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Sample records for bismuth silicon oxide

  1. Silicon-based bridge wire micro-chip initiators for bismuth oxide-aluminum nanothermite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, C. S.; Morris, C. J.; Thiruvengadathan, R.; Apperson, S. J.; Gangopadhyay, K.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2011-11-01

    We present a micro-manufacturing process for fabricating silicon-based bridge wire micro-chip initiators with the capacity to liberate joules of chemical energy at the expense of micro joules of input electrical energy. The micro-chip initiators are assembled with an open material reservoir utilizing a novel 47 °C melting point solder alloy bonding procedure and integrated with a bismuth oxide-aluminum nanothermite energetic composite. The electro-thermal conversion efficiency of the initiators is enhanced by the use of a nanoporous silicon bed which impedes thermal coupling between the bridge wire and bulk silicon substrate while maintaining the structural integrity of the device. Electrical behaviors of the ignition elements are investigated to extract minimum input power and energy requirements of 382.4 mW and 26.51 µJ, respectively, both in the absence and presence of an injected bismuth oxide-aluminum nanothermite composition. Programmed combustion of bismuth oxide-aluminum nanothermite housed within these initiators is demonstrated with a success rate of 100% over a 30 to 80 µJ range of firing energies and ignition response times of less than 2 µs are achieved in the high input power operation regime. The micro-initiators reported here are intended for use in miniaturized actuation technologies.

  2. Introduction, revelation, and evolution of complementary gratings in photorefractive bismuth silicon oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bashaw, M.C.; Ma, T.; Barker, R.C.; Mroczkowski, S. Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Microelectronic Materials and Structures, Yale University, New Haven, CT ); Dube, R.R. )

    1990-09-15

    Principal and complementary space-charge gratings are formed in photorefractive bismuth silicon oxide with use of 785-nm light. An electric field is optionally applied in the direction of the grating for hologram evolution by either drift or diffusion of charge carriers. For write times on the order of the decay time of the principal grating, no complementary behavior is observed. For much longer write times, a complementary space-charge grating is introduced both in the presence and in the absence of the applied field, and is initially hidden due to screening by the principal grating. Uniform illumination in the presence of the field reveals the complementary grating. Time-resolved data show its growth and decay, with a response rate much lower than that of the principal grating. A two-level electron-hole transport model explains the observations; one level participates in the establishment of the principal grating by majority carriers, and the other in the establishment of the extended-lifetime complementary grating by minority carriers. A scheme for multiplexing normal and extended-lifetime complementary gratings is presented.

  3. Electrical activation and electron spin resonance measurements of implanted bismuth in isotopically enriched silicon-28

    E-print Network

    Electrical activation and electron spin resonance measurements of implanted bismuth in isotopically measurements of implanted bismuth donors in isotopically enriched silicon-28. Donors are electrically activated via thermal annealing with minimal diffusion. Damage from bismuth ion implantation is repaired during

  4. Thermoelectric Properties of Bismuth and Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukai, Akram Issam

    Thermoelectric materials convert temperature differences into electricity and vice versa. Such materials utilize the Seebeck effect for power generation and the Peltier effect for refrigeration. In the Seebeck effect, a temperature gradient across a material causes the diffusion of charged carriers across that gradient, thus creating a voltage difference between the hot and cold ends of the material. Conversely, the Peltier effect explains the fact that when current flows through a material a temperature gradient arises because the charged carriers exchange thermal energy at the contacts. Thermoelectrics perform these functions without moving parts and they do not pollute. This makes them highly reliable and more importantly attractive as renewable energy sources, especially at a time when global warming is a growing concern. However, thermoelectrics find only limited use because of their poor efficiency. The efficiency of a thermoelectric material is determined by the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT = S2k T, where S is the thermoelectric power, defined as the thermoelectric voltage, V, produced per degree temperature difference S = dVdT , sigma is the electrical conductivity, kappa is the thermal conductivity, and T is the temperature. To maximize ZT, S must be large so that a small temperature difference can create a large voltage, sigma must be large in order to minimize joule heating losses, and kappa must be small to reduce heat leakage and maintain a temperature difference. Maximizing ZT is challenging because optimizing one physical parameter often adversely affects another. The best commercially available thermoelectric devices are alloys of Bi2Te3 and have a ZT of 1 which corresponds to a cannot efficiency of ˜10%. My research has focused on achieving efficient thermoelectric performance from the single component systems of bismuth and silicon nanowires. Bismuth nanowires are predicted to undergo a semi-metal to semiconductor transition below a size of 50 nm which should increase the thermopower and thus ZT. Limited experimental evidence by other groups has been acquired to support this claim. Through electric field gating measurements and by tuning the nanowire size, we have shown that no such transition occurs. Instead, surface states dominate the electric transport at a size smaller than 50 nm and bismuth remains a semimetal. Bulk silicon is a poor thermoelectric due to its large thermal conductivity. However, silicon nanowires may have a dramatically reduced thermal conductivity. By varying the nanowire size and impurity doping levels, ZT values representing an approximately 100-fold improvement over bulk silicon are achieved over a broad temperature range, including a ZT ˜ 1 at 200K. Independent measurements of S, sigma, and kappa, combined with theory, indicate that the improved efficiency originates from phonon effects. The thermal conductivity is reduced and the thermopower is enhanced. These results are expected to apply to other classes of semiconductor nanomaterials.

  5. Barium Titanate and Bismuth Oxide Nanocomposites Barium titanate, BaTiO3, and bismuth oxide Bi2O3 are transparent materials with

    E-print Network

    Harmon, Julie P.

    Barium Titanate and Bismuth Oxide Nanocomposites Barium titanate, BaTiO3, and bismuth oxide Bi2O3 Wall in Tetragonal Barium Titanate", H. Chaib, F. Schlaphof, T. Otto and L. M. Eng, Journal of Physics

  6. Transport study of a single bismuth nanowire fabricated by the silver and silicon nanowire shadow masks

    E-print Network

    Transport study of a single bismuth nanowire fabricated by the silver and silicon nanowire shadow bismuth nanowires fabricated by the low energy electron beam lithography using the silver/silicon nanowire shadow masks. The examined nanowires had cross-sectional dimensions of 40 30 and 40 50 nm2 . The chosen

  7. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  8. Mechanism of Selective Oxidation of Propene to Acrolein on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Mechanism of Selective Oxidation of Propene to Acrolein on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum by bismuth molybdates, we report quantum mechanical studies (at the DFT/ B3LYP/LACVP** level) of various reaction steps on bismuth oxide (Bi4O6/Bi4O7) and molybdenum oxide (Mo3O9) cluster models. For CH

  9. Bismuth in silicon qubits: the role of EPR cancellation resonances

    E-print Network

    M. H. Mohammady; G. W. Morley; T. S. Monteiro

    2010-08-25

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of bismuth doped silicon (Si:Bi) at intermediate magnetic fields, $B \\approx 0.05 -0.6$ T. We identify a previously unexplored EPR regime of "cancellation-resonances"- where part of the hyperfine coupling is resonant with the external field-induced splitting. We show this regime has interesting and experimentally accessible consequences for spectroscopy and quantum information applications. These include reduction of decoherence, fast manipulation of the coupled nuclear-electron qubit system and line narrowing in the multi-qubit case. We test our theoretical analysis by comparing with experimental X-band (9.7 GHz) EPR spectra obtained in the intermediate field regime.

  10. Spray pyrolysed bismuth oxide thin films and their characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gujar, T.P. . E-mail: gujar_tp@yahoo.com; Shinde, V.R.; Lokhande, C.D. . E-mail: l_chandrakant@yahoo.com

    2006-08-10

    Uniform, adherent and reproducible bismuth oxide thin films have been deposited on glass substrates from aqueous Bi(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution, using the solution spray technique. Their structural, surface morphological, optical, and electrical properties were investigated by XRD, AFM, optical absorption, electrical resistivity and thermo-emf measurements. The structural analysis from XRD pattern showed the formation of mixed phases of monoclinic Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} (predominant), tetragonal {beta}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and nonstiochiometric Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2.33}. The surface morphological studies on atomic force micrographs revealed round grain morphology of bismuth oxide crystallites. The optical studies showed a direct band gap of 2.90 eV for as-prepared bismuth oxide films. The electrical resistivity measurements of bismuth oxide films indicated a semiconducting behavior with the room temperature electrical resistivity of the order of 10{sup 7} {omega} cm. From thermo-emf measurements, the electrical conductivity was found to be of n-type.

  11. Spectroscopic and microscopic study of the corrosion of iron silicon steel by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Allen L.; Loewen, Eric P.; Ho, Thao T.; Koury, Dan; Hosterman, Brian; Younas, Umar; Welch, Jenny; Farley, John W.

    2006-05-01

    The performance of iron-silica alloys with different silicon composition was evaluated after exposure to an isothermal bath of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). Four alloys were evaluated: pure iron, Fe-1.24%Si, Fe-2.55%Si and Fe-3.82%Si. The samples were exposed to LBE in a dynamic corrosion cell for periods from 700 to 1000 h at a temperature of 550 °C. After exposure, the thickness and composition of the oxide layer were examined using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), including sputter depth profiling. Particular attention was paid to the role, spatial distribution, and chemical speciation of silicon. Low-binding-energy silicon (probably silicates or SiO44-) was found in the oxide; while elemental silicon (Si) was found in the metal as expected, and silica (SiO 2) was found at the bottom of the oxide layer, consistent with the formation of a layer between the oxide and the metal. Alloys with low concentrations of Si contained only silicate in the oxide. Alloys with higher concentrations of Si contained a layer of silica at the boundary between the oxide and the bulk metal. All of the alloys examined showed signs of oxide failure. This study has implications for the role of silicon in the stability of the oxide layer in the corrosion of steel by LBE.

  12. Bismuth Spheres Grown in Self-Nested Cavities in a Silicon Hong Liu, and Zhong Lin Wang*,

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Bismuth Spheres Grown in Self-Nested Cavities in a Silicon Wafer Hong Liu, and Zhong Lin Wang-step, hydrofluoric acid-free hydrothermal etching method that not only produces bismuth nano/micrometer-sized spheres Bismuth is a semimetal with unusual electronic properties that results from its highly anisotropic Fermi

  13. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  14. Optical pumping and readout of bismuth hyperfine states in silicon for atomic clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, K.; Szech, M.; Dluhy, P.; Salvail, J. Z.; Morse, K. J.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Nötzel, N.; Litvinenko, K. L.; Murdin, B. N.; Thewalt, M. L. W.

    2015-05-01

    The push for a semiconductor-based quantum information technology has renewed interest in the spin states and optical transitions of shallow donors in silicon, including the donor bound exciton transitions in the near-infrared and the Rydberg, or hydrogenic, transitions in the mid-infrared. The deepest group V donor in silicon, bismuth, has a large zero-field ground state hyperfine splitting, comparable to that of rubidium, upon which the now-ubiquitous rubidium atomic clock time standard is based. Here we show that the ground state hyperfine populations of bismuth can be read out using the mid-infrared Rydberg transitions, analogous to the optical readout of the rubidium ground state populations upon which rubidium clock technology is based. We further use these transitions to demonstrate strong population pumping by resonant excitation of the bound exciton transitions, suggesting several possible approaches to a solid-state atomic clock using bismuth in silicon, or eventually in enriched 28Si.

  15. Bismuth oxide nanotubes-graphene fiber-based flexible supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsamy, Karthikeyan; Xu, Zhen; Zheng, Bingna; Huang, Tieqi; Kou, Liang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Chao

    2014-07-01

    Graphene-bismuth oxide nanotube fiber as electrode material for constituting flexible supercapacitors using a PVA/H3PO4 gel electrolyte is reported with a high specific capacitance (Ca) of 69.3 mF cm-2 (for a single electrode) and 17.3 mF cm-2 (for the whole device) at 0.1 mA cm-2, respectively. Our approach opens the door to metal oxide-graphene hybrid fibers and high-performance flexible electronics.Graphene-bismuth oxide nanotube fiber as electrode material for constituting flexible supercapacitors using a PVA/H3PO4 gel electrolyte is reported with a high specific capacitance (Ca) of 69.3 mF cm-2 (for a single electrode) and 17.3 mF cm-2 (for the whole device) at 0.1 mA cm-2, respectively. Our approach opens the door to metal oxide-graphene hybrid fibers and high-performance flexible electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Equations and characterization. SEM images of GGO, XRD and XPS of Bi2O3 NTs, HRTEM images and EDX Spectra of Bi2O3 NT5-GF, CV curves of Bi2O3NT5-GF, Bi2O3 NTs and bismuth nitrate in three-electrode system (vs. Ag/AgCl). CV and GCD curves of Bi2O3 NT1-GF and Bi2O3 NT3-GF. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02615b

  16. Bismuth Oxide Nanoparticles in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mackinnon, Ian D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Platey grains of cubic Bi2O3, alpha-Bi2O3, and Bi2O(2.75), nanograins were associated with chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles W7029C1, W7029E5, and 2011C2 that were collected in the stratosphere at 17-19 km altitude. Similar Bi oxide nanograins were present in the upper stratosphere during May 1985. These grains are linked to the plumes of several major volcanic eruptions during the early 1980s that injected material into the stratosphere. The mass of sulfur from these eruptions is a proxy for the mass of stratospheric Bi from which we derive the particle number densities (p/cu m) for "average Bi2O3 nanograins" due to this volcanic activity and those necessary to contaminate the extraterrestrial chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles via collisional sticking. The match between both values supports the idea that Bi2O3 nanograins of volcanic origin could contaminate interplanetary dust particles in the Earth's stratosphere.

  17. Tributylphosphate Extraction Behavior of Bismuthate-Oxidized Americium

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher; Leigh R. Martin; Nicholas C. Schmitt

    2008-08-01

    Higher oxidation states of americium have long been known; however, options for their preparation in acidic solution are limited. The conventional choice, silver-catalyzed peroxydisulfate, is not useful at nitric acid concentrations above about 0.3 M. We investigated the use of sodium bismuthate as an oxidant for Am3+ in acidic solution. Room-temperature oxidation produced AmO2 2+ quantitatively, whereas oxidation at 80 °C produced AmO2+ quantitatively. The efficacy of the method for the production of oxidized americium was verified by fluoride precipitation and by spectroscopic absorbance measurements. We performed absorbance measurements using a conventional 1 cm cell for high americium concentrations and a 100 cm liquid waveguide capillary cell for low americium concentrations. Extinction coefficients for the absorbance of Am3+ at 503 nm, AmO2+ at 514 nm, and AmO2 2+ at 666 nm in 0.1 M nitric acid are reported. We also performed solvent extraction experiments with the hexavalent americium using the common actinide extraction ligand tributyl phosphate (TBP) for comparison to the other hexavalent actinides. Contact with 30% tributyl phosphate in dodecane reduced americium; it was nevertheless extracted using short contact times. The TBP extraction of AmO2 2+ over a range of nitric acid concentrations is shown for the first time and was found to be analogous to that of uranyl, neptunyl, and plutonyl ions.

  18. Optical pumping and readout of bismuth hyperfine states in silicon for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, K; Szech, M; Dluhy, P; Salvail, J Z; Morse, K J; Riemann, H; Abrosimov, N V; Nötzel, N; Litvinenko, K L; Murdin, B N; Thewalt, M L W

    2015-01-01

    The push for a semiconductor-based quantum information technology has renewed interest in the spin states and optical transitions of shallow donors in silicon, including the donor bound exciton transitions in the near-infrared and the Rydberg, or hydrogenic, transitions in the mid-infrared. The deepest group V donor in silicon, bismuth, has a large zero-field ground state hyperfine splitting, comparable to that of rubidium, upon which the now-ubiquitous rubidium atomic clock time standard is based. Here we show that the ground state hyperfine populations of bismuth can be read out using the mid-infrared Rydberg transitions, analogous to the optical readout of the rubidium ground state populations upon which rubidium clock technology is based. We further use these transitions to demonstrate strong population pumping by resonant excitation of the bound exciton transitions, suggesting several possible approaches to a solid-state atomic clock using bismuth in silicon, or eventually in enriched (28)Si. PMID:25990870

  19. Optical pumping and readout of bismuth hyperfine states in silicon for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, K.; Szech, M.; Dluhy, P.; Salvail, J.Z.; Morse, K.J.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N.V.; Nötzel, N.; Litvinenko, K.L.; Murdin, B.N.; Thewalt, M.L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The push for a semiconductor-based quantum information technology has renewed interest in the spin states and optical transitions of shallow donors in silicon, including the donor bound exciton transitions in the near-infrared and the Rydberg, or hydrogenic, transitions in the mid-infrared. The deepest group V donor in silicon, bismuth, has a large zero-field ground state hyperfine splitting, comparable to that of rubidium, upon which the now-ubiquitous rubidium atomic clock time standard is based. Here we show that the ground state hyperfine populations of bismuth can be read out using the mid-infrared Rydberg transitions, analogous to the optical readout of the rubidium ground state populations upon which rubidium clock technology is based. We further use these transitions to demonstrate strong population pumping by resonant excitation of the bound exciton transitions, suggesting several possible approaches to a solid-state atomic clock using bismuth in silicon, or eventually in enriched 28Si. PMID:25990870

  20. Mechanism of Selective Oxidation and Ammoxidation of Propene on Bismuth Molybdates from DFT Calculations on Model Clusters

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Mechanism of Selective Oxidation and Ammoxidation of Propene on Bismuth Molybdates from DFT catalysts for these reactions is based on bismuth molybdate.2-4 The mechanism has been proposed as follows:5,6 (1) Allylic H abstraction at a bismuth site resulting in an allyl intermediate adsorbing

  1. Structure and resistivity of bismuth nanobelts in situ synthesized on silicon wafer through an ethanol-thermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zheng; Qin Haiming; Yan Tao

    2011-12-15

    Bismuth nanobelts in situ grown on a silicon wafer were synthesized through an ethanol-thermal method without any capping agent. The structure of the bismuth belt-silicon composite nanostructure was characterized by scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscope. The nanobelt is a multilayered structure 100-800 nm in width and over 50 {mu}m in length. One layer has a thickness of about 50 nm. A unique sword-like nanostructure is observed as the initial structure of the nanobelts. From these observations, a possible growth mechanism of the nanobelt is proposed. Current-voltage property measurements indicate that the resistivity of the nanobelts is slightly larger than that of the bulk bismuth material. - Graphical Abstract: TEM images, EDS, and electron diffraction pattern of bismuth nanobelts. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bismuth nanobelts in situ grown on silicon wafer were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Special bismuth-silicon nanostructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential application in sensitive magnetic sensor and other electronic devices.

  2. Morphology modulated growth of bismuth tungsten oxide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Shushan; Wei, Jiyong; Huang Baibiao Feng Shengyu; Zhang Xiaoyang; Qin Xiaoyan; Wang Peng; Wang Zeyan; Zhang Qi; Jing Xiangyang; Zhan Jie

    2009-02-15

    Two kinds of bismuth tungsten oxide nanocrystals were prepared by microwave hydrothermal method. The morphology modulation of nanocrystals synthesized with precursor suspension's pH varied from 0.25 (strong acid) to 10.05 (base) was studied. The 3D flower like aggregation of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes was synthesized in acid precursor suspension and the nanooctahedron crystals of Bi{sub 3.84}W{sub 0.16}O{sub 6.24} were synthesized in alkalescent precursor. The dominant crystal is changed from Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} to Bi{sub 3.84}W{sub 0.16}O{sub 6.24} when the precursor suspension changes from acid to alkalescence. The growth mechanisms of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} and Bi{sub 3.84}W{sub 0.16}O{sub 6.24} were attributed to the different solubility of WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and [Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}]{sup 2+} in precursor suspensions with various pH. For the decomposition of Rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation ({lambda}>400 nm), different morphology of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} crystal samples obtained by microwavesolvothermal process showed different photocatalytic activity. - Graphical abstract: The morphology modulation of bismuth tungsten oxide nanocrystals synthesized by microwave hydrothermal method with precursor suspension's pH varied from 0.25 (strong acid) to 10.05 (base) was studied. The 3D flower like aggregation of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes and nanooctahedron crystals of Bi{sub 3.84}W{sub 0.16}O{sub 6.24} were prepared. The growth mechanisms of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} and Bi{sub 3.84}W{sub 0.16}O{sub 6.24} were attributed to the different precipitation ability and solubility of H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Bi(OH){sub 3} in precursor suspensions with various pH. The photocatalytic evaluation, via the decomposition of Rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation ({lambda}>420 nm), reveals that nanocrystalline Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} samples obtained in different condition exhibit different photocatalytic activities which depend on pH value of the precursor suspensions.

  3. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kova?evi?, Goran Pivac, Branko

    2014-01-28

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

  4. Bismuth Oxide: A New Lithium-Ion Battery Anode

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuling; Trujillo, Matthias A.; Fu, Engang; Patterson, Brian; Fei, Ling; Xu, Yun; Deng, Shuguang; Smirnov, Sergei; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    Bismuth oxide directly grown on nickel foam (p-Bi2O3/Ni) was prepared by a facile polymer-assisted solution approach and was used directly as a lithium-ion battery anode for the first time. The Bi2O3 particles were covered with thin carbon layers, forming network-like sheets on the surface of the Ni foam. The binder-free p-Bi2O3/Ni shows superior electrochemical properties with a capacity of 668 mAh/g at a current density of 800 mA/g, which is much higher than that of commercial Bi2O3 powder (c-Bi2O3) and Bi2O3 powder prepared by the polymer-assisted solution method (p-Bi2O3). The good performance of p-Bi2O3/Ni can be attributed to higher volumetric utilization efficiency, better connection of active materials to the current collector, and shorter lithium ion diffusion path. PMID:24416506

  5. Investigation of solution-processed bismuth-niobium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Satoshi; Ariga, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Shin; Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo

    2014-10-21

    The characteristics of bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared using a solution process were investigated. The BNO film annealed at 550°C involving three phases: an amorphous phase, Bi?NbO? fluorite microcrystals, and Nb-rich cubic pyrochlore microcrystals. The cubic pyrochlore structure, which was the main phase in this film, has not previously been reported in BNO films. The relative dielectric constant of the BNO film was approximately 140, which is much higher than that of a corresponding film prepared using a conventional vacuum sputtering process. Notably, the cubic pyrochlore microcrystals disappeared with increasing annealing temperature and were replaced with triclinic ?-BiNbO? crystals at 590°C. The relative dielectric constant also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Therefore, the high relative dielectric constant of the BNO film annealed at 550°C is thought to result from the BNO cubic pyrochlore structure. In addition, the BNO films annealed at 500°C contained approximately 6.5 atm.% carbon, which was lost at approximately 550°C. This result suggests that the carbon in the BNO film played an important role in the formation of the cubic pyrochlore structure.

  6. Efficient water-splitting device based on a bismuth vanadate photoanode and thin-film silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Lihao; Abdi, Fatwa F; van de Krol, Roel; Liu, Rui; Huang, Zhuangqun; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Dam, Bernard; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H M

    2014-10-01

    A hybrid photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC) water-splitting device with a benchmark solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 5.2% under simulated air mass (AM) 1.5 illumination is reported. This cell consists of a gradient-doped tungsten-bismuth vanadate (W:BiVO4 ) photoanode and a thin-film silicon solar cell. The improvement with respect to an earlier cell that also used gradient-doped W:BiVO4 has been achieved by simultaneously introducing a textured substrate to enhance light trapping in the BiVO4 photoanode and further optimization of the W gradient doping profile in the photoanode. Various PV cells have been studied in combination with this BiVO4 photoanode, such as an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) single junction, an a-Si:H/a-Si:H double junction, and an a-Si:H/nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) micromorph junction. The highest conversion efficiency, which is also the record efficiency for metal oxide based water-splitting devices, is reached for a tandem system consisting of the optimized W:BiVO4 photoanode and the micromorph (a-Si:H/nc-Si:H) cell. This record efficiency is attributed to the increased performance of the BiVO4 photoanode, which is the limiting factor in this hybrid PEC/PV device, as well as better spectral matching between BiVO4 and the nc-Si:H cell. PMID:25138735

  7. Growth of silicon bump induced by swift heavy ion at the silicon oxide-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Carlotti, J.-F.; Touboul, A.D.; Ramonda, M.; Caussanel, M.; Guasch, C.; Bonnet, J.; Gasiot, J.

    2006-01-23

    Thin silicon oxide layers on silicon substrates are investigated by scanning probe microscopy before and after irradiation with 210 MeV Au+ ions. After irradiation and complete chemical etching of the silicon oxide layer, silicon bumps grown on the silicon surface are observed. It is shown that each impinging ion induces one silicon bump at the interface. This observation is consistent with the thermal spike theory. Ion energy loss is transferred to the oxide and induces local melting. Silicon-bump formation is favored when the oxide and oxide-silicon interface are silicon rich.

  8. Structure and resistivity of bismuth nanobelts in situ synthesized on silicon wafer through an ethanol-thermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; Qin, Haiming; Yan, Tao; Liu, Hong; Wang, Jiyang

    2011-12-01

    Bismuth nanobelts in situ grown on a silicon wafer were synthesized through an ethanol-thermal method without any capping agent. The structure of the bismuth belt-silicon composite nanostructure was characterized by scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscope. The nanobelt is a multilayered structure 100-800 nm in width and over 50 ?m in length. One layer has a thickness of about 50 nm. A unique sword-like nanostructure is observed as the initial structure of the nanobelts. From these observations, a possible growth mechanism of the nanobelt is proposed. Current-voltage property measurements indicate that the resistivity of the nanobelts is slightly larger than that of the bulk bismuth material.

  9. Reduction of thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured bismuth telluride composites embedded with silicon nano-inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Tayebi, Lobat; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2014-01-01

    Bulk nanostructured bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) composite with silicon nano-crystallite inclusions was synthesized via sintering approach. The effect of the composite structure formed by the addition of miniscule quantity (5 at. %) of silicon on the thermoelectric properties of bulk nanostructured Bi2Te3 is shown via a 50% drop in thermal conductivity accompanied with a simultaneous enhancement in the Seebeck coefficient. We demonstrate that the addition of silicon nano-inclusions to the nanostructured compound combined with a systematic thermal treatment beneficially reduces the thermal conductivity to less than 1.0 W/mK over the entire temperature range of 300 K to 525 K. It is shown that the combinatorial techniques of nanostructuring, nano-inclusions, and annealing are effective in reducing thermal conductivity by a significant magnitude. This low thermal conductivity is comparable to that of Bi2Te3 based superlattices and significantly lower than that of bulk Bi2Te3. The technique is extendable to (Bi,Se)2(Sb,Te)3 based thermoelectric alloys for enhancing the figure-of-merit.

  10. Analysis of quantum coherence in bismuth-doped silicon: a system of strongly coupled spin qubits

    E-print Network

    M. H. Mohammady; G. W. Morley; A. Nazir; T. S. Monteiro

    2012-07-04

    There is growing interest in bismuth-doped silicon (Si:Bi) as an alternative to the well-studied proposals for silicon based quantum information processing (QIP) using phosphorus-doped silicon (Si:P). We focus here on the implications of its anomalously strong hyperfine coupling. In particular, we analyse in detail the regime where recent pulsed magnetic resonance experiments have demonstrated the potential for orders of magnitude speedup in quantum gates by exploiting transitions that are electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) forbidden at high fields. We also present calculations using a phenomenological Markovian master equation which models the decoherence of the electron spin due to Gaussian temporal magnetic field perturbations. The model quantifies the advantages of certain "optimal working points" identified as the $df/dB=0$ regions, where $f$ is the transition frequency, which come in the form of frequency minima and maxima. We show that at such regions, dephasing due to the interaction of the electron spin with a fluctuating magnetic field in the $z$ direction (usually adiabatic) is completely removed.

  11. Promotional Effects of Bismuth on the Formation of Platinum-Bismuth Nanowires Network and the Electrocatalytic Activity toward Ethanol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    X Teng; W Du; D Su; Q Wang; A Frenkel

    2011-12-31

    Electrocatalytic activities of Pt and their alloys toward small organic molecules oxidation are highly dependent on their morphology, chemical composition, and electronic structure. Here, we report the synthesis of dendrite-like Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5}, Pt{sub 83}Bi{sub 17}, and Pt{sub 76}Bi{sub 24} nanowires network with a high aspect ratio (up to 68). The electronic structure and heterogeneous crystalline structure have been studied using combined techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Bismuth-oriented attachment growth mechanism has been proposed for the anisotropic growth of Pt/Bi. The electrochemical activities of Pt/Bi nanowires network toward ethanol oxidations have been tested. In particular, the as-made Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5} appears to have superior activity toward ethanol oxidation in comparison with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The reported promotional effect of Bi on the formation of Pt/Bi and electrochemical activities will be important to design effective catalysts for ethanol fuel cell application.

  12. Promotional Effects of Bismuth on the Formation of Platinum-Bismuth Nanowires Network and the Electrocatalytic Activity toward Ethanol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, W.; Su, D.; Wang, Q.; Frenkel, A.I.; Teng, X.

    2011-01-11

    Electrocatalytic activities of Pt and their alloys toward small organic molecules oxidation are highly dependent on their morphology, chemical composition, and electronic structure. Here, we report the synthesis of dendrite-like Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5}, Pt{sub 83}Bi{sub 17}, and Pt{sub 76}Bi{sub 24} nanowires network with a high aspect ratio (up to 68). The electronic structure and heterogeneous crystalline structure have been studied using combined techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Bismuth-oriented attachment growth mechanism has been proposed for the anisotropic growth of Pt/Bi. The electrochemical activities of Pt/Bi nanowires network toward ethanol oxidations have been tested. In particular, the as-made Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5} appears to have superior activity toward ethanol oxidation in comparison with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The reported promotional effect of Bi on the formation of Pt/Bi and electrochemical activities will be important to design effective catalysts for ethanol fuel cell application.

  13. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir City, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  14. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  15. Silicon oxide colloidal/polymer nanocomposite films Haifeng Wanga)

    E-print Network

    Cao, Wenwu

    Silicon oxide colloidal/polymer nanocomposite films Haifeng Wanga) and Wenwu Cao Materials Research to fabricate sol-gel silicon oxide colloidal/polymer composite film on silicon substrate, in which the particle size of silicon oxide colloidal is between 10 and 40 nm. The acoustic impedance of the nanocomposite

  16. Electronic transport in natively oxidized silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Koleini, Mohammad; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio; Fernández-Serra, Maria Victoria

    2011-04-26

    Silicon nanowires are widely used as active functional elements in advanced electronic devices, most notably in biological sensors. While surface oxidation of the wires occurs upon exposure to a wet environment, theoretical studies are often limited to ideally crystalline, H-terminated wire models. We present an accurate computational study of the electronic and transport properties of natively oxidized, ultrathin silicon nanowires including dopant elements. Comparisons with perfectly ordered and distorted H-terminated structures reveal an unexpected interplay of effects that oxidation-induced structural distortions and electronegative Si/SiO(x) interfaces have on the conductance of B- or P-doped nanowires. PMID:21375292

  17. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    2015-11-01

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  18. Laser induced oxidation and optical properties of bismuth telluride nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhipeng; Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Keiser, Courtney; Kidd, Tim E.; Gao, Xuan P. A.; He, Rui

    2015-03-01

    Bi-Te nanoplates (NPs) grown by low pressure vapor transport method were studied by Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). We find that the surface of relatively thick (more than tens of nanometers) Bi2Te3 NPs is oxidized in the air and forms a bump under heating with moderate laser power, as revealed by the emergence of Raman lines characteristic of Bi2O3 and TeO2 and characterization by AFM and EDS. Further increase of laser power burns holes on the surface of the NPs. Thin (thicknesses less than 20 nm) NPs with stoichiometry different from Bi2Te3 were also studied. Raman lines from non-stoichiometric NPs are different from those of stoichiometric ones. Thin NPs with the same thickness but different stoichiometries show different color contrast compared to the substrate in the optical image. This indicates that the optical absorption coefficient in thin Bi-Te NPs strongly depends on their stoichiometry. Controlling the stoichiometry in the Bi-Te NP growth is thus very important for their thermoelectric, electronic, and optical device applications. Supported by American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (Grant 53401-UNI10), NSF (No. DMR-1206530, No. DMR-1410496, DMR-1151534), UNI Faculty Summer Fellowship and a UNI capacity building grant.

  19. Coupled mechanical-oxidation modeling during silicon thermal oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xian-Cheng; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2015-09-01

    This work provided an analytical model to solve the coupled mechanical-oxidation problem during the silicon thermal oxidation process. The silicon thermal oxidation behavior under two different mechanical load conditions, i.e., constant strain and uniaxial stress, were considered. The variations of oxide stress and scale thickness along with oxidation time were predicted. During modeling, all the effects of stress accumulation due to growth strain, stress relaxation due to viscous flow and the external load on the scale growth rate were taken into consideration. Results showed that the existence of external loads had an obvious influence on the oxide stress and scale thickness. Generally, tensile stress or strain accelerated the oxidant diffusion process. However, the reaction rate at the Si/SiO2 interface was retarded under uniaxial stress, which was not found in the case of constant strain load.

  20. Charge decay characteristics of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon structure at elevated temperatures and extraction of the nitride

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jong Duk

    -oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon type nonvolatile memory at elevated temperatures. Based on the amphoteric trap model and the thermal known attributes of traps in silicon nitride.8 In the amphoteric model, the traps of both charge states

  1. Epitaxial Growth of Strontium Bismuth Tantalate/Niobate of Buffered Magnesium Oxide Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, George H; Morrell, Johathan; Aytug, Tolga; Xue, Ziling {nmn}; Beach, David B

    2006-01-01

    Epitaxial films of strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}, SBT) and strontium bismuth niobate (SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, SBN) were grown using solution deposition techniques on magnesium oxide (MgO) substrates buffered with a 100 nm layer of lanthanum manganate (LaMnO{sub 3}, LMO). Film structure and texture analyses were carried out using x-ray diffraction. Theta-2theta diffraction patterns were consistent with a c-axis aligned structure for both the buffer layer and the solution deposited films. Theta-2 theta scans revealed (001){sub SBT, SBN}//(001) LMO epitaxial relationships between the solution deposited films and the buffer layer. A pole figure about the SBT, SBN (115) reflection indicated a single in-plane epitaxy. Film quality was assessed using {omega} and {phi} scans. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ({sup 13}C) was used to characterized the methoxy-ethoxide solutions used for the deposition of the SBN and SBT films.

  2. Broadly tunable multiwavelength fiber laser with bismuth-oxide EDF using large effective area fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramzia Salem, A. M.; Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Hizam, H.; Mohd Noor, S. B.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    A multiwavelength laser comb using 2.49 m Bismuth-oxide erbium-doped fiber (Bi-EDF) with different lengths of large effective area fiber (LEAF) in a ring cavity configuration is realized. The Bi-EDF is used as the linear gain medium and LEAF is used as the non-linear gain medium for stimulated Brillouin scattering. Out of the four different lengths, the longest length of 25 km LEAF exhibits the widest tuning range of 44 nm (1576 to 1620 nm) in the L-band at 264 mW pump power and 5 mW Brillouin pump power. In addition, a total of 15 output channels are achieved with total average output power of -8 dBm from this laser structure. All Brillouin Stokes signals exhibit high peak power of above -20 dBm per signal and their optical signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 15 dB.

  3. Enhanced Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity of Br-Doped Bismuth Oxide Formate Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Cui, Wen; Zhong, Junbo; Liu, Xiaoying; Dong, Fan; Zhang, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    A facile method was developed to enhance the visible light photocatalytic activity of bismuth oxide formate (BiOCOOH) nanosheets via Br-doping. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, and N? adsorption-desorption isotherms measurement. The Br(-) ions replaced the COOH(-) ions in the layers of BiOCOOH, result in a decreased layer distance. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared materials was evaluated by removal of NO in qir at ppb level. The results showed that the Br-doped BiOCOOH nanosheets showed enhanced visible light photocatalytic activtiy with a NO removal of 37.8%. The enhanced activity can be ascribed to the increased visible light absorption and the promoted charge separation. PMID:26506332

  4. Tailoring Silicon Oxycarbide Glasses for Oxidative Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Meador, M. A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Blackglas(Trademark) polysiloxane systems produce silicon oxycarbide glasses by pyrolysis in inert atmosphere. The silicon oxycarbides evidence oxidative degradation that limits their lifetime as composite matrices. The present study characterizes bonding rearrangements in the oxycarbide network accompanying increases in pyrolysis temperature. It also addresses the changes in susceptibility to oxidation due to variations in the distribution of Si bonded species obtained under different processing conditions. The study is carried out using Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and a design of experiments approach to model the oxidation behavior. The NMR results are compared with those obtained by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Samples pyrolyzed under inert conditions are compared to those pyrolyzed in reactive ammonia environments.

  5. Edge states and topological properties of electrons on the bismuth on silicon surface with giant spin-orbit coupling

    E-print Network

    D. V. Khomitsky; A. A. Chubanov

    2014-02-04

    We derive a model of localized edge states in the finite width strip for two-dimensional electron gas formed in the hybrid system of bismuth monolayer deposited on the silicon interface and described by the nearly-free electron model with giant spin-orbit splitting. The edge states have the energy dispersion in the bulk energy gap with the Dirac-like linear dependence on the quasimomentum and the spin polarization coupled to the direction of propagation, demonstrating the properties of topological insulator. The topological stability of edge states is confirmed by the calculations of the $Z_2$ invariant taken from the structure of the Pfaffian for the time reversal operator for the filled bulk bands in the surface Brillouin zone which is shown to have a stable number of zeros with the variations of material parameters. The proposed properties of the edge states may support future advances in experimental and technological applications of this new material in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  6. Silica substrate or portion formed from oxidation of monocrystalline silicon

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Ellis, Robert V.

    2003-07-15

    A method is disclosed for forming an inclusion-free silica substrate using a monocrystalline silicon substrate as the starting material and oxidizing the silicon substrate to convert it entirely to silica. The oxidation process is performed from both major surfaces of the silicon substrate using a conventional high-pressure oxidation system. The resulting product is an amorphous silica substrate which is expected to have superior etching characteristics for microfabrication than conventional fused silica substrates. The present invention can also be used to convert only a portion of a monocrystalline silicon substrate to silica by masking the silicon substrate and locally thinning a portion the silicon substrate prior to converting the silicon portion entirely to silica. In this case, the silica formed by oxidizing the thinned portion of the silicon substrate can be used, for example, as a window to provide optical access through the silicon substrate.

  7. Highly Manufacturable and Reliable 80-nm Gate Twin SiliconOxideNitrideOxideSilicon Memory Transistor

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jong Duk

    ­oxide­nitride­oxide­silicon (SONOS) memory (TSM) transistors with 20-nm twin nitride storage nodes under an 80- nm gate. In terms, Semiconductor R&D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., San #24, Nongseo-Ri, Giheung-Eup, Youngin-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711, Korea 3 Process Development Team, Semiconductor R&D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., San #24

  8. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  9. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  10. Synthesis and structural characterization of new bismuth (III) nano coordination polymer: A precursor to produce pure phase nano-sized bismuth (III) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifehpour, Younes; Mirtamizdoust, Babak; Hatami, Masoud; Khomami, Bamin; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-07-01

    A novel bismuth (III) nano coordination polymer, {[Bi (pcih)(NO3)2]?MeOH}n (1), ("pcih" is the abbreviations of 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazoneate) were synthesized by a sonochemical method. The new nano-structure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analyses and IR spectroscopy. Single crystalline material was obtained using a heat gradient applied to a solution of the reagents. Compound 1 was structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The determination of the structure by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the complex forms a zig-zag one dimensional polymer in the solid state and the coordination number of BiIII ions is seven, (BiN3O4), with three N-donor and one O-donor atoms from two "pcih" and three O-donors from nitrate anions. It has a hemidirected coordination sphere. The supramolecular features in these complexes are guided and controlled by weak directional intermolecular interactions. The chains interact with each other through ?-? stacking interactions creating a 3D framework. After thermolysis of 1 at 230 °C with oleic acid, pure phase nano-sized bismuth (III) oxide was produced. The morphology and size of the prepared Bi2O3 samples were further observed using SEM.

  11. Development of tellurium oxide and lead-bismuth oxide glasses for mid-wave infra-red transmission optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Beiming; Rapp, Charles F.; Driver, John K.; Myers, Michael J.; Myers, John D.; Goldstein, Jonathan; Utano, Rich; Gupta, Shantanu

    2013-03-01

    Heavy metal oxide glasses exhibiting high transmission in the Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) spectrum are often difficult to manufacture in large sizes with optimized physical and optical properties. In this work, we researched and developed improved tellurium-zinc-barium and lead-bismuth-gallium heavy metal oxide glasses for use in the manufacture of fiber optics, optical components and laser gain materials. Two glass families were investigated, one based upon tellurium and another based on lead-bismuth. Glass compositions were optimized for stability and high transmission in the MWIR. Targeted glass specifications included low hydroxyl concentration, extended MWIR transmission window, and high resistance against devitrification upon heating. Work included the processing of high purity raw materials, melting under controlled dry Redox balanced atmosphere, finning, casting and annealing. Batch melts as large as 4 kilograms were sprue cast into aluminum and stainless steel molds or temperature controlled bronze tube with mechanical bait. Small (100g) test melts were typically processed in-situ in a 5%Au°/95%Pt° crucible. Our group manufactured and evaluated over 100 different experimental heavy metal glass compositions during a two year period. A wide range of glass melting, fining, casting techniques and experimental protocols were employed. MWIR glass applications include remote sensing, directional infrared counter measures, detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents, laser detection tracking and ranging, range gated imaging and spectroscopy. Enhanced long range mid-infrared sensor performance is optimized when operating in the atmospheric windows from ~ 2.0 to 2.4?m, ~ 3.5 to 4.3?m and ~ 4.5 to 5.0?m.

  12. Iron-oxide catalyzed silicon photoanode for water splitting

    E-print Network

    Jun, Kimin

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents an integrated study of high efficiency photoanodes for water splitting using silicon and iron-oxide. The fundamental limitations of silicon to water splitting applications were overcome by an ultrathin ...

  13. Optical Studies on Oxidized Porous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asli, N. A.; Yusop, S. F. M.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.

    2011-03-01

    The porous silicon (PSi) samples were prepared by photo-electrochemical anodization method. As-prepared and oxidized PSi samples were studied using photoluminescence spectrometer and Raman spectrometer. PSi samples were prepared at 40 and 50 mA/cm2 of current density for 20 minutes. As-prepared sample was kept in a tight chamber as a control sample. The oxidation process used to prepare oxidized PSi which is PSi placed in the oxidation chamber for various time exposition. The products samples were analyzed by PL spectra which have shown the peak positions and peak intensity changes with level of oxidation. The peaks shown shifted to higher energies after oxidized and FWHM becomes smaller compared to as-prepared samples. Raman spectra of PSi have shown the significant differences between as-prepared PSi and oxidized PSi samples that change the line shape become more symmetry shape. Photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectrum used to estimate the size of nanocrystallites of as-prepared PSi and oxidized PSi.

  14. Evaluation of radiation dose reduction during CT scans by using bismuth oxide and nano-barium sulfate shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction and the image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS, were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4) filling the gaps left by the large bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) particles. The radiation dose was measured five times at a direction of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom by using a CT ionization chamber to calculate an average value. The image quality of measured CT transverse images of the PMMA head phantom depended on the X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. Two regions of interest in the CT transverse images were chosen, one from the right area and the other from the left area under the surface of the PMMA head phantom and at a distance of ion chamber holes located in a direction of 12 o'clock from the center of the PMMA head phantom. The results of this study showed that the new DRFS shields could reduce the dosages by 15.61%, 23.05%, and 22.71% at 90 kVp, 120 kVp, and 140 kVp, respectively, than with these of a conventional bismuth shield of the same thickness while maintaining image quality. In addition, the DRFSs produced were about 25% thinness than conventional bismuth. We conclude, therefore, that a DRFS can replace conventional bismuth as a new shield.

  15. Enhancing the Performance of the Rechargeable Iron Electrode in Alkaline Batteries with Bismuth Oxide and Iron Sulfide Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-09-07

    Iron-based alkaline rechargeable batteries have the potential of meeting the needs of large-scale electrical energy storage because of their low-cost, robustness and eco-friendliness. However, the widespread commercial deployment of iron-based batteries has been limited by the low charging efficiency and the poor discharge rate capability of the iron electrode. In this study, we have demonstrated iron electrodes containing bismuth oxide and iron sulfide with a charging efficiency of 92% and capable of being discharged at the 3C rate. Such a high value of charging efficiency combined with the ability to discharge at high rates is being reported for the first time. The bismuth oxide additive led to the in situ formation of elemental bismuth and a consequent increase in the overpotential for the hydrogen evolution reaction leading to an increase in the charging efficiency. We observed that the sulfide ions added to the electrolyte and iron sulfide added to the electrode mitigated-electrode passivation and allowed for continuous discharge at high rates. At the 3C discharge rate, a utilization of 0.2 Ah/g was achieved. The performance level of the rechargeable iron electrode demonstrated here is attractive for designing economically-viable large-scale energy storage systems based on alkaline nickel-iron and iron-air batteries. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Boron-Doped Strontium-Stabilized Bismuth Cobalt Oxide Thermoelectric Nanocrystalline Ceramic Powders Synthesized via Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koçyi?it, Serhat; Aytimur, Arda; Ç?nar, Emre; Uslu, ?brahim; Akdemir, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Boron-doped strontium-stabilized bismuth cobalt oxide thermoelectric nanocrystalline ceramic powders were produced by using a polymeric precursor technique. The powders were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and physical properties measurement system (PPMS) techniques. The XRD results showed that these patterns have a two-phase mixture. The phases are face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc). Values of the crystallite size, dislocation density, and microstrain were calculated by using the Scherrer equation. The lattice parameters were calculated for fcc and bcc phases. The SEM results showed that needle-like grains are formed in boron-undoped composite materials, but the needle-like grains changed to the plate-like grains with the addition of boron. The distribution of the nanofiber diameters was calculated and the average diameter of the boron-doped sample is smaller than the boron-undoped one. PPMS values showed that the electrical resistivity values decreased, but the thermal conductivity values, the Seebeck coefficients, and figure of merit ( ZT) increased with increasing temperature for the two samples.

  17. The Active Oxidation of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2009-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in two very different modes. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits further attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and may lead to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g) Generally passive oxidation occurs at higher oxidant pressures and active oxidation occurs at lower oxidant pressures and elevated temperatures. Active oxidation is a concern for reentry, where the flight trajectory involves the latter conditions. Thus the transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major concern. Passive/active transitions have been studied by a number of investigators. An examination of the literature indicates many questions remain regarding the effect of impurity, the hysteresis of the transition (i.e. the difference between active-to-passive and passive-toactive), and the effect of total pressure. In this study we systematically investigate each of these effects. Experiments were done in both an alumina furnace tube and a quartz furnace tube. It is known that alumina tubes release impurities such as sodium and increase the kinetics in the passive region [1]. We have observed that the active-to-passive transition occurs at a lower oxygen pressure when the experiment is conducted in alumina tubes and the resultant passive silica scale contains sodium. Thus the tests in this study are conducted in quartz tubes. The hysteresis of the transition has been discussed in the detail in the original theoretical treatise of this problem for pure silicon by Wagner [2], yet there is little mention of it in subsequent literature. Essentially Wagner points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. A series of experiments were conducted for active-to-passive and passive-to-active transitions by increasing and decreasing oxygen pressure, respectively. For pure silicon a dramatic difference was found; whereas for SiC the difference was not as great. This may be due to the oxidation of the carbon in SiC which may break down the scale [3]. The third area is the effect of total pressure. In the literature, low oxygen potentials are achieved via either low total pressure or low oxygen pressure in an O2/Ar mixture. Both types of experiments are done in this study and the differences are discussed with regard to the presence or absence of a boundary layer.

  18. A simple analytical model of thermal oxidation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, N. F.

    1999-02-01

    A simple closed-form analytical model of thermal oxidation of silicon is presented. The model is based on the oxidation rate expression of Massoud et al. [1], and is valid for artibitrary values of oxide thickness, including the initial regime. Using this analytical formulation, the various phases of oxidation kinetics are examined in detail.

  19. Guided photoluminescence study of Nd-doped silicon rich silicon oxide and silicon rich silicon nitride waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirasteh, Parastesh; Charrier, Joël; Dumeige, Yannick; Doualan, Jean-Louis; Camy, Patrice; Debieu, Olivier; Liang, Chuan-hui; Khomenkova, Larysa; Lemaitre, Jonathan; Boucher, Yann G.; Gourbilleau, Fabrice

    2013-07-01

    Planar waveguides made of Nd3+-doped silicon rich silicon oxide (SRSO) and silicon rich silicon nitride (SRSN) have been fabricated by reactive magnetron sputtering and characterized with special emphasis on the comparison of the guided photoluminescence (PL) properties of these two matrices. Guided fluorescence excited by top surface pumping at 488 nm on planar waveguides was measured as a function of the distance between the excitation area and the output of the waveguide, as well as a function of the pump power density. The PL intensity increased linearly with pump power without any saturation even at high power. The linear intensity increase of the Nd3+ guided PL under a non-resonant excitation (488 nm) confirms the efficient coupling between either Si-np and rare-earth ions for SRSO or radiative defects and rare earth ions for SRSN. The guided fluorescences at 945 and 1100 nm were observed until 4 mm and 8 mm of the output of the waveguide for Nd3+ doped SRSO and SRSN waveguides, respectively. The guided fluorescence decays of Nd3+-doped-SRSO and -SRSN planar waveguides have been measured and found equal to 97 ?s ±7 and 5 ?s ± 2, respectively. These results show notably that the Nd3+-doped silicon rich silicon oxide is a very promising candidate on the way to achieve a laser cavity at 1.06 ?m.

  20. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Cavallaro, Alex; Delalat, Bahman; Harding, Frances J.; McInnes, Steven JP; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vasilev, Krasimir; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

  1. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  2. Growth of silicon quantum dots by oxidation of the silicon nanocrystals embedded within silicon carbide matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha

    2014-10-15

    A moderately low temperature (?800 °C) thermal processing technique has been described for the growth of the silicon quantum dots (Si-QD) within microcrystalline silicon carbide (?c-SiC:H) dielectric thin films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. The nanocrystalline silicon grains (nc-Si) present in the as deposited films were initially enhanced by aluminium induced crystallization (AIC) method in vacuum at a temperature of T{sub v} = 525 °C. The samples were then stepwise annealed at different temperatures T{sub a} in air ambient. Analysis of the films by FTIR and XPS reveal a rearrangement of the ?c-SiC:H network has taken place with a significant surface oxidation of the nc-Si domains upon annealing in air. The nc-Si grain size (D{sub XRD}) as calculated from the XRD peak widths using Scherrer formula was found to decrease from 7 nm to 4 nm with increase in T{sub a} from 250 °C to 800 °C. A core shell like structure with the nc-Si as the core and the surface oxide layer as the shell can clearly describe the situation. The results indicate that with the increase of the annealing temperature in air the oxide shell layer becomes thicker and the nc-Si cores become smaller until their size reduced to the order of the Si-QDs. Quantum confinement effect due to the SiO covered nc-Si grains of size about 4 nm resulted in a photoluminescence peak due to the Si QDs with peak energy at 1.8 eV.

  3. Structural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride: Silicon/carbon nanocomposites thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Khushboo; Mehta, B. R.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the effect of the presence of secondary phases on the structural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of nanocomposite Bi2Te3 films prepared by co-sputtering of silicon and carbon with Bi2Te3 has been investigated. Growth temperature and the presence of Si and C phase are observed to have a strong effect on the topography and orientation of crystallites. X-ray diffraction study demonstrates that Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:C samples have preferred (0 0 15) orientation in comparison to Bi2Te3:Si sample, which have randomly oriented crystallites. Atomic force, conducting atomic force, and scanning thermal microscopy analysis show significant differences in topographical, electrical, and thermal conductivity contrasts in Bi2Te3:Si and Bi2Te3:C samples. Due to the randomly oriented crystallites and the presence of Si along the crystallite boundaries, appreciable Seebeck coefficient, higher electrical conductivity, and lower thermal conductivity is achieved resulting in relatively higher value of power factor (3.71 mW K-2 m-1) for Bi2Te3:Si sample. This study shows that by incorporating a secondary phase along crystallite boundaries, microstructural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of the composite samples can be modified.

  4. Structural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride: Silicon/carbon nanocomposites thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Khushboo; Mehta, B. R.

    2014-08-28

    In this study, the effect of the presence of secondary phases on the structural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of nanocomposite Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films prepared by co-sputtering of silicon and carbon with Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} has been investigated. Growth temperature and the presence of Si and C phase are observed to have a strong effect on the topography and orientation of crystallites. X-ray diffraction study demonstrates that Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:C samples have preferred (0 0 15) orientation in comparison to Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:Si sample, which have randomly oriented crystallites. Atomic force, conducting atomic force, and scanning thermal microscopy analysis show significant differences in topographical, electrical, and thermal conductivity contrasts in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:Si and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:C samples. Due to the randomly oriented crystallites and the presence of Si along the crystallite boundaries, appreciable Seebeck coefficient, higher electrical conductivity, and lower thermal conductivity is achieved resulting in relatively higher value of power factor (3.71 mW K{sup ?2} m{sup ?1}) for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:Si sample. This study shows that by incorporating a secondary phase along crystallite boundaries, microstructural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of the composite samples can be modified.

  5. Excimer laser induced oxidation of ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarassy, E.; White, C.W.; Slaoui, A.; Fuchs, C.; Siffert, P.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1988-10-31

    We have investigated laser-induced oxidation of ion-implanted Si using a repetitively pulsed ArF laser, working at low-energy density (100--500 mJ/cm/sup 2/). Oxidation is observed at energy densities between the melt threshold and that required for epitaxial recrystallization of the amorphous layer. At these energy densities, oxidation is not observed on virgin silicon. The factors that influence the oxidation process are discussed.

  6. The photorefractive characteristics of bismuth-oxide doped lithium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dahuai; Kong, Yongfa; Liu, Shiguo; Yao, Jiaying; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Shaolin; Xu, Jingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bismuth-doped lithium niobate (LN:Bi) crystals were grown by Czochralski method and their optical damage resistance, photorefraction, absorption spectra, and defect energy levels were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the photorefractive properties of LN:Bi were enhanced as compared with congruent one, the photorefractive response time was greatly shortened, the photorefractive sensitivity was increased, and the diffraction efficiency of near-stoichiometric LN:Bi (SLN:Bi) reached 31.72% and 49.08% at 532 nm and 488 nm laser, respectively (light intensity of 400 mW/cm2). An absorption peak at about 350 nm was observed in the absorption spectrum of LN:Bi. And the defect energy levels simulation indicates new defect levels appear in the forbidden gap of LN:Bi crystals. Therefore bismuth can act as photorefractive centers in LN crystals.

  7. New synthesis of bismuth oxide nanoparticles Bi2O3 assisted by tannic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascencio Aguirre, Francisco Miguel; Herrera Becerra, Raúl

    2015-06-01

    A new and simple method of biosynthesis assisted by tannic acid (C76H52O46) is used to obtain bismuth trioxide nanoparticles Bi2O3 in which the ?-Bi2O3 phase is identified. Synthesis takes place at room temperature and atmospheric pressure from the reduction of bismuth nitrate pentahydrate (Bi(NO3)3·5H2O) in solution, using tannic acid as a reducing agent and stabilizer. Nanoparticles with an average size of 10.99 ± 0.27 nm are obtained, and the structural properties of the nanoparticles are observed using transmission electron microscopy techniques, as well as UV-Visible-NIR spectroscopy, with which a semiconductor behavior with band gap within a range of (2.57-3.02) eV is observed. Using Raman spectroscopy, it is possible to observe and identify different normal modes of vibration, characteristic of the ?-Bi2O3 phase.

  8. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Reduction during CT Scans Using Oxide Bismuth and Nano-Barium Sulfate Shields

    E-print Network

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate radiation dose reduction and image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4), filling the gaps left by the large oxide bismuth (Bi2O3) particle sizes. The radiation dose was measured five times at directionss of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom to calculate an average value using a CT ionization chamber. The image quality measured CT transverse images of the PMMA head phantom depending on X-ray tube voltages and the type of shielding. Two regions of interest in CT transverse images were chosen from the right and left areas under the surface of the PMMA head phantom and from ion chamber holes located at directions of 12 o'clock from the center of the PMMA head phantom. The results of this study showed that the new DRFS shields could reduce dosages to 15.61%, 23.05%, and 22.71% more in ...

  9. Research on silicon microchannel arrays oxide insulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke-xin; Duanmu, Qingduo; Wang, Guozheng; Yang, Ji-kai; Kou, Yang-qiang

    2015-03-01

    Silicon microchannel plates (Si-MCP) is widely used in the photomultiplier, night vision, X- ray intensifier and other areas. In order to meet the requirements of high voltage electron multiplier, Si-MCP need to prepare a layer of silicon dioxide in the microchannel to improve the insulating properties. There are many methods for preparing SiO2 layer, such as thermal growth, magnetron sputtering method and chemical vapor deposition etc. The thermal oxidation method is often used for preparation of insulating layer that it grows film thickness uniformity, compact structure, simple process and so on. There will be bending deformation phenomenon of silicon microchannel arrays in high temperature oxidation process. The warpage of Si-MCP has brought great for difficulties of subsequent processing. Silicon crystals has the properties of plastic deformation at high temperature, this article take full advantage of this properties by which the already bending deformation of silicon microchannel arrays can be restored to flat.

  10. Development of an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified disposable bismuth film electrode and its application for stripping analysis of heavy metals in milk.

    PubMed

    Ping, Jianfeng; Wang, Yixian; Wu, Jian; Ying, Yibin

    2014-05-15

    A novel electrochemical sensing platform based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide film modified screen-printed electrode was developed. This disposable electrode shows excellent conductivity and fast electron transfer kinetics. By in situ plating bismuth film, the developed electrode exhibited well-defined and separate stripping peaks for cadmium and lead. Several parameters, including electrolytes environment and electrodeposition conditions, were carefully optimized to achieve best stripping performance. The linear range for both metal ions at the disposable bismuth film electrode was from 1.0 ?g L(-1) to 60.0 ?g L(-1). The detection limit was 0.5 ?g L(-1) for cadmium ion and 0.8 ?g L(-1) for lead ion. Milk sample analysis demonstrates that the developed electrode could be effectively used to detect low levels (?g L(-1)) of cadmium ion and lead ion. Graphene based disposable bismuth film electrode is a sensitive, stable, and reliable sensing platform for heavy metals determination. PMID:24423503

  11. Integration of functional complex oxide nanomaterials on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Fungueiriño, Jose Manuel; Bachelet, Romain; Saint-Girons, Guillaume; Gendry, Michel; Gich, Marti; Gazquez, Jaume; Ferain, Etienne; Rivadulla, Francisco; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Mestres, Narcis; Carretero-Genevrier, Adrian

    2015-06-01

    The combination of standard wafer-scale semiconductor processing with the properties of functional oxides opens up to innovative and more efficient devices with high value applications that can be produced at large scale. This review uncovers the main strategies that are successfully used to monolithically integrate functional complex oxide thin films and nanostructures on silicon: the chemical solution deposition approach (CSD) and the advanced physical vapor deposition techniques such as oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Special emphasis will be placed on complex oxide nanostructures epitaxially grown on silicon using the combination of CSD and MBE. Several examples will be exposed, with a particular stress on the control of interfaces and crystallization mechanisms on epitaxial perovskite oxide thin films, nanostructured quartz thin films, and octahedral molecular sieve nanowires. This review enlightens on the potential of complex oxide nanostructures and the combination of both chemical and physical elaboration techniques for novel oxide-based integrated devices.

  12. Light-induced degradation of native silicon oxide-silicon nitride bilayer passivated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2015-10-01

    This article reports on the effects of aging and light induced degradation of the passivation quality of the interface formed by the crystalline silicon surface and facile grown oxide—SiNx bilayer. Stable passivation quality against aging and light soaking require thicker oxide layers grown at room temperature, suggesting that thicker oxide layers mitigate the migration of hydrogen from the interface and hence the defect density under light soaking. In addition, the stoichiometry of the PECVD SiNx influences the stability of the passivation quality. Specifically, the rate of degradation in passivation quality is observed to correlate with the optical absorption properties of SiNx; the higher the optical absorption the greater the degradation in passivation. This result is attributed to neutralization of the K+ centers in SiNx. Passivation layers with SiNx deposited with 5% silane in nitrogen to ammonia gas ratio of 7 and facile grown native oxide thickness of ˜1 nm resulted in the most stable passivation scheme within the scope of the reported experiments.

  13. Compact and low-latency instantaneous frequency measurement using 38 cm bismuth-oxide fiber and fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Fok, Mable P

    2013-08-10

    We demonstrated a compact and low-latency photonic approach for broadband RF signal frequency measurement. The photonic approach does not require high-speed electronics for gigahertz RF signal measurement. Frequency-to-intensity mapping is achieved based on a two-tap finite-impulse-response filter architecture, where the time delay between signals is provided by fiber Bragg grating array. With four-wave mixing (FWM) as an optical broadband mixer, sinusoid frequency response is transferred to a DC output, where FWM is achieved in a 38 cm bismuth-oxide fiber. Thus, the resultant signal does not consist of any high-frequency component and no high-speed oscilloscope is needed for the measurement. PMID:23938415

  14. Zinc oxide varistors and/or resistors

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bond, Walter D. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    Varistors and/or resistors that includes doped zinc oxide gel microspheres. The doped zinc oxide gel microspheres preferably have from about 60 to about 95% by weight zinc oxide and from about 5 to about 40% by weight dopants based on the weight of the zinc oxide. The dopants are a plurality of dopants selected from silver salts, boron oxide, silicon oxide and hydrons oxides of aluminum, bismuth, cobalt, chromium, manganese, nickel, and antimony.

  15. Zinc oxide varistors and/or resistors

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1993-07-27

    Varistors and/or resistors are described that include doped zinc oxide gel microspheres. The doped zinc oxide gel microspheres preferably have from about 60 to about 95% by weight zinc oxide and from about 5 to about 40% by weight dopants based on the weight of the zinc oxide. The dopants are a plurality of dopants selected from silver salts, boron oxide, silicon oxide and hydrons oxides of aluminum, bismuth, cobalt, chromium, manganese, nickel, and antimony.

  16. Cycling endurance of silicon{endash}oxide{endash}nitride{endash}oxide{endash}silicon nonvolatile memory stacks prepared with nitrided SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Habermehl, S.; Nasby, R.D.; Rightley, M.J.

    1999-08-01

    The effects of nitrided SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) interfaces upon cycling endurance in silicon{endash}oxide{endash}nitride{endash}oxide{endash}silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile memory transistors are investigated. Analysis of metal{endash}oxide{endash}silicon field-effect transistor subthreshold characteristics indicate cycling degradation to be a manifestation of interface trap generation at the tunnel oxide/silicon interface. After 10{sup 6} write/erase cycles, SONOS film stacks prepared with nitrided tunnel oxides exhibit enhanced cycling endurance over stacks prepared with non-nitrided tunnel oxides. If the capping oxide is formed by steam oxidation, rather than by deposition, SONOS stacks prepared with non-nitrided tunnel oxides exhibit endurance characteristics similar to stacks with nitrided tunnel oxides. For this case, a mechanism for latent nitridation of the tunnel oxide/silicon interface is proposed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Infrared characterization of UV laser-induced silicon oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Slaoui, A.; Fogarassy, E.; White, C.W.; Siffert, P.

    1988-11-07

    Oxygen incorporation and subsequent oxidation of ion-implanted silicon have been performed using repetitive pulsed excimer laser irradiation working in the liquid phase regime. The kinetics of the oxidation and the characterization of the grown SiO/sub 2/ were investigated by infrared spectroscopy. The origin of the broadening of the Si-O stretching band of these oxides grown from the liquid phase is discussed.

  18. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed.

  19. Carbon nanotube network-silicon oxide non-volatile switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Albert D.; Araujo, Paulo T.; Xu, Runjie; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2014-12-01

    The integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon is important for their incorporation into next-generation nano-electronics. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile switch that utilizes carbon nanotube networks to electrically contact a conductive nanocrystal silicon filament in silicon dioxide. We form this device by biasing a nanotube network until it physically breaks in vacuum, creating the conductive silicon filament connected across a small nano-gap. From Raman spectroscopy, we observe coalescence of nanotubes during breakdown, which stabilizes the system to form very small gaps in the network~15?nm. We report that carbon nanotubes themselves are involved in switching the device to a high resistive state. Calculations reveal that this switching event occurs at ~600?°C, the temperature associated with the oxidation of nanotubes. Therefore, we propose that, in switching to a resistive state, the nanotube oxidizes by extracting oxygen from the substrate.

  20. Enhancement of Er optical efficiency through bismuth sensitization in yttrium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarangella, Adriana; Reitano, Riccardo; Franzò, Giorgia; Priolo, Francesco; Miritello, Maria

    2015-07-01

    The process of energy transfer (ET) between optically active ions has been widely studied to improve the optical efficiency of a system for different applications, from lighting and photovoltaics to silicon microphotonics. In this work, we report the influence of Bi on the Er optical emission in erbium-yttrium oxide thin films synthesized by magnetron co-sputtering. We demonstrate that this host permits to well dissolve Er and Bi ions, avoiding their clustering, and thus to stabilize the optically active Er3+ and Bi3+ valence states. In addition, we establish the ET occurrence from Bi3+ to Er3+ by the observed Bi3+ PL emission decrease and the simultaneous Er3+ photoluminescence (PL) emission increase. This was further confirmed by the coincidence of the Er3+ and Bi3+ excitation bands, analyzed by PL excitation spectroscopy. By increasing the Bi content of two orders of magnitude inside the host, though the occurrence of Bi-Bi interactions becomes deleterious for Bi3+ optical efficiency, the ET process between Bi3+ and Er3+ is still prevalent. We estimate ET efficiency of 70% for the optimized Bi:Er ratio equal to 1:3. Moreover, we have demonstrated to enhance the Er3+ effective excitation cross section by more than three orders of magnitude with respect to the direct one, estimating a value of 5.3 × 10-18 cm2, similar to the expected Bi3+ excitation cross section. This value is one of the highest obtained for Er in Si compatible hosts. These results make this material very promising as an efficient emitter for Si-compatible photonics devices.

  1. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 modulates bismuth oxide-induced cytotoxicity in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-San; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Bae, Ji-Myung; Park, Sang-Hyuk; Hong, Chan-Ui; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and nitric oxide (NO)-inducing effects of bismuth oxide (Bi(2)O(3))-containing Portland cement (BPC) on human dental pulp cells. We also assessed whether heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is involved in BPC-induced cytotoxicity in dental pulp cells. Cytotoxicity and NO production induced by BPC were higher than those induced by Portland cement at 12 and 24 hours, and the former gradually decreased to the level observed for PC. HO-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA expressions in the BPC group showed maximal increase at 24 hours, and it gradually decreased with increasing cultivation time. Hemin treatment reversed the BPC-induced cytotoxicity, whereas zinc protoporphyrin IX treatment increased the cytotoxicity. These results suggested that NO production by BPC correlates with HO-1 expression in dental pulp cells. Moreover, BPC-induced HO-1 expression in dental pulp cells plays a protective role against the cytotoxic effects of BPC. PMID:17963960

  2. Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors formed by oxidation of polycrystalline silicon on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J.; Das, M. K.; Cooper, J. A., Jr.; Melloch, M. R.

    1997-04-01

    A method to form SiO2/SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor structures by oxidation of a thin polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) layer deposited on SiC is demonstrated. The oxidation time used is sufficient to oxidize all the polysilicon while short enough at 1050 °C to insure insignificant oxidation of the underlying SiC. Since the oxidation of SiC is highly anisotropic, this method allows uniform oxide formation on a nonplanar SiC surface. The SiO2/SiC interface quality is comparable to that obtained with thermal oxidation.

  3. Ion implantation reduces radiation sensitivity of metal oxide silicon /MOS/ devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Implanting nitrogen ions improves hardening of silicon oxides 30 percent to 60 percent against ionizing radiation effects. Process reduces sensitivity, but retains stability normally shown by interfaces between silicon and thermally grown oxides.

  4. Oxidation kinetics of CVD silicon carbide and silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, D.S.

    1992-10-01

    The long-term oxidation behavior of pure, monolithic CVD SiC and Si3N4 is studied, and the isothermal oxidation kinetics of these two materials are obtained for the case of 100 hrs at 1200-1500 C in flowing oxygen. Estimates are made of lifetimes at the various temperatures investigated. Parabolic rate constants for SiC are within an order of magnitude of shorter exposure time values reported in the literature. The resulting silica scales are in the form of cristobalite, with cracks visible after exposure. The oxidation protection afforded by silica for these materials is adequate for long service times under isothermal conditions in 1-atm dry oxygen. 10 refs.

  5. Novel lead-free piezoelectric ceramics in the solid solution (1-x) bismuth iron oxide-barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontsev, Serhiy

    Piezoelectric materials are widely used in many areas of science and technology due to their electromechanical properties. The transformation of mechanical energy into electrical signals and vice versa based on the piezoelectric effect has led to the development of sensor devices and piezoelectric actuators used in accelerometers, pressure and vibration meters, micropositioning devices, ultrasound generators, motors etc. The most technologically important piezoelectric material is lead zirconate titanate PbZrO3-PbTiO3 (PZT), however, the commercial manufacture and application of PZT as a lead-based material represent serious health hazards. The need to reduce environmental contamination by lead-based substances has created the current drive to develop alternative lead-free piezoelectric materials. The present work describes a detailed investigation of the novel multifunctional ceramic material in a solid solution of bismuth iron oxide and barium titanate (1-x)BiFeO 3-xBaTiO3 (BFBT) with an emphasis on the room temperature piezoelectric properties and structural study. BFBT ceramics were prepared via the metal oxide solid-state preparation route. Addition of manganese oxide MnO2 increased the DC resistance by one to five orders of magnitude allowing high-field poling and piezoelectric strain measurements in Mn-modified BFBT ceramics. Piezoelectric d33 coefficients of 116 pC/N (low-field, Berlincourt) and 326 pC/N (effective, high-field) are reported for the compositions with x=0.25 and 0.33 respectively. Piezoelectric measurements using the Rayleigh law under applied large DC electric field indicated an increased low-field piezoelectric d33 coefficient to 150 pC/N (x=0.33). The DC bias is believed to stabilize the ferroclectric domain structure leading to stronger intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the piezoelectric response in BFBT. Bright field TEM imaging confirmed formation of macroscopic domains following high field poling from initially frustrated domain state indicating the ability to induce long-range polarization order in BFBT ceramics. It is believed that the results of this work will contribute to the development of a family of lead-free piezoelectric materials based on BiFeO3-BaTiO3 system. KEYWORDS: Bismuth ferrite, Barium titanate, Lead-free, Piezoelectric ceramics, Crystal Structure

  6. The Oxidation of CVD Silicon Carbide in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynchGiao N.

    1997-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) was oxidized in carbon dioxide (CO2) at temperatures of 1200-1400 C for times between 100 and 500 hours at several gas flow rates. Oxidation weight gains were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be very small and independent of temperature. Possible rate limiting kinetic laws are discussed. Oxidation of SiC by CO2 is negligible compared to the rates measured for other oxidants typically found in combustion environments: oxygen and water vapor.

  7. Temperature-induced phase changes in bismuth oxides and efficient photodegradation of phenol and p-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yin; Li, Danzhen; Sun, Fuqian; Weng, Yaqing; You, Shengyong; Shao, Yu

    2016-01-15

    A novel, simple and efficient approach for photodegrading phenol and p-chlorophenol, based on BixOy, was reported for the first time. Monoclinic Bi2O4 was prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of NaBiO3·2H2O. A series of interesting phase transitions happened and various bismuth oxides (Bi4O7, ?-Bi2O3 and ?-Bi2O3) were obtained by sintering Bi2O4 at different temperatures. The results demonstrated that the Bi2O4 and Bi4O7 phase had strong abilities towards the oxidative decomposition of phenol and p-chlorophenol and very high rates of TOC removal were observed. The characterization by XRD and XPS revealed that Bi(4+) in Bi2O4 and Bi(3.5+) in Bi4O7 were reduced to Bi(3+) during the reaction process. Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was identified as the major reactive species generated by Bi2O4 and Bi4O7 for the photodegradation of p-chlorophenol and phenol. This novel approach could be used as a highly efficient and green technology for treating wastewaters contaminated by high concentrations of phenol and chlorophenols. PMID:26384997

  8. Boron Carbide and Silicon Oxide Hetero-nanonecklaces via Temperature Modulation

    E-print Network

    Gao, Hongjun

    Boron Carbide and Silicon Oxide Hetero-nanonecklaces via Temperature Modulation Jifa Tian, Xingjun ReceiVed April 23, 2008 ABSTRACT: Boron carbide and silicon oxide (BCSiO) hetero-nanonecklaces have been-500 nm silicon oxide nanoballs onto 20-30 nm boron carbide nanowires. Synthetic analysis shows that a two

  9. The interface between silicon and a high-k oxide.

    PubMed

    Först, Clemens J; Ashman, Christopher R; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Blöchl, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    The ability of the semiconductor industry to continue scaling microelectronic devices to ever smaller dimensions (a trend known as Moore's Law) is limited by quantum mechanical effects: as the thickness of conventional silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) gate insulators is reduced to just a few atomic layers, electrons can tunnel directly through the films. Continued device scaling will therefore probably require the replacement of the insulator with high-dielectric-constant (high-k) oxides, to increase its thickness, thus preventing tunnelling currents while retaining the electronic properties of an ultrathin SiO(2) film. Ultimately, such insulators will require an atomically defined interface with silicon without an interfacial SiO(2) layer for optimal performance. Following the first reports of epitaxial growth of AO and ABO(3) compounds on silicon, the formation of an atomically abrupt crystalline interface between strontium titanate and silicon was demonstrated. However, the atomic structure proposed for this interface is questionable because it requires silicon atoms that have coordinations rarely found elsewhere in nature. Here we describe first-principles calculations of the formation of the interface between silicon and strontium titanate and its atomic structure. Our study shows that atomic control of the interfacial structure by altering the chemical environment can dramatically improve the electronic properties of the interface to meet technological requirements. The interface structure and its chemistry may provide guidance for the selection process of other high-k gate oxides and for controlling their growth. PMID:14702081

  10. Oxidized porous silicon moisture sensors for evaluation of microelectronic packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.J.; Guilinger, T.R.; Peterson, D.W.; Tuck, M.R.; Sweet, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    Accurate moisture measurements in microelectronic assemblies are crucial in assessing reliability of integrated circuits (ICs). We describe the fabrication and use of a silicon-based device for evaluation of moisture barrier coatings. The capacitive moisture sensors use oxidized porous silicon (OPS) as the sensing element. Porous silicon (PS) is formed by anodization of silicon in hydrofluroic acid (HF). Oxidation of PS in oxygen produces OPS, which is also porous if an appropriate starting microstructure and oxidation treatment are selected. Metallization layers on the OPS and the wafer back complete the capacitor structure. The capacitance of OPS sensors is functionally related to the moisture content of the surrounding atmosphere. For example, the capacitance of one sensor changed from 4 nF/cm{sup 2} when exposed to a moisture level of 300 ppm (by volume) to 36 nF/cm{sup 2} at 10,000 ppm. In addition to this excellent sensitivity, capacitor response to step changes in moisture is rapid and reversible. The sensors are also rugged, as demonstrated by their consistent performance during accelerated testing at 85% relative humidity and 140{degrees}C. A silicon nitride IC moisture barrier coating was deposited on sensors of this type after normal ceramic dual in-line packaging. Sensor operability after coating deposition was confirmed following intentional introduction of a pinhole into the moisture barrier coating. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  11. One dimensional silicon nanostructures prepared by oxidized porous silicon under heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendamani, V. S.; Pathak, A. P.; Rao, S. V. S. Nageswara

    2014-11-01

    One dimensional high aspect ratio Si nanostructures were prepared by using oxidized sponge like nanostructured porous silicon (pSi) as a seed material. This can be considered as a complementary technique to synthesize silicon nanowires such as vapour-liquid-solid method (VLS). One dimensional silicon nanostructures were fabricated by subjecting pSi to heat treatment without metal assistance. It is shown that the aspect ratio can be tuned by controlling the concentration of oxygen (SiO2) and the porosity of the seed material (pSi). The atomic percentage of oxygen incorporated into pSi was estimated by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) confirms unambiguously the formation of silicon nanowires. The broad peak observed around 490 cm-1 in Raman spectra further confirms the formation of Si NWs. At higher oxygen concentration, narrower (?20 nm) and longer (?1 ?m) silicon nanowires have been achieved. The observed change in photoluminescence (PL) peak position towards lower wavelength as a function of the aspect ratio of Si NWs is in good agreement with quantum confinement effects. This work demonstrates a new oxide assisted method to prepare high aspect ratio silicon nanowires without using any metal catalysts.

  12. Nonlinear optical properties of low temperature annealed silicon-rich oxide and silicon-rich nitride materials for silicon photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Minissale, S.; Yerci, S.; Dal Negro, L.

    2012-01-09

    We investigate the nonlinear optical properties of Si-rich silicon oxide (SRO) and Si-rich silicon nitride (SRN) samples as a function of silicon content, annealing temperature, and excitation wavelength. Using the Z-scan technique, we measure the non-linear refractive index n{sub 2} and the nonlinear absorption coefficient {beta} for a large number of samples fabricated by reactive co-sputtering. Moreover, we characterize the nonlinear optical parameters of SRN in the broad spectral region 1100-1500 nm and show the strongest nonlinearity at 1500 nm. These results demonstrate the potential of the SRN matrix for the engineering of compact devices with enhanced Kerr nonlinearities for silicon photonics applications.

  13. Tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene and silicon oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Uçar, A.; Çopuro?lu, M.; Suzer, S.; Baykara, M. Z.; Ar?kan, O.

    2014-10-28

    We investigated the tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and silicon oxide surfaces. A simple rig was designed to bring about a friction between the surfaces via sliding a piece of PTFE on a thermally oxidized silicon wafer specimen. A very mild inclination (?0.5°) along the sliding motion was also employed in order to monitor the tribological interaction in a gradual manner as a function of increasing contact force. Additionally, some patterns were sketched on the silicon oxide surface using the PTFE tip to investigate changes produced in the hydrophobicity of the surface, where the approximate water contact angle was 45° before the transfer. The nature of the transferred materials was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPS results revealed that PTFE was faithfully transferred onto the silicon oxide surface upon even at the slightest contact and SEM images demonstrated that stable morphological changes could be imparted onto the surface. The minimum apparent contact pressure to realize the PTFE transfer is estimated as 5 kPa, much lower than reported previously. Stability of the patterns imparted towards many chemical washing processes lead us to postulate that the interaction is most likely to be chemical. Contact angle measurements, which were carried out to characterize and monitor the hydrophobicity of the silicon oxide surface, showed that upon PTFE transfer the hydrophobicity of the SiO{sub 2} surface could be significantly enhanced, which might also depend upon the pattern sketched onto the surface. Contact angle values above 100° were obtained.

  14. Optical properties of Lead bismuth borate glasses doped with neodymium oxide.

    PubMed

    Farouk, M; Abd El-Maboud, A; Ibrahim, M; Ratep, A; Kashif, I

    2015-10-01

    Neodymium doped Lead bismuth borate glasses with the composition of 25PbO-25Bi2O3-50B2O3:xNd2O3, where x=0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 mol%, have been prepared by melt quenching technique. The behavior of the density and molar volume allows concluding that, addition of Nd2O3 leads to the formation of non-bridging oxygen. Rare earth ion parameters have been calculated and studied. The optical band gap (Eg), and band tails (Ee) were determined. Judd-Ofelt theory for the intensity analysis of induced electric dipole transitions has been applied to the measured oscillator strengths of the absorption bands to determine the three phenomenological intensity parameters ?2, ?4 and ?6 for glass. It was observed that the deviation parameters, rms, was found to be 0.56:0.58(×10(-6)). The estimated Judd-Ofelt parameters were found to be Nd2O3concentration dependent. The hypersensitive transition, (4)I9/2?(4)G5/2+(2)G7/2, is closely related to ?2 parameter. PMID:25965518

  15. The microstructure of laterally seeded silicon-on-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinizzotto, R. F.; Lam, H. W.; Vaandrager, B. L.

    1982-03-01

    The production of large scale integrated circuits in thin silicon films on insulating substrates is currently of much interest in the electronics industry. One of the most promising techniques of forming this composite structure is by lateral seeding. We have used optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the microstructure of silicon-on-oxide formed by scanning CW laser induced lateral epitaxy. The primary defects are dislocations. Dislocation rearrangement leads to the formation of both small angle boundaries (stable, regular dislocation arrays) and grain boundaries. The grains were found to be misoriented to the <100> direction perpendicular to the film plane by ? 4° and to the <100> directions in the plane of the film by ? 2°. Internal reflection twins are a common defect. Microtwinning was found to occur at the vertical step caused by the substrate-oxide interface if the substrate to oxide step height was > 120 nm. The microstructure is continuous across successive scan lines. Microstructural defects are found to initiate at the same topographical location in different oxide pads. We propose that this is due to the meeting of two crystallization growth fronts. The liquid silicon between the fronts causes large stresses in this area because of the 9% volume increase during solidification. The defects observed in the bulk may form by a similar mechanism or by dislocation generation at substrate-oxide interface irregularities. The models predict that slower growth leads to improved material quality. This has been observed experimentally.

  16. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  17. Enhanced current injection in thermal oxides grown on texturized silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcer, M.; Buehlmann, H. J.; Ilegems, M.

    1986-03-01

    A new method to obtain enhanced electron injection in MOS structures by means of an oxide layer grown on monocrystalline silicon, is described. It is shown that texturization of the Si surface prior to oxidation can lead to markedly enhanced electron injection, with field enhancement factors mu = E(inj)/E(a) reaching values in the range from about 2-4 to 8.6. Preliminary measurements suggest that the improved injection efficiency is obtained without deleterious effects on the trapping properties of the thermal oxide. The proposed technique may be used as an alternative to conventional Fowler-Nordheim emission processes for write/erase operations in EEPROM-type devices.

  18. Silicon nanowire circuits fabricated by AFM oxidation nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ramses V; Martínez, Javier; Garcia, Ricardo

    2010-06-18

    We report a top-down process for the fabrication of single-crystalline silicon nanowire circuits and devices. Local oxidation nanolithography is applied to define very narrow oxide masks on top of a silicon-on-insulator substrate. In a plasma etching, the nano-oxide mask generates a nanowire with a rectangular section. The nanowire width coincides with the lateral size of the mask. In this way, uniform and well-defined transistors with channel widths in the 10-20 nm range have been fabricated. The nanowires can be positioned with sub-100 nm lateral accuracy. The transistors exhibit an on/off current ratio of 10(5). The atomic force microscope nanolithography offers full control of the nanowire's shape from straight to circular or a combination of them. It also enables the integration of several nanowires within the same circuit. The nanowire transistors have been applied to detect immunological processes. PMID:20484797

  19. Silicon nanowire circuits fabricated by AFM oxidation nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Ramses V.; Martínez, Javier; Garcia, Ricardo

    2010-06-01

    We report a top-down process for the fabrication of single-crystalline silicon nanowire circuits and devices. Local oxidation nanolithography is applied to define very narrow oxide masks on top of a silicon-on-insulator substrate. In a plasma etching, the nano-oxide mask generates a nanowire with a rectangular section. The nanowire width coincides with the lateral size of the mask. In this way, uniform and well-defined transistors with channel widths in the 10-20 nm range have been fabricated. The nanowires can be positioned with sub-100 nm lateral accuracy. The transistors exhibit an on/off current ratio of 105. The atomic force microscope nanolithography offers full control of the nanowire's shape from straight to circular or a combination of them. It also enables the integration of several nanowires within the same circuit. The nanowire transistors have been applied to detect immunological processes.

  20. High-relative-dielectric-constant bismuth-niobium-oxide films prepared using Nb-rich precursor solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, Tomoki; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Shin; Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    Various ceramic materials have been developed for electronic devices. Bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared by a chemical solution deposition (CSD) method have the cubic pyrochlore phase, high relative dielectric constant, and low tangent loss (tan ?). We found that a BNO cubic pyrochlore crystal was Nb-rich, even though its pyrochlore formula is A2B2O7. The crystallization temperature of BNO increased with increasing Nb ratio. The relative dielectric constants of BNO films were related to the Nb ratio in the precursor solution. The dielectric constant of the BNO films was 250 when the Bi and Nb ratios in BNO precursor solutions were 4 and 6, respectively, and the sintering temperature was 600 °C. In addition, the tan ? was less than 0.01 at 1 kHz, which is higher than the reported values of BNO systems despite using the CSD method. These results show that the properties of BNO films prepared by the CSD method were associated with the Nb ratio in the precursor solution. Furthermore, the dielectric characteristics indicated that the Nb-rich BNO films have potential applications in electronic devices.

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, and Thermoelectric Properties of Electrospun Boron-Doped Barium-Stabilized Bismuth-Cobalt Oxide Nanoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çinar, Emre; Koçyi?it, Serhat; Aytimur, Arda; Uslu, ?brahim; Akdemir, Ahmet

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the boron-doped barium-stabilized bismuth cobalt oxide thermoelectric nanocrystalline ceramic powders were produced by the polymeric precursor technique. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and the physical properties measurement system. The X-ray diffraction results showed that these patterns have mixture of two phases as face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic. Values of the crystallite size, the dislocation density, and the microstrain were calculated by the Scherrer equation. According to these values, the crystallite size decreased from 60 to 51 nm with the boron addition in the boron-undoped and boron-doped samples, respectively. The scanning electron microscope results showed that nanograins are rarely seen in the boron-undoped samples, but nanograins turn into needle-like and layered structures with boron addition. The diameters distribution of nanofibers was calculated. The average diameter of the boron-doped sample is smaller than the boron-undoped sample. The physical properties measurement system values showed that the electrical and thermal conductivity, the Seebeck coefficient, and the figure of merit increased with the temperature rise for both samples. The boron-doping effect increased the electrical and thermal conductivity, decreased the Seebeck coefficient, and decreased the figure of merit.

  2. Structural and electrochemical evaluation of bismuth doped lithium titanium oxides for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subburaj, T.; Prasanna, K.; Kim, Ki Jae; Ilango, P. Robert; Jo, Yong Nam; Lee, Chang Woo

    2015-04-01

    Micro-sized Li4Ti5-xBixO12 (0 ? x ? 0.15) materials are synthesized using a simple solid state method in air. The structural, morphological, and electrochemical characteristics of Bi-doped lithium titanates and pristine samples are methodically analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The XRD and Raman spectroscopy results demonstrate that bismuth-doping do not alter the spinel structure and good crystalline materials are synthesized. The FE-SEM images show that all samples possess the same morphological characteristics, with a particle size distribution of 0.5-1 ?m. The electrochemical cycling testing reveals that the Li4Ti4.9Bi0.10O12 sample exhibits discharge capacities of 205.4 mAh g-1, 160.8 mAh g-1, and 135.4 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles at 1C, 5C, and 10C-rates, respectively. The differential capacity curves suggest that the Li4Ti4.9Bi0.10O12 sample has a weaker polarization effect than the other samples. The EIS measurements imply that the Li4Ti4.9Bi0.10O12 sample possesses a high electronic conductivity and lithium ion diffusivity, which demonstrate that this new Li4Ti4.9Bi0.10O12 material would be a good candidate as an anode for lithium ion batteries.

  3. Battery performance enhancement with additions of bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manders, J. E.; Lam, L. T.; de Marco, R.; Douglas, J. D.; Pillig, R.; Rand, D. A. J.

    1994-02-01

    Automotive and valve-regulated batteries (VRBs) of typical commercial design have been constructed using positive and negative plates produced from leady oxide that is doped with 0.06 wt.% bismuth. The doping is performed by adding bismuth (III) oxide powder during the paste-mixing stage. Both battery designs have been subjected to endurance tests (automotive batteries: JIS cycle-life test; VRBs: repetitive 3-h discharge) in parallel with batteries that are similar in all respects but do not contain bismuth. A strategy and necessary hardware have been developed to measure the gassing properties of the VRBs during both charge and discharge. The procedure involves monitoring the internal pressure with high-precision pressure transducers. For automotive batteries, doping with bismuth produces no significant differences in JIS cycle life. By contrast, both the endurance and the capacity of VRBs are found to be enhanced by the presence of bismuth. Furthermore, bismuth reduces the build-up in gas pressure (mainly oxygen) in VRBs during constant-current charging. These results suggest that future specifications for leady oxide should include a minimum - rather than a maximum - bismuth content. In this respect, although studies performed to date show that significant advantages can be achieved with 0.06 wt.% bismuth in the active material, the optimum bismuth level has yet to be established.

  4. Efficient Direct Reduction of Graphene Oxide by Silicon Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Chan Lee, Su; Some, Surajit; Wook Kim, Sung; Jun Kim, Sun; Seo, Jungmok; Lee, Jooho; Lee, Taeyoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Choi, Heon-Jin; Chan Jun, Seong

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has been studied for various applications due to its excellent properties. Graphene film fabrication from solutions of graphene oxide (GO) have attracted considerable attention because these procedures are suitable for mass production. GO, however, is an insulator, and therefore a reduction process is required to make the GO film conductive. These reduction procedures require chemical reducing agents or high temperature annealing. Herein, we report a novel direct and simple reduction procedure of GO by silicon, which is the most widely used material in the electronics industry. In this study, we also used silicon nanosheets (SiNSs) as reducing agents for GO. The reducing effect of silicon was confirmed by various characterization methods. Furthermore, the silicon wafer was also used as a reducing template to create a reduced GO (rGO) film on a silicon substrate. By this process, a pure rGO film can be formed without the impurities that normally come from chemical reducing agents. This is an easy and environmentally friendly method to prepare large scale graphene films on Si substrates. PMID:26194107

  5. Athermal silicon microring resonators with titanium oxide cladding.

    PubMed

    Guha, Biswajeet; Cardenas, Jaime; Lipson, Michal

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel approach for CMOS-compatible passively temperature insensitive silicon based optical devices using titanium oxide cladding which has a negative thermo-optic (TO) effect. We engineer the mode confinement in Si and TiO2 such that positive TO of Si is exactly cancelled out by negative TO of TiO2. We demonstrate robust operation of the resulting device over 35 degrees. PMID:24216877

  6. Ferroelectric and dielectric properties of strontium bismuth niobate vanadates

    E-print Network

    Cao, Guozhong

    Ferroelectric and dielectric properties of strontium bismuth niobate vanadates Yun Wu and Guozhong 19 November 1999; accepted 20 April 2000) Strontium bismuth niobate vanadates, SrBi2(VxNb1-x)2O9 qualitatively different nondestructive read op- erations.3 Recently, bismuth oxide layered perovskite materials

  7. Green light emission from terbium doped silicon rich silicon oxide films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Podhorodecki, A; Zatryb, G; Misiewicz, J; Wojcik, J; Wilson, P R J; Mascher, P

    2012-11-30

    The effect of silicon concentration and annealing temperature on terbium luminescence was investigated for thin silicon rich silicon oxide films. The structures were deposited by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural properties of these films were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. The optical properties were investigated by means of photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay spectroscopy. It was found that both the silicon concentration in the film and the annealing temperature have a strong impact on the terbium emission intensity. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of these issues and determine the optimal silicon concentration and annealing temperature. PMID:23110801

  8. Green light emission from terbium doped silicon rich silicon oxide films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wojcik, J.; Wilson, P. R. J.; Mascher, P.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of silicon concentration and annealing temperature on terbium luminescence was investigated for thin silicon rich silicon oxide films. The structures were deposited by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural properties of these films were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. The optical properties were investigated by means of photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay spectroscopy. It was found that both the silicon concentration in the film and the annealing temperature have a strong impact on the terbium emission intensity. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of these issues and determine the optimal silicon concentration and annealing temperature.

  9. Engineering functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide nano-biomaterials to passivate the aggressive proliferation of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Premnath, P.; Tan, B.; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of nano silicon in cancer therapy is limited as drug delivery vehicles and markers in imaging, not as manipulative/controlling agents. This is due to limited properties that native states of nano silicon and silicon oxides offers. We introduce nano-functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide biomaterials synthesized via ultrashort pulsed laser synthesis, with tunable properties that possess inherent cancer controlling properties that can passivate the progression of cancer. This nanostructured biomaterial is composed of individual functionalized nanoparticles made of a homogenous hybrid of multiple phases of silicon and silicon oxide in increasing concentration outwards from the core. The chemical properties of the proposed nanostructure such as number of phases, composition of phases and crystal orientation of each functionalized nanoparticle in the three dimensional nanostructure is defined based on precisely tuned ultrashort pulsed laser-material interaction mechanisms. The amorphous rich phased biomaterial shows a 30 fold (95%) reduction in number of cancer cells compared to bulk silicon in 48?hours. Further, the size of the cancer cells reduces by 76% from 24 to 48?hours. This method exposes untapped properties of combination of multiple phases of silicon oxides and its applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26190009

  10. Engineering functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide nano-biomaterials to passivate the aggressive proliferation of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premnath, P.; Tan, B.; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2015-07-01

    Currently, the use of nano silicon in cancer therapy is limited as drug delivery vehicles and markers in imaging, not as manipulative/controlling agents. This is due to limited properties that native states of nano silicon and silicon oxides offers. We introduce nano-functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide biomaterials synthesized via ultrashort pulsed laser synthesis, with tunable properties that possess inherent cancer controlling properties that can passivate the progression of cancer. This nanostructured biomaterial is composed of individual functionalized nanoparticles made of a homogenous hybrid of multiple phases of silicon and silicon oxide in increasing concentration outwards from the core. The chemical properties of the proposed nanostructure such as number of phases, composition of phases and crystal orientation of each functionalized nanoparticle in the three dimensional nanostructure is defined based on precisely tuned ultrashort pulsed laser-material interaction mechanisms. The amorphous rich phased biomaterial shows a 30 fold (95%) reduction in number of cancer cells compared to bulk silicon in 48?hours. Further, the size of the cancer cells reduces by 76% from 24 to 48?hours. This method exposes untapped properties of combination of multiple phases of silicon oxides and its applications in cancer therapy.

  11. Engineering functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide nano-biomaterials to passivate the aggressive proliferation of cancer.

    PubMed

    Premnath, P; Tan, B; Venkatakrishnan, K

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of nano silicon in cancer therapy is limited as drug delivery vehicles and markers in imaging, not as manipulative/controlling agents. This is due to limited properties that native states of nano silicon and silicon oxides offers. We introduce nano-functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide biomaterials synthesized via ultrashort pulsed laser synthesis, with tunable properties that possess inherent cancer controlling properties that can passivate the progression of cancer. This nanostructured biomaterial is composed of individual functionalized nanoparticles made of a homogenous hybrid of multiple phases of silicon and silicon oxide in increasing concentration outwards from the core. The chemical properties of the proposed nanostructure such as number of phases, composition of phases and crystal orientation of each functionalized nanoparticle in the three dimensional nanostructure is defined based on precisely tuned ultrashort pulsed laser-material interaction mechanisms. The amorphous rich phased biomaterial shows a 30 fold (95%) reduction in number of cancer cells compared to bulk silicon in 48 hours. Further, the size of the cancer cells reduces by 76% from 24 to 48 hours. This method exposes untapped properties of combination of multiple phases of silicon oxides and its applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26190009

  12. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 075307 (2013) Variable conductivity of nanocomposite nickel oxide/porous silicon

    E-print Network

    Weiss, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 075307 (2013) Variable conductivity of nanocomposite nickel oxide-state variable conductivity of nickel oxide/porous silicon nanocomposite thin films indicative of memristance. In this work we present a nanocomposite material, nickel oxide-hybridized porous silicon (NiO/PSi), as a model

  13. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide includes heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  14. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  15. Method for removing oxide contamination from silicon carbide powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1984-08-01

    The described invention is directed to a method for removing oxide contamination in the form of oxygen-containing compounds such as SiO/sub 2/ and B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from a charge of finely divided silicon carbide. The silicon carbide charge is contacted with a stream of hydrogen fluoride mixed with an inert gas carrier such as argon at a temperature in the range of about 200/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The oxides in the charge react with the heated hydrogen fluoride to form volatile gaseous fluorides such as SiF/sub 4/ and BF/sub 3/ which pass through the charge along with unreacted hydrogen fluoride and the carrier gas. Any residual gaseous reaction products and hydrogen fluoride remaining in the charge are removed by contacting the charge with the stream of inert gas which also cools the powder to room temperature. The removal of the oxygen contamination by practicing the present method provides silicon carbide powders with desirable pressing and sintering characteristics. 1 tab.

  16. Transparent conducting oxides (TCO's) for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, Steven; Liang, Haifan; Gordon, Roy G.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of various textured tin oxide and zinc oxide transparent conductors was evaluated against annealing in air, in vacuum or exposed to hydrogen plasma. Only fluorine-doped zinc oxide deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) had stable electrical and optical properties under all conditions. Thin layers of ZnO or TiO2 greatly improved the plasma resistance of SnO2. A new TCO material, niobium-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2:Nb) was able to withstand hydrogen plasmas with only slight increases in its optical absorption and conductivity. Composite TCO's consisting of glass/SnO2:F/TiO2:Nb were shown to provide good electrical contact to amorphous silicon solar cells.

  17. Mathematical characterization of oxidized crystalline silicon nanowires grown by electroless process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Robert G.; Sundaram, Kalpathy B.

    2012-03-01

    Silicon nanowires were created via the electroless etching technique using silver nitrate (AgNO3)/hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution. The prepared raw samples were oxidized for various intervals, so as to have an end result of various nanowire thicknesses. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were taken of the original nanowires, the oxidized nanowires and then the oxidized and etched (in HF solution) nanowires. When silicon nanowires are made, the area of exposed silicon undergoes "amplification," a formula for which is provided herein. When silicon nanowires are oxidized, the growth rate of the oxide layer varies according to the crystalline alignment. A formula for a polar plot is provided for illustrating the shape of a silicon nanowire after oxidation for various intervals, based on the Deal-Grove and Massoud models of oxidation.

  18. Silicon heterojunction solar cells with novel fluorinated n-type nanocrystalline silicon oxide emitters on p-type crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Sukanta; Mandal, Sourav; Das, Gourab; Mukhopadhyay, Sumita; Pratim Ray, Partha; Banerjee, Chandan; Barua, Asok Kumar

    2015-08-01

    A novel fluorinated phosphorus doped silicon oxide based nanocrystalline material have been used to prepare heterojunction solar cells on flat p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) Czochralski (CZ) wafers. The n-type nc-SiO:F:H material were deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Deposited films were characterized in detail by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and optoelectronics properties have been studied using temperature dependent conductivity measurement, Ellipsometry, UV-vis spectrum analysis etc. It is observed that the cell fabricated with fluorinated silicon oxide emitter showing higher initial efficiency (? = 15.64%, Jsc = 32.10 mA/cm2, Voc = 0.630 V, FF = 0.77) for 1 cm2 cell area compare to conventional n-a-Si:H emitter (14.73%) on flat c-Si wafer. These results indicate that n type nc-SiO:F:H material is a promising candidate for heterojunction solar cell on p-type crystalline wafers. The high Jsc value is associated with excellent quantum efficiencies at short wavelengths (<500 nm).

  19. Oxide Growth Rate Enhancement of Silicon Carbide (0001) Si-Faces in Thin Oxide Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hijikata, Yasuto; Yaguchi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Sadafumi

    2008-10-01

    Thermal oxidation process of silicon carbide (SiC) has been studied by performing in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. In our previous work, we, for the first time, found that the growth rates of SiC(0001) C-face at oxidation thicknesses less than around 20 nm are much higher than those given by the Deal-Grove (D-G) model. In this report, we show that such a growth rate enhancement occurs also in the oxidation of SiC(0001) Si-face. By applying the empirical equation proposed by Massoud et al. [J. Electrochem. Soc. 132 (1985) 2685] to the oxidation of SiC Si-face and comparing the temperature and oxygen partial pressure dependences of oxidation rate parameters obtained with those for C-face, we discuss the difference in oxidation mechanism between SiC Si- and C-faces.

  20. Understanding the role of silicon oxide shell in oxide-assisted SiNWs growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shunqing; Wang, Cai-Zhuang Z; Zhu, Z Z; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-12-01

    The role of silicon oxide shell in oxide-assisted SiNWs growth is studied by performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations on the structural and dynamical properties of the interface between crystalline Si(111) surface and disorder SiO thin film. Si atoms in the SiO film tends to aggregate into the vicinity of the Si(111)/SiO interface. In addition, the diffusion of Si atoms at the interface is anisotropic - the diffusion along the interface is several times faster than that perpendicular to the interface. The segregation and anisotropic diffusion of Si atoms at the Si(111)/SiO interface shed interesting light into the mechanism of oxide-assisted silicon nanowire growth.

  1. Organically Capped Silicon Nanoparticles with Blue Photoluminescence Prepared by Hydrosilylation Followed by Oxidation

    E-print Network

    Swihart, Mark T.

    Organically Capped Silicon Nanoparticles with Blue Photoluminescence Prepared by Hydrosilylation-emitting silicon nanoparticles that are dispersible in common organic solvents is presented. Oxidation of yellow-emitting silicon nanoparticles with an organic monolayer grafted to their surface, using either UV irradiation

  2. A scalable silicon microreactor for preferential CO oxidation: performance comparison with a tubular

    E-print Network

    Gulari, Erdogan

    A scalable silicon microreactor for preferential CO oxidation: performance comparison technology which does not scale down in a feasible manner. A microchannel reactor was fabricated in silicon obtained from a conventional packed-bed microreactor. The silicon microreactor performs very well, while

  3. Silicon and tungsten oxide nanostructures for water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Gil, Karla R.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2009-08-01

    Inorganic semiconductors are promising materials for driving photoelectrochemical water-splitting reactions. However, there is not a single semiconductor material that can sustain the unassisted splitting of water into H2 and O2. Instead, we are developing a three part cell design where individual catalysts for water reduction and oxidation will be attached to the ends of a membrane. The job of splitting water is therefore divided into separate reduction and oxidation reactions, and each catalyst can be optimized independently for a single reaction. Silicon might be suitable to drive the water reduction. Inexpensive highly ordered Si wire arrays were grown on a single crystal wafer and transferred into a transparent, flexible polymer matrix. In this array, light would be absorbed along the longer axial dimension while the resulting electrons or holes would be collected along the much shorter radial dimension in a massively parallel array resembling carpet fibers on a microscale, hence the term "solar carpet". Tungsten oxide is a good candidate to drive the water oxidation. Self-organized porous tungsten oxide was successfully synthesized on the tungsten foil by anodization. This sponge-like structure absorbs light efficiently due to its high surface area; hence we called it "solar sponge".

  4. Enhanced room temperature oxidation in silicon and porous silicon under 10 keV x-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ryckman, Judson D.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Weiss, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    We report the observation of enhanced oxidation on silicon and porous silicon samples exposed in air ambient to high-dose-rate 10 keV x-ray radiation at room temperature. The evolution of the radiation-induced oxide growth is monitored by ellipsometry and interferometric reflectance spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows the emergence of Si-O-Si stretching modes and corresponding suppression of SiH{sub x} and Si-Si modes in the porous silicon samples. The radiation response depends strongly on initial native oxide thickness and Si-H surface species. The enhanced oxidation mechanism is attributed to photoinduced oxidation processes wherein energetic photons are used to dissociate molecular oxygen and promote the formation of more reactive oxygen species.

  5. Study of the processes of carbonization and oxidation of porous silicon by Raman and IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, A. V.; Okholin, P. N.; Verovsky, I. N.; Nazarov, A. N.; Lysenko, V. S.; Kholostov, K. I. Bondarenko, V. P.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2011-03-15

    Porous silicon layers were produced by electrochemical etching of single-crystal silicon wafers with the resistivity 10 {Omega} cm in the aqueous-alcohol solution of hydrofluoric acid. Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy are used to study the processes of interaction of porous silicon with undiluted acetylene at low temperatures and the processes of oxidation of carbonized porous silicon by water vapors. It is established that, even at the temperature 550 Degree-Sign C, the silicon-carbon bonds are formed at the pore surface and the graphite-like carbon condensate emerges. It is shown that the carbon condensate inhibits oxidation of porous silicon by water vapors and contributes to quenching of white photoluminescence in the oxidized carbonized porous silicon nanocomposite layer.

  6. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissbühler, Jonas; Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Barraud, Loris; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  7. Research of materials for porous matrices in sol-gel systems based on silicon dioxide and metallic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraeva, E. V.; Bobkov, A. A.; Maximov, A. I.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Nalimova, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study silicon dioxide – stannic oxide and silicon dioxide – zinc nanomaterials oxide were obtained through sol-gel technology. The results of nitrogen thermal desorption measurements, atomic force microscopy measurements and particle sizes measurements are discussed.

  8. Phonon confinement in Ge nanocrystals in silicon oxide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Yiaxiong; Wee, A. T. S.; Huan, C. H. A.; Shen, Z. X.; Choi, W. K.

    2011-02-01

    Spherical Ge nanocrystals well-dispersed in amorphous silicon oxide matrix have been synthesized with different sizes, and significant size-dependent Raman shift and broadening have been observed. The lattice constant of Ge nanocrystals well-bonded to silicon oxide matrix has been characterized nearly size-independent. With our proposed stress generation and relaxation mechanisms, stress effects in our samples have been analyzed to be insignificant with respect to phonon confinement effects. The phenomenological model introduced by [Richter, Wang, and Ley, Solid State Commun. 39, 625 (1981] with Gaussian weighting function and TO2 phonon dispersion function has been found to give a quite good description of the measured size-dependence of Raman shift and broadening. A 3-peak fitting method has been proposed to determine Ge nanocrystal size and film crystallinity. After physically quantizing quantum-confined one-dimensional elastic waves, we have deduced that each quantum-confined phonon possesses an instantaneous momentum of a given magnitude ?k with an equal chance of being either positive or negative and momentum conservation is retained in an electron-phonon scattering process. Therefore, on the basis of the first-principle microscopic model and our experimental results, we deduced that Raman scattering in spherical nanocrystals is a concurrent two-phonon process, one phonon generation and one phonon transition.

  9. Single crystal ternary oxide ferroelectric integration with Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakaul, Saidur; Serrao, Claudy; Youun, Long; Khan, Asif; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2015-03-01

    Integrating single crystal, ternary oxide ferroelectric thin film with Silicon or other arbitrary substrates has been a holy grail for the researchers since the inception of microelectronics industry. The key motivation is that adding ferroelectric materials to existing electronic devices could bring into new functionality, physics and performance improvement such as non-volatility of information, negative capacitance effect and lowering sub-threshold swing of field effect transistor (FET) below 60 mV/decade in FET [Salahuddin, S, Datta, S. Nano Lett. 8, 405(2008)]. However, fabrication of single crystal ferroelectric thin film demands stringent conditions such as lattice matched single crystal substrate and high processing temperature which are incompatible with Silicon. Here we report on successful integration of PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 in single crystal form with by using a layer transfer method. The lattice structure, surface morphology, piezoelectric coefficient d33, dielectric constant, ferroelectric domain switching and spontaneous and remnant polarization of the transferred PZT are as good as these characteristics of the best PZT films grown by pulsed laser deposition on lattice matched oxide substrates. We also demonstrate Si based, FE gate controlled FET devices.

  10. Atomic layer-deposited tunnel oxide stabilizes silicon photoanodes for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi Wei; Prange, Jonathan D.; Dühnen, Simon; Park, Yohan; Gunji, Marika; Chidsey, Christopher E. D.; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2011-07-01

    A leading approach for large-scale electrochemical energy production with minimal global-warming gas emission is to use a renewable source of electricity, such as solar energy, to oxidize water, providing the abundant source of electrons needed in fuel synthesis. We report corrosion-resistant, nanocomposite anodes for the oxidation of water required to produce renewable fuels. Silicon, an earth-abundant element and an efficient photovoltaic material, is protected by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a highly uniform, 2?nm thick layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and then coated with an optically transmitting layer of a known catalyst (3?nm iridium). Photoelectrochemical water oxidation was observed to occur below the reversible potential whereas dark electrochemical water oxidation was found to have low-to-moderate overpotentials at all pH values, resulting in an inferred photovoltage of ~550?mV. Water oxidation is sustained at these anodes for many hours in harsh pH and oxidative environments whereas comparable silicon anodes without the TiO2 coating quickly fail. The desirable electrochemical efficiency and corrosion resistance of these anodes is made possible by the low electron-tunnelling resistance (<0.006???cm2 for p+-Si) and uniform thickness of atomic-layer deposited TiO2.

  11. Tantalum oxide/silicon nitride: A negatively charged surface passivation stack for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Bullock, James; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-05-18

    This letter reports effective passivation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces by thermal atomic layer deposited tantalum oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) underneath plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}). Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging shows an approximately 2?nm thick interfacial layer between Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and c-Si. Surface recombination velocities as low as 5.0?cm/s and 3.2?cm/s are attained on p-type 0.8 ?·cm and n-type 1.0 ?·cm c-Si wafers, respectively. Recombination current densities of 25 fA/cm{sup 2} and 68 fA/cm{sup 2} are measured on 150??/sq boron-diffused p{sup +} and 120??/sq phosphorus-diffused n{sup +} c-Si, respectively. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a negative fixed insulator charge density of ?1.8?×?10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film and ?1.0?×?10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack. The Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack is demonstrated to be an excellent candidate for surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells.

  12. Fabrication of p-type porous silicon nanowire with oxidized silicon substrate through one-step MACE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaoyuan; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Xiuhua; Xiao, Yongyin; Ma, Mingyu; Wei, Feng; Yang, Xi

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the simple pre-oxidization process is firstly used to treat the starting silicon wafer, and then MPSiNWs are successfully fabricated from the moderately doped wafer by one-step MACE technology in HF/AgNO{sub 3} system. The PL spectrum of MPSiNWs obtained from the oxidized silicon wafers show a large blue-shift, which can be attributed to the deep Q. C. effect induced by numerous mesoporous structures. The effects of HF and AgNO{sub 3} concentration on formation of SiNWs were carefully investigated. The results indicate that the higher HF concentration is favorable to the growth of SiNWs, and the density of SiNWs is significantly reduced when Ag{sup +} ions concentrations are too high. The deposition behaviors of Ag{sup +} ions on oxidized and unoxidized silicon surface were studied. According to the experimental results, a model was proposed to explain the formation mechanism of porous SiNWs by etching the oxidized starting silicon. - Graphical abstract: Schematic cross-sectional views of PSiNWs array formation by etching oxidized silicon wafer in HF/AgNO{sub 3} solution. (A) At the starting point; (B) during the etching process; and (C) after Ag dendrites remove. - Highlights: • Prior to etching, a simple pre-oxidation is firstly used to treat silicon substrate. • The medially doped p-type MPSiNWs are prepared by one-step MACE. • Deposition behaviors of Ag{sup +} ions on oxidized and unoxidized silicon are studied. • A model is finally proposed to explain the formation mechanism of PSiNWs.

  13. Atomistic modeling of bending properties of oxidized silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinov, Andrey Kuronen, Antti

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we have modeled a three point bending test of monocrystalline Si nanowires using molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate their elastic properties. Tested nanowires were about 30?nm in length and had diameters from 5 to 9?nm. To study the influence of a native oxide layer, nanowires were covered with a 1?nm thick silica layer. The bending force was applied by a carbon diamond half-sphere with a 5?nm diameter. The Si-O parametrization for the Tersoff potential was used to describe atomic interactions between Si and O atoms. In order to remove the indentation effect of the diamond half-sphere and to obtain a pure bending behavior, we have also performed a set of simulations with fixed bottoms of the nanowires. Our results show that the oxide layer reduces the nanowire stiffness when compared with a pure Si nanowire with the same number of silicon atoms—in spite of the fact that the oxidized nanowires had larger diameters.

  14. Formation of hybrid hafnium oxide by applying sacrifacial silicon film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiung-Wei; Zheng, Bo-Shen; Huang, Jing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the fabrication of hafnium oxide (HfO2)-based metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) devices, a sacrificial amorphous silicon (a-Si) film was used as silicon source for facilitating the formation of hafnium silicate (Hf-silicate; HfSiO) between HfO2 and crystallized Si (c-Si). HfSiO can assist in changing the phase of the HfO2 film into the tetragonal phase and achieve high dielectric constant. The combination of HfSiO and HfO2 was named as “Hybrid HfO2”. When this Hybrid HfO2 insulator was applied to MIS devices, it can form a good insulator/semiconductor interface with c-Si. Hybrid HfO2 cannot only suppress the leakage current but also show high dielectric strength. The Hybrid HfO2 film in this work exhibited a high dielectric constant of 25.5 and a high dielectric strength of 17.9 MV/cm.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of bismuth oxide using Bi(OCMe{sub 2}{sup i}Pr){sub 3} and H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, Dustin Z. Conley, John F.; Allman, Derryl; Price, David; Hose, Sallie; Saly, Mark

    2014-01-15

    Bismuth oxide thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition using Bi(OCMe{sub 2}{sup i}Pr){sub 3} and H{sub 2}O at deposition temperatures between 90 and 270?°C on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TaN, and TiN substrates. Films were analyzed using spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited at 150?°C have a linear growth per cycle of 0.039?nm/cycle, density of 8.3?g/cm{sup 3}, band gap of approximately 2.9?eV, low carbon content, and show the ? phase structure with a (201) preferred crystal orientation. Deposition temperatures above 210?°C and postdeposition anneals caused uneven volumetric expansion, resulting in a decrease in film density, increased interfacial roughness, and degraded optical properties.

  16. Studies on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy-Silicon Oxide Hybrid Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Kumar, Kaushal; Kumar, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasonic dual mixing (UDM) process involving ultrasonic vibration with simultaneous stirring is used to prepare epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials with inorganic nanoscale building blocks by incorporating nanoscale silicon oxide network in epoxy matrix. The silicon oxide network is obtained from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) by using the in situ sol-gel process. Same epoxy-silica hybrid materials were also prepared by mixing with simple impeller stirring, and its properties were compared with the material of same composition prepared by the UDM process. The epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials are characterized by using FT-IR, DSC, FESEM, and XRD techniques. The glass transition temperature, tensile strength, and elastic modulus of the epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials treated by UDM process are found comparatively better than those of the materials processed by a rotating impeller. FESEM studies confirm that amount of TEOS varies the distribution and size of silicon oxide network, which remains relatively finer at lower content of TEOS. Significant improvement of thermal and mechanical properties of the neat epoxy is noted in the presence of 3.05 wt.% TEOS content in it is giving rise to the formation of inorganic building block of silicon oxide of size 88 ± 45 nm in the matrix. In this regard, the use of UDM process is found superior to mixing by simple impeller stirring for enhancement of properties of epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials. Lowering of properties of the epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials with TEOS addition beyond 3.05 wt.% up to 6.1 wt.% occurs primarily due to increase of amount and size (up to 170 ± 82 nm) of the inorganic building block in the matrix.

  17. Serum protein layers on parylene-C and silicon oxide: Effect on cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Ouberai, Myriam M.; Coffey, Paul D.; Swann, Marcus J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Welland, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Among the range of materials used in bioengineering, parylene-C has been used in combination with silicon oxide and in presence of the serum proteins, in cell patterning. However, the structural properties of adsorbed serum proteins on these substrates still remain elusive. In this study, we use an optical biosensing technique to decipher the properties of fibronectin (Fn) and serum albumin adsorbed on parylene-C and silicon oxide substrates. Our results show the formation of layers with distinct structural and adhesive properties. Thin, dense layers are formed on parylene-C, whereas thicker, more diffuse layers are formed on silicon oxide. These results suggest that Fn acquires a compact structure on parylene-C and a more extended structure on silicon oxide. Nonetheless, parylene-C and silicon oxide substrates coated with Fn host cell populations that exhibit focal adhesion complexes and good cell attachment. Albumin adopts a deformed structure on parylene-C and a globular structure on silicon oxide, and does not support significant cell attachment on either surface. Interestingly, the co-incubation of Fn and albumin at the ratio found in serum, results in the preferential adsorption of albumin on parylene-C and Fn on silicon oxide. This finding is supported by the exclusive formation of focal adhesion complexes in differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (CGR8), cultured on Fn/albumin coated silicon oxide, but not on parylene-C. The detailed information provided in this study on the distinct properties of layers of serum proteins on substrates such as parylene-C and silicon oxide is highly significant in developing methods for cell patterning. PMID:25555155

  18. High-temperature oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. T.; Singh, M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics was investigated in the temperature range of 1100 to 1400 C. The oxidation weight change was recorded by TGA; the oxidized materials were examined by light and electron microscopy, and the oxidation product by x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The materials exhibited initial weight loss, followed by passive weight gain (with enhanced parabolic rates, k(sub p)), and ending with a negative (logarithmic) deviation from the parabolic law. The weight loss arose from the oxidation of residual carbon, and the enhanced k(sub p) values from internal oxidation and the oxidation of residual silicon, while the logarithmic kinetics is thought to have resulted from crystallization of the oxide. The presence of a small amount of MoSi, in the RFSC material caused a further increase in the oxidation rate. The only solid oxidation product for all temperatures studied was silica.

  19. Surface kinetics modeling of silicon and silicon oxide plasma etching. III. Modeling of silicon oxide etching in fluorocarbon chemistry using translating mixed-layer representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ohseung; Bai Bo; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2006-09-15

    Silicon oxide etching was modeled using a translating mixed-layer model, a novel surface kinetic modeling technique, and the model showed good agreement with measured data. Carbon and fluorine were identified as the primary contributors to deposition and etching, respectively. Atomic fluorine flux is a major factor that determines the etching behavior. With a chemistry having a small amount of atomic fluorine (such as the C{sub 4}F{sub 8} chemistry), etching yield shows stronger dependence on the composition change in the gas flux.

  20. Comparison of the synthesis of Ge nanocrystals in hafnium aluminum oxide and silicon oxide matrices.

    PubMed

    Chew, H G; Zheng, F; Choi, W K; Chim, W K; Fitzgerald, E A; Foo, Y L

    2009-02-01

    Growth of germanium (Ge) nanocrystals in silicon (Si) oxide and hafnium aluminum oxide (HfAlO) is examined. In Si oxide, nanocrystals were able to form at annealing temperatures of 800 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Nanocrystals formed at 800 degrees C were round and approximately 8 nm in diameter, at 900 degrees C they become facetted and at 1000 degrees C they become spherical again. In HfAlO, at 800 degrees C nanocrystals formed are relatively smaller (approximately 3 nm in diameter) and lower in density. While at 900 degrees C and 1000 degrees C, nanocrystals did not form due to out-diffusion of Ge. Different nanocrystal formation characteristics in the matrices are attributed to differences in their crystallization temperatures. PMID:19441574

  1. Monolithic integration of rare-earth oxides and semiconductors for on-silicon technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dargis, Rytis Clark, Andrew; Erdem Arkun, Fevzi; Grinys, Tomas; Tomasiunas, Rolandas; O'Hara, Andy; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2014-07-01

    Several concepts of integration of the epitaxial rare-earth oxides into the emerging advanced semiconductor on silicon technology are presented. Germanium grows epitaxially on gadolinium oxide despite lattice mismatch of more than 4%. Additionally, polymorphism of some of the rare-earth oxides allows engineering of their crystal structure from hexagonal to cubic and formation of buffer layers that can be used for growth of germanium on a lattice matched oxide layer. Molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition of gallium nitride on the rare-earth oxide buffer layers on silicon is discussed.

  2. Improved performance of microcrystalline silicon solar cell with graded-band-gap silicon oxide buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhen-Liang; Ji, Yun; Yu, Wei; Yang, Yan-Bin; Cong, Ri-Dong; Chen, Ying-Juan; Li, Xiao-Wei; Fu, Guang-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (?c-Si:H) solar cell with graded band gap microcrystalline silicon oxide (?c-SiOx:H) buffer layer is prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and exhibits improved performance compared with the cell without it. The buffer layer moderates the band gap mismatch by reducing the barrier of the p/i interface, which promotes the nucleation of the i-layer and effectively eliminates the incubation layer, and then enhances the collection efficiency of the cell in the short wavelength region of the spectrum. The p/i interface defect density also decreases from 2.2 × 1012 cm-2 to 5.0 × 1011 cm-2. This graded buffer layer allows to simplify the deposition process for the ?c-Si:H solar cell application. Project supported by the Key Basic Research Project of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. 12963930D and 12963929D), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. F2013201250 and E2012201059), and the Science and Technology Research Projects of the Education Department of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. ZH2012030).

  3. Floating low-temperature radio-frequency plasma oxidation of polycrystalline silicon-germanium

    E-print Network

    Floating low-temperature radio-frequency plasma oxidation of polycrystalline silicon at low temperature by floating plasma oxidation using an inductively coupled radio fre- quency rf source Received 26 March 1998; accepted for publication 16 May 1998 Low temperature oxide formation

  4. Epitaxial integration of perovskite-based multifunctional oxides on silicon q

    E-print Network

    Eom, Chang Beom

    Epitaxial integration of perovskite-based multifunctional oxides on silicon q Seung-Hyub Baek Epitaxial heterostructures of perovskite-type oxides have attracted much attention due to their enormous and multiferroics have been demonstrated in perovskite oxides. The combination of cations within perovskite unit

  5. Topology of an anodically formed oxide film on a silicon single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. M.; Yavtushenko, I. O.; Makhmud-Akhunov, M. Yu.

    2015-08-01

    The results of investigations of the morphological properties of an oxide film formed on single-crystal silicon by anodic oxidation in distilled water in the potential-controlled mode have been presented. It has been established that the oxide film is always formed in the form of separate islands, the shape of which depends on the substrate orientation irrespective of the applied potential.

  6. Ion irradiation of the native oxide/silicon surface increases the thermal boundary conductance across aluminum/silicon interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, Caroline S.; Hattar, Khalid; Cheaito, Ramez; Duda, John C.; Gaskins, John T.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Biedermann, Laura B.; Piekos, Edward S.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2014-07-01

    The thermal boundary conductance across solid-solid interfaces can be affected by the physical properties of the solid boundary. Atomic composition, disorder, and bonding between materials can result in large deviations in the phonon scattering mechanisms contributing to thermal boundary conductance. Theoretical and computational studies have suggested that the mixing of atoms around an interface can lead to an increase in thermal boundary conductance by creating a region with an average vibrational spectra of the two materials forming the interface. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate that ion irradiation and subsequent modification of atoms at solid surfaces can increase the thermal boundary conductance across solid interfaces due to a change in the acoustic impedance of the surface. We measure the thermal boundary conductance between thin aluminum films and silicon substrates with native silicon dioxide layers that have been subjected to proton irradiation and post-irradiation surface cleaning procedures. The thermal boundary conductance across the Al/native oxide/Si interfacial region increases with an increase in proton dose. Supported with statistical simulations, we hypothesize that ion beam mixing of the native oxide and silicon substrate within ˜2.2nm of the silicon surface results in the observed increase in thermal boundary conductance. This ion mixing leads to the spatial gradation of the silicon native oxide into the silicon substrate, which alters the acoustic impedance and vibrational characteristics at the interface of the aluminum film and native oxide/silicon substrate. We confirm this assertion with picosecond acoustic analyses. Our results demonstrate that under specific conditions, a "more disordered and defected" interfacial region can have a lower resistance than a more "perfect" interface.

  7. Role of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as oxidation barrier for silicon based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe Morana, Bruno; Forte, Salvatore; Sarro, Pasqualina Maria

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, the authors study the protective effect against oxidation of a thin layer of atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Nitrogen doped silicon carbide (poly-SiC:N) based microheaters coated with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used as test structure to investigate the barrier effect of the alumina layers to oxygen and water vapor at very high temperature (up to 1000?°C). Different device sets have been fabricated changing the doping levels, to evaluate possible interaction between the dopants and the alumina layer. The as-deposited alumina layer morphology has been evaluated by means of AFM analysis and compared to an annealed sample (8 h at 1000?°C) to estimate the change in the grain structure and the film density. The coated microheaters are subjected to very long oxidation time in dry and wet environment (up to 8 h at 900 and 1000?°C). By evaluating the electrical resistance variation between uncoated reference devices and the ALD coated devices, the oxide growth on the SiC is estimated. The results show that the ALD alumina coating completely prevents the oxidation of the SiC up to 900?°C in wet environment, while an oxide thickness reduction of 50% is observed at 1000?°C compared to uncoated devices.

  8. Silicon nanoprofiling with the use of a solid aluminum oxide mask and combined 'dry' etching

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A. N.; Demidov, Yu. A.; Putrya, M. G.; Golishnikov, A. A.; Vasilyev, A. A.

    2009-12-15

    Technological features of nanoprofiling of silicon protected by a solid mask based on porous aluminum oxide are considered. It is shown that, for a nanoprofiled silicon surface to be formed, it is advisable that combined dry etching be used including preliminary bombardment of structures with accelerated neutral atoms of an inert gas followed by reactive ion etching.

  9. Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1984-03-13

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  10. Complementary metal oxide silicon integrated circuits incorporating monolithically integrated stretchable wavy interconnects

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    Complementary metal oxide silicon integrated circuits incorporating monolithically integrated--yields strain independent electrical performance and realistic paths to circuit integration. A typical circuit systems.2 A disadvantage of the former is that large scale integration can be difficult, due

  11. Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

    1999-07-21

    Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors.

  12. ReaxFFSiO Reactive Force Field for Silicon and Silicon Oxide Systems Adri C. T. van Duin, Alejandro Strachan, Shannon Stewman, Qingsong Zhang,

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Ved: December 5, 2002 To predict the structures, properties, and chemistry of materials involving siliconReaxFFSiO Reactive Force Field for Silicon and Silicon Oxide Systems Adri C. T. van Duin, Alejandro, United Kingdom, and Materials and Process Simulation Center, Beckman Institute (139-74), Di

  13. Solar absorptivity and thermal emissivity of aluminum coated with silicon oxide films prepared by evaporation of silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Bradford, A P; Hass, G; Heaney, J B; Triolo, J J

    1970-02-01

    The solar absorptivity (alpha) and the total normal and hemispherical emissivities (? (n) and ?) of vacuum deposited Al coated with silicon oxide films prepared by evaporation of SiO were determined. For Al coated with true SiO films evaporated at 5 x 10(-7) Torr and deposited at rates >30 A/sec, both and e increase but alpha/? decreases more rapidly with increasing SiO thickness. Such coatings were found to be very stable under simulated space conditions, but they should not be used as temperature control coatings since their alpha, ? and alpha/? values are for most applications too high. The proper way to produce silicon oxide films on Al for temperature control coatings is reactive evaporation of SiO in the presence of oxygen followed by an uv treatment in air. Aluminum surfaces coated with such films have predictable alpha values of 11.0%-11.5% which remain essentially independent of the silicon oxide thickness. By increasing the thickness of reactively deposited silicon oxide on Al from zero to 2.96 micro, ? increases from 0.017 to 0.53, and alpha/? decreases from about 5 to 0.2. Such coatings have been successfully used as temperature control surfaces on many satellites, and there are ample laboratory and flight data to assure their high stability in space environment. PMID:20076191

  14. Degenerate epitaxy-driven defects in monolayer silicon oxide on ruthenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Shashank; Vlaic, Sergio; Machado-Charry, Eduardo; Vu, Anh-Duc; Guisset, Valérie; David, Philippe; Hadji, Emmanuel; Pochet, Pascal; Coraux, Johann

    2015-10-01

    The structure of the ultimately thin crystalline allotrope of silicon oxide, prepared on a ruthenium surface, is unveiled down to the atomic scale with chemical sensitivity, owing to high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and first principles calculations. An ordered oxygen lattice is imaged which coexists with the two-dimensional monolayer oxide. This coexistence signals a displacive transformation from an oxygen-reconstructed Ru(0001) to silicon oxide, along which laterally shifted domains form, each with equivalent and degenerate epitaxial relationships with the substrate. The unavoidable character of defects at the boundaries between these domains appeals for the development of alternative methods capable of producing single-crystalline two-dimensional oxides.

  15. Effect of temperature on data retention of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-semiconductor nonvolatile memory transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. L.; McWhorter, P. J.; Dellin, T. A.; Zimmermann, G. T.

    1990-06-01

    The discharge behavior of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-semiconductor nonvolatile memory transistors is investigated for a range of programming and storage temperatures spanning -55 C to 200 C. A number of empirical observations strongly limit the nature of the mechanisms that govern charge injection and decay. Both electrons and holes contribute to the charge storage properties of the transistors, and the decay properties of both are thermally activated with a continuous distribution of activation energies (trap depths). Charge decay, for both charge states, is negligibly limited by mechanisms other than those which are strongly thermally activated. The programming temperature, relative to the storage temperature, significantly impacts the retention time of the excess electron state, while not affecting the long term decay of the excess hole state. The experimental results also have significant implications regarding proper retention screening techniques and nonvolatile ROM programming techniques.

  16. The electroluminescence mechanism of Er³? in different silicon oxide and silicon nitride environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rebohle, L. Wutzler, R.; Braun, M.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W.; Berencén, Y.; Ramírez, J. M.; Garrido, B.; Hiller, D.

    2014-09-28

    Rare earth doped metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures are of great interest for Si-based light emission. However, several physical limitations make it difficult to achieve the performance of light emitters based on compound semiconductors. To address this point, in this work the electroluminescence (EL) excitation and quenching mechanism of Er-implanted MOS structures with different designs of the dielectric stack are investigated. The devices usually consist of an injection layer made of SiO? and an Er-implanted layer made of SiO?, Si-rich SiO?, silicon nitride, or Si-rich silicon nitride. All structures implanted with Er show intense EL around 1540 nm with EL power efficiencies in the order of 2 × 10?³ (for SiO?:Er) or 2 × 10??(all other matrices) for lower current densities. The EL is excited by the impact of hot electrons with an excitation cross section in the range of 0.5–1.5 × 10?¹?cm?². Whereas the fraction of potentially excitable Er ions in SiO? can reach values up to 50%, five times lower values were observed for other matrices. The decrease of the EL decay time for devices with Si-rich SiO? or Si nitride compared to SiO? as host matrix implies an increase of the number of defects adding additional non-radiative de-excitation paths for Er³?. For all investigated devices, EL quenching cross sections in the 10?²? cm² range and charge-to-breakdown values in the range of 1–10 C cm?² were measured. For the present design with a SiO? acceleration layer, thickness reduction and the use of different host matrices did not improve the EL power efficiency or the operation lifetime, but strongly lowered the operation voltage needed to achieve intense EL.

  17. Assessment of the influence of surface finishing and weld joints on the corrosion/oxidation behaviour of stainless steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Muñoz, F. J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to gain some insight into the influence of the surface finishing in the oxidation/corrosion behaviour of 316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Specimens of both materials with different surface states were prepared (as-received, grinded, grinded and polished, and electrolitically polished) and oxidation tests were carried out at 775 and 825 K from 100 to 2000 h for two different oxygen concentrations and for H 2/H 2O molar ratios of 3 and 0.03. The general conclusion for these tests is that the effect of surface finishing on the corrosion/protection processes is not significant under the tested conditions. In addition the behaviour of weld joints, T91-T91 Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and T91-316L have been also studied under similar conditions. The conclusions are that, whereas T91-T91 welded joint shows the same corrosion properties as the parent materials for the conditions tested, AISI 316L-T91 welded joint, present an important dissolution over seam area that it associated to the electrode 309S used for the fabrication process.

  18. The influence of natural and stimulated oxidation on luminescent properties of silicon-cellulose nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulev, V. B.; Loginova, S. V.; Gurtov, V. A.

    2012-08-01

    A composite has been developed on the basis of nanocrystalline cellulose and silicon nanoparticles, which exhibited more intense photoluminescence in the visible range of the spectrum than did nanoporous silicon. This may be related to the spatial separation of silicon nanoparticles and migration of excitation from their vicinity. The effect of temperature and gas-phase oxidation on the luminescent properties of the material indicates a high stability of the luminescent properties of the composite. Investigation of the charging effect of the nanocomposite allows silicon nanoparticles to be considered as centers of accumulation of the bulk electricity charge.

  19. Cobalt silicon mixed oxide nanocomposites by modified sol gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Serena; Turco, Maria; Ramis, Gianguido; Bagnasco, Giovanni; Pernice, Pasquale; Pagliuca, Concetta; Bevilacqua, Maria; Aronne, Antonio

    2007-12-01

    Cobalt-silicon mixed oxide materials (Co/Si=0.111, 0.250 and 0.428) were synthesised starting from Co(NO 3) 2·6H 2O and Si(OC 2H 5) 4 using a modified sol-gel method. Structural, textural and surface chemical properties were investigated by thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses (TG/DTA), XRD, UV-vis, FT-IR spectroscopy and N 2 adsorption at -196 °C. The nature of cobalt species and their interactions with the siloxane matrix were strongly depending on both the cobalt loading and the heat treatment. All dried gels were amorphous and contained Co 2+ ions forming both tetrahedral and octahedral complexes with the siloxane matrix. After treatment at 400 °C, the sample with lowest Co content appeared amorphous and contained only Co 2+ tetrahedral complexes, while at higher cobalt loading Co 3O 4 was present as the only crystalline phase, besides Co 2+ ions strongly interacting with siloxane matrix. At 850 °C, in all samples crystalline Co 2SiO 4 was formed and was the only crystallising phase for the nanocomposite with the lowest cobalt content. All materials retained high surface areas also after treatments at 600 °C and exhibited surface Lewis acidity, due to cationic sites. The presence of cobalt affected the textural properties of the siloxane matrix decreasing microporosity and increasing mesoporosity.

  20. Silicon oxide permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have displaced established materials in many areas of food and beverage packaging. Plastic packing materials offer are various advantages concerning production and handling. PET bottles for instance are non-breakable and lightweight compared to glass and metal containers. However, PET offers poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf live of packaged food is reduced. Permeation of gases can be reduced by depositing transparent plasma polymerized silicon oxide (SiOx) barrier coatings. A microwave (2.45 GHz) driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna to treat PET foils or bottles. To increase the barrier properties of the coatings furthermore a RF substrate bias (13.56 MHz) is applied. The composition of the coatings is analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy regarding carbon and hydrogen content. Influence of gas phase composition and substrate bias on chemical composition of the coatings is discussed. A strong relation between barrier properties and film composition is found: good oxygen barriers are observed as carbon content is reduced and films become quartz-like. Regarding oxygen permeation a barrier improvement factor (BIF) of 70 is achieved.

  1. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  2. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100.degree. C.

  3. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1994-12-27

    An iron-based alloy is described containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100 C. 8 figures.

  4. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100{degrees}C.

  5. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si-H...Hf interactions or by the dielectric screening effect of as-grown high-kappa moiety. A summary of local bonding models with vibrational mode assignments of the adsorbed TMA and TEMAH on silicon surfaces is presented based on the analysis of the substructure of silicate interfacial band at 900--1100 cm-1.

  6. Mechanism of Selective Ammoxidation of Propene to Acrylonitrile on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Mechanism of Selective Ammoxidation of Propene to Acrylonitrile on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum ammoxidation of propene to acrylonitrile by bismuth molybdates, we report quantum mechanical studies (using stages of this industry, acrylonitrile was produced by propene on simple bismuth and molybdenum oxide

  7. Single-Longitudinal-Mode Lanthanum-Codoped Bismuth-Based Erbium Doped Fiber Ring Laser

    E-print Network

    Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

    Single-Longitudinal-Mode Lanthanum-Codoped Bismuth-Based Erbium Doped Fiber Ring Laser K. K and demonstrate a stable single-longitudinal-mode lanthanum-codoped bismuth oxide- based erbium doped fiber ring of the experimental setup to demonstrate the proposed SLM La-codoped bismuth based EDF ring laser. The fiber laser

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Microwave-Exfoliated Graphene Oxide-Wrapped Silicon Nanowire via Hydrosilylation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Donghee; Cho, Bomin; Ahn, Jihoon; Kim, Sungsoo; Ko, Young Chun; Sohn, Honglae

    2015-02-01

    Single-crystalline silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were fabricated by using an electroless metal-assisted etching of bulk silicon wafers with silver nanoparticles obtained by wet electroless deposition. The etching of SiNWs is based on sequential treatment in aqueous solutions of silver nitrate followed by hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. Free-standing SiNWs were then obtained using ultra-sono method in toluene. Graphene oxide was prepared using the modified Hummers' process. Activated microwave-exfoliated graphite oxide (MEGO) was prepared and used for composition of silicon nanowires and graphene oxide via hydrosilylation. The silicon nanowire-graphene composite materials were characterized using XPS and FE-SEM. PMID:26353725

  9. Reduction of sidewall defect induced leakage currents by the use of nitrided field oxides in silicon selective epitaxial growth isolation

    E-print Network

    Bashir, Rashid

    to conventional recessed local oxidation of silicon LOCOS or shallow trench isolation STI , SEG of silicon of the oxide isolation region as shown in Fig. 2 a . For the case of MOSFETs, however, as shown in Fig. 2 bReduction of sidewall defect induced leakage currents by the use of nitrided field oxides

  10. Surface kinetics modeling of silicon and silicon oxide plasma etching. I. Effect of neutral and ion fluxes on etching yield of silicon oxide in fluorocarbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ohseung; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2006-09-15

    Silicon oxide etching processes in C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}+80% Ar plasmas were investigated. Neutral and ion compositions in the plasma were measured using quadrupole mass spectrometry and etching yield was measured by a quartz-crystal microbalance. In C{sub 2}F{sub 6} plasma, the concentration of atomic fluorine in the neutral flux was 5%-25%, whereas there was less than 0.5% of atomic fluorine in C{sub 4}F{sub 8}+80% Ar plasma. A surface plot representing the etching yield as a function of neutral and ion fluxes was constructed and used to qualitatively explain the etching characteristics of silicon oxide in fluorocarbon plasmas. In C{sub 2}F{sub 6} chemistry, etching yield decreases slightly with increasing rf coil power. This is attributed to the decrease in both F/ion and CF{sub x}/ion, which is caused by an increase in ion flux, with a more significant effect due to a decrease in F/ion. In C{sub 4}F{sub 8}+80% Ar chemistry, however, etching yield increases with increasing rf coil power. This is attributed to the decrease in CF{sub x}, without the effect of F/ion due to the low atomic fluorine concentration. With increased operating pressure, etching yield decreases for both chemistries because as the pressure increases, ion current decreases, and CF{sub x} neutral concentration increases to have more deposition and less etching.

  11. OXIDATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SILICON NITRIDE CERAMICS

    E-print Network

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    in the compositions may induce changes in the mechanical properties of the internal part. In this paper the oxidation-induced changes in the room-temperature mechanical properties of the whole sample (strength, elastic modulusOXIDATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SILICON NITRIDE CERAMICS J. Gubicza, P. Arató

  12. Observations of Accelerated Silicon Carbide Recession by Oxidation at High Water-Vapor Pressures

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Observations of Accelerated Silicon Carbide Recession by Oxidation at High Water-Vapor PressuresC at 1200°C and high water-vapor pressures (1.5 atm) has shown SiC recession rates that exceed what is predicted based on parabolic oxidation at water-vapor pressures of less than or equal to 1 atm. After

  13. Effect of Oxide on Trench Edge Defect Formation in Ion-Implanted Silicon

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Effect of Oxide on Trench Edge Defect Formation in Ion-Implanted Silicon N. Burbure, N. G. Rudawski, Florida 32611-6400, USA An investigation of the defects that form near oxide-filled trenches during solid near the trench edge after recrystallization. Defect formation resulted from pinning of the initial

  14. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hattum, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology, where the SiOx layer is used as the charge retention layer on the drums for copying and printing devices. The thesis describes investigations of the plasma and of processes taking place on the sputter target and on the SiOx growth surface in the room temperature, RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition technology. The sputtering target consists of silicon and the reactive atmosphere consists of an Ar/O2 mixture. The composition of the grown SiOx layers has been varied between x=0 and x=2 by variation of the O2 partial pressure. The characteristics of the growth process have been related to the nanostructural properties of the grown films. The deposition system enables the characterisation of the plasma (Langmuir probe, energy resolved mass spectrometer) and of the growing film (Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD), Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy) and is connected to a beamline of a 6MV tandem van de Graaff accelerator. Also Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy have been applied. It is shown how ERD can be used as a real-time in-situ technique. The thesis presents spatially resolved values of the ion density, electron temperature and the quasi-electrostatic potential, determined using a Langmuir probe. The plasma potential has a maximum about 2 cm from the cathode erosion area, and decreases (more than 200 V typically) towards the floating sputter cathode. The potential decreases slightly in the direction towards the grounded growth surface and the positive, mainly Ar+, ions created in the large volume of the plasma closest to the substrate are accelerated towards the growth surface. These ions obtain a few eV of kinetic energy in the plasma and around 30-50 eV in the anode sheath, and bombard the growing film. Some of them are incorporated in the grown material. The flux of ions on the growth surface hardly depends on the power injected into the plasma. Since the growth rate increases strongly with increasing injected power, at the same time the relative ion bombardment (about 10-20 ions per deposited atom) decreases strongly. The hypothesis that the microstructure of the grown material depends on the ion bombardment is not supported by the results, as deduced from the infrared analysis. The oxygen, incorporated in the growing SiOx, originates for ~65 % from O2 and for about 30 % from atomic oxygen produced in the plasma. A minority contribution is from SiO sputtered from the cathode. The oxygen coverage in the sputter erosion area appears low for all oxygen partial pressures leading to x<2. This explains why the silicon growth rate does not depend on the O2 partial pressure in the range where x < 2 is grown. It is discussed how this observation relates to the details of the rf plasma deposition setup.

  15. Improvement of plasmonic enhancement of quantum dot emission via an intermediate silicon-aluminum oxide interface

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Waylin J.; Sadeghi, Seyed M. Campbell, Quinn

    2015-01-05

    We studied the emission of quantum dots in the presence of plasmon-metal oxide substrates, which consist of arrays of metallic nanorods embedded in amorphous silicon coated with a nanometer-thin layer of aluminum oxide on the top. We showed that the combined effects of plasmons and the silicon-aluminum oxide interface can lead to significant enhancement of the quantum efficiency of quantum dots. Our results show that such an interface can significantly enhance plasmonic effects of the nanorods via quantum dot-induced exciton-plasmon coupling, leading to partial polarization of the quantum dots' emission.

  16. Comparative investigation of infrared optical absorption properties of silicon oxide, oxynitride and nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shun; Liu, Weiguo; Cai, Changlong; Liu, Huan

    2011-02-01

    Amorphous silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride films were deposited in a PECVD reactor using silane (SiH4),ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) as precursor gases. The N2O/NH3 flow ratio was varied in order to obtain different oxynitride compositions. The films were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry, XPS and FTIR spectroscopy. The compositions and infrared optical absorption properties of the three different types of films were investigated and compared. Special attention was paid to analyze the Si-O/Si-N bond stretching absorption including the absorption band intensity. It was found that the silicon oxynitride films show a dominant infrared stretching band due to the Si-O/Si-N bond , with the infrared absorption peak located between 860cm-1(11.6?m) for Si-N bond in silicon nitride and 1063cm-1(9.4?m) for Si-O bond in silicon oxide. The position of peak also shifts to a shorter wavelength when increasing the N2O/NH3 flow ratio. The infrared optical absorption properties of the silicon oxynitride films make them well suited for the absorber of uncooled microbolometer detectors

  17. Comparative investigation of infrared optical absorption properties of silicon oxide, oxynitride and nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shun; Liu, Weiguo; Cai, Changlong; Liu, Huan

    2010-10-01

    Amorphous silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride films were deposited in a PECVD reactor using silane (SiH4),ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) as precursor gases. The N2O/NH3 flow ratio was varied in order to obtain different oxynitride compositions. The films were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry, XPS and FTIR spectroscopy. The compositions and infrared optical absorption properties of the three different types of films were investigated and compared. Special attention was paid to analyze the Si-O/Si-N bond stretching absorption including the absorption band intensity. It was found that the silicon oxynitride films show a dominant infrared stretching band due to the Si-O/Si-N bond , with the infrared absorption peak located between 860cm-1(11.6?m) for Si-N bond in silicon nitride and 1063cm-1(9.4?m) for Si-O bond in silicon oxide. The position of peak also shifts to a shorter wavelength when increasing the N2O/NH3 flow ratio. The infrared optical absorption properties of the silicon oxynitride films make them well suited for the absorber of uncooled microbolometer detectors

  18. Fabrication of low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon strip waveguide using focused proton-beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Teo, E J; Bettiol, A A; Yang, P; Breese, M B H; Xiong, B Q; Mashanovich, G Z; Headley, W R; Reed, G T

    2009-03-01

    We have successfully fabricated low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon (SOPS) strip waveguides with high-index contrast using focused proton-beam irradiation and electrochemical etching. Smooth surface quality with rms roughness of 3.1 nm is achieved for a fluence of 1x10(15)/cm(2) after postoxidation treatment. Optical characterization at a wavelength of 1550 nm shows a loss of 1.1+/-0.4 dB/cm and 1.2+/-0.4 dB/cm in TE and TM polarization respectively, which we believe is the lowest reported loss for SOPS waveguides. This opens up new opportunities for all-silicon-based optoelectronics applications. PMID:19252584

  19. Method for one-to-one polishing of silicon nitride and silicon oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babu, Suryadevara V. (Inventor); Natarajan, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of removing silicon nitride at about the same removal rate as silicon dioxide by CMP. The method utilizes a polishing slurry that includes colloidal silica abrasive particles dispersed in water and additives that modulate the silicon dioxide and silicon nitride removal rates such that they are about the same. In one embodiment of the invention, the additive is lysine or lysine mono hydrochloride in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 8. In another embodiment of the invention, the additive is arginine in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 10.

  20. Gas-phase formation of silicon carbides, oxides, and sulphides from atomic silicon ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohme, Diethard K.; Wlodek, Stanislaw; Fox, Arnold

    1989-01-01

    A systematic experimental study of the kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions in the gas phase between ground-state Si(+)2p and a variety of astrophysical molecules. The aim of this study is to identify the reactions which trigger the formation of chemical bonds between silicon and carbon, oxygen and sulphur, and the chemical pathways which lead to further molecular growth. Such knowledge is valuable in the identification of new extraterrestrial silicon-bearing molecules and for an assessment of the gas-phase transition from atomic silicon to silicon carbide and silicate grain particles in carbon-rich and oxygen-rich astrophysical environments.

  1. Annealing behavior of atomic layer deposited hafnium oxide on silicon: Changes at the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Anand; Inman, Ronald; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2006-05-01

    Thin films of hafnium oxide are deposited on Si(100) substrates by means of atomic layer deposition using tetrakis(diethylamino)hafnium and water on Si(100) at 300 °C. Detailed studies of temperature induced annealing effects on the HfO2/Si interface are done using angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). As-deposited films show mostly native silicon oxide at the interface. Crystallization of HfO2 film initiates at about 600 °C. As the annealing temperature is increased, the hafnium silicate content in the film is found to increase and the mostly silicon oxide interlayer is found to grow thicker under Ar atmosphere. Also, the formation of hafnium silicide is found to take place at temperatures >=800 °C. The XPS data shows decomposition of the interfacial hafnium silicate layer into hafnium oxide and silicon oxide at 1000 °C along with increasing formation of hafnium silicide. The ToF-SIMS data suggest interdiffusion of the hafnium oxide film and the interfacial silicon oxide during the annealing process.

  2. Optimization of contaminated oxide inversion layer solar cell. [considering silicon oxide coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Contaminated oxide cells have been fabricated with efficiencies of 8.6% with values of I sub sc = 120 ma, V sub oc = .54 volts, and curve factor of .73. Attempts to optimize the fabrication step to yield a higher output have not been successful. The fundamental limitation is the inadequate antireflection coating afforded by the silicon dioxide coating used to hold the contaminating ions. Coatings of SiO, therefore, were used to obtain a good antireflection coating, but the thinness of the coatings prevented a large concentration of the contaminating ions, and the cells was weak. Data of the best cell were .52 volts V sub oc, 110 ma I sub sc, .66 CFF and 6.7% efficiency.

  3. Synthesis of metal silicide at metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.-G.; Nagase, T.; Yasuda, H.; Mori, H.

    2015-05-21

    The synthesis of metal silicide at the metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. A platinum silicide, ?-Pt{sub 2}Si, was successfully formed at the platinum/silicon oxide interface under 25–200?keV electron irradiation. This is of interest since any platinum silicide was not formed at the platinum/silicon oxide interface by simple thermal annealing under no-electron-irradiation conditions. From the electron energy dependence of the cross section for the initiation of the silicide formation, it is clarified that the silicide formation under electron irradiation was not due to a knock-on atom-displacement process, but a process induced by electronic excitation. It is suggested that a mechanism related to the Knotek and Feibelman mechanism may play an important role in silicide formation within the solid. Similar silicide formation was also observed at the palladium/silicon oxide and nickel/silicon oxide interfaces, indicating a wide generality of the silicide formation by electronic excitation.

  4. Graphene-Assisted Chemical Etching of Silicon Using Anodic Aluminum Oxides as Patterning Templates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2015-11-01

    We first report graphene-assisted chemical etching (GaCE) of silicon by using patterned graphene as an etching catalyst. Chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene transferred on a silicon substrate is patterned to a mesh with nanohole arrays by oxygen plasma etching using an anodic- aluminum-oxide etching mask. The prepared graphene mesh/silicon is immersed in a mixture solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydro peroxide with various molecular fractions at optimized temperatures. The silicon underneath graphene mesh is then selectively etched to form aligned nanopillar arrays. The morphology of the nanostructured silicon can be controlled to be smooth or porous depending on the etching conditions. The experimental results are systematically discussed based on possible mechanisms for GaCE of Si. PMID:26473800

  5. Corrosion resistant three-dimensional nanotextured silicon for water photo-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Rachel; Chatterjee, Shahana; Gordon, Evan; Share, Keith; Erwin, William R.; Cohn, Adam P.; Bardhan, Rizia; Pint, Cary L.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm-2 under 100 mW cm-2 (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications.We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm-2 under 100 mW cm-2 (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental details, (ii) Nyquist plot from EIS data, (iii) FTIR of H-terminated silicon, (iv) reflectance measurements to quantify light trapping in nanotextured silicon, (v) LSV from Tafel analysis, and (vi) J-V curves for H-terminated flat samples, (vii) stability test of photoanode, and (viii) forward and reverse scans for each sample type. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03897a

  6. Dispersion engineering of high-Q silicon microresonators via thermal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Wei C.; Zhang, Jidong; Usechak, Nicholas G.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-07-21

    We propose and demonstrate a convenient and sensitive technique for precise engineering of group-velocity dispersion in high-Q silicon microresonators. By accurately controlling the surface-oxidation thickness of silicon microdisk resonators, we are able to precisely manage the zero-dispersion wavelength, while simultaneously further improving the high optical quality of our devices, with the optical Q close to a million. The demonstrated dispersion management allows us to achieve parametric generation with precisely engineerable emission wavelengths, which shows great potential for application in integrated silicon nonlinear and quantum photonics.

  7. Quantification of Silane Molecules on Oxidized Silicon: Are there Options for a Traceable and Absolute Determination?

    PubMed

    Dietrich, P M; Streeck, C; Glamsch, S; Ehlert, C; Lippitz, A; Nutsch, A; Kulak, N; Beckhoff, B; Unger, W E S

    2015-10-01

    Organosilanes are used routinely to functionalize various support materials for further modifications. Nevertheless, reliable quantitative information about surface functional group densities after layer formation is rarely available. Here, we present the analysis of thin organic nanolayers made from nitrogen containing silane molecules on naturally oxidized silicon wafers with reference-free total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An areic density of 2-4 silane molecules per nm(2) was calculated from the layer's nitrogen mass deposition per area unit obtained by reference-free TXRF. Complementary energy and angle-resolved XPS (ER/AR-XPS) in the Si 2p core-level region was used to analyze the outermost surface region of the organic (silane layer)-inorganic (silicon wafer) interface. Different coexisting silicon species as silicon, native silicon oxide, and silane were identified and quantified. As a result of the presented proof-of-concept, absolute and traceable values for the areic density of silanes containing nitrogen as intrinsic marker are obtained by calibration of the XPS methods with reference-free TXRF. Furthermore, ER/AR-XPS is shown to facilitate the determination of areic densities in (mono)layers made from silanes having no heteroatomic marker other than silicon. After calibration with reference-free TXRF, these areic densities of silane molecules can be determined when using the XPS component intensity of the silane's silicon atom. PMID:26334589

  8. The effect of nanocrystalline silicon host on magnetic properties of encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Granitzer, P; Rumpf, K; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, R; Coffer, J L; Reissner, M

    2015-12-21

    The purpose of this work is a detailed comparison of the fundamental magnetic properties of nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe3O4 nanoparticle-loaded porous silicon as well as silicon nanotubes. Such composite structures are of potential merit in the area of magnetically guided drug delivery. For magnetic systems to be utilized in biomedical applications, there are certain magnetic properties that must be fulfilled. Therefore magnetic properties of embedded Fe3O4-nanoparticles in these nanostructured silicon host matrices, porous silicon and silicon nanotubes, are investigated. Temperature-dependent magnetic investigations have been carried out for four types of iron oxide particle sizes (4, 5, 8 and 10 nm). The silicon host, in interplay with the iron oxide nanoparticle size, plays a sensitive role. It is shown that Fe3O4 loaded porous silicon and SiNTs differ significantly in their magnetic behavior, especially the transition between superparamagnetic behavior and blocked state, due to host morphology-dependent magnetic interactions. Importantly, it is found that all investigated samples meet the magnetic precondition of possible biomedical applications of exhibiting a negligible magnetic remanence at room temperature. PMID:26575478

  9. Designing high performance precursors for atomic layer deposition of silicon oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mallikarjunan, Anupama Chandra, Haripin; Xiao, Manchao; Lei, Xinjian; Pearlstein, Ronald M.; Bowen, Heather R.; O'Neill, Mark L.; Derecskei-Kovacs, Agnes; Han, Bing

    2015-01-15

    Conformal and continuous silicon oxide films produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are enabling novel processing schemes and integrated device structures. The increasing drive toward lower temperature processing requires new precursors with even higher reactivity. The aminosilane family of precursors has advantages due to their reactive nature and relative ease of use. In this paper, the authors present the experimental results that reveal the uniqueness of the monoaminosilane structure [(R{sub 2}N)SiH{sub 3}] in providing ultralow temperature silicon oxide depositions. Disubstituted aminosilanes with primary amines such as in bis(t-butylamino)silane and with secondary amines such as in bis(diethylamino)silane were compared with a representative monoaminosilane: di-sec-butylaminosilane (DSBAS). DSBAS showed the highest growth per cycle in both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD. These findings show the importance of the arrangement of the precursor's organic groups in an ALD silicon oxide process.

  10. Effective surface passivation of p-type crystalline silicon with silicon oxides formed by light-induced anodisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jie; Grant, Nicholas; Lennon, Alison

    2014-12-01

    Electronic surface passivation of p-type crystalline silicon by anodic silicon dioxide (SiO2) was investigated. The anodic SiO2 was grown by light-induced anodisation (LIA) in diluted sulphuric acid at room temperature, a process that is significantly less-expensive than thermal oxidation which is widely-used in silicon solar cell fabrication. After annealing in oxygen and then forming gas at 400 °C for 30 min, the effective minority carrier lifetime of 3-5 ? cm, boron-doped Czochralski silicon wafers with a phosphorus-doped 80 ?/? emitter and a LIA anodic SiO2 formed on the p-type surface was increased by two orders of magnitude to 150 ?s. Capacitance-voltage measurements demonstrated a very low positive charge density of 3.4 × 1011 cm-2 and a moderate density of interface states of 6 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2. This corresponded to a silicon surface recombination velocity of 62 cm s-1, which is comparable with values reported for other anodic SiO2 films, which required higher temperatures and longer growth times, and significantly lower than oxides grown by chemical vapour deposition techniques. Additionally, a very low leakage current density of 3.5 × 10-10 and 1.6 × 10-9 A cm-2 at 1 and -1 V, respectively, was measured for LIA SiO2 suggesting its potential application as insulation layer in IBC solar cells and a barrier for potential induced degradation.

  11. Bismuth-doped germanosilicate fibre laser with 20-W output power at 1460 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Firstov, Sergei V; Shubin, Aleksei V; Khopin, V F; Mel'kumov, Mikhail A; Bufetov, Igor' A; Medvedkov, O I; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2011-07-31

    We report the first cw bismuth - germanium codoped silica fibre laser with an output power above 20 W at 1460 nm and 50% optical efficiency. The laser operates on a transition between energy levels of bismuth-related active centres associated with silicon. The incorporation of a small amount ({approx}5 mol %) of germanium into the core of bismuth-doped silica fibre has little effect on its luminescence spectrum but reduces optical losses, which limit the laser efficiency. (letters)

  12. High- k-oxide/silicon interfaces characterized by capacitance frequency spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeissi, B.; Piscator, J.; Engström, O.; Hall, S.; Buiu, O.; Lemme, M. C.; Gottlob, H. D. B.; Hurley, P. K.; Cherkaoui, K.; Osten, H. J.

    2008-09-01

    Electron capture into insulator/silicon interface states is investigated for high-k dielectrics of Gd2O3 prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD), and for HfO2 prepared by reactive sputtering, by measuring the frequency dependence of Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) capacitance. The capture cross sections are found to be thermally activated and to increase steeply with the energy depth of the interface electron states. The methodology adopted is considered useful for increasing the understanding of high-k-oxide/silicon interfaces.

  13. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine applications. Protective coatings and/or inlet air filtration may be required to achieve required ceramic component lives in more aggressive environments.

  14. Plasma-Sprayed Refractory Oxide Coatings on Silicon-Base Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, Surendra

    1997-01-01

    Silicon-base ceramics are promising candidate materials for high temperature structural applications such as heat exchangers, gas turbines and advanced internal combustion engines. Composites based on these materials are leading candidates for combustor materials for HSCT gas turbine engines. These materials possess a combination of excellent physical and mechanical properties at high temperatures, for example, high strength, high toughness, high thermal shock resistance, high thermal conductivity, light weight and excellent oxidation resistance. However, environmental durability can be significantly reduced in certain conditions such as when molten salts, H2 or water vapor are present. The oxidation resistance of silicon-base materials is provided by SiO2 protective layer. Molten salt reacts with SiO2 and forms a mixture of SiO2 and liquid silicate at temperatures above 800C. Oxygen diffuses more easily through the chemically altered layer, resulting in a catastrophic degradation of the substrate. SiC and Si3N4 are not stable in pure H2 and decompose to silicon and gaseous species such as CH4, SiH, SiH4, N2, and NH3. Water vapor is known to slightly increase the oxidation rate of SiC and Si3N4. Refractory oxides such as alumina, yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttria and mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2) possess excellent environmental durability in harsh conditions mentioned above. Therefore, refractory oxide coatings on silicon-base ceramics can substantially improve the environmental durability of these materials by acting as a chemical reaction barrier. These oxide coatings can also serve as a thermal barrier. The purpose of this research program has been to develop refractory oxide chemical/thermal barrier coatings on silicon-base ceramics to provide extended temperature range and lifetime to these materials in harsh environments.

  15. Facile preparation of highly-dispersed cobalt-silicon mixed oxide nanosphere and its catalytic application in cyclohexane selective oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Highly dispersed cobalt-silicon mixed oxide [Co-SiO2] nanosphere was successfully prepared with a modified reverse-phase microemulsion method. This material was characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectra, X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge structure, and N2 adsorption-desorption measurements. High valence state cobalt could be easily obtained without calcination, which is fascinating for the catalytic application for its strong oxidation ability. In the selective oxidation of cyclohexane, Co-SiO2 acted as an efficient catalyst, and good activity could be obtained under mild conditions. PMID:22067075

  16. Investigation of Low Temperature, Atomic-Layer-Deposited Oxides on 4Hydrigen-Silicon Carbide and their Effect on the Silicon Carbide/Silicon Dioxide Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Sarah Kay

    Silicon carbide has long been considered an excellent substrate for high power, high temperature applications. Fabrication of conventional MOSFETs on silicon carbide (SiC) relies on thermal oxidation of the SiC for formation of the silicon dioxide (SiO2) gate oxide. Historically, direct oxidation was viewed favorably due to ease of fabrication. However, the resulting MOS devices have exhibited significant interface trap densities, Dit , which reduce effective inversion layer mobility by capturing free carriers and enhancing scattering. While nitridation has been shown to reduce Dit, the inversion layer electron mobility of these devices is still limited by the presence of carbon near the interface. Studies have suggested a low mobility transition region between the SiC and SiO2, on the SiC side, attributed to increased carbon concentration resulting from the thermal oxidation of the SiC. In this work, we have investigated the low temperature, atomic layer deposition (ALD) of SiO2 onto SiC compared to thermal oxidation of SiC for the fabrication of MOS devices. Avoiding the carbon out diffusion and subsequent carbon build-up resulting from thermal oxidation is expected to result in a superior, higher mobility MOSFET. A three-step ALD process using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysiliane (3-APTES), ozone and water was evaluated on silicon and SiC substrates. Ellipsometry and XPS were used to characterize blanket films, and showed good results. Capacitors fabricated on SiC showed the need for optimized post deposition anneals. The effect of post oxidation anneals in nitrogen, forming gas and nitric oxide were examined. The standard nitric oxide (NO) anneal that is used to improve Dit after thermal oxidation was also shown to be the best anneal for the low temperature deposited ALD oxides. Materials characterization of the nitrided ALD and nitrided thermal oxide samples was completed using STEM/EELS techniques in addition to the ellipsometry and XPS. STEM/EELS analysis of the samples revealed no significant difference in transition regions on either side of the SiC/SiO2 interface regardless of oxidation technique or anneal temperature or ambient. All samples analyzed exhibited approximately 2-3nm of transition region on either side of the interface with no evidence of carbon or silicon rich regions. XPS was also used to determine a valence band offset of 2.43eV for the ALD oxide on 4H-SiC. Lateral MOSFETs were fabricated on 4H-SiC substrates with the following oxidation treatments: thermal oxidation at 1175°C, thermal oxidation at 1175°C followed by a nitric oxide (NO) anneal at 1175°C, and ALD of SiC at 150°C followed by an NO post oxidation anneal (POA) at 1175°C. ALD of the SiO2 was performed using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysiliane (3-APTES), ozone and water. Field effect mobility values were comparable for these samples, suggesting common thermal oxidation steps were still limiting the mobility. As such additional lateral MOSFETs were fabricated without the incoming sacrificial oxidation steps. This sacrificial-oxidation free experiment showed a 15% improvement in peak field effect mobility for the nitrided ALD oxide samples as compared to the nitrided thermal oxides. SIMS of the interfaces revealed nitrogen concentrations of ˜6E21 at/cc in the nitrided ALD sample compared to ˜4-6E20 in the nitrided thermal sample. This extremely high level of nitrogen incorporation, which is unparalleled in NO annealed thermal oxides, is accountable for the increase in field effect mobility. The low deposition temperature of the ALD oxide causes high levels of carbon incorporation and greater number of dangling bonds at the interface. Both the dangling bonds and excess carbon acts as binding sites for the nitrogen, increasing the nitrogen concentration and resulting in higher mobilities. Results presented support the use of SiO2 deposited using low temperature atomic layer deposition for improved gate oxides on 4H-SiC MOSFETs given the opportunity for increased nitrogen incorporation. The elevated levels of nitrogen measured in the NO annealed

  17. The apatite structure without an inversion center in a new bismuth calcium vanadium oxide: BiCa[sub 4]V[sub 3]O[sub 13

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jinfan; Sleight, A.W. )

    1993-05-01

    A new bismuth calcium vanadium oxide, BiCa[sub 4]V[sub 3]O[sub 13], with hexagonal symmetry has been synthesized: space group P6[sub 3] (No. 173), a = 9.819(2) [Angstrom], c = 7.033(2) [Angstrom], V = 587.2(3) [Angstrom][sup 3], and Z = 2. The structure was solved and refined from single crystal X-ray data leading to R = 0.055 and R[sub w] = 0.069 for 1076 unique reflections. Three different types of Ca sites were found: Ca(1) and Ca(2) coordinate to six O atoms, and Ca(3) coordinates to nine O atoms. There is no Bi site; instead, Bi partially occupies the Ca(1) and Ca(2) sites. The V atom is coordinated to four O atoms and forms a distorted tetrahedron with the V-O bond lengths ranging from 1.693(6) [Angstrom] to 1.72(1) [Angstrom] and O-V-O angles varying from 102.5(7)[degrees] to 114.7(6)[degrees]. The coordination polyhedra of Ca(1) and Ca(3) share faces forming chains along the c axis, and the coordination hexahedra of Ca(2) also form a chain along the c axis through sharing the corners among themselves. The VO[sub 4] tetrahedra connect the two types of chains forming a three dimensional structure. The BiCa[sub 4]V[sub 3]O[sub 13] formula may be written as A[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]O to emphasize that this structure is essentially the same as the apatite structure, except that the inversion center is missing. Many compounds previously reported to have the apatite structure may actually have the lower symmetry version of this structure found in this study and thus be candidates for ferroelectricity. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Growth of thin silver films on silicon oxide pretreated by low temperature argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, Andriy; Steiner, Roland; Mack, Iris; Oelhafen, Peter; Mathys, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    In the present study, we investigate the influence of low energy ion bombardment on nucleation and growth of thin silver films on silicon oxide by in situ photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) combined with specific resistivity measurements. Thermally grown thin silicon oxide films were exposed to a low temperature argon plasma for different time intervals resulting in changes in surface chemical composition as monitored by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). We demonstrate that irradiation of the oxide surface with low energy ions results in substantially changed nucleation of silver. Furthermore, silver films deposited on plasma treated oxide tend to have lower resistivity which is attributed to the effect of reduced grain boundary and surface roughness.

  19. Synthesis of silicon oxide nanowires and nanotubes with cobalt-palladium or palladium catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterina, Ria; Liu, X. M.; Ross, C. A.; Adeyeye, A. O.; Choi, W. K.

    2012-07-01

    The dewetting behaviors of cobalt (Co), cobalt palladium (CoPd), and palladium (Pd) thin films on oxidized silicon substrates were examined. We observed the formation of craters in the oxide layer and pits in the Si substrate for larger CoPd or Pd catalyst particles and thinner oxide. Nanowires and nanotubes were observed near the Si pits. The nanowires and nanotubes grow via a vapor-solid-solid or vapor-liquid-solid mechanism with the silicon vapor source provided from the substrate. The original Si atoms that form the nanowires or nanotubes were oxidized in situ by the residual oxygen atoms present in the chamber. Some of the nanotubes had a series of embedded sub-catalysts that formed branches from the primary nanotube.

  20. A Model for the Oxidation of Carbon Silicon Carbide Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical theory and an accompanying numerical scheme have been developed for predicting the oxidation behavior of carbon silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite structures. The theory is derived from the mechanics of the flow of ideal gases through a porous solid. The result of the theoretical formulation is a set of two coupled nonlinear differential equations written in terms of the oxidant and oxide partial pressures. The differential equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the partial vapor pressures of the oxidant and oxides as a function of the spatial location and time. The local rate of carbon oxidation is determined using the map of the local oxidant partial vapor pressure along with the Arrhenius rate equation. The nonlinear differential equations are cast into matrix equations by applying the Bubnov-Galerkin weighted residual method, allowing for the solution of the differential equations numerically. The numerical method is demonstrated by utilizing the method to model the carbon oxidation and weight loss behavior of C/SiC specimens during thermogravimetric experiments. The numerical method is used to study the physics of carbon oxidation in carbon silicon carbide composites.

  1. Development of an oxidized porous silicon vacuum microtriode 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Don Deewayne

    1994-01-01

    the requirements for a gigatron cathode. In the present work, a porous sihcon-based approach is evaluated. The use of porous silicon reduces the size of a single emitter to the manometer scale, and a true two-dimensional array geometry can be approached. A wide...

  2. Athermal silicon microring resonators with titanium oxide cladding

    E-print Network

    Lipson, Michal

    , and K. Bergman, "Thermal stabilization of a microring modulator using feedback control," Opt. Express 20, 27999­28008 (2012). 8. K. Padmaraju, D. F. Logan, X. Zhu, J. J. Ackert, A. P. Knights, and K. Bergman, 2012). 12. B. Guha, A. Gondarenko, and M. Lipson, "Minimizing temperature sensitivity of silicon Mach

  3. Corrosion resistant three-dimensional nanotextured silicon for water photo-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rachel; Chatterjee, Shahana; Gordon, Evan; Share, Keith; Erwin, William R; Cohn, Adam P; Bardhan, Rizia; Pint, Cary L

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the ability to chemically transform bulk silicon into a nanotextured surface that exhibits excellent electrochemical stability in aqueous conditions for water photo-oxidation. Conformal defective graphene coatings on nanotextured silicon formed by thermal treatment enable over 50× corrosion resistance in aqueous electrolytes based upon Tafel analysis and impedance spectroscopy. This enables nanotextured silicon as an effective oxygen-evolution photoanode for water splitting with saturation current density measured near 35 mA cm(-2) under 100 mW cm(-2) (1 sun) illumination. Our approach builds upon simple and scalable processing techniques with silicon to develop corrosion resistant electrodes that can benefit a broad range of catalytic and photocatalytic applications. PMID:26400265

  4. Nanopatterning of Crystalline Silicon Using Anodized Aluminum Oxide Templates for Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tsu-An

    A novel thin film anodized aluminum oxide templating process was developed and applied to make nanopatterns on crystalline silicon to enhance the optical properties of silicon. The thin film anodized aluminum oxide was created to improve the conventional thick aluminum templating method with the aim for potential large scale fabrication. A unique two-step anodizing method was introduced to create high quality nanopatterns and it was demonstrated that this process is superior over the original one-step approach. Optical characterization of the nanopatterned silicon showed up to 10% reduction in reflection in the short wavelength range. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to analyze the nanopatterned surface structure and it was found that interpore spacing and pore density can be tuned by changing the anodizing potential.

  5. Corrosion Test of US Steels in Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) and Kinetic Modeling of Corrosion in LBE Systems

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    1 Corrosion Test of US Steels in Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) and Kinetic Modeling of Corrosion compatibility and corrosion in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) systems present a critical challenge for using LBE lead and bismuth, oxygen in LBE will "passivate" the steel surface with formation of an oxide film

  6. Mid-infrared optical properties of thin films of aluminum oxide, titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Kischkat, Jan; Peters, Sven; Gruska, Bernd; Semtsiv, Mykhaylo; Chashnikova, Mikaela; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Fedosenko, Oliana; Machulik, Stephan; Aleksandrova, Anna; Monastyrskyi, Gregorii; Flores, Yuri; Masselink, W Ted

    2012-10-01

    The complex refractive index components, n and k, have been studied for thin films of several common dielectric materials with a low to medium refractive index as functions of wavelength and stoichiometry for mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths within the range 1.54-14.29 ?m (700-6500 cm(-1)). The materials silicon oxide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and titanium oxide are prepared using room temperature reactive sputter deposition and are characterized using MIR variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. The investigation shows how sensitive the refractive index functions are to the O2 and N2 flow rates, and for which growth conditions the materials deposit homogeneously. It also allows conclusions to be drawn on the degree of amorphousness and roughness. To facilitate comparison of the materials deposited in this work with others, the index of refraction was also determined and provided for the near-IR and visible ranges of the spectrum. The results presented here should serve as a useful information base for designing optical coatings for the MIR part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The results are parameterized to allow them to be easily used for coating design. PMID:23033094

  7. Scalable Preparation of Ternary Hierarchical Silicon Oxide-Nickel-Graphite Composites for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Bao, Wurigumula; Ma, Lu; Tan, Guoqiang; Su, Yuefeng; Chen, Shi; Wu, Feng; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-12-01

    Silicon monoxide is a promising anode candidate because of its high theoretical capacity and good cycle performance. To solve the problems associated with this material, including large volume changes during charge-discharge processes, we report a ternary hierarchical silicon oxide-nickel-graphite composite prepared by a facile two-step ball-milling method. The composite consists of nano-Si dispersed silicon oxides embedded in nano-Ni/graphite matrices (Si@SiOx /Ni/graphite). In the composite, crystalline nano-Si particles are generated by the mechanochemical reduction of SiO by ball milling with Ni. These nano-Si dispersed oxides have abundant electrochemical activity and can provide high Li-ion storage capacity. Furthermore, the milled nano-Ni/graphite matrices stick well to active materials and interconnect to form a crosslinked framework, which functions as an electrical highway and a mechanical backbone so that all silicon oxide particles become electrochemically active. Owing to these advanced structural and electrochemical characteristics, the composite enhances the utilization efficiency of SiO, accommodates its large volume expansion upon cycling, and has good ionic and electronic conductivity. The composite electrodes thus exhibit substantial improvements in electrochemical performance. This ternary hierarchical Si@SiOx /Ni/graphite composite is a promising candidate anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries. Additionally, the mechanochemical ball-milling method is low cost and easy to reproduce, indicating potential for the commercial production of the composite materials. PMID:26548901

  8. Metal Oxide Silicon /MOS/ transistors protected from destructive damage by wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Devine, E. J.

    1966-01-01

    Loop of flexible, small diameter, nickel wire protects metal oxide silicon /MOS/ transistors from a damaging electrostatic potential. The wire is attached to a music-wire spring, slipped over the MOS transistor case, and released so the spring tensions the wire loop around all the transistor leads, shorting them together. This allows handling without danger of damage.

  9. Improved reaction sintered silicon nitride. [protective coatings to improve oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processing treatments were applied to as-nitrided reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) with the purposes of improving strength after processing to above 350 MN/m2 and improving strength after oxidation exposure. The experimental approaches are divided into three broad classifications: sintering of surface-applied powders; impregnation of solution followed by further thermal processing; and infiltration of molten silicon and subsequent carburization or nitridation of the silicon. The impregnation of RSSN with solutions of aluminum nitrate and zirconyl chloride, followed by heating at 1400-1500 C in a nitrogen atmosphere containing silicon monoxide, improved RSSN strength and oxidation resistance. The room temperature bend strength of RSSN was increased nearly fifty percent above the untreated strength with mean absolute strengths up to 420 MN/m2. Strengths of treated samples that were measured after a 12 hour oxidation exposure in air were up to 90 percent of the original as-nitrided strength, as compared to retained strengths in the range of 35 to 60 percent for untreated RSSN after the same oxidation exposure.

  10. Serum protein layers on parylene-C and silicon oxide: effect on cell adhesion

    E-print Network

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Ouberai, Myriam M.; Coffey, Paul D.; Swann, Marcus J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Welland, Mark E.

    2014-12-16

    structure xide. less, differentiated mES cells exhibited focal adhesion on both parylene-C and silicon oxide Fn coated sub- umin follows the same trend with a compact and tructure on parylene-C and a globular structure on sil- However albumin coated...

  11. Enhanced sinterability and conductivity of BaZr0.3Ce0.5Y0.2O3-? by addition of bismuth oxide for proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Liangqi; Ling, Yihan; Li, Geng; Wang, Zhihao; Wan, Yanhong; Wang, Ranran; He, Beibei; Zhao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The effect of bismuth oxide addition on the sintering behavior and electrical properties of BaZr0.3Ce0.5Y0.2O3-? (BZCY) as an electrolyte for proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells (H-SOFCs) is studied. The introduction of Bi2O3 is beneficial to improving sinterability of BZCY, resulting in high density. Meanwhile, the conductivity test indicates that BaZr0.3Ce0.5Y0.2O3-? - 2 mol% Bi2O3 (BZCY-2) promises the highest conductivities. Further, single cells with BZCY-2 as the electrolyte are fabricated and evaluated. The cell with BZCY-2 presents excellent power densities, which reaches 0.67, 0.44, and 0.27 mW cm-2 at 700, 650, and 600 °C, respectively. The conductivities of BZCY-2 film are higher than BZCY in this work and other reported BZCY films. The encouraging results suggest that the addition of a small amount (2 mol%) of Bi2O3 to BZCY can significantly promote sinterability and electrical conductivity for H-SOFCs.

  12. Analyses of silicon dioxide, magnesium oxide, lead fluoride, bismuth as low-pass velocity filters for neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, D.; Holmryd, S.

    1969-01-01

    Transmission measurement of neutrons by filter materials for low energy neutrons is important for the study of structure and dynamics of condensed matter. Since only thermal neutrons are useful for such experiments, filter materials that transmit thermal neutrons while attenuating fast neutrons and gamma rays are of considerable interest.

  13. Low-damage direct patterning of silicon oxide mask by mechanical processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To realize the nanofabrication of silicon surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the etching of mechanically processed oxide masks using potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. The dependence of the KOH solution etching rate on the load and scanning density of the mechanical pre-processing was evaluated. Particular load ranges were found to increase the etching rate, and the silicon etching rate also increased with removal of the natural oxide layer by diamond tip sliding. In contrast, the local oxide pattern formed (due to mechanochemical reaction of the silicon) by tip sliding at higher load was found to have higher etching resistance than that of unprocessed areas. The profile changes caused by the etching of the mechanically pre-processed areas with the KOH solution were also investigated. First, protuberances were processed by diamond tip sliding at lower and higher stresses than that of the shearing strength. Mechanical processing at low load and scanning density to remove the natural oxide layer was then performed. The KOH solution selectively etched the low load and scanning density processed area first and then etched the unprocessed silicon area. In contrast, the protuberances pre-processed at higher load were hardly etched. The etching resistance of plastic deformed layers was decreased, and their etching rate was increased because of surface damage induced by the pre-processing. These results show that etching depth can be controlled by controlling the etching time through natural oxide layer removal and mechanochemical oxide layer formation. These oxide layer removal and formation processes can be exploited to realize low-damage mask patterns. PMID:24948891

  14. Bismuth as a modifier of Au Pd catalyst: Enhancing selectivity in alcohol oxidation by suppressing parallel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Bi has been widely employed as a modifier for Pd and Pt based catalyst mainly in order to improve selectivity. We found that when Bi was added to the bimetallic system AuPd, the effect on activity in alcohol oxidation mainly depends on the amount of Bi regardless its position, being negligible when Bi was 0.1 wt% and detectably negative when the amount was increased to 3 wt%. However, the selectivity of the reactions notably varied only when Bi was deposited on the surface of metal nanoparticles suppressing parallel reaction in both benzyl alcohol and glycerol oxidation. After a careful characterization of all the catalysts and additional catalytic tests, we concluded that the Bi influence on the activity of the catalysts could be ascribed to electronic effect whereas the one on selectivity mainly to a geometric modification. Moreover, the Bi-modified AuPd/AC catalyst showed possible application in the production of tartronic acid, a useful intermediate, from glycerol.

  15. Microcrystalline silicon oxides for silicon-based solar cells: impact of the O/Si ratio on the electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, M.; Starr, D. E.; Lambertz, A.; Holländer, B.; Alsmeier, J.-H.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Gorgoi, M.; Yang, W.; Wilks, R. G.; Heske, C.

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon oxide (?c-SiOx:H) layers are one alternative approach to ensure sufficient interlayer charge transport while maintaining high transparency and good passivation in Si-based solar cells. We have used a combination of complementary x-ray and electron spectroscopies to study the chemical and electronic structure of the (?c-SiOx:H) material system. With these techniques, we monitor the transition from a purely Si-based crystalline bonding network to a silicon oxide dominated environment, coinciding with a significant decrease of the material's conductivity. Most Si-based solar cell structures contain emitter/contact/passivation layers. Ideally, these layers fulfill their desired task (i.e., induce a sufficiently high internal electric field, ensure a good electric contact, and passivate the interfaces of the absorber) without absorbing light. Usually this leads to a trade-off in which a higher transparency can only be realized at the expense of the layer's ability to properly fulfill its task. One alternative approach is to use hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon oxide (?c-SiOx:H), a mixture of microcrystalline silicon and amorphous silicon (sub)oxide. The crystalline Si regions allow charge transport, while the oxide matrix maintains a high transparency. To date, it is still unclear how in detail the oxygen content influences the electronic structure of the ?c-SiOx:H mixed phase material. To address this question, we have studied the chemical and electronic structure of the ?c-SiOx:H (0 <= x = O/Si <=1) system with a combination of complementary x-ray and electron spectroscopies. The different surface sensitivities of the employed techniques help to reduce the impact of surface oxides on the spectral interpretation. For all samples, we find the valence band maximum to be located at a similar energy with respect to the Fermi energy. However, for x > 0.5, we observe a pronounced decrease of Si 3s - Si 3p hybridization in favor of Si 3p - O 2p hybridization in the upper valence band. This coincides with a significant increase of the material's resistivity, possibly indicating the breakdown of the conducting crystalline Si network. Silicon oxide layers with a thickness of several hundred nanometres were deposited in a PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition) multi chamber system using an excitation frequency of 13.56 MHz with a plasma power density of 0.3 W/cm2. Glass (Corning type Eagle) and mono-crystalline silicon wafer substrates were coated in the same run at a substrate temperature of 185°C. The deposition pressure was 4 mbar and the substrate-electrode distance 20 mm. Mixtures of silane (SiH4), 1% TMB (B(CH3)3) diluted in helium, hydrogen (H2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) gases were used at flow rates of 1.25 - 0.18/0.32/500/0 - 1.07) sccm (standard cubic centimeters per minute) for the deposition of ?c-SiOx:H(B) layers. By changing the CO2/SiH4 gas flow rate ratio from 0 to 6, ?c-SiOx:H(B) layers with a composition of 0 <=? x = O/Si ?<= 1 were prepared using a constant sum of SiH4 and CO2. The TMB flow and the H2 flow were kept constant within the series. For more details see Ref. [1]. The oxygen content in the films was determined using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). With RBS, the area-related atomic density of oxygen and silicon can be determined (+/- 2% [2]), and thus x can be calculated. This quantity considers only the number of silicon / oxygen atoms and not the number of atoms of other elements, such as hydrogen, which is also incorporated to a considerable extent: up to 20% in ?c-SiOx:H (measured using the hydrogen effusion method). To avoid charging effects, the measurements were performed on films deposited on a substrate of mono-crystalline silicon wafers. The electrical conductivity was measured in the planar direction of the film in a vacuum cryostat, using voltages from - 100 V to + 100 V. For that two co-planar Ag contacts were evaporated on the film with a gap of 0.5 mm - 5 mm. In the present study, the

  16. Low temperature photo-oxidation of silicon using a xenon excimer lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    1997-11-01

    Low temperature (250 °C) photo-oxidation of silicon initiated by a Xe2* excimer lamp operating at a wavelength of 172 nm has been investigated. The induced reaction rate of 0.1 nm/min is 90 times greater than thermal oxidation at 612 °C and more than three times greater than that previously obtained at 350 °C using a low pressure mercury lamp. It was found to be strongly dependent upon oxygen pressure with the highest rates being achievable below 10 mbar. Ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, and current-voltage measurements have been employed to characterize the oxide films and designate them as high quality.

  17. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength ?= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  18. Rapid photo-oxidation of silicon at room temperature using 126 nm vacuum ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    Over the years, photo-oxidation of silicon has been found to proceed fastest when the progressively lower wavelength radiation has been used. Here, we use the shortest UV lamp radiation yet applied to Si oxidation, by employing 126 nm radiation from an Ar excimer lamp source. Oxidation rates as high as 5 nm/min were readily achievable at room temperature, which are more than two orders of magnitude higher than those for UV-induced oxidation of silicon using a low pressure mercury lamp at a temperature of 350 °C, and immeasurably higher than for thermal oxidation at room temperature. This enhancement is believed to arise from two effects: ozone produced by 126 nm light and more efficient photochemical reaction at lower wavelengths. Furthermore, thicknesses up to 9 nm have been obtained, which are not possible in reasonable times with conventional dry thermal oxidation processes at temperatures less than even 500 °C. The films are found by XPS and FTIR to be stoichiometric in nature. Current-voltage measurements from metal oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices fabricated using a 9 nm SiO 2 layer showed that leakage current densities as low as 10 -6 A/cm 2 at an electric field of 1 MV/cm can be obtained in the as-grown films. Further properties of these films will be reported.

  19. Enhanced Lithium-Ion Storage Capability of a Bismuth Sulfide/Graphene Oxide/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Composite.

    PubMed

    Mukkabla, Radha; Deepa, Melepurath; Srivastava, Avanish Kumar

    2015-10-01

    A Bi2 S3 /graphene oxide (GO) composite enwrapped by a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) coating was prepared for the first time for use as an anode in Li-ion batteries. Pristine Bi2 S3 nanoflowers and composites of Bi2 S3 /GO and Bi2 S3 /GO/PEDOT were assembled into half cells with Li metal as the counter electrode, and initial discharge capacities of 833, 1020, and 1300?mAh?g(-1) , respectively, were obtained. Composites of Bi2 S3 /GO/PEDOT and Bi2 S3 /GO showed superior cycling stability and better rate capability than pristine Bi2 S3 . GO provides highly conducting interconnections, which allow facile propagation of electrons during charge/discharge, and this improves the ion-uptake capability of the Bi2 S3 nanoflowers and also increases the rate capability. PEDOT furnishes a protective coating that prevents detachment of the material from the current collector during cycling, and it also imparts better cycling stability to the Bi2 S3 /GO/PEDOT composite. PMID:26247745

  20. Optical properties of bismuth-doped silica fibres in the temperature range 300 - 1500 K

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoretskii, D A; Bufetov, Igor' A; Vel'miskin, V V; Zlenko, Alexander S; Khopin, V F; Semjonov, S L; Guryanov, Aleksei N; Denisov, L K; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2012-09-30

    The visible and near-IR absorption and luminescence bands of bismuth-doped silica and germanosilicate fibres have been measured for the first time as a function of temperature. The temperature-dependent IR luminescence lifetime of a bismuth-related active centre associated with silicon in the germanosilicate fibre has been determined. The Bi{sup 3+} profile across the silica fibre preform is shown to differ markedly from the distribution of IR-emitting bismuth centres associated with silicon. The present results strongly suggest that the IR-emitting bismuth centre comprises a lowvalence bismuth ion and an oxygen-deficient glass network defect. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  1. Oxidation Behavior of Germanium- and/or Silicon-Bearing Near-? Titanium Alloys in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitashima, Tomonori; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko

    2015-06-01

    The effect of germanium (Ge) and/or silicon (Si) addition on the oxidation behavior of the near-? alloy Ti-5Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo was investigated in air at 973 K (700 °C). Ge addition decreased the oxidation resistance because of the formation of a Ge-rich layer in the substrate at the TiO2/substrate interface, enhancing Sn segregation at the interface. In addition, a small amount of Ge dissolved in the external Al2O3 layer. These results reduced the aluminum activity at the interface, suppressed the formation of Al2O3, and increased the diffusivity of oxygen in the oxide scales. The addition of 0.2 and 0.9 wt pct Si was beneficial for improving oxidation resistance. The effect of germanide and silicide precipitates in the matrix on the oxide growth process was also discussed.

  2. Thin film germanium on silicon created via ion implantation and oxide trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, R.; Knights, A. P.

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel process for integrating germanium with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Germanium is implanted into SOI which is then oxidized, trapping the germanium between the two oxide layers (the grown oxide and the buried oxide). With careful control of the implantation and oxidation conditions this process creates a thin layer (current experiments indicate up to 20-30nm) of almost pure germanium. The layer can be used potentially for fabrication of integrated photo-detectors sensitive to infrared wavelengths, or may serve as a seed for further germanium growth. Results are presented from electron microscopy and Rutherford back-scattering analysis, as well as preliminary modelling using an analytical description of the process.

  3. Effects of rapid thermal processing on thermal oxides of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. K.; Kwong, D. L.; Alvi, N. S.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of rapid thermal processing (RTP) on the electrical properties of thin gate oxides in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices have been studied. MOS capacitors have been analyzed by current-voltage (I-V) and constant current stress techniques. MOS field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) have been fabricated using RTP for the post-implant anneal, and the transistor degradation due to hot carrier injection has also been investigated. No significant RTP-induced degradation was detected in any category of the device properties considered here. An abnormal trapping behavior was observed on the wafer annealed at high temperature and/or long duration.

  4. Effect of W and WC on the oxidation resistance of yttria-doped silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tungsten and tungsten carbide contamination on the oxidation and cracking in air of yttria-doped silicon nitride ceramics is investigated. Silicon nitride powder containing 8 wt % Y2O3 was doped with 2 wt % W, 4 wt % W, 2 wt % WC or left undoped, and sintered in order to simulate contamination during milling, and specimens were exposed in air to 500, 750 and 1350 C for various lengths of time. Scanning electron and optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction of the specimens in the as-sintered state reveals that the addition of W or WC does not affect the phase relationships in the system, composed of alpha and beta Si3N4, melilite and an amorphous phase. Catastrophic oxidation is observed at 750 C in specimens containing 2 and 4 wt % W, accompanied by the disappearance of alpha Si3N4 and melilite from the structure. At 1350 C, the formation of a protective glassy oxide layer was observed on all specimens without catastrophic oxidation, and it is found that pre-oxidation at 1350 C also improved the oxidation resistance at 750 C of bars doped with 4 wt % W. It is suggested that tungsten contamination from WC grinding balls may be the major cause of the intermediate-temperature cracking and instability frequently observed in Si3N4-8Y2O3.

  5. Positive charge instability during bidirectional stress on metal-oxide-silicon capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziane, Dj.; El-Hdiy, A.

    2000-12-01

    Bidirectional electron injections are made on metal-oxide-silicon capacitors under constant currents or constant voltages. It is shown that both stresses reveal the same generation mechanism of oxide defects and consequently confirm that the gate/oxide interface is more stress resistant than the oxide/silicon interface. It is also shown that the created positive charge is unstable during bidirectional stress. We characterize this instability by studying dielectric defect neutralization following a new procedure. Oxide field intensity and polarity are considered as the principal precursors of this instability. Without any applied field, the neutralization follows a logarithmic law; while under a nonstressing field it follows an exponential law. Both kinetic laws are linked, since the logarithmic law describes the saturation value of the exponential one, and hence both describe the same process. Results of both current and voltage stresses give a power law between the oxide field near the cathode during stress and the capture cross section measured from neutralization kinetics.

  6. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  7. High-Temperature (1200-1400°C) Dry Oxidation of 3C-SiC on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Y. K.; Li, F.; Jennings, M. R.; Fisher, C. A.; Pérez-Tomás, A.; Thomas, S.; Hamilton, D. P.; Russell, S. A. O.; Mawby, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    In a novel approach, high temperatures (1200-1400°C) were used to oxidize cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) grown on silicon substrate. High-temperature oxidation does not significantly affect 3C-SiC doping concentration, 3C-SiC structural composition, or the final morphology of the SiO2 layer, which remains unaffected even at 1400°C (the melting point of silicon is 1414°C). Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOS-C) and lateral channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFET) were fabricated by use of the high-temperature oxidation process to study 3C-SiC/SiO2 interfaces. Unlike 4H-SiC MOSFET, there is no extra benefit of increasing the oxidation temperature from 1200°C to 1400°C. All the MOSFET resulted in a maximum field-effect mobility of approximately 70 cm2/V s.

  8. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K. (Lexington, MA)

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  9. High-temperature oxidation studies of several silicon-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramberg, Charles Eric

    1997-10-01

    A mixed control oxidation model was used in Chapter 1 to reevaluate historical assumptions regarding diffusion controlled oxidation. Rather than assuming thermodynamic equilibrium at the scale/substrate interface (a fast chemical reaction), a mixed control model allows finite rates for both the diffusion process and the chemical reaction, which occur in series. This coupling of the two mechanisms by the interfacial oxygen concentration can result in kinetics that appear completely parabolic. However, the interfacial oxygen concentration may never reach the equilibrium thermodynamic value, and may in fact remain at a significant percentage of the atmospheric value, despite the apparently parabolic kinetics. In Chapter 2, siliconized silicon carbide samples were oxidized in high purity oxygen from 1250 to 1600sp°C. The parabolic rate constants for the siliconized SiC at temperatures below 1400sp°C agreed well with literature values for CVD-SiC and single crystal SiC. At higher temperatures, the parabolic rate constants and activation energy for siliconized SiC oxidation increased. However, the parabolic rate constants obtained in this study for oxidation of CVD-SiC at 1500 and 1600 C were consistent with a single activation energy extrapolated from lower temperature rate constants obtained in prior studies. In Chapter 3, dense, homogeneous samples in the Mo-Al-Si system were fabricated using a combination of self propagating synthesis (SPS) and hot pressing. Materials in the Mosb3Alsb8-MoSisb2 pseudobinary had a strong tendency to form alumina (Alsb2Osb3) scales. During oxidation at 600 C for 50 days, arc melted Mosb3Alsb8 was extremely oxidation resistant-forming a 170 nm thick oxide scale. Increasing the silicon content reduced the oxidation resistance at this temperature for arc-melted samples. At higher temperatures, compositions in the Mosb3Alsb8-MoSisb2 pseudobinary with silicon to aluminum ratios greater than 2:1 formed scales containing both silica and alumina. The oxidation kinetics as a function of temperature were determined for hot pressed Mo(Alsb{0.1}Sisb{0.9})sb2 and Mo(Alsb{0.01}Sisb{0.99})sb2. The hot-pressed Mo(Alsb{0.1}Sisb{0.9})sb2 materials formed alumina scales at low temperatures (1200 C), and oxide scales composed of alumina (Alsb2Osb3) and mullite (3Alsb2Osb3sp\\*2SiOsb2) at higher temperatures (>1300 C). Hot pressed Mo(Alsb{0.01}Sisb{0.99})sb2 materials formed scales consisting of cristobalite (SiOsb2) and mullite. At 1500 C, the oxidation kinetics were extremely nonlinear, presumably due to the formation of a continuous mullite layer at the scale/substrate interface after ˜20 hours.

  10. Novel Iron-oxide Catalyzed CNT Formation on Semiconductor Silicon Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Tijjani; U, Hashim

    2014-01-01

    An aqueous ferric nitrate nonahydrate (Fe(NO3)3.9H2O) and magnesium oxide (MgO) were mixed and deposited on silicon nanowires (SiNWs), the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) formed by the concentration of Fe3O4/MgO catalysts with the mole ratio set at 0.15:9.85 and 600°C had diameter between 15.23 to 90nm with high-density distribution of CNT while those with the mole ratio set at 0.45:9.55 and 730°C had diameter of 100 to 230nm. The UV/Vis/NIR and FT-IR spectroscopes clearly confirmed the presence of the silicon-CNTs hybrid structure. UV/Vis/NIR, FT-IR spectra and FESEM images confirmed the silicon-CNT structure exists with diameters ranging between 15-230nm. Thus, the study demonstrated cost effective method of silicon-CNT composite nanowire formation via Iron-oxide Catalyze synthesis. PMID:25237290

  11. Novel Iron-oxide Catalyzed CNT Formation on Semiconductor Silicon Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Adam, Tijjani; U, Hashim

    2014-10-01

    An aqueous ferric nitrate nonahydrate (Fe(NO3)3.9H2O) and magnesium oxide (MgO) were mixed and deposited on silicon nanowires (SiNWs), the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) formed by the concentration of Fe3O4/MgO catalysts with the mole ratio set at 0.15:9.85 and 600°C had diameter between 15.23 to 90nm with high-density distribution of CNT while those with the mole ratio set at 0.45:9.55 and 730°C had diameter of 100 to 230nm. The UV/Vis/NIR and FT-IR spectroscopes clearly confirmed the presence of the silicon-CNTs hybrid structure. UV/Vis/NIR, FT-IR spectra and FESEM images confirmed the silicon-CNT structure exists with diameters ranging between 15-230nm. Thus, the study demonstrated cost effective method of silicon-CNT composite nanowire formation via Iron-oxide Catalyze synthesis. PMID:25237290

  12. Production of Silicon Oxide like Thin Films by the Use of Atmospheric Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozono, E. M.; Fachini, E. R.; Silva, M. L. P.; Ruchko, L. F.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2015-03-01

    The advantages of HMDS (hexamethyldisilazane) APT-plasma films for sensor applications were explored producing films in a three-turn copper coil APT equipment. HMDS was introduced into the argon plasma at four different conditions. Additional flux of oxygen could modulate the presence of organic components in the film, the composition varying from pure inorganic oxides to organo-silane polymers. Oxygen promoted deposition rates as high as 900 nm/min on silicon, acrylic or piezoelectric quartz crystal substrates. Films with a clustered morphology and refractive index of 1.45 were obtained, mainly due to a silicon oxide structure. Raman spectroscopy and XPS data showed the presence of CHn and amorphous carbon in the inorganic matrix. The films were sensitive to the humidity of the air. The adsorptive capabilities of outstanding films were tested in a Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). The results support that those films can be a useful and simple alternative for the development of sensors.

  13. Sinterability, strength and oxidation of alpha silicon carbide powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is made of pressureless sintering of commercially available alpha-SiC powders at temperatures between 1900 and 2150 C for periods of 10 to 240 min under one atmosphere of argon pressure. It is found that alpha-SiC powder containing boron and carbon sintering aids is sinterable at 2150 C for a period of 30 min to a high final density (greater than 96 percent of theoretical). In alpha-SiC powder containing aluminum and carbon sintering aids, the final density achieved is only about 80 percent of theoretical. Determinations are made of room temperature and high temperature (1370 C) flexure strength and oxidation resistance on sintered high density (more than 96 percent of theoretical) alpha-SiC (boron, carbon) material. It is found that both the strength and the resistance to oxidation are equivalent and comparable to those of the sintered alpha-SiC which represents the state of the art.

  14. Band lineup between silicon and transparent conducting oxides B. Hffling,a

    E-print Network

    Schleife, André

    on hybrid functionals are used to predict natural band discontinuities between silicon and In2O3, ZnO.1063/1.3464562 Transparent conducting oxides TCOs such as In2O3, SnO2, and ZnO are frequently applied as transparent elec, electron affinities, and branch-point en- ergies for Si, In2O3, SnO2, and ZnO, which in turn are then used

  15. Comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite crucibles for boron doped silicon epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K.

    2012-11-15

    This article reports on the comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite as crucible liners in a high-temperature effusion cell used for boron doping in silicon grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis indicates decomposition of the beryllium oxide liner, leading to significant incorporation of beryllium and oxygen in the grown films. The resulting films are of poor crystal quality with rough surfaces and broad x-ray diffraction peaks. Alternatively, the use of pyrolytic graphite crucible liners results in higher quality films.

  16. Optical waveguides in oxygen-implanted buried-oxide silicon-on-insulator structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurdi, B. N.; Hall, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is made of the waveguiding properties of the oxygen-implanted, buried-oxide, silicon-on-insulator structures currently being developed for use in microelectronics. It is found that in spite of the fact that the buried-oxide layer is only a few tenths of a micrometer thick, the single-crystal overlayer can support TEo guided-wave propagation, at subbandgap wavelengths, with losses due to substrate radiation leakage at or below the benchmark level of 1 dB/cm.

  17. Patterns of discoloration and oxidation by direct and scattered fluxes, especially oxygen on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Filz, R. C.; Rich, F. J.; Sagalyn, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    A number of interesting discoloration patterns are clearly evident on M0002-1 which resides on three faces of LDEF: front face, rear face, and earth face. Most interesting is the pattern of blue oxidation on polished single crystal silicon apparently produced by once-scattered ram oxygen atoms along the earth face. Most of the other patterns are seen in the Thermal Control Paint. Also, severe oxidation of CR-39 polycarbonate occurred on the front face of LDEF, as expected. A complete explanation for the patterns has not yet been obtained.

  18. Proposal of Trench-Oxide Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Structure and Computer Simulation of Silicon Quantum-Wire Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukui, Tetsuya; Oda, Shunri

    1993-12-01

    We propose “trench-oxide metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS)” structures as a novel formation method of silicon-based low-dimensional quantum structures, which are considered to be basic elements of future ultrahigh-speed and ultralarge-scale integrated devices. In this method, the applied gate voltage forms the potential well confined in an additional direction defined by ultrafine “trenches” on the oxide layer of the MOS structure. We characterize “trench-oxide MOS” quantum wire structures by two-dimensional numerical calculation of the shape of the potential well, the subband energy levels and the electron density, and investigate the possibility of the experimental observation of quantized density of states peculiar to quantum wires, by measuring capacitance-gate voltage (C-V) characteristics of “trench-oxide MOS capacitors.” We also have successfully fabricated “trench-oxide MOS” quantum wires with the width of 16 nm using electron beam (EB) lithography and electron cyclotron resonance reactive ion etching (ECR-RIE).

  19. A novel composite cathode Er0.4Bi1.6O3-Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-? for ceria-bismuth bilayer electrolyte high performance low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jie; Bi, Lei; Qian, Jing; Gong, Zheng; Zhu, Zhiwen; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A novel composite cathode consisting of A-site disordered Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-? (PBM) and Er0.4Bi1.6O3 (ESB) is developed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with ceria-bismuth bilayer electrolyte. Based on Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85O2-?|ESB (SNDC|ESB) bilayer structured film, the single cell NiO-SNDC|SNDC|ESB|ESB-PBM achieves an encouraging performance with the maximum power density (MPD) of 994 mW cm-2 and an interfacial polarization resistance (Rp) of 0.027 ? cm2 at 650 °C. Although a possible reaction between ESB and PBM has been identified in the cathode, the ascendant electrochemical performance including the very high fuel cell performance and Rp obtained here can demonstrate that the novel cobalt-free composite cathode ESB-PBM is a preferable alternative for ceria-bismuth bilayer electrolyte high performance low temperature SOFCs (HPLT-SOFCs) and the interfacial reaction in the cathode seems not to be detrimental to the electrochemical performance.

  20. Magnetometer uses bismuth-selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollman, J. A.; Spain, I. L.; Beale, H.

    1972-01-01

    Characteristics of bismuth-selenide magnetometer are described. Advantages of bismuth-selenide magnetometer over standard magnetometers are stressed. Thermal stability of bismuth-selenide magnetometer is analyzed. Linearity of output versus magnetic field over wide range of temperatures is reported.

  1. Effect of ion-plated films of germanium and silicon on friction, wear, and oxidation of 52100 bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Spalvins, T.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with ion plated films of germanium and silicon on the surface of 52100 bearing steel both dry and in the presence of mineral oil. Both silicon and germanium were found to reduce wear, with germanium being more effective than silicon. An optimum film thickness of germanium for minimum wear without surface crack formation was found to be approximately 400 nanometers (4000 A). The presence of silicon and germanium on the 52100 bearing steel surface improved resistance to oxidation.

  2. Atomistic and Electronic Structure of Crystalline Oxides on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocks, G. Malcolm; Moghadam, Nassrin Y.

    2001-03-01

    Crystalline rare earth and perovskite oxides can now be grown commensurate with the Si-(100) surface [R. A. McKee et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 81, 3014 (1998)]. These systems, by virtue of their high dielectric constants offer significant possibilities for replacing native oxides in semi-conductor devices as will as new physics based on their ferro-electric response. Here we present the results of first principles studies of the atomistic and electronic structure of SrO over-layers on Si-(001). The calculation are based on the model structures suggested by McKee et al. for which it is speculated that a layer of SrSi2 passivates the Si-surface and allows subsequent oxide growth. The calculations were performed using the first principles pseudo-potential package VASP [G. Kresse and J. Furthmüller, Phys. Rev. B 55 11169 (1996)] and super-cell models of the surface structure. Optimization of the surface structure together with the subsurface Si layers was performed. A stable structure for the SrSi2 monolayer on Si-100 was found [SrSi_2/Si-(100)]. Results for subsequent over layers of SrO on SrSi_2/Si-(100) are presented [nSrO/ SrSi_2/Si-(100)]. Stable structures are obtained and we comment on the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of the number of SrO over-layers n. Work supported by DOE Office of Science BES-DMS and OASCR-MICS under subcontract DEAC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  3. Window layer with p doped silicon oxide for high Voc thin-film silicon n-i-p solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biron, Rémi; Pahud, Celine; Haug, Franz-Josef; Escarré, Jordi; Söderström, Karin; Ballif, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the oxygen content in boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon oxide films (p-nc-SiOx) and introduce this material as window layer in n-i-p solar cells. The dependence of both, optical and electrical properties on the oxygen content is consistent with a bi-phase model which describes the p-nc-SiOx material as a mixture of an oxygen-rich (O-rich) phase and a silicon-rich (Si-rich) phase. We observe that increasing the oxygen content enhances the optical gap E04 while deteriorating the activation energy and the planar conductivity. These trends are ascribed to a higher volume fraction of the O-rich phase. Incorporated into n-i-p a-Si:H cells, p-nc-SiOx layers with moderate oxygen content yield open circuit voltage (Voc) up to 945 mV, which corresponds to a relative gain of 11% compared to an oxygen-free p-layer. As a similar gain is obtained on planar and on textured substrates, we attribute the increase in Voc to the higher work function of the p-nc-SiOx layer made possible by its wider band gap. These results are attained without changing the dilution ratio of the 250 nm thick intrinsic layer. We also observe an enhancement of 0.6 mA cm-2 in short circuit current density in the short wavelengths due to the higher transparency of the p-nc-SiOx layer. Finally, an initial efficiency of 9.9% for a single junction 250 nm a-Si:H n-i-p solar cell on plastic foil is achieved with the optimization of the p layer thickness, the doping ratio of the front transparent conductive oxide, and the optical properties of the back reflector.

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis map of bismuth titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Sardar, Kripasindhu; Walton, Richard I.

    2012-05-15

    The hydrothermal synthesis of four bismuth titanate materials from common bismuth and titanium precursors under hydrothermal conditions is described. Reaction of NaBiO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and anatase TiO{sub 2} in concentrated NaOH solution at 240 Degree-Sign C is shown to produce perovskite and sillenite phases Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} and Bi{sub 12}TiO{sub 20}, depending on the ratio of metal precursors used. When KOH solution is used and a 1:1 ratio of the same precursors, a pyrochlore Bi{sub 1.43}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6}(OH){sub 0.29}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.66} is formed. The use of a mixture of HNO{sub 3} and NaOH is shown to facilitate the formation of the Aurivillius-type bismuth titanate Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The phases have been isolated separately as phase-pure powders and profile refinement of powder X-ray diffraction data allows comparisons with comparable materials reported in the literature. Analysis of Bi L{sub III}-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the materials shows the oxidation state of bismuth is +3 in all of the hydrothermally derived products. - Graphical abstract: Use of NaBiO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} as reagents under hydrothermal conditions allows the phase-pure preparation of four crystalline bismuth titanate materials. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaBiO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} under hydrothermal conditions allow formation of bismuth titanates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of four distint phases has been mapped. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi LIII-edge XANES shows Bi is reduced to oxidation state +3 in all materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new hydrated bismuth titanate pyrochlore has been isolated.

  5. Elementary reaction schemes for physical and chemical vapor deposition of transition metal oxides on silicon for high-k gate dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, D.; Ashcraft, R. W.; Kelly, M. J.; Chambers, J. J.; Klein, T. M.; Parsons, G. N.

    2002-05-01

    This article describes the kinetics of reactions that result in substrate consumption during formation of ultrathin transition metal oxides on silicon. Yttrium silicate films (˜40 Å) with an equivalent silicon dioxide thickness of ˜11 Å are demonstrated by physical vapor deposition (PVD) routes. Interface reactions that occur during deposition and during postdeposition treatment are observed and compared for PVD and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) yttrium oxides and CVD aluminum-oxide systems. Silicon diffusion, metal-silicon bond formation, and reactions involving hydroxides are proposed as critical processes in interface layer formation. For PVD of yttrium silicate, oxidation is thermally activated with an effective barrier of 0.3 eV, consistent with the oxidation of silicide being the rate-limited step. For CVD aluminum oxide, interface oxidation is consistent with a process limited by silicon diffusion into the deposited oxide layer.

  6. Starting Material Silicon substrate

    E-print Network

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    Starting Material Silicon substrate 150 mm, p-type, , 36-63 ohm-cm Attila Horvath 2005 #12;Pad Oxidation and Nitride Deposition Silicon substrate Pad oxide = 250A Silicon nitride = 2200A Attila Horvath 2005 #12;N-Well Photo and Nitride Etch Silicon substrate Pad oxide Silicon nitride Photo resist Attila

  7. Effect of nitric oxide annealing on the interface trap densities near the band edges in the 4H polytype of silicon carbide

    E-print Network

    Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    polytype of silicon carbide G. Y. Chung, C. C. Tin, and J. R. Williamsa) Physics Department, Auburn­voltage measurements are reported for metal­oxide­semiconductor capacitors fabricated using the 4H polytype of silicon carbide doped with either nitrogen n or aluminum p . Annealing in nitric oxide after a standard oxidation

  8. Structural silicon nitride materials containing rare earth oxides

    DOEpatents

    Andersson, Clarence A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A ceramic composition suitable for use as a high-temperature structural material, particularly for use in apparatus exposed to oxidizing atmospheres at temperatures of 400 to 1600.degree. C., is found within the triangular area ABCA of the Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 --SiO.sub.2 --M.sub.2 O.sub.3 ternary diagram depicted in FIG. 1. M is selected from the group of Yb, Dy, Er, Sc, and alloys having Yb, Y, Er, or Dy as one component and Sc, Al, Cr, Ti, (Mg +Zr) or (Ni+Zr) as a second component, said alloy having an effective ionic radius less than 0.89 A.

  9. Oxidation of silicon nitride sintered with rare-earth oxide additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Sanders, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of rare-earth oxide additions on the oxidation of sintered Si3N4 were examined. Insignificant oxidation occurred at 700 and 1000 C, with no evidence of phase instability. At 1370 C, the oxidation rate was lowest for Y2O3 and increased for additions of La2O3, Sm2O3, and CeO2, in that order. Data obtained from X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and scanning electron microscopy indicate that oxidation occurs via diffusion of cationic species from Si3N4 grain boundaries.

  10. Optimization of oxidation processes to improve crystalline silicon solar cell emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, L.; Liang, Z. C. Liu, C. F.; Long, T. J.; Wang, D. L.

    2014-02-15

    Control of the oxidation process is one key issue in producing high-quality emitters for crystalline silicon solar cells. In this paper, the oxidation parameters of pre-oxidation time, oxygen concentration during pre-oxidation and pre-deposition and drive-in time were optimized by using orthogonal experiments. By analyzing experimental measurements of short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, series resistance and solar cell efficiency in solar cells with different sheet resistances which were produced by using different diffusion processes, we inferred that an emitter with a sheet resistance of approximately 70 ?/? performed best under the existing standard solar cell process. Further investigations were conducted on emitters with sheet resistances of approximately 70 ?/? that were obtained from different preparation processes. The results indicate that emitters with surface phosphorus concentrations between 4.96 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} and 7.78 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} and with junction depths between 0.46 ?m and 0.55 ?m possessed the best quality. With no extra processing, the final preparation of the crystalline silicon solar cell efficiency can reach 18.41%, which is an increase of 0.4%{sub abs} compared to conventional emitters with 50 ?/? sheet resistance.

  11. Micro-wear resistance of ultrathin silicon oxide film-covered polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozumi, Atsushi; Wu, Yunying; Hayashi, Kazuyuki; Sugimura, Hiroyuki; Takai, Osamu; Yokogawa, Yoshiyuki; Kameyama, Tetsuya

    2003-06-01

    An ultrathin silicon oxide film only several nanometers in thickness was prepared on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate at the relatively low temperature of 80 °C, which is below the glass transition temperature of PMMA. Our method consisted of three processes. A hydrophobic PMMA substrate was first photochemically hydrophilized using vacuum ultraviolet light of 172 nm wavelength radiated from an excimer lamp. The photochemically treated sample was then exposed to vapor-phase tetoraethoxysilane (TEOS) as a silica precursor. Because of the chemisorbed TEOS layer thus formed, the sample surface again became relatively hydrophobic with a water-contact angle of about 70°. Finally, in order to eliminate the organic phase from the chemisorbed layer, the sample was again irradiated with the same excimer lamp. As confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the binding energy (BE) of the Si 2p spectra for the chemisorbed TEOS layer shifted from 102.8 to 103.5 eV after photooxidation. This final BE value is consisted with that of amorphous silicon dioxide. The actual thickness of the oxide was estimated to be 3 nm or less by a cross-sectional image acquired by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we investigated the micro-wear resistance of the oxide-covered PMMA substrates based on a micro-scratching test using a nanoindenter. Wear depths on the scratched oxide-covered substrates were markedly reduced by about 60-84% compared with those on bare PMMA substrates.

  12. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 17 (1998) 615618 Elastic modulus of oxidation-formed silicon nitride composite

    E-print Network

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    1998-01-01

    JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 17 (1998) 615±618 Elastic modulus of oxidation-formed silicon attention was paid to the elastic properties. It is known that the Young's modulus gives valuable and a surface oxide layer. The elastic modulus of the whole sample was measured by the standard four point

  13. Silicon Metal-oxide-semiconductor Quantum Dots for Single-electron Pumping.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandro; Tanttu, Tuomo; Hudson, Fay E; Sun, Yuxin; Möttönen, Mikko; Dzurak, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    As mass-produced silicon transistors have reached the nano-scale, their behavior and performances are increasingly affected, and often deteriorated, by quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling through single dopants, scattering via interface defects, and discrete trap charge states. However, progress in silicon technology has shown that these phenomena can be harnessed and exploited for a new class of quantum-based electronics. Among others, multi-layer-gated silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) technology can be used to control single charge or spin confined in electrostatically-defined quantum dots (QD). These QD-based devices are an excellent platform for quantum computing applications and, recently, it has been demonstrated that they can also be used as single-electron pumps, which are accurate sources of quantized current for metrological purposes. Here, we discuss in detail the fabrication protocol for silicon MOS QDs which is relevant to both quantum computing and quantum metrology applications. Moreover, we describe characterization methods to test the integrity of the devices after fabrication. Finally, we give a brief description of the measurement set-up used for charge pumping experiments and show representative results of electric current quantization. PMID:26067215

  14. Silicon Metal-oxide-semiconductor Quantum Dots for Single-electron Pumping

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Alessandro; Tanttu, Tuomo; Hudson, Fay E.; Sun, Yuxin; Möttönen, Mikko; Dzurak, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    As mass-produced silicon transistors have reached the nano-scale, their behavior and performances are increasingly affected, and often deteriorated, by quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling through single dopants, scattering via interface defects, and discrete trap charge states. However, progress in silicon technology has shown that these phenomena can be harnessed and exploited for a new class of quantum-based electronics. Among others, multi-layer-gated silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) technology can be used to control single charge or spin confined in electrostatically-defined quantum dots (QD). These QD-based devices are an excellent platform for quantum computing applications and, recently, it has been demonstrated that they can also be used as single-electron pumps, which are accurate sources of quantized current for metrological purposes. Here, we discuss in detail the fabrication protocol for silicon MOS QDs which is relevant to both quantum computing and quantum metrology applications. Moreover, we describe characterization methods to test the integrity of the devices after fabrication. Finally, we give a brief description of the measurement set-up used for charge pumping experiments and show representative results of electric current quantization. PMID:26067215

  15. Identification and Control of Gravity Related Defect Formation During Melt Growth of Bismuth-Silicate (Bi12SiO20)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Y.; Witt, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    In the light of strong indications that a majority of critical defects formed in bismuth silicon oxide (BSO) during growth from the melt is related directly or indirectly to gravitational interference, it is suggested to use the reduced gravity environment of outer space for experimentation directed at the identification and control of these defects. The results of these experiments are expected to lead to advances in our understanding of crystal growth related defect formation in general and will establish a basis for effective defect engineering, the approach to efficient achievement of defect related, application specific properties in opto-electronic materials

  16. Oxide-free hybrid silicon nanowires: From fundamentals to applied nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashouti, Muhammad Y.; Sardashti, Kasra; Schmitt, Sebastian W.; Pietsch, Matthias; Ristein, Jürgen; Haick, Hossam; Christiansen, Silke H.

    2013-02-01

    The ability to control physical properties of silicon nanowires (Si NWs) by designing their surface bonds is important for their applicability in devices in the areas of nano-electronics, nano-photonics, including photovoltaics and sensing. In principle a wealth of different molecules can be attached to the bare Si NW surface atoms to create e.g. Si-O, Si-C, Si-N, etc. to mention just the most prominent ones. Si-O bond formation, i.e. oxidation usually takes place automatically as soon as Si NWs are exposed to ambient conditions and this is undesired is since a defective oxide layer (i.e. native silicon dioxide - SiO2) can cause uncontrolled trap states in the band gap of silicon. Surface functionalization of Si NW surfaces with the aim to avoid oxidation can be carried out by permitting e.g. Si-C bond formation when alkyl chains are covalently attached to the Si NW surfaces by employing a versatile two-step chlorination/alkylation process that does not affect the original length and diameter of the NWs. Termination of Si NWs with alkyl molecules through covalent Si-C bonds can provide long term stability against oxidation of the Si NW surfaces. The alkyl chain length determines the molecular coverage of Si NW surfaces and thus the surface energy and next to simple Si-C bonds even bond types such as Cdbnd C and Ctbnd C can be realized. When integrating differently functionalized Si NWs in functional devices such as field effect transistors (FETs) and solar cells, the physical properties of the resultant devices vary.

  17. Effect of gate oxide thickness on the radiation hardness of silicon-gate CMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Nordstrom, T.V.; Gibbon, C.F.

    1981-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of silicon-gate CMOS by reducing the gate oxide thickness. The device studied is an 8-bit arithmetic logic unit designed with Sandia's Expanded Linear Array (ELA) standard cells. Devices with gate oxide thicknesses of 400, 570 (standard), and 700 A were fabricated. Irradiations were done at a dose rate of 2 x 10/sup 6/ rads (Si) per hour. N- and P-channel maximum threshold shifts were reduced by 0.3 and 1.2 volts, respectively, for the thinnest oxide. Approximately, a linear relationship is found for threshold shift versus thickness. The functional radiation hardness of the full integrated circuit was also measured.

  18. Transparent conducting oxides (TCO{close_quote}s) for amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, S.; Liang, H.; Gordon, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of various textured tin oxide and zinc oxide transparent conductors was evaluated against annealing in air, in vacuum or exposed to hydrogen plasma. Only fluorine-doped zinc oxide deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) had stable electrical and optical properties under all conditions. Thin layers of ZnO or TiO{sub 2} greatly improved the plasma resistance of SnO{sub 2}. A new TCO material, niobium-doped titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}:Nb) was able to withstand hydrogen plasmas with only slight increases in its optical absorption and conductivity. Composite TCO{close_quote}s consisting of glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/TiO{sub 2}:Nb were shown to provide good electrical contact to amorphous silicon solar cells. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Oxidative stress in bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) exposed to nanostructures of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Szala, Mateusz; Kowalczyk, Pawe?; C?apa, Tomasz; Naro?na, Dorota; Selwet, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanostructures produced by combustion synthesis can cause oxidative stress in the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. The results of this study showed that SiC nanostructures damaged the cell membrane, which can lead to oxidative stress in living cells and to the loss of cell viability. As a reference, micrometric SiC was also used, which did not exhibit toxicity toward cells. Oxidative stress was studied by analyzing the activity of peroxidases, and the expression of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (zwf1) using real-time PCR and northern blot techniques. Damage to nucleic acid was studied by isolating and hydrolyzing plasmids with the formamidopyrimidine [fapy]-DNA glycosylase (also known as 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) (Fpg), which is able to detect damaged DNA. The level of viable microbial cells was investigated by propidium iodide and acridine orange staining. PMID:25965002

  20. Interaction of silicon-based quantum dots with gibel carp liver: oxidative and structural modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanca, Loredana; Petrache, Sorina Nicoleta; Serban, Andreea Iren; Staicu, Andrea Cristina; Sima, Cornelia; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Z?rnescu, Otilia; Dinu, Diana; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2013-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) interaction with living organisms is of central interest due to their various biological and medical applications. One of the most important mechanisms proposed for various silicon nanoparticle-mediated toxicity is oxidative stress. We investigated the basic processes of cellular damage by oxidative stress and tissue injury following QD accumulation in the gibel carp liver after intraperitoneal injection of a single dose of 2 mg/kg body weight Si/SiO2 QDs after 1, 3, and 7 days from their administration. QDs gradual accumulation was highlighted by fluorescence microscopy, and subsequent histological changes in the hepatic tissue were noted. After 1 and 3 days, QD-treated fish showed an increased number of macrophage clusters and fibrosis, while hepatocyte basophilia and isolated hepatolytic microlesions were observed only after substantial QDs accumulation in the liver parenchyma, at 7 days after IP injection. Induction of oxidative stress in fish liver was revealed by the formation of malondialdehyde and advanced oxidation protein products, as well as a decrease in protein thiol groups and reduced glutathione levels. The liver enzymatic antioxidant defense was modulated to maintain the redox status in response to the changes initiated by Si/SiO2 QDs. So, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were upregulated starting from the first day after injection, while the activity of superoxide dismutase increased only after 7 days. The oxidative damage that still occurred may impair the activity of more sensitive enzymes. A significant inhibition in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione-S-transferase activity was noted, while glutathione reductase remained unaltered. Taking into account that the reduced glutathione level had a deep decline and the level of lipid peroxidation products remained highly increased in the time interval we studied, it appears that the liver antioxidant defense of Carassius gibelio does not counteract the oxidative stress induced 7 days after silicon-based QDs exposure in an efficient manner.

  1. Ultrathin silicon dioxide films grown by photo-oxidation of silicon using 172 nm excimer lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliwoh, Never; Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2000-12-01

    We report the low temperature growth of ultrathin SiO2 films on crystalline Si by photo-oxidation with an array of Xe2? excimer vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamps operating at a wavelength of 172 nm. Ultrathin layers from 1.2 to 3.3 nm thickness were grown at time intervals from 5 to 40 min at 100-400°C at an O2 pressure of 1000 mbar. Growth rates of up to 0.2 nm min-1 have been achieved at 400°C, while the chemical bonding of the films has been analysed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and found to be SiO2. The as-grown 3.3 nm films exhibited good dielectric properties, comparible to SiO2 films of identical thickness, grown by RTP at 800°C.

  2. Plasmonic silicon solar cell based on silver nanoparticles using ultra-thin anodic aluminum oxide template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Cheng, Po-Yueh; Hsiao, Kuan-Yu

    2015-11-01

    This study fabricated a plasmonic silicon solar cell covered with silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) using an ultra-thin anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template as a deposition mask. An ultra-thin AAO template of approximately 200 nm was produced using a single-step anodization process in which an Al substrate was etched with phosphoric acid (H3PO4) for 3 min. We then used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the thickness and density of the AAO as a function of anodization duration, the results of which were confirmed by optical transmission measurement. The photovoltaic performance of the resulting silicon solar cell with Ag NPs was characterized according to photovoltaic current-voltage and external quantum efficiency. The inclusion of Ag NPs resulted in a 32.92% increase in conversion efficiency, compared with reference solar cells produced without Ag NPs.

  3. Hydrogen passivation of silicon(100) used as templates for low-temperature epitaxy and oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atluri, Vasudeva Prasad

    Epitaxial growth, oxidation and ohmic contacts require surfaces as free as possible of physical defects and chemical contaminants, especially, oxygen and hydrocarbons. Wet chemical cleaning typically involves a RCA clean to remove contaminants by stripping the native oxide and regrowing a chemical oxide with only trace levels of carbon and metallic impurities. Low temperature epitaxy, T<800sp° C, limits the thermal budget for the desorption of impurities and surface oxides, and can be performed on processed structures. But, silicon dioxide cannot be desorbed at temperatures lower than 800sp°C. Recently, hydrogen passivation of Si(111) has been reported to produce stable and ordered surfaces at low temperatures. Hydrogen can then be desorbed between 200sp°C and 600sp°C prior to deposition. In this work, Si(100) is passivated via a solution of hydrofluoric acid in alcohol (methanol, ethanol, or isopropyl alcohol) with HF concentrations between 0.5 to 10%. A rinse in water or alcohol is performed after etching to remove excess fluorine. This work investigates wet chemical cleaning of Si(100) to produce ordered, hydrogen-terminated, oxygen- and carbon-free surfaces to be used as templates for low temperature epitaxial growth and rapid thermal oxidation. Ion beam analysis, Tapping mode atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Secondary ion mass spectroscopy, Chemical etching, Capacitance-voltage measurements and Ellipsometry are used to measure, at the surface and interface, impurities concentration, residual disorder, crystalline order, surface topography, roughness, chemical composition, defects density, electrical characteristics, thickness, and refractive index as a function of cleaning conditions for homoepitaxial silicon growth and oxidation. The wetting characteristics of the Si(100) surfaces are measured with a tilting plate technique. Different materials are analyzed by ion beam analysis for use as hydrogen standards in elastic recoil detection of hydrogen on sample surfaces. The results obtained in this study provide a quantitative optimization of passivation of Si(100) surfaces and their use as templates for low temperature epitaxy and rapid thermal oxidation. Ion beam analysis shows that the total coverage of H increases during passivation of Si(100) via HF in alcohol, while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that more complex termination than the formation of simple silicon hydrides occurs.

  4. Band offsets of a ruthenium gate on ultrathin high-{kappa} oxide films on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan, Sylvie; Bersch, Eric; Bartynski, Robert Allen; Garfunkel, Eric; Vescovo, Elio

    2009-02-15

    Valence-band and conduction-band edges of ultrathin oxides (SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, Hf{sub 0.7}Si{sub 0.3}O{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown on silicon) and their shifts upon sequential metallization with ruthenium have been measured using synchrotron-radiation-excited x-ray, ultraviolet, and inverse photoemissions. From these techniques, the offsets between the valence-band and conduction-band edges of the oxides, and the ruthenium metal gate Fermi edge have been directly measured. In addition the core levels of the oxides and the ruthenium have been characterized. Upon deposition, Ru remains metallic and no chemical alteration of the underlying oxide gates, or interfacial SiO{sub 2} in the case of the high-{kappa} thin films, can be detected. However a clear shift of the band edges is measured for all samples due to the creation of an interface dipole at the ruthenium-oxide interface. Using the energy gap, the electron affinity of the oxides, and the ruthenium work function that have been directly measured on these samples, the experimental band offsets are compared to those predicted by the induced gap states model.

  5. Valley polarization in bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauque, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    The electronic structure of certain crystal lattices can contain multiple degenerate valleys for their charge carriers to occupy. The principal challenge in the development of valleytronics is to lift the valley degeneracy of charge carriers in a controlled way. In bulk semi-metallic bismuth, the Fermi surface includes three cigar-shaped electron valleys lying almost perpendicular to the high symmetry axis known as the trigonal axis. The in-plane mass anisotropy of each valley exceeds 200 as a consequence of Dirac dispersion, which drastically reduces the effective mass along two out of the three orientations. According to our recent study of angle-dependent magnetoresistance in bismuth, a flow of Dirac electrons along the trigonal axis is extremely sensitive to the orientation of in-plane magnetic field. Thus, a rotatable magnetic field can be used as a valley valve to tune the contribution of each valley to the total conductivity. As a consequence of a unique combination of high mobility and extreme mass anisotropy in bismuth, the effect is visible even at room temperature in a magnetic field of 1 T. Thus, a modest magnetic field can be used as a valley valve in bismuth. The results of our recent investigation of angle-dependent magnetoresistance in other semi-metals and doped semiconductors suggest that a rotating magnetic field can behave as a valley valve in a multi-valley system with sizeable mass anisotropy.

  6. A Modified Oxidative Refinement Process for Removing Boron from Molten Silicon Under Enhanced Electromagnetic Force.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Kyu; Lee, Jin-Seok; Jang, Bo-Yun; Kim, Joon-Soo; Ahn, Young-Soo; Kang, Gi-Hwan; Cho, Churl-Hee

    2015-11-01

    The removal of boron is one of the main challenges in the purification of metallurgical grade silicon destined for low-cost photovoltaic applications. However, boron is very difficult to remove in its elemental form due to its large segregation coefficient in silicon and its low vapor pressure. The removal of boron by slag treatment is today regarded as a highly promising method, but its refining efficiency is relatively low. Also, the reduction of boron by plasma treatment exhibits a high refining efficiency, but the processing cost is high due to the large amount of electricity consumed by the process. In this regard, the use of an oxidizing reactive gas in the refinement process offers some advantages both in terms of low energy consumption and promising refinement rates. Boron can be extracted in various gaseous forms as B(x)O(y) and/or B(x)H(z)O(y) phases, but the vapor pressure of B(x)H(z)O(y) is much greater than that of the other specie at a temperature of 1700 K. The present study reports a modified oxidative refining method designed to enhance the vaporization of boron as B(x)H(z)O(y) by blowing gaseous water onto the silicon melt in a segmented crucible to enhance the electromagnetic force, whereby the processing cost can be dramatically reduced due to the use of a reusable quartz crucible in a graphite crucible. An initial boron content of 13 ppm in the metallurgical grade silicon was significantly decreased to 0.3 ppm by the employment of 1.7SLM Ar + 100 ml/h H2O. Also, a mechanism capable of reducing boron based on thermodynamic considerations is proposed. PMID:26726550

  7. Process for removal of water and silicon mu-oxides from chlorosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M. (New Milford, CT); McManus, James V. (Danbury, CT)

    1992-03-10

    A scavenger composition having utility for removal of water and silicon mu-oxide impurities from chlorosilanes, such scavenger composition comprising: (a) a support; and (b) associated with the support, one or more compound(s) selected from the group consisting of compounds of the formula: R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x wherein: M is a metal selected from the group consisting of the monovalent metals lithium, sodium, and potassium; the divalent metals magnesium, strontium, barium, and calcium; and the trivalent metal aluminum; R is alkyl; a is a number equal to the valency of metal M; and x is a number having a value of from 0 to a, inclusive; and wherein said compound(s) of the formula R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x have been activated for impurity-removal service by a reaction scheme selected from those of the group consisting of: (i) reaction of such compound(s) with hydrogen chloride to form a first reaction product therefrom, followed by reaction of the first reaction product with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y, wherein y is a number having a value of from 1 to 3, inclusive; and (ii) reaction of such compound(s) with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y wherein y is a number having a value of 1 to 3, inclusive. A corresponding method of making the scavenger composition, and of purifying a chlorosilane which contains oxygen and silicon mu-oxide impurities, likewise are disclosed, together with a purifier apparatus, in which a bed of the scavenger composition is disposed. The composition, purification process, and purifier apparatus of the invention have utility in purifying gaseous chlorosilanes which are employed in the semiconductor industry as silicon source reagents for forming epitaxial silicon layers.

  8. Composition, process, and apparatus, for removal of water and silicon mu-oxides from chlorosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M. (New Milford, CT); McManus, James V. (Danbury, CT)

    1991-10-15

    A scavenger composition having utility for removal of water and silicon mu-oxide impurities from chlorosilanes, such scavenger composition comprising: (a) a support; and (b) associated with the support, one or more compound(s) selected from the group consisting of compounds of the formula: R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x wherein: M is a metal selected from the group consisting of the monovalent metals lithium, sodium, and potassium; the divalent metals magnesium, strontium, barium, and calcium; and the trivalent metal aluminum; R is alkyl; a is a number equal to the valency of metal M; and x is a number having a value from 0 to a, inclusive; and wherein said compound(s) of the formula R.sub.a-x MCl.sub.x have been activated for impurity-removal service by a reaction scheme selected from those of the group consisting of: (i) reaction of such compound(s) with hydrogen chloride to form a first reaction product therefrom, followed by reaction of the first reaction product with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4"y Cl.sub.y, wherein y is a number having a value of from 1 to 3, inclusive; and (ii) reaction of such compound(s) with a chlorosilane of the formula: SiH.sub.4-y Cl.sub.y wherein y is a number having a value of 1 to 3, inclusive. A corresponding method of making the scavenger composition, and of purifying a chlorosilane which contains oxygen and silicon mu-oxide impurities, likewise are disclosed, together with a purifier apparatus, in which a bed of the scavenger composition is disposed. The composition, purification process, and purifier apparatus of the invention have utility in purifying gaseous chlorosilanes which are employed in the semiconductor industry as silicon source reagents for forming epitaxial silicon layers.

  9. Reliability of potassium ion electret in silicon oxide for vibrational energy harvester applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Kensuke; Sugiyama, Tatsuhiko; Hashiguchi, Gen; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report on the long-term reliability of potassium ion electret included in a thermally grown silicon oxide. The electret in this work is used in a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) energy harvester to generate electrical current from mechanical vibration. A spring-mass system similar to a comb-drive electrostatic actuator is developed by silicon micromachining, and the surface is oxidized by wet-oxidation through a potassium hydroxide bubbler, thereby including potassium atoms at a high concentration. The potassium is then electrically polarized by an applied voltage of 150 V at 650 °C for 5 min. Degradation of the stored polarization potential is monitored in a vacuum of 1 × 10-3 Pa at elevated temperatures of 350, 400, and 450 °C. The time needed to cause a -1 dB decay of the potential is used as the lifetime of the electret, and the Arrhenius extrapolation plot suggested a life time of more than 400 years at 25 °C.

  10. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yang; Piper, Daniela M.; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J.; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X.; Zhang, Jiguang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-11-25

    Surface modification of silicon nanoparticle via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism as how this thin layer of coating function is not known, which is even complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in-situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation, and therefore low coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD coated particles show extremely fast, thorough and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li+/e- conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer and therefore mitigates side reaction and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the coulombic efficiency and preserve capacity and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrated that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance as the coating layer itself.

  11. Anti-reflection zinc oxide nanocones for higher efficiency thin-film silicon solar cells

    E-print Network

    Mailoa, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Thin film silicon solar cells, which are commonly made from microcrystalline silicon ([mu]c-Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si), have been considered inexpensive alternatives to thick polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) solar ...

  12. Influence of van der Waals interactions on morphology and dynamics in ultrathin liquid films at silicon oxide interfaces

    E-print Network

    Daniela Täuber; Ines Trenkmann; Christian von Borczyskowski

    2015-06-26

    Single molecule tracer diffusion studies of evaporating (thinning) ultrathin tetrakis-2-ethyl-hexoxysilane (TEHOS) films on silicon with 100 nm thermal oxide reveal a considerable slowdown of the molecular mobility within less than 4 nm above the substrate (corresponding to a few molecular TEHOS layers). This is related to restricted mobility and structure formation of the liquid in this region, in agreement with information obtained from a long-time ellipsometric study of thinning TEHOS films on silicon substrates with 100 nm thermal or 2 nm native oxide. Both show evidence for the formation of up to four layers. Additionally, on thermal oxide, a lateral flow of the liquid is observed, while the film on the native oxide forms an almost flat surface and shows negligible flow. Thus, on the 2 nm native oxide the liquid mobility is even more restricted in close vicinity to the substrate as compared to the 100 nm thermal oxide. In addition, we found a significantly smaller initial film thickness in case of the native oxide under similar dipcoating conditions. We ascribe these differences to van der Waals interactions with the underlying silicon in case of the native oxide, whereas the thermal oxide suffices to shield those interactions.

  13. Pull-test adhesion measurements of diamondlike carbon films on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A.; Dierks, J.F.

    1993-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films or diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were formed by ion-beam deposition of 400 eV methane (CH{sub 4}) ions on several smooth and rough ceramics, as well as on ceramics coated with a layer of Si and Ti. Adhesion was measured by the pin-pull method. Excellent adhesion was measured for smooth SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, but adhesion of DLC to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} was negligible. The use of a Si bonding interlayer produced good adhesion to all the substrates, but a Ti layer was ineffective because bonding between the DLC film and Ti was poor. The presence of surface roughness appeared to greatly increase the measured adhesion in all cases. Bulk thermodynamic calculations are not directly applicable to bonding at the interface. If the standard enthalpy of formation for reaction between CH{sub 4} and substrate is calculated assumpting a carbide or carbon phase is produced, a relation is seen between reaction enthalpy and relative adhesion. Large positive enthalpies are associated with poor adhesion; negative or small positive enthalpies are associated with good adhesion. This relation between enthalpy and adhesion was also observed for DLC deposited on Si. Lack of adhesion to Ti was attributed to inadvertent formation of a surface oxide layer that rendered the enthalpy for reaction with CH{sub 4} strongly positive and similar in magnitude to that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  14. Ultrasensitive food toxin biosensor using frequency based signals of silicon oxide nanoporous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, H.; RoyChaudhuri, C.

    2013-06-01

    We report an electrochemically fabricated silicon oxide nanoporous structure for ultrasensitive detection of AfB1 in food by shift in peak frequency corresponding to maximum sensitivity. It has been observed that the impedance sensitivity changes from 19% to 40% (which is only twice) where as the peak frequency shifts from 500 Hz to 50 kHz, for a change in concentration from 1 fg/ml to 1 pg/ml. This has been attributed to the combined effect of the significant pore narrowing with increasing AfB1 concentration and the opposing nature of impedance change within the nanopores and the conducting substrate immediately below the nanoporous layer.

  15. Oxidation behavior in reaction-bonded aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, S.H.

    1992-12-01

    Goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of producing low-shrinkage mullite/alumina composites by applying the reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) process to an aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina system. Mirostructural and compositional changes during heat treatment were studied by removing samples from the furnace at different steps in the heating schedule and then using optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS and XRD to characterize the powder compacts. Results suggest that the oxidation behavior of the alloy compact is different from the model proposed for the pure Al/alumina system.

  16. Using nanopillars of silicon oxide as a versatile platform for visualizing a selective immunosorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Zhou, Gang-Yan; Huang, Chih-Feng; Ko, Fu-Hsiang

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we fabricated nanopillar arrays of silicon oxide for use as two-dimensional periodic relief gratings (2DPRGs) on Si surfaces. We deposited antibodies onto the pillar surfaces of 2DPRGs modified with protein G to obtain optical detectors that were specific for the targeted antigen; the antigen units that filled the spaces between the nanopillars of the 2DPRG lead to a dramatic change in the pillar scale. The effective refractive index (neff) of the 2DPRGs was related to the pillar scale of the 2DPRG; after coupling of the antigen, a color change from pure green to orange was observable.

  17. 21 CFR 73.1162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bismuth oxychloride. 73.1162 Section 73...CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1162 Bismuth oxychloride. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bismuth oxychloride is a synthetically...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bismuth oxychloride. 73.1162 Section 73...CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1162 Bismuth oxychloride. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bismuth oxychloride is a synthetically...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bismuth oxychloride. 73.1162 Section 73...CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1162 Bismuth oxychloride. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bismuth oxychloride is a synthetically...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bismuth oxychloride. 73.1162 Section 73...CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1162 Bismuth oxychloride. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bismuth oxychloride is a synthetically...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bismuth oxychloride. 73.1162 Section 73...CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1162 Bismuth oxychloride. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bismuth oxychloride is a synthetically...

  2. Application of n-type microcrystalline silicon oxide as back reflector of crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Kazuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the application of n-type hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon oxide (n-µc-Si1-xOx:H) as an alternative back reflector material for n-type heterojunction solar cells. The effect of the CO2 and PH3 flow rates on the refractive index, oxygen content, conductivity, and crystalline fraction (Xc) of n-µc-Si1-xOx:H films was evaluated. By controlling the film oxygen content, the refractive index could be widely changed, while the absorption coefficient at wavelengths exceeding 800 nm was practically zero. We found that the insertion of an n-µc-Si1-xOx:H layer between the back surface field and the rear electrode improves the reflectance at long wavelengths. The improvement in reflectance resulted in higher internal quantum efficiency in the IR range, suggesting that the application of n-µc-Si1-xOx:H as a back reflector is promising for reducing long-wavelength losses in heterojunction solar cells.

  3. Water absorption and interface reactivity of yttrium oxide gate dielectrics on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, D.; Ashcraft, R. W.; Parsons, G. N.

    2002-05-01

    High dielectric constant insulators deposited at low temperatures rapidly absorb water during exposure to the atmosphere, and the resulting OH leads to detrimental interface reactions. We report the effect of atmospheric exposure on ultrathin yttrium oxide, and details of silicon substrate reactions during postdeposition anneals. Infrared absorption analysis indicates significant absorption of water vapor during atmospheric exposure, even for very short times (<15 min). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that after OH absorption, a thermally activated interface reaction proceeds with an activation energy of 0.33 eV, consistent with substrate reaction with OH present in the film. The OH absorption rate is reduced for annealed films or when capping layers are deposited in situ. Similar oxidation processes are expected to occur in other high-k materials of interest, where the rate of OH absorption will depend on the deposition process and material thermal history.

  4. Charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon capacitors in the presence of hydrogen deactivated dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Witczak, Steven C.; Winokur, Peter S.; Lacoe, Ronald C.; Mayer, Donald C.

    2000-06-01

    An improved charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors is presented which accounts for the deactivation of substrate dopants by hydrogen at elevated irradiation temperatures or small irradiation biases. Using high-frequency capacitance-voltage measurements, radiation-induced inversion voltage shifts are separated into components due to oxide trapped charge, interface traps, and deactivated dopants, where the latter is computed from a reduction in Si capacitance. In the limit of no radiation-induced dopant deactivation, this approach reduces to the standard midgap charge separation technique used widely for the analysis of room-temperature irradiations. The technique is demonstrated on a p-type MOS capacitor irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays at 100 degree sign C and zero bias, where the dopant deactivation is significant.(c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon capacitors in the presence of hydrogen deactivated dopants

    SciTech Connect

    WITCZAK,STEVEN C.; WINOKUR,PETER S.; LACOE,RONALD C.; MAYER,DONALD C.

    2000-02-01

    An improved charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors is presented which accounts for the deactivation of substrate dopants by hydrogen at elevated irradiation temperatures or small irradiation biases. Using high-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, radiation-induced inversion voltage shifts are separated into components due to oxide trapped charge, interface traps and deactivated dopants, where the latter is computed from a reduction in Si capacitance. In the limit of no radiation-induced dopant deactivation, this approach reduces to the standard midgap charge separation technique used widely for the analysis of room-temperature irradiations. The technique is demonstrated on a p-type MOS capacitor irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays at 100 C and zero bias, where the dopant deactivation is significant.

  6. Encapsulation of Au Nanoparticles on a Silicon Wafer During Thermal Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the behavior of Au nanoparticles anchored onto a Si(111) substrate and the evolution of the combined structure with annealing and oxidation. Au nanoparticles, formed by annealing a Au film, appear to “float” upon a growing layer of SiO2 during oxidation at high temperature, yet they also tend to become partially encapsulated by the growing silica layers. It is proposed that this occurs largely because of the differential growth rates of the silica layer on the silicon substrate between the particles and below the particles due to limited access of oxygen to the latter. This in turn is due to a combination of blockage of oxygen adsorption by the Au and limited oxygen diffusion under the gold. We think that such behavior is likely to be seen for other metal–semiconductor systems. PMID:24163715

  7. Fabrication of Silicon Oxide Thin Films by Mist Chemical Vapor Deposition Method from Polysilazane and Ozone as Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Jinchun; Katori, Shigetaka; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Li, Chaoyang; Fujita, Shizuo

    2012-09-01

    Silicon oxide thin films were grown from the liquid source, polysilazane, by using mist chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at temperatures of 200-350 °C. The films were grown with a reasonable growth rate of 12 nm/min at the temperature of 200 °C, and they showed resistivity of the order of 1013 ?·cm, although the incorporation of carbon and oxygen remains as a problem to be discussed and solved in the future. The results are encouraging for the future application of mist CVD for the growth of silicon oxide films on plastic substrates.

  8. Surface-Related States in Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals Enhance Carrier Relaxation and Inhibit Auger Recombination

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    We have studied ultrafast carrier dynamics in oxidized silicon nanocrystals (NCs) and the role that surface-related states play in the various relaxation mechanisms over a broad range of photon excitation energy corresponding to energy levels below and above the direct bandgap of the formed NCs. Transient photoinduced absorption techniques have been employed to investigate the effects of surface-related states on the relaxation dynamics of photogenerated carriers in 2.8 nm oxidized silicon NCs. Independent of the excitation photon energy, non-degenerate measurements reveal several distinct relaxation regions corresponding to relaxation of photoexcited carriers from the initial excited states, the lowest indirect states and the surface-related states. Furthermore, degenerate and non-degenerate measurements at difference excitation fluences reveal a linear dependence of the maximum of the photoinduced absorption (PA) signal and an identical decay, suggesting that Auger recombination does not play a significant role in these nanostructures even for fluence generating up to 20 carriers/NC.

  9. Silicon Carbide and Uranium Oxide Based Composite Fuel Preparation Using Polymer Infiltration and Pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Abhishek K.; Zunjarrao, Suraj C.; Singh, Raman P.

    2006-07-01

    Ceramic composite pellets consisting of uranium oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, particles in a silicon carbide matrix are fabricated using a novel processing technique based on polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP). In this process, spherical particles of depleted uranium oxide, in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, are dispersed in liquid allyl-hydrido-poly-carbo-silane (AHPCS), and subjected to pyrolysis up to 900 deg. C under a continuous flow of ultra high purity (UHP) argon. Pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous SiC at 900 deg. C. Multiple polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles are required to minimize open porosity and densify the silicon carbide matrix, in order to enhance the mechanical strength of the material. Structural characterization is carried out after first pyrolysis to investigate chemical interaction between U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and SiC. The physical and mechanical properties are also quantified, and it is shown that this processing scheme promotes uniform distribution of uranium fuel source along with a high ceramic yield of the parent matrix. Furthermore, the processing technique involves lower energy requirements than conventional sintering processes currently in practice. (authors)

  10. Improvement of silicon oxide film properties by ultraviolet excimer lamp annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, E. G.; González, P.; Serra, J.; León, B.; Pérez-Amor, M.; Flicstein, J.; Devine, R. A. B.

    1995-02-01

    A novel technology of excimer lamps has been applied to improve the properties of silicon oxide films by VUV photon annealing. Silicon oxide films were deposited at low temperature by ArF laser-CVD in parallel configuration using SiH 4 and N 2O as precursors. Post-deposition irradiation by VUV photons provided by a Xe excimer lamp (? = 172 nm) at room temperature and in an inert atmosphere was performed. The films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), single-wavelength ellipsometry and electron spin resonance (ESR) to analyze the changes in the composition, the refractive index and the paramagnetic defects in the film structure. The VUV irradiation time was successively increased until saturation of film properties was reached. As observed by FTIR, the Si-H and Si-O bands show a clear evolution. While the Si-H bonds are broken until reaching their total elimination, an increase in the number of Si-O bonds takes place. These results are in agreement with the ellipsometric measurements in which a decrease in the refractive index towards stoichiometric values ( n = 1.46) is observed. Moreover, ESR measurements show an increase in the concentration of paramagnetic defects in the structure by the VUV photon annealing, reaching a lower saturation value in comparison with samples obtained by other deposition methods.

  11. The n-silicon/thallium(III) oxide heterojunction photoelectrochemical solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, J. A.

    1986-04-01

    A protective thallium(III) oxide film was deposited on an n-silicon electrode, and the characteristics of the modified electrode were investigated. A photoelectrochemical cell consisting of the n-silicon/thallium oxide photoanode and a platinum cathode in an alkaline solution of ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox couple produced a 0.512 V open-circuit photovoltage, 33.5 mA/sq cm short-circuit photocurrent density, 0.643 fill factor, and 13.8 percent photovoltaic efficiency with 80 mW/sq cm IR-filtered xenon light. With natural sunlight, the efficiency was 11.0 percent, and with 800 nm monochromatic light, it was 22.3 percent. A solid-state photovoltaic cell, fabricated by making a low-pressure point contact to the front surface of a dry photoanode, was found to have photovoltaic characteristics that were nearly identical with those of the photoelectrochemical cell. This suggests that the photoelectrochemical cell functions like a Schottky-barrier or SIS solid-state photovoltaic cell in series with a highly reversible electrochemical cell.

  12. Silicon carbide: A unique platform for metal-oxide-semiconductor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Tuttle, Blair R.; Dhar, Sarit

    2015-06-01

    A sustainable energy future requires power electronics that can enable significantly higher efficiencies in the generation, distribution, and usage of electrical energy. Silicon carbide (4H-SiC) is one of the most technologically advanced wide bandgap semiconductor that can outperform conventional silicon in terms of power handling, maximum operating temperature, and power conversion efficiency in power modules. While SiC Schottky diode is a mature technology, SiC power Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors are relatively novel and there is large room for performance improvement. Specifically, major initiatives are under way to improve the inversion channel mobility and gate oxide stability in order to further reduce the on-resistance and enhance the gate reliability. Both problems relate to the defects near the SiO2/SiC interface, which have been the focus of intensive studies for more than a decade. Here we review research on the SiC MOS physics and technology, including its brief history, the state-of-art, and the latest progress in this field. We focus on the two main scientific problems, namely, low channel mobility and bias temperature instability. The possible mechanisms behind these issues are discussed at the device physics level as well as the atomic scale, with the support of published physical analysis and theoretical studies results. Some of the most exciting recent progress in interface engineering for improving the channel mobility and fundamental understanding of channel transport is reviewed.

  13. Mixed Ti-O-Si oxide films formation by oxidation of titanium-silicon interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, N.; Palacio, C.

    2014-05-01

    The reaction of oxygen with titanium deposited on Si (1 0 0) surfaces has been studied at room temperature and low oxygen pressures, using XPS and ARXPS. The experimental results for Ti growth on Si can be explained using a model involving a two stage mechanism. The first stage is characterized by the formation of a uniform TiSix layer ˜4 ML thick and the second one by the formation of metallic titanium that grows following a Stranki-Krastanov mechanism, that is, the formation of a Ti monolayer followed by the growth of Ti islands (7 ML thick) over the TiSix layer previously formed. The oxidation of Ti/Si interfaces strongly depends on the interface that is oxidized. For an interface corresponding to the first stage of deposition a Ti-O-Si mixed oxide layer is formed on the near surface. This layer is on top of a multilayer structure which is composed of TiO2 (Ti4+), titanium suboxides along with TiSi (TiSi + Ti1+ + Ti2+ + Ti3+), and substrate when going from the outer surface to the substrate whereas for an interface corresponding to the second stage no Ti-O-Si mixed oxide is detected and a Ti0 rich layer is observed between the titanium suboxides and the Si substrate.

  14. Optical and structural characterization of thermal oxidation effects of erbium thin films deposited by electron beam on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kamineni, Himani S.; Kamineni, Vimal K.; Moore, Richard L.; Gallis, Spyros; Diebold, Alain C.; Huang Mengbing; Kaloyeros, Alain E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal oxidation effects on the structural, compositional, and optical properties of erbium films deposited on silicon via electron beam evaporation were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. A gradual rise in oxidation temperature from 700 to 900 deg. C resulted in a transition from ErO- to Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich phase. Additional increase in oxidation temperature above 1000 deg. C led to the formation of erbium silicate due to further oxygen incorporation, as well as silicon out-diffusion from the substrate. A silicon oxide interfacial layer was also detected, with its thickness increasing with higher oxidation temperature. Additionally, film refractive index decreased, while its Tauc bandgap value increased from {approx}5.2 eV to {approx}6.4 eV, as the oxidation temperature was raised from 700 deg. C to above 900 deg. C. These transformations were accompanied by the appearance of an intense and broad absorption band below the optical gap. Thermal oxidation effects are discussed in the context of film structural characteristics and defect states.

  15. 986 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 17, NO. 5, MAY 2005 Wavelength-Switchable La-Codoped Bismuth-Based

    E-print Network

    Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

    -Codoped Bismuth-Based Erbium-Doped Fiber Ring Laser H. L. Liu, H. Y. Tam, Senior Member, IEEE, W. H. Chung, P. K. A. Wai, Senior Member, IEEE, and N. Sugimoto Abstract--A wavelength-switchable La-codoped bismuth polarization controller, and a 0.85-m-long La-codoped bis- muth-based Bi-EDF. La-codoped bismuth oxide glass

  16. Design, microstructure, and high-temperature behavior of silicon nitride sintered with rate-earth oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ciniculk, M.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1991-08-01

    The processing-microstructure-property relations of silicon nitride ceramics sintered with rare-earth oxide additives have been investigated with the aim of improving their high-temperature behavior. The additions of the oxides of Y, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, or Yb were compositionally controlled to tailor the intergranular phase. The resulting microstructure consisted of {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains and a crystalline secondary phase of RE{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, with a thin residual amorphous phase present at grain boundaries. The lanthanide oxides were found to be as effective as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in densifying Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, resulting in identical microstructures. The crystallization behavior of all six disilicates was similar, characterized by a limited nucleation and rapid growth mechanism resulting in large single crystals. Complete crystallization of the intergranular phase was obtained with the exception of a residual amorphous, observed at interfaces and believed to be rich in impurities, the cause of incomplete devitrification. The low resistance to oxidation of these materials was attributed to the minimization of amorphous phases via devitrification to disilicates, compatible with SiO{sub 2}, the oxidation product of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The strength retention of these materials at 1300{degrees}C was found to be between 80% and 91% of room-temperature strength, due to crystallization of the secondary phase and a residual but refractory amorphous grain-boundary phase. The creep behavior was found to be strongly dependent on residual amorphous phase viscosity as well as on the oxidation behavior, as evidenced by the nonsteady-state creep rates of all materials. 122 refs., 51 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Fabrication, strength and oxidation of molybdenum-silicon-boron alloys from reaction synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemas, Michael Robert

    Mo-Si-B alloys are a leading candidate for the next generation of jet turbine engine blades and have the potential to raise the operating temperatures by 300-400°C, which would dramatically increase power and efficiency. The alloys of interest are a three-phase mixture of the molybdenum solid solution (Moss) and two intermetallic phases, Mo3Si (A15) and Mo5SiB2 (T2). A novel powder metallurgical method was developed which uses the reaction of molybdenum, silicon nitride (Si3N4) and boron nitride (BN) powders to synthesize a fine dispersion of the intermetallic phases in a Moss matrix. The covalent nitrides are stable in oxidizing environments up to 1000ºC, allowing for fine particle processing without the formation of silicon and boron oxides. The process developed uses standard powder processing techniques to create Mo-Si-B alloys in a less complex and expensive manner than previously demonstrated. The formation of the intermetallic phases was examined by thermo-gravimetric analysis and x-ray diffraction. The start of the reactions to form the T2 and A15 phases were observed at 1140°C and 1193°C and the reactions have been demonstrated to be complete in as little as two hours at 1300°C. This powder metallurgy approach yields a fine dispersion of intermetallics in the Moss matrix, with average grain sizes of 2-4mum. Densities up to 95% of theoretical were attained from pressureless sintering at 1600°C and full theoretical density was achieved by hot-isostatic pressing (HIP). Low temperature sintering and HIPing was attempted to limit grain growth and to reduce the equilibrium silicon concentration in the Moss matrix. Sintering and HIPing at 1300°C reduced the grain sizes of all three phases by over a factor of two. Powder metallurgy provides an opportunity for microstructure control through changes in raw materials and processing parameters. Microstructure examination by electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) imaging was used to precisely define the location of all three phases and to measure the volume fractions and grain size distributions. Microstructural quantification techniques including two-point correlation functions were used to quantify microstructural features and correlate the BN powder size and morphology to the distribution of the intermetallic phases. High-temperature tensile tests were conducted and yield strengths of 580MPa at 1100°C and 480MPa at 1200°C were measured for the Mo-2Si-1B wt.% alloy. The yield strength of the Mo-3Si-1B wt.% alloy was 680MPa at 1100°C and 420MPa at 1300°C. A review of the pertinent literature reveals that these are among the highest yield strengths measured for these compositions. The oxidation resistance in air at 1000 and 1100°C was found to be comparable to the best values reported in the literature. The protective borosilicate surface layer was formed quickly due to the close spacing of intermetallic particles and pre-oxidation treatment was developed to further limit the transient oxidation behavior. An oxidation model was developed which factors in the different stages of oxidation to predict compositions which minimize the total metal recession due to oxidation.

  18. Deterministic assembly of releasable single crystal silicon-metal oxide field-effect devices formed from bulk wafers

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    formed from bulk wafers Tae-il Kim, Yei Hwan Jung, Hyun-Joong Chung, Ki Jun Yu, Numair Ahmed et al silicon-metal oxide field-effect devices formed from bulk wafers Tae-il Kim,1,2,a) Yei Hwan Jung,1,a released from the surfaces of bulk wafers with (111) orientation provides a route to high quality

  19. Preparation of magnetic and bioactive calcium zinc iron silicon oxide composite for hyperthermia treatment of bone cancer

    E-print Network

    Qin, Qinghua

    Preparation of magnetic and bioactive calcium zinc iron silicon oxide composite for hyperthermia]. Therefore hyperthermia at between 43 and 45°C is expected to be one of the most useful treatments of bone, the hyperthermia treatment can be classified as microwave thermotherapy, RF thermotherapy, ultrasonic thermotherapy

  20. Plasma-activated direct bonding of diamond-on-insulator wafers to thermal oxide grown silicon wafers

    E-print Network

    Akin, Tayfun

    Plasma-activated direct bonding of diamond-on-insulator wafers to thermal oxide grown silicon September 2010 Keywords: Diamond-on-insulator Plasma activation Ultrananocrystalline diamond Direct bonding Diamond-on-insulator (DOI) wafers featuring ultrananocrystalline diamond are studied via atomic force

  1. ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS

    E-print Network

    ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR- contacted rear being either passivated by atomic-layer- deposited Al2O3 or by stacks consisting-Si passivation to thermal processes. ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED Al2O3 Recently, it was shown that thin films

  2. Hot-pressed silicon nitride with various lanthanide oxides as sintering additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, K.; Toibana, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of addition of various lanthanide oxides and their mixture with Y2O3 on the sintering of Si3N4 were investigated. The addition of simple and mixed lanthanide oxides promoted the densification of Si3N4 in hot-pressing at 1800 C under 300-400kg/ centimeters squared for 60 min. The crystallization of yttrium and lanthanide-silicon oxynitrides which was observed inn the sintered body containing yttrium-lanthanide mixed oxides as additives led to the formation of a highly refractory Si3N4 ceramic having a bending strength of 82 and 84 kg/millimeters squared at room temperature and 1300 C respectively. In a Y2O3+La2O3 system, a higher molar ratio of La2O3 to Y2O3 gave a higher hardness and strength at high temperatures. It was found that 90 min was an optimum sintering time for the highest strength.

  3. Understanding the mechanism by which bismuth improves lead-acid battery capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, L. T.; Haigh, N. P.; Rand, D. A. J.

    To elucidate the mechanism by which bismuth enhances the capacity of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, model experiments are performed on pulverized positive electrodes produced either from leady oxide, which contains virtually no bismuth (termed 'Bi-free oxide'), or from Pasminco VRLA Refined™ oxide, which is of high purity and contains a specified amount (0.05 wt.%) of bismuth. The electrodes are compressed under a range of pressures (1.4 to 60 kPa). Below 40 kPa, the presence of bismuth increases the initial capacity. At all pressures, bismuth enhances the rate at which the capacity develops during cycling. Reconnection of the separated agglomerates of lead dioxide is the key factor in restoring the capacity of the pulverized electrode. Electron micrographs reveal that there are two essential types of contact in the positive material: (i) 'micro-contact' between individual irregular-shaped or individual needle-like crystals, to form the agglomerates; (ii) 'macro-contact' between individual agglomerates, to form the skeleton of the positive mass. Bismuth encourages the growth of fine needle-like crystals on the surface of the agglomerates. These crystals spread out and inter-weld to form 'bridges' between the agglomerates and, thereby, consolidate the porous mass of the electrode. This influence of bismuth on morphology is considered to be responsible for the demonstrated improvements in capacity performance.

  4. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, Christian; Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2015-11-01

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiOx/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF2), the ion implantation dose (5 × 1014 cm-2 to 1 × 1016 cm-2), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iVoc) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF2 implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iVoc of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iVoc of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved Voc of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF2 implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with Voc of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  5. Density profile in thin films of polybutadiene on silicon oxide substrates: a TOF-NR study.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, E Tilo; Sepe, Alessandro; Haese-Seiller, Martin; Moulin, Jean-François; Papadakis, Christine M

    2013-08-27

    We have investigated thin films from fully deuterated polybutadiene (PB-d6) on silicon substrates with the aim of detecting and characterizing a possible interphase in the polymer film near the substrate using time-of-flight neutron reflectometry (TOF-NR). As substrates, thermally oxidized silicon wafers were either used as such or they were coated with triethylethoxysilyl modified 1,2-PB prior to deposition of the PB-d6 film. TOF-NR reveals that, for both substrates, the scattering length density (SLD) of the PB films decreases near the solid interface. The reduction of SLD is converted to an excess fraction of free volume. To further verify the existence of the interphase in PB-d6, we attempt to model the TOF-NR curves with density profiles which do not feature an interphase. These density profiles do not describe the TOF-NR curves adequately. We conclude that, near the solid interface, an interphase having an SLD lower than the bulk of the film is present. PMID:23941468

  6. Electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by thin films of atomic layer deposited gallium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. G. Cuevas, A.

    2014-07-21

    This paper proposes the application of gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films to crystalline silicon solar cells. Effective passivation of n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of very thin Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films prepared by atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ozone (O{sub 3}) as the reactants. Surface recombination velocities as low as 6.1?cm/s have been recorded with films less than 4.5?nm thick. A range of deposition parameters has been explored, with growth rates of approximately 0.2?Å/cycle providing optimum passivation. The thermal activation energy for passivation of the Si-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface has been found to be approximately 0.5?eV. Depassivation of the interface was observed for prolonged annealing at increased temperatures. The activation energy for depassivation was measured to be 1.9?eV.

  7. The formation of light emitting cerium silicates in cerium-doped silicon oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Zalloum, Othman; Roschuk, Tyler; Heng Chenglin; Wojcik, Jacek; Mascher, Peter

    2009-01-05

    Cerium-doped silicon oxides with cerium concentrations of up to 0.9 at. % were deposited by electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Bright cerium related photoluminescence, easily seen even under room lighting conditions, was observed from the films and found to be sensitive to film composition and annealing temperature. The film containing 0.9 at. % Ce subjected to anneal in N{sub 2} at 1200 deg. C for 3 h showed the most intense cerium-related emission, easily visible under bright room lighting conditions. This is attributed to the formation of cerium silicate [Ce{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} or Ce{sub 4.667} (SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}O], the presence of which was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Synthesis of magnetite-silica core-shell nanoparticles via direct silicon oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuxian; Tang, Jing; Zhao, Hongfu; Wan, Jiaqi; Chen, Kezheng

    2014-10-15

    Magnetite-silica core-shell nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs) were prepared from silicon powder by direct oxidation without using any expensive precursors (such as TEOS) and organic solvents. The as-prepared Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs were characterized by TEM, DLS, XRD, FT-IR, zeta potential and NMR Analyzer. The results show that the Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs are monodispersed core-shell nanostructures with single cores that were uniformly coated by silica shells. The relaxation property indicates that Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs have desirable characteristics for T2 MRI contrast agents. This facile and green method is promising for large-scale production, which would open new opportunities for preparing core-shell nanostructures for biomedical applications. PMID:25072518

  9. Paralinear Oxidation of Silicon Nitride in a Water Vapor/Oxygen Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao; Humphrey, Donald L.; Lewton, Susan M.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Three silicon nitride materials were exposed to dry oxygen flowing at 0.44 cm/s at temperatures between 1200 and 1400 C. Reaction kinetics were measured with a continuously recording microbalance. Parabolic kinetics were observed. When the same materials were exposed to a 50% H2O - 50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s, all three types exhibited paralinear kinetics. The material is oxidized by water vapor to form solid silica. The protective silica is in turn volatilized by water vapor to form primarily gaseous Si(OH)4. Nonlinear least squares analysis and a paralinear kinetic model were used to determine both parabolic and linear rate constants from the kinetic data. Volatilization of the protective silica scale can result in accelerated consumption of Si3N4. Recession rates under conditions more representative of actual combustors are compared to the furnace data.

  10. Radiation response of silicon carbide metal–oxide–semiconductor transistors in high dose region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Takeshi; Yokoseki, Takashi; Murata, Koichi; Matsuda, Takuma; Mitomo, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Makino, Takahiro; Onoda, Shinobu; Hijikata, Yasuto; Tanaka, Yuki; Kandori, Mikio; Okubo, Shuichi; Yoshie, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Radiation response of vertical structure hexagonal (4H) silicon carbide (SiC) power metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) was investigated up to 5.8 MGy. The drain current–gate voltage curves for the MOSFETs shifted from positive to negative voltages due to irradiation. However, the drain current–gate voltage curve shifts for the MOSFETs irradiated at 150 °C was smaller than those irradiated at room temperature. Thus, the shift of threshold voltage due to irradiation was suppressed by irradiation at 150 °C. No significant change or slight decrease in subthreshold voltage swing for the MOSFETs irradiated at 150 °C was observed. The value of channel mobility increased due to irradiation, and the increase was enhanced by irradiation at 150 °C comparing to irradiation at RT.

  11. Effect of atmospheric-air pressure on charge transport in structures with oxidized porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bilenko, D. I. Belobrovaya, O. Ya.; Zharkova, E. A.; Terin, D. V.; Khasina, E. I.

    2007-08-15

    The electron-transport processes in structures with oxidized porous silicon (OPS) are investigated during adsorption and desorption of polar molecules from atmosphere when the air pressure varies. It is shown that the cause of the existence of the open-circuit voltage in Pd-OPS-p{sup +}-Si-Al structures in the initial state is the surface-charge change on the Pd-OPS interface due to the polar-molecule adsorption from atmospheric air. The desorption of atmospheric-air molecules leads to a change in the current-voltage characteristics of structures, growth of the metal-OPS barrier in samples with the Schottky barrier, and initiation of current instabilities. The nanocrystalline nature of OPS manifests itself in the charge-carrier localization in quantum dots (QDs) during desorption in samples with space-charge-limited currents.

  12. Selective growth of vertical silicon nanowire array guided by anodic aluminum oxide template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Nguyen, Van; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka; Konagai, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    We report on the selective growth of vertical silicon nanowire arrays guided by an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template without the introduction of any metallic catalyst. Gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using disilane as a source gas was carried out. The growth conditions such as flow rate and growth temperature were changed to optimize the Si nanowire growth. It was found that the selective growth was promoted at a flow rate of 0.5 sccm, whereas the selective growth was poor at high flow rates of 1 and 2 sccm. One-micrometer-long Si nanowire arrays were obtained at a low flow rate of 0.5 sccm only at the growth temperature of 700 °C. The obtained Si grown at a temperature of 650 °C exhibited conglomerated structures with Si grains piled up inside the nanopores of the AAO template. We found that increasing the growth temperature and decreasing the flow rate are useful for improving the growth selectivity.

  13. Quantum dot made in metal oxide silicon-nanowire field effect transistor working at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Lavieville, Romain; Triozon, François; Barraud, Sylvain; Corna, Andrea; Jehl, Xavier; Sanquer, Marc; Li, Jing; Abisset, Antoine; Duchemin, Ivan; Niquet, Yann-Michel

    2015-05-13

    We report the observation of an atomic like behavior from T = 4.2 K up to room temperature in n- and p-type ?-gate silicon nanowire (NW) transistors. For that purpose, we modified the design of a NW transistor and introduced long spacers between the source/drain and the channel in order to separate the channel from the electrodes. The channel was made extremely small (3.4 nm in diameter with 10 nm gate length) with a thick gate oxide (7 nm) in order to enhance the Coulomb repulsion between carriers, which can be as large as 200 meV when surface roughness promotes charge confinement. Parasitic stochastic Coulomb blockade effect can be eliminated in our devices by choosing proper control voltages. Moreover, the quantum dot can be tuned so that the resonant current at T = 4.2 K exceeds that at room temperature. PMID:25923197

  14. Patterns of discoloration and oxidation by direct and scattered fluxes on LDEF, including oxygen on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Filz, R. C.; Rich, F. J.; Sagalyn, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    A number of interesting discoloration patterns are clearly evident on MOOO2-1 which resides on the three faces of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Most interesting is the pattern of blue oxidation on polished single crystal silicon apparently produced by scattered or direct ram oxygen atoms along the earth face. A complete explanation for the patterns has not yet been obtained. All honeycomb outgassing holes have a small discoloration ring around them that varies in color. The shadow cast by a suspended wire on the earth face surface is not easily explained by either solar photons or by ram flux. The shadows and the dark/light regions cannot be explained consistently by the process of solar ultraviolet paint-darkening modulated by ram flux oxygen bleaching of the paint.

  15. Bismuth ochers from San Diego Co., California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaller, W.T.

    1911-01-01

    The chief points brought out in this paper may be briefly summarized as follows: (1) The existence of natural Bi2O3 has not been established. (2) Natural bismite or bismuth ocher, when pure, is more probably a bismuth hydroxide. (3) The bismuth ochers from San Diego County, California, are either a bismuth hydroxide or bismuth vanadate, pucherite, or mixtures of these two. (4) Pucherite has been found noncrystallin and determined for the first time in the United States.

  16. Homogeneity of bismuth-distribution in bismuth-doped alkali germanate laser glasses towards superbroad fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanqi; Wondraczek, Lothar; Mermet, Alain; Peng, Mingying; Zhang, Qinyuan; Qiu, Jianrong

    2015-05-01

    Compared to rare-earth doped glasses, bismuth-doped glasses hold promise for super-broadband near-infrared (NIR) photoemission and potential applications in optical amplification. However, optically active bismuth centers are extremely sensitive to the properties of the surrounding matrix, and also to processing conditions. This is strongly complicating the exploitation of this class of materials, because functional devices require a very delicate adjustment of the redox state of the bismuth species, and its distribution throughout the bulk of the material. It also largely limits some of the conventional processing routes for glass fiber, which start from gas phase deposition and may require very high processing temperature. Here, we investigate the influence of melting time and alkali addition on bismuth-related NIR photoluminescence from melt-derived germanate glasses. We show that the effect of melting time on bismuth-related absorption and NIR photoemission is primarily through bismuth volatilization. Adding alkali oxides as fluxing agents, the melt viscosity can be lowered to reduce either the glass melting temperature, or the melting time, or both. At the same time, however, alkali addition also leads to increasing mean-field basicity, what may reduce the intensity of bismuth-related NIR emission. Preferentially using Li2O over Na2O or K2O presents the best trade-off between those above factors, because its local effect may be adverse to the generally assumed trend of the negative influence of more basic matrix composition. This observation provides an important guideline for the design of melt-derived Bi-doped glasses with efficient NIR photoemission and high optical homogeneity. PMID:25969328

  17. Isolation and Characterization of a Bismuth(II) Radical.

    PubMed

    Schwamm, Ryan J; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Lein, Matthias; Fitchett, Christopher M; Granville, Simon; Coles, Martyn P

    2015-09-01

    More than 80?years after Paneth's report of dimethyl bismuth, the first monomeric Bi(II) radical that is stable in the solid state has been isolated and characterized. Reduction of the diamidobismuth(III) chloride Bi(NON(Ar))Cl (NON(Ar)=[O(SiMe2NAr)2](2-); Ar=2,6-iPr2C6H3) with magnesium affords the Bi(II) radical ?Bi(NON(Ar)). X-ray crystallographic measurements are consistent with a two-coordinate bismuth in the +2 oxidation state with no short intermolecular contacts, and solid-state SQUID magnetic measurements indicate a paramagnetic compound with a single unpaired electron. EPR and density functional calculations show a metal-centered radical with >90% spin density in a p-type orbital on bismuth. PMID:26215838

  18. Thermal oxidation of 6 nm aerosolized silicon nanoparticles: size and surface chemistry changes.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Roberts, Jeffrey T

    2007-10-23

    The earliest stages of thermal oxidation of 6 nm diameter silicon nanoparticles by molecular oxygen are examined using a tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA) apparatus, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Particles are synthesized in and then extracted from a nonthermal RF plasma operating at approximately 20 Torr into the atmospheric pressure TDMA apparatus. The TDMA apparatus was used to measure oxidation-induced size changes over a broad range of temperature settings and N2-O2 carrier gas composition. Surface chemistry changes are evaluated in situ with an FTIR spectrometer and a hybrid flow-through cell, and ex situ with ToF-SIMS and XPS. Particle size measurements show that, at temperatures less than approximately 500 degrees C, particles shrink regardless of the carrier gas oxygen concentration, while FTIR and ToF-SIMS spectra demonstrate a loss of hydrogen from the particles and minimal oxide formation. At higher temperatures, FTIR and XPS spectra indicate that an oxide forms which tends toward, but does not fully reach, stoichiometric SiO2 with increasing temperature. Between 500 and 800 degrees C, size measurements show a small increase in particle diameter with increasing carrier gas oxygen content and temperature. Above 800 degrees C, particle growth rapidly reaches a plateau while FTIR and XPS spectra change little. ToF-SIMS signals associated with O-Si species also show an increase in intensity at 800 degrees C. PMID:17910484

  19. Characterization of the charge trapping properties in p-channel silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon memory devices including SiO2/Si3N4 interfacial transition layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yung-Yueh; Yang, Bo-Jun; Li, Fu-Hai; Chang, Ru-Wei; Sun, Wein-Town; Lo, Chun-Yuan; Hsu, Chia-Jung; Kuo, Chao-Wei; Shirota, Riichiro

    2015-10-01

    The role of SiO2/Si3N4 interfacial transition (IFT) layer in the oxide-nitride-oxide (ONO) tri-layer is quantitatively analyzed for the first time by simulating the temperature and stress-accelerated retention characteristics of p-channel silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) devices. The ONO tri-layer is modeled as an alloy-dielectric by changing the atomic concentration of silicon, oxygen and nitrogen. It is revealed that simulated results including the IFT layer are more consistent with the experimental data than those neglecting the IFT layer. In addition, the results show that the trapped charge density in IFT layer is two times larger than in the bulk Si3N4 film, due to the oxygen atoms penetrated from SiO2 cause the extrinsic defects in the IFT layer. The energy levels of the trapped charge are continuously distributed, and the peak value is ˜1.6 eV below the conduction band of the ONO tri-layer with a full width at half maximum of 0.45 eV.

  20. Size control, quantum confinement, and oxidation kinetics of silicon nanocrystals synthesized at a high rate by expanding thermal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lihao E-mail: A.H.M.Smets@tudelft.nl; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H. M. E-mail: A.H.M.Smets@tudelft.nl

    2015-05-25

    The growth mechanism of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) synthesized at a high rate by means of expanding thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition technique are studied in this letter. A bimodal Gaussian size distribution is revealed from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images, and routes to reduce the unwanted large Si NCs are discussed. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies are employed to study the size-dependent quantum confinement effect, from which the average diameters of the small Si NCs are determined. The surface oxidation kinetics of Si NCs are studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the importance of post-deposition passivation treatments of hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces are demonstrated.

  1. Silicon carbide MIS and MOS development using alternative nitride and oxide dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stodilka, Danielle O.

    Magnesium oxide and magnesium calcium oxide, MgO and MgxCa 1-xO, were grown as gate dielectrics on 6H-SiC (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy for the first time. MOS diodes of MgO/SiC and Mg.75Ca .25O/SiC showed electrical breakdown fields, Ebb reaching 3.1 and 3.7 MV/cm2, respectively. An optimal Ebd of 3.7 MV/cm2 was achieved by a combination of a substrate chemical mechanical polish (CMP) treatment in acid solution, ultraviolet ozone (UV/O3) oxidation, and growth of an epitaxial Mg.75Ca .25O dielectric on SiC. The lowest density of interface states, Dit = 1 x 10-11 eV-1cm -2, was achieved for a film prepared in the same manner, without UV/O 3 exposure. The interface states were attributed to a predominant oxide of the Si-O bond type, determined by XPS to have a binding energy of 102 eV (for Si 2p) and 532.5 eV (for O 1s). In general, the UV/O3 treated diodes showed negative flat-band voltage shifts, Vfb, and higher densities of interface states. CMP treated samples measured positive Vfb, indicative of remnant interface species from polishing. Growth temperatures above 300°C showed no significant increase in Ebd or reduction in Dit, These oxides are presented as low temperature alternatives to SiO2 dielectric, commonly formed by thermal oxidation. Nanocrystalline AlN gate dielectrics were grown by metal-organic MBE (MOMBE) on SiC as an alternative to epitaxial AlN/SiC. The level of oxygen at the AlN/SiC interface could not be effectively reduced by a combination of in-situ thermal cleaning and chemical scavenging using bromide precursors, SiBr4 and CBr4. However, the ratio of silicon to carbon at the interface was controlled by regulating the flow ratio of precursors. The level of carbon deficient at the surface of SiC was compensated by additional CBr4 flux. The nanocrystalline-AlN film, which is in its preliminary stage of development, measured excellent rms roughness of 0.1 nm. The film and interface were shown to be very stable at 300°C by high temperature x-ray reflectivity (HTXRR) measurement.

  2. Controllably Interfacing with Ferroelectric Layer: A Strategy for Enhancing Water Oxidation on Silicon by Surface Polarization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Xia, Zhouhui; Wu, Shan; Chen, Fengjiao; Li, Yanguang; Sun, Baoquan

    2015-11-25

    Silicon (Si) is an important material in photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting because of its good light-harvesting capability as well as excellent charge-transport properties. However, the shallow valence band edge of Si hinders its PEC performance for water oxidation. Generally, thanks to their deep valence band edge, metal oxides are incorporated with Si to improve the performance, but they also decrease the transportation of carriers in the electrode. Here, we integrated a ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] layer with Si to increase the photovoltage as well as the saturated current density. Because of the prominent ferroelectric property from P(VDF-TrFE), the Schottky barrier between Si and the electrolyte can be facially tuned by manipulating the poling direction of the ferroelectric domains. The photovoltage is improved from 460 to 540 mV with a forward-poled P(VDF-TrFE) layer, while the current density increased from 5.8 to 12.4 mA/cm(2) at 1.23 V bias versus reversible hydrogen electrode. PMID:25844486

  3. Valence band offset in heterojunctions between crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon (sub)oxides (a-SiO{sub x}:H, 0 < x < 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Liebhaber, M.; Mews, M.; Schulze, T. F.; Korte, L. Rech, B.; Lips, K.

    2015-01-19

    The heterojunction between amorphous silicon (sub)oxides (a-SiO{sub x}:H, 0?silicon (c-Si) is investigated. We combine chemical vapor deposition with in-system photoelectron spectroscopy in order to determine the valence band offset ?E{sub V} and the interface defect density, being technologically important junction parameters. ?E{sub V} increases from ?0.3?eV for the a-Si:H/c-Si interface to >4?eV for the a-SiO{sub 2}/c-Si interface, while the electronic quality of the heterointerface deteriorates. High-bandgap a-SiO{sub x}:H is therefore unsuitable for the hole contact in heterojunction solar cells, due to electronic transport hindrance resulting from the large ?E{sub V}. Our method is readily applicable to other heterojunctions.

  4. Investigation of the threshold voltage shift effect of lanthanum(III) oxide on tin/hafnium dioxide/lanthanum oxide/silicon dioxide/silicon stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di, Ming

    The semiconductor industry continues to scale (shrink) transistor dimensions to both increase the number of transistors per integrated circuit and their speed. One important aspect of scaling is the need to decrease the equivalent oxide thickness of the transistor gate dielectric while minimizing leakage current. Traditional thin layer SiO2 or SiOxNy films have been replaced by higher dielectric constant film stacks Here we study one example, the HfO2/La2O3/SiO 2 stack. This dissertation describes an investigation of the use of La2O3 to reduce the threshold voltage of TiN/HfO 2/SiO2/Si stacks (high-kappa/metal gate stacks). A significant aspect of this study is the determination of band alignment for a series of high-kappa/metal gate stacks that explore the effect of placement and thickness of the Lanthanum oxide layer. In order to achieve this goal, a number of film stack properties were determined including film thicknesses, band gap of the high-kappa oxides, the flat band voltages, Si band bending, and the valence band and conduction band offsets. The first part of this work was measurement of individual layer thickness in the multi-layer film stacks using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and other complementary techniques. In order to more completely understand the SE measurements, complementary techniques were used. These techniques include angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). In this dissertation, we show that SE can simultaneously measure HfO 2 and SiO2 thicknesses in HfO2/SiO2/Si stacks. We discuss the difficulties in simultaneous measurement of all films in the La oxide Hf oxide film stack. The second part of this dissertation is the measurement of the band gap of high-kappa films. The band gap of a high-kappa film is an important parameter because it affects the conduction band offset (CBO) between high-kappa and Si substrate. The CBO affects the gate leakage current of the transistor. The band gap of high-kappa films was determined from the complex refractive index using several different methods. Comparisons of plots of the extinction coefficient (k), absorption coefficient (alpha), and optical models for imaginary part of the dielectric function (epsilon2) show that each method gives slightly different values for the band gap. The Cody Lorentz model for the dielectric function provides a useful model for the defect induced sub-band gap absorption. We show the impact of the subband gap absorption on band gap extrapolation. Because the existence of sub band gap states is well documented in the literature, we use the Cody Lorentz model to determine the band gap. The next step was to determine band alignment of the valence and conduction bands the layers in the film stack. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were used to determine the valence band offset (VBO) and silicon band bending. The conduction band levels were determined from the valence band energy levels and the band gap. The CBO we measured (1.77eV) is well above the specified minimum CBO for Hf oxide (1.0eV). We developed a band alignment model to account for the trends that we observed. Our data is consistent with the presence of a dipole at the high-kappa/SiO2 interface. According to this model, the change in VBO is a direct measure of the change in the interface dipole moment. Because the combination of capacitance -- voltage (C-V) and XPS to measure the flat band voltage and Si band bending, respectively, has rarely been used, relationship between these two quantities has not been discussed in the literature. The agreement between an empirical, theoretical relationship between flat band voltage vs. Si band and our data suggests that XPS can be a useful tool for examining VT shift layers in high-kappa gate stacks. We also investigated the effect of the SiO2 thickness and growth method on the flat band voltage of TiN/HfO2/La2O 3/SiO2/Si stacks. We observed no change in flat band voltage for stacks wit

  5. Corrosion by liquid lead and lead-bismuth: experimental results review and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinsuo

    2008-01-01

    Liquid metal technologies for liquid lead and lead-bismuth alloy are under wide investigation and development for advanced nuclear energy systems and waste transmutation systems. Material corrosion is one of the main issues studied a lot recently in the development of the liquid metal technology. This study reviews corrosion by liquid lead and lead bismuth, including the corrosion mechanisms, corrosion inhibitor and the formation of the protective oxide layer. The available experimental data are analyzed by using a corrosion model in which the oxidation and scale removal are coupled. Based on the model, long-term behaviors of steels in liquid lead and lead-bismuth are predictable. This report provides information for the selection of structural materials for typical nuclear reactor coolant systems when selecting liquid lead or lead bismuth as heat transfer media.

  6. Band offsets of a ruthenium gate on ultrathin high-oxide films on silicon Sylvie Rangan, Eric Bersch, and Robert Allen Bartynski

    E-print Network

    Garfunkel, Eric

    , and the ruthenium work function that have been directly measured on these samples, the experimental band offsetsBand offsets of a ruthenium gate on ultrathin high- oxide films on silicon Sylvie Rangan, Eric, HfO2, Hf0.7Si0.3O2, and Al2O3 grown on silicon and their shifts upon sequential metallization

  7. Electronic devices containing switchably conductive silicon oxides as a switching element and methods for production and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Yao, Jun; Natelson, Douglas; Zhong, Lin; He, Tao

    2015-09-08

    In various embodiments, electronic devices containing switchably conductive silicon oxide as a switching element are described herein. The electronic devices are two-terminal devices containing a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact in which at least one of the first electrical contact or the second electrical contact is deposed on a substrate to define a gap region therebetween. A switching layer containing a switchably conductive silicon oxide resides in the gap region between the first electrical contact and the second electrical contact. The electronic devices exhibit hysteretic current versus voltage properties, enabling their use in switching and memory applications. Methods for configuring, operating and constructing the electronic devices are also presented herein.

  8. Electronic devices containing switchably conductive silicon oxides as a switching element and methods for production and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M; Yao, Jun; Natelson, Douglas; Zhong, Lin; He, Tao

    2013-11-26

    In various embodiments, electronic devices containing switchably conductive silicon oxide as a switching element are described herein. The electronic devices are two-terminal devices containing a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact in which at least one of the first electrical contact or the second electrical contact is deposed on a substrate to define a gap region therebetween. A switching layer containing a switchably conductive silicon oxide resides in the the gap region between the first electical contact and the second electrical contact. The electronic devices exhibit hysteretic current versus voltage properties, enabling their use in switching and memory applications. Methods for configuring, operating and constructing the electronic devices are also presented herein.

  9. Very high-cycle fatigue failure in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon films: Effects of environment and surface oxide thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsem, D. H.; Timmerman, R.; Boyce, B. L.; Stach, E. A.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Ritchie, R. O.

    2007-01-01

    Fatigue failure in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon structural films, a phenomenon that is not observed in bulk silicon, can severely impact the durability and reliability of microelectromechanical system devices. Despite several studies on the very high-cycle fatigue behavior of these films (up to 1012cycles), there is still an on-going debate on the precise mechanisms involved. We show here that for devices fabricated in the multiuser microelectromechanical system process (MUMPs) foundry and Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT V™) process and tested under equi-tension/compression loading at ˜40kHz in different environments, stress-lifetime data exhibit similar trends in fatigue behavior in ambient room air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments, and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. The transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides in the test samples shows a four- to sixfold thickening of the surface oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after overload fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo. We find that such oxide thickening and premature fatigue failure (in air) occur in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of ˜4nm (SUMMiT V™) as well as in devices with much thicker initial oxides ˜20nm (MUMPs). Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction-layer fatigue mechanism. Specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure of the entire device. The entirety of the evidence presented here strongly indicates that the reaction-layer fatigue mechanism is the governing mechanism for fatigue failure in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon thin films.

  10. Cross-Sectional X-Ray Topographic Study of Lattice Distortion in Silicon Crstal with Oxide Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Yoichi; Isomae, Seiichi; Horiuchi, Masatada

    1990-06-01

    Cross-Sectinal X-ray topography, in which a specimen is prepared as a thin section perpendicular to the specimen surface, is proposed to quantitavely evaluate depth profiles of lattice distortion. The topographs obatined in silicon wafer with an oxide film show a black speck near the film edge. Such a diffraction image is obseved to be apparently deflected as a consequence of strain relaxation caused by the surface effect on the cross sections.

  11. Homopolyatomic Bismuth Ions, Part 2= Electronic Excitations in Homopolyatomic Bismuth Cations: Spectroscopic

    E-print Network

    Glaser, Rainer

    Homopolyatomic Bismuth Ions, Part 2= Electronic Excitations in Homopolyatomic Bismuth Cations of the low-valence bismuth cluster cations Bi5 3 , Bi8 2 , and Bi9 5 have been studied with experimental and theoretical tech- niques. The UV-visible spectra of the bismuth ions were measured in acidic chloroaluminate

  12. Characterization of hybrid cobalt-porous silicon systems: protective effect of the Matrix in the metal oxidation.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Noval, Alvaro; Gallach, Darío; García, Miguel Angel; Ferro-Llanos, Vicente; Herrero, Pilar; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Ogata, Yukio H; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raúl J; Ciment-Font, Aurelio; Manso-Silván, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the characterization of cobalt-porous silicon (Co-PSi) hybrid systems is performed by a combination of magnetic, spectroscopic, and structural techniques. The Co-PSi structures are composed by a columnar matrix of PSi with Co nanoparticles embedded inside, as determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The oxidation state, crystalline structure, and magnetic behavior are determined by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and Alternating Gradient Field Magnetometry (AGFM). Additionally, the Co concentration profile inside the matrix has been studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). It is concluded that the PSi matrix can be tailored to provide the Co nanoparticles with extra protection against oxidation. PMID:22938050

  13. Low power zinc-oxide based charge trapping memory with embedded silicon nanoparticles via poole-frenkel hole emission

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Ozcan, Ayse; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.; Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara

    2014-01-06

    A low power zinc-oxide (ZnO) charge trapping memory with embedded silicon (Si) nanoparticles is demonstrated. The charge trapping layer is formed by spin coating 2?nm silicon nanoparticles between Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO steps. The threshold voltage shift (?V{sub t}) vs. programming voltage is studied with and without the silicon nanoparticles. Applying ?1?V for 5?s at the gate of the memory with nanoparticles results in a ?V{sub t} of 3.4?V, and the memory window can be up to 8?V with an excellent retention characteristic (>10 yr). Without nanoparticles, at ?1?V programming voltage, the ?V{sub t} is negligible. In order to get ?V{sub t} of 3.4?V without nanoparticles, programming voltage in excess of 10?V is required. The negative voltage on the gate programs the memory indicating that holes are being trapped in the charge trapping layer. In addition, at 1?V the electric field across the 3.6?nm tunnel oxide is calculated to be 0.36 MV/cm, which is too small for significant tunneling. Moreover, the ?V{sub t} vs. electric field across the tunnel oxide shows square root dependence at low fields (E??2.7 MV/cm). This indicates that Poole-Frenkel Effect is the main mechanism for holes emission at low fields and Phonon Assisted Tunneling at higher fields.

  14. From GaAs MOSFETs to epitaxial oxides on silicon : old and new MBE stories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fompeyrine, Jean

    2008-03-01

    50 years of intense development in chip technology did not fundamentally change the initial concept: the capability to modulate charges right at the interface between two dissimilar materials. This concept allowed the whole microelectronic industry to develop exponentially and to disseminate its products all over our environment. Two simple reasons can be given to such a success: i) device scaling was a simple and cost-effective method to make chip faster; ii) faster chips simply allowed our computing environment to perform new functions. None of the two reasons given will remain true in the next few years. Scaling has come to an end. The materials properties will be scaled instead of the device itself. The recent introduction of high-k materials perfectly illustrates such a transition. The future success for chip makers might then depends on new rules: i) many new materials will be developed, and interfaces, still a key element for a device to perform better, will multiply; ii) The future technology developments will be more expensive and generate smaller performance gains. The added value might be then in the integration of functions implemented in these new materials. A few years ago, molecular beam epitaxy allowed band-gap engineering in compound semiconductors to build new devices and, more recently, was successfully used to explore the physics and chemistry of complex perovskites. During the last years, new developments have been made to combine oxides and semiconductors. In particular, many groups have reported the growth of epitaxial oxides on silicon surfaces. The recent and renewed interest in compound semiconductor MOSFETs structures might indeed be seen as a logical conclusion for this evolution. This presentation will review the latest developments in the field, with a focus on the activities taking place at IBM Zurich. It will also put them in perspective with the new rules the microelectronic industry might follow.

  15. The optical properties of bismuth nanowires

    E-print Network

    Black, Marcie R. (Marcie Rochelle)

    2003-01-01

    The optical absorption of bismuth nanowires in the energy (wavenumber) range of 600 - 4000cm-1 is studied. Optical reflection and transmission spectra reveal that bismuth nanowires have a large and intense absorption peak ...

  16. Organic-on-silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor colour image sensors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seon-Jeong; Leem, Dong-Seok; Park, Kyung-Bae; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Sul, Sangchul; Na, Kyoungwon; Lee, Gae Hwang; Heo, Chul-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Bulliard, Xavier; Satoh, Ryu-Ichi; Yagi, Tadao; Ro, Takkyun; Im, Dongmo; Jung, Jungkyu; Lee, Myungwon; Lee, Tae-Yon; Han, Moon Gyu; Jin, Yong Wan; Lee, Sangyoon

    2015-01-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) colour image sensors are representative examples of light-detection devices. To achieve extremely high resolutions, the pixel sizes of the CMOS image sensors must be reduced to less than a micron, which in turn significantly limits the number of photons that can be captured by each pixel using silicon (Si)-based technology (i.e., this reduction in pixel size results in a loss of sensitivity). Here, we demonstrate a novel and efficient method of increasing the sensitivity and resolution of the CMOS image sensors by superposing an organic photodiode (OPD) onto a CMOS circuit with Si photodiodes, which consequently doubles the light-input surface area of each pixel. To realise this concept, we developed organic semiconductor materials with absorption properties selective to green light and successfully fabricated highly efficient green-light-sensitive OPDs without colour filters. We found that such a top light-receiving OPD, which is selective to specific green wavelengths, demonstrates great potential when combined with a newly designed Si-based CMOS circuit containing only blue and red colour filters. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this state-of-the-art hybrid colour image sensor, we acquired a real full-colour image using a camera that contained the organic-on-Si hybrid CMOS colour image sensor. PMID:25578322

  17. Organic-on-silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor colour image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seon-Jeong; Leem, Dong-Seok; Park, Kyung-Bae; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Sul, Sangchul; Na, Kyoungwon; Lee, Gae Hwang; Heo, Chul-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Bulliard, Xavier; Satoh, Ryu-Ichi; Yagi, Tadao; Ro, Takkyun; Im, Dongmo; Jung, Jungkyu; Lee, Myungwon; Lee, Tae-Yon; Han, Moon Gyu; Jin, Yong Wan; Lee, Sangyoon

    2015-01-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) colour image sensors are representative examples of light-detection devices. To achieve extremely high resolutions, the pixel sizes of the CMOS image sensors must be reduced to less than a micron, which in turn significantly limits the number of photons that can be captured by each pixel using silicon (Si)-based technology (i.e., this reduction in pixel size results in a loss of sensitivity). Here, we demonstrate a novel and efficient method of increasing the sensitivity and resolution of the CMOS image sensors by superposing an organic photodiode (OPD) onto a CMOS circuit with Si photodiodes, which consequently doubles the light-input surface area of each pixel. To realise this concept, we developed organic semiconductor materials with absorption properties selective to green light and successfully fabricated highly efficient green-light-sensitive OPDs without colour filters. We found that such a top light-receiving OPD, which is selective to specific green wavelengths, demonstrates great potential when combined with a newly designed Si-based CMOS circuit containing only blue and red colour filters. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this state-of-the-art hybrid colour image sensor, we acquired a real full-colour image using a camera that contained the organic-on-Si hybrid CMOS colour image sensor.

  18. Permeation mechanisms of pulsed microwave plasma deposited silicon oxide films for food packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deilmann, Michael; Grabowski, Mirko; Theiß, Sebastian; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Silicon oxide barrier layers are deposited on polyethylene terephthalate as permeation barriers for food packaging applications by means of a low pressure microwave plasma. Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and oxygen are used as process gases to deposit SiOx coatings via pulsed low pressure plasmas. The layer composition of the coating is investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to show correlations with barrier properties of the films. The oxygen permeation barrier is determined by the carrier gas method using an electrochemical detector. The transition from low to high barrier films is mapped by the transition from organic SiOxCyHz layers to quartz-like SiO1.7 films containing silanol bound hydrogen. A residual permeation as low as J = 1 ± 0.3 cm3 m-2 day-1 bar-1 is achieved, which is a good value for food packaging applications. Additionally, the activation energy Ep of oxygen permeation is analysed and a strong increase from Ep = 31.5 kJ mol-1 for SiOx CyHz-like coatings to Ep = 53.7 kJ mol-1 for SiO1.7 films is observed by increasing the oxygen dilution of HMDSO:O2 plasma. The reason for the residual permeation of high barrier films is discussed and coating defects are visualized by capacitively coupled atomic oxygen plasma etching of coated substrates. A defect density of 3000 mm-2 is revealed.

  19. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxide films with divinyldimethylsilane and tetravinylsilane

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Gyu; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2006-03-15

    Carbon-doped silicon oxide (SiCOH) low-k films were deposited with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using divinyldimethylsilane (DVDMS) with two vinyl groups and tetravinylsilane (TVS) with four vinyl groups compared with vinyltrimethylsilane (VTMS) with one vinyl group. With more vinyl groups in the precursor, due to the crosslinking of the vinyl groups, the film contains more of an organic phase and organic phase became less volatile. It was confirmed that the deposition rate, refractive index, and k value increase with more vinyl groups in the precursor molecule. After annealing, the SiCOH films deposited with DVDMS and TVS showed a low dielectric constant of 2.2 and 2.4 at optimum conditions, respectively. In both cases, the annealed film had low leakage current density (J=6.7x10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} for SiCOH film of DVDMS and J=1.18x10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2} for SiCOH film of TVS at 1 MV/cm) and relatively high breakdown field strength (E>4.0 MV/cm at 1 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is comparable to those of PECVD SiO{sub 2}.

  20. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  1. Mineral resource of the month: bismuth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlin, James F.

    2006-01-01

    Bismuth compounds are most known for their soothing effects on the stomach, wounds and sores. These properties make the compounds an essential part of many medicinal and cosmetic preparations, which until 1930 accounted for about 90 percent of the bismuth used. The subsequent development of low-melting alloys and chemical catalysts containing bismuth, as well as its use as an additive to casting alloys, has resulted in a wider variety of industrial applications for bismuth.

  2. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdale, Pravin; Castellino, Micaela; Marrec, Françoise; Rodil, Sandra E.; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method was used to prepare thin films of bismuth based nano particles starting from bismuth salts. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) crystals were synthesized from solution containing bismuth chloride (BiCl3) in acetone (CH3sbnd COsbnd CH3). Self-assembly of nano sized BiOCl crystals were observed on the surface of silicon, fused silica, copper, carbon nanotubes and aluminium substrates. Various synthesis parameters and their significant impact onto the formation of self-assembled nano-crystalline BiOCl were investigated. BiOCl nano particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that bismuth nanometer-sized crystal structures showing a single tetragonal phase were indeed bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) square platelets 18-250 nm thick and a few micrometres wide.

  3. 21 CFR 73.2110 - Bismuth citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2110 Bismuth citrate. (a) Identity. The color additive... restrictions. The color additive bismuth citrate may be safely used in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp, subject to the following restrictions: (1) The amount of bismuth citrate in the...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2110 - Bismuth citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2110 Bismuth citrate. (a) Identity. The color additive... restrictions. The color additive bismuth citrate may be safely used in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp, subject to the following restrictions: (1) The amount of bismuth citrate in the...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2110 - Bismuth citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2110 Bismuth citrate. (a) Identity. The color additive... restrictions. The color additive bismuth citrate may be safely used in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp, subject to the following restrictions: (1) The amount of bismuth citrate in the...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2110 - Bismuth citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2110 Bismuth citrate. (a) Identity. The color additive... restrictions. The color additive bismuth citrate may be safely used in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp, subject to the following restrictions: (1) The amount of bismuth citrate in the...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2110 - Bismuth citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2110 Bismuth citrate. (a) Identity. The color additive... restrictions. The color additive bismuth citrate may be safely used in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp, subject to the following restrictions: (1) The amount of bismuth citrate in the...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2110 - Bismuth citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2110 Bismuth citrate. ...bismuth citrate may be safely used in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp...The amount of bismuth citrate in the cosmetic shall not be in excess of 2.0...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2110 - Bismuth citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2110 Bismuth citrate. ...bismuth citrate may be safely used in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp...The amount of bismuth citrate in the cosmetic shall not be in excess of 2.0...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2110 - Bismuth citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2110 Bismuth citrate. ...bismuth citrate may be safely used in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp...The amount of bismuth citrate in the cosmetic shall not be in excess of 2.0...

  11. Effects of surface oxide layer on nanocavity formation and silver gettering in hydrogen ion implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Naczas, Sebastian; Huang Mengbing; Yaqoob, Faisal

    2013-07-14

    We have made an investigation of the surface oxide effects on nanocavity formation in hydrogen implanted silicon and the influence of resultant nanocavities on diffusion and gettering of implanted silver atoms. A wafer with a 200-nm SiO{sub 2} surface layer was implanted with 22.5 keV H ions to a dose of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, yielding the concentration peak of implanted H ions at {approx}140 nm below the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface. Subsequently, two sets of Si samples were prepared, depending on whether the oxide layer was etched off before (Group-A) or after (Group-B) post-H-implantation annealing. As evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, Group-A samples exhibited an array of large-sized nanocavities in hexagon-like shape, extending from the surface to the depth {approx}140 nm, whereas a narrow band of sphere-shaped nanocavities of small size was present around 140 nm below the surface in Group-B samples. These Si samples with pre-existing nanocavities were further implanted with Ag ions in the surface region ({approx}40 nm projected range) and post-Ag-implantation annealing was conducted in the temperature range between 600 and 900 Degree-Sign C. Measurements based on Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy revealed much different behaviors for Ag redistribution and defect accumulation in these two sets of samples. Compared to the case for Group-B Si, Group-A Si exhibited a lower concentration of residual defects and a slower kinetics in Ag diffusion as well. We discuss the role of thick surface oxide in point defect generation and recombination, and the consequence on nanocavity formation and defect retention in Si. The properties of nanocavities, e.g., their depth distribution, size, and even shape, are believed to be responsible for the observed disparities between these samples, including an interesting contrast of surface vs. bulk diffusion phenomena for implanted Ag atoms.

  12. Third order nonlinear optical properties of bismuth zinc borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavelu, B.; Ravi Kanth Kumar, V. V.; Kuladeep, R.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2013-12-28

    Third order nonlinear optical characterization of bismuth zinc borate glasses are reported here using different laser pulse durations. Bismuth zinc borate glasses with compositions xBi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30ZnO-(70-x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x?=?30, 35, 40, and 45?mol. %) have been prepared by melt quenching method. These glasses were characterized by Raman, UV-Vis absorption, and Z scan measurements. Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopic results indicate that non-bridging oxygens increase with increase of bismuth content in the glass. Nonlinear absorption and refraction behavior in the nanosecond (ns), picosecond (ps), and femtosecond (fs) time domains were studied in detail. Strong reverse saturable absorption due to dominant two-photon absorption (TPA) was observed with both ps and fs excitations. In the case of ns pulse excitations, TPA and free-carrier absorption processes contribute for the nonlinear absorption. Two-photon absorption coefficient (?) and the absorption cross section due to free carriers (?{sub e}) are estimated by theoretical fit of the open aperture Z-scan measurements and found to be dependent on the amount of bismuth oxide in the glass composition. In both ns and fs regimes the sign and magnitude of the third order nonlinearity are evaluated, and the optical limiting characteristics are also reported.

  13. Excitation mechanism and thermal emission quenching of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition—Do we need silicon nanoclusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorodecki, A. Golacki, L. W.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W.; Fedus, K.

    2014-04-14

    In this work, we will discuss the excitation and emission properties of Tb ions in a Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide (SRSO) matrix obtained at different technological conditions. By means of electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition, undoped and doped SRSO films have been obtained with different Si content (33, 35, 39, 50 at. %) and were annealed at different temperatures (600, 900, 1100?°C). The samples were characterized optically and structurally using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time resolved PL, absorption, cathodoluminescence, temperature dependent PL, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how the matrix modifications influence excitation and emission properties of Tb ions.

  14. Effects of silicon nanostructure evolution on Er{sup 3+} luminescence in silicon-rich silicon oxide/Er-doped silica multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Soo; Jhe, Ji-Hong; Yang, Moon-Seung; Shin, Jung H.; Kim, Kyung Joong; Moon, Dae Won

    2006-10-30

    The effect of silicon nanostructure evolution on Er{sup 3+} luminescence is investigated by using multilayers of 2.5 nm thin SiO{sub x} (x<2) and 10 nm thin Er-doped silica (SiO{sub 2}:Er). By separating excess Si and Er atoms into separate, nanometer-thin layers, the effect of silicon nanostructure evolution on np-Si sensitized Er{sup 3+} luminescence could be investigated while keeping the microscopic Er{sup 3+} environment the same. The authors find that while the presence of np-Si is necessary for efficient sensitization, the overall quality of np-Si layer has little effect on the Er{sup 3+} luminescence. On the other hand, intrusion of np-Si into Er-doped silica layers leads to deactivation of np-Si/Er{sup 3+} interaction, suggesting that there is a limit to excess Si and Er contents that can be used.

  15. Evaluation of Seebeck coefficients in n- and p-type silicon nanowires fabricated by complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Younghoon; Park, Youngsam; Choi, Wonchul; Kim, Jaehyeon; Zyung, Taehyoung; Jang, Moongyu

    2012-10-01

    Silicon-based thermoelectric nanowires were fabricated by using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. 50 nm width n- and p-type silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were manufactured using a conventional photolithography method on 8 inch silicon wafer. For the evaluation of the Seebeck coefficients of the silicon nanowires, heater and temperature sensor embedded test patterns were fabricated. Moreover, for the elimination of electrical and thermal contact resistance issues, the SiNWs, heater and temperature sensors were fabricated monolithically using a CMOS process. For validation of the temperature measurement by an electrical method, scanning thermal microscopy analysis was carried out. The highest Seebeck coefficients were - 169.97 ?V K-1 and 152.82 ?V K-1 and the highest power factors were 2.77 mW m-1 K-2 and 0.65 mW m-1 K-2 for n- and p-type SiNWs, respectively, in the temperature range from 200 to 300 K. The larger power factor value for n-type SiNW was due to the higher electrical conductivity. The total Seebeck coefficient and total power factor for the n- and p-leg unit device were 157.66 ?V K-1 and 9.30 mW m-1 K-2 at 300 K, respectively.

  16. Evaluation of Seebeck coefficients in n- and p-type silicon nanowires fabricated by complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Younghoon; Park, Youngsam; Choi, Wonchul; Kim, Jaehyeon; Zyung, Taehyoung; Jang, Moongyu

    2012-10-12

    Silicon-based thermoelectric nanowires were fabricated by using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. 50 nm width n- and p-type silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were manufactured using a conventional photolithography method on 8 inch silicon wafer. For the evaluation of the Seebeck coefficients of the silicon nanowires, heater and temperature sensor embedded test patterns were fabricated. Moreover, for the elimination of electrical and thermal contact resistance issues, the SiNWs, heater and temperature sensors were fabricated monolithically using a CMOS process. For validation of the temperature measurement by an electrical method, scanning thermal microscopy analysis was carried out. The highest Seebeck coefficients were - 169.97 ?V K(-1) and 152.82 ?V K(-1) and the highest power factors were 2.77 mW m(-1) K(-2) and 0.65 mW m(-1) K(-2) for n- and p-type SiNWs, respectively, in the temperature range from 200 to 300 K. The larger power factor value for n-type SiNW was due to the higher electrical conductivity. The total Seebeck coefficient and total power factor for the n- and p-leg unit device were 157.66 ?V K(-1) and 9.30 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 300 K, respectively. PMID:22995969

  17. Corrosion behavior of Si-enriched steels for nuclear applications in liquid lead-bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Yuji

    2013-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of Si-enriched steels in liquid lead-bismuth was studied in order to develop accelerator driven systems for transmutation of long-lived radioactive wastes and lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors. The corrosion tests of 316SS, Si-enriched 316SS, Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (T91) and Si-enriched T91 were conducted at 550 °C in liquid lead-bismuth at the two controlled oxygen levels. Both the additions of 2.5 wt.% Si to 316SS and 1.5 wt.% Si to T91 had the effect of reducing the thickness of oxide layer in liquid lead-bismuth at the high oxygen concentration (2.5 × 10-5 wt.%). Although the Si addition to 316SS reduced the depth of ferritization caused by Ni dissolution in liquid lead-bismuth at the low oxygen concentration (4.4 × 10-8 wt.%), it could not suppress the ferritization and the penetration of Pb and Bi completely. The Si addition to T91 did not have the effect of preventing the penetration of Pb and Bi in the liquid lead-bismuth at the low oxygen concentration. The oxide scales formed on both Si-enriched steels did not have sufficient corrosion resistance under the low oxygen condition.

  18. Interaction at the silicon/transition metal oxide heterojunction interface and its effect on the photovoltaic performance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhimin; Su, Mingze; Zhou, Yangyang; Gong, Li; Zhao, Chuanxi; Chen, Keqiu; Xie, Fangyan; Zhang, Weihong; Chen, Jian; Liu, Pengyi; Xie, Weiguang

    2015-10-14

    The interfacial reaction and energy level alignment at the Si/transition metal oxide (TMO, including MoO3-x, V2O5-x, WO3-x) heterojunction are systematically investigated. We confirm that the interfacial reaction appears during the thermal deposition of TMO, with the reaction extent increasing from MoO3-x, to V2O5-x, and to WO3-x. The reaction causes the surface oxidation of silicon for faster electron/hole recombination, and the reduction of TMO for effective hole collection. The photovoltaic performance of the Si/TMO heterojunction devices is affected by the interface reaction. MoO3-x are the best hole selecting materials that induce least surface oxidation but strongest reduction. Compared with H-passivation, methyl group passivation is an effective way to reduce the interface reaction and improve the interfacial energy level alignment for better electron and hole collection. PMID:26422643

  19. [Bismuth-207 in environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Komura, K

    1985-10-01

    Measurements of fallout 207Bi in environmental samples were reported for water filters used at the Scott Base in Antarctica and the surface soils containing high amount of fallout nuclides. The level of 207Bi in these samples was found to be nearly the same or a little higher than that of fallout 60Co and the 207Bi/137Cs activity ratios were in the range of 0.001-0.018. Contamination of bismuth by 207Bi was found in "high purity" bismuth on market and its level was measured to be 1.9 mBq/g-Bi. PMID:4095279

  20. Comparative toxicity of silicon dioxide, silver and iron oxide nanoparticles after repeated oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Seung-Hyun; You, Ji-Ran; Kim, Woo Ho; Jang, Ja-June; Min, Seung-Kee; Kim, Hee Chan; Chung, Doo Hyun; Jeong, Jayoung; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Che, Jeong-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Although silicon dioxide (SiO2), silver (Ag) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles are widely used in diverse applications from food to biomedicine, in vivo toxicities of these nanoparticles exposed via the oral route remain highly controversial. To examine the systemic toxicity of these nanoparticles, well-dispersed nanoparticles were orally administered to Sprague-Dawley rats daily over a 13-week period. Based on the results of an acute toxicity and a 14-day repeated toxicity study, 975.9, 1030.5 and 1000 mg kg(-1) were selected as the highest dose of the SiO2 , Ag and Fe2O3 nanoparticles, respectively, for the 13-week repeated oral toxicity study. The SiO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not induce dose-related changes in a number of parameters associated with the systemic toxicity up to 975.9 and 1000 mg kg(-1) , respectively, whereas the Ag nanoparticles resulted in increases in serum alkaline phosphatase and calcium as well as lymphocyte infiltration in liver and kidney, raising the possibility of liver and kidney toxicity induced by the Ag nanoparticles. Compared with the SiO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles showing no systemic distribution in all tissues tested, the Ag concentration in sampled blood and organs in the Ag nanoparticle-treated group significantly increased with a positive and/or dose-related trend, meaning that the systemic toxicity of the Ag nanoparticles, including liver and kidney toxicity, might be explained by extensive systemic distribution of Ag originating from the Ag nanoparticles. Our current results suggest that further study is required to identify that Ag detected outside the gastrointestinal tract were indeed a nanoparticle form or ionized form. PMID:25752675

  1. Electronic states at the interface between indium tin oxide and silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Malmbekk, H.; Vines, L.; Monakhov, E. V.; Svensson, B. G.

    2011-10-01

    Electronic properties and thermal stability of interfacial states between indium tin oxide (ITO) and monocrystalline silicon (Si) have been investigated. ITO films with thicknesses of about 300 nm were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering on n- and p-type (100) Si at room temperature. The samples were then annealed for 30 min at different temperatures in the range 100-600 deg. C, and the ITO-Si junction was found to exhibit rectifying behavior. Current-voltage (IV), capacitance-voltage (CV), and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been used to electrically characterize the ITO-Si interface. DLTS measurements on p-type Si samples reveal a dominant hole trap at around 0.37 eV above the valence band edge. In the n-type samples, a broad band of electron traps occur in the range 0.1-0.2 eV below the conduction band edge. These electron traps display wide DLTS peaks, indicating a band of electronic energy levels rather than well-defined states originating from isolated point defects. All the traps in both the p- and n-type samples are found to be located near the ITO-Si interface. Investigations of the thermal stability of the observed electronic states show that the dominant hole trap anneal out after 30 min at 250 deg. C, while the dominant electron traps can be stable up to 500 deg. C. IV and DLTS measurements demonstrate a clear correlation between the annealing of the dominant electronic states and increase in the junction rectification.

  2. Nonlinear effects in infrared action spectroscopy of silicon and vanadium oxide clusters: experiment and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Florent; Li, Yejun; Kiawi, Denis M; Bakker, Joost M; Parneix, Pascal; Janssens, Ewald

    2015-10-21

    For structural assignment of gas phase compounds, infrared action spectra are usually compared to computed linear absorption spectra. However, action spectroscopy is highly nonlinear owing to the necessary transfer of the excitation energy and its subsequent redistribution leading to statistical ionization or dissociation. Here, we examine by joint experiment and dedicated modeling how such nonlinear effects affect the spectroscopic features in the case of selected inorganic clusters. Vibrational spectra of neutral silicon clusters are recorded by tunable IR-UV two-color ionization while IR spectra for cationic vanadium oxide clusters are obtained by IR multiphoton absorption followed by dissociation of the bare cluster or of its complex with Xe. Our kinetic modeling accounts for vibrational anharmonicities, for the laser interaction through photon absorption and stimulated emission rates, as well as for the relevant ionization or dissociation rates, all based on input parameters from quantum chemical calculations. Comparison of the measured and calculated spectra indicates an overall agreement as far as trends are concerned, except for the photodissociation of the V3O7(+)-Xe messenger complex, for which anharmonicities are too large and poorly captured by the perturbative anharmonic model. In all systems studied, nonlinear effects are essentially manifested by variations in the intensities as well as spectral broadenings. Differences in some band positions originate from inaccuracies of the quantum chemical data rather than specific nonlinear effects. The simulations further yield information on the average number of photons absorbed, which is otherwise unaccessible information: several to several tens of photons need to be absorbed to observe a band through dissociation, while three to five photons can be sufficient for detection of a band via IR-UV ionization. PMID:26208251

  3. Effects of traps on charge storage characteristics in metal-oxide-semiconductor memory structures based on silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Saito, Kenichi; Ishikuro, Hiroki; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    1998-08-01

    Charge storage characteristics have been investigated in metal-oxide-semiconductor memory structures based on silicon nanocrystals, where various interface traps and defects were introduced by thermal annealing treatment. The observations demonstrate that traps have strong influence on the charge storage behavior, in which the traps and defects at the internal/surface of silicon nanocrystals and the interface states at the SiO2/Si substrate play different roles, respectively. It is suggested that the injected charges are mainly stored at the deep traps of nanocrystals instead of the conduction band in long-term retention mode. The long-term charge-loss process is dominantly determined by the direct tunneling of the trapped charges to the interface states in the present experiment. An optimum way to improve the retention time would be to introduce a certain number of deep trapping centers in nanocrystals and to decrease the interface states at SiO2/Si substrate.

  4. High-temperature behavior of silicon carbide, sialon, and aluminum oxide ceramics in coal and residual-oil slags

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Wei, G.C.; Ferber, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Effects of exposure of commercial silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and sialon ceramic tubes at T approx. = 1200 to 1220/sup 0/C to the combustion products of No. 6 residual fuel oil and a coal-oil mixture containing 10 wt % bituminous coal suspended in a No. 6 oil were determined via two separate exposure experiments. The exposure time for both of these experiments was about 500 h, and air was blown through the inside of the tubes while the hot gases flowed over the outside. When the ash came only from residual oil, the fracture strength of siliconized SiC when subsequently measured at 25/sup 0/C increased, while that of sintered alpha SiC decreased about 30% and that for CVD SiC was essentially unchanged.

  5. Sponge-like Si-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite—Morphology studies of spinodally decomposed silicon-rich oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, D.; Schmidt, B.; Heinig, K. H.; Liedke, B.; Mücklich, A.; Hübner, R.; Wolf, D.; Kölling, S.; Mikolajick, T.; Technische Universität Dresden, Nöthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden

    2013-09-23

    Sponge-like Si nanostructures embedded in SiO{sub 2} were fabricated by spinodal decomposition of sputter-deposited silicon-rich oxide with a stoichiometry close to that of silicon monoxide. After thermal treatment a mean feature size of about 3 nm was found in the phase-separated structure. The structure of the Si-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite was investigated by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), EFTEM tomography, and atom probe tomography, which revealed a percolated Si morphology. It was shown that the percolation of the Si network in 3D can also be proven on the basis of 2D EFTEM images by comparison with 3D kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Thickness-dependent optimization of Er3+ light emission from silicon-rich silicon oxide thin films

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of the film thickness on the silicon-excess-mediated sensitization of Erbium ions in Si-rich silica. The Er3+ photoluminescence at 1.5 ?m, normalized to the film thickness, was found five times larger for films 1 ?m-thick than that from 50-nm-thick films intended for electrically driven devices. The origin of this difference is shared by changes in the local density of optical states and depth-dependent interferences, and by limited formation of Si-based sensitizers in "thin" films, probably because of the prevailing high stress. More Si excess has significantly increased the emission from "thin" films, up to ten times. This paves the way to the realization of highly efficient electrically excited devices. PMID:21711930

  7. The silicon/zinc oxide interface in amorphous silicon-based thin-film solar cells: Understanding an empirically optimized contact

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, D.; Wilks, R. G.; Wimmer, M.; Felix, R.; Gorgoi, M.; Lips, K.; Rech, B.; Wippler, D.; Mueck, A.; Meier, M.; Huepkes, J.; Lozac'h, M.; Ueda, S.; Sumiya, M.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Baer, M.

    2013-07-08

    The electronic structure of the interface between the boron-doped oxygenated amorphous silicon 'window layer' (a-SiO{sub x}:H(B)) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) was investigated using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared to that of the boron-doped microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H(B))/ZnO:Al interface. The corresponding valence band offsets have been determined to be (-2.87 {+-} 0.27) eV and (-3.37 {+-} 0.27) eV, respectively. A lower tunnel junction barrier height at the {mu}c-Si:H(B)/ZnO:Al interface compared to that at the a-SiO{sub x}:H(B)/ZnO:Al interface is found and linked to the higher device performances in cells where a {mu}c-Si:H(B) buffer between the a-Si:H p-i-n absorber stack and the ZnO:Al contact is employed.

  8. Square wave anodic stripping voltammetric determination of Cd²? and Pb²? at bismuth-film electrode modified with electroreduced graphene oxide-supported thiolated thionine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zou; Chen, Li; He, Fang; Bu, Lijuan; Qin, Xiaoli; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo; Tu, Xinman; Luo, Xubiao; Luo, Shenglian

    2014-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO)-thionine (TH) nanocomposite was prepared by ?-? stacking. The nanocomposite was cast-coated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to prepare an electroreduced GO (ERGO)-TH/GCE, then 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MES) was covalently tethered to ERGO-TH by potentiostatic anodization to form an ERGO-TH-MES/GCE. The thiolation reaction was monitored by electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). Square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was used to determine Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) at the ERGO-TH-MES/GCE further modified with Nafion and Bi. Under the optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves for Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) are from 1 to 40 ?g L(-1), with limits of detection (S/N=3) of 0.1 ?g L(-1) for Cd(2+) and 0.05 ?g L(-1) for Pb(2+), respectively. The electrode was used for the simultaneous analysis of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) in water samples with satisfactory recovery. PMID:24720997

  9. Water-resistant hard coating on optical material by photo-oxidation of silicone oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murahara, Masataka; Sato, Nobuhiro; Funatsu, Takayuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki

    2005-12-01

    Using photo-excited silicone oil developed a new protective hard coating method for high power laser to present the tolerance in water. The silicone oil was spin-coated onto the surface of an optical material and then irradiated with a xenon excimer lamp in the air, which transformed the organic silicone oil into inorganic glass. This technique has enabled an optical thin film capable of transmitting ultraviolet rays of wavelengths under 200 nm and possessing the characteristics of homogeneity, high density, resistance to environmental effects and to water, anti-reflective in water, and Mohs scale value of 5.

  10. Study of the use of Metal-Oxide-Silicon (MOS) devices for particulate detection and monitoring in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. D.; Monteith, L. K.; Wortman, J. J.; Mulligan, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor-type particulate sensor was evaluated for use in atmospheric measurements. An accelerator system was designed and tested for the purpose of providing the necessary energy to trigger the MOS-type sensor. The accelerator system and the MOS sensor were characterized as a function of particle size and velocity. Diamond particles were used as particulate sources in laboratory tests. Preliminary tests were performed in which the detector was mounted on an aircraft and flown in the vicinity of coal-fired electric generating plants.

  11. Wettability effect of graphene-based surfaces on silicon carbide and their influence on hydrophobicity of nanocrystalline cerium oxide films.

    PubMed

    Souza, Jean C; Neckel, Itamar T; Varalda, Jose; Ribeiro, Evaldo; Schreiner, Wido H; Mosca, Dante H; Sierakowski, Maria-Rita; Fernandes, Vilmar; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the water-repellent ability of graphene-based surfaces stabilized on silicon carbide (SiC) and the nanocrystalline cerium oxide (CeO2) films electrodeposited on them. Water contact angle is revealed strongly dependent on the number of graphene monolayers on SiC, indicating partial permeability of graphene on SiC. Fluctuations in the roughness of textured surfaces as well as variations of oxygen vacancy content in CeO2 electrodeposits are determinant for the hydrophobicity of the interaction between water droplets and nanocrystalline CeO2 electrodeposits on monolayers graphene on SiC. PMID:25490565

  12. Synthetic entry into polynuclear bismuth-manganese chemistry: high oxidation state Bi(III)2Mn(IV)6 and Bi(III)Mn(III)10 complexes.

    PubMed

    Stamatatos, Theocharis C; Oliver, Katie; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2011-06-01

    The first high nuclearity, mixed-metal Bi(III)/Mn(IV) and Bi(III)/Mn(III) complexes are reported. The former complexes are [Bi(2)Mn(IV)(6)O(9)(O(2)CEt)(9)(HO(2)CEt)(NO(3))(3)] (1) and [Bi(2)Mn(IV)(6)O(9)(O(2)CPh)(9)(HO(2)CPh)(NO(3))(3)] (2) and were obtained from the comproportionation reaction between Mn(O(2)CR)(2) and MnO(4)(-) in a 10:3 ratio in the presence of Bi(NO(3))(3) (3 equiv) in either a H(2)O/EtCO(2)H (1) or MeCN/PhCO(2)H (2) solvent medium. The same reaction that gives 2, but with Bi(O(2)CMe)(3) and MeNO(2) in place of Bi(NO(3))(3) and MeCN, gave the lower oxidation state product [BiMn(III)(10)O(8)(O(2)CPh)(17)(HO(2)CPh)(H(2)O)] (3). Complexes 1 and 2 are near-isostructural and possess an unusual and high symmetry core topology consisting of a Mn(IV)(6) wheel with two central Bi(III) atoms capping the wheel on each side. In contrast, the [BiMn(III)(10)O(8)](17+) core of 3 is low symmetry, comprising a [BiMn(3)(?(3)-O)(2)](8+) butterfly unit, four [BiMn(3)(?(4)-O)](10+) tetrahedra, and two [BiMn(2)(?(3)-O)](7+) triangles all fused together by sharing common Mn and Bi vertices. Variable-temperature, solid-state dc and ac magnetization data on 1-3 in the 1.8-300 K range revealed that 1 and 2 possess an S = 0 ground state spin, whereas 3 possesses an S = 2 ground state. The work offers the possibility of access to molecular analogs of the multifunctional Bi/Mn/O solids that are of such great interest in materials science. PMID:21520907

  13. Enhancement of oxidation resistance of graphite foams by polymer derived-silicon carbide coating for concentrated solar power applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, T.; Singh, D.; Singh, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphite foam with extremely high thermal conductivity has been investigated to enhance heat transfer of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. However, the use of graphite foam for elevated temperature applications (>600 °C) is limited due to poor oxidation resistance of graphite. In the present study, oxidation resistance of graphite foam coated with silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated. A pre-ceramic polymer derived coating (PDC) method was used to form a SiC coating on the graphite foams. Post coating deposition, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The oxidation resistance of PDC-SiC coating was quantifiedmore »by measuring the weight of the samples at several measuring points. The experiments were conducted under static argon atmosphere in a furnace. After the experiments, oxidation rates (%/hour) were calculated to predict the lifetime of the graphite foams. The experimental results showed that the PDC-SiC coating could prevent the oxidation of graphite foam under static argon atmosphere up to 900 °C.« less

  14. Enhancement of oxidation resistance of graphite foams by polymer derived-silicon carbide coating for concentrated solar power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.; Singh, D.; Singh, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphite foam with extremely high thermal conductivity has been investigated to enhance heat transfer of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. However, the use of graphite foam for elevated temperature applications (>600 °C) is limited due to poor oxidation resistance of graphite. In the present study, oxidation resistance of graphite foam coated with silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated. A pre-ceramic polymer derived coating (PDC) method was used to form a SiC coating on the graphite foams. Post coating deposition, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The oxidation resistance of PDC-SiC coating was quantified by measuring the weight of the samples at several measuring points. The experiments were conducted under static argon atmosphere in a furnace. After the experiments, oxidation rates (%/hour) were calculated to predict the lifetime of the graphite foams. The experimental results showed that the PDC-SiC coating could prevent the oxidation of graphite foam under static argon atmosphere up to 900 °C.

  15. 21 CFR 520.1204 - Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1204 Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...kanamycin (as the sulfate), 250 mg bismuth subcarbonate, and 500 mg activated...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1204 - Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1204 Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...kanamycin (as the sulfate), 250 mg bismuth subcarbonate, and 500 mg activated...

  17. 21 CFR 520.1204 - Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1204 Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...kanamycin (as the sulfate), 250 mg bismuth subcarbonate, and 500 mg activated...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1204 - Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1204 Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...kanamycin (as the sulfate), 250 mg bismuth subcarbonate, and 500 mg activated...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1204 - Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1204 Kanamycin, bismuth subcarbonate, activated attapulgite...kanamycin (as the sulfate), 250 mg bismuth subcarbonate, and 500 mg activated...

  20. Exfoliation and Characterization of Bismuth Telluride Atomic Quintuples and

    E-print Network

    Exfoliation and Characterization of Bismuth Telluride Atomic Quintuples and Quasi, University of CaliforniasRiverside, Riverside, California 92521 ABSTRACT Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and its describe a method for "graphene-inspired" exfoliation of crystalline bismuth telluride films

  1. Surface Area, and Oxidation Effects on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon Powder Compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercially available silicon powders were wet-attrition-milled from 2 to 48 hr to achieve surface areas (SA's) ranging from 1.3 to 70 sq m/g. The surface area effects on the nitridation kinetics of silicon powder compacts were determined at 1250 or 1350 C for 4 hr. In addition, the influence of nitridation environment, and preoxidation on nitridation kinetics of a silicon powder of high surface area (approximately equals 63 sq m/g) was investigated. As the surface area increased, so did the percentage nitridation after 4 hr in N2 at 1250 or 1350 C. Silicon powders of high surface area (greater than 40 sq m/g) can be nitrided to greater than 70% at 1250 C in 4 hr. The nitridation kinetics of the high-surface-area powder compacts were significantly delayed by preoxidation treatment. Conversely, the nitridation environment had no significant influence on the nitridation kinetics of the same powder. Impurities present in the starting powder, and those accumulated during attrition milling, appeared to react with the silica layer on the surface of silicon particles to form a molten silicate layer, which provided a path for rapid diffusion of nitrogen and enhanced the nitridation kinetics of high surface area silicon powder.

  2. The photoluminescence and structural properties of (Ce, Yb) co-doped silicon oxides after high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, C. L. Li, J. T.; Su, W. Y.; Yin, P. G.; Finstad, T. G.

    2015-01-28

    We studied the photoluminescence (PL) and structural properties of Ce and Yb co-doped silicon oxide films after high temperature annealing. The PL spectra of Ce{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions were sensitive to the structural variation of the films, and the Yb PL intensities were significantly enhanced especially upon 1200?°C annealing. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that rare earth silicates and the CeO{sub 2} phase had formed in the oxides. The proportions of the phases varied with the “nominal Si-richness” of the films. Energy transfer from the excited Ce{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+} can be inferred from both PL excitation and decay spectra.

  3. Oxygen impurity effects at metal/silicide interfaces - Formation of silicon oxide and suboxides in the Ni/Si system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Scott, D. M.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Mayer, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of implanted oxygen impurities on the Ni/Ni2Si interface is investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, He-4(+) backscattering and O(d, alpha)-16 N-14 nuclear reactions. Oxygen dosages corresponding to concentrations of 1, 2, and 3 atomic percent were implanted into Ni films evaporated on Si substrates. The oxygen, nickel, and silicon core lines were monitored as a function of time during in situ growth of the Ni silicide to determine the chemical nature of the diffusion barrier which forms in the presence of oxygen impurities. Analysis of the Ni, Si, and O core levels demonstrates that the formation of SiO2 is responsible for the Ni diffusion barrier rather than Ni oxide or mixed oxides, such as Ni2SiO4. It is determined that 2.2 x 10 to the 16th O/qu cm is sufficient to prevent Ni diffusion under UHV annealing conditions.

  4. One-step Melt Synthesis of Water Soluble, Photoluminescent, Surface-Oxidized Silicon Nanoparticles for Cellular Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Manhat, Beth A.; Brown, Anna L.; Black, Labe A.; Ross, J.B. Alexander; Fichter, Katye; Vu, Tania; Richman, Erik

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a versatile, one-step melt synthesis of water-soluble, highly emissive silicon nanoparticles using bi-functional, low-melting solids (such as glutaric acid) as reaction media. Characterization through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy shows that the one-step melt synthesis produces nanoscale Si cores surrounded by a silicon oxide shell. Analysis of the nanoparticle surface using FT-IR, zeta potential, and gel electrophoresis indicates that the bi-functional ligand used in the one-step synthesis is grafted onto the nanoparticle, which allows for tuning of the particle surface charge, solubility, and functionality. Photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared glutaric acid-synthesized silicon nanoparticles show an intense blue-green emission with a short (ns) lifetime suitable for biological imaging. These nanoparticles are found to be stable in biological media and have been used to examine cellular uptake and distribution in live N2a cells. PMID:23139440

  5. High temperature behaviour of silicon carbide and aluminium oxide ceramics in coal and residual-oil slags

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Wei, G.C.; Ferber, M.K.

    1981-11-01

    Ceramic tubes made of aluminium oxide, sialon, and several commercial silicon carbides were exposed for about 500 h at 1200 to 1220 C to the combustion products from either No. 6 fuel oil or a mixture of 10% bituminous coal in No. 6 fuel oil (COM). After exposure to combustion products from No. 6 fuel oil, the linear thermal expansion at 1000 C for sintered ..gamma..chemically bond-SiC was 17% greater than it was before the experiment. For CVD SiC and siliconized SiC, there was no change. For alumina, it decreased by about 30%. When exposed to COM combustion products, the thermal expansion of the ..gamma..chemically bond-SiC increased slightly, and that of siliconized KT SiC increased by about 16% at 1000 C. Significant thermal expansion differences were observed between the upstream and downstream sides of the tubes for sintered ..gamma..chemically bond-SiC, the KT SiC, and the alumina. The strength after exposure for ..cap alpha..-SiC decreased by about 4%; the others remained unchanged. The helium permeability increased after exposure. The greatest increase occurred for tubes exposed only to residual fuel oil. 6 references.

  6. Aspects of the magmatic geochemistry of bismuth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Gottfried, D.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1973-01-01

    Bismuth has been determined in 74 rocks from a differentiated tholeiitic dolerite, two calc-alkaline batholith suites and in 66 mineral separates from one of the batholiths. Average bismuth contents, weighted for rock type, of the Great Lake (Tasmania) dolerite, the Southern California batholith and the Idaho batholith are, 32, 50 and 70 ppb respectively. All three bodies demonstrate an enrichment of bismuth in residual magmas with magmatic differentiation. Bismuth is greatly enriched (relative to the host rock) in the calcium-rich accessory minerals, apatite and sphene, but other mineral analyses show that a Bi-Ca association is of little significance to the magmatic geochemistry of bismuth. Most of the bismuth, in the Southern California batholith at least, occurs in a trace mineral phase (possibly sulfides) present as inclusions in the rock-forming minerals. ?? 1973.

  7. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  8. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K. (Lexington, MA)

    1991-01-01

    A process for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900.degree.-1500.degree. C. and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  9. Structural and Oxidative Changes in the Kidney of Crucian Carp Induced by Silicon-Based Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Petrache, Sorina Nicoleta; Stanca, Loredana; Serban, Andreea Iren; Sima, Cornelia; Staicu, Andreia Cristina; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Costache, Marieta; Burlacu, Radu; Zarnescu, Otilia; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2012-01-01

    Silicon-based quantum dots were intraperitoneally injected in Carassius auratus gibelio specimens and, over one week, the effects on renal tissue were investigated by following their distribution and histological effects, as well as antioxidative system modifications. After three and seven days, detached epithelial cells from the basal lamina, dilated tubules and debris in the lumen of tubules were observed. At day 7, nephrogenesis was noticed. The reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration decreased in the first three days and started to rise later on. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased only after one week, whereas catalase (CAT) was up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. The activities of glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidise (GPX) decreased dramatically by approximately 50% compared to control, whereas the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) increased significantly after 3 and 7 days of treatment. Oxidative modifications of proteins and the time-dependent increase of Hsp70 expression were also registered. Our data suggest that silicon-based quantum dots induced oxidative stress followed by structural damages. However, renal tissue is capable of restoring its integrity by nephron development. PMID:22949855

  10. Microwave dielectric relaxation in cubic bismuth based pyrochlores containing titanium

    E-print Network

    KuÂ?el, Petr

    Microwave dielectric relaxation in cubic bismuth based pyrochlores containing titanium Hong Wanga range of different chemical substituents and defect structures also exist. In bismuth based pyrochlore

  11. Mechanism of ?-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates growth-and-dissolution and pyramidal defects' formation during oxidation of Fe-contaminated silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, Anthony; Texier, Michaël Portavoce, Alain; Burle, Nelly; Grosjean, Catherine; Morata, Stéphane; Michel, Fabrice

    2015-03-21

    Fe-implanted Si-wafers have been oxidized at 900?°C and 1100?°C in order to investigate the behaviour of Fe atoms at the growing SiO{sub 2}/Si interface and the impact on the integrity of microelectronic devices of an involuntary Fe contamination before or during the oxidation process. As-implanted and oxidized wafers have been characterized using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, atom probe tomography, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Experimental results were compared to calculated implantation profiles and simulated images. Successive steps of iron disilicide precipitation and oxidation were evidenced during the silicon oxidation process. The formation of characteristic pyramidal-shaped defects, at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, was notably found to correlate with the presence of ?-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates. Taking into account the competitive oxidation of these precipitates and of the surrounding silicon matrix, dynamic mechanisms are proposed to model the observed microstructural evolution of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, during the growth of the silicon oxide layer.

  12. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of interface structure of yttrium oxide gate dielectrics on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, D.; Ashcraft, R. W.; Chen, Z.; Stemmer, S.; Parsons, G. N.

    2002-07-01

    Interface stability of high dielectric constant gate insulators on silicon is an important issue for advanced gate stack engineering. In this article, we analyze the silicon/dielectric interface structure for thin Y2O3 and Y silicate films deposited by chemical vapor deposition on clean and prenitrided Si(100) using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The analysis shows the films to be stoichiometric Y2O3 on top and Y-silicate/SiO2 at the dielectric/Si interface. Prenitridation of the silicon surface impedes the reaction between the depositing film and the substrate, promoting a Si-free Y2O3 structure. Possible mechanisms leading to the observed Y2O3 and Y silicate structures are discussed.

  13. Determination of doping profiles in silicon from resistivity measurements via the four-point probe in combination with layer strippings via anodic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Brian H.

    1987-08-01

    The performance of resistivity measurements using the four-point probe in combination with layer strippings using anodic oxidation, is a well-known and useful method for profiling doped layers of silicon. The method is implemented and critically assessed. This method uses a technique for forming silicon dioxide on the surface of silicon wafers at room temperature. By performing four-point probe resistivity measurements both before and after the process, the differential resistivity is calculated and converted to an electrically active dopant concentration for the average depth of the layer removed. Repeating this process until the opposite conductivity type silicon is reached, yields the series of points quantifying the dopant concentration at specific depths into the silicon. Anodic oxidation is used to form the silicon dioxide. This technique is discussed and a critical review of the literature presented. Precautions and general considerations for measuring resistivity via the four-point probe are also given. An error analysis is undertaken to determine the source of some of the observed experimental error. The project report details all aspects of the method, offers techniques for improved accuracy and repeatability, looks into surface effects, critiques the method, and explores further areas for work. The experimental doping profiles obtained are compared with profiles obtained from four other methods (two experimental and two theoretical).

  14. Light-induced water oxidation at silicon electrodes functionalized with a cobalt oxygen-evolving catalyst

    E-print Network

    Pijpers, Joep J. H.

    Integrating a silicon solar cell with a recently developed cobalt-based water-splitting catalyst (Co-Pi) yields a robust, monolithic, photo-assisted anode for the solar fuels process of water splitting to O2 at neutral pH. ...

  15. Easy and Efficient Bonding of Biomolecules to an Oxide Surface of Silicon

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, Jeffrey

    ambientconditions.Thebiomolecule-modifiedsurfacesarestableunderphysiologicalconditions,areselective for adhesion for developing sensing devices based on silicon, which can be of significant use in medical, military in dry THF; the solvent is allowed to evaporate slowly so that the meniscus slowly traverses the surface

  16. Photoemission spectroscopy study of the lanthanum lutetium oxide/silicon interface.

    PubMed

    Nichau, A; Schnee, M; Schubert, J; Besmehn, A; Rubio-Zuazo, J; Breuer, U; Bernardy, P; Holländer, B; Mücklich, A; Castro, G R; von Borany, J; Buca, D; Mantl, S

    2013-04-21

    Rare earth oxides are promising candidates for future integration into nano-electronics. A key property of these oxides is their ability to form silicates in order to replace the interfacial layer in Si-based complementary metal-oxide field effect transistors. In this work a detailed study of lanthanum lutetium oxide based gate stacks is presented. Special attention is given to the silicate formation at temperatures typical for CMOS processing. The experimental analysis is based on hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy complemented by standard laboratory experiments as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Homogenously distributed La silicate and Lu silicate at the Si interface are proven to form already during gate oxide deposition. During the thermal treatment Si atoms diffuse through the oxide layer towards the TiN metal gate. This mechanism is identified to be promoted via Lu-O bonds, whereby the diffusion of La was found to be less important. PMID:23614438

  17. Photoemission spectroscopy study of the lanthanum lutetium oxide/silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Nichau, A.; Schnee, M.; Schubert, J.; Bernardy, P.; Hollaender, B.; Buca, D.; Mantl, S.; Besmehn, A.; Breuer, U.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Muecklich, A.; Borany, J. von

    2013-04-21

    Rare earth oxides are promising candidates for future integration into nano-electronics. A key property of these oxides is their ability to form silicates in order to replace the interfacial layer in Si-based complementary metal-oxide field effect transistors. In this work a detailed study of lanthanum lutetium oxide based gate stacks is presented. Special attention is given to the silicate formation at temperatures typical for CMOS processing. The experimental analysis is based on hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy complemented by standard laboratory experiments as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Homogenously distributed La silicate and Lu silicate at the Si interface are proven to form already during gate oxide deposition. During the thermal treatment Si atoms diffuse through the oxide layer towards the TiN metal gate. This mechanism is identified to be promoted via Lu-O bonds, whereby the diffusion of La was found to be less important.

  18. Bis(tri-n-hexylsilyl oxide) silicon phthalocyanine: a unique additive in ternary bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Benoît H; Dang, Jeremy D; Grant, Trevor M; Gao, Dong; Seferos, Dwight S; Bender, Timothy P

    2014-09-10

    Previous studies have shown that the use of bis(tri-n-hexylsilyl oxide) silicon phthalocyanine ((3HS)2-SiPc) as an additive in a P3HT:PC61BM cascade ternary bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic (BHJ OPV) device results in an increase in the short circuit current (J(SC)) and efficiency (?(eff)) of up to 25% and 20%, respectively. The previous studies have attributed the increase in performance to the presence of (3HS)2-SiPc at the BHJ interface. In this study, we explored the molecular characteristics of (3HS)2-SiPc which makes it so effective in increasing the OPV device J(SC) and ?(eff. Initially, we synthesized phthalocyanine-based additives using different core elements such as germanium and boron instead of silicon, each having similar frontier orbital energies compared to (3HS)2-SiPc and tested their effect on BHJ OPV device performance. We observed that addition of bis(tri-n-hexylsilyl oxide) germanium phthalocyanine ((3HS)2-GePc) or tri-n-hexylsilyl oxide boron subphthalocyanine (3HS-BsubPc) resulted in a nonstatistically significant increase in JSC and ?(eff). Secondly, we kept the silicon phthalocyanine core and substituted the tri-n-hexylsilyl solubilizing groups with pentadecyl phenoxy groups and tested the resulting dye in a BHJ OPV. While an increase in JSC and ?(eff) was observed at low (PDP)2-SiPc loadings, the increase was not as significant as (3HS)2-SiPc; therefore, (3HS)2-SiPc is a unique additive. During our study, we observed that (3HS)2-SiPc had an extraordinary tendency to crystallize compared to the other compounds in this study and our general experience. On the basis of this observation, we have offered a hypothesis that when (3HS)2-SiPc migrates to the P3HT:PC61BM interface the reason for its unique performance is not solely due to its frontier orbital energies but also might be due to a high driving force for crystallization. PMID:25105425

  19. Efficient ultraviolet electroluminescence from a Gd-implanted silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. M.; Skorupa, W.; Dekorsy, T.; Helm, M.; Rebohle, L.; Gebel, T.

    2004-10-01

    Strong ultraviolet electroluminescence with an external quantum efficiency above 1% is observed from an indium-tin oxide/SiO2:Gd /Si metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. The SiO2:Gd active layer is prepared by thermal oxidation followed by Gd+ implantation and annealing. The electroluminescence spectra show a sharp peak at 316nm from the P7/26 to S7/28 transition of Gd3+ ions. Micrometer-sized electroluminescent devices are demonstrated.

  20. Electric Fields on Oxidized Silicon Surfaces: Static Polarization of PbSe Nanocrystals Chaya H. Ben-Porat, Oksana Cherniavskaya, and Louis Brus*

    E-print Network

    Electric Fields on Oxidized Silicon Surfaces: Static Polarization of PbSe Nanocrystals Chaya H. Ben. In ambient light, the nanocrystals generate static electric fields of magnitudes too weak to be caused by a full elementary charge. These nanocrystals are statically polarized by surface electric fields

  1. Photoemission measurements of interface barrier energies for tunnel oxides on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressendorfer, P. V.; Barker, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Internal photoemission measurements of the Si/SiO2 and Al/SiO2 barrier heights on oxides of tunneling thickness (43-56 A) are compared with measurements on thick oxides (310 A and greater) and the barrier heights are found to be the same. The results suggest that substantially thinner oxides, grown by the same method, can be characterized by the same barrier heights. Limits to the experimental technique posed by photovoltaic and displacement currents, and transport of hot carriers in the tunnel oxide are discussed.

  2. Silicon (Si) alleviates cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) from zinc (Zn) toxicity stress by limiting Zn uptake and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Anwaar, Shad Ali; Ali, Shafaqat; Ali, Skhawat; Ishaque, Wajid; Farid, Mujahid; Farooq, Muhammad Ahsan; Najeeb, Ullah; Abbas, Farhat; Sharif, Muhammad

    2015-03-01

    Silicon (Si) is as an important fertilizer element, which has been found effective in enhancing plant tolerance to variety of biotic and a-biotic stresses. This study investigates the Si potential to alleviate zinc (Zn) toxicity stress in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Cotton plants were grown in hydroponics and exposed to different Zn concentration, 0, 25, and 50 ?M, alone and/or in combination with 1 mM Si. Incremental Zn concentration in growth media instigated the cellular oxidative damage that was evident from elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), electrolyte leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and consequently inhibited cotton growth, biomass, chlorophyll pigments, and photosynthetic process. Application of Si significantly suppressed Zn accumulation in various plant parts, i.e., roots, stems, and leaves and thus promoted biomass, photosynthetic, growth parameters, and antioxidant enzymes activity of Zn-stressed as well unstressed plants. In addition, Si reduced the MDA and H2O2 production and electrolyte leakage suggesting its role in protecting cotton plants from Zn toxicity-induced oxidative damage. Thus, the study indicated that exogenous Si application could improve growth and development of cotton crop experiencing Zn toxicity stress by limiting Zn bioavailability and oxidative damage. PMID:25516248

  3. Diffusion-limited interaction of dislocation loops and interstitials during dry oxidation in silicon

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Diffusion-limited interaction of dislocation loops and interstitials during dry oxidation reduction of OED (oxidation enhanced diffusion) of boron in a buried layer due to very efficient interstitial capturing action of dislocation loops, suggesting diffusion-limited dislocation loop growth

  4. Active silicon octagonal micropillar resonator modulators using metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors

    E-print Network

    Poon, Andrew Wing On

    -oxide-semiconductor capacitors Chao Li and Andrew W. Poon Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The Hong Kong resonator modulators using metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors. Our initial electrical and optical simulations suggest a high-extinction ratio resonance modulation by selectively embedding capacitors along

  5. Sintered-reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride Densified by a Gas Pressure Sintering Process Effects of Rare Earth Oxide Sintering Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. H.; Ko, J. W.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, H. D.; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitrides containing rare-earth oxide sintering additives were densified by gas pressure sintering. The sintering behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties of the resultant specimens were analyzed. For that purpose, Lu2O3-SiO2 (US), La2O3-MgO (AM) and Y2O3-Al2O3 (YA) additive systems were selected. Among the tested compositions, densification of silicon nitride occurred at the lowest temperature when using the La2O3-MgO system. Since the Lu2O3-SiO2 system has the highest melting temperature, full densification could not be achieved after sintering at 1950oC. However, the system had a reasonably high bending strength of 527 MPa at 1200oC in air and a high fracture toughness of 9.2 MPa m1/2. The Y2O3-Al2O3 system had the highest room temperature bending strength of 1.2 GPa

  6. Characterization of Free and Porous Silicon-Encapsulated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as Platforms for the Development of Theranostic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lundquist, Charles M.; Loo, Christopher; Meraz, Ismail M.; Cerda, Jorge De La; Liu, Xuewu; Serda, Rita E.

    2014-01-01

    Tracking vaccine components from the site of injection to their destination in lymphatic tissue, and simultaneously monitoring immune effects, sheds light on the influence of vaccine components on particle and immune cell trafficking and therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we create a hybrid particle vaccine platform comprised of porous silicon (pSi) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). The impact of nanoparticle size and mode of presentation on magnetic resonance contrast enhancement are examined. SPION-enhanced relaxivity increased as the core diameter of the nanoparticle increased, while encapsulation of SPIONs within a pSi matrix had only minor effects on T2 and no significant effect on T2* relaxation. Following intravenous injection of single and hybrid particles, there was an increase in negative contrast in the spleen, with changes in contrast being slightly greater for free compared to silicon encapsulated SPIONs. Incubation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) with pSi microparticles loaded with SPIONs, SIINFEKL peptide, and lipopolysaccharide stimulated immune cell interactions and interferon gamma production in OT-1 TCR transgenic CD8+ T cells. Overall, the hybrid particle platform enabled presentation of a complex payload that was traceable, stimulated functional T cell and BMDC interactions, and resolved in cellular activation of T cells in response to a specific antigen. PMID:24932409

  7. Electroluminescence from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with erbium-doped CeO2 films on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chunyan; Zhu, Chen; Wang, Canxing; Gao, Yuhan; Ma, Xiangyang; Yang, Deren

    2015-04-01

    We report on erbium (Er)-related electroluminescence (EL) in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) from metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with Er-doped CeO2 (CeO2:Er) films on silicon. The onset voltage of such EL under either forward or reverse bias is smaller than 10 V. Moreover, the EL quenching can be avoidable for the CeO2:Er-based MOS devices. Analysis on the current-voltage characteristic of the device indicates that the electron transportation at the EL-enabling voltages under either forward or reverse bias is dominated by trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Namely, electrons in n+-Si/ITO can tunnel into the conduction band of CeO2 host via defect states at sufficiently high forward/reverse bias voltages. Then, a fraction of such electrons are accelerated by electric field to become hot electrons, which impact-excite the Er3+ ions, thus leading to characteristic emissions. It is believed that this work has laid the foundation for developing viable silicon-based emitters using CeO2:Er films.

  8. The feasibility of using molten carbonate corrosion for separating a nuclear surrogate for plutonium oxide from silicon carbide inert matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ting; Baney, Ronald H.; Tulenko, James

    2010-10-01

    Silicon carbide is one of the prime candidates as a matrix material in inert matrix fuels (IMF) being designed to reduce the plutonium inventories. Since complete fission and transmutation is not practical in a single in-core run, it is necessary to separate the non-transmuted actinide materials from the silicon carbide matrix for recycling. In this work, SiC was corroded in sodium carbonate (Na 2CO 3) and potassium carbonate (K 2CO 3), to form water soluble sodium or potassium silicate. Separation of the transuranics was achieved by dissolving the SiC corrosion product in boiling water. Ceria (CeO 2), which was used as a surrogate for plutonium oxide (PuO 2), was not corroded in these molten salt environments. The molten salt depth, which is a distance between the salt/air interface to the upper surface of SiC pellets, significantly affected the rate of corrosion. The corrosion was faster in K 2CO 3 than in Na 2CO 3 molten salt at 1050 °C, when the initial molten salt depths were kept the same for both salts.

  9. Single-electron regime and Pauli spin blockade in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, Sophie; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael P.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Silicon quantum dots are promising candidates for quantum information processing as spin qubits with long coherence time. We present electrical transport measurements on a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) double quantum dot (DQD). First, Coulomb diamonds measurements demonstrate the one-electron regime at a relatively high temperature of 1.5 K. Then, the 8 mK stability diagram shows Pauli spin blockade with a large singlet-triplet separation of approximatively 0.40 meV, pointing towards a strong lifting of the valley degeneracy. Finally, numerical simulations indicate that by integrating a micro-magnet to those devices, we could achieve fast spin rotations of the order of 30 ns. Those results are part of the recent body of work demonstrating the potential of Si MOS DQD as reliable and long-lived spin qubits that could be ultimately integrated into modern electronic facilities. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. A silicon nanowire-reduced graphene oxide composite as a high-performance lithium ion battery anode material.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-Guo; Wang, Chundong; Wu, Qi-Hui; Liu, Xiang; Yang, Yang; He, Lifang; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-03-21

    Toward the increasing demands of portable energy storage and electric vehicle applications, silicon has been emerging as a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) owing to its high specific capacity. However, serious pulverization of bulk silicon during cycling limits its cycle life. Herein, we report a novel hierarchical Si nanowire (Si NW)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite fabricated using a solvothermal method followed by a chemical vapor deposition process. In the composite, the uniform-sized [111]-oriented Si NWs are well dispersed on the rGO surface and in between rGO sheets. The flexible rGO enables us to maintain the structural integrity and to provide a continuous conductive network of the electrode, which results in over 100 cycles serving as an anode in half cells at a high lithium storage capacity of 2300 mA h g(-1). Due to its [111] growth direction and the large contact area with rGO, the Si NWs in the composite show substantially enhanced reaction kinetics compared with other Si NWs or Si particles. PMID:24522297

  11. Ink jet printable silver metallization with zinc oxide for front side metallization for micro crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurk, Robert; Fritsch, Marco; Eberstein, Markus; Schilm, Jochen; Uhlig, Florian; Waltinger, Andreas; Michaelis, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Ink jet printable water based inks are prepared by a new silver nanoparticle synthesis and the addition of nanoscaled ZnO particles. For the formation of front side contacts the inks are ink jet printed on the front side of micro crystalline silicon solar cells, and contact the cell directly during the firing step by etching through the wafers’ anti-reflection coating (ARC). In terms of Ag dissolution and precipitation the mechanism of contact formation can be compared to commercial glass containing thick film pastes. This avoids additional processing steps, like laser ablation, which are usually necessary to open the ARC prior to ink jet printing. As a consequence process costs can be reduced. In order to optimize the ARC etching and contact formation during firing, zinc oxide nanoparticles are investigated as an ink additive. By utilization of in situ contact resistivity measurements the mechanism of contacting was explored. Our results show that silver inks containing ZnO particles realize a specific contact resistance below 10 m??cm2. By using a multi-pass ink jet printing and plating process a front side metallization of commercial 6??×??6 inch2 standard micro crystalline silicone solar cells with emitter resistance of 60 ?/? was achieved and showed an efficiency of 15.7%.

  12. Quantitative Real-Time Measurements of DNA Hybridization with Alkylated Non-Oxidized Silicon Nanowires in Electrolyte Solution

    PubMed Central

    Bunimovich, Yuri L.; Shin, Young Shik; Yeo, Woon-Seok; Amori, Michael; Kwong, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative, real time detection of single stranded oligonucleotides with silicon nanowires (SiNWs) in physiologically relevant electrolyte solution is demonstrated. Debye screening of the hybridization event is minimized by utilizing electrostatically adsorbed primary DNA on an amine-terminated NW surface. Two surface functionalization chemistries are compared: an amine terminated siloxane monolayer on the native SiO2 surface of the SiNW, and an amine terminated alkyl monolayer grown directly on a hydrogen-terminated SiNW surface. The SiNWs without the native oxide exhibit improved solution-gated field-effect transistor characteristics and a significantly enhanced sensitivity to single stranded DNA detection, with an accompanying two orders of magnitude improvement in the dynamic range of sensing. A model for the detection of analyte by SiNW sensors is developed and utilized to extract DNA binding kinetic parameters. Those values are directly compared with values obtained by the standard method of surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and demonstrated to be similar. The nanowires, however, are characterized by higher detection sensitivity. The implication is that Si NWs can be utilized to quantitate the solution phase concentration of biomolecules at low concentrations. This work also demonstrates the importance of surface chemistry for optimizing biomolecular sensing with silicon nanowires. PMID:17165787

  13. Electroluminescence from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with erbium-doped CeO{sub 2} films on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Chunyan; Zhu, Chen; Wang, Canxing; Gao, Yuhan; Ma, Xiangyang Yang, Deren

    2015-04-06

    We report on erbium (Er)-related electroluminescence (EL) in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) from metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with Er-doped CeO{sub 2} (CeO{sub 2}:Er) films on silicon. The onset voltage of such EL under either forward or reverse bias is smaller than 10?V. Moreover, the EL quenching can be avoidable for the CeO{sub 2}:Er-based MOS devices. Analysis on the current-voltage characteristic of the device indicates that the electron transportation at the EL-enabling voltages under either forward or reverse bias is dominated by trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Namely, electrons in n{sup +}-Si/ITO can tunnel into the conduction band of CeO{sub 2} host via defect states at sufficiently high forward/reverse bias voltages. Then, a fraction of such electrons are accelerated by electric field to become hot electrons, which impact-excite the Er{sup 3+} ions, thus leading to characteristic emissions. It is believed that this work has laid the foundation for developing viable silicon-based emitters using CeO{sub 2}:Er films.

  14. Highly sensitive sensors for alkali metal ions based on complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Jun; Agarwal, Ajay; Buddharaju, Kavitha D.; Singh, Navab; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2007-06-01

    Highly sensitive sensors for alkali metal ions based on complementary-metal-oxide- semiconductor-compatible silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with crown ethers covalently immobilized on their surface are presented. A densely packed organic monolayer terminated with amine groups is introduced to the SiNW surface via hydrosilylation. Amine-modified crown ethers, acting as sensing elements, are then immobilized onto the SiNWs through a cross-linking reaction with the monolayer. The crown ether-functionalized SiNWs recognize Na+ and K+ according to their complexation ability to the crown ethers. The SiNW sensors are highly selective and capable of achieving an ultralow detection limit down to 50nM, over three orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional crown ether-based ion-selective electrodes.

  15. Low-power embedded read-only memory using atom switch and silicon-on-thin-buried-oxide transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Toshitsugu; Tada, Munehiro; Tsuji, Yukihide; Makiyama, Hideki; Hasegawa, Takumi; Yamamoto, Yoshiki; Okanishi, Shinobu; Banno, Naoki; Miyamura, Makoto; Okamoto, Koichiro; Iguchi, Noriyuki; Ogasahara, Yasuhiro; Oda, Hidekazu; Kamohara, Shiro; Yamagata, Yasushi; Sugii, Nobuyuki; Hada, Hiromitsu

    2015-04-01

    We developed an atom-switch read-only memory (ROM) fabricated on silicon-on-thin-buried-oxide (SOTB) for use in a low-power microcontroller for the first time. An atom switch with a low programming voltage and large ON/OFF conductance ratio is suitable for low-power nonvolatile memory. The atom-switch ROM using an SOTB transistor uses a 0.34-1.2 V operating voltage and 12 µA/MHz active current (or 4.5 µW/MHz active power). Furthermore, the sleep current is as low as 0.4 µA when a body bias voltage is applied to the SOTB.

  16. Schottky barrier height reduction for holes by Fermi level depinning using metal/nickel oxide/silicon contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Raisul Shine, Gautam; Saraswat, Krishna C.

    2014-11-03

    We report the experimental demonstration of Fermi level depinning using nickel oxide (NiO) as the insulator material in metal-insulator-semiconductor (M-I-S) contacts. Using this contact, we show less than 0.1?eV barrier height for holes in platinum/NiO/silicon (Pt/NiO/p-Si) contact. Overall, the pinning factor was improved from 0.08 (metal/Si) to 0.26 (metal/NiO/Si). The experimental results show good agreement with that obtained from theoretical calculation. NiO offers high conduction band offset and low valence band offset with Si. By reducing Schottky barrier height, this contact can be used as a carrier selective contact allowing hole transport but blocking electron transport, which is important for high efficiency in photonic applications such as photovoltaics and optical detectors.

  17. Probing the density of states of two-level tunneling systems in silicon oxide films using superconducting lumped element resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Skacel, S. T.; Kaiser, Ch.; Wuensch, S.; Siegel, M.; Rotzinger, H.; Lukashenko, A.; Jerger, M.; Weiss, G.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2015-01-12

    We have investigated dielectric losses in amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO) thin films under operating conditions of superconducting qubits (mK temperatures and low microwave powers). For this purpose, we have developed a broadband measurement setup employing multiplexed lumped element resonators using a broadband power combiner and a low-noise amplifier. The measured temperature and power dependences of the dielectric losses are in good agreement with those predicted for atomic two-level tunneling systems (TLS). By measuring the losses at different frequencies, we found that the TLS density of states is energy dependent. This had not been seen previously in loss measurements. These results contribute to a better understanding of decoherence effects in superconducting qubits and suggest a possibility to minimize TLS-related decoherence by reducing the qubit operation frequency.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Silicone Rubber Acoustic Lens Material Doped with Fine Zinc Oxide Powders for Ultrasonic Medical Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Noriko; Yohachi; Yamashita; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2009-07-01

    The mechanical properties of high-temperature-vulcanization silicone (Q) rubber doped with zinc oxide (ZnO) fine powders have been investigated to develop an acoustic lens material with high reliability. The ZnO-doped Q rubber with an acoustic impedance (Z) of 1.46×106 kg·m-2·s-1 showed a tear strength of 43 N/mm and an elongation of 560%. These mechanical property values were about 3 times higher than those of conventional acoustic Q lens materials. The ZnO-doped Q rubbers also showed a lower abrasion loss. These superior characteristics are attributable to the microstructure with fewer origins of breaks; few pores and spherical fine ZnO powder. The high mechanical properties of ZnO-doped Q rubber acoustic lenses enable higher performance during long-life and safe operation during diagnosis using medical array probe applications.

  19. Bright green electroluminescence from Tb3+ in silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. M.; Skorupa, W.; Dekorsy, T.; Helm, M.; Rebohle, L.; Gebel, T.

    2005-06-01

    Bright green electroluminescence with luminance up to 2800cd/m2 is reported from indium-tin-oxide/SiO2:Tb /Si metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. The SiO2:Tb3+ gate oxide was prepared by thermal oxidation followed by Tb+ implantation. Electroluminescence and photoluminescence properties were studied with variations of the Tb3+ ion concentration and the annealing temperature. The optimized device shows a high external quantum efficiency of 16% and a luminous efficiency of 2.1lm/W. The excitation processes of the strong green electroluminescence are attributed to the impact excitation of the Tb3+ luminescent centers by hot electrons and the subsequent crossrelaxation from D35 to D45 energy levels. Light-emitting devices with micrometer size fabricated by the standard metal-oxide-semiconductor technology are demonstrated.

  20. Hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowire photocatalysis: Benzene oxidation and methyl red decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Suoyuan; School of Chemical Engineering and Materials, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 ; Tsang, Chi Him A.; Centre of Super Diamond and Advanced Films, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Kang, Zhenhui; Liu, Yang; Wong, Ningbew; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Centre of Super Diamond and Advanced Films, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: H-SiNWs can catalyze hydroxylation of benzene and degradation of methyl red under visible light irradiation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires were active photocatalyst in the hydroxylation of benzene under light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires were also effective in the decomposition of methyl red dye. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Si/SiO{sub x} core-shell structure is the main reason of the obtained high selectivity during the hydroxylation. -- Abstract: Hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs) were used as heterogeneous photocatalysts for the hydroxylation of benzene and for the decomposition of methyl red under visible light irradiation. The above reactions were monitored by GC-MS and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, respectively, which shows 100% selectivity for the transformation of benzene to phenol. A complete decomposition of a 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M methyl red solution was achieved within 30 min. The high selectivity for the hydroxylation of benzene and the photodecomposition demonstrate the catalytic activity of ultrafine H-SiNWs during nanocatalysis.

  1. Molybdenum oxide MoO{sub x}: A versatile hole contact for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, James Cuevas, Andres; Allen, Thomas; Battaglia, Corsin

    2014-12-08

    This letter examines the application of transparent MoO{sub x} (x?silicon (c-Si) to create hole-conducting contacts for silicon solar cells. The carrier-selectivity of MoO{sub x} based contacts on both n- and p-type surfaces is evaluated via simultaneous consideration of the contact recombination parameter J{sub 0c} and the contact resistivity ?{sub c}. Contacts made to p-type wafers and p{sup +} diffused regions achieve optimum ?{sub c} values of 1 and 0.2 m?·cm{sup 2}, respectively, and both result in a J{sub 0c} of ?200 fA/cm{sup 2}. These values suggest that significant gains can be made over conventional hole contacts to p-type material. Similar MoO{sub x} contacts made to n-type silicon result in higher J{sub 0c} and ?{sub c} with optimum values of ?300 fA/cm{sup 2} and 30 m?·cm{sup 2} but still offer significant advantages over conventional approaches in terms of contact passivation, optical properties, and device fabrication.

  2. A complex study of the fast blue luminescence of oxidized silicon nanocrystals: the role of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondi?, Lukáš; K?sová, Kate?ina; Ziegler, Marc; Fekete, Ladislav; Gärtnerová, Viera; Cháb, Vladimír; Holý, Václav; Cibulka, Ond?ej; Herynková, Kate?ina; Gallart, Mathieu; Gilliot, Pierre; Hönerlage, Bernd; Pelant, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) smaller than 5 nm are a material with strong visible photoluminescence (PL). However, the physical origin of the PL, which, in the case of oxide-passivated SiNCs, is typically composed of a slow-decaying red-orange band (S-band) and of a fast-decaying blue-green band (F-band), is still not fully understood. Here we present a physical interpretation of the F-band origin based on the results of an experimental study, in which we combine temperature (4-296 K), temporally (picosecond resolution) and spectrally resolved luminescence spectroscopy of free-standing oxide-passivated SiNCs. Our complex study shows that the F-band red-shifts only by 35 meV with increasing temperature, which is almost 6 times less than the red-shift of the S-band in a similar temperature range. In addition, the F-band characteristic decay time obtained from a stretched-exponential fit decreases only slightly with increasing temperature. These data strongly suggest that the F-band arises from the core-related quasi-direct radiative recombination governed by slowly thermalizing photoholes.Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) smaller than 5 nm are a material with strong visible photoluminescence (PL). However, the physical origin of the PL, which, in the case of oxide-passivated SiNCs, is typically composed of a slow-decaying red-orange band (S-band) and of a fast-decaying blue-green band (F-band), is still not fully understood. Here we present a physical interpretation of the F-band origin based on the results of an experimental study, in which we combine temperature (4-296 K), temporally (picosecond resolution) and spectrally resolved luminescence spectroscopy of free-standing oxide-passivated SiNCs. Our complex study shows that the F-band red-shifts only by 35 meV with increasing temperature, which is almost 6 times less than the red-shift of the S-band in a similar temperature range. In addition, the F-band characteristic decay time obtained from a stretched-exponential fit decreases only slightly with increasing temperature. These data strongly suggest that the F-band arises from the core-related quasi-direct radiative recombination governed by slowly thermalizing photoholes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06454a

  3. Effect of W and WC on the oxidation resistance of yttria-doped silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of W and WC contamination on the oxidation and cracking in air of sintered Si3N4 - 8 w/o Y2O3 ceramics at 500, 750, and 1350 C is examined. A mixture of Si3N4 - 8Y2O3, milled with alumina balls, was divided into four portions. Three portions were doped with 2 w/o WC W, and 4 w/o W respectively, in order to simulate contamination during milling. The fourth portion was undoped and used on a control. The addition of W or WC did not affect the phase relationships in the system, as all bars with or without additions contained melilite as the major Si-Y-O-N phase after sintering. At 750 C, instability (rapid oxidation and cracking) of W-doped bars appears to have occurred as a result of oxidation of the tungsten containing melilite phase. No intermediate temperature instability was observed in bars containing 2 w/o WC or in bars with no additive. Specimens exposed at 1350 C had good oxidation resistance due to the formation of a protective siliceous oxide layer. A specimen containing 4 w/o W which was preoxidized at 1350 C had improved oxidation resistance at 750 C. The tendency towards oxidation and cracking of Si3N4 - 8 Y2O3 at 750 C is concluded to be related to tungsten content of the sintered bars.

  4. Forward-bias diode parameters, electronic noise, and photoresponse of graphene/silicon Schottky junctions with an interfacial native oxide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yanbin; Behnam, Ashkan; Pop, Eric; Bosman, Gijs; Ural, Ant

    2015-09-01

    Metal-semiconductor Schottky junction devices composed of chemical vapor deposition grown monolayer graphene on p-type silicon substrates are fabricated and characterized. Important diode parameters, such as the Schottky barrier height, ideality factor, and series resistance, are extracted from forward bias current-voltage characteristics using a previously established method modified to take into account the interfacial native oxide layer present at the graphene/silicon junction. It is found that the ideality factor can be substantially increased by the presence of the interfacial oxide layer. Furthermore, low frequency noise of graphene/silicon Schottky junctions under both forward and reverse bias is characterized. The noise is found to be 1/f dominated and the shot noise contribution is found to be negligible. The dependence of the 1/f noise on the forward and reverse current is also investigated. Finally, the photoresponse of graphene/silicon Schottky junctions is studied. The devices exhibit a peak responsivity of around 0.13 A/W and an external quantum efficiency higher than 25%. From the photoresponse and noise measurements, the bandwidth is extracted to be ˜1 kHz and the normalized detectivity is calculated to be 1.2 ×109 cm Hz1/2 W-1. These results provide important insights for the future integration of graphene with silicon device technology.

  5. IR luminescence in bismuth-doped germanate glasses and fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pynenkov, A. A.; Firstov, Sergei V.; Panov, A. A.; Firstova, E. G.; Nishchev, K. N.; Bufetov, Igor'A.; Dianov, Evgenii M.

    2013-02-01

    We have studied the optical properties of lightly bismuth doped (<=0.002 mol %) germanate glasses prepared in an alumina crucible. The glasses are shown to contain bismuth-related active centres that have been identified previously only in bismuth-doped fibres produced by MCVD. With increasing bismuth concentration in the glasses, their luminescence spectra change markedly, which is attributable to interaction between individual bismuth centres.

  6. IR luminescence in bismuth-doped germanate glasses and fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Pynenkov, A A; Firstov, Sergei V; Panov, A A; Firstova, E G; Nishchev, K N; Bufetov, Igor' A; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2013-02-28

    We have studied the optical properties of lightly bismuth doped ({<=}0.002 mol %) germanate glasses prepared in an alumina crucible. The glasses are shown to contain bismuth-related active centres that have been identified previously only in bismuth-doped fibres produced by MCVD. With increasing bismuth concentration in the glasses, their luminescence spectra change markedly, which is attributable to interaction between individual bismuth centres. (optical fibres)

  7. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C. (Sunnyvale, CA); Elwell, Dennis (Palo Alto, CA); Feigelson, Robert S. (Saratoga, CA)

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  8. Band Offsets of a Ruthenium Gate on Ultrathin High-k Oxide Films on Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan, S.; Bersch, W; Bartynski, R; Garfunkel, E; Vescovo, E

    2009-01-01

    Valence-band and conduction-band edges of ultrathin oxides and their shifts upon sequential metallization with ruthenium have been measured using synchrotron-radiation-excited x-ray, ultraviolet, and inverse photoemissions. From these techniques, the offsets between the valence-band and conduction-band edges of the oxides, and the ruthenium metal gate Fermi edge have been directly measured. In addition the core levels of the oxides and the ruthenium have been characterized. Upon deposition, Ru remains metallic and no chemical alteration of the underlying oxide gates, or interfacial SiO{sub 2} in the case of the high-? thin films, can be detected. However a clear shift of the band edges is measured for all samples due to the creation of an interface dipole at the ruthenium-oxide interface. Using the energy gap, the electron affinity of the oxides, and the ruthenium work function that have been directly measured on these samples, the experimental band offsets are compared to those predicted by the induced gap states model.

  9. Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha; Sarkar, Indranil; Shirolkar, Mandar M.; Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi

    2014-09-08

    We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (?75?nm and ?155?nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6?eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500?eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg K? (1253.6?eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

  10. A novel method for crystalline silicon solar cells with low contact resistance and antireflection coating by an oxidized Mg layer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues in the solar industry is lowering dopant concentration of emitter for high-efficiency crystalline solar cells. However, it is well known that a low surface concentration of dopants results in poor contact formation between the front Ag electrode and the n-layer of Si. In this paper, an evaporated Mg layer is used to reduce series resistance of c-Si solar cells. A layer of Mg metal is deposited on a lightly doped n-type Si emitter by evaporation. Ag electrode is screen printed to collect the generated electrons. Small work function difference between Mg and n-type silicon reduces the contact resistance. During a co-firing process, Mg is oxidized, and the oxidized layer serves as an antireflection layer. The measurement of an Ag/Mg/n-Si solar cell shows that Voc, Jsc, FF, and efficiency are 602 mV, 36.9 mA/cm2, 80.1%, and 17.75%, respectively. It can be applied to the manufacturing of low-cost, simple, and high-efficiency solar cells. PMID:22221405

  11. Fabrication and characterization of a chemically oxidized-nanostructured porous silicon based biosensor implementing orienting protein A.

    PubMed

    Naveas, Nelson; Hernandez-Montelongo, Jacobo; Pulido, Ruth; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Villanueva-Guerrero, Raúl; Predestinación García Ruiz, Josefa; Manso-Silván, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) elicits as a very attractive material for future biosensing systems due to its high surface area, biocompatibility and well-established fabrication methods. In order to engineer its performance as a biosensor transducer platform, the density of immunoglobulins properly immobilized and oriented onto the surface needs to be optimized. In this work we fabricated and characterized a novel biosensing system focusing on the improvement of the biofunctionalization cascade. The system consists on a chemically oxidized PSi platform derivatized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) that is coupled to Staphylococcus protein A (SpA). The chemical oxidation has previously demonstrated to enhance the biofunctionalization process and here "by implementing SpA" a molecularly oriented immunosensor is achieved. The biosensor system is characterized in terms of its chemical composition, wettability and optical reflectance. Finally, this system is successfully exploited to develop a biosensor for detecting asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous molecule involved in cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this work is relevant from the point of view of design and optimization of the biomolecular immobilization cascade on PSi surfaces with the added value of contribution to the development of new assays for detecting ADMA with a view on prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24388860

  12. Stable Solar-Driven Water Oxidation to O2(g) by Ni-Oxide-Coated Silicon Photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ke; McDowell, Matthew T; Nielander, Adam C; Hu, Shu; Shaner, Matthew R; Yang, Fan; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Lewis, Nathan S

    2015-02-19

    Semiconductors with small band gaps (<2 eV) must be stabilized against corrosion or passivation in aqueous electrolytes before such materials can be used as photoelectrodes to directly produce fuels from sunlight. In addition, incorporation of electrocatalysts on the surface of photoelectrodes is required for efficient oxidation of H2O to O2(g) and reduction of H2O or H2O and CO2 to fuels. We report herein the stabilization of np(+)-Si(100) and n-Si(111) photoanodes for over 1200 h of continuous light-driven evolution of O2(g) in 1.0 M KOH(aq) by an earth-abundant, optically transparent, electrocatalytic, stable, conducting nickel oxide layer. Under simulated solar illumination and with optimized index-matching for proper antireflection, NiOx-coated np(+)-Si(100) photoanodes produced photocurrent-onset potentials of -180 ± 20 mV referenced to the equilibrium potential for evolution of O2(g), photocurrent densities of 29 ± 1.8 mA cm(-2) at the equilibrium potential for evolution of O2(g), and a solar-to-O2(g) conversion figure-of-merit of 2.1%. PMID:26262472

  13. Strain-induced transformation of amorphous spherical precipitates into platelets: Application to oxide particles in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Voronkov, V. V.; Falster, R.

    2001-06-01

    The spherical shape of an amorphous precipitate becomes unstable if the combination P{sup 2}R of precipitate radius R and pressure P exceeds some critical value. This critical value was found to be about 4.44 G{sigma}, where G is the matrix shear modulus and {sigma} is the specific energy of the precipitate/matrix interface. Once this instability criterion is fulfilled, the initially spherical particle will reduce the total free energy (the sum of strain energy and the surface energy) by becoming a thin oblate spheroid (effectively, a platelet). The actual pressure P in the course of oxygen precipitation in silicon is controlled by a high self-interstitial supersaturation caused by emission of self-interstitials by growing precipitates. The duration of annealing necessary to reach the stage of collapse of spheres into platelets is calculated as a function of temperature and the precipitate density. Calculated results are compatible with the experimentally observed annealing conditions for platelet formation. Another important example of sphere to platelet transformation is microdefect formation in vacancy-type silicon. In this case a large negative value of P is sufficient to induce collapse. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Thermal oxidation of single-crystal silicon carbide - Kinetic, electrical, and chemical studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petit, J. B.; Neudeck, P. G.; Matus, L. G.; Powell, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents kinetic data from oxidation studies of the polar faces for 3C and 6H SiC in wet and dry oxidizing ambients. Values for the linear and parabolic rate constants were obtained, as well as preliminary results for the activation energies of the rate constants. Examples are presented describing how thermal oxidation can be used to map polytypes and characterize defects in epitaxial layers grown on low tilt angle 6H SiC substrates. Interface widths were measured using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) with Ar ion beam depth profiling and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) with effective medium approximation (EMA) models. Preliminary electrical measurements of MOS capacitors are also presented.

  15. The design of the data acquisition system for a very large bismuth germanate calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bakken, J.; Isaila, M.; Piroue, P.; Stickland, D.; Sumner, R.

    1984-02-01

    LEPC, the Large Electron Positron Collider being built at CERN, will be ready for experiments in 1988. A large array of bismuth germanate crystals will be part of one of the first experiments to be installed. Particles (including photons) resulting from the collisions will be identified and measured in the surrounding detector. At the center of this composite detector is a tracking device to observe the trajectories of all particles. Beyond this is the bismuth germanate array; it will measure the energy of electrons and photons from a few MeV to 100 GeV. This is surrounded by the hadron calorimeter. The bismuth germanate calorimeter will consist of about 12,000 individual bismuth germanate crystals. Each crystal will have an independent readout system. This system uses silicon photodiodes, each with its own ADC, to measure the scintillation light from each crystal. The ADC is implemented in software in a single chip microcomputer, using a modification of successive approximation, which produces a very wide dynamic range. The microcomputer also provides data buffering and several other housekeeping functions. The initial design of the readout system, presented in this paper, evolved from an attempt to minimize the size requirements and the number of cables needed, and to meet the dynamic range requirement in a practical way.

  16. Different ceria-based materials Gd0.1Ce0.9O2-? and Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85O2-? for ceria-bismuth bilayer electrolyte high performance low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jie; Liu, Fengguang; Gong, Zheng; Wu, Yusen; Liu, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Two types of ceria-bismuth bilayer films Gd0.1Ce0.9O2-?|Er0.4Bi1.6O3 (GDC|ESB) and Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85O2-?|ESB (SNDC|ESB) assembled with ESB-La0.74Bi0.1Sr0.16MnO3-? (ESB-LBSM) cathode are evaluated based on anode supported single cells, in order to compare and investigate the influence of different ceria-based materials GDC and SNDC with different ionic conductivity on the performance of the ceria-bismuth bilayer electrolyte films for high performance low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (HPLT-SOFCs). The single cell with GDC|ESB bilayer film outputs the maximum power density (MPD) of 895 mW cm-2 with interfacial polarization resistance (Rp) of 0.079 ? cm2 at 650 °C. When SNDC is used, which has a much higher ionic conductivity with respect to GDC, the cell with SNDC|ESB bilayer film achieves the MPD of 930 mW cm-2 and the Rp of 0.035 ? cm2 at the same conditions which shows better electrochemical performance. Furthermore, the SNDC|ESB bilayer film cell shows higher power output in the entire operation temperature range compared with GDC|ESB-based cell and has the MPD of 271 mW cm-2 at 500 °C which demonstrate the superiority of SNDC|ESB bilayer structure cell in LT-SOFC operations.

  17. Silicon nanowires with high-k hafnium oxide dielectrics for sensitive detection of small nucleic acid oligomers.

    PubMed

    Dorvel, Brian R; Reddy, Bobby; Go, Jonghyun; Duarte Guevara, Carlos; Salm, Eric; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Bashir, Rashid

    2012-07-24

    Nanobiosensors based on silicon nanowire field effect transistors offer advantages of low cost, label-free detection, and potential for massive parallelization. As a result, these sensors have often been suggested as an attractive option for applications in point-of-care (POC) medical diagnostics. Unfortunately, a number of performance issues, such as gate leakage and current instability due to fluid contact, have prevented widespread adoption of the technology for routine use. High-k dielectrics, such as hafnium oxide (HfO(2)), have the known ability to address these challenges by passivating the exposed surfaces against destabilizing concerns of ion transport. With these fundamental stability issues addressed, a promising target for POC diagnostics and SiNWFETs has been small oligonucleotides, more specifically, microRNA (miRNA). MicroRNAs are small RNA oligonucleotides which bind to mRNAs, causing translational repression of proteins, gene silencing, and expressions are typically altered in several forms of cancer. In this paper, we describe a process for fabricating stable HfO(2) dielectric-based silicon nanowires for biosensing applications. Here we demonstrate sensing of single-stranded DNA analogues to their microRNA cousins using miR-10b and miR-21 as templates, both known to be upregulated in breast cancer. We characterize the effect of surface functionalization on device performance using the miR-10b DNA analogue as the target sequence and different molecular weight poly-l-lysine as the functionalization layer. By optimizing the surface functionalization and fabrication protocol, we were able to achieve <100 fM detection levels of the miR-10b DNA analogue, with a theoretical limit of detection of 1 fM. Moreover, the noncomplementary DNA target strand, based on miR-21, showed very little response, indicating a highly sensitive and highly selective biosensing platform. PMID:22695179

  18. Photoreactivity of Alkylsiloxane Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon Oxide Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Borguet, Eric

    hydrogen abstraction is suggested based on the mechanism of gas-phase oxidation of alkanes. Our results functional groups to SAMs, enabling one to tailor wettability, adhesion, and electrical properties headgroups to produce solvent-labile species and cleavage of the C-S bond. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM

  19. Selective adsorption of bismuth telluride nanoplatelets through electrostatic attraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lingling; Aglan, Amira; Quan, Haiyu; Sun, Junjie; Tang, Chaolong; Song, Jinhui; Szulczewski, Greg; Wang, Hung-Ta

    2014-06-21

    We demonstrate a facile technique to assemble solution phase-synthesized bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanoplatelets into arrays of micropatterns. Aminosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are printed on silicon dioxide (SiO2) substrates using microcontact printing (?CP). The SAM printed surfaces are terminated with amine-groups allowing Bi2Te3 nanoplatelet selective adsorption by electrostatic attraction. Using Kelvin probe force microscopy, the electrical potential difference between aminosilane SAM and Bi2Te3 nanoplatelet surfaces is found to be ?650 mV, which is larger than that (?400 mV) between the SiO2 substrate and Bi2Te3 nanoplatelet surfaces. The selective adsorption provides an opportunity for integrating solution phase-grown topological insulators toward several device-level applications. PMID:24789217

  20. Induced electronic anisotropy in bismuth thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Albert D.; Yao, Mengliang; Katmis, Ferhat; Li, Mingda; Tang, Shuang; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Opeil, Cyril; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2014-08-01

    We use magneto-resistance measurements to investigate the effect of texturing in polycrystalline bismuth thin films. Electrical current in bismuth films with texturing such that all grains are oriented with the trigonal axis normal to the film plane is found to flow in an isotropic manner. By contrast, bismuth films with no texture such that not all grains have the same crystallographic orientation exhibit anisotropic current flow, giving rise to preferential current flow pathways in each grain depending on its orientation. Extraction of the mobility and the phase coherence length in both types of films indicates that carrier scattering is not responsible for the observed anisotropic conduction. Evidence from control experiments on antimony thin films suggests that the anisotropy is a result of bismuth's large electron effective mass anisotropy.

  1. Induced electronic anisotropy in bismuth thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Albert D.; Yao, Mengliang; Opeil, Cyril; Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Li, Mingda; Tang, Shuang; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2014-08-11

    We use magneto-resistance measurements to investigate the effect of texturing in polycrystalline bismuth thin films. Electrical current in bismuth films with texturing such that all grains are oriented with the trigonal axis normal to the film plane is found to flow in an isotropic manner. By contrast, bismuth films with no texture such that not all grains have the same crystallographic orientation exhibit anisotropic current flow, giving rise to preferential current flow pathways in each grain depending on its orientation. Extraction of the mobility and the phase coherence length in both types of films indicates that carrier scattering is not responsible for the observed anisotropic conduction. Evidence from control experiments on antimony thin films suggests that the anisotropy is a result of bismuth's large electron effective mass anisotropy.

  2. 21 CFR 73.2162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2162 Bismuth oxychloride...following diluents: (i) For coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed...ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in §...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2162 Bismuth oxychloride...following diluents: (i) For coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed...ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in §...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2162 Bismuth oxychloride...following diluents: (i) For coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed...ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in §...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2162 Bismuth oxychloride...following diluents: (i) For coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed...ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in §...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2162 Bismuth oxychloride...following diluents: (i) For coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed...ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in §...

  7. Bismuth-based electrochemical stripping analysis

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph

    2004-01-27

    Method and apparatus for trace metal detection and analysis using bismuth-coated electrodes and electrochemical stripping analysis. Both anodic stripping voltammetry and adsorptive stripping analysis may be employed.

  8. Separation and Extraction of Bismuth and Manganese from Roasted Low-Grade Bismuthinite and Pyrolusite: Thermodynamic Analysis and Sulfur Fixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Jing; Wang, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Chuan-Fu; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Xia, Chu-Ping

    2015-05-01

    A new environmentally friendly technology with higher recovery of bismuth is proposed to extract bismuth from low-grade bismuthinite and co-production MnSO4 from low-grade pyrolusite. The effects of simultaneous roasting process parameters on the sulfur-fixing rate and MnSO4 formation rate are investigated. Based on the Pourbaix diagram of metal-sulfur-oxygen system, the behavior of bismuth, manganese, and associated metal elements such ferrous, copper, lead, and sulfur in the bismuthinite and pyrolusite during roasting process is analyzed. The experimental results show that Bi in the ores can be converted into bismuth oxide or oxygen bismuth sulfate, and most of Mn in the ores can react with SO2 from bismuthinite to form MnSO4, which agree with thermodynamic analysis. A maximum of sulfur-fixing rate of 98.14% and MnSO4 formation rate of 70.2% are obtained under the conditions of 1.4 for the molar ratio of MnO2 to total sulfur in mixing ores of bismuthinite and pyrolusite ( n(MnO2)/ n(S)), 923 K for the roasting temperature, 2 h for roasting time, 140 L/h for air rate, and less than 74 ?m for particle size. The ultimate recovery rate of bismuth reaches 96.25% by selective leaching of the roasted product, purification of leaching solution, and hydrolysis, which is higher than the current applied technology for the low-grade bismuthinite.

  9. Vitreous arsenic sulfide doped with bismuth bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semencha, A. V.; Kurushkin, M. V.; Markov, V. A.; Shakhmin, A. L.

    2015-05-01

    Chalcogenide glasses of the As-S-Bi-Br system are synthesized, certain physicochemical properties (density, microhardness, glass transition temperature, and transparency range) of these glasses are determined, and the refraction index is calculated based on the principle of additivity of covalent refractions. The thermally activated mobility of bismuth cations in the glass lattice and the partial transition of bismuth into a subvalent state are revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  10. Effects of oxide additions and temperature on sinterability of milled silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1980-01-01

    Specimens of milled alpha-Si3N4 with 0 to 5.07 equivalent percent of oxide additions were pressureless sintered at 1650 to 1820 C for 4 hours in nitrogen while covered with powdered Si3N4 + SiO2. Densities of less than or equal to 97.5 percent resulted with approximately 2.5 equivalent percent of MgO, CeO2, Y2O3, and three mixtures involving these oxides. Densities of greater than or equal to 94 percent were obtained with approximately 0.62 equivalent percent of the same additives. At most temperatures, best sinterability (density maxima) was obtained with 1.2 to 2.5 equivalent percent additive.

  11. Enhancing the Performance of Amorphous-Silicon Photoanodes for Photoelectrocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Nan; Yao, Tingting; Wang, Shubo; Wang, Hui; Cao, Yuexian; Liu, Shengzhong Frank; Li, Can

    2015-12-01

    Herein, hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) covered with a thin layer of CoOx is applied as photoanode for PEC water splitting. The thin layer of CoOx effectively protects a-Si:H from the corrosive electrolyte and quantitative oxidation of water to oxygen was observed. A high applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of 2.34?% was achieved using an intrinsic absorber and an additional p-type layer. This work shows that a-Si:H with a sandwich-like structure, in which each layer has its own functionality, can be applied as an efficient and stable photoanode for PEC water oxidation. PMID:26554346

  12. DEGRADATION OF SM2ZR2O7 THERMAL BARRIER COATING CAUSED BY CALCIUM-MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON OXIDE (CMAS) DEPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Honglong; Sheng, Zhizhi; Tarwater, Emily; Zhang, Xingxing; Dasgupta, Sudip; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2015-03-16

    Rare earth zirconates are promising materials for use as thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engines. Among the lanthanide zirconate materials, Sm2Zr2O7 with the pyrochlore structure has lower thermal conductivity and better corrosion resistance against calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicon oxide (CMAS). In this work, after reaction with CMAS, the pyrochlore structure transforms to the cubic fluorite structure and Ca2Sm8(SiO4)6O2 forms in elongated grain.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of sub-100/10?nm planar nanofluidic channels by triple thermal oxidation and silicon-glass anodic bonding

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Wei; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We reported the fabrication and characterization of nanofluidic channels by Triple Thermal Oxidation and Silicon-Glass Anodic Bonding. Planar nanochannels with depths from sub-100?nm down to sub-10?nm were realized by this method. A theoretical model was developed to precisely predict the depth of nanochannels. The depth and uniformity of nanochannels showed good stability during anodic bonding. This method is promising for various nanofluidic studies, such as nanofluidic electrokinetics, biomolecule manipulation, and energy conversion. PMID:25538802

  14. Tunable sustained intravitreal drug delivery system for daunorubicin using oxidized porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huiyuan; Nieto, Alejandra; Ma, Feiyan; Freeman, William R; Sailor, Michael J; Cheng, Lingyun

    2014-03-28

    Daunorubicin (DNR) is an effective inhibitor of an array of proteins involved in neovascularization, including VEGF and PDGF. These growth factors are directly related to retina scar formation in many devastating retinal diseases. Due to the short vitreous half-life and narrow therapeutic window, ocular application of DNR is limited. It has been shown that a porous silicon (pSi) based delivery system can extend DNR vitreous residence from a few days to 3months. In this study we investigated the feasibility of altering the pore size of the silicon particles to regulate the payload release. Modulation of the etching parameters allowed control of the nano-pore size from 15nm to 95nm. In vitro studies showed that degradation of pSiO2 increased with increasing pore size and the degradation of pSiO2 was approximately constant for a given particle type. The degradation of pSiO2 with 43nm pores was significantly greater than the other two particles with smaller pores, judged by observed and normalized mean Si concentration of the dissolution samples (44.2±8.9 vs 25.7±5.6 or 21.2±4.2?g/mL, p<0.0001). In vitro dynamic DNR release revealed that pSiO2-CO2H:DNR (porous silicon dioxide with covalent loading of daunorubicin) with large pores (43nm) yielded a significantly higher DNR level than particles with 15 or 26nm pores (13.5±6.9ng/mL vs. 2.3±1.6ng/mL and 1.1±0.9ng/mL, p<0.0001). After two months of in vitro dynamic release, 54% of the pSiO2-CO2H:DNR particles still remained in the dissolution chamber by weight. In vivo drug release study demonstrated that free DNR in the vitreous at post-injection day 14 was 66.52ng/mL for 95nm pore size pSiO2-CO2H:DNR, 10.76ng/mL for 43nm pSiO2-CO2H:DNR, and only 1.05ng/mL for 15nm pSiO2-CO2H:DNR. Pore expansion from 15nm to 95nm led to a 63 fold increase of DNR release (p<0.0001) and a direct correlation between the pore size and the drug levels in the living eye vitreous was confirmed. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of regulating DNR release from pSiO2 covalently loaded with DNR by engineering the nano-pore size of pSi. PMID:24424270

  15. Oxidation and alkali-metal sulfate corrosion processes in silicon nitride-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, M.J.; Byrne, P.; Ramesh, R.

    1998-12-31

    {beta}-sialon materials (Si{sub (6{minus}z)}Al{sub z}O{sub z}N{sub (8{minus}z)}) densified with a YSiAlON glass and having z-values of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0 have been subjected to oxidation and hot corrosion experiments. From the results obtained, the process by which oxidation occurs at a temperature of 1350 C involves direct solution of {beta}-sialon grains by an aluminosilicate liquid. This liquid forms by the preferential diffusion of yttrium and/or aluminum from the bulk of the ceramic into the scale-ceramic interface. In the case of higher z-value materials ({ge}1.0), liquid formation is also facilitated by the reaction of yttrium aluminum garnet, formed by the devitrification of the YSiAlON glass during oxidation, and silica formed as an oxidation product. Hot corrosion experiments carried out using a crucible testing technique at 1150 C showed that only the z = 0.2 and 3.0 materials do not undergo catastrophic corrosion by molten sodium, potassium sulfate. The z = 0.2 material is partially protected by a high viscosity surface film, while the z = 3.0 material is protected by the formation of a nepheline (RAlSiO{sub 4} [R = alkali-metal]) scale layer. Corrosion morphologies for these two materials show that the reaction interface is at the scale-ceramic interface and that a liquid phase is in direct contact with the ceramic. Accordingly, the mechanism by which hot corrosion occurs, like oxidation at the higher temperature, is by solution of {beta}-sialon grains. While the z = 3.0 material is protected by the formation of nepheline, the five to six fold difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion for this phase and the z = 3.0 material results in significant mechanical damage to the scale during thermal cycling. Accordingly, the nepheline phase may have only limited protective ability.

  16. Gravimetric Analysis of Bismuth in Bismuth Subsalicylate Tablets: A Versatile Quantitative Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Eric; Cheung, Ken; Pauls, Steve; Dick, Jonathan; Roth, Elijah; Zalewski, Nicole; Veldhuizen, Christopher; Coeler, Joel

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, lower- and upper-division students dissolved bismuth subsalicylate tablets in acid and precipitated the resultant Bi[superscript 3+] in solution with sodium phosphate for a gravimetric determination of bismuth subsalicylate in the tablets. With a labeled concentration of 262 mg/tablet, the combined data from three…

  17. Sol-gel synthesis of magnesium oxide-silicon dioxide glass compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1988-01-01

    MgO-SiO2 glasses containing up to 15 mol pct MgO, which could not have been prepared by the conventional glass melting method due to the presence of stable liquid-liquid immiscibility, were synthesized by the sol-gel technique. Clear and transparent gels were obtained from the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) and magnesium nitrate hexahydrate when the water/TEOS mole ratio was four or more. The gelling time decreased with increase in magnesium content, water/TEOS ratio, and reaction temperature. Magnesium nitrate hexahydrate crystallized out of the gels containing 15 and 20 mol pct MgO on slow drying. This problem was partially alleviated by drying the gels quickly at higher temperatures. Monolithic gel samples were prepared using glycerol as the drying control additive. The gels were subjected to various thermal treatments and characterized by several methods. No organic groups could be detected in the glasses after heat treatments to approx. 800 C, but trace amounts of hydroxyl groups were still present. No crystalline phase was found from X-ray diffraction in the gel samples to approx. 890 C. At higher temperatures, alpha quartz precipitated out as the crystalline phase in gels containing up to 10 mol pct MgO. The overall activation energy for gel formation in 10MgO-90SiO2 (mol pct) system for water/TEOS mole ratio of 7.5 was calculated to be 58.7 kJ/mol.

  18. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: II, Comparison with commercial oxide materials.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Bryan J; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Raman microprobe-assisted indentation, a micromechanics method validated in a companion paper, was used to compare the surface toughening behaviors of silicon nitride (Si3N4) and alumina-based bioceramics employed in joint arthroplasty (i.e., monolithic alumina, Al2O3, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)-toughened alumina, ZTA). Quantitative assessments of microscopic stress fields both ahead and behind the tip of Vickers indentation cracks propagated under increasing indentation loads were systematically made using a Raman microprobe with spatial resolution on the order of a single micrometer. Concurrently, crack opening displacement (COD) profiles were monitored on the same microcracks screened by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman eye clearly visualized different mechanisms operative in toughening Si3N4 and ZTA bioceramics (i.e., crack-face bridging and ZrO2 polymorphic transformation, respectively) as compared to the brittle behavior of monolithic Al2O3. Moreover, emphasis was placed on assessing not only the effectiveness but also the durability of such toughening effects when the biomaterials were aged in a hydrothermal environment. A significant degree of embrittlement at the biomaterial surface was recorded in the transformation-toughened ZTA, with the surface toughness reduced by exposure to the hydrothermal environment. Conversely, the Si3N4 biomaterial experienced a surface toughness value independent of hydrothermal attack. Crack-face bridging thus appears to be a durable surface toughening mechanism for biomaterials in joint arthroplasty. PMID:26437609

  19. Microchannel-connected SU-8 honeycombs by single-step projection photolithography for positioning cells on silicon oxide nanopillar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larramendy, Florian; Charline Blatche, Marie; Mazenq, Laurent; Laborde, Adrian; Temple-Boyer, Pierre; Paul, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    We report on the fabrication, functionalization and testing of SU-8 microstructures for cell culture and positioning over large areas. The microstructure consists of a honeycomb arrangement of cell containers interconnected by microchannels and centered on nanopillar arrays designed for promoting cell positioning. The containers have been dimensioned to trap single cells and, with a height of 50?µm, prevent cells from escaping. The structures are fabricated using a single ultraviolet photolithography exposure with focus depth in the lower part of the SU-8 resist. With optimized process parameters, microchannels of various aspect ratios are thus produced. The cell containers and microchannels serve for the organization of axonal growth between neurons. The roughly 2?µm-high and 500?nm-wide nanopillars are made of silicon oxide structured by deep reactive ion etching. In future work, beyond their cell positioning purpose, the nanopillars could be functionalized as sensors. The proof of concept of the novel microstructure for organized cell culture is given by the successful growth of interconnected PC12 cells. Promoted by the honeycomb geometry, a dense network of interconnections between the cells has formed and the intended intimate contact of cells with the nanopillar arrays was observed by scanning electron microscopy. This proves the potential of these new devices as tools for the controlled cell growth in an interconnected container system with well-defined 3D geometry.

  20. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  1. Optimization of the deposition and annealing conditions of fluorine-doped indium oxide films for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Untila, G. G. Kost, T. N.; Chebotareva, A. B.; Timofeyev, M. A.

    2013-03-15

    Fluorine-doped indium oxide (IFO) films are deposited onto (pp{sup +})Si and (n{sup +}nn{sup +})Si structures made of single-crystal silicon by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effect of the IFO deposition time and annealing time in an argon atmosphere with methanol vapor on the IFO chemical composition, the photovoltage and fill factor of the Illumination-U{sub oc} curves of IFO/(pp{sup +})Si structures, and the sheet resistance of IFO/(n{sup +}nn{sup +})Si structures, correlating with the IFO/(n{sup +})Si contact resistance, is studied. The obtained features are explained by modification of the properties of the SiO{sub x} transition layer at the IFO/Si interface during deposition and annealing. Analysis of the results made it possible to optimize the fabrication conditions of solar cells based on IFO/(pp{sup +})Si heterostructures and to increase their efficiency from 17% to a record 17.8%.

  2. Liquid-phase-deposited silicon oxide film as a mask for single-sided texturing of monocrystalline Si wafers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Jiang, Kun; Zhou, Bo-Xuan; Xu, Su-Fan; Cai, Wen-Bin

    2014-01-22

    A silicon oxide film doped with fluorine was grown on a (100)-oriented Si wafer through liquid-phase deposition (LPD) as a protective mask of the wafer's rear side in order to chemically texture the wafer's unprotected front side in a basic etching bath, which is a new process in solar-cell manufacturing. The growth rate of the LPD-SiO2 film increased monotonically with an increase of the deposition temperature up to 60 °C for a given precursor solution. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicates that a pyramidal surface texture forms on the front side in the chemical texturing bath, whereas the underlying Si surface on the rear side remains intact. As a result, the average reflectivity for incident light over 450-850 nm is decreased to 11.1% on the front side, and a 5.8 ?m thick Si surface on the rear side is saved per wafer. The all-wet process involved in this single-sided texturing is promising for the mass production of thinner and higher-efficiency Si-based solar cells because of its simplicity and lower cost. PMID:24372321

  3. Silicon Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Chip for Portable Consumer Electronics -- Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Ludwiszewski

    2009-06-29

    LSI’s fuel cell uses efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (“SOFC”) technology, is manufactured using Micro Electrical Mechanical System (“MEMS”) fabrication methods, and runs on high energy fuels, such as butane and ethanol. The company’s Fuel Cell on a Chip™ technology enables a form-factor battery replacement for portable electronic devices that has the potential to provide an order-of-magnitude run-time improvement over current batteries. Further, the technology is clean and environmentally-friendly. This Department of Energy funded project focused on accelerating the commercialization and market introduction of this technology through improvements in fuel cell chip power output, lifetime, and manufacturability.

  4. Swift heavy ion induced dewetting of metal oxide thin films on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolse, T.; Paulus, H.; Bolse, W.

    2006-04-01

    We have observed that thin oxide coatings (NiO, Fe2O3) tend to dewet their Si substrate when being bombarded with swift heavy ions (350-600 MeV Au ions) even though the irradiation was carried out about 80 K and hence, the films never reached their melting point. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy reveal a surprising similarity of the dewetting morphologies with those observed for molten polymer films on Si, which have recently been reported by others [S. Herminghaus, K. Jakobs, K. Mecke, J. Bischof, A. Fery, M. Ibn-Elhaj, S. Schlagowsky, Science 282 (1998) 916; R. Seemann, S. Herminghaus, K. Jacobs, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13 (2001) 4925]. Like in that cases also here heterogeneous and homogeneous hole nucleation could be identified. Heterogeneous nucleation is less pronounced in Fe2O3/Si than in NiO/Si. The occurrence of spinodal-like dewetting cannot be detected unambiguously. The dewetting kinetics were determined by means of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and found to slightly differ for the two compounds. The dewetting kinetics as well as the final dewetting pattern strongly depend on the initial film thicknesses. No dewetting occurs for film thicknesses above about 150 nm, while for very small thicknesses below about 40 nm the film decays into nm-sized spherical droplets. At intermediate film thicknesses percolated networks of small oxide bridges are formed.

  5. Fabrication of a symmetric micro supercapacitor based on tubular ruthenium oxide on silicon 3D microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Yin, Yajiang; Li, Xiangyu; You, Zheng

    2014-04-01

    A micro-supercapacitor with a three-dimensional configuration has been fabricated using an ICP etching technique. Hydrous ruthenium oxide with a tubular morphology is successfully synthesized using a cathodic deposition technique with a Si micro prominence as a template. The desired tubular RuO2·xH2O architecture facilitates electrolyte penetration and proton exchange/diffusion. A single MEMS electrode is studied using cyclic voltammetry, and a specific capacitance of 99.3 mF cm-2 and 70 F g-1 is presented at 5 mV s-1 in neutral Na2SO4 solution. The accelerated cycle life is tested at 80 mV s-1, and satisfactory cyclability is observed. When placed on a chip, the symmetric cell exhibits good supercapacitor properties, and a specific capacitance as high as 23 mF cm-2 is achieved at 10 mA cm-2. Therefore, 3D MEMS microelectrode arrays with electrochemically deposited ruthenium oxide films are promising candidates for on-chip electrochemical micro-capacitor applications.

  6. An ultrahigh vacuum complementary metal oxide silicon compatible nonlithographic system to fabricate nanoparticle-based devices.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arghya; Das, Biswajit

    2008-03-01

    Nanoparticles of metals and semiconductors are promising for the implementation of a variety of photonic and electronic devices with superior performances and new functionalities. However, their successful implementation has been limited due to the lack of appropriate fabrication processes that are suitable for volume manufacturing. The current techniques for the fabrication of nanoparticles either are solution based, thus requiring complex surface passivation, or have severe constraints over the choice of particle size and material. We have developed an ultrahigh vacuum system for the implementation of a complex nanosystem that is flexible and compatible with the silicon integrated circuit process, thus making it suitable for volume manufacturing. The system also allows the fabrication of Ohmic contacts and isolation dielectrics in an integrated manner, which is a requirement for most electronic and photonic devices. We have demonstrated the power and the flexibility of this new system for the manufacturing of nanoscale devices by implementing a variety of structures incorporating nanoparticles. Descriptions of this new fabrication system together with experimental results are presented in this article. The system explains the method of size-selected deposition of nanoparticles of any metallic, semiconducting, and (or) insulating materials on any substrate, which is very important in fabricating useful nanoparticle-based devices. It has also been shown that at elevated substrate temperature, a selective deposition of the nanoparticles is observed near the grain-boundary regions. However, in these natural systems, there will always be low and favorable energy states present away from the grain-boundary regions, leading to the undesirable deposition of nanoparticles in the far-grain-boundary regions, too. PMID:18377028

  7. Bismuth nanowire and antidot array studies motivated by thermoelectricity

    E-print Network

    Rabin, Oded, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) films were utilized to template the fabrication of nanostructures of bismuth, antimony and bismuth-antimony alloys. The cylindrical template pores were used to synthesize nanowires by electrochemical ...

  8. Bismuth alloy potting seals aluminum connector in cryogenic application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J. F.; Stafford, R. L.

    1966-01-01

    Bismuth alloy potting seals feedthrough electrical connector for instrumentation within a pressurized vessel filled with cryogenic liquids. The seal combines the transformation of high-bismuth content alloys with the thermal contraction of an external aluminum tube.

  9. Processing and Properties of Strontium Bismuth Vanadate Niobate Ferroelectric Ceramics

    E-print Network

    Cao, Guozhong

    Processing and Properties of Strontium Bismuth Vanadate Niobate Ferroelectric Ceramics Yun Wu, Chau, microstructure, and dielectric properties of strontium bismuth niobate vanadate ceramics, SrBi2(VxNb1 x)2O9 (SBVN

  10. A surface science investigation of silicon carbide: Oxidation, crystal growth and surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    For the semiconductor SiC to fulfill its potential as an electronic material, methods must be developed to produce insulating surface oxide layers in a reproducible fashion. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the oxidation of single crystal {alpha}-SiC over a wide temperature and O{sub 2} pressure range. The {alpha}-SiC surface becomes graphitic at high temperatures and low O{sub 2} pressures due to Si and SiO sublimation from the surface. Amorphous SiO{sub 2} surface layers from on {alpha}-SiC at elevated O{sub 2} pressures and temperatures. Both the graphitization and oxidation of {alpha}-SiC appears to be enhanced by surface roughness. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently the preferred method of producing single crystal SiC, although the method is slow and prone to contamination. We have attempted to produce SiC films at lower temperatures and higher deposition rates using plasma enhanced CVD with CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3}. Scanning AES, XPS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to study the composition and morphology of the deposited Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films as a function of substrate temperature, plasma power and ion flux bombardment of the film during deposition. High energy ion bombardment during deposition was found to increase film density and substrate adhesion while simultaneously reducing hydrogen and oxygen incorporation in the film. Under all deposition conditions the Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films were found to be amorphous, with the ion bombarded films showing promise as hard protective coatings. Studies with LEED and AES have shown that {beta}-SiC (100) exhibits multiple surface reconstructions, depending on the surface composition. These surface reconstructions possess substantially different surface reactivities at elevated temperatures, which can complicate the fabrication of metal on SiC junctions.

  11. Topological nature and the multiple Dirac cones hidden in Bismuth high-Tc superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Yan, Binghai; Thomale, Ronny; Hanke, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies employing density-functional theory have predicted BaBiO3 (when doped with electrons) and YBiO3 to become a topological insulator (TI) with a large topological gap (~0.7?eV). This, together with the natural stability against surface oxidation, makes the Bismuth-Oxide family of special interest for possible applications in quantum information and spintronics. The central question, we study here, is whether the hole-doped Bismuth Oxides, i.e. Ba1-xKxBiO3 and BaPb1-xBixO3, which are “high-Tc” bulk superconducting near 30?K, additionally display in the further vicinity of their Fermi energy EF a topological gap with a Dirac-type of topological surface state. Our electronic structure calculations predict the K-doped family to emerge as a TI, with a topological gap above EF. Thus, these compounds can become superconductors with hole-doping and potential TIs with additional electron doping. Furthermore, we predict the Bismuth-Oxide family to contain an additional Dirac cone below EF for further hole doping, which manifests these systems to be candidates for both electron- and hole-doped topological insulators. PMID:26014056

  12. High-temperature deformation and microstructural analysis for silicon nitride-scandium(III) oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, Deock-Soo; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    It was indicated that Si3N4 doped with Sc2O3 may exhibit high temperature mechanical properties superior to Si3N4 systems with various other oxide sintered additives. High temperature deformation of samples was studied by characterizing the microstructures before and after deformation. It was found that elements of the additive, such as Sc and O, exist in small amounts at very thin grain boundary layers and most of them stay in secondary phases at tripple and multiple grain boundary junctions. These secondary phases are devitrified as crystalline Sc2Si2O7. Deformation of the samples was dominated by cavitational processes rather than movements of dislocations. Thus the excellent deformation resistance of the samples at high temperature can be attributed to the very small thickness of the grain boundary layers and the crystalline secondary phase.

  13. Blown Bubble Assembly of Graphene Oxide Patches for Transparent Electrodes in Carbon-Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiting; Yang, Yanbing; Li, Yitan; Wang, Chunhui; Xu, Wenjing; Shi, Enzheng; Zou, Mingchu; Yang, Liusi; Yang, Xiangdong; Li, Yan; Cao, Anyuan

    2015-12-30

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets have a strong tendency to aggregate, and their interfaces can impose limitations on the electrical conductivity, which would hinder practical applications. Here, we present a blown bubble film method to assemble GO sheets with a uniform distribution over a large area and further interconnect individual GO sheets by transforming the bubble film into graphitized carbon. A conventional polymer was used to facilitate the bubble blowing process and disperse GO sheets in the bubble. Then, the bubble film was annealed on a Cu substrate, resulting in a highly transparent reduced GO (RGO)-carbon hybrid structure consisting of RGO patches well adhered to the carbon film. We fabricated RGO-carbon/Si solar cells with power conversion efficiencies up to 6.42%, and the assembled RGO patches hybridized with carbon film can form an effective junction with Si, indicating potential applications in thin film electronic devices and photovoltaics. PMID:26641030

  14. Temperature dependent photoluminescence from porous silicon nanostructures: Quantum confinement and oxide related transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Mallar; Ratan Bandyopadhyay, Nil; Ghanta, Ujjwal; Klie, Robert F.; Kumar Pramanick, Ashit; Das, Samaresh; Ray, Samit K.; Minhaz Hossain, Syed

    2011-11-01

    Temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy along with structural investigations of luminescent porous Si enable us to experimentally distinguish between the relative contributions of band-to-band and oxide interface mediated electronic transitions responsible for light emission from these nanostructures. Porous Si samples formed using high current densities (J ? 80 mA/cm2) have large porosities (P ? 85%) and consequently smaller (˜1-6 nm) average crystallite sizes. The PL spectra of these high porosity samples are characterized by multiple peaks. Two dominant peaks—one in the blue regime and one in the yellow/orange regime, along with a very low intensity red/NIR peak, are observed for these samples. The high energy peak position is nearly independent of temperature, whereas the yellow/orange peak red-shifts with increasing temperature. Both the peaks blue shift with ageing and with increasing porosity. The intensity of the blue peak increases whereas the yellow/orange peak decreases with increasing temperature, while the intensity and peak position of the very low intensity red/NIR peak appears to be unaffected by temperature, porosity, and ageing. The low porosity samples (P ? 60%) on the other hand exhibit a single PL peak whose intensity decreases and exhibits a very small red spectral shift with increase in temperature. From the variation of intensity and PL peak positions, it is established that both quantum confinement of excitons and oxide related interfacial defect states play dominant role in light emission from porous Si and it is possible to qualitatively distinguish and assign their individual contributions.

  15. Liquid Bismuth Propellant Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, B. J.; Korman, V.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the propellant mass flow rate in liquid bismuth-fed electric propulsion systems has two challenging facets. First, the flow sensors must be capable of providing a resolvable measurement at propellant mass flow rates on the order of 10 mg/see with and uncertainty of less that 5%. The second challenge has to do with the fact that the materials from which the flow sensors are fabricated must be capable of resisting any of the corrosive effects associated with the high-temperature propellant. The measurement itself is necessary in order to properly assess the performance (thrust efficiency, Isp) of thruster systems in the laboratory environment. The hotspot sensor[I] has been designed to provide the bismuth propellant mass flow rate measurement. In the hotspot sensor, a pulse of thermal energy (derived from a current pulse and associated joule heating) is applied near the inlet of the sensor. The flow is "tagged" with a thermal feature that is convected downstream by the flowing liquid metal. Downstream, a temperature measurement is performed to detect a "ripple" in the local temperature associated with the passing "hotspot" in the propellant. By measuring the time between the upstream generation and downstream detection of the thermal feature, the flow speed can be calculated using a "time of flight" analysis. In addition, the system can be calibrated by measuring the accumulated mass exiting the system as a-function of time and correlating this with the time it takes the hotspot to convect through the sensor. The primary advantage of this technique is that it doesn't depend on an absolute measurement of temperature but, instead, relies on the observation of thermal features. This makes the technique insensitive to other externally generated thermal fluctuations. In this paper, we describe experiments performed using the hotspot flow sensor aimed at quantifying the resolution of the sensor technology. Propellant is expelled onto an electronic scale to provide an independent measure of the propellant mass flow rate as a function of time. In addition, two separate detection schemes are employed. The first uses a thermocouple to directly measure temperature in the fluid. The second involves the ,use of a fiber optic coupled to a photodiode allowing for detection of an increase in light emission from the fluid as the hotspot passes. the detection location.

  16. Chemical Gated Field Effect Transistor by Hybrid Integration of One-Dimensional Silicon Nanowire and Two-Dimensional Tin Oxide Thin Film for Low Power Gas Sensor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Rim, Taiuk; Baek, Chang-Ki; Meyyappan, M

    2015-09-30

    Gas sensors based on metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor with the polysilicon gate replaced by a gas sensitive thin film have been around for over 50 years. These are not suitable for the emerging mobile and wearable sensor platforms due to operating voltages and powers far exceeding the supply capability of batteries. Here we present a novel approach to decouple the chemically sensitive region from the conducting channel for reducing the drive voltage and increasing reliability. This chemically gated field effect transistor uses silicon nanowire for the current conduction channel with a tin oxide film on top of the nanowire serving as the gas sensitive medium. The potential change induced by the molecular adsorption and desorption allows the electrically floating tin oxide film to gate the silicon channel. As the device is designed to be normally off, the power is consumed only during the gas sensing event. This feature is attractive for the battery operated sensor and wearable electronics. In addition, the decoupling of the chemical reaction and the current conduction regions allows the gas sensitive material to be free from electrical stress, thus increasing reliability. The device shows excellent gas sensitivity to the tested analytes relative to conventional metal oxide transistors and resistive sensors. PMID:26381613

  17. Lead-Bismuth Spallation Target Design Yousry Gohar

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Lead-Bismuth Spallation Target Design Yousry Gohar Nuclear Engineering Division Argonne National Driven System #12;Lead-Bismuth Spallation Target Design A study was carried out to analyze and design a Lead-Bismuth spallation target for driving a subcritical assembly. Performance Parameters: Produce

  18. WAVELENGTH CONVERSION USING BISMUTH-BASED NONLINEAR OPTICAL LOOP MIRROR

    E-print Network

    Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

    WAVELENGTH CONVERSION USING BISMUTH-BASED NONLINEAR OPTICAL LOOP MIRROR C. C. Lee,1§ P. K. A. Wai,1 of bismuth-based highly-nonlinear fiber in optical loop mirror configuration (Bi-NOLM). Both inverted and non of the wavelength converter is also measured. Keywords: Bismuth based fiber, wavelength conversion, optical signal

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Effect of bismuth breast shielding on radiation

    E-print Network

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Effect of bismuth breast shielding on radiation dose and image quality in coronary angiography (CCTA) is associated with high radiation dose to the female breasts. Bismuth breast shielding and signal were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) including the coronary arteries. Results. With bismuth

  20. Reactive Sputtering of Bismuth Vanadate Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting

    E-print Network

    Javey, Ali

    Reactive Sputtering of Bismuth Vanadate Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting Le Chen,, Esther, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) has attracted increasing-blocking layer. I. INTRODUCTION Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) has been studied since the late 1990s as a water

  1. Copyright by Eric Ashley Olson, 2003 NANOCALORIMETRY OF BISMUTH NANOPARTICLES

    E-print Network

    Allen, Leslie H.

    © Copyright by Eric Ashley Olson, 2003 #12;NANOCALORIMETRY OF BISMUTH NANOPARTICLES BY ERIC ASHLEY of nanosized bismuth particles are investigated using a nanocalorimetric technique. A brief description of the experimental method and data analysis procedures is reported. Bismuth nanoparticles are found to melt

  2. VOLUME 81, NUMBER 14 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 5 OCTOBER 1998 Crystalline Oxides on Silicon: The First Five Monolayers

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    a commensurate crystalline oxide interface with silicon has been solved. Alkaline earth and perovskite oxides can relied on silica SiO2 as the gate dielectric in a field effect tran- sistor. However, silica tunneling currents make transistor design untenable; an alternative gate dielectric is needed [1]. While now

  3. Effect of contact conditions on embrittlement of T91 steel by lead-bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, T.; Lorang, G.; Guérin, S.; Pastol, J.-L.; Gorse, D.

    2004-11-01

    The T91 martensitic steel is a candidate structural material for the liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) MEGAPIE spallation target. This paper first reviews some results on Liquid Metal Embrittlement (LME) of martensitic steels by liquid metals. It appears that LME of steels can occur provided a few criteria are fulfilled simultaneously. Intimate contact between liquid metal and solid metal is the first one. Usually, it is impossible to avoid the oxide film formation on the steel surface even after short exposure to air. This explains the difficulty arising when one would like to determine the susceptibility to LME of T91 steel whilst put into contact with lead-bismuth. Later, we report on different methods of surface preparation in order to remove the oxide layer on the T91 steel (PVD, soft soldering fluxes) and the resulting susceptibility to LME.

  4. Evolution of a Native Oxide Layer at the a-Si:H/c-Si Interface and Its Influence on a Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhu; Meng, Fanying; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Zhengxin

    2015-12-01

    The interface microstructure of a silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell was investigated. We found an ultrathin native oxide layer (NOL) with a thickness of several angstroms was formed on the crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface in a very short time (?30 s) after being etched by HF solution. Although the NOL had a loose structure with defects that are detrimental for surface passivation, it acted as a barrier to restrain the epitaxial growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) during the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The microstructure change of the NOL during the PECVD deposition of a-Si:H layers with different conditions and under different H2 plasma treatments were systemically investigated in detail. When a brief H2 plasma was applied to treat the a-Si:H layer after the PECVD deposition, interstitial oxygen and small-size SiO2 precipitates were transformed to hydrogenated amorphous silicon suboxide alloy (a-SiOx:H, x ? 1.5). In the meantime, the interface defect density was reduced by about 50%, and the parameters of the SHJ solar cell were improved due to the post H2 plasma treatment. PMID:26565116

  5. Write-Once Read-Many-Times (WORM) Memory based on Zinc Oxide on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing

    2011-12-01

    Write-once read-many-times (WORM) memory feature is found in ZnO films deposited on silicon substrates. The resistance ratio (R ratio) between the high resistance state (HRS or ON state) and low resistance state (LRS or OFF state) is mostly around 104 for all tested devices. The programming power required to switch the memory devices from HRS to LRS can be as low as 10-3 watts when current compliance is set at 50microA. Lowering the current compliance will result in lower R ratio, because the maximum LRS current level will also be limited by the current compliance. To test the devices for long term storage purpose, endurance to reading pulse with width of 2?s and amplitude of 1V were tested for several randomly selected devices with various top contact sizes. Results shown all devices sustained their R ratio with hardly noticeable resistance change throughout 108 reading cycles. Retention was also tested on several devices. The results showed that only R ratio of HRS showed some drop in resistance after 105 seconds (27.78 hours) testing period, while LRS current level was almost constant throughout. R ratio still retained around 10 3 after being extrapolated to 100 years. Temperature stability of the devices was also tested up to 120ºC. There was current drop in both HRS and LRS under high temperature over time, but the overall R ratio did not change much, still above 103 for all tested devices. Endurance and retention test results under high temperature showed similar trend as room temperature. Au metal contact devices showed almost undetectable HRS current by the equipment because the probe station used has current noise level which is almost the same as the current level of the HRS devices. Devices with Au and Ti metal have almost the same conductivity at LRS, and Au top contact has the potential to provide higher R ratio for WORM devices. Higher memory performance can be clearly observed in devices fabricated on p-Si substrates than that on n-Si substrates. Devices on p-Si substrate showed low rectifying ratio in HRS, and high rectifying ratio in LRS, thus the R ratio of the devices is higher. The high rectifying ratio in both HRS and LRS in devices with n-Si substrate resulted in lower R ratio of around 102. The switching mechanism of all devices is explained by the filament model, in which conducting filaments consisting of oxygen vacancies are formed after applying external electric field to switch the device to ON state. The filament model explained why all devices' LRS conductivity is independent of contact size. As write-once memory, the LRS devices have to sustain their resistivity through any external electric field. Test results showed that all devices do not reset to HRS after repeatedly attempting to reset devices by looping the -5V ˜ 5V sweep on them. Although all devices kept their LRS status, a slight reset can be observed in the negative bias region, positive bias region showed no sign of reset.

  6. The study of tribological performance and surface film characterization of bismuth dioctyldithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ligong; Dong Junxiu; Chen Guoxu

    1997-05-01

    In this study, bismuth dioctyldithiocarbamate has been synthesized, and its tribological behaviors, such as friction-reducing ability, antiwear property and extreme pressure performance have been respectively evaluated with a ring-on-block test rig and a fourball machine. In addition to correlate its tribological behaviors with the film formed on the metallic rubbing surface under boundary lubrication conditions, surface analyses have been conducted to characterize the surface film by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersion of X-ray (EDX). Test results show the additive compound can effectively improve the friction and wear of the rubbing couples. On the other hand, EDX confirmed the presence of carbon, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, bismuth and iron on the surface; AES revealed their depth distribution of atomic concentration percentages. Whereas XPS further disclosed that the composition of the surface film was composed of organic and inorganic species including iron sulfide and sulfate, metallic bismuth, bismuth oxide and sulfide, etc. which are conducive to the reduction of friction and wear.

  7. InAs nanowire growth on oxide-masked <111> silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björk, Mikael T.; Schmid, Heinz; Breslin, Chris M.; Gignac, Lynne; Riel, Heike

    2012-04-01

    Here we investigate the growth of InAs nanowires on <111> Si substrates masked by SiOx using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. We study <111> (axial) and <1-10> (radial) growth of InAs NWs by varying growth duration, temperature, group-III molar flows, V/III ratio, mask material, mask opening size, and inter-wire distance. We find that growth takes place without an In droplet and the process evolves through three successive phases: nucleation of an InAs cluster, followed by two distinct nanowire growth phases. These two growth phases have different axial and radial growth rates, which originate in a transition from having In supply dominated by the open Si area in the first phase towards an In supply from the vapor/oxide mask in the second growth phase. The linear relation found between nanowire length and diameter vs. time in the last growth phase indicates that <111> growth is not surface diffusion limited as is usually the case for catalyzed growth. A high yield of vertical nanowires is obtained if group-III flow is above and V/III ratio below threshold values, in addition to having an arsenic-terminated Si surface. Furthermore, we observe that <111> and <1-10> growth is surface kinetically limited below 520 °C and 540 °C, respectively, with activation energies of 20 and 6.5 kcal/mol. This difference in activation energies limits the selectivity of the <111> to <1-10> growth to 25:1 under optimized conditions, which must be considered when fabricating axially modulated structures. However, we find that by placing wires in large arrays it is possible to completely stop the <1-10> growth rate in favor of the <111> growth rate.

  8. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si. PMID:25593562

  9. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm(2) using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si. PMID:25593562

  10. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Norizzawati Mohd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-12-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si.

  11. Liquid Bismuth Feed System for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.; Polzin, K. A.; Stanojev, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    Operation of Hall thrusters with bismuth propellant has been shown to be a promising path toward high-power, high-performance, long-lifetime electric propulsion for spaceflight missions. For example, the VHITAL project aims td accurately, experimentally assess the performance characteristics of 10 kW-class bismuth-fed Hall thrusters - in order to validate earlier results and resuscitate a promising technology that has been relatively dormant for about two decades. A critical element of these tests will be the precise metering of propellant to the thruster, since performance cannot be accurately assessed without an accurate accounting of mass flow rate. Earlier work used a pre/post-test propellant weighing scheme that did not provide any real-time measurement of mass flow rate while the thruster was firing, and makes subsequent performance calculations difficult. The motivation of the present work was to develop a precision liquid bismuth Propellant Management System (PMS) that provides real-time propellant mass flow rate measurement and control, enabling accurate thruster performance measurements. Additionally, our approach emphasizes the development of new liquid metal flow control components and, hence, will establish a basis for the future development of components for application in spaceflight. The design of various critical components in a bismuth PMS are described - reservoir, electromagnetic pump, hotspot flow sensor, and automated control system. Particular emphasis is given to material selection and high-temperature sealing techniques. Open loop calibration test results are reported, which validate the systems capability to deliver bismuth at mass flow rates ranging from 10 to 100 mg/sec with an uncertainty of less than +/- 5%. Results of integrated vaporizer/liquid PMS tests demonstrate all of the necessary elements of a complete bismuth feed system for electric propulsion.

  12. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  13. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  14. High-efficiency visible photoluminescence from amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in silicon nitride

    E-print Network

    Zexian, Cao

    High-efficiency visible photoluminescence from amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in silicon 29 August 2003 Confinement of silicon nanoparticles in silicon nitride instead of an oxide matrix. We report in this letter the production of high-density up to 4.0 1012 /cm2 from micrographs silicon

  15. Bismuth labeling for the CT assessment of local administration of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Luengo, Y.; Serna, C. J.; Andrés-Vergés, M.; Varela, M.; Calero, Macarena; Lazaro-Carrillo, Ana; Villanueva, Angeles; Sisniega, A.; Montesinos, P.; Morales, M. P.

    2015-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles involve the local administration of nanometric iron oxide based materials as seeds for magnetothermia or drug carriers. A simple and widespread way of controlling the process using x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners is desirable. The combination of iron and bismuth in one entity will increase the atenuation of x-rays, offering such a possibility. In order to check this possibility core-shell nanocrystals of iron oxide@bismuth oxide have been synthesized by an aqueous route and stabilized in water by polyethylene glycol (PEG), and we have evaluated their ability to generate contrast by CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the radiopacity and proton relaxivities using phantoms. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed that the material consists of a highly crystalline 8 nm core of maghemite and a 1 nm shell of bismuth atoms either isolated or clustered on the nanocrystal’s surface. The comparison of ?CT and MRI images of mice acquired in the presence of the contrast shows that when local accumulations of the magnetic nanoparticles take place, CT images are more superior in the localization of the magnetic nanoparticles than MRI images, which results in magnetic field inhomogeneity artifacts.

  16. Implanted bismuth donors in 28-Si: Process development and electron spin resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, C. D.; Lo, C. C.; Lang, V.; George, R. E.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Bokor, J.; Lyon, S. A.; Morton, J. J. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2012-02-01

    Spins of donor atoms in silicon are excellent qubit candidates. Isotope engineered substrates provide a nuclear spin free host environment, resulting in long spin coherence times [1,2]. The capability of swapping quantum information between electron and nuclear spins can enable quantum communication and gate operation via the electron spin and quantum memory via the nuclear spin [2]. Spin properties of donor qubit candidates in silicon have been studied mostly for phosphorous and antimony [1-3]. Bismuth donors in silicon exhibit a zero field splitting of 7.4 GHz and have attracted attention as potential nuclear spin memory and spin qubit candidates [4,5] that could be coupled to superconducting resonators [4,6]. We report on progress in the formation of bismuth doped 28-Si epi layers by ion implantation, electrical dopant activation and their study via pulsed electron spin resonance measurements showing narrow linewidths and good coherence times. [4pt] [1] A. M. Tyryshkin, et al. arXiv: 1105.3772 [2] J. J. L. Morton, et al. Nature (2008) [3] T. Schenkel, et al APL 2006; F. R. Bradbury, et al. PRL (2006) [4] R. E. George, et al. PRL (2010) [5] G. W. Morley, et al. Nat Mat (2010) [6] M. Hatridge, et al. PRB (2011), R. Vijay, et al. APL (2010) This work was supported by NSA (100000080295) and DOE (DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  17. Micro-channel drilling of Ni and Pt films on silicon by using laser beam interference ablation for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedvilas, Mindaugas; Voisiat, Bogdan; Indriši?nas, Simonas; Maciulevi?ius, Mindaugas; Tamulevi?ius, Sigitas; Abakevi?ien?, Brigita; Grigali?nas, Viktoras; Ra?iukaitis, Gediminas

    2011-12-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are widely studied because of their potential usage in power source applications. At present huge attention is paid to micro solid oxide fuel cells (?-SOFC) based on thin film technologies with power capacity in the range of several watts. Porous nickel is an important part in many types of solid oxide fuel cells. This work presents experimental results of laser micro-channel formation in the 200 nm thick nickel and platinum films for the fuel cell membranes. The four-beam interference ablation was applied for fast and parallel formation of microchannel over a large area in thin metal film on a silicon substrate for ?-SOFC. Using this technique, regularly arranged circular holes with a period of 4.2 ?m were formed in the 200 nm thick nickel and platinum films. The diameter of the holes ranged from 1.7 to 2.7 ?m. The area where holes were ablated by a single laser exposure was approximately 250x250 ?m. A silicon substrate was chemically etched from backside to release the patterned nickel film.

  18. The use of poly(ethylene oxide) for the efficient stabilization of entrapped alpha-chymotrypsin in silicone elastomers: a chemometric study.

    PubMed

    Ragheb, Amro M; Hileman, Oliver E; Brook, Michael

    2005-12-01

    The enzyme alpha-chymotrypsin, a model for catalytic proteins, was entrapped in different silicone elastomers that were formed via the condensation-cure room temperature vulcanization (CC-RTV) of silanol terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) with tetraethyl orthosilicate as a crosslinker, in the presence of different poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers that were functionalized with triethoxysilyl groups. The effects of various chemical factors on both the activity and entrapping efficiency of proteins (leaching) were studied using a 2-level fractional factorial design--a chemometrics approach. The factors studied include the concentration and chain length of poly(ethylene oxide), enzyme content, and crosslinker (TEOS) concentration. The study indicated that poly(ethylene oxide) can stabilize the entrapped alpha-chymotrypsin in silicone rubber: the specific activity can be maximized by incorporating a relatively high content of short chain, functional PEO. Increased enzyme concentration was found to adversely affect the specific activity. The effect of TEOS was found to be insignificant when PEO was present in the elastomer, however, it does affect the activity positively in the case of simple elastomers. PMID:15992922

  19. Luminescence properties of IR-emitting bismuth centres in SiO{sub 2}-based glasses in the UV to near-IR spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Firstova, E G; Vel'miskin, V V; Firstov, S V; Dianov, E M; Bufetov, I A; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, A N; Bufetova, G A; Nishchev, K N

    2015-01-31

    We have studied UV excitation spectra of IR luminescence in bismuth-doped glasses of various compositions and obtained energy level diagrams of IR-emitting bismuth-related active centres (BACs) associated with silicon and germanium atoms up to ?5.2 eV over the ground level. A possible energy level diagram of the BACs in phosphosilicate glass has been proposed. The UV excitation peaks for the IR luminescence of the BACs in the glasses have been shown to considerably overlap with absorption bands of the Bi{sup 3+} ion, suggesting that Bi{sup 3+} may participate in BAC formation. (optical fibres)

  20. 21 CFR 73.2162 - Bismuth oxychloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2162 Bismuth oxychloride. (a) Identity and... following diluents: (i) For coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and,...