation. Moreover, shRNA-mediated depletion and pharmacological inhibition of ENG in human umbilical vein cells mitigated VEGF-induced angiogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that ENG is required for efficient VEGF-induced angiogenesis. PMID:24489709

  6. ENDOGLIN Is Dispensable for Vasculogenesis, but Required for Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    van der Brink, Stieneke; van Dinther, Maarten; Thorikay, Midory; Martin, Sabrina; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Hawinkels, Lukas J. A. C.; van Meeteren, Laurens A.; Pardali, Evangelia; Korving, Jeroen; Letarte, Michelle; Arthur, Helen M.; Theuer, Charles; Goumans, Marie-José; Mummery, Christine; ten Dijke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ENDOGLIN (ENG) is a co-receptor for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members that is highly expressed in endothelial cells and has a critical function in the development of the vascular system. Mutations in Eng are associated with the vascular disease known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type l. Using mouse embryonic stem cells we observed that angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), induce vasculogenesis in embryoid bodies even when Eng deficient cells or cells depleted of Eng using shRNA are used. However, ENG is required for the stem cell-derived endothelial cells to organize effectively into tubular structures. Consistent with this finding, fetal metatarsals isolated from E17.5 Eng heterozygous mouse embryos showed reduced VEGF-induced vascular network formation. Moreover, shRNA-mediated depletion and pharmacological inhibition of ENG in human umbilical vein cells mitigated VEGF-induced angiogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that ENG is required for efficient VEGF-induced angiogenesis. PMID:24489709

  7. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Takasawa, Wataru; Ohnuma, Kei; Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  8. A three-dimensional phase diagram of growth-induced surface instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-03-01

    A variety of fascinating morphological patterns arise on surfaces of growing, developing or aging tissues, organs and microorganism colonies. These patterns can be classified into creases, wrinkles, folds, period-doubles, ridges and delaminated-buckles according to their distinctive topographical characteristics. One universal mechanism for the pattern formation has been long believed to be the mismatch strains between biological layers with different expanding or shrinking rates, which induce mechanical instabilities. However, a general model that accounts for the formation and evolution of these various surface-instability patterns still does not exist. Here, we take biological structures at their current states as thermodynamic systems, treat each instability pattern as a thermodynamic phase, and construct a unified phase diagram that can quantitatively predict various types of growth-induced surface instabilities. We further validate the phase diagram with our experiments on surface instabilities induced by mismatch strains as well as the reported data on growth-induced instabilities in various biological systems. The predicted wavelengths and amplitudes of various instability patterns match well with our experimental data. It is expected that the unified phase diagram will not only advance the understanding of biological morphogenesis, but also significantly facilitate the design of new materials and structures by rationally harnessing surface instabilities.

  9. A three-dimensional phase diagram of growth-induced surface instabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiming; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-01-01

    A variety of fascinating morphological patterns arise on surfaces of growing, developing or aging tissues, organs and microorganism colonies. These patterns can be classified into creases, wrinkles, folds, period-doubles, ridges and delaminated-buckles according to their distinctive topographical characteristics. One universal mechanism for the pattern formation has been long believed to be the mismatch strains between biological layers with different expanding or shrinking rates, which induce mechanical instabilities. However, a general model that accounts for the formation and evolution of these various surface-instability patterns still does not exist. Here, we take biological structures at their current states as thermodynamic systems, treat each instability pattern as a thermodynamic phase, and construct a unified phase diagram that can quantitatively predict various types of growth-induced surface instabilities. We further validate the phase diagram with our experiments on surface instabilities induced by mismatch strains as well as the reported data on growth-induced instabilities in various biological systems. The predicted wavelengths and amplitudes of various instability patterns match well with our experimental data. It is expected that the unified phase diagram will not only advance the understanding of biological morphogenesis, but also significantly facilitate the design of new materials and structures by rationally harnessing surface instabilities. PMID:25748825

  10. Hypoxia-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Precedes Neovascularization after Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Hugo J. H.; Bernaudin, Myriam; Bellail, Anita; Schoch, Heike; Euler, Monika; Petit, Edwige; Risau, Werner

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hypoxia induces angiogenesis and thereby may counteract the detrimental neurological effects associated with stroke. Forty-eight to seventy-two hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion we found a strong increase in the number of newly formed vessels at the border of the infarction. Using the hypoxia marker nitroimidazole EF5, we detected hypoxic cells in the ischemic border of the neocortex. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is the main regulator of angiogenesis and is inducible by hypoxia, was strongly up-regulated in the ischemic border, at times between 6 and 24 hours after occlusion. In addition, both VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) were up-regulated at the border after 48 hours and later in the ischemic core. Finally, the two transcription factors, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and HIF-2, known to be involved in the regulation of VEGF and VEGFR gene expression, were increased in the ischemic border after 72 hours, suggesting a regulatory function for these factors. These results strongly suggest that the VEGF/VEGFR system, induced by hypoxia, leads to the growth of new vessels after cerebral ischemia. Exogenous support of this natural protective mechanism might lead to enhanced survival after stroke. PMID:10702412

  11. Activation of Nod1 Signaling Induces Fetal Growth Restriction and Death through Fetal and Maternal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Hisanori; Takada, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Yasunari; Nanishi, Etsuro; Ochiai, Masayuki; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Chen, Si Jing; Matsui, Toshiro; Hara, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR) and death (IUFD) are both serious problems in the perinatal medicine. Fetal vasculopathy is currently considered to account for a pathogenic mechanism of IUGR and IUFD. We previously demonstrated that an innate immune receptor, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-1 (Nod1), contributed to the development of vascular inflammations in mice at postnatal stages. However, little is known about the deleterious effects of activated Nod1 signaling on embryonic growth and development. We report that administration of FK565, one of the Nod1 ligands, to pregnant C57BL/6 mice induced IUGR and IUFD. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that maternally injected FK565 was distributed to the fetal tissues across placenta. In addition, maternal injection of FK565 induced robust increases in the amounts of CCL2, IL-6, and TNF proteins as well as NO in maternal, placental and fetal tissues. Nod1 was highly expressed in fetal vascular tissues, where significantly higher levels of CCL2 and IL-6 mRNAs were induced with maternal injection of FK565 than those in other tissues. Using Nod1-knockout mice, we verified that both maternal and fetal tissues were involved in the development of IUGR and IUFD. Furthermore, FK565 induced upregulation of genes associated with immune response, inflammation, and apoptosis in fetal vascular tissues. Our data thus provided new evidence for the pathogenic role of Nod1 in the development of IUGR and IUFD at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26880761

  12. BMP2-Induced Inflammation Can Be Suppressed by the Osteoinductive Growth Factor NELL-1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W.; Zara, Janette N.; Asatrian, Greg; Khadarian, Kevork; Zhang, James B.; Ho, Stephanie; Kim, Hyun Ju

    2013-01-01

    Bone-morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is currently the only Food and Drug Administration-approved osteoinductive growth factor used in clinical settings for bone regeneration and repair. However, the use of BMP2 is encumbered by numerous clinical complications, including postoperative inflammation and life-threatening cervical swelling. Thus, methods to prevent BMP2-induced inflammation would have far-reaching clinical implications toward improving current BMP2-based methods for bone regeneration. For the first time, we investigate the potential role of the growth factor Nel-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) in inhibiting BMP2-induced inflammation. Adult rats underwent a femoral bone onlay procedure, treated with either BMP2 protein (4 mg/mL), NELL-1 protein (4 mg/mL), or both proteins combined. Animals were evaluated at 3, 7, and 14 days postoperatively by histology, histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR for markers of inflammation (TNFα, IL6). The relative levels of TNFα and IL6 in serum were also detected by ELISA. The mechanism for NELL-1's anti-inflammatory effect was further assessed through examining inflammatory markers and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH3T3 cells. BMP2 significantly induced local inflammation, including an early and pronounced polymorphonuclear cell infiltration accompanied by increased expression of TNFα and IL6. Treatment with NELL-1 alone elicited no significant inflammatory response. However, NELL-1 significantly attenuated BMP2-induced inflammation by all markers and at all timepoints. These local findings were also confirmed using systemic serum inflammatory biomarkers (TNFα, IL6). In each case, NELL-1 fully reversed BMP2-induced systemic inflammation. Lastly, our findings were recapitulated in vitro, where NELL-1 suppressed BMP2 induced expression of inflammatory markers, as well as NF-κB transcriptional activity and generation of ROS. BMP2-induced inflammation is a

  13. Paclitaxel induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression through reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Sun; Oh, Jin Mi; Jin, Dong Hoon; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2008-01-01

    The antineoplastic drug paclitaxel is known to block cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle through stabilization of microtubules. The development of paclitaxel resistance in tumors is one of the most significant obstacles to successful therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) are important regulators of neovascularization. HIF-1 regulates VEGF expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we investigated whether paclitaxel treatment affects VEGF expression for the development of paclitaxel resistance. Paclitaxel treatment induced dose-dependent cell death and increased VEGF expression. Paclitaxel also induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and stabilized HIF-1alpha, which stimulated luciferase activity of HIF-1alpha response element on VEGF gene. As paclitaxel treatment produced reactive oxygen species (ROS), VEGF expression was increased by H2O2 treatment and reduced by various ROS scavengers such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and diphenylene iodonium. Paclitaxel-induced cell death was aggravated by incubation with those ROS scavengers. Collectively, this suggests that paclitaxel-induced VEGF expression could be mediated by paclitaxel-induced ROS production through nuclear factor-kappaB activation and HIF-1alpha stabilization, which could affect resistance induction to antitumor therapeutics during cancer treatment. PMID:18322419

  14. Knockdown of stromal interaction molecule 1 attenuates hepatocyte growth factor-induced endothelial progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yankun; Song, Mingbao; Guo, Ruiwei; Wang, Hong; Gao, Pan; Shi, Weibin; Huang, Lan

    2010-03-01

    Increased Ca(2+) entry through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCCs) plays an essential role in the regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced cell proliferation. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is thought to transmit endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) store depletion signals to the plasma membrane (PM), causing the opening of SOCCs in the PM. However, the relationship between HGF and STIM1 in endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) proliferation remains uncharacterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential involvement of STIM1 in HGF-induced EPC proliferation. For this purpose, we used cultured rat bone marrow-derived EPCs and found that HGF-induced EPC proliferation at low concentrations. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) was elevated in HGF-treated EPCs, and the SOCC inhibitors 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and BTP-2 inhibited the HGF-induced proliferation response. Moreover, STIM1 mRNA and protein expression levels were increased in response to HGF stimulation and knockdown of STMI1 decreased SOCE and prevented HGF-induced EPC proliferation. In conclusion, our data suggest that HGF-induced EPC proliferation is mediated partly via activation of STIM1. PMID:20404049

  15. Role for the epidermal growth factor receptor in chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bichsel, Kyle J; Gogia, Navdeep; Malouff, Timothy; Pena, Zachary; Forney, Eric; Hammiller, Brianna; Watson, Patrice; Hansen, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients with chemotherapeutics like cyclophosphamide often causes alopecia as a result of premature and aberrant catagen. Because the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signals anagen hair follicles to enter catagen, we hypothesized that EGFR signaling may be involved in cyclophosphamide-induced alopecia. To test this hypothesis, skin-targeted Egfr mutant mice were generated by crossing floxed Egfr and Keratin 14 promoter-driven Cre recombinase mice. Cyclophosphamide treatment of control mice resulted in alopecia while Egfr mutant skin was resistant to cyclophosphamide-induced alopecia. Egfr mutant skin entered catagen normally, as indicated by dermal papilla condensation and decreased follicular proliferation, but did not progress to telogen as did Egfr wild type follicles. Egfr mutant follicles responded with less proliferation, apoptosis, and fewer p53-positive cells after cyclophosphamide. Treatment of control mice with the EGFR inhibitors erlotinib or gefitinib similarly suppressed alopecia and catagen progression by cyclophosphamide. Secondary analysis of clinical trials utilizing EGFR-targeted therapies and alopecia-inducing chemotherapy also revealed evidence for involvement of EGFR in chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Taken together, our results demonstrated the involvement of EGFR signaling in chemotherapy-induced alopecia, which will help in the design of novel therapeutic regimens to minimize chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:23894460

  16. NOS Inhibition Modulates Immune Polarization and Improves Radiation-Induced Tumor Growth Delay.

    PubMed

    Ridnour, Lisa A; Cheng, Robert Y S; Weiss, Jonathan M; Kaur, Sukhbir; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Basudhar, Debashree; Heinecke, Julie L; Stewart, C Andrew; DeGraff, William; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Kesarwala, Aparna H; Roberts, David D; Young, Howard A; Mitchell, James B; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Wiltrout, Robert H; Wink, David A

    2015-07-15

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are important mediators of progrowth signaling in tumor cells, as they regulate angiogenesis, immune response, and immune-mediated wound healing. Ionizing radiation (IR) is also an immune modulator and inducer of wound response. We hypothesized that radiation therapeutic efficacy could be improved by targeting NOS following tumor irradiation. Herein, we show enhanced radiation-induced (10 Gy) tumor growth delay in a syngeneic model (C3H) but not immunosuppressed (Nu/Nu) squamous cell carcinoma tumor-bearing mice treated post-IR with the constitutive NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). These results suggest a requirement of T cells for improved radiation tumor response. In support of this observation, tumor irradiation induced a rapid increase in the immunosuppressive Th2 cytokine IL10, which was abated by post-IR administration of L-NAME. In vivo suppression of IL10 using an antisense IL10 morpholino also extended the tumor growth delay induced by radiation in a manner similar to L-NAME. Further examination of this mechanism in cultured Jurkat T cells revealed L-NAME suppression of IR-induced IL10 expression, which reaccumulated in the presence of exogenous NO donor. In addition to L-NAME, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitors ODQ and thrombospondin-1 also abated IR-induced IL10 expression in Jurkat T cells and ANA-1 macrophages, which further suggests that the immunosuppressive effects involve eNOS. Moreover, cytotoxic Th1 cytokines, including IL2, IL12p40, and IFNγ, as well as activated CD8(+) T cells were elevated in tumors receiving post-IR L-NAME. Together, these results suggest that post-IR NOS inhibition improves radiation tumor response via Th1 immune polarization within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25990221

  17. MAP kinase mediates epidermal growth factor- and phorbol ester-induced prostacyclin formation in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Braconi Quintaje, S; Rebsamen, M; Church, D J; Vallotton, M B; Lang, U

    1998-05-01

    We studied the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced prostacyclin (PGI2) production in cultured, spontaneously-beating neonatal ventricular rat cardiomyocytes. To this purpose, the effect of EGF on cardiomyocyte MAPK phosphorylation, MAPK activity and PGI2-production were investigated, and compared to those induced by the PKC activator 4 beta phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both EGF (0.1 microM) and PMA (0.1 microM) induced the rapid and reversible phosphorylation of 42 KDa-MAPK in ventricular cardiomyocytes, responses that were accompanied by transient increases in MAPK activity (190-230% of control values within 5 min), and two- to three-fold increases in PGI2 formation. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors lavendustin (1 microM) and genistein (10 microM) strongly inhibited EGF-induced MAPK activation and PGI2-formation, but had no effect on PMA-stimulated responses. Experiments with the PKC inhibitor CGP 41251 (1 microM) or with PKC-downregulated cells demonstrated that in contrast to the PMA-stimulated responses, EGF-induced MAPK activation and PGI2-production were PKC-independent processes. Investigating the role of MAPK in EGF- and in PMA-promoted PGI2-formation, we found that the MAPK-inhibitor 6-thioguanine (500 microM), as well as the MAPK-kinase-inhibitor PD98059 (50 microM) abolished both EGF- and PMA-stimulated PGI2-production in cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate that MAPK-activation is at the basis of both growth factor receptor and PKC-dependent eicosanoid-formation in ventricular cardiomyocytes, where EGF-induced prostaglandin-production takes place via a PKC-independent pathway. PMID:9618234

  18. Large plasma-membrane depolarization precedes rapid blue-light-induced growth inhibition in cucumber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Blue-light (BL)-induced suppression of elongation of etiolated Cucumis sativus L. hypocotyls began after a 30-s lag time, which was halved by increasing the fluence rate from 10 to 100 micromoles m-2 s-1. Prior to the growth suppression, the plasma-membrane of the irradiated cells depolarized by as much as 100 mV, then returned within 2-3 min to near its initial value. The potential difference measured with surface electrodes changed with an identical time course but opposite polarity. The lag time for the change in surface potential showed an inverse dependence on fluence rate, similar to the lag for the growth inhibition. Green light and red light caused neither the electrical response nor the rapid inhibition of growth. The depolarization by BL did not propagate to nonirradiated regions and exhibited a refractory period of about 10 min following a BL pulse. Fluence-response relationships for the electrical and growth responses provide correlational evidence that the plasma-membrane depolarization reflects an event in the transduction chain of this light-growth response.

  19. Laser induced chemical vapor phase epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shirley S.; Chu, Ting L.

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the homo- and hetero-epitaxial growth of device quality III-V semiconductor films by the free electron laser (FEL) induced growth at lower temperatures. An ArF excimer laser was used in this investigation. Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) is the commonly used technique in the growth of III-V compounds and alloys. The major concern to the use of MOVPE is the hazard involved in using highly toxic arsine and phosphine gases as the group V source materials. Efforts during this period have been focused to the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs and heteroepitaxial growth of InP on GaAs using alternate sources to eliminate the use of arsine and phosphine. Good quality epitaxial GaAs films have been prepared from elemental arsenic for the first time by either conventional substrate heating or laser enhanced processes. The epitaxial GaAs films grown from elemental arsenic are suitable for many GaAs based devices, particularly for large area devices such as solar cells. Significant cost reduction and less stringent safety requirements are major advantages.

  20. Growth factor induced proliferation, migration, and lumen formation of rat endometrial epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Rashedul; Yamagami, Kazuki; Yoshii, Yuka; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko

    2016-06-17

    Endometrial modulation is essential for the preservation of normal uterine physiology, and this modulation is driven by a number of growth factors. The present study investigated the mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on rat endometrial epithelial (REE) cells. The REE cells were isolated and cultured and then characterized based on their morphology and their expression of epithelial cell markers. The MTT assay revealed that EGF and HGF induce proliferation of REE cells. Consistent with increased proliferation, we found that the cell cycle regulatory factor Cyclin D1 was also upregulated upon EGF and HGF addition. REE cell migration was prompted by EGF, as observed with the Oris Cell Migration Assay. The morphogenic impact of growth factors on REE cells was studied in a three-dimensional BD Matrigel cell culture system, wherein these growth factors also increased the frequency of lumen formation. In summary, we show that EGF and HGF have a stimulatory effect on REE cells, promoting proliferation, cell migration, and lumen formation. Our findings provide important insights that further the understanding of endometrial regeneration and its regulation. PMID:26946922

  1. Malathion exposure induces the endocrine disruption and growth retardation in the catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linn.).

    PubMed

    Lal, Bechan; Sarang, Mukesh Kumar; Kumar, Pankaj

    2013-01-15

    Many hormones are known for their role in the regulation of metabolic activities and somatic growth in fishes. The present study deals with the effects of malathion (an organophosphorous pesticide) on the levels of metabolic hormones that are responsible for promotion of somatic and ovarian growth of the freshwater catfish, Clarias batrachus. Malathion treatment for thirty days drastically reduced the food intake and body weight of fish. These fish also exhibited a great avoidance to food. Exposure of catfish to malathion reduced the levels of thyroxine (T(4)), triiodothyronine (T(3)), growth hormone (GH), insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I), testosterone (T) and estradiol-17β (E(2)) in a dose dependent manner during all the studied reproductive phases, in general, except that malathion increased the level of GH during the quiescence phase. Significant reduction in muscle and hepatic protein content also occurred in the malathion-treated fish. Malathion exposure induced lipolysis too in the liver and muscle. The results thus support that malathion treatment disrupts the endocrine functions and the olfactory sensation responsible for food intake and gustatory feeding behavior, which ultimately leads to retardation of fish growth. PMID:23174696

  2. Mechanism of growth delay induced in Escherichia coli by near ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Ramabhadran, T V; Jagger, J

    1976-01-01

    Continuously growing cultures of E. coli B/r were irradiated with a fluence of broad-band near-ultraviolet radiation (315-405 nm) sufficient to cause extensive growth delay and complete cessation of net RNA synthesis. Chloramphenicol treatment was found to stimulate resumption of RNA synthesis, similar to that observed with chloramphenicol treatment after amino-acid starvation. E. coli strains in which amino-acid starvation does not result in cessation of RNA synthesis ("relaxed" or rel- strains) show no cessation of growth and only a slight effect on the rate of growth or of RNA synthesis. These findings show that such near-UV fluences do not inactivate the RNA synthetic machinery but affect the regulation of RNA synthesis, in a manner similat to that produced by amino-acid starvation. Such regulation is believed to be mediated through alterations in concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), and our estimations of ppGpp after near-UV irradiation are consistent with such an interpretation. These data, combined with earlier published data, strongly suggest that the mechanism of near-UV-induced growth delay in E. coli involves partial inactivation of certain tRNA species, which is interpreted by the cell in a manner similar to that of amino-acid starvation, causing a rise in ppGpp levels, a shut-off of net RNA synthesis, and the induction of a growth delay. Images PMID:1108019

  3. Growth factor induced proliferation, migration, and lumen formation of rat endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ISLAM, Md. Rashedul; YAMAGAMI, Kazuki; YOSHII, Yuka; YAMAUCHI, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial modulation is essential for the preservation of normal uterine physiology, and this modulation is driven by a number of growth factors. The present study investigated the mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on rat endometrial epithelial (REE) cells. The REE cells were isolated and cultured and then characterized based on their morphology and their expression of epithelial cell markers. The MTT assay revealed that EGF and HGF induce proliferation of REE cells. Consistent with increased proliferation, we found that the cell cycle regulatory factor Cyclin D1 was also upregulated upon EGF and HGF addition. REE cell migration was prompted by EGF, as observed with the Oris Cell Migration Assay. The morphogenic impact of growth factors on REE cells was studied in a three-dimensional BD Matrigel cell culture system, wherein these growth factors also increased the frequency of lumen formation. In summary, we show that EGF and HGF have a stimulatory effect on REE cells, promoting proliferation, cell migration, and lumen formation. Our findings provide important insights that further the understanding of endometrial regeneration and its regulation. PMID:26946922

  4. RARalpha is a regulatory factor for Am-80-induced cell growth inhibition of hematologic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Jimi, Shiro; Mashima, Kota; Matsumoto, Taichi; Hara, Shuji; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2007-08-01

    Retinoids are used for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Am-80, Tamibarotene, binds to retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) more specifically than all-trans retinoic acid. We studied the tumor cell suppressive effects of Am-80, with respect to cytotoxicity and growth inhibition using eight myeloid and lymphoid malignant cells in culture (HL-60, HL-60R, K-562, Kasumi-1, MEG01, Raji, U266B1, and U937). The effects of Am-80 were examined during 9 days of incubation with 10(-7)-10(-5) M of Am-80 in culture medium, which was changed every 3 days. HL-60 were the only cells sensitive to Am-80-induced cytotoxicity; the latter reached more than 95% after 9 days of incubation, and death was primarily through apoptosis. The total mass of RARalpha in HL-60 was significantly greater (p<0.006) than in ATRA-resistant HL-60 (HL-60R) as well as all of other cells tested. However, in all cells excluding HL-60, Am-80 induced time- and dose-dependent cell growth inhibition without noticeable cytotoxicity. TGF-beta2 was released into the media containing cells incubated with Am-80 for 3 days. A dose-dependent increment of phosphorylation of Smad-2 was also detected. The relative amount of secreted TGF-beta2 correlated with the growth inhibition rates in all cells tested excluding HL-60, and with the total mass of RARalpha in the cells (p=0.0137). Our results indicate that Am-80-induced cell-type non-specific growth inhibition is mediated by TGF-beta2, where the total mass of RARalpha could be an important regulatory factor in hematologic malignant cells. PMID:17611697

  5. Topical Application of Oleuropein Induces Anagen Hair Growth in Telogen Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tao; Kim, Nahyun; Park, Taesun

    2015-01-01

    We observed that oleuropein, the main constituent of the leaves and unprocessed olive drupes of Olea europaea, protected mice from high-fat diet-induced adiposity by up-regulation of genes involved in Wnt10b-mediated signaling in adipose tissue. The activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway is also well established to positively regulate the anagen phase of hair growth cycle in mice skin. Methodology and Principal Findings Oleuropein promoted cultured human follicle dermal papilla cell proliferation and induced LEF1 and Cyc-D1 mRNA expression and β-catenin protein expression in dermal papilla cells. Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in dermal papilla cells was observed after oleuropein treatment. Topical application of oleuropein (0.4 mg/mouse/day) to C57BL/6N mice accelerated the hair-growth induction and increased the size of hair follicles in telogenic mouse skin. The oleuropein-treated mouse skin showed substantial upregulation of Wnt10b, FZDR1, LRP5, LEF1, Cyc-D1, IGF-1, KGF, HGF, and VEGF mRNA expression and β-catenin protein expression. Conclusions and Significance These results demonstrate that topical oleuroepin administration induced anagenic hair growth in telogenic C57BL/6N mouse skin. The hair-growth promoting effect of oleuropein in mice appeared to be associated with the stimulation of the Wnt10b/β-catenin signaling pathway and the upregulation of IGF-1, KGF, HGF, and VEGF gene expression in mouse skin tissue. PMID:26060936

  6. Restoration of XAF1 expression induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shui Ping; Liston, Peter; Cui, Jian Tao; Lin, Marie C M; Jiang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Yi; Gu, Qing; Jiang, Shi Hu; Lum, Ching Tung; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Korneluk, Robert G; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu

    2009-08-01

    XAF1 (XIAP-associated factor 1) is a novel XIAP binding protein that can antagonize XIAP and sensitize cells to other cell death triggers. Our previous results have shown that aberrant hypermethylation of the CpG sites in XAF1 promoter is strongly associated with lower expression of XAF1 in gastric cancers. In our study, we investigated the effect of restoration of XAF1 expression on growth of gastric cancers. We found that the restoration of XAF1 expression suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth and increased sensitivity to TRAIL and drug-induced apoptosis. Stable cell clones expressing XAF1 exhibited delayed tumor initiation in nude mice. Restoration of XAF1 expression mediated by adenovirus vector greatly increased apoptosis in gastric cancer cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner and sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL and drugs-induced apoptosis. Adeno-XAF1 transduction induced cell cycle G2/M arrest and upregulated the expression of p21 and downregulated the expression of cyclin B1 and cdc2. Notably, adeno-XAF1 treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth, strongly enhanced the antitumor activity of TRAIL in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo, and significantly prolonged the survival time of animals bearing tumor xenografts. Complete eradication of established tumors was achieved on combined treatment with adeno-XAF1 and TRAIL. Our results document that the restoration of XAF1 inhibits gastric tumorigenesis and tumor growth and that XAF1 is a promising candidate for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19358264

  7. Bone quality is affected by food restriction and by nutrition-induced catch-up growth.

    PubMed

    Pando, Rakefet; Masarwi, Majdi; Shtaif, Biana; Idelevich, Anna; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Shahar, Ron; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2014-12-01

    Growth stunting constitutes the most common effect of malnutrition. When the primary cause of malnutrition is resolved, catch-up (CU) growth usually occurs. In this study, we have explored the effect of food restriction (RES) and refeeding on bone structure and mechanical properties. Sprague-Dawley male rats aged 24 days were subjected to 10 days of 40% RES, followed by refeeding for 1 (CU) or 26 days long-term CU (LTCU). The rats fed ad libitum served as controls. The growth plates were measured, osteoclasts were identified using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, and micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and mechanical testing were used to study structure and mechanical properties. Micro-CT analysis showed that RES led to a significant reduction in trabecular BV/TV and trabecular number (Tb.N), concomitant with an increase in trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). Trabecular BV/TV and Tb.N were significantly greater in the CU group than in the RES in both short- and long-term experiments. Mechanical testing showed that RES led to weaker and less compliant bones; interestingly, bones of the CU group were also more fragile after 1 day of CU. Longer term of refeeding enabled correction of the bone parameters; however, LTCU did not achieve full recovery. These results suggest that RES in young rats attenuated growth and reduced trabecular bone parameters. While nutrition-induced CU growth led to an immediate increase in epiphyseal growth plate height and active bone modeling, it was also associated with a transient reduction in bone quality. This should be taken into consideration when treating children undergoing CU growth. PMID:25248555

  8. Ado-Trastuzumab Emtansine Targets Hepatocytes Via Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 to Induce Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoheng; Endo, Yukinori; Shen, Yi; Rotstein, David; Dokmanovic, Milos; Mohan, Nishant; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Gao, Bin; Pacher, Pal; Wu, Wen Jin

    2016-03-01

    Ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) approved for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. It consists of trastuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against HER2, and a microtubule inhibitor, DM1, conjugated to trastuzumab via a thioether linker. Hepatotoxicity is one of the serious adverse events associated with T-DM1 therapy. Mechanisms underlying T-DM1-induced hepatotoxicity remain elusive. Here, we use hepatocytes and mouse models to investigate the mechanisms of T-DM1-induced hepatotoxicity. We show that T-DM1 is internalized upon binding to cell surface HER2 and is colocalized with LAMP1, resulting in DM1-associated cytotoxicity, including disorganized microtubules, nuclear fragmentation/multiple nuclei, and cell growth inhibition. We further demonstrate that T-DM1 treatment significantly increases the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase in mice and induces inflammation and necrosis in liver tissues, and that T-DM1-induced hepatotoxicity is dose dependent. Moreover, the gene expression of TNFα in liver tissues is significantly increased in mice treated with T-DM1 as compared with those treated with trastuzumab or vehicle. We propose that T-DM1-induced upregulation of TNFα enhances the liver injury that may be initially caused by DM1-mediated intracellular damage. Our proposal is underscored by the fact that T-DM1 induces the outer mitochondrial membrane rupture, a typical morphologic change in the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis, and mitochondrial membrane potential dysfunction. Our work provides mechanistic insights into T-DM1-induced hepatotoxicity, which may yield novel strategies to manage liver injury induced by T-DM1 or other ADCs. PMID:26712117

  9. Tryptanthrin induces growth inhibition and neuronal differentiation in the human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xuemei; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2013-04-25

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common extracranial solid cancers found in young children. The prognosis of neuroblastoma patients in advanced stages having N-myc amplification remains poor despite intensive multimodal therapy. Agents that trigger neuroblastoma cells to undergo cellular differentiation and thereby stop proliferation have attracted considerable interest as an alternative therapy. Tryptanthrin (12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants known as Banlangen. It has been shown to possess various biological activities, such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. However, its effects and mechanism(s) of action on human neuroblastoma cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effects of tryptanthrin on the growth and differentiation of human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells with N-myc amplification. Our results show that tryptanthrin inhibited the growth of the human neuroblastoma cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Mechanistic studies indicated that tryptanthrin induced cell cycle arrest of the human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells at the G0/G1 phase. Tryptanthrin also induced neuronal differentiation of LA-N-1 cells, as assessed by morphological criteria, enhancement of acetylcholine esterase activity and up-regulation of various differentiation markers. Moreover, tryptanthrin treatment led to the significant reduction of N-myc expression in LA-N-1 cells while siRNA directed against N-myc induced morphological differentiation of LA-N-1 cells. These results, when taken together, suggest that tryptanthrin suppressed the growth and induced neuronal differentiation in the human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells and might be exploited as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastomas with N-myc-amplification. PMID:23500671

  10. Reduced susceptibility of mice overexpressing transforming growth factor α to dextran sodium sulphate induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Egger, B; Carey, H; Procaccino, F; Chai, N; Sandgren, E; Lakshmanan, J; Buslon, V; French, S; Buchler, M; Eysselein, V

    1998-01-01

    Background—Transforming growth factor α (TGF-α) knockout mice have increased susceptibility to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) induced colitis. 
Aim—To substantiate the findings that TGF-α is a key mediator of colonic mucosal protection and/or repair mechanisms by evaluating the susceptibility of mice overexpressing TGF-α to DSS induced colitis. 
Methods—TGF-α overexpression was induced in transgenic mice by ZnSO4 administration in drinking water (TG+). Three groups were used as controls: one transgenic group without ZnSO4 administration (TG−), and two non-transgenic littermate groups receiving ZnSO4 (Non-TG+) or only water (Non-TG−). Acute colitis was induced in all groups by administration of DSS (5%, w/v) in drinking water for six days ad libitum. 
Results—About 35-39% of the entire colonic mucosa was destroyed in Non-TG−, Non-TG+, and TG− animals compared with 9% in TG+ mice. The crypt damage score was 18.7 (0.9), 18.2 (1.0), 18.9(0.8), and 6.8 (1.5) (means (SEM)) in Non-TG−, Non-TG+, TG−, and TG+ mice respectively. Mucin and bromodeoxyuridine staining were markedly enhanced in colons of TG+ mice compared with controls, indicating increased mucosal protection and regeneration. 
Conclusions—The significantly reduced susceptibility of mice overexpressing TGF-α to DSS further substantiates that endogenous TGF-α is a pivotal mediator of protection and/or healing mechanisms in the colon. 

 Keywords: transforming growth factor α; epidermal growth factor; dextran sodium sulphate; colitis; inflammatory bowel disease; transgenic mice PMID:9771407

  11. Suppression of tumor growth by designed dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine targeting hypoxia-inducible transcription factor complex.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Ramin; Levin, Michael D; Szabo, Lajos Z; Laszlo, Csaba F; Kushal, Swati; Singh, Jason B; Oh, Philip; Schnitzer, Jan E; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z

    2013-03-20

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors, is associated with local invasion, metastatic spread, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and is an independent, negative prognostic factor for a diverse range of malignant neoplasms. The cellular response to hypoxia is primarily mediated by a family of transcription factors, among which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) plays a major role. Under normoxia, the oxygen-sensitive α subunit of HIF1 is rapidly and constitutively degraded but is stabilized and accumulates under hypoxia. Upon nuclear translocation, HIF1 controls the expression of over 100 genes involved in angiogenesis, altered energy metabolism, antiapoptotic, and pro-proliferative mechanisms that promote tumor growth. A designed transcriptional antagonist, dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine (ETP 2), selectively disrupts the interaction of HIF1α with p300/CBP coactivators and downregulates the expression of hypoxia-inducible genes. ETP 2 was synthesized via a novel homo-oxidative coupling of the aliphatic primary carbons of the dithioacetal precursor. It effectively inhibits HIF1-induced activation of VEGFA, LOX, Glut1, and c-Met genes in a panel of cell lines representing breast and lung cancers. We observed an outstanding antitumor efficacy of both (±)-ETP 2 and meso-ETP 2 in a fully established breast carcinoma model by intravital microscopy. Treatment with either form of ETP 2 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a rapid regression of tumor growth that lasted for up to 14 days. These results suggest that inhibition of HIF1 transcriptional activity by designed dimeric ETPs could offer an innovative approach to cancer therapy with the potential to overcome hypoxia-induced tumor growth and resistance. PMID:23448368

  12. Laminin-511, inducer of hair growth, is down-regulated and its suppressor in hair growth, laminin-332 up-regulated in chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Hisayoshi; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Tateishi, Chiharu; Sugawara, Koji; Paus, Ralf; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Ishii, Masamitsu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kunimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Koichi; Jones, Jonathan C.R.; Kobayashi, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) has a devastating cosmetic effect, especially in the young. Recent data indicate that two major basement membrane components (laminin-332 and -511) of the skin have opposing effects on hair growth. Objective In this study, we examined the role and localization of laminin-332 and -511 in CIA. Methods We examined the expression of laminin-332 and -511 during the dystrophic catagen form of CIA induced in C57BL/6 mice by cyclophosphamide (CYP) treatment. Results Our data indicate that both laminin-332 and its receptor α6β4 integrin are up-regulated (both quantitatively and spatially) after mid to late dystrophic catagen around the outer root sheath (ORS) in the lower third of hair follicles in CIA. This up-regulation also occurs at the transcriptional level. In contrast, laminin-511 is down-regulated after mid dystrophic catagen at the protein level, with transcriptional inactivation of laminin-511 occurring transiently at the early dystrophic catagen stage in both epidermal and ORS keratinocytes. Laminin-511 expression correlates with expression of α3 integrin in CIA and we also demonstrate that laminin-511 can up-regulate the activity of the α3 integrin promoter in cultured keratinocytes. Injection of a laminin-511 rich protein extract, but not recombinant laminin-332, in the back skin of mice delays hair loss in CYP-induced CIA. Conclusions We propose that abrupt hair loss in CIA is, at least in part, caused by down-regulation of laminin-511 and up-regulation of laminin-332 at the transcriptional and translational levels. PMID:20211547

  13. Netrin-1 induces local translation of down syndrome cell adhesion molecule in axonal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shruti; Welshhans, Kristy

    2016-07-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) plays an important role in many neurodevelopmental processes such as axon guidance, dendrite arborization, and synapse formation. DSCAM is located in the Down syndrome trisomic region of human chromosome 21 and may contribute to the Down syndrome brain phenotype, which includes a reduction in the formation of long-distance connectivity. The local translation of a select group of mRNA transcripts within growth cones is necessary for the formation of appropriate neuronal connectivity. Interestingly, we have found that Dscam mRNA is localized to growth cones of mouse hippocampal neurons, and is dynamically regulated in response to the axon guidance molecule, netrin-1. Furthermore, netrin-1 stimulation results in an increase in locally translated DSCAM protein in growth cones. Deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), a netrin-1 receptor, is required for the netrin-1-induced increase in Dscam mRNA local translation. We also find that two RNA-binding proteins-fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB)-colocalize with Dscam mRNA in growth cones, suggesting their regulation of Dscam mRNA localization and translation. Finally, overexpression of DSCAM in mouse cortical neurons results in a severe stunting of axon outgrowth and branching, suggesting that an increase in DSCAM protein results in a structural change having functional consequences. Taken together, these results suggest that netrin-1-induced local translation of Dscam mRNA during embryonic development may be an important mechanism to regulate axon growth and guidance in the developing nervous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 799-816, 2016. PMID:26518186

  14. Growth control switch by a DNA-damage-inducible toxin-antitoxin system in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Martins, Daniel; Redder, Peter; Frandi, Antonio; Mignolet, Johann; Chapalay, Julien Bortoli; Chambon, Marc; Turcatti, Gerardo; Viollier, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems (TASs) are thought to respond to various stresses, often inducing growth-arrested (persistent) sub-populations of cells whose housekeeping functions are inhibited. Many such TASs induce this effect through the translation-dependent RNA cleavage (RNase) activity of their toxins, which are held in check by their cognate antitoxins in the absence of stress. However, it is not always clear whether specific mRNA targets of orthologous RNase toxins are responsible for their phenotypic effect, which has made it difficult to accurately place the multitude of TASs within cellular and adaptive regulatory networks. Here, we show that the TAS HigBA of Caulobacter crescentus can promote and inhibit bacterial growth dependent on the dosage of HigB, a toxin regulated by the DNA damage (SOS) repressor LexA in addition to its antitoxin HigA, and the target selectivity of HigB's mRNA cleavage activity. HigB reduced the expression of an efflux pump that is toxic to a polarity control mutant, cripples the growth of cells lacking LexA, and targets the cell cycle circuitry. Thus, TASs can have outcome switching activity in bacterial adaptive (stress) and systemic (cell cycle) networks. PMID:27572440

  15. Electromigration induced Kirkendall void growth in Sn-3.5Ag/Cu solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yong; Yu, Jin

    2014-02-28

    Effects of electric current flow on the Kirkendall void formation at solder joints were investigated using Sn-3.5Ag/Cu joints specially designed to have localized nucleation of Kirkendall voids at the Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu interface. Under the current density of 1 × 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2}, kinetics of Kirkendall void growth and intermetallic compound thickening were affected by the electromigration (EM), and both showed the polarity effect. Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} showed a strong susceptibility to the polarity effect, while Cu{sub 3}Sn did not. The electromigration force induced additional tensile (or compressive) stress at the cathode (or anode), which accelerated (or decelerated) the void growth. From the measurements of the fraction of void at the Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu interface on SEM micrographs and analysis of the kinetics of void growth, the magnitude of the local stress induced by EM was estimated to be 9 MPa at the anode and −7 MPa at the cathode.

  16. Bacterial sensing underlies artificial sweetener-induced growth of gut Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kristian; Darby, Alistair C; Hall, Neil; Wilkinson, Mark C; Pongchaikul, Pisut; Bravo, David; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2016-07-01

    Disruption in stable establishment of commensal gut microbiota by early weaning is an important factor in susceptibility of young animals to enteric disorders. The artificial sweetener SUCRAM [consisting of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) and saccharin] included in piglets' feed reduces incidence of enteric disease. Pyrosequencing of pig caecal 16S rRNA gene amplicons identified 25 major families encompassing seven bacterial classes with Bacteroidia, Clostridia and Bacilli dominating the microbiota. There were significant shifts in microbial composition in pigs maintained on a diet containing SUCRAM, establishing SUCRAM as a major influence driving bacterial community dynamics. The most notable change was a significant increase of Lactobacillaceae population abundance, almost entirely due to a single phylotype, designated Lactobacillus 4228. The sweetener-induced increase in Lactobacillaceae was observed in two different breeds of pigs signifying a general effect. We isolated Lactobacillus 4228, sequenced its genome and found it to be related to Lactobacillus amylovorus. In vitro analyses of Lactobacillus 4228 growth characteristics showed that presence of NHDC significantly reduces the lag phase of growth and enhances expression of specific sugar transporters, independently of NHDC metabolism. This study suggests that sensing of NHDC by a bacterial plasma membrane receptor underlies sweetener-induced growth of a health promoting gut bacterium. PMID:26058469

  17. THICK-DISK EVOLUTION INDUCED BY THE GROWTH OF AN EMBEDDED THIN DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos, Alvaro; Helmi, Amina; Kazantzidis, Stelios E-mail: ahelmi@astro.rug.n E-mail: villalobos@oats.inaf.i

    2010-07-20

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the structural and kinematical properties of simulated thick disks induced by the growth of an embedded thin disk. The thick disks used in the present study originate from cosmologically common 5:1 encounters between initially thin primary disk galaxies and infalling satellites. The growing thin disks are modeled as static gravitational potentials and we explore a variety of growing-disk parameters that are likely to influence the response of thick disks. We find that the final thick-disk properties depend strongly on the total mass and radial scale length of the growing thin disk, and much less sensitively on its growth timescale and vertical scale height as well as the initial sense of thick-disk rotation. Overall, the growth of an embedded thin disk can cause a substantial contraction in both the radial and vertical direction, resulting in a significant decrease in the scale lengths and scale heights of thick disks. Kinematically, a growing thin disk can induce a notable increase in the mean rotation and velocity dispersions of thick-disk stars. We conclude that the reformation of a thin disk via gas accretion may play a significant role in setting the structure and kinematics of thick disks, and thus it is an important ingredient in models of thick-disk formation.

  18. CXCR2 signaling regulates KRAS(G12D)-induced autocrine growth of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Abhilasha; Varney, Michelle; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Ouellette, Michel M.; Batra, Surinder K.; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of RAS, the master regulator of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), continues to be a challenge. Mutations in various isoforms of RAS gene, including KRAS are known to upregulate CXC chemokines; however, their precise role in KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this report, we reveal a previously unidentified tumor cell-autonomous role of KRAS(G12D)-induced CXCR2 signaling in mediating growth of neoplastic PDAC cells. Progressively increasing expression of mCXCR2 and its ligands was detected in the malignant ductal cells of Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) mice. Knocking-down CXCR2 in KRAS(G12D)-bearing human pancreatic duct-derived cells demonstrated a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, CXCR2 antagonists showed selective growth inhibition of KRAS(G12D)-bearing cells in vitro. Intriguingly, both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-bearing pancreatic ductal cells reduced the levels of KRAS protein, strongly implying the presence of a KRAS-CXCR2 feed-forward loop. Together, these data demonstrate the role of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-induced growth transformation and progression in PDAC. PMID:26771140

  19. Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.-J.; Hou, Y.C.; Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A.; Sheu, Jim J.C.; Lai, C.-H.; Chen, B.-H.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Wan Lei Tsai, F.-J.

    2009-01-23

    Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI{sub 50}) concentration of 2.35 {mu}M. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

  20. Nuclear localization of Src-family tyrosine kinases is required for growth factor-induced euchromatinization

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akinori; Obata, Yuuki; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Nakayama, Yuji; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kuga, Takahisa; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Saito, Takashi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2009-04-15

    Src-family kinases (SFKs), which participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also several subcellular compartments, including the nucleus. Nuclear structural changes are frequently observed during transcription, cell differentiation, senescence, tumorigenesis, and cell cycle. However, little is known about signal transduction in the alteration of chromatin texture. Here, we develop a pixel imaging method for quantitatively evaluating chromatin structural changes. Growth factor stimulation increases euchromatic hypocondensation and concomitant heterochromatic hypercondensation in G{sub 1} phase, and the levels reach a plateau by 30 min, sustain for at least 5 h and return to the basal levels after 24 h. Serum-activated SFKs in the nucleus were more frequently detected in the euchromatin areas than the heterochromatin areas. Nuclear expression of kinase-active SFKs, but not unrelated Syk kinase, drastically increases both euchromatinization and heterochromatinization in a manner dependent on the levels of nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation. However, growth factor stimulation does not induce chromatin structural changes in SYF cells lacking SFKs, and reintroduction of one SFK member into SYF cells can, albeit insufficiently, induce chromatin structural changes. These results suggest that nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by SFKs plays an important role in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation.

  1. Accommodating the cost of growth and swimming in fish—the applicability of exercise-induced growth to juvenile hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Javed R.; Trembath, Caroline; Pether, Steve; Bruce, Michael; Walker, Seumas P.; Herbert, Neill A.

    2014-01-01

    Induced-swimming can improve the growth and feed conversion efficiency of finfish aquaculture species, such as salmonids and Seriola sp., but some species, such as Atlantic cod, show no or a negative productivity response to exercise. As a possible explanation for these species-specific differences, a recent hypothesis proposed that the applicability of exercise training, as well as the exercise regime for optimal growth gain (ERopt growth), was dependent upon the size of available aerobic metabolic scope (AMS). This study aimed to test this hypothesis by measuring the growth and swimming metabolism of hapuku, Polyprion oxygeneios, to different exercise regimes and then reconciling the metabolic costs of swimming and specific dynamic action (SDA) against AMS. Two 8-week growth trials were conducted with ERs of 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, and 1.5 body lengths per second (BL s−1). Fish in the first trial showed a modest 4.8% increase in SGR over static controls in the region 0.5–0.75 BL s−1 whereas the fish in trial 2 showed no significant effect of ER on growth performance. Reconciling the SDA of hapuku with the metabolic costs of swimming showed that hapuku AMS is sufficient to support growth and swimming at all ERs. The current study therefore suggests that exercise-induced growth is independent of AMS and is driven by other factors. PMID:25520662

  2. Accommodating the cost of growth and swimming in fish-the applicability of exercise-induced growth to juvenile hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios).

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed R; Trembath, Caroline; Pether, Steve; Bruce, Michael; Walker, Seumas P; Herbert, Neill A

    2014-01-01

    Induced-swimming can improve the growth and feed conversion efficiency of finfish aquaculture species, such as salmonids and Seriola sp., but some species, such as Atlantic cod, show no or a negative productivity response to exercise. As a possible explanation for these species-specific differences, a recent hypothesis proposed that the applicability of exercise training, as well as the exercise regime for optimal growth gain (ERopt growth), was dependent upon the size of available aerobic metabolic scope (AMS). This study aimed to test this hypothesis by measuring the growth and swimming metabolism of hapuku, Polyprion oxygeneios, to different exercise regimes and then reconciling the metabolic costs of swimming and specific dynamic action (SDA) against AMS. Two 8-week growth trials were conducted with ERs of 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, and 1.5 body lengths per second (BL s(-1)). Fish in the first trial showed a modest 4.8% increase in SGR over static controls in the region 0.5-0.75 BL s(-1) whereas the fish in trial 2 showed no significant effect of ER on growth performance. Reconciling the SDA of hapuku with the metabolic costs of swimming showed that hapuku AMS is sufficient to support growth and swimming at all ERs. The current study therefore suggests that exercise-induced growth is independent of AMS and is driven by other factors. PMID:25520662

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling mediates aldosterone-induced profibrotic responses in kidney.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Lili; Yang, Min; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Minmin; Niu, Jianying; Qiao, Zhongdong; Gu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Aldosterone has been recognized as a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Studies have indicated that enhanced activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with the development and progression of renal fibrosis. But if EGFR is involved in aldosterone-induced renal fibrosis is less investigated. In the present study, we examined the effect of erlotinib, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, on the progression of aldosterone-induced renal profibrotic responses in a murine model underwent uninephrectomy. Erlotinib-treated rats exhibited relieved structural lesion comparing with rats treated with aldosterone alone, as characterized by glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial cell proliferation and expansion. Also, erlotinib inhibited the expression of TGF-β, α-SMA and mesangial matrix proteins such as collagen Ⅳ and fibronectin. In cultured mesangial cells, inhibition of EGFR also abrogated aldosterone-induced expression of extracellular matrix proteins, cell proliferation and migration. We also demonstrated that aldosterone induced the phosphorylation of EGFR through generation of ROS. And the activation of EGFR resulted in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, leading to the activation of profibrotic pathways. Taken together, we concluded that aldosterone-mediated tissue fibrosis relies on ROS induced EGFR/ERK activation, highlighting EGFR as a potential therapeutic target for modulating renal fibrosis. PMID:27317889

  4. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  5. Flavonoids from the leaves of Carya cathayensis Sarg. inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sha-Sha; Jiang, Fu-Sheng; Zhang, Kun; Zhu, Xue-Xin; Jin, Bo; Lu, Jin-Jian; Ding, Zhi-Shan

    2014-01-01

    The total flavonoids (TFs) were isolated from the leaves of Carya cathayensis Sarg. (LCC), a well-known Chinese medicinal herb commercially cultivated in Tianmu Mountain district, a cross area of Zhejiang and Anhui provinces in China. Five flavonoids, i.e. cardamonin, pinostrobin chalcone (PC), wogonin, chrysin, and pinocembrin were the main components of the TFs. The TFs and these pure compounds suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis as detected in the mouse aortic ring assay, and cardamonin showed the best effect among them. To further elucidate the mechanisms for suppressing angiogenesis of these flavonoids, assays of VEGF-induced proliferation and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed. The TFs, cardamonin, pinocembrin, and chrysin obviously suppressed both VEGF-induced HUVEC proliferation and migration. However, PC and wogonin not only slightly inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation but also remarkably suppressed those of migration in HUVECs. Our further study showed that cardamonin decreased the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT induced by VEGF with a dose-dependent manner in HUVECs. Our findings indicate that the TFs and these pure flavonoids may become potential preventive and/or therapeutic agents against angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24096161

  6. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  7. Genetic Analysis of Growth-Regulator-Induced Parthenocarpy in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Vivian-Smith, Adam; Koltunow, Anna M.

    1999-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, seedless silique development or parthenocarpy can be induced by the application of various plant growth regulators (PGRs) to unfertilized pistils. Ecotype-specific responses were observed in the Arabidopsis ecotypes Columbia and Landsberg relative to the type of PGR and level applied. The parthenocarpic response was greatest in ecotype Landsberg, and comparisons of fruit growth and morphology were studied primarily in this ecotype. Gibberellic acid application (10 μmol pistil−1) caused development similar to that in pollinated pistils, while benzyladenine (1 μmol pistil−1) and naphthylacetic acid (10 μmol pistil−1) treatment produced shorter siliques. Naphthylacetic acid primarily modified mesocarp cell expansion. Arabidopsis mutants were employed to examine potential dependencies on gibberellin biosynthesis (ga1-3, ga4-1, and ga5-1) and perception (spy-4 and gai) during parthenocarpic silique development. Emasculated spy-4 pistils were neither obviously parthenocarpic nor deficient in PGR perception. By contrast, emasculated gai mutants did not produce parthenocarpic siliques following gibberellic acid application, but silique development occurred following pollination or application of auxin and cytokinin. Pollinated gai siliques had decreased cell numbers and morphologically resembled auxin-induced parthenocarpic siliques. This shows that a number of independent and possibly redundant pathways can direct hormone-induced parthenocarpy, and that endogenous gibberellins play a role in regulating cell expansion and promoting cell division in carpels. PMID:10517835

  8. alpha1B-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization induced by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Avila, M Teresa; Flores-Jasso, C Fabián; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induced alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation in Rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing these adrenoceptors. This effect of TGF-beta was rapid, reaching a maximum within 30 min and decreasing thereafter, and concentration-dependent (EC(50) 0.3 pM). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, and the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine, Ro 318220 and bisindolylmaleimide, blocked the effect of this growth factor. alpha(1B)-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation was associated with desensitization, as indicated by a reduction in the adrenergic-mediated production of [(3)H]inositol phosphates. Phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors by TGF-beta was also observed in Cos-1 cells transfected with the receptor. Co-transfection of the dominant-negative mutant of the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Deltap85) inhibited the phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors induced by TGF-beta. Our results indicate that activation of TGF-beta receptors induces alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. The data suggest that phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C play key roles in this effect of TGF-beta. PMID:12234252

  9. alpha1B-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization induced by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Romero-Avila, M Teresa; Flores-Jasso, C Fabián; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2002-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induced alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation in Rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing these adrenoceptors. This effect of TGF-beta was rapid, reaching a maximum within 30 min and decreasing thereafter, and concentration-dependent (EC(50) 0.3 pM). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, and the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine, Ro 318220 and bisindolylmaleimide, blocked the effect of this growth factor. alpha(1B)-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation was associated with desensitization, as indicated by a reduction in the adrenergic-mediated production of [(3)H]inositol phosphates. Phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors by TGF-beta was also observed in Cos-1 cells transfected with the receptor. Co-transfection of the dominant-negative mutant of the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Deltap85) inhibited the phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors induced by TGF-beta. Our results indicate that activation of TGF-beta receptors induces alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. The data suggest that phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C play key roles in this effect of TGF-beta. PMID:12234252

  10. Withaferin-A suppress AKT induced tumor growth in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P.; Sirimulla, Suman; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K.; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic activation of AKT gene has emerged as a key determinant of the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC); hence, research has focused on targeting AKT signaling for the treatment of advanced stages of CRC. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic effects of withaferin A (WA) on CRC cells overexpressing AKT in preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) models. Our results indicated that WA, a natural compound, resulted in significant inhibition of AKT activity and led to the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in CRC cells overexpressing AKT. The oral administration of WA significantly suppressed AKT-induced aggressive tumor growth in a xenograft model. Molecular analysis revealed that the decreased expression of AKT and its downstream pro-survival signaling molecules may be responsible for tumor inhibition. Further, significant inhibition of some important EMT markers, i.e., Snail, Slug, β-catenin and vimentin, was observed in WA-treated human CRC cells overexpressing AKT. Significant inhibition of micro-vessel formation and the length of vessels were evident in WA-treated tumors, which correlated with a low expression of the angiogenic marker RETIC. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the crucial role of AKT activation in inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis and EMT in CRC cells and suggests that WA may overcome AKT-induced cell proliferation and tumor growth in CRC. PMID:26883103

  11. Withaferin-A suppress AKT induced tumor growth in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P; Sirimulla, Suman; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-03-22

    The oncogenic activation of AKT gene has emerged as a key determinant of the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC); hence, research has focused on targeting AKT signaling for the treatment of advanced stages of CRC. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic effects of withaferin A (WA) on CRC cells overexpressing AKT in preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) models. Our results indicated that WA, a natural compound, resulted in significant inhibition of AKT activity and led to the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in CRC cells overexpressing AKT. The oral administration of WA significantly suppressed AKT-induced aggressive tumor growth in a xenograft model. Molecular analysis revealed that the decreased expression of AKT and its downstream pro-survival signaling molecules may be responsible for tumor inhibition. Further, significant inhibition of some important EMT markers, i.e., Snail, Slug, β-catenin and vimentin, was observed in WA-treated human CRC cells overexpressing AKT. Significant inhibition of micro-vessel formation and the length of vessels were evident in WA-treated tumors, which correlated with a low expression of the angiogenic marker RETIC. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the crucial role of AKT activation in inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis and EMT in CRC cells and suggests that WA may overcome AKT-induced cell proliferation and tumor growth in CRC. PMID:26883103

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor-Induced Hypertension: Basics for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Carmen P.; Zalpour, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Frequently, primary care providers continue to manage the overall medical care of cancer patients. With newer and often more potent antitumor agents, patients may present to their local physicians with drug-induced toxicities such as hypertension induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. It is imperative that these healthcare providers are aware of basic aspects of this drug class, as its use has increased significantly in the last several years. Uncontrolled or malignant hypertension due to these agents should be recognized readily and treated early to prevent more severe outcomes. This overview provides a brief background on the role of VEGF and angiogenesis in tumor metabolism as well as theories of the mechanism of VEGF inhibitors and hypertension. Helpful clinical practice aspects including the types of inhibitors used in the United States and their pharmacologic characteristics will be discussed. Also, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension induced by vascular endothelial growth factors are reviewed. A summary of key aspects of this drug class and hypertension is included. PMID:21629798

  13. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  14. Resveratrol Inhibits Hypoxia-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pathological Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher Seungkyu; Choi, Eun Young; Lee, Sung Chul; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Lee, Joon Haeng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of resveratrol on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human adult retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells, and on experimental choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mice. Materials and Methods ARPE-19 cells were treated with different concentrations of resveratrol and then incubated under hypoxic conditions with subsequent evaluation of cell viability, expression of HIF-1α, and expression of VEGF. The effects of resveratrol on the synthesis and degradation of hypoxia-induced HIF-1α were evaluated using inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and the ubiquitin proteasome pathways. In animal studies, CNV lesions were induced in C57BL/6 mice by laser photocoagulation. After 7 days of oral administration of resveratrol or vehicle, which began one day after CNV induction, image analysis was used to measure CNV areas on choroidal flat mounts stained with isolectin IB4. Results In ARPE-19 cells, resveratrol significantly inhibited HIF-1α and VEGF in a dose-dependent manner, by blocking the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and by promoting proteasomal HIF-1α degradation. In mice experiments, orally administered resveratrol significantly inhibited CNV growth in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Resveratrol may have therapeutic value in the management of diseases involving pathological neovascularization. PMID:26446654

  15. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1α activates ectopic production of fibroblast growth factor 23 in tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Doucet, Michele; Tomlinson, Ryan E; Han, Xiaobin; Quarles, L Darryl; Collins, Michael T; Clemens, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome in which ectopic production of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) by non-malignant mesenchymal tumors causes phosphate wasting and bone fractures. Recent studies have implicated the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in other phosphate wasting disorders caused by elevated FGF23, including X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and autosomal dominant hypophosphatemia. Here we provide evidence that HIF-1α mediates aberrant FGF23 in TIO by transcriptionally activating its promoter. Immunohistochemical studies in phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors resected from patients with documented TIO showed that HIF-1α and FGF23 were co-localized in spindle-shaped cells adjacent to blood vessels. Cultured tumor tissue produced high levels of intact FGF23 and demonstrated increased expression of HIF-1α protein. Transfection of MC3T3-E1 and Saos-2 cells with a HIF-1α expression construct induced the activity of a FGF23 reporter construct. Prior treatment of tumor organ cultures with HIF-1α inhibitors decreased HIF-1α and FGF23 protein accumulation and inhibited HIF-1α-induced luciferase reporter activity in transfected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed binding to a HIF-1α consensus sequence within the proximal FGF23 promoter, which was eliminated by treatment with a HIF-1α inhibitor. These results show for the first time that HIF-1α is a direct transcriptional activator of FGF23 and suggest that upregulation of HIF-1α activity in TIO contributes to the aberrant FGF23 production in these patients. PMID:27468359

  16. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yosuke Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  17. Overload-Induced Skeletal Muscle Extracellular Matrix Remodeling And Myofiber Growth in Mice Lacking IL-6

    PubMed Central

    White, James P.; Reecy, James M.; Washington, Tyrone A.; Sato, Shuichi; Le, Michael E.; Davis, J. Mark; Wilson, L. Britt; Carson, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Overloading healthy skeletal muscle produces myofiber hypertrophy and extracellular matrix remodeling, and these processes are thought to be interdependent for producing muscle growth. Inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression is induced in overloaded skeletal muscle, and the loss of this IL-6 induction can attenuate the hypertrophic response to overload. Although the overload induction of IL-6 in skeletal muscle may be an important regulator of inflammatory processes and satellite cell proliferation, less is known about its role in the regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling. The purpose of the current study was to examine if overload-induced extracellular matrix remodeling, muscle growth, and associated gene expression were altered in mice that lack IL-6, when compared to wild-type mice. Methods Male C57/BL6 (WT) and C57/BL6 × IL-6-/- (IL-6-/-) mice (10 wks of age) were assigned to either a sham control or synergist ablation overload (OV) treatments for 3 or 21 days. Results Plantaris muscle mass increased 59% in WT and 116% in IL-6-/- mice after 21d OV. Myofiber CSA was also increased by 21d OV in both WT and IL-6-/- mice. Overload induced a 2-fold greater increase in the volume of non-contractile tissue in IL-6-/- muscle as compared to WT. Overload also induced a significantly greater accumulation of hydroxyproline and procollagen-1 mRNA in IL-6-/- muscle, when compared to WT muscle after 21d OV. TGF-β and IGF-1 mRNA expression were also induced to a greater extent in IL-6-/- muscle when compared to WT muscle after 21d OV. There was no effect of IL-6 loss on the induction of myogenin, and cyclin D1 mRNA expression after 3d OV. However, MyoD mRNA expression in 3d OV IL-6-/- muscle was attenuated when compared to WT overload mice. Conclusion IL-6 appears to be necessary for the normal regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling during overload-induced growth. PMID:19681796

  18. Zoledronic acid suppresses transforming growth factor-β-induced fibrogenesis by human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, YUKO; IBI, MIHO; CHOSA, NAOYUKI; KYAKUMOTO, SEIKO; KAMO, MASAHARU; SHIBATA, TOSHIYUKI; SUGIYAMA, YOSHIKI; ISHISAKI, AKIRA

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are analogues of pyro-phosphate that are known to prevent bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast activity. Nitrogen-containing BPs, such as zoledronic acid (ZA), are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastasis. However, despite having benefits, ZA has been reported to induce BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in cancer patients. The molecular pathological mechanisms responsible for the development of BRONJ, including necrotic bone exposure after tooth extraction, remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of ZA on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced myofibroblast (MF) differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) and the migratory activity of hGFs, which are important for wound closure by fibrous tissue formation. The ZA maximum concentration in serum (Cmax) was found to be approximately 1.47 µM, which clinically, is found after the intravenous administration of 4 mg ZA, and ZA at this dose is considered appropriate for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis or bone diseases, such as Erdheim-Chester disease. At Cmax, ZA significantly suppressed i) the TGF-β-induced promotion of cell viability, ii) the TGF-β-induced expression of MF markers such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen, iii) the TGF-β-induced migratory activity of hGFs and iv) the expression level of TGF-β type I receptor on the surfaces of hGFs, as well as the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Thus, ZA suppresses TGF-β-induced fibrous tissue formation by hGFs, possibly through the inhibition of Smad-dependent signal transduction. Our findings partly elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying BRONJ and may prove to be beneficial to the identification of drug targets for the treatment of this symptom at the molecular level. PMID:27176567

  19. Growth decline linked to warming-induced water limitation in hemi-boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Guo, Dali; Anenkhonov, Oleg A; Badmaeva, Natalya K; Sandanov, Denis V

    2012-01-01

    Hemi-boreal forests, which make up the transition from temperate deciduous forests to boreal forests in southern Siberia, have experienced significant warming without any accompanying increase in precipitation during the last 80 years. This climatic change could have a profound impact on tree growth and on the stability of forest ecosystems in this region, but at present evidence for these impacts is lacking. In this study, we report a recent dramatic decline in the growth of hemi-boreal forests, based on ring width measurements from three dominant tree-species (Pinus sylvestris, Larix sibirica and Larix gmelinii), sampled from eight sites in the region. We found that regional tree growth has become increasingly limited by low soil water content in the pre- and early-growing season (from October of the previous year to July of the current year) over the past 80 years. A warming-induced reduction in soil water content has also increased the climate sensitivity of these three tree species. Beginning in the mid-1980s, a clear decline in growth is evident for both the pine forests and the larch forests, although there are increasing trends in the proxy of soil water use efficiencies. Our findings are consistent with those from other parts of the world and provide valuable insights into the regional carbon cycle and vegetation dynamics, and should be useful for devising adaptive forest management strategies. PMID:22916142

  20. Telomerase expression abrogates rapamycin-induced irreversible growth arrest of uterine fibroid smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Suo, Guangli; Sadarangani, Anil; Tang, Wingchung; Cowan, Bryan D; Wang, Jean Y J

    2014-09-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common solid tumors found in women of reproductive age. It has been reported that deregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays an important role in the etiology of leiomyoma. Here, we investigated the effect of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, on the growth of primary fibroid smooth muscle cells (fSMCs) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-transduced and immortalized fSMCs. With the primary fSMCs, a 24-hour treatment with rapamycin was sufficient to trigger a growth arrest that was not reversible upon drug removal. By contrast, the growth inhibitory effect of rapamycin on the hTERT-transduced fSMCs was readily reversible, as these cells resumed proliferation upon the withdrawal of the drug. These results suggest that rapamycin-induced irreversible growth arrest of fSMCs is dependent on the senescence barrier that is abrogated by the ectopic expression of telomerase. PMID:24784716

  1. α-Tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; Chen, Shaohua; Van Doren, Jeremiah; Li, Dongli; Farichon, Chelsea; He, Yan; Zhang, Qiuyan; Zhang, Kun; Conney, Allan H; Goodin, Susan; Du, Zhiyun; Zheng, Xi

    2015-06-01

    α‑Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α‑tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL‑60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL‑60 cells with α‑tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration‑dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL‑60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α‑tomatine in HL‑60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α‑tomatine and cell membrane‑associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α‑tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor‑κB by the phorbol ester, 12‑O‑tetradecanoylphorbol‑13‑acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL‑60 cells treated with α‑tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α‑tomatine inhibited the growth of HL‑60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α‑tomatine may have useful anti‑leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  2. Oridonin inhibits tumor growth in glioma by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-H; Liu, Y-X; Jia, M; Han, J-S; Zhao, M; Ji, S-P; Li, A-M

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common malignant intracranial tumors. Despite newly developed therapies, these treatments mainly target oncogenic signals, and unfortunately, fail to provide enough survival benefit in both human patients and mouse xenograft models, especially the first-generation therapies. Oridonin is purified from the Chinese herb Rabdosia rubescens and considered to exert extensive anti-cancer effects on human tumorigenesis. In this study, we systemically investigated the role of Oridonin in tumor growth and the underlying mechanisms in human glioma. We found that Oridonin inhibited cell proliferations in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both glioma U87 and U251 cells. Moreover, these anti-cancer effects were also confirmed in a mouse model bearing glioma. Furthermore, cell cycle arrest in S phase was observed in Oridonin-mediated growth inhibition by flow cytometry. Cell cycle arrest in S phase led to eventual cell apoptosis, as revealed by Hoechst 33342 staining and annexin V/PI double-staining. The cell apoptosis might be accomplished through a mitochondrial manner. In all, we were the first to our knowledge to report that Oridonin could exert anti-cancer effects on tumor growth in human glioma by inducing cell cycle arrest and eventual cell apoptosis. The identification of Oridonin as a critical mediator of glioma growth may potentiate Oridonin as a novel therapeutic strategies in glioma treatments. PMID:25553351

  3. Salt-induced modulation in growth, photosynthesis and antioxidant system in two varieties of Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Wani, Arif Shafi; Ahmad, Aqil; Hayat, Shamsul; Fariduddin, Qazi

    2013-04-01

    The present study was carried out to examine salt-induced modulation in growth, photosynthetic characteristics and antioxidant system in two cultivars of Brassica juncea Czern and Coss varieties (Varuna and RH-30). The surface sterilized seeds of these varieties were sown in the soil amended with different levels (2.8, 4.2 or 5.6 dsm(-1)) of sodium chloride under a simple randomized block design. The salt treatment significantly decreased growth, net photosynthetic rate and its related attributes, chlorophyll fluorescence, SPAD value of chlorophyll, leaf carbonic anhydrase activity and leaf water potential, whereas electrolyte leakage, proline content, and activity of catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes increased in both the varieties at 30 d stage of growth. The variety Varuna was found more resistant than RH-30 to the salt stress and possessed higher values for growth, photosynthetic attributes and antioxidant enzymes. Out of the graded concentrations (2.8, 4.2 or 5.6 dsm(-1)) of sodium chloride, 2.8 sm(-1) was least toxic and 5.6 dsm(-1) was most harmful. The variation in the responses of these two varieties to salt stress is attributed to their differential photosynthetic traits, SPAD chlorophyll value and antioxidant capacity, which can be used as potential markers for screening mustard plants for salt tolerance. PMID:23961235

  4. Growth Decline Linked to Warming-Induced Water Limitation in Hemi-Boreal Forests

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Guo, Dali; Anenkhonov, Oleg A.; Badmaeva, Natalya K.; Sandanov, Denis V.

    2012-01-01

    Hemi-boreal forests, which make up the transition from temperate deciduous forests to boreal forests in southern Siberia, have experienced significant warming without any accompanying increase in precipitation during the last 80 years. This climatic change could have a profound impact on tree growth and on the stability of forest ecosystems in this region, but at present evidence for these impacts is lacking. In this study, we report a recent dramatic decline in the growth of hemi-boreal forests, based on ring width measurements from three dominant tree-species (Pinus sylvestris, Larix sibirica and Larix gmelinii), sampled from eight sites in the region. We found that regional tree growth has become increasingly limited by low soil water content in the pre- and early-growing season (from October of the previous year to July of the current year) over the past 80 years. A warming-induced reduction in soil water content has also increased the climate sensitivity of these three tree species. Beginning in the mid-1980s, a clear decline in growth is evident for both the pine forests and the larch forests, although there are increasing trends in the proxy of soil water use efficiencies. Our findings are consistent with those from other parts of the world and provide valuable insights into the regional carbon cycle and vegetation dynamics, and should be useful for devising adaptive forest management strategies. PMID:22916142

  5. The Incompatibility of Living Systems: Characterizing Growth-Induced Incompatibilities in Expanded Skin.

    PubMed

    Buganza Tepole, Adrian; Gart, Michael; Purnell, Chad A; Gosain, Arun K; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-05-01

    Skin expansion is a common surgical technique to correct large cutaneous defects. Selecting a successful expansion protocol is solely based on the experience and personal preference of the operating surgeon. Skin expansion could be improved by predictive computational simulations. Towards this goal, we model skin expansion using the continuum framework of finite growth. This approach crucially relies on the concept of incompatible configurations. However, aside from the classical opening angle experiment, our current understanding of growth-induced incompatibilities remains rather vague. Here we visualize and characterize incompatibilities in living systems using skin expansion in a porcine model: We implanted and inflated two expanders, crescent, and spherical, and filled them to 225 cc throughout a period of 21 days. To quantify the residual strains developed during this period, we excised the expanded skin patches and subdivided them into smaller pieces. Skin growth averaged 1.17 times the original area for the spherical and 1.10 for the crescent expander, and displayed significant regional variations. When subdivided into smaller pieces, the grown skin patches retracted heterogeneously and confirmed the existence of incompatibilities. Understanding skin growth through mechanical stretch will allow surgeons to improve-and ultimately personalize-preoperative treatment planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:26416721

  6. Salt-induced modulation in growth, photosynthesis and antioxidant system in two varieties of Brassica juncea

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Arif Shafi; Ahmad, Aqil; Hayat, Shamsul; Fariduddin, Qazi

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine salt-induced modulation in growth, photosynthetic characteristics and antioxidant system in two cultivars of Brassica juncea Czern and Coss varieties (Varuna and RH-30). The surface sterilized seeds of these varieties were sown in the soil amended with different levels (2.8, 4.2 or 5.6 dsm−1) of sodium chloride under a simple randomized block design. The salt treatment significantly decreased growth, net photosynthetic rate and its related attributes, chlorophyll fluorescence, SPAD value of chlorophyll, leaf carbonic anhydrase activity and leaf water potential, whereas electrolyte leakage, proline content, and activity of catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes increased in both the varieties at 30 d stage of growth. The variety Varuna was found more resistant than RH-30 to the salt stress and possessed higher values for growth, photosynthetic attributes and antioxidant enzymes. Out of the graded concentrations (2.8, 4.2 or 5.6 dsm−1) of sodium chloride, 2.8 sm−1 was least toxic and 5.6 dsm−1 was most harmful. The variation in the responses of these two varieties to salt stress is attributed to their differential photosynthetic traits, SPAD chlorophyll value and antioxidant capacity, which can be used as potential markers for screening mustard plants for salt tolerance. PMID:23961235

  7. Vapor-Induced Solid-Liquid-Solid Process for Silicon-based Nanowire Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Donghai; Choi, Daiwon; Fifield, Leonard S.; Wang, Chong M.; Xia, Guanguang; Nie, Zimin; Yang, Zhenguo; Pederson, Larry R.; Graff, Gordon L.

    2010-03-10

    Silicon based nanowires have been grown from commercial silicon powders under conditions of differing oxygen and carbon activities. Nanowires grown in the presence of carbon sources consisted of a crystalline SiC core with an amorphous SiOx shell. The thickness of SiOx shell decreased as the oxygen concentration in the precursor gases was lowered. Nanowires grown in a carbon-free environment consisted of amorphous silicon oxide with a typical composition of SiO1.8. The growth rate of nanowires decreased with decreasing oxygen content in the precursor gases. SiO1.8 nanowires exhibited an initial discharge capacity of ~ 1,300 mAh/g and better stability than those of silicon powders. A Vapor Induced Solid-Liquid-Solid (VI-SLS) mechanism is proposed to explain the nanowire growth (including silicon and other metal based nanowires) from powder sources. In this approach, both a gas source and a solid powder source are required for nanowire growth. This mechanism is consistent with experimental observations and can also be used to guide the design and growth of other nanowires.

  8. A Model for Surface Induced Growth of Inert Gas Bubbles in Irradiated Copper-Boron Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, G.P.; Ramadasan, E.

    2006-07-01

    A matrix containing inert gas bubbles dilates in direct proportion to the growth experienced by the gas bubbles. This phenomenon is termed as swelling. A model for the swelling induced by the growth of the helium gas bubbles in irradiated copper-boron alloys is presented. The bubbles grow by acquiring vacancies from the external surface, which acts as a source of vacancies. The vacancies reach the surface of the bubbles mainly via lattice diffusion and to a limited extent via diffusion through short-circuiting paths such as grain boundaries and dislocation pipes. The model predicts that overall swelling of the matrix varies as 1.5 power of time. Another consequence of the present model is that the growth rate of a gas bubble varies inversely as the cube of its distance from the external surface. The model has been applied to the data on irradiated copper-boron alloys and found to be in accord with the experimental results. The model is general and can be applied to the growth of all kinds of stationary inert gas bubbles trapped within a crystalline matrix. (authors)

  9. Chrysanthemum zawadskii extract induces hair growth by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of hair matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Li, Jingjie; Gu, Lijuan; Begum, Shahnaz; Wang, Yunbo; Sun, Baishen; Lee, Mira; Sung, Changkeun

    2014-07-01

    Chrysanthemum zawadskii has been proven to possess hair growth activity and has been used as treatment for hair loss. The aim of this study was to provide a novel explanation of the mechanism by which Chrysanthemum zawadskii extracts (CZe) promote hair growth and to characterize the affected hair follicle (HF) regions and the progression of growth. The n-butanol and water fractions of CZe were used for hair growth induction by topical application to the backs of C57BL/6 mice for up to 30 days. To investigate cell development during HF morphogenesis, bromodeoxyuridine-labeled skin sections were detected using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the water fraction of CZe promoted hair shaft production and induced premature entry of telogen HFs into the anagen. Subsequently, immunohistochemical studies indicated that the water fraction of CZe stimulated the differentiation and proliferation of pluripotent epidermal matrix cells in the matrix region and epithelial stem cells in the basal layer of the epidermis. Additionally, flavonoids were identified as effective constituents. Therefore, the findings of this study suggested that the water fraction of CZe may be developed as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of hair loss. PMID:24807783

  10. Concentration gradient induced morphology evolution of silica nanostructure growth on photoresist-derived carbon micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of silica nanostructure morphology induced by local Si vapor source concentration gradient has been investigated by a smart design of experiments. Silica nanostructure or their assemblies with different morphologies are obtained on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode array. At a temperature of 1,000°C, rope-, feather-, and octopus-like nanowire assemblies can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. While at 950°C, stringlike assemblies, bamboo-like nanostructures with large joints, and hollow structures with smaller sizes can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. Both vapor–liquid-solid and vapor-quasiliquid-solid growth mechanisms have been applied to explain the diverse morphologies involving branching, connecting, and batch growth behaviors. The present approach offers a potential method for precise design and controlled synthesis of nanostructures with different features. PMID:22938090