Science.gov

Sample records for bisphosphonate-associated femoral fracture

  1. Clinician approach to diagnosis of stress fractures including bisphosphonate-associated fractures.

    PubMed

    McKenna, M J; Heffernan, E; Hurson, C; McKiernan, F E

    2014-02-01

    Stress fractures are repetitive strain injuries that occur in normal bones and in abnormal bones. Stress fractures share many features in common but differences depend on the status of the underlying bone. This review article for clinicians addresses aspects about stress fractures with particular respect to fatigue fractures, Looser zones of osteomalacia, atypical Looser zones, atypical femoral fractures associated with bisphosphonate therapy and stress fractures in Paget's disease of bone. PMID:24106312

  2. [Trochanteric femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Douša, P; Čech, O; Weissinger, M; Džupa, V

    2013-01-01

    At the present time proximal femoral fractures account for 30% of all fractures referred to hospitals for treatment. Our population is ageing, the proportion of patients with post-menopausal or senile osteoporosis is increasing and therefore the number of proximal femoral fractures requiring urgent treatment is growing too. In the age category of 50 years and older, the incidence of these fractures has increased exponentially. Our department serves as a trauma centre for half of Prague and part of the Central Bohemia Region with a population of 1 150 000. Prague in particular has a high number of elderly citizens. Our experience is based on extensive clinical data obtained from the Register of Proximal Femoral Fractures established in 1997. During 14 years, 4280 patients, 3112 women and 1168 men, were admitted to our department for treatment of proximal femoral fractures. All patients were followed up until healing or development of complications. In the group under study, 82% were patients older than 70 years; 72% of those requiring surgery were in their seventies and eighties. Men were significantly younger than women (p<0.001) and represented 30% of the group. The fractures were 2.3-times more frequent in women than in men. In the category under 60 years, men significantly outnumbered women (p<0.001). The patients with pertrochanteric fractures were, on the average, eight years older than the patients with intertrochanteric fractures, which is a significant difference (p<0.001). The mortality rate within a year of injury was about 30%. Trochanteric fractures accounted for 54.7% and femoral neck fractures for 45.3% of all fractures. The inter-annual increase was 5.9%, with more trochanteric than femoral neck fractures. There was a non-significant decrease in intertrochanteric (AO 31-A3) fractures. On the other hand, the number of pertrochanteric (AO 31-A1+2) fractures increased significantly (p<0.001). A total of 1 394 fractures were treated with a proximal

  3. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  4. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  5. Distal femoral fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Gwathmey, F Winston; Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Kahler, David; Hurwitz, Shepard; Cui, Quanjun

    2010-10-01

    The diversity of surgical options for the management of distal femoral fractures reflects the challenges inherent in these injuries. These fractures are frequently comminuted and intra-articular, and they often involve osteoporotic bone, which makes it difficult to reduce and hold them while maintaining joint function and overall limb alignment. Surgery has become the standard of care for displaced fractures and for patients who must obtain rapid return of knee function. The goal of surgical management is to promote early knee motion while restoring the articular surface, maintaining limb length and alignment, and preserving the soft-tissue envelope with a durable fixation that allows functional recovery during bone healing. A variety of surgical exposures, techniques, and implants has been developed to meet these objectives, including intramedullary nailing, screw fixation, and periarticular locked plating, possibly augmented with bone fillers. Recognition of the indications and applications of the principles of modern implants and techniques is fundamental in achieving optimal outcomes. PMID:20889949

  6. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases

  7. History of femoral head fracture and coronal fracture of the femoral condyles.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, Jan; Rammelt, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The first known description of the coronal fracture of the lateral femoral condyle was published by Busch in 1869. Hoffa used Busch's drawing in the first edition of his book in 1888 and accompanied it only with one sentence. A full case history of this fracture pattern was described by Braun in 1891. However, Braun's article fell into oblivion and so the fracture was popularized only in the fourth edition of Hoffa's textbook, particularly thanks to the drawing, rather than the brief description. Therefore, a fracture of the posterior femoral condyle, or more specifically, of the lateral condyle, could properly be called "Busch-Hoffa fracture". Femoral head fracture was initially described by Birkett in 1869. Of essential importance in this respect were the publications by Christopher in 1924 and, particularly, Pipkin's study of 1957, including his classification that is still in use today. A historically correct eponym for a femoral head fracture would therefore be "Birkitt-Pipkin fracture". PMID:25787681

  8. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN DIAPHYSEAL FEMORAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Cassiano Ricardo; Traldi, Eduardo Franceschini; Posser, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the personal, fracture, treatment and complication characteristics among patients with pediatric femoral shaft fractures attended at the pediatric orthopedic service of the Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on a population consisting of patients with femoral shaft fractures, aged between birth and 14 years and 11 months, who were divided into four age groups. Information was obtained from medical records and was transferred to a survey questionnaire to present personal, fracture, treatment and complication variables. Results: The study population consisted of 96 patients. Their mean age was 6.8 years. The cases were predominantly among males, comprising closed fractures on the right side, in the middle third with a single line. Regarding fracture etiology, traffic accidents predominated overall in the sample. Most of the patients (74 to 77.1%) presented femoral fractures as their only injury. Conservative treatment predominated in the group younger than six years of age, and surgical treatment in the group aged 6 to 14 years and 11 months. The complications observed until bone union were: discrepancy, infection and movement limitation. The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.6 ± 2.4 weeks, varying with age. Conclusion: The features of these fractures were similar to those described in the literature and the treatment used showed good results. The Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital has used the treatment proposed in the literature for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27042619

  9. Intramedullary nailing of pediatric femoral shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Harish S; Pandya, Nirav K; Cho, Robert H; Glaser, Diana A; Moor, Molly A; Herman, Martin J

    2011-08-01

    Intramedullary nail fixation of pediatric long bone fracture, particularly femoral shaft fracture, has revolutionized the care and outcome of these complex injuries. Nailing is associated with a high rate of union and a low rate of complications. Improved understanding of proximal femoral vascularity has led to changes in nail insertion methodology. Multiple fixation devices are available; selection is based on fracture type, patient age, skeletal maturity, and body mass index. A thorough knowledge of anatomy and biomechanics is required to achieve optimal results without negatively affecting skeletal development. PMID:21807915

  10. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  11. Atypical periprosthetic femoral fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Woo, S B; Choi, S T; Chan, W L

    2016-08-01

    We report an 82-year-old woman who underwent fixation with a long-spanning cable-plate for a bisphosphonate-induced Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femoral fracture. Non-union and breakage of the plate occurred at 16 months and necessitated revision surgery using a long-stem femoral prosthesis augmented with a cable-plate construct. Bone union was achieved eventually after 10 months. PMID:27574277

  12. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  13. Subtrochanteric fractures after retrograde femoral nailing.

    PubMed

    Mounasamy, Varatharaj; Mallu, Sathya; Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil

    2015-10-18

    Secondary fractures around femoral nails placed for the management of hip fractures are well known. We report, two cases of a fracture of the femur at the interlocking screw site in the subtrochanteric area after retrograde femoral nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. Only a few reports in the existing literature have described these fractures. Two young men after sustaining a fall presented to us with pain, swelling and deformity in the upper thigh region. On enquiring, examining and radiographing them, peri-implant fractures of subtrochanteric nature through the distal interlocking screws were revealed in both patients who also had histories of previous falls for which retrograde intramedullary nailing was performed for their respective femora. Both patients were managed with similar surgical routines including removal of the existing hardware, open reduction and ace cephallomedullary antegrade nailing. The second case did show evidence of delayed healing and was additionally stabilized with cerclage wires. Both patients had uneventful postoperative outcomes and union was evident at the end of 6 mo postoperatively with a good range of motion at the hip and knee. Our report suggests that though seldom reported, peri-implant fractures around the subtrochanteric region can occur and pose a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We suggest these be managed, after initial stabilization and resuscitation, by implant removal, open reduction and interlocking intramedullary antegrade nailing. Good results and progression to union can be expected in these patients by adhering to basic principles of osteosynthesis. PMID:26495251

  14. Periprosthetic Femur Fracture Occuring after Contralateral Neglected Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Deniz; Toprak, Ali; IKilic, Enver; Bingol, Olgun; Tabak, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are uncommon, but at times may lead to complications especially in elderly patients. As treatment of these fractures is difficult, prevention by identifying the risk factors is the best way to overcome these complex problems. Case Report: A periprosthetic right femur fracture associated with a neglected left femoral neck fracture in the contralateral femur in a 78-year-old elder woman patient is reported in the present article. We discuss the prevention of periprosthetic fractures after hip arthroplasty and address the risk factors associated with this complication. Conclusion: The present case emphasizes the importance of investigating and treating the cause of sudden onset of restriction on full weight-bearing in the contralateral limb, to prevent periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty in elderly patients. PMID:27299115

  15. Femoral midshaft fractures: expandable versus locked nailing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen-Tao; Song, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Xiao-Zhong; Zhou, Hai-Bin; Luo, Zong-Ping; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2015-04-01

    Femoral midshaft fracture is one of the most common clinical injuries and is often caused by high-energy traffic accidents. Intramedullary nailings, plates, and external fixators are all used as treatment alternatives for a variety of patients depending on fracture location, displacement, comminution, soft tissue condition, and local tradition. Locked intramedullary nailing is currently the preferred treatment method for most diaphyseal fractures and has good clinical results. The goal of this study was to compare expandable and locked intramedullary nailing for the treatment of AO type 32A and 32B1 femoral midshaft fractures. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 46 patients (33 men and 13 women; mean age, 32.3 years; range, 22-52 years) with femoral midshaft fractures who were divided into 2 groups-one treated with an expandable intramedullary nailing method and the other with a conventional locked intramedullary nailing. The 2 groups were compared with respect to operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, hospitalization time, healing time, and complications. Patients were followed for at least 1 year. The results of this study showed that all of the patients achieved bone union within 12 to 24 months. Expandable nailing performed better than locked nailing in operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, and healing time (P<.001). There was no difference in hospitalization time and no visible shortening or severe complications were observed in either group. Based on the results of this study, the expandable intramedullary nailing is an easy and effective treatment for AO type 32A and 32B1 diaphyseal femoral fractures. PMID:25901625

  16. Atypical femoral fracture following zoledronic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Ataoğlu, Baybars; Kaptan, Ahmet Yiğit; Eren, Toygun Kağan; Yapar, Ali Ekber; Berkay, Ahmet Fırat

    2016-04-01

    A 68-year-old female patient admitted to our clinic with right anterior thigh pain ongoing for six months and which increased in last two months. The patient had no trauma history. The patient had been followed-up for 15 years because of osteoporosis and administrated alendronate and ibandronate treatment for 10 years. Patient had three shots of zoledronate once a year during the last three years. Her pain was increasing when she was walking. Physical examination revealed pain in her right thigh. Radiogram showed thickened lateral cortex of the subtrochanteric area. Magnetic resonance imaging also showed thickening and edema of the same area. These images were correlated with atypical fracture in right femoral subthrochanteric zone. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed that T score was -3.3 in lumbar region and -2.5 in femoral neck. Zoledronate treatment was ended. Prophylactic surgical fixation was performed with titanium elastic nails. PMID:26874637

  17. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Min, Byung-Woo; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature. PMID:27536624

  18. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature.

  19. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. Methods This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Results Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. Conclusions The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures. PMID:27247738

  20. Subtrochanteric femur fracture after removal of screws for femoral neck fracture in a child.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook

    2015-01-01

    Displaced femoral neck fractures are rare in children and are associated with a high rate of complications. Subtrochanteric fractures after cannulated screw fixation of femoral neck fractures in adults are well recognized, and there are several reports on the topic. However, there are no reports on complications related to hardware or subtrochanteric fractures after removal of the screws in the treatment of femoral neck fractures in children. Here we report the case of a 10-year-old boy who sustained a subtrochanteric fracture after the screw removal and healing that followed a femoral neck fracture. PMID:25566556

  1. An occult acetabular fracture preceding a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Lasanianos, Nikolaos; Kanakaris, Nikolaos; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2009-08-01

    This article describes the case of a 69-year-old patient with an occult acetabular fracture complicated by an ipsilateral femoral neck fracture occurring within 2 months. The acetabular fracture remained undiagnosed at examination due to insufficient clinical and radiographic data interpretation. The patient was assured of early mobilization that led to a fall and subsequent hip fracture. We focus on the potential reasons for the nondiagnosis of the acetabular fracture. Acetabular fractures in the elderly may occur after low-energy injuries. The lack of history of violent injury may lead to an incorrect diagnosis. Plain anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs alone may prove an insufficient tool, especially in the hands of inexperienced personnel. As is characteristic, a retrospective review of the AP pelvis radiograph obtained after the first fall in our case revealed the undisplaced fracture of the anterior column that was missed initially. Combined fractures of the hip and the acetabulum are rarely described in the literature and are usually addressed by total hip arthroplasty (THA) alone. Similar fracture patterns that develop in 2 stages (2 injuries), as the 1 presented herein, are even more rare. The uniqueness of this combined fracture required a unique surgical treatment. The senior surgeon (P.V.G.) addressed the acetabular fracture separately to graft the anterior column fracture and facilitate union, as it was already 8 weeks old and the second fall had generated a further gap between the fragments. Stable fixation was felt appropriate prior to the THA. Thus, a double surgical approach was used. Six weeks postoperatively, the patient was able to perform full weight-bearing mobilization without an antalgic gait pattern. At 6-month follow-up, radiographs showed the metalwork to be in place with no displacement, and the fracture had progressed to union. PMID:19708620

  2. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD. PMID:27622182

  3. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat S; Karkamkar, Sachin S; Patil, Vaishali S Dumbre; Patil, Shailesh S; Ranaware, Abhijeet S

    2016-01-01

    Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN) or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS) are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP) of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22–65 years) and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27–72 months). Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion. PMID:27512218

  4. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  5. [The changes of bone architecture in atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriaki; Shimakura, Taketoshi; Takahash, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    The feature of atypical femoral fracture is stress induced cortical bone reaction. It was considered to be the accumulation of microdamage which come from increasing of mechanical stress by femoral lateral bowing, and the decreased of ability of microdamage repair system. PMID:23811584

  6. Bilateral midshaft femoral fractures in an adolescent baseball player.

    PubMed

    Ju, D G; Mogayzel, P J; Sponseller, P D; Familiari, F; McFarland, E G

    2016-07-01

    Bone disease, specifically low bone mineral density, is a common and undertreated complication that begins during childhood in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This case describes a male baseball player, aged 14years, with undiagnosed CF who sustained a left midshaft femoral fracture while running toward base; 8months later, he sustained a right midshaft femoral fracture under similar conditions. After the second fracture, further evaluation revealed low bone mineral density and CF. There is no previously published report of pathologic fractures occurring in the femoral shaft in an athlete with undiagnosed CF. Patients with CF have a higher fracture rate. Low-energy fractures of major bones in athletically active individuals should be viewed with suspicion for an underlying process. PMID:26927602

  7. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. PMID:23823040

  8. Parallel manipulator robot assisted femoral fracture reduction on traction table.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Wang, J Q; Han, W

    2013-01-01

    The principle of femoral shaft fracture reduction is to restore its pre-fractured limb length and mechanical axis. The current documented treatment method with traction table reduction does not conform to the quantitative alignment and reduction. There is also a great amount of X-Ray radiation exposure to both surgeon and patient during the procedure. For this reason, we introduced an innovated Parallel Manipulator Robot (PMR) application: A Femoral Shaft Fracture Reduction with Parallel Manipulator Robot on Traction Table. With this application, the quantitative control on fracture reduction and alignment can be achieved and the radiation exposure to both surgeons and patients can be greatly reduced. PMID:24110820

  9. Bone SPECT/CT of Femoral Head Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Goro; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-09-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head may be confused with osteonecrosis, mainly because of radiological overlap. SPECT/CT with Tc-99 m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate images in 7 patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture were retrospectively reviewed and compared with those from 11 patients with symptomatic early osteonecrosis. In all of the hips with subchondral insufficiency fracture, SPECT/CT showed increased uptake at the subchondral lesions of the femoral head. On the other hand, in all of the hips with osteonecrosis, absence of uptake was confirmed at the subchondral lesions. SPECT/CT may assist in differentiating subchondral insufficiency fracture from osteonecrosis. PMID:26164176

  10. Traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman sustained a trochanteric fracture of the left femur after a fall. Fracture fixation was performed using proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) II, and she was able to walk with a T-cane after 3 months. Eleven months following the operation, the patient presented with left hip pain after a fall. Radiographs showed a subchondral collapse of the femoral head located above the blade tip. The authors removed the PFNA-II and subsequently performed cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Histological evaluation of the femoral head showed osteoporosis with no evidence of osteonecrosis. Repair tissue, granulation tissue and callus formation were seen at the collapsed subchondral area. Based on these findings, a traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture was diagnosed. A traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head may need to be considered as a possible diagnosis after internal fixation of the trochanteric fracture. PMID:25015169

  11. Incidence of Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Wan; Oh, Jong-Keon; Byun, Young-Soo; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Jai Hyung; Oh, Hyoung Keun; Shon, Hyun Chul; Park, Ki Chul; Kim, Jung Jae; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) after intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures and to identify risk factors for developing AVNFH. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with femoral shaft fractures treated with antegrade intramedullary nailing at 10 institutions. Among the 703 patients enrolled, 161 patients were excluded leaving 542 patients in the study. Average age was 42.1 years with average follow-up of 26.3 months. Patient characteristics and fracture patterns as well as entry point of femoral nails were identified and the incidence of AVNFH was investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to open versus closed physis, open versus closed fractures, and age (<20 versus ≥20 years). Overall incidence of AVNFH was 0.2% (1 of 542): the patient was 15-year-old boy. Of 25 patients with open physis, the incidence of AVNFH was 4%, whereas none of 517 patients with closed physis developed AVNFH (P < 0.001). The incidence of AVNFH in patients aged < 20 versus ≥20 years was 1.1% (1 of 93) and 0.0% (0 of 449), respectively (P = 0.172), which meant that the incidence of AVNFH was 0% in adult with femur shaft fracture. Of 61 patients with open fractures, the incidence of AVNFH was 0%. The number of cases with entry point at the trochanteric fossa or tip of the greater trochanter (GT) was 324 and 218, respectively, and the incidence of AVNFH was 0.3% and 0.0%, respectively (P = 0.412). In patients aged ≥20 years with isolated femoral shaft fracture, there was no case of AVNFH following antegrade intramedullary nailing regardless of the entry point. Therefore, our findings suggest that the risk of AVNFH following antegrade femoral nailing is extremely low in adult patients. PMID:26844518

  12. Unusual Foreign Bone Fragment in Femoral Open Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sadoni, Hanon; Arti, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Femoral shaft fracture is one of the typical bone fractures due to high energy trauma and may occur as an open fracture. Some foreign materials may enter the fracture site such as sand, cloth particles and so on. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old motorcycle riding military member and his collaborator were received in the hospital because of multiple traumas due to a fall in a hollow during a surveillance mission. His collaborator died because of head trauma and multiple severe open fractures. When fixing the patients femoral fracture, a large femoral butterfly fragment was removed from the patient’s thigh as a foreign segment. The patient’s femur was fixed with a plate and screws. No femoral defect was detected during surgery or post-operative X-rays and CT scan. The removed segment was not a part of the patient’s femur. Conclusions: Surgical and post-surgical findings showed that this segment was not related to the patient’s femur. The foreign segment may have belonged to the other victim of this trauma.

  13. Distal Femoral Oblique Fracture in a Young Male Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David Naji; Al Khateeb, Hesham; Safwat, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Here, we report a case of a distal femoral fracture in a 23-year-old male army cadet who presented to the Accident and Emergency department following a twisting injury while participating in a routine military marching exercise. A pathological fracture was considered but this suspicion was put to rest following thorough investigations, leaving only a diagnosis of a nontraumatic spontaneous femoral fracture. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of distal femoral fractures associated with nontraumatic military exercises, with the majority of injuries instead related to stress fractures. A vigilant literature search yielded no cases of similar injury nature, which is the primary reason we believe that those interested in orthopaedics or military doctors would find themselves drawn to this case. The patient presented with severe pain in his left thigh and on examination there was a deformity of his left thigh. In terms of investigations, a bone profile, plain film radiographs, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and tumor markers were all preformed and proved unremarkable. The definitive treatment was by open reduction and internal fixation. Femoral fractures often require significant amounts of force, particularly in young, healthy individuals. Generally, these injuries in this demographic follow high-energy traumas, with the lion's share occurring following a road traffic accident or other high-speed impact. More often than not, the treatment is surgical. Given the extraordinary manner of this such, one must be attentive and exhaustive in their investigation of such presentations. PMID:27258509

  14. Traumatic Hip Dislocation with Associated Femoral Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Dortaj, H.; Emamifar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the hip is a critical injury that results from high-energy trauma. This paper describes a case of posterior dislocation of the right hip in a 35-year-old woman with associated ipsilateral femoral head fracture. Initial treatment included reduction of the right hip through posterior approach and fixation of the femoral head fracture with three absorbable screws. After 15-month follow-up, a full range of motion has been achieved and there are no signs of avascular necrosis, hip instability, or limping. The authors describe their method of surgery. PMID:25874147

  15. Occult fracture of the femoral neck associated with extensive osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the subchondral portion of the femoral head is a common site for collapse in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), femoral-neck fracture rarely occurs during the course of ONFH. We report a case of occult insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck without conditions predisposing to insufficiency fractures, occurring in association with ONFH. Presentation of case We report a case of occult fracture of the femoral neck due to extensive ONFH in a 60-year-old man. No abnormal findings suggestive of ONFH were identified on radiographs, and the fracture occurred spontaneously without any trauma or unusual increase in activity. The patient’s medical history, age, and good bone quality suggested ONFH as a possible underlying cause. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was useful in determining whether the fracture was caused by ONFH or was instead a simple insufficiency fracture caused by steroid use. Discussion The patient was treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty, but if we had not suspected ONFH as a predisposing condition, the undisplaced fracture might have been treated by osteosynthesis, and this would have led to nonunion or collapse of the femoral head. To avoid providing improper treatment, clinicians should consider ONFH as a predisposing factor in pathologic fractures of the femoral neck. Conclusion ONFH should be included in the differential diagnosis of insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck. PMID:26275737

  16. Reduction of Femoral Fractures in Long-Term Care Facilities: The Bavarian Fracture Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Clemens; Cameron, Ian D.; Klenk, Jochen; Lindemann, Ulrich; Heinrich, Sven; König, Hans-Helmut; Rapp, Kilian

    2011-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are a major public health burden. In industrialized countries about 20% of all femoral fractures occur in care dependent persons living in nursing care and assisted living facilities. Preventive strategies for these groups are needed as the access to medical services differs from independent home dwelling older persons at risk of osteoporotic fractures. It was the objective of the study to evaluate the effect of a fall and fracture prevention program on the incidence of femoral fracture in nursing homes in Bavaria, Germany. Methods In a translational intervention study a fall prevention program was introduced in 256 nursing homes with 13,653 residents. The control group consisted of 893 nursing homes with 31,668 residents. The intervention consisted of staff education on fall and fracture prevention strategies, progressive strength and balance training, and on institutional advice on environmental adaptations. Incident femoral fractures served as outcome measure. Results In the years before the intervention risk of a femoral fracture did not differ between the intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). During the one-year intervention period femoral fracture rates were 33.6 (IG) and 41.0/1000 person years (CG), respectively. The adjusted relative risk of a femoral fracture was 0.82 (95% CI 0.72-0.93) in residents exposed to the fall and fracture prevention program compared to residents from CG. Conclusions The state-wide dissemination of a multi-factorial fall and fracture prevention program was able to reduce femoral fractures in residents of nursing homes. PMID:21918688

  17. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were

  18. Bilateral Simultaneous Femoral Neck and Shafts Fractures - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghifar, Amirreza; Saied, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous fractures of the femoral neck and shaft are not common injuries, though they cannot be considered rare. Herein, we report our experience with a patient with bilateral occurance of this injury. Up to the best of our knowkedge this is the first case reported in literature in which correct diagnosis was made initially. Both femurs were fixed using broad 4.5 mm dynamic compression plate and both necks were fixed using 6.5 mm cannulated screws. Femur fixation on one side was converted to retrograde nailing because of plate failure. Both neck fractures healed uneventfully. In spite of rarity of concomitant fractures of femoral neck and shaft, this injury must be approached carefully demanding especial attention and careful device selection. PMID:25692158

  19. A Case of Femoral Fracture in Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Sam; Wong, Fabian; Back, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) who presented with severe bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Preoperative planning was commenced for a total knee replacement (TKR). Whilst on the waiting list the patient suffered a fall and sustained a complete femoral diaphysis fracture. Conservative management in the form of skin traction was initially chosen as significant extra- and intramedullary vascular malformations posed an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. This failed to progress to union, and so open reduction and internal fixation was performed. This subsequently resulted in on-going delayed union, which was subsequently managed with low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS, otherwise known as Exogen (Bioventus. exogen. Secondary exogen, 2012)). There are only two previous documented cases of femoral fracture in KTS. This is the first report of a patient with this rare syndrome receiving this treatment. We discuss the management of fracture in this challenging group of patients. PMID:25478269

  20. Clinical Instability of the Knee and Functional Differences Following Tibial Plateau Fractures Versus Distal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Birjandinejad, Ali; Moradi, Ali; Fathi Choghadeh, Maysam; Rezazadeh, Jafar; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractures of the knee account for about 6% of all trauma admissions. While its management is mostly focused on fracture treatment, it is not the only factor that defines the final outcome. Objectives: This study aimed to study objective and subjective outcomes after proximal tibial versus distal femoral fractures in terms of knee instability and health-related quality of life. Patients and Methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional, cohort study was carried out on 80 patients with either isolated proximal tibial (n = 42) or distal femoral (n = 38) fractures, who underwent open reduction and internal fixation. All the fractures were classified based on the Schatzker and AO classification for tibial plateau and distal femoral fractures, respectively. The patients were followed and examined by an orthopedic knee surgeon for clinical assessment of knee instability. In their last follow-up visit, these patients completed a Lysholm knee score and the short-form (SF) 36 health survey. Results: Among the 42 tibial plateau fractures, 25% were classified as Schatzker type 2. Of the 38 distal femoral fractures, we did not find any type B1 or B3 fractures. The overall prevalence of anterior and posterior instability was 42% and 20%, respectively. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) and Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL) injuries were detected clinically in 50% and 28%, respectively. The incidence rates of ligament injuries in tibial plateau fractures were as follows: Anterior Collateral Ligament (ACL) 26%, Posterior Collateral Ligament (PCL) 7%, MCL 24%, and LCL 14%. Medial collateral ligament injury was the most common in the Schatzker type 2 (50% of the injuries). Distal femoral fractures were associated with ACL injury in 16%, PCL in 13%, MCL in 26% and LCL in 14%. However, final knee range of motion (ROM) and function (Lysholm score) were not associated with fracture location. No statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups, except for

  1. Risk of atypical femoral fracture during and after bisphosphonate use

    PubMed Central

    Schilcher, Jörg; Koeppen, Veronika; Aspenberg, Per; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Use of bisphosphonates in women is associated with higher risk of atypical femoral fractures. The risk in terms of timing of use and type of bisphosphonate, and in men, remains unclear. Patients and methods We reviewed radiographs of 5,342 Swedish women and men aged 55 years or more who had had a fracture of the femoral shaft in the 3-year period 2008–2010 (97% of those eligible), and found 172 patients with atypical fractures (93% of them women). We obtained data on medication and comorbidity. The risk of atypical fracture associated with bisphosphonate use was estimated in a nationwide cohort analysis. In addition, we performed a case-control analysis with comparison to 952 patients with ordinary shaft fractures. A short report of the findings has recently been presented (Schilcher et al. 2014a). Here we provide full details. Results The age-adjusted relative risk (RR) of atypical fracture associated with bisphosphonate use was 55 (95% CI: 39–79) in women and 54 (CI: 15–192) in men. In bisphosphonate users, women had a 3-fold higher risk than men (RR = 3.1, CI: 1.1–8.4). Alendronate users had higher risk than risedronate users (RR = 1.9, CI: 1.1–3.3). The RR after 4 years or more of use reached 126 (CI: 55–288), with a corresponding absolute risk of 11 (CI: 7–14) fractures per 10,000 person-years of use. The risk decreased by 70% per year since last use. Interpretation Women have a higher risk of atypical femoral fracture than men. The type of bisphosphonate used may affect risk estimates and the risk decreases rapidly after cessation. PMID:25582459

  2. Atypical femoral fractures bilaterally in a patient receiving bisphosphonate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moghnie, Alessandro; Scamacca, Veronica; De Fabrizio, Giovanni; Valentini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Atypical femoral fractures are often associated with prolonged bisphosphonate use. The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) has set the diagnosis criteria for atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures by classifying them according to their major and minor criteria. Prolonged bisphosphonate use is correlated with AFF, but the pathogenetic mechanism that causes this kind of fracture has not been defined yet. We describe simultaneous bilaterally femoral fractures in a 76-year-old woman. PMID:27252749

  3. A low-energy femoral shaft fracture from performing a yoga posture.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Andrew; Ellanti, Prasad; Hogan, Niall

    2015-01-01

    The femoral shaft is rarely the site of a low-energy fracture in a healthy individual. The vast majority of these fractures are due to major trauma such as motor vehicle accidents. Although low-energy femoral shaft fractures do occur, they are typically in patients with osteoporotic bone, or prosthesis related. In this case report, we present a man in his late 30s who was practising a specific yoga stance when he experienced a femoral shaft fracture. PMID:26452743

  4. [Delayed hypoxia after the surgical correction of femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Goh, R; Mori, K; Abe, T; Kohyama, A; Minato, A

    1996-11-01

    We investigated perioperative blood gas changes in 26 patients scheduled for surgical correction of femoral neck fracture under epidural anesthesia. Arterial blood gases during spontaneous air respiration were measured eight times during the femoral neck prosthetic replacements (n = 16), and four times during osteosynthesis (n = 10). In the patients who received femoral neck replacements using bone cement (n = 8), arterial oxygen tension decreased significantly four hours after insertion of prosthesis, and did not recover during two postoperative days. In contrast, in the patients who received cementless femoral neck replacements (n = 8), arterial oxygen tension tended to decrease but not significantly, and returned to normal on the second postoperative day. In the patients who received osteosynthesis, arterial oxygen tension did not change. We suspected that the causes of delayed hypoxia in the femoral neck replacements were vascular endothelial cell injury in the lung by free fatty acid originating from fat embolism, and/or microthrombosis resulting from activated coagulation system. Bone cement was thought to intensify fat embolism because of elevated intramedullary pressure in the femur. PMID:8953864

  5. Osteochondral Fractures of the Lateral Femoral Trochlea in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Method: Between May 2012 and September 2014 cluster of five patients with large osteochondral fractures of the lateral femoral trochlea were treated at our institution. These all occurred in high level male athletes, one at a decathlete and the other four soccer players. The MRI scan showed a characteristic appearance of a large subchondral fracture involving most of the lateral femoral trochlea. All patients were symptomatic. The patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using headless compression screws. The operative technique and short term results will be outlined. Results: Fixation appears successful in most cases. Conclusion: This appears to be a repetitive trauma related injury that occurs in young high-level athletes.

  6. Robotic assisted reduction of femoral shaft fractures using Stewart platform.

    PubMed

    Majidifakhr, Kamran; Kazemirad, Siavash; Farahmand, Farzam

    2009-01-01

    A robotic system with 6 DOF mobility was proposed for reduction of femoral shaft fractures based on Stewart platform. A plan for implementing the platform on bone fragments was introduced and a step by step strategy for performing the reduction procedure, based on the system's inverse kinematic solution, was proposed. The efficacy of the system was evaluated in some case studies and it was shown that it can be locked to act as an external fixator. PMID:19377143

  7. Pathogenesis, Management and Prevention of Atypical Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung-Hyo

    2015-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the relationship between atypical femoral fractures (AFF) and use of bisphosphonates (BPs). While a significant cause-effect relationship was not established in earlier studies, more recent data shows a growing relationship between AFF and BPs use. The definition of an 'AFF' has also undergone significant changes. This review briefly summarizes the definition, pathogenesis, and management of AFF. PMID:25774358

  8. Variations in treatment of femoral neck fractures in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Marilyn; Yang, Qian; Scharfenberger, Angela; Johnson, David; Carrière, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To examine, in the province of Alberta, temporal trends, regional variations in treatment options and in-hospital death rates after a femoral neck fracture. Design A retrospective cohort study. Patients Six years’ data were abstracted from the Alberta Morbidity File, the Alberta Health Stakeholder File and the Alberta Health Care Claims File. Patients were included if they were Alberta residents, aged 65 years or older, had sustained a femoral neck fracture and had undergone internal fixation, hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. Main outcome measures Death rates, arthroplasty rates and hospital stay. Results In-hospital death rates were similar across hospitals, with risks being higher for men, patients aged 80 years or older and those with more comorbid conditions. Arthroplasty rates varied from 58% to 77% among hospitals, and hospital stays associated with arthroplasty were significantly longer than those associated with internal fixation. The chance of undergoing arthroplasty varied from hospital to hospital by gender and by the number of comorbid conditions. Conclusion Regional variations suggest lack of agreement among Alberta’s surgeons as to how best to treat femoral neck fractures. PMID:12174977

  9. Periprosthetic Femoral Fracture With Broken Implant Insitu: - A Treatment Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandra Prakash; Singh, Pulkesh; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Arpit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fractures involving bones containing a component of a prosthetic joint are becoming more common. The causation is multifactorial but most of these injuries are associated with trivial trauma. The options available for operative management of these fractures include internal fixation of the fracture alone, fixation of the fracture with revision of the prosthesis, and reconstruction of proximal femur with either modified impaction bone grafting or proximal femoral replacement. Case Report: We present here a case of periprosthetic fracture Vancouver type B1 with a broken cemented bipolar prosthesis insitu, in which the broken implant was firmly fixed in the proximal fragment and could not be removed following which the whole of the proximal fragment along with the broken implant was removed and replaced by a customized steel long stem cemented mega prosthesis. Conclusion: This case is being presented on account of its unusual presentation and fracture pattern. A broken prosthesis along with a periprosthetic fracture is not a common incident. Thus the treatment had to be individualized. Since the prosthesis was well fixed, its broken stem could not be removed from the proximal fragment and so the whole of the proximal fragment along with stem was removed and replaced with a long stem custom made bipolar prosthesis. PMID:27298972

  10. Operative management of Hoffa fracture of the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ramji Lal; Gupta, Pratiksha

    2014-01-01

    Hoffa fracture is a rare injury consisting of unicondylar tangential posterior fracture of the distal femur and only very few cases have been reported in the literature. These fractures are due to high energy trauma and conservative treatment generally yields poor results, but rigid internal fixation allows early functional rehabilitation and decreases the incidence of complications. The purpose of the study was to prospectively analyse the clinico-radiological and functional outcome following open surgical treatment. From July 2005 to July 2010, 22 patients (14 males and 8 females) were recruited from Emergency and outpatient department having closed and open Hoffa fracture of the femoral condyle. All patients were operated under general or spinal anesthesia. Post-operatively, all the patients were followed for 12 months. Fractures were united in a mean time of 10 weeks (range from 6 - 16 weeks) depending on the type of fracture pattern. Fractures were reduced anatomically in all except in one patient. During follow-up, there were no losses of reduction or fixation. Full weight bearing were started in the mean time of 8.8 weeks. Mean duration of hospital stay were 9.8 days. Complications were stiffness and pain in one patient, collateral laxity in one patient and progression of arthritis in one patient. The results were excellent in 90.90% and good in 9.09% patients. Finally, we conclude that the early anatomical reduction and rigid fixation with screws provide best results and minimal complications. PMID:25130151

  11. Femoral neck fracture fixation: rigidity of five techniques compared.

    PubMed Central

    Mackechnie-Jarvis, A C

    1983-01-01

    Artificial cadaveric femoral neck fractures were internally fixed with five different devices and subjected to cyclical loading of 0-1.0 kilonewtons (approximately one body weight) whilst in an anatomical position. Displacement of the proximal fragment was detected by a transducer and charted. Bone strength was assessed by a preliminary control loading phase on the intact bone. Efficiency of each fracture fixator could then be directly compared by the relative movement in each case. Five specimens each were tested with Moore's Pins, Trifin Nail, Garden Screws and a sliding screw-plate (OEC Ltd). By the criteria of the experiment, which put a severe shearing load on the implant, none of these devices reliably bore the representative body weight. An extended barrel-plate, which supported the sliding screw almost up to the fracture line, was then made. This device, employing some of Charnley's concepts, tolerated body weight in four cases out of five. PMID:6887186

  12. Calcar Preservation Arthroplasty for Unstable Intertrochanteric Femoral Fractures in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Togrul, Emre; Kose, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in elderly is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to present treatment strategies for unstable intertrochanteric fractures with hemiarthroplasty using standard uncemented collared femoral stems and at the same time preserving the fractured calcar fragment. Methods Fifty-four patients aged 75 years or older with unstable intertrochanteric fractures were included in this prospective cohort study. All patients were treated with calcar preserving hemiarthroplasty using cementless collored femoral stems. Fractured calcar fragment was stabilized either by compaction between the implant and femur or fixed with cable grip system. Follow-up evaluations were performed at least 24 months and later. Palmer and Parker mobility score and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score were assessed. We also analyzed radiographs of the operated hip at each follow-up visit. Results The patients were 15 males and 39 females with a mean age of 81.3 years (range, 75 to 93 years). The average operative time was 86.6 minutes. The mean transfused blood units were 1.2 units. The average duration of hospital stay was 5.3 days. The preoperative mean mobility score was 6.20. This score was found to be 4.96 on postoperative third day and 5.90 at 24 months postoperatively. The results of the statistical analysis revealed significant increase in the mobility scores at each follow-up after three days. Radiological interpretation revealed no loosening in the cable-grip systems, and no significant subsidence (> 5 mm) of prosthesis was observed. Conclusions Calcar preservation arthroplasty is a good option for elderly patients with severe osteoporosis, frail constitution and the patients who are at higher risk for second operation due to unstable intertrochanteric fractures. PMID:26640625

  13. Management of distal femoral periprosthetic fractures by distal femoral locking plate: A retrospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Thukral, Rajiv; Marya, SKS; Singh, Chandeep

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures is difficult. Osteoporosis, comminution and bone loss, compromise stability with delayed mobility and poor functional outcomes. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with anatomic distal femoral (DF) locking plate permits early mobilization. However, this usually necessitates bone grafting (BG). Biological fixation using minimally invasive techniques minimizes periosteal stripping and morbidity. Materials and Methods: 31 patients with comminuted periprosthetic DF fractures were reviewed retrospectively from October 2006 to September 2012. All patients underwent fixation using a DF locking compression plate (Synthes). 17 patients underwent ORIF with primary BG, whereas 14 were treated by closed reduction (CR) and internal fixation using biological minimally invasive techniques. Clinical and radiological followup were recorded for an average 36 months. Results: Mean time to union for the entire group was 5.6 months (range 3-9 months). Patients of ORIF group took longer (Mean 6.4 months, range 4.5-9 months) than the CR group (mean 4.6 months, range 3-7 months). Three patients of ORIF and one in CR group had poor results. Mean knee society scores were higher for CR group at 6 months, but nearly identical at 12 months, with similar eventual range of motion. Discussion: Locked plating of comminuted periprosthetic DF fractures permits stable rigid fixation and early mobilization. Fixation using minimally invasive biological techniques minimizes morbidity and may obviate the need for primary BG. PMID:26015610

  14. Multiple cannulated screw fixation of young femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yong; Kong, Gyu Min; Park, Dae Hyun; Kim, Dae Yoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We wanted to analyze the factors affecting the results of multiple cannulated screws fixation in patients less than 60 years old with femoral neck fracture (FNF). Methods: We reviewed 52 patients (30 males, 22 females) who were treated with multiple cannulated screws fixation for FNFs. They were followed up for more than one year during January 2002 to December 2012. They were classified by Garden’s classification. The anatomic reduction was evaluated by Garden’s alignment index on hip both anteroposterior and lateral images. Postoperative complications were analyzed during follow up periods. Results: By Garden’s classification, 6 cases were in stage I, 13 cases in stage II, 30 cases in stage III and 3 cases in stage IV. During follow up periods, avascular necrosis of the femoral head was observed in 12 cases (23%) and nonunion was observed in 5 cases (9%). The 16 patients who had complications underwent total hip arthroplasty (31%). In non-displaced fracture groups (Garde I, II) did not have AVN nor nonunion. The incidence of complications in displaced fracture group was 51.5%. The complicated cases showed tendency for increased apex anterior angulation of femoral neck on hip lateral images and the result was statistically significant. (p=0.0260). Conclusion: The patients less than 60 years old who were treated with multiple cannulated screws fixation for displaced FNFs showed the incidence of complications was more than 50%. It needs a cautious approach for anatomical reduction, especially related to anterior angulation on hip lateral image. PMID:26870127

  15. Hybrid Anterolateral Approach for Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Vopat, Bryan G; Daniels, Alan H; Lareau, Craig R; Christino, Melissa A; Kane, Patrick M; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2015-07-01

    Displaced femoral neck fractures in physiologically young patients are best treated with anatomic reduction and stable fixation. Several surgical approaches to the femoral neck have previously been described, although they are fraught with disadvantages such as poor visualization, the need for 2 incisions, and risk of injury to the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and branches of the medial femoral circumflex artery. The authors' hybrid anterolateral approach to the hip allows for excellent visualization of femoral neck fractures and for placement of plate and/or screw constructs through a single incision. This surgical technique additionally minimizes risk to neurovascular structures. PMID:26186310

  16. Rupture of the Deep Femoral Artery during Proximal Femoral Nailing Following an Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Han Kook; Park, Junyoung; Oyunbat, Choidog; Kim, Taehwan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we experienced a case where the diagnosis and management of a deep femoral artery rupture was delayed. This vascular complication occurred during the insertion of a distal interlocking screw of a proximal femoral nail for the fixation of an intertrochanteric femur fracture. A 79-year-old male patient was diagnosed with a right intertrochanteric fracture after a fall. We fixed the fracture with a proximal femoral nail (Zimmer® Natural Nail™ System). One day after the procedure, the patient complained of pain and swelling on the anteromedial side of his middle thigh followed by hypotension, anemia and prolonged thigh swelling. Computed tomography angiography was performed 7 days after the procedure. We found a pseudoaneurysm of the perforating artery caused by injury to the deep femoral artery and an intramuscular hematoma in the anterior thigh muscle. We successfully treated the pseudoaneurysm using coil embolization. Throughout the management of intertrochanteric femoral fractures, it is important to be aware and monitor signs and symptoms related to the possibility of blood vessel damage. When a patient presents with swelling and pain on the middle thigh and/or unexplained anemia postoperatively, the possibility that these symptoms are caused by an injury to the femoral artery must be considered.

  17. [Progress in diagnosis and treatment of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture].

    PubMed

    Du, C G; Zhang, Y Z; Chen, W

    2016-07-01

    Ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures are rare injuries, which are often caused by high-energy trauma and combined with multiple injuries, such as thoracic and abdominal injury, head injuries, and fractures of other sites.Delayed or missed diagnosis of the ipsilateral femoral neck fracture often occurs.When patients with femoral shaft fractures caused by high-energy trauma are admitted into hospital, physical examination should be conducted carefully.In addition to femoral shaft fractures, radiographs of the ipsilater hip and knee joints should been taken, simultaneously taking into consideration the potential effect of anteversion angle on the demonstration of femoral neck fracture.Computed tomograph and magnetic resonance imaging are advised to perform if necessary to facilitate early and accurate diagnosis of ipsilateral femoral neck fracture.Comprehensive evaluation should be done based on age, physical condition, associated injuries as well as fracture site, classification and injury severity.Accordingly, proper and reasonable surgical plan is made.During the operation, anatomical reduction of the fractures, especially femoral neck fractures, should be achieved, and then fixed with appropriate internal implants.Besides, attention should also be paid to the treatment of associated injuries as well as the prevention and management of complications. PMID:27373484

  18. Fracture of the femoral alignment stem of a hip resurfacing arthroplasty. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mohammed A; Shah, Vinod B

    2011-02-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of osteoarthritis in a younger patient population. While the initial complication of femoral neck fracture is being addressed, we describe a fracture of the femoral alignment stem in a component two years from the primary procedure. PMID:21473460

  19. Comparison of the Sliding and Femoral Head Rotation among Three Different Femoral Head Fixation Devices for Trochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chinzei, Nobuaki; Niikura, Takahiro; Tsuji, Mitsuo; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Doita, Minoru; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, various femoral head fixation devices (HFDs) for trochanteric fractures have become available. However, there are some cases in which femoral head rotation with excessive sliding of the HFD is observed and it is often followed by cutout. The purpose of this study is to compare the ability of the three types of HFDs to prevent femoral head rotation. Methods Between July 2005 and December 2009, 206 patients aged over 60 years with trochanteric fractures who had undergone surgical treatment using a short femoral nail in our institution were enrolled into the study. We used the gamma 3 nail (GMN) as the screw-type HFD in 66 cases, the gliding nail (GLN) as a non-cylindrical blade in 76 cases, and the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) as a cylindrical blade in 64 cases. The sliding length of HFDs and the occurrence of femoral head rotation were evaluated by assessing radiographs as the main outcome, and the results were compared among these devices. Results A comparison of the degree of sliding in the GMN group showed that femoral head rotation was observed significantly more frequently in cases with rotation. Further, it appeared that femoral head rotation occurred more frequently in comminuted fractures. However, no significant differences between the sliding lengths of the different HFDs were observed among three groups. Femoral head rotation was observed in 15 cases of GMN (22.7%), 0 case of GLN, and 5 case of PFNA (7.8%). Significant differences with regard to the occurrence of femoral head rotation were observed among the three groups. Furthermore, significant differences were also observed between GLN and PFNA with respect to the occurrence of femoral head rotation. Conclusions The ability to stabilize femoral head appears to be greater with blade-type materials than with screw-type materials. Furthermore, we believe that a non-cylindrical blade is preferable to a cylindrical blade for the surgical treatment of comminuted, unstable

  20. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  1. Predictors of atypical femoral fractures during long term bisphosphonate therapy: A case series & review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Sridhar, Subbiah; Muthukrishnan, Jeyaram; Mithal, Ambrish; Sharma, Dinesh C.; Bhansali, Anil; Dhiman, Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Bisphosphonates (BPs) are the most widely prescribed medicines for the treatment of osteoporosis because of their efficacy and favourable safety profile. There have been, several reports on an increased incidence of atypical femoral fractures after long term treatment with BPs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical presentation including prodromal symptoms, skeletal radiograph findings, type and duration of BPs received and treatment outcome of patients who developed atypical femoral fractures during bisphosphonate therapy. Methods: In this retrospective study, eight patients with atypical femoral fractures were analysed based on clinical features, biochemical and radiological investigations. Results: Of the eight patients, who sustained atypical femoral fractures, six were on alendronate and two were on zoledronate therapy before the fractures. In addition to BPs, two patients were on long term corticosteroid therapy for rheumatoid arthritis and Addison's disease. Three patients had bilateral atypical femoral fractures. Except one, all of them had prodromal symptoms prior to fracture. Skeletal radiograph showed cortical thickening, pointed (beaking of) cortical margin and transverse fracture in meta-diaphyseal location. Serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) concentrations were within the reference range in all patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Long term bisphosphonate therapy may increase the risk of atypical femoral fractures. Presence of prodromal pain, thickened cortex with cortical beaking may be an early clue for predicting the atypical fractures. High risk patients need periodical skeletal survey and a close follow up for early detection of cases. PMID:25222777

  2. Simultaneous Bilateral Fracture of Femoral Neck in Korea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hwa-Jae; Shin, Hun-Kyu; Kim, Eugene; Ko, Taeg Su; Choi, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral femoral neck factures are common and their incidence is increasing. However, simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures are rare. Although cases of simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures have been reported, most were caused by strong muscle contractions during electroconvulsive therapy. Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures caused by a simple fall are an extremely rare injury; therefore, limited literature is available, and no case has been reported in Korea. We report herein a case of simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures caused by a simple fall. An 83-year-old woman visited the emergency department with bilateral hip joint pain and gait disturbance, which developed 1 day after a fall. Tenderness and severe limitation in left hip joint range of motion and mild limitation in right hip joint range of motion were observed on a physical examination. A Garden type IV femoral neck fracture in the left hip joint and a Garden type I femoral neck fracture in the right hip joint were observed on plain radiography. She underwent right screw fixation and left bipolar hemiarthroplasty 2 days after admission. The patient could walk using a walker 4 weeks postoperatively. Bone union in the right femoral neck was observed at the 3 month follow-up. No specific findings were observed at the left hip hemiarthroplasty site.

  3. HEMIARTHROPLASTY IN THE TREATMENT FRACTURES OF THE FEMORAL NECK

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Nelson Keiske; de Andrade Lima, Guilherme Didier; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Júnior, Walter Ricioli; de Queiroz, Marcelo Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To epidemiologically and clinically evaluate patients with displaced femoral neck fractures that were surgically treatment with cemented hip hemiarthroplasty. Methods: All patients with displaced femoral neck fractures (Garden III and IV) who underwent cemented hip hemiarthroplasty using a unipolar prosthesis (Thompson), by means of a posterolateral access between June 2005 and September 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Seventy patients were initially evaluated. Their mean age was 83.1 years. The patients were predominantly female (84.3%). Thirty-six patients were monitored as outpatients for periods ranging from 10 to 48 months (mean of 26.5 months). Fifteen patients were lost to follow-up. Nineteen patients died, and the mortality rate within the first year was 25.4%. Patients classified as ASA III had a mortality rate of 25.7% and ASA II patients, a rate of 12.1%. Two patients had symptomatic deep vein thrombosis; one patient had an operative wound infection; and none of the patients presented hip dislocation. Most of the patients did not experience pain. Twelve patients (33%) showed deterioration of their walking ability. Conclusion: There were no cases of hip dislocation. Patients classified as ASA III had a higher mortality rate than did patients with ASA I or II. There was a worsening of walking ability in 33% of the patients. No revision due to loosening or pain was needed for any patient. Thirty patients did not present any pain (83.3%), four presented moderate pain (11.1%) and two presented intense pain (5.5%). PMID:27022567

  4. Femoral head viability following hip fracture. Prognostic role of radionuclide bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Rudd, T.G.

    1985-03-01

    A retrospective study was made of all radionuclide (RN) bone images performed at our institution over a two-year period to evaluate femoral head viability after nonpathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Twelve patients had avascular femoral heads during the perioperative period, of which nine had adequate follow-up. Seven of these nine patients had follow-up bone images. Revascularization occurred in four patients, while three had persistent absence of femoral head uptake. With clinical follow-up ranging from four to 29 months (median: 14 months), only two of these nine patients developed clinical or radiographic evidence of osteonecrosis. RN bone imaging performed in the perioperative period does not reliably predict the development of post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head and, at present, should not be used to determine prospectively method of treatment of femoral neck fracture.

  5. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  6. Non-union coronal fracture femoral condyle, sandwich technique : A case report.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Kousik; Raman, Rajeev; Vijay, R K; Maini, Lalit

    2015-03-01

    Coronal fractures of the femoral condyle (Hoffa fracture) are rare injuries but can be managed with satisfactory outcome if properly treated. We discuss an unusual case of a young adult male presenting with 9 month old neglected Hoffa fracture with pain, stiffness and limitation of knee movement, managed with sandwich bone grafting technique.(1). PMID:26549953

  7. Non-union coronal fracture femoral condyle, sandwich technique : A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Kousik; Raman, Rajeev; Vijay, R.K.; Maini, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the femoral condyle (Hoffa fracture) are rare injuries but can be managed with satisfactory outcome if properly treated. We discuss an unusual case of a young adult male presenting with 9 month old neglected Hoffa fracture with pain, stiffness and limitation of knee movement, managed with sandwich bone grafting technique.1 PMID:26549953

  8. [Treatment strategy for posttraumatic complex deformity : After bilateral femoral shaft fractures].

    PubMed

    Ahrend, M; Ateschrang, A; Stöckle, U; Schröter, S

    2016-02-01

    A case of complex posttraumatic deformity after bilateral femoral shaft fractures is reported. Different possibilities for correction in cases of valgus malalignment combined with internal rotation deformity as well as shortening combined with external rotation deformity are presented. Oblique osteotomy and a motorized femoral extension nail were used. PMID:26187430

  9. Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation Versus Reverse Less Invasive Stabilization System-distal Femur for Treating Proximal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuan; Wang, Ying; Ma, XinLong; Ma, JianXiong; Wang, Chen; Zhang, ChengBao; Han, Zhe; Sun, Lei; Lu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of 2 surgical techniques that are used to treat proximal femoral fractures. A systematic literature search (up to December 2014) was conducted in Medline, Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to screen for studies comparing proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) with less invasive stabilization system–distal femur (LISS-DF) for proximal femoral fractures. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of the included studies and extracted data. Surgical information and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. A total of 7 studies with 361 patients who satisfied the eligibility criteria included 3 randomized controlled trials and 4 case-controlled trials associated with PFNA versus LISS in treating proximal femoral fractures. Our results demonstrated that there was a significant reduction in hospital stay and time to weight-bearing ambulation and bone healing for PFNA compared with LISS (odds ratio [OR] −1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] −2.92 to −0.05; OR −7.08, 95% CI −8.32 to −5.84; OR −2.71, 95% CI −4.76 to 0.67). No statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups for operative time, blood loss volume, Harris hip score, and incidence of complications. Based on the results of this analysis, we inferred that PFNA is safer and more effective than reverse LISS-DF in patients undergoing osteosynthesis for proximal femoral fractures, and that PFNA is associated with reduced hospital stays and reduced time to weight-bearing ambulation and bone healing. Nonetheless, in certain cases in which PFNA is not suitable due to abnormal structure of the proximal femur or particularly unstable fractures, the LISS plate technique could be a useful alternative. PMID:27057840

  10. Cross-match protocols for femoral neck fractures--finding one that can work.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A. M.; Mushtaq, N.; Giannakas, K.; Sochart, D. H.; Andrews, J. G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cross-match practice for patients with femoral neck fractures continues to cause concern due to a failure of compliance to the existing protocols. To address this issue, a number of studies were conducted over a 3-year period. METHODS: First, the existing cross-match practice for patients admitted with femoral neck fractures was reviewed to demonstrate the deficiencies within the system. Second, the opinion of anaesthetic and orthopaedic trainees was assessed regarding blood requirements for different femoral neck fractures following surgery and the justification of their perceptions. RESULTS: A summation of the studies is reported which demonstrates the reasons for the poor compliance to previous protocols. CONCLUSIONS: A simple and effective protocol is provided that has helped reduce pre-operative cross-matching of femoral neck fractures from 71% to 16.7% when assessed 2 years after its introduction. PMID:15005938

  11. Management of femoral neck fractures in the young patient: A critical analysis review

    PubMed Central

    Pauyo, Thierry; Drager, Justin; Albers, Anthony; Harvey, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Femoral neck fractures account for nearly half of all hip fractures with the vast majority occurring in elderly patients after simple falls. Currently there may be sufficient evidence to support the routine use of hip replacement surgery for low demand elderly patients in all but non-displaced and valgus impacted femoral neck fractures. However, for the physiologically young patients, preservation of the natural hip anatomy and mechanics is a priority in management because of their high functional demands. The biomechanical challenges of femoral neck fixation and the vulnerability of the femoral head blood supply lead to a high incidence of non-union and osteonecrosis of the femoral head after internal fixation of displaced femoral neck fractures. Anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are essentials in achieving the goals of treatment in this young patient population. Furthermore, other management variables such as surgical timing, the role of capsulotomy and the choice of implant for fixation remain controversial. This review will focus both on the demographics and injury profile of young patients with femoral neck fractures and the current evidence behind the surgical management of these injuries as well as their major secondary complications. PMID:25035822

  12. Fracture of Fully-coated Femoral Stem after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty for Nonunion of Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young Soo; Juh, Hyung Suk; Cho, Yoon Je

    2015-01-01

    Femoral stem fracture is an uncommon reason for the failure of total hip arthroplasty, with only 16 cases of fully coated stem fractures reported to date. Here we report a case in which a fully coated primary femoral stem fracture occurred after conversion to total hip arthroplasty for the non-union of an intertrochanteric fracture of the femur. Metallurgic evaluation of the etiology and mechanism revealed that the fracture was initiated by fatigue-related failure and completed by ductile failure on the posterior side of the fracture. Considering the recent trend of treating an intertrochanteric fracture with hip arthroplasty, possible stem failure should be considered, since most patients will have at least one of the known risk factors for stem fracture. PMID:27536622

  13. Expert tibia nail for subtrochanteric femoral fracture to prevent thermal injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Min, Byung-Woo; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Min-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Subtrochanteric femoral fractures are relatively uncommon, accounting for 7–15% of all hip fractures and treatment of these fractures are considered challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Although several treatment options are reported with up to 90% of satisfactory results, the choice of the appropriate implant is still a matter of debate. Some authors reported thermal injury after reaming for intramedullary nail fixation in patients with narrow medullary canal. Presentation of case A 21-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital because of right subtrochanteric femoral fracture. The narrowest diameter of medullary canal of her femur was about 7 mm but she refused open reduction and internal fixation with plate due to large scar formation. We used expert tibia nail instead of femoral intramedullary nail to prevent thermal injury. Discussion Subtrochanteric femoral fractures are difficult to treat because of their biomechanical and anatomical characteristics. Although several implants are reported for the surgical treatment of these fractures, intramedullary nails have been advocated due to their biological and biomechanical advantages. However, under certain circumstances with associated injury or anatomic difference we might consider another treatment options. Conclusion Expert tibia nail may be considered one of the treatment options for subtrochanteric femoral fracture with narrow medullary canal. We also emphasize the importance of preoperative evaluation of the medullary canal size for these risky fractures. PMID:25839435

  14. Misdiagnosis of pathological femoral fracture in a patient with intramuscular hemangioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YU, XIAOLONG; NIE, TAO; ZHANG, BIN; DAI, MIN; LIU, HUCHENG; ZOU, FAN

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is a common disease; however, intramuscular hemangioma (IH) presenting with a pathological fracture is extremely rare. The present study reports a case of a 46-year-old male patient that suffered from IH of the right thigh, presenting with a pathological femoral fracture. The patient was initially diagnosed with a traumatic femoral fracture, and routine open reduction and internal fixation were performed at a local hospital. However, 20 days subsequent to surgery, gradual swelling and soreness around the incision were observed. The incision eventually ruptured during squatting for bowel movement, which led to extensive blood loss. Based on computed tomography (CT) and deep femoral artery arteriography, IH presenting with a pathological femoral fracture was diagnosed. The patient underwent artery embolization, from which he recovered well. At the 6-month follow-up, the femoral fracture was revealed to have healed, and a CT scan demonstrated no evidence of recurrence; however, continuous observation using CT is required in order to determine the long-term outcome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a misdiagnosed pathological femoral fracture in a patient with IH reported in the English literature. PMID:27347124

  15. Simultaneous, bilateral, complete atypical femoral fractures after long-term alendronate use.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Mark; Morgan-John, Sam; Badhe, Sachin

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade there have been increasing reports of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) associated with bisphosphonate use. Reported cases of bilateral involvement usually refer to sequential injuries, or a complete fracture with an incomplete injury to the contralateral limb. In this case report we describe simultaneous, bilateral, complete atypical femoral fractures following a simple fall. A history of prodromal pain, previous radiological evidence of cortical thickening and long term alendronate therapy for osteoporosis secondary to corticosteroid treatment paint a classical picture of the presentation of an atypical fracture pattern of which orthopaedic surgeons should be aware. PMID:27570414

  16. Fracture of the femoral component associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H; Yang, C Y; Cheng, C K

    1999-04-01

    Fracture of the femoral component associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has not been well reported before. A 63-year-old man with osteoarthritis of the right knee underwent TKA with a New Jersey LCS Knee, with cementing on the tibia and patella but not on the femoral component. After 42 months, in addition to wearing of polyethylene of the tibia and patella, severe osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle was noted. Osteonecrosis caused loss of osseous support of the medial flange of the femoral component, and the bone ingrowth of the central and lateral flange to the distal femur was so good that it overcame the yield stress of the metal of the femoral component and caused fracture of the femoral component. The osteolytic area was filled with autogenous iliac bone, and a new femoral component was inserted and cemented. The patient's condition became satisfactory with relief of pain. Although uncommon, fracture of the femoral component does occur associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis. PMID:10220194

  17. Deep wound infection after proximal femoral fracture: consequences and costs.

    PubMed

    Pollard, T C B; Newman, J E; Barlow, N J; Price, J D; Willett, K M

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of deep wound infection after surgery for proximal femoral fracture (PFF) on the patient in terms of mortality and social consequences, and on the National Health Service in terms of financial burden. Sixty-one cases of PFF over a six-year period were complicated with deep surgical wound infection. These cases were compared with a matched control group of 122 patients without infection. Infected cases had greatly increased hospital stay (P<0.001), were 4.5 times less likely to survive to discharge (P=0.002), and if they survived, were three times less likely to return to their original residence (P=0.05). The total cost of treatment per infected case was 24,410 pound sterling compared with 7210 pound sterling for controls (P<0.001). Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection increased admission length and cost compared with non-MRSA infection (P=0.02). Deep wound infection after PFF is a devastating and costly complication for both the patient and the healthcare services. The cost consequences should be considered when allocating resources to trauma services to ensure adequate provision to minimize infection risks and to accommodate treatment costs in this vulnerable group. PMID:16621145

  18. Case Reports: Treatment of Subtrochanteric and Ipsilateral Femoral Neck Fractures in an Adult with Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mchale, Kathleen A.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a patient with autosomal-dominant osteopetrosis, a subtrochanteric fracture, and an ipsilateral femoral neck fracture treated with a hip spica cast Although the fracture united with coxa vara and external rotation deformities, the patient successfully returned to his normal activities of daily living. Operative fracture treatment in patients with osteopetrosis is difficult, and our patient provides evidence that with nonoperative treatment these patients can return to a functional level when operative treatment is not an option. PMID:18431613

  19. Anterior Hip Fracture Dislocation with Intrapelvic Retention of the Femoral Head and Ureter Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Patrascanu, Calin; Cibu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The anterior dislocation of the hip represents only a small percentage of all hip dislocations: 85% are posterior. Most commonly associated with this dislocation is a fracture of the femoral head and, in rare cases, a femoral neck fracture. We have found in literature no report of an anterior dislocation of the hip associated with femoral neck fracture, pelvic retention of the head and ureteral fistula. We report such a case of a 68 year old male. Case Report: A 68 year old male was presented to our attention, following a severe injury of the hip when falling from a high bridge, with severe pain in the hip and a clinical aspect of femoral neck fracture. The X-ray confirmed the femoral neck fracture but following an anterior dislocation with the head retained into the pelvis. The patient also had hematuria. An Austin Moore prosthesis was implanted for the femoral neck fracture and the head was extracted by the urologist by a new abdominal incision. Urological evaluation revealed a fistula of the ureter, treated by an internal drainage for three months. One month later the Moore prosthesis was extracted and the patient had a Girldestone hip for 5 months. Revision with a Muller cemented prosthesis had a normal evolution. Conclusion: The anterior fracture dislocation of the hip with pelvic retention of the femoral head and ureteral fistula is a rare condition resulting from high energy trauma. A multidisciplinary team is necessary to diagnose and treat fracture and soft tissue lesions. Early diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid septic complications. PMID:27298980

  20. The stability of fixation of proximal femoral fractures: a radiostereometric analysis.

    PubMed

    van Embden, D; Stollenwerck, G A N L; Koster, L A; Kaptein, B L; Nelissen, R G H H; Schipper, I B

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the stability of fracture-implant complex in fractures after fixation. A total of 15 patients with an undisplaced fracture of the femoral neck, treated with either a dynamic hip screw or three cannulated hip screws, and 16 patients with an AO31-A2 trochanteric fracture treated with a dynamic hip screw or a Gamma Nail, were included. Radiostereometric analysis was used at six weeks, four months and 12 months post-operatively to evaluate shortening and rotation. Migration could be assessed in ten patients with a fracture of the femoral neck and seven with a trochanteric fracture. By four months post-operatively, a mean shortening of 5.4 mm (-0.04 to 16.1) had occurred in the fracture of the femoral neck group and 5.0 mm (-0.13 to 12.9) in the trochanteric fracture group. A wide range of rotation occurred in both types of fracture. Right-sided trochanteric fractures seem more rotationally stable than left-sided fractures. This prospective study shows that migration at the fracture site occurs continuously during the first four post-operative months, after which stabilisation occurs. This information may allow the early recognition of patients at risk of failure of fixation. PMID:25737524

  1. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Junichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga. PMID:27293934

  2. Femoral Varus Osteotomy for Hip Instability after Traumatic Fracture Dislocations of the Hip Associated with Femoral Head Fractures: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Nakamura, Junichi; Iida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chiho; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the femoral head and the acetabulum with traumatic dislocation of the hip is a severe injury representing various types and unfavorable outcome. We showed a 45-year-old man with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga. An immediate closed reduction was achieved followed by open reduction and internal fixation via a posterior approach 6 days later. However, dislocation occurred three times without traumatic events after three weeks. CT demonstrated no displacement of posterior fragments or implant failure. Femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was performed to gain concentric stability and successfully resolved recurrent dislocation. Another 45-year-old woman with Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga also underwent closed reduction initially and then continued conservative treatment. After eight weeks, when she started gait training, progressive pain became symptomatic. Persistent hip pain at weight bearing was not improved in spite of arthroscopic synovectomy and osteochondroplasty. Two years after injury, femoral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy was indicated and her refractory pain was resolved gradually. We suggest that femoral varus osteotomy should be considered for superolateral subluxation associated fracture dislocation of the hip in Pipkin type-IV and coxa valga. PMID:27293934

  3. A Review of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures Associated With Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Marsland, Daniel; Mears, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur in association with total hip arthroplasty are increasingly common and often difficult to treat. Patients with periprosthetic fractures are typically elderly and frail and have osteoporosis. No clear consensus exists regarding the optimal management strategy because there is limited high-quality research. The Vancouver classification facilitates treatment decisions. In the presence of a stable prosthesis (type-B1 and -C fractures), most authors recommend surgical stabilization of the fracture with plates, strut grafts, or a combination thereof. In up to 20% of apparent Vancouver type-B1 fractures, the femoral stem is loose, which may explain the high failure rates associated with open reduction and internal fixation. Some authors recommend routine opening and dislocation of the hip to perform an intraoperative stem stability test to rule out a loose component. Advances in plating techniques and technology are improving the outcomes for these fractures. For fractures around a loose femoral prosthesis (types B2 and 3), revision using an extensively porous-coated uncemented long stem, with or without additional fracture fixation, appears to offer the most reliable outcome. Cement-in-cement revision using a long-stem prosthesis is feasible in elderly patients with a well-fixed cement mantle. It is essential to treat the osteoporosis to help fracture healing and to prevent further fractures. We provide an overview of the causes, classification, and management of periprosthetic femoral fractures around a total hip arthroplasty based on the current best available evidence. PMID:23569704

  4. Femoral head diameter in subcapital fracture of the femur in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogunlade, S O; Omololu, A B; Alonge, T O; Obajimi, M O

    2004-09-01

    Subcapital fracture of the femur is common in the elderly patients though the incidence is less in our environment than in the western world. Primary prosthetic replacement is the method of treatment in the majority of the patients. To facilitate this, a foreknowledge of the femoral head diameter is necessary. To determine the diameter of the femoral head and its magnification on radiograph among patients with hip fractures seen in South-West Nigeria, all patients with subcapital fracture of the neck of femur seen between March 1997 and February 2002 were included in the study. The femoral heads were measured on the radiographic film using a transparent ruler and after extraction of the femoral head during surgery using callipers. There were 25 patients in all, the mean age of patients was 73.2 years. Fall at home accounted for 70% of the cases. The femoral head diameter was between 42 mm and 50 mm in 92% of patients while magnification of femoral head diameter on radiograph was 10-14% in 92% of cases. The usaof 10-14% magnification of femoral head on radiograph would help the surgeon determine the size of prosthetic head before commencement of surgery. PMID:15819470

  5. Results of the treatment of the open femoral shaft fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Gap, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Background Intramedullary nailing has become the treatment of choice for closed femoral shaft fractures in children and adolescents. Immediate intramedullary nailing of open fractures of femur in children remains controversial, with most surgeons preferring to treat grade II or III open fractures either by debridement and traction or external fixation. The aims The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of intramedullary nailing of open femoral fractures in children. Methods 172 children were treated for femoral shaft fracture in our department. 19 fractures were opened in 18 patients. Results In children with polytrauma, multiple fractures, head injuries and other conditions which necessitate intensive nursing care, intramedullary nailing of opens femoral shaft fractures (type I, II, IIIA, IIIB) should be preferred. Conclusion Satisfactory results were obtained in all patients in terms of self evaluation of patients, radiological and clinical evaluation. The infection rate was much lower for patients who had been given a cephalosporin than for patient who had been given a penicillin or had been given no antibiotic. PMID:25104890

  6. Bilateral insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck in a male patient with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Pedro; Lopez-Soroche, Eva; Carpintero, Rocio; Morales, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a risk factor for secondary osteoporosis. Anorexia nervosa-related metabolic disturbances lead to disminished bone resistance and increased risk of fractures. We report a case of bilateral femoral neck fracture as the first symptom of anorexia nervosa in a male patient. PMID:23547526

  7. Locking plate fixation of distal femoral fractures is a challenging technique: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Giampiero; Toro, Antonio; de Sire, Alessandro; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Distal femoral fractures have typically a bimodal occurrence: in young people due to a high-energy trauma and in older people related to a low-energy trauma. These fractures are associated to a very high morbidity and mortality in elderly. Distal femoral fractures might be treated with plates, intramedullary nails, external fixations, and prosthesis. However, difficulties in fracture healing and the rate of complications are important clinical issues. The purpose of this retrospective review was to present our experience in treatment of distal femoral fracture in a sample of older people in order to evaluate the technical pitfalls and strategies used to face up the fractures unsuccessfully treated with locking plates. We included people aged more than 65 years, with a diagnosis of distal femoral fracture, treated with locking plates. We considered ‘unsuccessfully treated’ the cases with healing problems or hardware failures. Of the 12 patients (9 females and 3 males; mean aged 68.75 ± 3.31 years) included, we observed 3 ‘unsuccessfully cases’, 2 due to nonunions and 1 due to an early hardware failure, all treated using a condylar blade plate with a bone graft. One patient obtained a complete fracture healing after 1 year and in the other cases there was a nonunion. We observed as most common technical pitfalls: inadequate plate lengthening, fracture bridging, and number of locking screws. The use of locking plates is an emerging technique to treat these fractures but it seems more challenging than expected. In literature there is a lack of evidences about the surgical management of distal femoral fractures that is still an important challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon that has to be able to use all the fixation devices available. PMID:27134634

  8. Extreme femoral valgus and patella dislocation following lateral plate fixation of a pediatric femur fracture.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Ahmed; Iobst, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    A 15-year-old boy presented with a 35° femoral valgus deformity, leg-length discrepancy, painful retained hardware, and a lateral dislocation of the patella 4 years after undergoing lateral plate fixation of a distal femur fracture. Femoral valgus is a possible complication of lateral plate fixation in up to 30% of pediatric distal femur fractures. With this patient's unusual combination of deformities as an example, we suggest early hardware removal after fracture union to prevent the development of deformity. If plate removal is not chosen, then continued close monitoring of the patient is necessary until skeletal maturity. PMID:27243610

  9. Atypical femoral fracture due to chronic use of bisphosphonates: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Junior, Lúcio Honório; Costa, Lincoln Paiva

    2015-01-01

    The causal relationship between chronic use of bisphosphonates and occurrences of atypical femoral fractures has not yet been established. Nonetheless, it is known that their chronic use is more related to fractures with a pattern differing from that of classical osteoporotic fractures. Atypical fractures are still rare events and the benefit from using bisphosphonates remains greater for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. There are few studies guiding the diagnosis and management of these fractures, thus making it difficult to achieve better results. In this report, we present the case of an elderly patient with an atypical femoral fracture that was managed in accordance with guidance from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26401508

  10. Osteomalacia and coxa vara. An unusual co-existence for femoral neck stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sariyilmaz, Kerim; Ozkunt, Okan; Sungur, Mustafa; Dikici, Fatih; Yazicioglu, Onder

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Femoral neck stress fractures are not uncommon. Several causes exist about these fractures. Osteomalacia is one of the most common cause of insufficiency fractures and coxa vara can produce a focal concentration of mechanical stress in the femoral neck and may cause stress fractures. This case study is about the co-existence of these two pathologies in a patient with bilateral femoral neck stress fracture. Presentation of case A 26-year-old woman admitted to our department with a complaint of bilateral groin pain and diagnosed as bilateral coxa vara and osteomalacia. Medical treatment for osteomalacia and staged bilateral Pauwels’ osteotomy was performed. After 2 years of follow-up, good result was obtained. Discussion There are several risk factors for stress fractures and osteomalacia and coxa vara are two of the causes. Osteomalacia results in softening of the bones and coxa vara can produce a focal concentration of stresses in the femoral neck. Conclusion Joint and bone pain without any trauma should be investigated and bone metabolism disorders should be kept in mind. There might be co-existing factors related with stress fractures, and they must be treated simultaneously. PMID:26454499

  11. Malunion in displaced intracapsular fracture of femoral neck: A rare case.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nikhil; Singh, M P; Ul Haq, Rehan; Aggarwal, Aditya N; Jain, Anuj

    2015-01-01

    Intracapsular fracture of femoral neck is treated by anatomical reduction (preferably closed) and cannulated cancellous lag screw fixation. Malunion of these fractures have been described in the coronal plane (coxa valga or coxa vara). We reported a case of young adult patient with displaced intracapsular fracture of femoral neck that had malunited in sagittal plane with callus formation with excellent functional outcome. The radiographs revealed intracapsular fracture of femoral neck right side (Garden type 4 and Pauwel type 3). The patient was operated and closed reduction and internal fixation with three cannulated cancellous screws was performed. The postoperative radiograph revealed a loss of reduction in the lateral view. Due to this technical error, the patient was counselled for revision fixation for which he refused. At 9 months we observed union of the fracture in the displaced position by callus formation. Harris hip score at 2 years was 96 that indicate excellent functional outcome and the radiographs did not reveal any evidence of avascular necrosis of femoral head. We advised revision surgery to our patient as he had increased chances of implant failure and nonunion. However he refused the revision surgery and was continued with the suboptimal reduction. However, the fracture united and that too with callus formation, which is not a described phenomenon in neck of femur fracture. PMID:26777718

  12. A simple new technique for the removal of fractured femoral stems: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The removal of broken femoral stems has become a major issue in revision surgery, and is a technically difficult and time-consuming procedure. Case presentation We present a case of a fracture of a cementless long femoral stem in a 65-year-old, white Caucasian man. The distal part was removed with a special longitudinal osteotomy through the anterior cortex extending distally for 10cm. It was then followed by a transversal osteotomy 2cm below the tip of the femoral stump to allow enough space for two locking pliers. Simultaneously using a lamina spreader on the distal part, the broken stem was extracted while hammering on two locking pliers. Conclusions We developed a simple and easy technique for the removal of a broken femoral stem that can be applied to all kinds of femoral stems and intramedullary nails regardless of their cross section. We used ordinary surgical instruments and spared the remaining bone stock. PMID:24886067

  13. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head Caused by Excessive Lateralization of the Acetabular Rim

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Goto, Tomohiro; Hamada, Daisuke; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 53-year-old woman with subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head without history of severe osteoporosis or overexertion. Plain radiographs showed acetabular overcoverage with excessive lateralization of the acetabular rim. A diagnosis of SIF was made by typical MRI findings of SIF. The lesion occurred at the antipodes of the extended rim. Increased mechanical stress over the femoral head due to impingement against the excess bone was suspected as a cause of SIF. The distinct femoral head deformity is consistent with this hypothesis. This is the first report of SIF associated with acetabular overcoverage. PMID:27293935

  14. UNSTABLE FEMORAL FRACTURES TREATED WITH TITANIUM ELASTIC INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS, IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Jamil Faissal; Schelle, Gisele; Valenza, Weverley; Pavelec, Anna Carolina; Souza, Camila Deneka Arantes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the indications, epidemiology, associated lesions, complications and prognosis among children with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who were treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails. Method: This was a retrospective analysis on 24 patients aged 5-12 years with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who underwent surgical treatment with elastic titanium intramedullary nails at the Cajuru University Hospital, Curitiba-PR, between April 2002 and March 2008, with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. The epidemiological data, angular deviations, leg shortening and bone consolidation were evaluated. Results: The medical files of 113 cases operated between April 2002 and March 2008 were reassessed. From these, 24 cases of unstable femoral diaphysis fractures treated with elastic titanium intramedullary nails with retrograde insertion were included in the study. There were two bilateral fractures and two exposed fractures. Seven patients were female and 17 were male, and the mean age was 8.3 years. The following were presented at the end of the study: shortening, varus or valgus displacement, final retrocurvatum or antecurvatum of zero, and absence of delayed consolidation or pseudarthrosis. Conclusions: The elastic titanium intramedullary nails were easily placed and removed. We believe that using elastic titanium intramedullary nails is a good option for fixation of unstable femoral fractures in children. PMID:27047868

  15. Use of the trochanteric flip osteotomy to facilitate internal fixation of a femoral head fracture.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, James A; Marsh, Andrew G; Patil, Sanjeev R

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old male who suffered a fracture-dislocation of the femoral head. After a closed reduction of the hip, this proceeded to an open reduction with internal fixation of the fractured femoral head, in addition to labral repair and micro-fracture of an articular cartilage defect. After considering the risks to the femoral head blood supply, the trochanteric flip osteotomy was used. This provided ample and safe exposure. At 14 months follow-up, the patient-reported outcome measures are favourable: modified Harris Hip Score (81/100), the non-arthritic hip score (92.5/100) and SF-12 (41/48). PMID:27470013

  16. Fracture mechanics of human cortical bone: The relationship of geometry, microstructure and composition with the fracture of the tibia, femoral shaft and the femoral neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeni, Yener Nail

    Bone fracture is a major health problem in old population with its complications leading to mortality and morbidity. Therapies mostly involve preventing bone mass loss. Individuals with high bone mass, however, may still suffer fractures suggesting that additional components such as bone microstructure and composition may be responsible for increased fracture risk in the elderly. The relationship of bone constituents with bone fragility, however, is not well-understood. A better understanding of these relationships will help improving therapies by controlling the relevant biological processes. Bone is a composite material with many constituents such as osteons embedded with vascular channels, collagen fibers, mineral crystals, etc. The nature of interfacing between these constituents makes bone a more complex material. Bone also has a structure that adapts itself, both internally and externally, to better fit its needs. This suggested that, unlike man-made materials, a relationship between material properties and structural properties may exist. Because bone has some similarities with engineering composite materials and also experiences microcracks, a fracture mechanics approach would be more appropriate for investigating its fragility. Choosing mode I and mode II fracture toughness (Gsb{Ic} and Gnsb{IIc}, respectively) as indicators of bone fragility, their relationship with bone microstructure (porosity, osteon morphology, mineral crystal imperfection and microdamage), composition (density, mineral, organic, water and collagen content) and macrostructure (thickness, diameter and moment of inertia of the shaft and angle between the femoral neck and femoral shaft from different views) was investigated. Use of x-ray radiogrammetry for detecting the latter was tested. Differences among the femoral shaft, femoral neck and the tibia were investigated for an age range of 22-94 years. In general, fracture toughness increased with increasing bone quantity. However, the

  17. Early Results of a Geriatric Hip Fracture Program in India for Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepak; Sidhu, Guraziz Singh; Mears, Simon C.; Yamin, Mohammad; Mahindra, Pankaj; Pannu, Harminder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are a challenging clinical problem throughout the world. Hip fracture services have been shown to shorten time to surgery, decrease the cost of admissions, and improve the outcomes. We instituted a geriatric hip fracture program for comanagement of these injuries by orthopedic and internal medicine teams at our hospital in India. From January 2010 till December 2011, 119 patients with a femoral neck fracture were treated with cemented modular hemiarthroplasty under this program using a cost-effective Indian implant. The cohort included 63 males and 56 females with a mean age of 70.7 years (range 55-98 years). Hypertension (n = 42) and diabetes mellitus (n = 29) were the most common comorbidities. The follow-up period ranged from 12 to 37 months with an average of 24 months. The surgery was performed within 24 hours of admission in 60.5% (n = 72) patients. The use of antiplatelet drugs was the most common reason for delay of surgery. The mean length of hospital stay was 10.4 days (range 3-24 days) with 77% (n = 92) of patients discharged within 1 week of admission. On follow-up, good to excellent Harris hip scores were seen in 88% of patients with 76% of patients returning to the preinjury ambulatory status. The mortality rate was 6% at 6 months follow-up and 10.9% at 2 years. Our study shows that a hip fracture program can be instituted in India. The program helped us in achieving the goal of early surgery, mobilization, and discharge from hospital with decreased mortality. PMID:26246953

  18. Fibrous dysplasia, shepherd's crook deformity and an intra-capsular femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Al-Mouazzen, Louay; Rajakulendran, Karthig; Ahad, Nurul

    2013-11-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a rare bone disorder in which normal medullary bone is replaced by fibro-osseous tissue. It typically presents in childhood with pain, skeletal deformities, gait abnormalities and occasionally, fatigue fractures. The management of FD remains a challenge. Surgical procedures have been developed to provide symptom relief, correct skeletal deformity and offer mechanical support in cases at risk of fracture. However, there is a paucity of data on the management of acute femoral neck fractures in the adult population with FD. We report the case of a 23-year-old man with a shepherd's crook deformity secondary to FD, who sustained an intra-capsular femoral neck fracture whilst playing football. The patient initially underwent closed reduction and internal fixation with cannulated screws. However, during the procedure, a guide wire broke whilst inside the femoral head. The patient was referred to the senior author, who undertook a second operation to remove the metalwork and correct the varus deformity using a closing-wedge femoral osteotomy, whilst achieving osteosynthesis at the fracture site. At 1-year follow-up, the patient is pain-free and demonstrates a full range of movement. These cases can be technically demanding and carry a greater risk of complication. It is important that preoperative planning is undertaken and surgery performed by individuals with experience in managing FD and complex femoral neck fractures. Correction of the skeletal deformity whilst fixing the fracture will help restore the mechanical axis and reduce the risk of a recurrent fracture. PMID:24036944

  19. Incidence and Characteristics of Atypical Femoral Fractures: Clinical and Geometrical Data.

    PubMed

    Mahjoub, Zeineb; Jean, Sonia; Leclerc, Jean-Thomas; Brown, Jacques P; Boulet, Dominic; Pelet, Stéphane; Grondin, Charlotte; Dumont, Jeannette; Belzile, Étienne L; Michou, Laetitia

    2016-04-01

    Despite the multitude of studies published on atypical femoral fractures (AFFs), a profile for patients at risk does not exist. This study aimed first at estimating AFF incidence over a 19-month-period in Quebec City using the ASBMR Task force criteria to define AFF. The medical records of patients hospitalized for hip or femoral fracture between June 1, 2009, and December 31, 2010, were reviewed. Thirty-six cases of atypical fractures were identified during the 19-month period, representing an AFF incidence of 7.0 (range, 4.7 to 9.3) cases per 100,000 person-years. In the second part of the study, data regarding the characteristics suspected of increasing the risks of AFF were collected from medical and pharmacological records, proximal femur radiographs, and patient interviews. The data regarding each patient with an AFF during years 2008-2011 were compared to two controls with a hip or femoral fragility fracture or a traumatic fracture, paired for age and sex. Twenty patients with AFF were added to the 36 patients with AFF selected in the first part, thereby 56 patients with AFF were investigated. The association between the occurrence of AFF and bisphosphonates (BPs) use was proven statistically significant in multivariate analysis, odds ratio (OR) = 10.39 (95% CI, 2.22 to 48.58; p = 0.0029). Compared to controls, patients with AFF had excessive femoral offset (43.1 mm versus 38.3 mm, p = 0.0007), proximal femoral neck angle in varus (128.9 degrees versus 134.0 degrees, p < 0.0001), and had greater proximal cortical thickness. This retrospective study confirms the low incidence of AFF, confirms its significant association with exposure to BPs, and reveals the possible contribution of proximal femoral geometry in AFF occurrence. PMID:26588590

  20. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head at 2 years after pertrochanteric fracture surgery: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Deleanu, Bogdan; Prejbeanu, Radu; Vermesan, Dinu; Honcea, Lucian; Mioc, Mihail Lazar; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Predescu, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The avascular necrosis of the femoral head represents the death of bone tissue due to the lack of blood supply. The disease has a progressive evolution and left untreated leads to femoral head collapse and severe arthritis. Case presentation We present a case of a pertrochanteric fracture which has been successfully operated with a dynamic interlocking trochanteric gamma nail on the right hip. At 2 years after surgery the patient developed an incipient avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Despite the good positioning of the implant, we considered that the source of the pain was an intolerance of the implant, and thus we removed it. After implant removal, the patient was kept under observation and conservative treatment, to prevent further damage to the right hip and allow the healing to occur. At 6 months after the gamma nail was removed the X-rays revealed advanced avascular necrosis of the femoral head and secondary osteoarthritis on the right hip. The patient underwent surgery with an uncemented total hip arthroplasty. Discussion There are a few discussions regarding the avascular necrosis of the femoral head. These discussions may include the predisposing risk factors, the treatment of choice and the postoperative complications. Conclusion The avascular necrosis of the femoral head is a complication of pertrochanteric fractures that can not be foreseen or avoided. The optimal treatment in these cases is uncemented total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26900462

  1. Biomechanical optimization of subject-specific implant positioning for femoral head resurfacing to reduce fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Appleyard, Richard; Theodore, Willy; Zheng, Keke; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Peri-prosthetic femoral neck fracture after femoral head resurfacing can be either patient-related or surgical technique-related. The study aimed to develop a patient-specific finite element modelling technique that can reliably predict an optimal implant position and give minimal strain in the peri-prosthetic bone tissue, thereby reducing the risk of peri-prosthetic femoral neck fracture. The subject-specific finite element modelling was integrated with optimization techniques including design of experiments to best possibly position the implant for achieving minimal strain for femoral head resurfacing. Sample space was defined by varying the floating point to find the extremes at which the cylindrical reaming operation actually cuts into the femoral neck causing a notch during hip resurfacing surgery. The study showed that the location of the maximum strain, for all non-notching positions, was on the superior femoral neck, in the peri-prosthetic bone tissue. It demonstrated that varus positioning resulted in a higher strain, while valgus positioning reduced the strain, and further that neutral version had a lower strain. PMID:27098752

  2. Management of neglected femoral neck fracture in above knee amputated limb: A case report.

    PubMed

    Meena, Umesh; Meena, Ramesh; S, Balaji; Gaba, Sahil

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of an above knee amputee who has sustained a fracture of the femoral neck is a chal- lenging situation for both the orthopedic surgeon and the rehabilitation team. These fractures may be managed acutely either by reduction and internal fixation or by endoprosthetic replacement based on the same criteria as in any other patient with otherwise intact limbs.We present a neglected case treated successfully with valgus osteotomy. We conclude that these fractures should be treated with the same urgency and expertise as similar fractures in non-amputees as long-term survival and good quality of life can be expected. PMID:26917032

  3. Surgical prevention of femoral neck fractures in elderly osteoporotic patients. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chiarello, Eugenio; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Cadossi, Matteo; Capra, Paola; Terrando, Silvio; Miti, Andrea; Giannini, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Fragility fractures of the femur are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The incidence of new contralateral hip fractures in elderly osteoporotic patients ranges from 7 to 12% within 2 years after the first fracture. Secondary prevention can be divided in: pharmacological therapy based on the prescription of anti-osteoporotic drugs with different mechanism of action and non-pharmacological therapy which is based on modification of environmental risk factors, on a healthy diet with daily supplements of calcium and vitamin D and calcium and on the use of hip protectors. Recently a new form of prevention is becoming achievable: surgical prevention; the rationale of surgical reinforcement is the need to increase the resistance of the femoral neck to the compression and distraction forces acting on it. In this paper we analyse all the experimental and “on the market” device available for the surgical prevention of femoral neck fracture. PMID:27252744

  4. Spontaneous capital femoral physeal fracture in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Galya

    2013-01-01

    A young neutered male cat was presented with a 1-week history of left hind limb lameness. Pain and crepitus were identified on manipulation of the left coxofemoral joint. Radiographic evaluation led to the diagnosis of physeal dysplasia with slipped capital femoral epiphysis of the left femur, which did not respond to conservative management. PMID:24155467

  5. Arthroscopic Suture Fixation in Femoral-Sided Avulsion Fracture of Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Umprai, Vantawat; Laohathaimongkol, Thongchai; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2015-01-01

    A femoral-sided avulsion fracture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a rare and challenging condition. Most reported cases have occurred in childhood or adolescence. Many techniques of ACL repair have been reported, and in recent years, techniques in arthroscopic surgery have been developed and have become ever more popular with orthopaedic surgeons. We created a technique of arthroscopic ACL repair with suture anchor fixation for a femoral-sided ACL avulsion fracture. This technique saves the natural ACL stump. It is available for cases in which creation of a tibial tunnel is not allowed. Moreover, it does not require a skin incision for fixation on the far femoral cortex and, therefore, does not require a second operation to remove the fixation device. The arthroscopic technique also has a good cosmetic outcome. PMID:26258035

  6. Negative magnetic resonance imaging in femoral neck stress fracture with joint effusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Seki, Nobutoshi; Okuyama, Koichiro; Kamo, Keiji; Chiba, Mitsuho; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-06-01

    Femoral neck stress fracture (FNSF) is well documented in the orthopedic literature and is generally associated with strenuous activities such as long-distance running and military training. The diagnostic yield of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for FNSF was reported to be 100 %, and early MRI is recommended when this fracture is suspected. We encountered a 16-year-old male long-distance runner with FNSF in whom the left femoral neck showed no signal changes on MRI although an effusion was detected in the left hip joint. One month later, roentgenograms revealed periosteal callus and oblique consolidation of the left femoral neck, confirming the diagnosis of compression FNSF. Because FNSF with a normal bone marrow signal on MRI is very rare, this patient is presented here. PMID:27020451

  7. Bilateral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head and neck in a case of oncogenic osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V; Agrawal, K; Vinothkumar, T K; Mathesul, A

    2010-07-01

    We describe a case of oncogenic osteomalacia in an adult male who presented with low back pain and bilateral hip pain. Extensive investigations had failed to find a cause. A plain pelvic radiograph showed Looser's zones in both femoral necks. MRI confirmed the presence of insufficiency fractures bilaterally in the femoral head and neck. Biochemical investigations confirmed osteomalacia which was unresponsive to treatment with vitamin D and calcium. A persistently low serum phosphate level suggested a diagnosis of hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. The level of fibroblast growth factor-23 was highly raised, indicating the cause as oncogenic osteomalacia. This was confirmed on positron-emission tomography, MRI and excision of a benign fibrous histiocytoma following a rapid recovery. The diagnosis of oncogenic osteomalacia may be delayed due to the non-specific presenting symptoms. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head may be missed unless specifically looked for. PMID:20595128

  8. Use of the trochanteric flip osteotomy to facilitate internal fixation of a femoral head fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, James A.; Marsh, Andrew G.; Patil, Sanjeev R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old male who suffered a fracture–dislocation of the femoral head. After a closed reduction of the hip, this proceeded to an open reduction with internal fixation of the fractured femoral head, in addition to labral repair and micro-fracture of an articular cartilage defect. After considering the risks to the femoral head blood supply, the trochanteric flip osteotomy was used. This provided ample and safe exposure. At 14 months follow-up, the patient-reported outcome measures are favourable: modified Harris Hip Score (81/100), the non-arthritic hip score (92.5/100) and SF-12 (41/48). PMID:27470013

  9. Rigid Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures for Patients Age 12 and Younger: Indications and Technique.

    PubMed

    Martus, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are common injuries in the pediatric and adolescent age groups. Rigid intramedullary nailing is an excellent treatment option for older children and adolescents, particularly for length-unstable fractures and larger patients (>49 kg). Appropriate indications, contraindications, and preoperative assessment are described. The rigid nailing surgical technique is detailed including positioning, operative steps, pearls, and pitfalls. Complications and the reported outcomes of lateral trochanteric entry nailing are reviewed from the published series. PMID:27100036

  10. Evaluation of proximal femoral locking plate in unstable extracapsular proximal femoral fractures: Surgical technique & mid term follow up results☆

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nishikant; Kataria, Himanshu; Yadav, Chandrashekhar; Gadagoli, Bharath S.; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    Background Stable trochanteric femur fractures can be treated successfully with conventional implants such as sliding hip screw, cephalomedullary nails, angular blade plates. However comminuted and unstable inter or subtrochanteric fractures with or without osteoporosis are challenging & prone to complications. The PF-LCP is a new implant that allows angular stability by creating fixed angle block for treatment of complex, comminuted proximal femoral fractures. Method We reviewed 30 patients with unstable inter or subtrochanteric fractures, which were stabilized with PF-LCP. Mean age of patient was 65 years, and average operative time was 80 min. Patients were followed up for a period of 3 years (June 2010–June 2013). Patients were examined regularly at 3 weekly interval for signs of union (radiological & clinical), varus collapse (neck-shaft angle), limb shortening, and hardware failure. Result All patients showed signs of union at an average of 9 weeks (8–10 weeks), with minimum varus collapse (<10°), & no limb shortening and hardware failure. Results were analysed using IOWA (Larson) hip scoring. Average IOWA hip score was 77.5. Conclusion PF-LCP represents a feasible alternative for treatment of unstable inter- or subtrochanteric fractures. PMID:25983487

  11. Surgical Treatment of Undisplaced Femur Neck Fractures in Dementia Patients Using Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong-Ju; Min, Woong-Bae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose People with dementia have poor mobility and discharge outcomes following hip fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of internal fixation of undisplaced femur neck fractures (Garden types 1 and 2) by proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) in dementia patients. Materials and Methods We studied retrospectively 19 patients with undisplaced femur neck fracture. All patients were over 70 years of age, walked independently with a cane or crutches and suffered moderate-to-severe dementia. Patients were treated with PFNA and followed-up for more than 2 years. Revision, loss of fixation, complications, and walking ability outcomes were measured. Results In walking-ability evaluation, patients showed an average decrease of just 0.2 points at the final follow-up. Walking ability was evaluated from before injury to 4 weeks after surgery and decreased by less than 0.5 points. Radiological bone union was achieved in 17 cases; the average time to bone union was 4.14 months (range, 2.5-7 months). Complications included non-union in two cases and femoral head avascular necrosis in one case of non-union. Conclusion We found that for patients with osteoporotic bone tissues in their femoral heads or patients (e.g., those suffering dementia) for whom cooperating with medical workers for postoperative walking control or rehabilitation exercises is difficult, implanting a mechanically stable spiral blade for fixation of femoral neck fractures could facilitate walking after surgery. PMID:27536620

  12. Removal of a broken guide wire entrapped in a fractured femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-hua; Ye, Tian-wen; Guo, Yong-fei; Wang, Chong-li; Chen, Ai-min

    2013-01-01

    Guide wire plays an important role in the fixation of femoral neck fracture with dynamic hip screw (DHS). Breakage of a guide wire during operation is a very rare condition. We met such a dilemma in DHS fixation of a 54-year-old male patient who sustained Garden type IV fracture of the right femoral neck. The distal end of the guide wire broke and was entrapped in the fractured femoral neck. We tried to get the broken part out by a cannulated drill. Reaming was started with the cannulated drill slowly rotating around the guide K-wire until the reamer fully contained the target under fluoroscope. A bone curette was used to get the broken wire out but failed, so we had to use the cannuated drill to dredge this bone tunnel. Finally the broken wire end was taken out, mixed with blood and bone fragments. Through the existing drilling channel, DHS fixation was easily finished. The patient had an uneventful recovery without avascular necrosis of femoral head or non-union of the fracture at one year's follow-up. A few methods can be adopted to deal with the broken guide wire. The way used in our case is less invasive but technically challenging. When the guide wire is properly positioned, this method is very practical and useful. PMID:23910678

  13. Result of Internal Fixation for Stable Femoral Neck Fractures in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byung-Woo; Bae, Ki-Cheor; Lee, Si-Wuk; Lee, Seok-Jung; Choi, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to evaluate the results of internal fixation for stable femoral neck fractures occurring in patients over 65 years old. Materials and Methods Between 2008 and 2014, we evaluated 25 patients over 65 years old with Garden type 1 and 2 femoral neck fractures that were treated with internal fixation after a minimum follow up of 1 year. There were 5 males and 20 females and the average age was 72.3 years (range, 65-84 years) at the time of surgery. Fracture site union, horizontal shortening and complications were evaluated as radiographic parameters and change of walking ability (as measured using Koval walking ability score) was investigated as a clinical parameter. Results Union of fracture site was achieved in 24 out of the 25 cases (96.0%). The average length of horizontal shortening was 6.5 mm (range, 0.2-19.7 mm). At final follow up, 3 cases experienced complications: nonunion (n=1), avascular necrosis (n=1), and subtrochanteric fracture after minor trauma (n=1). Walking ability decreased an average of 1 step at the final follow up. Conclusion Internal fixation for stable femoral neck fractures occurring in patients over 65 years showed satisfactory union rates. However, care should be taken with this technique given the possibility of decreased walking ability resulting from horizontal shortening.

  14. The Correlation between the Fracture Types and the Complications after Internal Fixation of the Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Suenghwan; Lee, Hyeon Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to determine the correlation between the fracture patterns and the complications in patients with femoral neck fracture treated with internal fixation. Materials and Methods The study comprises 45 patients with femoral neck fracture treated with multiple screws or compression hip screw between May 2008 and April 2012. The mean age was 48 years at the time of the surgery and the mean duration from initial injury to surgery was 20 hours. The fracture patterns were identified according to the anatomical location, the Garden classification and the Pauwels classification. The occurrence of nonunion and avascular necrosis were reviewed with clinical results including Harris hip score and Lunceford hip function test. The correlation between the fracture pattern and occurrence of complications were analyzed. Results Fracture site union was achieved in 40 hips with the average union time of 17 weeks. Five nonunions occurred which showed high likelihood to occur in subcapital type, displaced (Garden stage III or IV) and Pauwels type III fractures (P<0.05). Avascular necrosis was developed in 10 hips which was mostly in subcapital type and Pauwels type III fracture but no statistical significance was found (P>0.05). The mean Harris hip score was 91 points, and Lunceford functional results were excellent in 15 hips, good in 24, fair in 4 and poor in 2. Conclusion There was high risk of nonunion in subcapital type fracture, displaced fracture (Garden stage III and IV) and vertically oriented fracture (Pauwels type III). Careful attention is needed in these fracture types.

  15. Treatment of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound: Report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures remains a difficult clinical problem for orthopaedic surgeons. In the physiologically young patient, every effort should be made to preserve the native hip joint. We present two cases of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults who were successfully treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and showed satisfactory results. Presentation of case 1 A 41-year-old woman was involved in a motor vehicle crash and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Eleven months after internal fixation, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the presence of non-union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After eight months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Presentation of case 2 A 39-year-old man was involved in a cycling accident and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Thirteen weeks after internal fixation, a CT scan revealed delayed union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After six months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Conclusion We suggest use of LIPUS as a possible treatment approach for delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures in young patients before considering further surgical intervention. PMID:26942332

  16. Proximal Femoral Shortening after Operation with Compression Hip Screws for Intertrochanteric Fracture in Patients under the Age of 60 Years

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Kee; Kim, Dong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to quantify proximal femoral shortening after operation with compression hip screws for intertrochanteric fracture in patients under the age of 60 years. Materials and Methods We followed 37 consecutive patients with intertrochanteric fractures treated with compression hip screws from March 2005 to February 2014. We designated the aspect of the fracture, a defect of the postero-medial wall, a defect of the lateral wall, and the degree of reduction as four potentially important factors we assumed would strongly affect proximal femoral shortening. We quantified proximal femoral shortening and compared the effects of above factors. We divided femoral shortening into two plane vectors; femoral offset in the horizontal plane and leg length discrepancy in the vertical plane. We measured shortening separately during two periods: during operation and after weight bearing (called dynamic compression). Results After bone union, the average femoral offset shortening was 5.45 mm. Patient groups with anatomic reduction and intact postero-medial wall showed lower femoral offset shortening than the respective opposite groups. As to functional score using modified Harris hip score, low femoral offset shortening group showed more 2.35 scores than high groups. None of the factors significantly affected leg length shortening. Conclusion We found that a stable medial buttress is involved in lower femoral offset shortening. Thus, surgeons need to attempt to recover the defect of the medial wall and to reduce anatomically when operating intertrochanteric fractures with compression hip screws.

  17. MANAGEMENT OF BILATERAL FEMORAL NECK FRACTURE IN A NONAGENARIAN PATIENT--CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Popescu, D; Trandabaţ, C; Puha, B; Veliceasa, B; Alexa, O

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fracture is rare injury. Cases with this type of fracture have been reported in the literature since the 1950s, following the introduction of electroconvulsive therapy which generates violent hip muscle contractions. In young patients' simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fracture results from high energy trauma (car accident or fall from height) in a normal bone. Pathological changes in bone structure occurring in chronic kidney disease, vitamin D deficiency, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, metabolic imbalances and administration of corticosteroids explain the occurrence of this particular type of fracture following low-energy trauma. We present the case of a 90-year-old female patient who suffered a simple fall from her own height resulting in a Garden IV bilateral femoral neck fracture. Our therapeutic option in this patient was bilateral uncemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty in a single session using a single tray of sterile surgical instruments and two sterile drapes. Postoperative outcome was very good, allowing the initiation of functional recovery on the first postoperative day. Uncemented hemiarthroplasty proved to be a good choice in such a patient in the associated diseases may trigger the risk of cardiovascular disturbances specific to bone cement implantation syndrome. PMID:27483720

  18. Effect of boundary conditions, impact loading and hydraulic stiffening on femoral fracture strength.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ifaz T; Speirs, Andrew D; Frei, Hanspeter

    2013-09-01

    Patient specific quantitative CT (QCT) imaging data together with the finite element (FE) method may provide an accurate prediction of a patient's femoral strength and fracture risk. Although numerous FE models investigating femoral fracture strength have been published, there is little consent on the effect of boundary conditions, dynamic loading and hydraulic strengthening due to intra-medullary pressure on the predicted fracture strength. We developed a QCT-derived FE model of a proximal femur that included node-specific modulus assigned based on the local bone density. The effect of three commonly used boundary conditions published in literature were investigated by comparing the resulting strain field due to an applied fracture load. The models were also augmented with viscoelastic material properties and subject to a realistic impact load profile to determine the effect of dynamic loads on the strain field. Finally, the effect of hydraulic strengthening was investigated by including node specific permeability and performing a coupled pore diffusion and stress analysis of the FE model. Results showed that all boundary conditions yield the same strain field patterns, but peak strains were 22% lower and fracture load was 18% higher when loaded at the greater trochanter than when loaded at the femoral head. Comparison of the dynamic models showed that material viscoelasticity was important, but inertial effects (vibration and shock) were not. Finally, pore pressure changes did not cause significant hydraulic strengthening of bone under fall impact loading. PMID:23906770

  19. The biomechanical effect of bone quality and fracture topography on locking plate fixation in periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Leonidou, Andreas; Moazen, Mehran; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Graham, Simon M; Macheras, George A; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2015-02-01

    Optimal management of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) around a well fixed prosthesis (Vancouver B1) remains controversial as adequate fixation needs to be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to highlight the effect of bone quality i.e. canal thickness ratio (CTR), and fracture topography i.e. fracture angle and its position in relation to the stem, on the biomechanics of a locking plate for a Vancouver B1 fracture. A previously corroborated simplified finite element model of a femur with a cemented total hip replacement stem was used in this study. Canal thickness ratio (CTR) and fracture topography were altered in several models and the effect of these variations on the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture displacement was studied. Increasing the CTR led to reduction of the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture movement. In respect to the fracture angle with the medial cortex, it was shown that acute angles resulted in lower von Mises stress on the plate as opposed to obtuse angles. Furthermore, acute fracture angles resulted in lower fracture displacement compared to the other fractures considered here. Fractures around the tip of the stem had the same biomechanical effect on the locking plate. However, fractures more distal to the stem led to subsequent increase of stress, strain, and fracture displacement. Results highlight that in good bone quality and acute fracture angles, single locking plate fixation is perhaps an appropriate management method. On the contrary, for poor bone quality and obtuse fracture angles alternative management methods might be required as the fixation might be under higher risk of failure. Clinical studies for the management of PFF are required to further support our findings. PMID:25467710

  20. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  1. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae; Dan, Jinmyoung

    2016-06-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  2. Bilateral Femoral Neck Fatigue Fracture due to Osteomalacia Secondary to Celiac Disease: Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Selek, Ozgur; Memisoglu, Kaya; Selek, Alev

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral non traumatic femoral neck fatigue fracture is a rare condition usually occurring secondary to medical conditions such as pregnancy, pelvic irradiation, corticosteroid exposure, chronic renal failure and osteomalacia. In this report, we present three young female patients with bilateral femoral neck fracture secondary to osteomalacia. The underlying cause of osteomalacia was Celiac disease in all patients. The patients were treated with closed reduction and internal fixation with cannulated lag screws. They were free of pain and full weight bearing was achieved at three months. There were no complications, avascular necrosis and nonunion during the follow up period. In patients with bone pain, non traumatic fractures and muscle weakness, osteomalacia should be kept in mind and proper diagnostic work-up should be performed to identify the underlying cause of osteomalacia such as celiac disease. PMID:26265523

  3. Fracture of the cemented femoral component following hemiarthroplasty in physically active patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Deniz; Yoldas, Burak; Yılmaz, Serdar; Tecirli, Ali; Ozkurt, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture of the femoral stem following hip arthroplasty has become very rare since the developments in modern prosthetic designs. Prevention by identifying the risk factors is the best way to overcome these complex problems, as treatment is difficult. Case Report: Femoral component fracture after cemented hemiarthroplasty in a physically active 64-year-old, male patient is reported in this present article. Conclusion: The present case emphasizes the importance of preserving the joint after hip fracture and avoidance of using mono block prosthesis in younger patients. If the patient is physically active, he/she should be advised to limit her/his daily activities to moderate intensity after hemiarthroplasty surgery. PMID:27299090

  4. Successful management of simple fractures of the femoral neck with femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty in two free-living avian species.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Whittington, Julia K; Bennett, R Avery; McFadden, Mike; Mitchell, Mark; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-09-01

    A red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) and a Canada goose (Branta canadensis) were evaluated for unilateral pelvic limb lameness. Physical examination findings and results of diagnostic imaging revealed femoral neck fractures in both birds. Both birds were treated with a femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty. The affected legs were not immobilized, and the birds were encouraged to use the legs immediately after surgery to encourage formation of a pseudoarthrosis. Within 2 weeks, both birds were using the affected limb well enough to be either successfully released or transferred to a wildlife rehabilitation facility. Femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty without immobilization of the limb is recommended for managing avian femoral neck fractures, especially in free-ranging species in which a rapid and complete or near complete return to function is vital for survival in the wild. PMID:22216722

  5. Laser etching causing fatigue fracture at the neck–shoulder junction of an uncemented femoral stem: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Bob; Kanawati, Andrew; Brazil, Declan; Bruce, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue fracture of a femoral component in total hip arthroplasty is a rare occurrence but well documented in the literature. It is understood that proximal loosing of a femoral stem with a well fixed stem distally will result in cantilever bending and eventual fatigue fracture of the stem. Other factors which may potentiate a fatigue fracture are material design, implant positioning, and patient characteristics. More recently, laser etching on the femoral neck of an implant has resulted in fatigue fracture. We report a case of a fatigue fracture at the neck–shoulder junction in a well fixed, uncemented, femoral component due to laser etching in the region of high tensile stress. PMID:24403758

  6. Superficial femoral artery stent fracture that led to perforation, hematoma and deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lewitton, Steve; Babaev, Anvar

    2008-09-01

    We describe the case of a 70-year old male with total occlusion of the left superficial femoral artery (SFA) treated with percutaneous implantation of a self-expanding nitinol stent. The patient's course post-stent implantation was complicated by the development of stent fracture with SFA perforation and a large, compressive intramuscular hematoma with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The patient returned to the catheterization laboratory where the fracture and perforation were successfully treated by the deployment of another stent across the fracture site. The DVT was initially treated with an inferior vena cava filter until anticoagulation could safely be instituted. PMID:18762680

  7. Management of Femoral Shaft Fracture in Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome with External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yogendra; Jha, Ranjib Kumar; Karn, Navin Kumar; Sah, Sanjaya Kumar; Mishra, Bibhuti Nath; Bhattarai, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare complex malformation characterized by the clinical triad of capillary malformations, soft tissue and bone hypertrophy, and venous/lymphatic malformation. Fractures of long bones in such cases are challenging to treat. A 12-year-old female with this syndrome presented with femoral shaft fracture of right thigh. She was initially kept on skeletal traction for two weeks and then she underwent closed reduction and immobilization with external fixator with uneventful intraoperative and postoperative period. Fracture united at four and half months. PMID:26885423

  8. Bilateral simultaneous femoral diaphyseal fractures in a patient with long-term ibandronate use.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vishal C; Lazzarini, Adam M

    2010-10-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most common medication used to treat patients with documented osteoporosis. Recently, reports have associated long-term bisphosphonate use with low-energy femur fractures. While no definitive mechanism has been associated, bisphosphonate use has been strongly implicated. This article presents the case of a 65-year-old woman with a 2-year history of ibandronate use presenting with simultaneous low-energy femoral shaft fractures. The patient reported prodromal bilateral thigh pain and was seen by a spine surgeon. A review of the literature implicates long-term ibandronate use in low-energy femur fractures. With most of the basic science studies demonstrating suppressed bone turnover after 5 years of treatment with alendronate, the significance of the present case also lies in the relatively short duration of time the patient was on ibandronate before suffering the bilateral femoral shaft fractures. Possible pathophysiology for the fractures includes suppressed bone turnover that may allow microcracks to propagate in cortical bone, which can weaken the bone and possibly predispose it to fractures. Patients who have been on bisphosphonates long term should be questioned about thigh pain and have radiographs of their femurs obtained if pain exists. Furthermore, if a patient presents with a single subtrochanteric or diaphyseal low-energy femur fracture after long-term bisphosphonate use, a radiograph of the contralateral femur should be obtained to assess for a cortical stress reaction. PMID:20954650

  9. Clinical outcomes of locked plating of distal femoral fractures in a retrospective cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Locked plating (LP) of distal femoral fractures has become very popular. Despite technique suggestions from anecdotal and some early reports, knowledge about risk factors for failure, nonunion (NU), and revision is limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze the complications and clinical outcomes of LP treatment for distal femoral fractures. Materials and methods From two trauma centers, 243 consecutive surgically treated distal femoral fractures (AO/OTA 33) were retrospectively identified. Of these, 111 fractures in 106 patients (53.8% female) underwent locked plate fixation. They had an average age of 54 years (range 18 to 95 years): 34.2% were obese, 18.9% were smokers, and 18.9% were diabetic. Open fractures were present in 40.5% with 79.5% Gustilo type III. Fixation constructs for plate length, working length, and screw concentration were delineated. Nonunion and/or infection, and implant failure were used as outcome complication variables. Outcome was based on surgical method and addressed according to Pritchett for reduction, range of motion, and pain. Results Eighty-three (74.8%) of the fractures healed after the index procedure. Twenty (18.0%) of the patients developed a NU. Four of 20 (20%) resulted in a recalcitrant NU. Length of comminution did not correlate to NU (p = 0.180). Closed injuries had a higher tendency to heal after the index procedure than open injuries (p = 0.057). Closed and minimally open (Gustilo/Anderson types I and II) fractures healed at a significantly higher rate after the index procedure compared to type III open fractures (80.0% versus 61.3%, p = 0.041). Eleven fractures (9.9%) developed hardware failure. Fewer nonunions were found in the submuscular group (10.7%) compared to open reduction (32.0%) (p = 0.023). Fractures above total knee arthroplasties had a significantly greater rate of failed hardware (p = 0.040) and worse clinical outcome according to Pritchett (p = 0.040). Loss of

  10. Unstable Intertrochanteric Fracture Fixation – Is Proximal Femoral Locked Compression Plate Better Than Dynamic Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Qureshi, Owais Ahmad; Jilani, Latif Zafar; Hamesh, Tajdar; Jameel, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Background Intertrochanteric fractures are one of the most common fractures encountered in our practice. Most of them need operative intervention and union is achieved. As per the literature dynamic hip screw (DHS) is the gold standard for the treatment of these fractures, however problem arises with maintenance of neck shaft angle and proper reduction in unstable intertrochanteric fractures. The situation gets more complex when “cut out” of femoral head screw occurs either alone or in combination with varus collapse when they are treated with DHS. Here we are giving results of unstable intertrochanteric fractures treated with Proximal Femoral Locked Compression Plate (PFLCP) as compared with similar patients treated with Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS). Materials and Methods The study included a total of 27 patients (17 males, 10 females) with unstable intertrochanteric fractures who were subjected to PFLCP treatment from March 2011 to November 2012 in one group. Another was a similar group of 35 patients treated with DHS from March 2008 to February 2010. Results of group 1 were compared with group 2. Detailed clinical conditions of all patients, duration of surgery, blood loss, length of incision and duration of image intensifier use were recorded. Patients were revisited at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after operation. Results were evaluated clinically by Harris hip Score and radiologically for fracture union. Progress of union and complications (limb shortening, varus collapse, cut out of femoral head screw and medialization of distal fragment) were recorded. Results Among 27 patients treated with PFLCP, one patient expired 6 week postoperatively and one patient lost to follow up, so 25 patients were evaluated for final outcome of which 23 (92%) showed union at follow up of 12 months. One patient developed bending of proximal screws and three developed varus collapse. Among the group treated with DHS, eight patients developed varus collapse, seven

  11. [Hip Fracture--Epidemiology, Management and Liaison Service. Multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of proximal femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Sawaguchi, Takeshi; Shigemoto, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    Multidisciplinary approach for proximal femoral fracture was organized in the hospital. Inter and intra division obstacles were discussed. After general consensus of the team was obtained, manuals and guidelines of the each division were prepared. In addition to this, the electrical chart specific for the proximal femoral fracture was made which enables to eliminate in-hospital reference letters. As the results, all patients were examined by internal medicine doctors at the time of admission. Average interval from the time of admission to surgery became 1.3 days. Closer relationship with psychiatrist made early detection and treatment of delirium possible. After changing the system to check the antiosteoporosis medication at the time of discharge by the ward pharmacist dramatically increased the prescription rate form 39 percent to 95 percent. PMID:25814013

  12. Stress fractures of the femoral shaft in athletes: a new treatment algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ivkovic, A; Bojanic, I; Pecina, M

    2006-01-01

    Background Femoral shaft stress fractures in athletes are not common but pose a great diagnostic challenge to clinicians. Because of few clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment are often delayed. Furthermore, if not treated correctly, these fractures are well known for complications and difficulties. Objective To develop a well structured and reproducible treatment algorithm for athletes with femoral shaft stress fractures. Methods The proposed algorithm is carried out in four phases, each lasting three weeks, and the move to the next phase is based on the result of the tests carried out at the end of the previous phase. Over nine years, we treated seven top level athletes, aged 17–21. In all athletes, diagnosis was based on physical examination, plain radiographs, and bone scan. Results As a result of the treatment method, all the athletes were fully engaged in athletic activity 12–18 weeks after the beginning of treatment. After completion of the treatment, the athletes were followed up for 48–96 months. During the follow up, there was no recurrence of discomfort or pain, and all the athletes eventually returned to competition level. Conclusion These results and data available from the literature suggest that the algorithm is the optimal treatment protocol for femoral shaft stress fractures in athletes, avoiding the common complications and difficulties. PMID:16720887

  13. Prophylactic proton pump inhibitors in femoral neck fracture patients - A life - and cost-saving intervention.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Trickett, R; Meyer, Cer; Lewthwaite, S; Ford, D

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Acute gastrointestinal stress ulceration is a common and serious complication of trauma. Prophylactic proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or histamine receptor antagonists have been used in poly-trauma, burns and head and spinal injuries, as well as on intensive care units, for the prevention of acute gastric stress ulcers. Methods We prospectively studied the use of prophylactic PPIs in with femoral neck fracture patients, gathering data on all acute gastric ulcer complications, including coffee-ground vomiting, malena and haematemesis. We then implemented a treatment protocol in which all patients were given prophylactic PPIs, again prospectively collecting all data. Results Five hundred and fifteen patients were included. Prior to prophylactic PPI, 15% of patients developed gastric stress ulcer complications, with 3% requiring acute intervention with oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD), 5% requiring transfusions and 4% experiencing surgical delays. All patients had delayed discharges. Following PPI implementation, no patients developed gastric stress ulcer complications. Conclusions Femoral neck fracture patients create a substantial workload for orthopaedic units. The increasingly elderly population often have comorbidities, and concomitantly use medications with gastrointestinal side effects. This, combined with the stress of a fracture and preoperative starvation periods increases the risk of gastric ulcers. Here, the use of prophylactic PPIs statistically reduced the incidence of gastric stress ulcers in patients with femoral neck fractures, resulting in fewer surgical delays, reduced length of hospital stay and reduced stress ulcer-related mortality. PMID:27055405

  14. Periprosthetic fractures around the femoral stem: overcoming challenges and avoiding pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.

    2015-01-01

    Management of periprosthetic fractures around the femoral stem after total hip arthroplasty (THA) represents a significant challenge and optimal treatment remains controversial. The most common treatment paradigm involves treating fractures around a well-fixed stem with osteosynthesis, whereas fractures around a loose stem require revision arthroplasty and those with poor bone require augmentation with bone graft. Paradoxically, the literature reports a higher rate of failure for osteosynthesis around prostheses considered to be well-fixed. Such a high rate of poor outcomes may result not only from difficult fracture fixation and compromised biologic healing, but also from unrecognized peri-implant pathology. Therefore, proper preoperative and intraoperative evaluation is key, and a subset of patients may benefit from alternative management. We review the appropriate methods for evaluation and treatment of Vancouver type B fractures with particular emphasis on avoiding missteps that can lead to failure. PMID:26539451

  15. Fat embolism due to bilateral femoral fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Porpodis, Konstantinos; Karanikas, Michael; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Konoglou, Maria; Domvri, Kalliopi; Mitrakas, Alexandros; Boglou, Panagiotis; Bakali, Stamatia; Iordanidis, Alkis; Zervas, Vasilis; Courcoutsakis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is usually associated with surgery for large bone fractures. Symptoms usually occur within 36 hours of hospitalization after traumatic injury. We present a case with fat embolism syndrome due to femur fracture. Prompt supportive treatment of the patient’s respiratory system and additional pharmaceutical treatment provided the positive clinical outcome. There is no specific therapy for fat embolism syndrome; prevention, early diagnosis, and adequate symptomatic treatment are very important. Most of the studies in the last 20 years have shown that the incidence of fat embolism syndrome is reduced by early stabilization of the fractures and the risk is even further decreased with surgical correction rather than conservative management. PMID:22287848

  16. Risk Factors Associated with Dislocation after Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty in Elderly Patients with Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Kim, Joon-Kuk; Joo, Il-Han; Hwang, Kyu-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the incidence and time of dislocation and other factors associated with dislocation of bipolar hemiarthroplasty related to the treatment of femoral neck fracture in old age patients. Materials and Methods Between January 2002 and April 2014, 498 femoral neck fractures (467 patients) were treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty and included in this study. All surgeries were performed using the postero-lateral approach. The incidence of dislocation was investigated. A comparative analysis between a control group and dislocation group was performed with respect to patient factors including age, gender, body mass index, comorbidities, the ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) score, mental status and center-edge angle, and surgical factors including type of femoral stem, leg length discrepancy, femoral offset and method of short external rotator (SER) reconstruction. Results The incidence of dislocation was 3.8%, and the dislocation occurred on average 2.2 months (range, 0.6-6.5 months) after operation. No difference in patient-related factors was observed between the two groups. However, a smaller center edge (CE) angle was observed in the dislocation group (42.1°±3.2° vs. 46.9°±5.4°, P<0.001), and significantly lower incidence of dislocation was observed in tendon to bone repair group (0.7% vs 7.8%, P<0.001). Conclusion SERs should be repaired using the tendon-to-bone repair method to reduce dislocation rate in elderly patients who undergo bipolar hemiarthroplasty using the postero-lateral approach due to femoral neck fracture. In addition, patients with smaller CE angle should be carefully monitored due to high incidence of dislocation. PMID:27536652

  17. The Reliability of Classifications of Proximal Femoral Fractures with 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography: The New Concept of Comprehensive Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kijima, Hiroaki; Konishi, Natsuo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Tani, Takayuki; Suzuki, Norio; Kamo, Keiji; Okudera, Yoshihiko; Sasaki, Ken; Kawano, Tetsuya; Shimada, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    The reliability of proximal femoral fracture classifications using 3DCT was evaluated, and a comprehensive “area classification” was developed. Eleven orthopedists (5–26 years from graduation) classified 27 proximal femoral fractures at one hospital from June 2013 to July 2014 based on preoperative images. Various classifications were compared to “area classification.” In “area classification,” the proximal femur is divided into 4 areas with 3 boundary lines: Line-1 is the center of the neck, Line-2 is the border between the neck and the trochanteric zone, and Line-3 links the inferior borders of the greater and lesser trochanters. A fracture only in the first area was classified as a pure first area fracture; one in the first and second area was classified as a 1-2 type fracture. In the same way, fractures were classified as pure 2, 3-4, 1-2-3, and so on. “Area classification” reliability was highest when orthopedists with varying experience classified proximal femoral fractures using 3DCT. Other classifications cannot classify proximal femoral fractures if they exceed each classification's particular zones. However, fractures that exceed the target zones are “dangerous” fractures. “Area classification” can classify such fractures, and it is therefore useful for selecting osteosynthesis methods. PMID:25610659

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF FEMORAL SHAFT FRACTURES: STUDY OF 200 CASES

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; da Silva, Luciano Lucindo; Ferreira, Fábio Vieira; Ferro, Ademar Martins; da Rocha, Valney Luís; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate epidemiological and radiological characteristics of the femoral shaft fractures, surgically treated from 1990 to 2005 at Hospital de Acidentados – Clínica Santa Isabel – in Goiânia, Goiás, aiming to contribute to better preventive and therapeutic measures planning to adopt on those fractures. Methods: 200 patients' files and x-rays with femoral shaft fractures have been retrospectively evaluated. Patients below the age of 10 years were not included because the treatment for this group was conservative. 25 files have been discarded for not supplying all the necessary data to the study. The patients were assessed for sex, age, side of the fracture, bone exposure, mechanisms of trauma, classification of the fractures, associated trauma, time for bone healing and types of surgical devices. Statistic analyses were made by chi-squared, Fisher and Student's-t tests, adopting as a significance level p<0.05. Results: significant results (p < 0.05) were found in: 70% of men, 80% closed fractures and 65% of women above the age of 60. Fractures resulting from simple falls were more frequent in women, above 60 years old, with simpler traces, and the ones caused by projectiles of firearm in men, from 20 to 60 years, with unstable traces. Trampling accidents were prevalent among youngsters between 10 and 19 years old. Car accidents showed all the types of fractures, mostly associated to other traumas, reaching its peak incidence in the age group of 20-30 years. The treatment with Küntscher Nail resulted in a longer mean consolidation time, as well as fractures with unstable traces (B3,C1,C2,C3). Conclusion: we found a bi-modal characteristic the femoral shaft fractures, consistently to literature data, where the high energy mechanisms (traffic accidents, high falls and wounds from firearms), have been more frequent in young adults, men, generating unstable traces of fractures, with more serious associated trauma, while the other group with low

  19. Augmentation of femoral neck fracture fixation with an injectable calcium-phosphate bone mineral cement.

    PubMed

    Stankewich, C J; Swiontkowski, M F; Tencer, A F; Yetkinler, D N; Poser, R D

    1996-09-01

    The first goal of this study was to determine if augmentation with an injectable, in situ setting, calcium-phosphate cement that is capable of being remodeled and was designed to mimic bone mineral significantly improved the strength and stiffness of fixation in a cadaveric femoral neck fracture model. The second goal was to determine if greater increases in fixation strength were achieved as the bone density of the specimen decreased. Sixteen pairs of fresh cadaveric human femora with a mean age of 70.9 years (SD = 17.2 years) were utilized. The bone density of the femoral neck was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The femoral head was impacted vertically with the femoral shaft fixed in 12 degrees of adduction using a materials testing machine to create a fully displaced fracture. Following fracture, 30% inferior comminution was created in each specimen. One randomly chosen femur from each pair underwent anatomic reduction and fixation with three cannulated cancellous bone screws, 7 mm in diameter, in an inverted triangle configuration. The contralateral femur underwent the same fixation augmented with calcium-phosphate cement. Specimens were preconditioned followed by 1.000 cycles to one body weight (611.6 N) at 0.5 Hz to simulate single-limb stance loading. The stiffness in the first cycle was observed to be significantly greater in cement-augmented specimens compared with unaugmented controls (p < 0.05). After cycling, each specimen was loaded at 10 mm/min until complete displacement of the fracture surface and failure of fixation occurred. Specimens augmented with bone mineral cement failed at a mean of 4,573 N (SD = 1,243 N); this was significantly greater (p < 0.01) than the mean for controls (3,092 N, SD = 1,258 N). The relative improvement in fixation strength (augmented/control x 100%) was not inversely correlated to femoral neck bone density (p = 0.25, R2 = 0.09), was weakly correlated to the volume of cement injected (p = 0.07, R2 = 0

  20. Questioning the association between bisphosphonates and atypical femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Pazianas, Michael; Kim, Se-min; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Epstein, Sol; Zaidi, Mone

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the first line treatment for osteoporosis. Structurally, they are stable analogues of pyrophosphate and therefore exhibit a high affinity for bone mineral. They reduce bone loss by attenuating the ability of the osteoclast to resorb bone, decreasing activation frequency and the rate of remodelling. Large prospective randomized placebo-control trials provide unequivocal evidence for a reduction in the incidence of fractures.1 Impressively, 40 years since their first use in patients, the safety profile of bisphosphonates has been equally re-assuring.2 Questions have arisen lately as to whether bisphosphonates could cause atypical fractures, a rare type of atraumatic or minimal trauma femur fracture occurring below the great trochanter. This question has prompted calls for a broader examination of the long-term effects of bisphosphonate use. An attempt by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to garner consensus and provide definitive views was not successful.3 This has led to continued anxiety among treating physicians and patients alike, resulting in an overall reduction in prescriptions for bisphosphonates and for osteoporosis therapies in general. Here, we provide an overview of the current data on atypical fractures and bisphosphonate use. PMID:25294742

  1. Hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Carmelo; Perugia, Dario; Carcangiu, Alessandro; Monaco, Edoardo; Speranza, Attilio; Ferretti, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture typically leads to profound functional disability and pain. Salvage treatment with hip arthroplasty may be considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of hip arthroplasty performed as a salvage procedure after the failed treatment of an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Twenty-one patients were treated in our hospital with hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of intertrochanteric hip fracture. There were sixteen women and five men with a mean age of 75.8 years (range 61-85 years). Fourteen patients had failure of a previous nail fixation procedure, five had failure of a plate fixation, one of hip screws fixation and one of Ender nail fixation. In 19 out of 21 patients we performed a total hip arthroplasty-14 cases used modular implants with long-stems and five cases used a standard straight stem. In 2 of 21 cases we used a bipolar hemiarthroplasty. A statistically significant improvement was found comparing pre and postoperative conditions (p < 0.05). Our experience confirms that total hip arthroplasty is a satisfactory salvage procedure after failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture in elderly patients with few serious orthopaedic complications and acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:19572131

  2. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of Femoral head: Uncommon cause of Hip pain in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ghate, Sushant D; Samant, Ashwin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of femoral head is not very common cause of hip pain. This usually occurs in elderly osteoporotic patients or fatigue fracture in young military recruits. Case Report: We report a case of hip pain in an osteoporotic male which was diagnosed on MRI after the condition was missed by two physicians initially. Patient responded well to conservative treatment and was asymptomatic at one year follow up. Conclusion: Purpose of this case is to highlight clinical and radiological features of this entity and to discuss the prognosis and treatment. This case should increase awareness of this rare condition amongst treating physicians. This may facilitate early diagnosis and successful outcome with conservative treatment in selected sub-group of patients having SIF of femoral head.

  3. Treatment of an open book pelvic fracture and bilateral femoral fractures with an external fixator in a 14-month-old: a case report.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Thomas G; Chase, Helen E; Stohr, Kuldeep; Melton, Joel T K

    2016-05-01

    A 14-month-old girl was involved in a road traffic accident that resulted in an open book pelvic fracture and bilateral femoral fractures. Acute treatment involved a novel collar and the cuff pelvic closure technique to tamponade the pelvis and reduce bleeding. The patient was treated surgically with an external fixator, which provided good reduction of the pelvic and femoral fractures. A literature search found no previous information on open book pelvic fractures in infants younger than 2 years. The success of this surgery led us to suggest that the use of an external fixator is a potential treatment method for open book pelvic fractures and bilateral femoral fractures in extremely young infants. PMID:26717190

  4. A meta-analysis of flexible intramedullary nailing versus external fixation for pediatric femoral shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong Cheng; Feng, Guo Ming; Xing, Guang Wei; Yin, Jin Neng; Xia, Bing; Dong, Yan Zhao; Niu, Xue Qiang; He, Qianyi; Hu, Pengfei

    2016-09-01

    To compare the difference in efficacy following flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) and external fixation (EF) for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. A systematic search was performed on PubMed, Embase, Medline, and Cochrane library for relevant studies. We included controlled trials comparing complications between FIN and EF for pediatric femoral shaft fractures published before 25 November 2014. Modified Jadad scores were utilized to assess the methodological quality of the studies included. The meta-analysis was carried out using Stata 12.0 software. Six studies involving 237 patients were included. On comparison of EF, a low incidence of overall complications [relative risk (RR)=0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.19-0.46; P<0.001] and pin-tract infection (RR=0.286, 95% CI: 0.13-0.61; P=0.001), but a high risk of soft tissue irritation (RR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.35-2.56; P<0.001) were found in patients treated with the FIN approach. No significant differences in other complications were found. On the basis of current evidence, the use of FIN leads to fewer complications than EF and may be considered as the first-line approach in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27294706

  5. Nonvascularized fibular grafting in nonunion of femoral neck fracture: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Goyal, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Nonunion of femoral neck fractures following primary fixation and neglected femoral neck fracture in young adults is a challenging task. Every effort should be directed toward hip joint salvage in these patients. Among different available options of hip salvage, nonvascularized fibular graft (NVFG) osteosynthesis is simple, easy to perform, and a successful technique. In this review, the available literature on NVFG in neglected and nonunion femoral neck fractures has been analyzed. After review of 15 articles on NVFG, the average nonunion rate was estimated to be 7.86% (range 0-31%). Six articles that evaluated the preoperative and postoperative osteonecrosis reported improvement in 50% patients. The clinical and/or functional outcome was good to excellent in 56-96% patients following fibular osteosynthesis. Few complications such as coxa vara deformity, limb shortening, and intraarticular penetration of the graft or hardware have been reported. However, there are minimal donor site morbidities such as mild ankle pain, transient loss of toe flexors and extensors and transient lateral popliteal nerve palsy. PMID:27512214

  6. Serum albumin and fixation failure with cannulated hip screws in undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Riaz, O; Arshad, R; Nisar, S; Vanker, R

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Internal fixation of undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures with cannulated hip screws is a widely accepted surgical technique, despite reported failure rates of 12%-19%. This study determined whether preoperative serum albumin levels are linked to fixation failure. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 251 consecutive undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fracture patients treated with cannulated hip screws in a district general hospital. Preoperative albumin levels were measured, and the fixation technique, classification and posterior tilt on radiography assessed. Fixation failure was defined as a screw cut, avascular necrosis (AVN) or non-union. Results Of the patients, 185 were female and 66 male. The mean age was 77 years (range 60-101 years). Thirty seven (15%) patients had fixation failure: 10 (4%) due to AVN; 12 (5%) due to non-union; and 15 (6%) due to fixation collapse. Low serum albumin levels were significantly associated with failure (p=0.01), whereas gender (p=0.56), operated side (p=0.62), age (p=0.34) and screw configuration (p=0.42) were not. A posterior tilt angle greater than 20° on lateral radiography significantly predicted failure (p=0.002). Conclusions Preoperative serum albumin is an independent predictor of cannulated hip screw fixation failure in undisplaced femoral neck fractures. Nutritional status should therefore be considered when deciding between surgical fixation and arthroplasty to avoid the possibility of revision surgery, along with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. PMID:27055409

  7. Nonvascularized fibular grafting in nonunion of femoral neck fracture: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Goyal, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Nonunion of femoral neck fractures following primary fixation and neglected femoral neck fracture in young adults is a challenging task. Every effort should be directed toward hip joint salvage in these patients. Among different available options of hip salvage, nonvascularized fibular graft (NVFG) osteosynthesis is simple, easy to perform, and a successful technique. In this review, the available literature on NVFG in neglected and nonunion femoral neck fractures has been analyzed. After review of 15 articles on NVFG, the average nonunion rate was estimated to be 7.86% (range 0–31%). Six articles that evaluated the preoperative and postoperative osteonecrosis reported improvement in 50% patients. The clinical and/or functional outcome was good to excellent in 56–96% patients following fibular osteosynthesis. Few complications such as coxa vara deformity, limb shortening, and intraarticular penetration of the graft or hardware have been reported. However, there are minimal donor site morbidities such as mild ankle pain, transient loss of toe flexors and extensors and transient lateral popliteal nerve palsy. PMID:27512214

  8. Atypical Femoral Fracture: 2015 Position Statement of the Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyu Hyun; Min, Byung Woo; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2015-08-01

    Bisphosphonate (BP) is a useful anti-resorptive agent which decreases the risk of osteoporotic fracture by about 50%. However, recent evidences have shown its strong correlation with the occurrence of atypical femoral fracture (AFF). The longer the patient takes BP, the higher the risk of AFF. Also, the higher the drug adherence, the higher the risk of AFF. It is necessary to ask the patients who are taking BP for more than 3 years about the prodromal symptoms such as dull thigh pain. Simple radiography, bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are good tools for the diagnosis of AFF. The pre-fracture lesion depicted on the hip dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images should not be missed. BP should be stopped immediately after AFF is diagnosed and calcium and vitamin D (1,000 to 2,000 IU) should be administered. The patient should be advised not to put full weight on the injured limb. Daily subcutaneous injection of recombinant human parathyroid hormone (PTH; 1-34) is recommended if the patient can afford it. Prophylactic femoral nailing is indicated when the dreaded black line is visible in the lateral femoral cortex, especially in the subtrochanteric area. PMID:26389082

  9. Length of preoperative hospital stay: a risk factor for reducing surgical infection in femoral fracture cases

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Hoberdan Oliveira; Rezende, Edna Maria; Couto, Bráulio Roberto Gonçalves Marinho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze infections of the surgical site among patients undergoing clean-wound surgery for correction of femoral fractures. Methods This was a historical cohort study developed in a large-sized hospital in Belo Horizonte. Data covering the period from July 2007 to July 2009 were gathered from the records in electronic medical files, relating to the characteristics of the patients, surgical procedures and surgical infections. The risk factors for infection were identified by means of statistical tests on bilateral hypotheses, taking the significance level to be 5%. Continuous variables were evaluated using Student's t test. Categorical variables were evaluated using the chi-square test, or Fisher's exact test, when necessary. For each factor under analysis, a point estimate and the 95% confidence interval for the relative risk were obtained. In the final stage of the study, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Results 432 patients who underwent clean-wound surgery for correcting femoral fractures were included in this study. The rate of incidence of surgical site infections was 4.9% and the risk factors identified were the presence of stroke (odds ratio, OR = 5.0) and length of preoperative hospital stay greater than four days (OR = 3.3). Conclusion To prevent surgical site infections in operations for treating femoral fractures, measures involving assessment of patients’ clinical conditions by a multiprofessional team, reduction of the length of preoperative hospital stay and prevention of complications resulting from infections will be necessary.

  10. Omentalisation as adjunctive treatment of an infected femoral nonunion fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    McAlinden, A; Glyde, M; McAllister, H; Kirby, B

    2009-01-01

    A three-year-old male working border collie with an infected femoral nonunion fracture was managed in a two-stage procedure involving debridement and omentalisation, followed by stabilisation with a bone plate and an autogenous cancellous bone graft. Osseous union was documented radiographically 16 weeks after surgery. Telephone follow-up one year later revealed the dog had returned to full working function without evidence of lameness. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical case described in the veterinary literature using omentalisation as an adjunct to the management of an infected, biologically inactive nonunion fracture. PMID:21851725

  11. Tips and tricks for ORIF of displaced femoral neck fractures in the young adult patient.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Stephen C; Renninger, Christopher H; Hak, David; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2016-05-01

    Femoral neck fractures in the young adult are a less common, but potentially functionally significant injury commonly occurring after high-energy trauma. The management goals of these injuries are the maintenance of a native hip joint absent avascular necrosis and nonunion. The primary determinant to this end is an anatomic reduction in displaced fractures with stable fixation. In this paper, the authors provide a set of technical tips and tricks to aid orthopedic surgeons in the surgical management of these injuries while reviewing the most recent literature available to inform clinical decision making. The paper includes the recommendations of the authors from the Denver Health Orthopaedic Trauma Service. PMID:26965005

  12. Concept, diagnosis and classification of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws. A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bagan, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates (BPs) and other antiresorptive agents such as denosumab are widely prescribed for the treatment of osteoporosis and are also used in patients with multiple myeloma and metastatic breast or prostate cancer for avoiding bone reabsorption and fractures that result in increased morbidity-mortality among such individuals. Material and Methods We made a bibliographic search to analyze the concept, diagnosis and the different classifications for bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws. Results Osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ) is an important complication of exposure to BPs or other antiresorptive agents, and although its prevalence is low, it can pose management problems. The definition, diagnosis and classification of osteonecrosis have evolved since Marx reported the first cases in 2003. Conclusions The present study offers a literature review and update on the existing diagnostic methods and classification of the disorder, with a view to facilitating earlier and more effective treatment. Key words:Osteonecrosis, jaws, bisphosphonates. PMID:26827066

  13. Factors Affecting Time to Bony Union of Femoral Subtrochanteric Fractures Treated with Intramedullary Devices

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yoon; Yoo, Jin-Hee; Chung, Sung-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the factors affecting the bone union time and the occurrence of nonunion after intramedullary nailing of subtrochanteric femoral fractures in adults. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed data from 31 patients (22 men and 9 women) who had undergone femoral intramedullary nailing at least 1 year post-operatively and analyzed the bone union time, nonunion rates, and factors that affected the bone union time according to the fracture classification (AO and Fielding classifications), comminution of the medial cortex, reduction method, and additional cerclage wiring. Results The average union time was 26.4 weeks. There were no differences in the bone union time according to the fracture classification, reduction method, or additional cerclage wiring. Significant differences were found in the bone union time between the medial cortex comminution and non-comminution groups. A relatively strong positive correlation was detected between the degree of post-operative displacement and the bone union time. Nonunion occurred in three cases and there was no failure of implants. Conclusion The bone union time was not affected by the reduction method nor additional cerclage wiring in intramedullary nailing of subtrochanteric femur fractures. Comminution of the medial cortex and the degree of the postoperative displacement of fractures contributed to the delayed time of union.

  14. A rat model for evaluating physiological responses to femoral shaft fracture reduction using a surgical robot.

    PubMed

    Oszwald, Markus; Westphal, Ralf; O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Kendoff, Daniel; Hufner, Tobias; Wahl, Friedrich; Krettek, Christian; Gosling, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    The first step in treatment of displaced femoral shaft fractures is adequate reduction of the fracture fragments. Manually performed, reduction can be challenging, and is frequently associated with soft tissue damage, especially when repeated reduction attempts are made. The magnitude of local and systemic inflammatory responses caused by prolonged and repeated reduction maneuvers has not been fully established. We devised an operative technique utilizing a robotic reduction device for use in a rat. A femoral fracture was simulated by means of an osteotomy. The robot enabled reproduction of both manual and guided precision reductions, performed in a single path movement. An external fixator was designed specifically to manipulate the rat femur and also for fixation of the osteotomy region. First, reduction accuracy was assessed in eight femurs, then the quality of fixator placement and reduction accuracy was analyzed in 22 femurs. In the first case, 100% of the femurs were accurately reduced. In the second case, 91% had successful stable fixation and an accurate reduction was achieved in 86% of the specimens. We demonstrated the feasibility of a model of robot-assisted fracture reduction that could be used to analyze the effects of reduction on the surrounding soft tissue via biochemical and histopathological means. A future aspect will be to evaluate whether the robot confers an advantage in fracture reduction versus the conventional technique, which would have significant implications for the use of robotic devices in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:18634014

  15. Concepts and Potential Future Developments for Treatment of Periprosthetic Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, Stephan; Ettinger, Max; Omar, Mohamed; Hawi, Nael; Krettek, Christian; Petri, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures are a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon, with a continuously increasing incidence due to aging populations and concordantly increasing numbers of total hip replacements. Surgical decision-making mainly depends on the stability of the arthroplasty, and the quality of bone stock. As patients final outcomes mainly depend on early mobilization, a high primary stability of the construct is of particular relevance. Osteosynthetic procedures are usually applied for fractures with a stable arthroplasty, while fractures with a loosened endoprosthesis commonly require revision arthroplasty. Osteoporotic bone with insufficient anchoring substance for screws poses one major concern for cases with well-fixed arthroplasties. Complication rates and perioperative mortality have remained unacceptably high, emphasizing the need for new innovations in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures. Transprosthetic drilling of screws through the hip stem as the most solid and reliable part in the patient might represent a promising future approach, with auspicious results in recent biomechanical studies. PMID:26401164

  16. Concepts and Potential Future Developments for Treatment of Periprosthetic Proximal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Ettinger, Max; Omar, Mohamed; Hawi, Nael; Krettek, Christian; Petri, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures are a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon, with a continuously increasing incidence due to aging populations and concordantly increasing numbers of total hip replacements. Surgical decision-making mainly depends on the stability of the arthroplasty, and the quality of bone stock. As patients final outcomes mainly depend on early mobilization, a high primary stability of the construct is of particular relevance. Osteosynthetic procedures are usually applied for fractures with a stable arthroplasty, while fractures with a loosened endoprosthesis commonly require revision arthroplasty. Osteoporotic bone with insufficient anchoring substance for screws poses one major concern for cases with well-fixed arthroplasties. Complication rates and perioperative mortality have remained unacceptably high, emphasizing the need for new innovations in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures. Transprosthetic drilling of screws through the hip stem as the most solid and reliable part in the patient might represent a promising future approach, with auspicious results in recent biomechanical studies. PMID:26401164

  17. Atypical femoral fractures and bisphosphonate use: current evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Yoshitomo; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by a low bone volume and deterioration of the bone quality, which increases the risk of low-energy fractures. Bisphosphonate (BP) treatment increases the bone mass and reduces the risk of fractures in patients with osteoporosis by suppressing bone resorption. In spite of its clinical benefits, the long-term use of BPs has been linked to the occurrence of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs). Although the evidence had been controversial regarding the association between the occurrence of AFFs and BP use, more recent studies with radiographic adjudication have indicated the significant associations between them. However, the pathogenesis of AFFs is not completely understood. The most popular hypothesis has suggested that the suppression of bone turnover by BPs is responsible; however, some recent reports have implied the involvement of pathophysiological alterations of the bone quality and fracture repair process. In this review, we summarize and discuss the epidemiology, risk factors and pathology of AFFs. PMID:26137208

  18. Atypical femoral fractures and bisphosphonate use: current evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Saita, Yoshitomo; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by a low bone volume and deterioration of the bone quality, which increases the risk of low-energy fractures. Bisphosphonate (BP) treatment increases the bone mass and reduces the risk of fractures in patients with osteoporosis by suppressing bone resorption. In spite of its clinical benefits, the long-term use of BPs has been linked to the occurrence of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs). Although the evidence had been controversial regarding the association between the occurrence of AFFs and BP use, more recent studies with radiographic adjudication have indicated the significant associations between them. However, the pathogenesis of AFFs is not completely understood. The most popular hypothesis has suggested that the suppression of bone turnover by BPs is responsible; however, some recent reports have implied the involvement of pathophysiological alterations of the bone quality and fracture repair process. In this review, we summarize and discuss the epidemiology, risk factors and pathology of AFFs. PMID:26137208

  19. Intra-operative femoral neck fracture during attempted dislocation of a reduced hemi-arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ling, Samuel Ka Kin; Ma, Chun Man; Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-05-01

    Fragility hip fractures are increasingly common and hemiarthroplasty is one of the standard treatments. Although a common surgery, it should be performed with great caution because of the poor premorbid and bone quality in this demographic. Intra-operative fractures can occur while attempting press fit of the femoral implant. However; vigilance often steps down once the implant is secured and the hip reduced. This case report reminds surgeons that a large amount of torque can be transmitted during intra-operative positioning, such as during an attempt of hip dislocation. This torque, in addition to the risk factor of osteoporotic bone, can result in iatrogenic fractures. Published literature regarding management of an intra-operative fracture while the prosthetic hip is still reduced is lacking. The authors propose that temporary prophylactic cerclage wiring is a prudent and safe procedure prior to hip dislocation. PMID:26058283

  20. Comparison of Femoral Neck Stress Fractures in Pediatric versus Young Adult Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, Benton E.; Quinn, Bridget; Ehrlichman, Lauren; Bixby, Sarah; Ackerman, Kathryn; Yen, Yi-Meng; Boyle, Matthew John; Kim, Young-Jo; Millis, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the demographics, metabolic bone health, radiologic features, treatment approaches and recurrence rates of pediatric versus young adult athletes with femoral neck stress fractures. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients <45 years-old who were diagnosed with a femoral neck stress fracture at a single tertiary-care referral center from 2003-2015. Patients who had undergone previous hip surgery or had primary bone disorders/lesions were excluded. Variables analyzed included demographics, presenting symptoms, metabolic bone health (laboratory results, Dexa scores, menstrual history, eating disorder history), imaging, treatment approach and clinical course. Results: Forty-nine patients (mean age 21.4 years, range 5-44, 78% females) met study inclusion criteria, including 28 pediatric patients (mean age 14.4 years, range 5-19 years, 71% females) and 21 young adults (mean age 30.8 years, range 20-44 years, 86% females). A higher percentage of females was seen with each increasing decade of age, with 50% of pediatric patients under 11 years-old being male. Mean BMI was lower (p=0.04) in the pediatric group (20.6 kg/m2 +/-3.42) than the adult group (21.8 kg/m2 +/-2.04). Pain was the presenting complaint in all patients, with pain localized to the groin in 80% of cases. Participation in running sports was higher for the young adult cohort (86%) than the pediatric cohort (50%), while multiple sports were played more by pediatric patients (29%) than young adults (5%). History of previous acute fractures (2%) and previous stress fractures (14%) was identical between groups. Delayed menarche was recorded in 6% of pediatric patients, and menstrual irregularity was reported in 29% and 33% of pediatric and adult females, respectively. The base of the femoral neck was most common location for fracture in both pediatric (67%) and adult (81%) groups, while transcervical fractures were more likely to occur in pediatric (29%) than adult

  1. Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Wook; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). Materials and Methods From June 2002 to May 2012, 40 patients who could be followed-up for more than 1 year after surgery were enrolled in this study. The mean duration of follow-up was 28.5 months (range, 15-97 months) and the average age at the time of surgery was 71.5 years (range, 38-89 years). The fracture types were determined by using the Vancouver classification. Among intraoperative fractures, there were type A in 3 hips, type B2 in 2 hips and type B3 in one. Among postoperative fractures, type AG was present in 5 hips, type AL in 2 hips, type B1 in 15 hips, type B2 in 6 hips, type B3 in 3 hips, and type C in 3 hips. Evaluation of the results was based on bony union, stability of the prosthesis, postoperative complications, and Harris hip score at the final follow-up. Results Bony union was achieved in all but one case and the average time for bony union was 21 weeks. The mean Harris hip score was 86 at the final follow-up. Clinical results were above good in 34 of 40 hips (85.0%). Stem loosening occurred in one patient with a type B1 fracture treated with open reduction and plate fixation. Nonunion was observed in 1 patient with an AG type fracture. Conclusion Open reduction and fixation using a plate with a screw and cerclage wiring provided good results for periprosthetic fractures in patients who had a stable femoral stem without bone defects. Revision surgery with a cementless long stem should be considered in patients with an unstable stem or suspected stability in B1 type of THA using a proximal fixation type. PMID:27536618

  2. An Effective Approach for Optimization of a Composite Intramedullary Nail for Treating Femoral Shaft Fractures.

    PubMed

    Samiezadeh, Saeid; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-12-01

    The high stiffness of conventional intramedullary (IM) nails may result in stress shielding and subsequent bone loss following healing in long bone fractures. It can also delay union by reducing compressive loads at the fracture site, thereby inhibiting secondary bone healing. This paper introduces a new approach for the optimization of a fiber-reinforced composite nail made of carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy based on a combination of the classical laminate theory, beam theory, finite-element (FE) method, and bone remodeling model using irreversible thermodynamics. The optimization began by altering the composite stacking sequence and thickness to minimize axial stiffness, while maximizing torsional stiffness for a given range of bending stiffnesses. The selected candidates for the seven intervals of bending stiffness were then examined in an experimentally validated FE model to evaluate their mechanical performance in transverse and oblique femoral shaft fractures. It was found that the composite nail having an axial stiffness of 3.70 MN and bending and torsional stiffnesses of 70.3 and 70.9 N⋅m², respectively, showed an overall superiority compared to the other configurations. It increased compression at the fracture site by 344.9 N (31%) on average, while maintaining fracture stability through an average increase of only 0.6 mm (49%) in fracture shear movement in transverse and oblique fractures when compared to a conventional titanium-alloy nail. The long-term results obtained from the bone remodeling model suggest that the proposed composite IM nail reduces bone loss in the femoral shaft from 7.9% to 3.5% when compared to a conventional titanium-alloy nail. This study proposes a number of practical guidelines for the design of composite IM nails. PMID:26458035

  3. Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation Versus Reverse Less Invasive Stabilization System-distal Femur for Treating Proximal Femoral Fractures: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuan; Wang, Ying; Ma, XinLong; Ma, JianXiong; Wang, Chen; Zhang, ChengBao; Han, Zhe; Sun, Lei; Lu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of 2 surgical techniques that are used to treat proximal femoral fractures.A systematic literature search (up to December 2014) was conducted in Medline, Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to screen for studies comparing proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) with less invasive stabilization system-distal femur (LISS-DF) for proximal femoral fractures. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of the included studies and extracted data. Surgical information and postoperative outcomes were analyzed.A total of 7 studies with 361 patients who satisfied the eligibility criteria included 3 randomized controlled trials and 4 case-controlled trials associated with PFNA versus LISS in treating proximal femoral fractures. Our results demonstrated that there was a significant reduction in hospital stay and time to weight-bearing ambulation and bone healing for PFNA compared with LISS (odds ratio [OR] -1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.92 to -0.05; OR -7.08, 95% CI -8.32 to -5.84; OR -2.71, 95% CI -4.76 to 0.67). No statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups for operative time, blood loss volume, Harris hip score, and incidence of complications.Based on the results of this analysis, we inferred that PFNA is safer and more effective than reverse LISS-DF in patients undergoing osteosynthesis for proximal femoral fractures, and that PFNA is associated with reduced hospital stays and reduced time to weight-bearing ambulation and bone healing. Nonetheless, in certain cases in which PFNA is not suitable due to abnormal structure of the proximal femur or particularly unstable fractures, the LISS plate technique could be a useful alternative. PMID:27057840

  4. Periprosthetic femoral fracture--a biomechanical comparison between Vancouver type B1 and B2 fixation methods.

    PubMed

    Moazen, Mehran; Mak, Jonathan H; Etchels, Lee W; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Jones, Alison C; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2014-03-01

    Current clinical data suggest a higher failure rate for internal fixation in Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) fixations compared to long stem revision in B2 fractures. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical performance of several fixations in the aforementioned fractures. Finite element models of B1 and B2 fixations, previously corroborated against in vitro experimental models, were compared. The results indicated that in treatment of B1 fractures, a single locking plate can be without complications provided partial weight bearing is followed. In case of B2 fractures, long stem revision and bypassing the fracture gap by two femoral diameters are recommended. Considering the risk of single plate failure, long stem revision could be considered in all comminuted B1 and B2 fractures. PMID:24035619

  5. Delirium is associated with poor rehabilitation outcome in elderly patients treated for femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Birgitta; Lundström, Maria; Borssén, Bengt; Nyberg, Lars; Gustafson, Yngve

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe risk factors for delirium and the impact of delirium on the rehabilitation outcome for patients operated for femoral neck fractures. Sixty-one patients, aged 70 years or older, consecutively admitted to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden for femoral neck fractures were assessed and interviewed during hospitalization and at follow up 4 months after surgery. Delirium occurred in 38 (62%) patients and those who developed delirium were more often demented and/or depressed. Patients with delirium were longer hospitalized and they were more dependent in their activity of daily living (ADL) on discharge and after 4 months. They had poorer psychological well-being and more medical complications than the nondelirious. A large proportion of the patients who developed delirium did not regain their previous walking ability and could not return to their prefracture living accommodation. Delirium after hip fracture surgery is very common especially among patients with dementia or depression. This study shows that delirium has a serious impact on the rehabilitation outcome from both short- and long-term perspectives. Because delirium can be prevented and treated, it is important to improve the care of elderly patients with hip fractures. PMID:15877637

  6. Analysis of mechanical strength to fixing the femoral neck fracture in synthetic bone type Asnis

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Anderson; Lula, Welder Fernandes; de Oliveira, Jonathan Sampaio; Maciel, Rafael Almeida; Souto, Diogo Ranier de Macedo; Godinho, Patrick Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the results of biomechanical assays of fixation of Pauwels type III femoral neck fracture in synthetic bone, using 7.5mm cannulated screws in inverted triangle formation, in relation to the control group. METHODS: Ten synthetic bones were used, from a domestic brand, divided into two groups: test and control. In the test group, a 70° tilt osteotomy of the femoral neck was fixated using three cannulated screws in inverted triangle formation. The resistance of this fixation and its rotational deviation were analyzed at 5mm displacement (phase 1) and 10mm displacement (phase 2). The control group was tested in its integrity until the fracture of the femoral neck occurred. The Mann-Whitney test was used for group analysis and comparison. RESULTS: The values in the test group in phase 1, in samples 1-5, showed a mean of 579N and SD =77N. Rotational deviations showed a mean of 3.33°, SD = 2.63°. In phase 2, the mean was 696N and SD =106N. The values of the maximum load in the control group had a mean of 1329N and SD=177N. CONCLUSION: The analysis of mechanical strength between the groups determined a statistically significant lower value in the test group. Level of Evidence III, Control Case. PMID:25246851

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE SEGMENTAL IMPACTION OF FEMORAL HEAD FOLLOWING AN ACETABULAR FRACTURE SURGICALLY MANAGED

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Carina; Daniachi, Daniel; Keiske Ono, Nelson; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Riccioli, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Correlate the postoperative radiographic evaluation with variables accompanying acetabular fractures in order to determine the predictive factors for segmental impaction of femoral head. Methods: Retrospective analysis of medial files of patients submitted to open reduction surgery with internal acetabular fixation. Within approximately 35 years, 596 patients were treated for acetabular fractures; 267 were followed up for at least two years. The others were excluded either because their follow up was shorter than the minimum time, or as a result of the lack of sufficient data reported on files, or because they had been submitted to non-surgical treatment. The patients were followed up by one of three surgeons of the group using the Merle d'Aubigné and Postel clinical scales as well as radiological studies. Results: Only tow studied variables-age and amount of postoperative reductionshowed statistically significant correlation with femoral head impaction. Conclusions: The quality of reduction-anatomical or with up to 2mm residual deviation-presents a good radiographic evolution, reducing the potential for segmental impaction of the femoral head, a statistically significant finding. PMID:27004191

  8. Bilateral atypical femoral subtrochanteric fractures in a premenopausal patient receiving prolonged bisphosphonate therapy: evidence of severely suppressed bone turnover

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Naoki; Yoda, Takuya; Fujisawa, Junichi; Arai, Katsumitsu; Sakuma, Mayumi; Ninomiya, Hiroshi; Sano, Hiroshige; Endo, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a case of bilateral atypical femoral fractures that occurred in a patient who had been taking bisphosphonate long-term. A 36-year-old premenopausal female diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis had been treated with glucocorticoid and alendronate (5 mg/day) to prevent glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. She was taken to our hospital because she could not walk immediately after falling down from the standing position. A plain radiograph showed a subtrochanteric fracture of the left femur. Four months later, she fell again and sustained a contralateral subtrochanteric fracture. For each fracture, a femoral intramedullary nail was inserted. Delayed union was detected in both sides, and revision surgery with an iliac bone graft was required for implant breakage in the right side. Histomorphometric findings for the ilium revealed remarkably decreased osteoid volume with no osteoclasts and a minimally eroded surface, suggesting that bone turnover was severely suppressed. However, histology of the delayed union site revealed callus formation and some osteoclast appearance, suggesting that fracture healing was occurring. In total, it took 29 months (left) and 24 months (right) until fracture healing was achieved, showing delayed union. This case is extremely rare in that patient who presented with atypical femoral fractures in spite of her premenopausal status. The bone histomorphometric findings from this case suggest that severely suppressed bone turnover is associated with atypical femoral subtrochanteric fracture and can cause delayed union in patients treated with alendronate long-term. PMID:26811712

  9. Functional outcome after successful internal fixation versus salvage arthroplasty of patients with a femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Keijsers, Noël L.; Praet, Stephan F.E.; Heetveld, Martin J.; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine patient independency, health-related and disease-specific quality of life (QOL), gait pattern, and muscle strength in patients after salvage arthroplasty for failed internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture. Design Secondary cohort study to a randomized controlled trial. Setting Multicenter trial in the Netherlands, including 14 academic and non-academic hospitals Patients Patients after salvage arthroplasty for failed internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture were studied. A comparison was made with patients who healed uneventfully after internal fixation. Intervention None (observatory study) Main outcome measurements Patient characteristics, SF-12, and WOMAC scores were collected. Gait parameters were measured using plantar pressure measurement. Maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Groups were compared using univariate analysis. Results Of 248 internal fixation patients (median age 72 years), salvage arthroplasty was performed in 68 patients (27%). Salvage arthroplasty patients had a significantly lower WOMAC score (median 73 versus 90, P=0.016) than patients who healed uneventfully after internal fixation. Health-related QOL (SF-12) and patient independency did not differ significantly between the groups. Gait analysis showed a significantly impaired progression of the center of pressure in the salvage surgery patients (median ratio −8.9 versus 0.4, P=0.013) and a significant greater loss of abduction strength (median −25.4 versus −20.4 N, P=0.025). Conclusion Despite a similar level of dependency and QOL, salvage arthroplasty patients have inferior functional outcome than patients who heal after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture. PMID:24835623

  10. A modified technique to extract fractured femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Magra, Merzesh; Shetty, Ajit; Ng, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The removal of well-fixed broken femoral component and cement mantle can be extremely demanding, time consuming and potentially damaging to the host bone. Different methods have been described to extract broken femoral stem yet this remains one of the most challenging prospect to the revision hip surgeon. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors present two cases underwent a modified sliding cortical window technique utilising a tungsten carbide drill, Charnley pin retractor and an orthopaedic mallet to aid extraction of a fractured cemented femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty. DISCUSSION The modified technique offers a simple and controlled method in extracting a well fixed fractured cemented femoral stem. It has the advantage of retaining the cement mantle with subsequent good seal of the femoral cortical window secured with cable ready system. Furthermore, tungsten carbide drill bit and Charnley pin retractor are relatively readily available to aid the extraction of the broken stem. Finally, it yields the option of implanting a standard femoral stem and obviates the need for bypassing the cortical window with long revision femoral component. CONCLUSION Fractured femoral stem is a rare yet a complex and very demanding prospect to both patients and hip surgeons. The sliding cortical window technique utilising tungsten carbide drill and Charnley pin retractor is technically easy and most importantly; preserves host bone stock with cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty. We believe this technique can be added to the armamentarium of revision hip surgeon when faced with the challenge of extracting a fractured cemented femoral stem. PMID:24858980

  11. A New Case of Fracture of a Modular Femoral Neck Device After a Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Trieb, Klemens; Stadler, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This report addresses a new case of a modular femoral neck fracture after total hip arthroplasty. A now seventy-three-year- old overweight female underwent total hip replacement of the right hip because of osteoarthritis in the year 2002. Then, years later, the head and the polyethylene were changed due to wear. In October 2014, the patient was transferred from the trauma department of her hometown to our department after she had slipped and fallen directly on her right hip. The x-rays done at the trauma department have shown no periprosthetic fracture but a fracture of the modular neck. Therefore, the patient was transferred to our department in order to undergo a revision arthroplasty with change of the stem and head after splitting the femur. PMID:26157528

  12. Could Patient Undergwent Surgical Treatment for Periprosthetic Femoral Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty Return to Their Status before Trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Long; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Noh, Chang-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare preoperative clinical outcomes before occurrence of periprosthetic femoral fracture (status before trauma) with postoperative clinical outcomes (status after operation) in patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of all periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty treated surgically at our institution from January 2010 to January 2014. Among 29 patients who underwent surgical treatment for periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty, 3 patients excluded because of non-union of the fracture site. The clinical outcomes were determined by using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS), Harris hip score (HHS), and ambulatory ability using Koval classification. VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability was assessed for all the included patients at the last follow-up of status before trauma and after operation. Results The mean VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability at the last follow-up of status before trauma was 2.2 (range, 0-4), 78.9 (range, 48-92) and 1.9 (range, 1-5), respectively. The mean VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability at the last follow-up of status after operation was 3.1 (range, 1-5), 68.4 (range, 46-81) and 2.9 (range, 2-6), respectively. The clinical outcome of VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability were significantly worsened after surgical treatment for periprosthetic femoral fracture (P=0.010, P=0.001, and P=0.002, respectively). Conclusion Patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty could not return to their status before trauma, although patients underwent appropriate surgical treatment and the fracture union achieved. PMID:27536650

  13. Cement-in-cement revision for selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Brew, Christopher J; Wilson, Lance J; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Hubble, Matthew J W; Crawford, Ross W

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a biomechanical analysis of the cement-in-cement (c-in-c) technique for fixation of selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures and to assess the degree of cement interposition at the fracture site. Six embalmed cadaveric femora were implanted with a cemented femoral stem. Vancouver Type B1 fractures were created by applying a combined axial and rotational load to failure. The femora were repaired using the c-in-c technique and reloaded to failure. The mean primary fracture torque was 117 Nm (SD 16.6, range 89-133). The mean revision fracture torque was 50 Nm (SD 16.6, range 29-74), which is above the torque previously observed for activities of daily living. Cement interposition at the fracture site was found to be minimal. PMID:23146585

  14. Bilateral femoral neck fractures secondary to chronic carbamazepine use treated by bilateral dynamic hip screw: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sariyilmaz, Kerim; Gulenc, Baris; Ozkunt, Okan; Dikici, Fatih; Yazicioglu, Onder

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bilateral femoral neck fractures without major trauma are rare and related to several conditions. Insufficiency fractures due to the use of anti-epileptic drug are one of the rare causes. This case study is about bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fractures resulting from chronic use of anti-epileptic drug. Presentation of case A 26-year-old woman was referred to our emergency department with a complaint of bilateral groin pain and a 12-year history of irregular carbamazepine use. The diagnosis was bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fractures due to irregular long-term carbamazepine use. One-stage bilateral dynamic hip screw osteosynthesis was performed. After 2 years of follow up, good result was obtained. Discussion There are several risk factors for insufficiency fracture, and antiepileptic drug related osteoporosis is one of the reason. These drugs have negative effect on bone methabolism and bone mineral density. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature of bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fracture due to chronic carbamazepine use. Joint and bone pain with a history of long-term use of anti-epileptic drug should be investigated carefully, and insufficiency fractures should be kept in mind. PMID:25528039

  15. Influence of age on delayed surgical treatment of proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Lisiane Pinto; do Nascimento, Leandra Delfim; Campos, Tulio Vinicius de Oliveira; Paiva, Edson Barreto; de Andrade, Marco Antonio Percope; Guimarães, Henrique Cerqueira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To investigate the influence of patients' age on the delay between diagnosis and surgical treatment of proximal femoral fractures METHODS : This is a retrospective study, con-ducted at a tertiary university hospital, including all patients admitted with proximal femoral fractures between March 2013 and March 2014. The participants were categorized into four groups according to age levels. The groups were compared according to demographics, comorbidities, fracture type, trau-ma circumstances, and time between diagnosis and surgical procedure RESULTS : One hundred and sixty one patients were included, 37 adults and 124 elderly. Among adults, the mean delay between diagnosis and surgical procedure was 6.4±5.3 days; among elderly the delay was 9.5±7.6 days. There was a progressive increase in the delay from the young-adults group through the elderly individuals (Kruskal-Wallis: 13.7; p=0.003) CONCLUSION : In spite of being the patients most susceptible to complications due to surgical delay, the elderly individuals pre-sented the longest delays from admission to surgical treatment. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Study. PMID:27057145

  16. Management of pathological femoral fracture secondary to breast cancer in pregnancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CIAVATTINI, ANDREA; MANCIOLI, FRANCESCA; PACI, ENRICO; POLITANO, ROCCO

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis resulting from breast cancer in pregnancy is rare. In the literature there are few reports regarding osteolytic lesions in pregnancy and no data on the treatment of such femoral fractures. The present study reports a case of a 29-week primigravida presenting with severe lumbosciatica in the left side, refractory to medical therapy. During neurosurgical examination a spontaneous pathological fracture of the left femur occurred. Damage control orthopedic principals were applied and a biopsy specimen from the femoral lesion was obtained, providing a diagnosis of metastases from breast adenocarcinoma. Cesarean section was performed at 32 gestational weeks. Following delivery, an internal fixator was placed in the left femur for definitive treatment of the fracture and staging of cancer was conducted. Subsequently, adjuvant treatment comprising left mastectomy and percutaneous radiofrequency thermoablation of the sacroiliac lesion were performed. A follow-up one-year following percutaneous radiofrequency thermoablation of the sacroiliac lesion detected no metastatic bone pain, and identified a stable sacroiliac lesion. PMID:26870230

  17. Treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children using the "Tobruk" method.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Turlough M P; Murphy, Diarmuid P; Mullett, Hannan; Moore, David P; Fogarty, Esmond E; Dowling, Frank E

    2006-08-01

    The "Tobruk" technique of plaster augmentation of a Thomas' splint can be used for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children. The radiological and clinical data of 118 patients treated using this method were reviewed over a consecutive 3-year period. The mean age of the patients was 4.25 years. Mean hospital stay was 14.11 days. Mean time spent in the "Tobruk" splint was 44.77 days. Loss of reduction during splintage occurred in 9.32% of patients. Skin complications occurred in 5 patients (4.2%), and cast repairs were necessary in 3 patients. "Tobruk" splinting is a relatively safe and effective way of treating femoral shaft fractures in children. Although its use is not widespread, especially in the United States, until better results are achieved with spica casting and elastic stable intramedullary nails, it does provide a valid option in the treatment of these fractures. A controlled randomized prospective trial with long-term follow-up is needed to fully elucidate its value. PMID:16983865

  18. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  19. Addition of an anti-rotation screw to the dynamic hip screw for femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Makki, Daoud; Mohamed, Ahmed M; Gadiyar, Rajeev; Patterson, Marc

    2013-07-01

    The authors investigated the use of an anti-rotation screw with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) during internal fixation of Garden I and II femoral neck fractures. Sixty-five patients with Garden I and II femoral neck fractures (mean age, 70 years) were treated with internal fixation at the authors' institution. In 31 patients, a 2-hole DHS was used alone (group 1), and in 34 patients, the DHS was combined with an anti-rotation screw placed in the cranial part of femoral head and neck (group 2). Patients' preinjury function and mental level were assessed using the Barthel index and the Abbreviated Mental test, respectively. The outcome measures included cost implications, operative time, and intraoperative radiation dose. The modified Harris Hip Score and a radiological assessment were performed at a mean of 11 months (range, 8-24 months) postoperatively. The use of the anti-rotation screw was associated with a longer operative time (mean, 44.54 minutes in group 1 vs 51.52 minutes in group 2; P<.0001) and more fluoroscopy screening (mean dose area product, 28.39 cGy/cm(2) in group 1 vs 44.33 cGy/cm(2) in group 2; P=.03). The additional cost of using an anti-rotation screw was £106 ($170) per case. No difference existed between the 2 groups with regard to radiological union, onset of avascular necrosis, and rate of revision surgeries. An anti-rotation screw, used with the dynamic hip screw, involves extra costs, prolongs operative time, and requires more intraoperative fluoroscopy screening but offers no advantages with regard to fracture union. PMID:23823042

  20. Autograft Transfer from the Ipsilateral Femoral Condyle in Depressed Tibial Plateau Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sferopoulos, N.K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction : The rationale for operative treatment of depressed tibial plateau fractures is anatomic reduction, stable fixation and grafting. Grafting options include autogenous bone graft or bone substitutes. Methods : The autograft group included 18 patients with depressed tibial plateau fractures treated with autogenous bone grafting from the ipsilateral femoral condyle following open reduction and internal fixation. According to Schatzker classification, there were 9 type II, 4 type III, 2 type IV and 3 type V lesions. The average time to union and the hospital charges were compared with the bone substitute group. The latter included 17 patients who had an excellent outcome following treatment of split and/or depressed lateral plateau fractures, using a similar surgical technique but grafting with bone substitutes (allografts). Results : Excellent clinical and radiological results were detected in the autograft group after an average follow-up of 28 months (range 12-37). The average time to union in the autograft group was 14 weeks (range 12-16), while in the bone substitute group it was 18 weeks (range 16-20). The mean total cost was 1276 Euros for the autograft group and 2978 Euros for the bone substitute group. Discussion : The use of autogenous graft from the ipsilateral femoral condyle following open reduction and internal fixation of depressed tibial plateau fractures provided enough bone to maintain the height of the tibial plateau and was not associated with any donor site morbidity. Using this method, the surgical time was not significantly elongated and the rehabilitation was not affected. It also exhibited faster fracture healing without postoperative loss of reduction and it was less expensive than the use of bone substitutes. PMID:25317215

  1. A Displaced Femoral Neck Stress Fracture in an Amenorrheic Adolescent Female Runner

    PubMed Central

    Goolsby, Marci A.; Barrack, Michelle T.; Nattiv, Aurelia

    2012-01-01

    This case demonstrates the potential serious consequences of the female athlete triad and its effects on bone. Displaced femoral neck stress fractures cause significant morbidity, and this case highlights the preventable nature of this injury. The treatment was focused on improving low energy availability, and, although challenging, improvements were made. This injury could have been prevented if the signs and symptoms of her injury had been addressed and there had been better knowledge of her risk factors. This case highlights the need for further education in the sports and health communities. PMID:23016107

  2. Lateral femoral condyle osteochondral fracture combined to patellar dislocation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Callewier, A; Monsaert, A; Lamraski, G

    2009-02-01

    The authors report the case of an osteochondral fracture involving the weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle in a 23-year-old sportsman. The defect was concomitant to a lateral patellar dislocation involving a rare injury mechanism. Fixation of the osteochondral fragment was performed with bioabsorbable pins and healing was achieved within an acceptable time. Clinical and radiographic outcome at one year is highly satisfactory and bioabsorbable implant fixation reveals to be a worthwhile option in such a case. This rare lesion is diagnostically challenging and requires an adapted and prompt treatment. PMID:19251243

  3. Femoral shaft fracture osteosynthesis in a critically ill patient under Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO)

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Cristobal; Salineros, Matias; Diaz, Rodrigo; Carvajal, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is an invasive procedure used in critically ill patients with catastrophic pulmonary failure or cardiogenic shock in which conventional management has failed. These patients are managed with permanent anticoagulation, with increased bleeding risk. Hemorrhage is the main reported complication. Case: A 25-year-old polytraumatized woman, both lower limbs amputated and a left femoral shaft fracture with catastrophic pulmonary failure (Murray score 4) that required intensive management care with ECMO. During her evolution definitive femoral shaft osteosynthesis with a nail as required and the medical team decided to operate on the patient under ECMO. She recovered with fluctuations in her hematocrit, but was hemodynamically stable. The patient recovered satisfactorily, was weaned from ECMO and commenced her rehabilitation program. At 16 months, she was almost autovalent, and full consolidation was achieved, with no complication of the implants. Discussion: ECMO is a life-saving support, but requires permanent anticoagulation, which implies a high risk of hemorrhages, specially for surgical treatment. This patient underwent an osteosynthesis surgery satisfactorily. Hematoma was the only complication of her intramedullary femoral nail, without compromising hemodynamics. This case shows that patients on ECMO can undergo a major orthopedic surgery in selected cases. PMID:27194108

  4. Effect of Teriparatide on Healing of Atypical Femoral Fractures: A Systemic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates (BPs) are the most commonly used anti-osteoporotic drugs, which have been proven to reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. However, use of BPs, particularly for long periods of time, is associated with an increased risk of atypical femoral fracture (AFF). Healing of BP-associated AFF is usually delayed because of suppressed bone turnover. Teriparatide (TPTD), a recombinant form of parathyroid hormone (PTH), enhances bone healing in patients with delayed healing or non-union. Methods In this study, we summarized and performed a systemic review of the published literature on treatment of AFF using TPTD. Results Although there is a lack of level 1 studies on the evidence of TPTD in promoting bone union in AFFs, this systemic review of the available literature revealed that TPTD works positively in AFFs, and we put together the evidence that TPTD is a viable treatment option for enhancing fracture healing in AFFs. Conclusions While anecdotal evidence of beneficial effects of TPTD on fracture healing offer limited guidance for clinical decision making, a better understanding of the role of TPTD in fracture healing may be elucidated with future prospective trials. PMID:26713309

  5. Osteosynthesis of ununited femoral neck fracture by internal fixation combined with iliac crest bone chips and muscle pedicle bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, D D; Pal, A K; Baksi, D P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ununited femoral neck fracture is seen commonly in developing countries due to delayed presentation or failure of primary internal fixation. Such fractures, commonly present with partial or total absorption of femoral neck, osteonecrosis of femoral head in 8–30% cases with upward migration of trochanter posing problem for osteosynthesis, especially in younger individuals. Several techniques for treatment of such conditions are described like osteotomies or nonvascularied cortical or cancellous bone grafting provided varying degrees of success in terms of fracture union but unsatisfactory long term results occurred due to varying incidence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head. Moreover, in presence of AVN of femoral head neither free fibular graft nor cancellous bone graft is satisfactory. The vascularied bone grafting by deep circumflex iliac artery based on iliac crest bone grafting, free vascularied fibular grafting and muscle pedicle periosteal grafting showed high incidence of success rate. Osteosynthesis is the preferred treatment of choice in ununited femoral neck fracture in younger individuals. Materials and Methods: Of the 293 patients operated during the period from June 1977 to June 2009, 42 were lost to followup. Seven patients with gluteus medius muscle pedicle bone grafting (MPBG) were excluded. Thus, out of 244 patients, 208 (85.3%) untreated nonunion and 36 (14.7%) following failure of primary internal fixation were available for studies. Time interval between the date of injury and operation in untreated nonunion cases was mean 6.5 months and in failed internal fixation cases was mean 11.2 months. Ages of the patients varied from 16 to 55 years. Seventy patients had partial and 174 had subtotal absorption of the femoral neck. Evidence of avascular necrosis (AVN) femoral head was found histologically in 135 (54.3%) and radiologically in 48 (19.7%) patients. The patients were operated by open reduction of fracture, cannulated hip

  6. Site-Dependent Reference Point Microindentation Complements Clinical Measures for Improved Fracture Risk Assessment at the Human Femoral Neck.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Thomas; Coutts, Louise V; D'Angelo, Stefania; Dunlop, Douglas G; Oreffo, Richard O C; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C; Thurner, Phillipp J

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to traditional approaches to fracture risk assessment using clinical risk factors and bone mineral density (BMD), a new technique, reference point microindentation (RPI), permits direct assessment of bone quality; in vivo tibial RPI measurements appear to discriminate patients with a fragility fracture from controls. However, it is unclear how this relates to the site of the most clinically devastating fracture, the femoral neck, and whether RPI provides information complementary to that from existing assessments. Femoral neck samples were collected at surgery after low-trauma hip fracture (n = 46; 17 male; aged 83 [interquartile range 77-87] years) and compared, using RPI (Biodent Hfc), with 16 cadaveric control samples, free from bone disease (7 male; aged 65 [IQR 61-74] years). A subset of fracture patients returned for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) assessment (Hologic Discovery) and, for the controls, a micro-computed tomography setup (HMX, Nikon) was used to replicate DXA scans. The indentation depth was greater in femoral neck samples from osteoporotic fracture patients than controls (p < 0.001), which persisted with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and height (p < 0.001) but was site-dependent, being less pronounced in the inferomedial region. RPI demonstrated good discrimination between fracture and controls using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.79 to 0.89), and a model combining RPI to clinical risk factors or BMD performed better than the individual components (AUC = 0.88 to 0.99). In conclusion, RPI at the femoral neck discriminated fracture cases from controls independent of BMD and traditional risk factors but dependent on location. The clinical RPI device may, therefore, supplement risk assessment and requires testing in prospective cohorts and comparison between the clinically accessible tibia and the femoral neck. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral

  7. Open reduction and plate fixation of femoral shaft fractures in children aged 4 to 10.

    PubMed

    Eren, Osman Tugrul; Kucukkaya, Metin; Kockesen, Caglar; Kabukcuoglu, Yavuz; Kuzgun, Unal

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective review of 40 children aged 4 to 10 years with 46 femur fractures treated with open reduction and plate fixation is presented. Follow-up time was 6.3 years (range 2.5-17.5). There were no nonunions. One case of osteomyelitis and one refracture occurred. Leg-length discrepancy averaging 1.2 cm (range 0.4-1.8), with lengthening on the operated side, was observed in 15 patients. Although there is some risk for complications, and although good early results have been reported with elastic intramedullary nails, plate fixation continues to be a viable alternative in the surgical treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children aged 4 to 10. PMID:12604949

  8. Effects of Sclerostin Antibody on the Healing of Femoral Fractures in Ovariectomised Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Rui, Yunfeng; Cheng, Tin Yan; Huang, Shuo; Xu, Liangliang; Meng, Fanbiao; Lee, Wayne Yuk Wai; Zhang, Ting; Li, Nan; Li, Chaoyang; Ke, Huazhu; Li, Gang

    2016-03-01

    The inhibition of sclerostin by the systemic administration of a monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) significantly increased bone mass and strength in fractured bones in animal models and non-fractured bones in ovariectomised (OVX) rats. In this study, the effects of Scl-Ab on healing were examined in a closed fracture model in OVX rats. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats underwent an ovariectomy or a sham operation at 4 months of age, and a closed fracture of the right femur was performed 3 months later. Subcutaneous injections with Scl-Ab (25 mg/kg) or saline were then administered on day 1 after the fracture and twice a week for 8 weeks (n = 20 per group), at which time the fractured femurs were harvested for micro-computed tomography analysis, four-point bending mechanical testing and histomorphometric analysis to examine bone mass, bone strength and dynamic bone formation at the fracture site. The angiogenesis at the fracture site was also examined. Bone marrow stem cells were also isolated from the fractured bone to perform a colony-forming unit (CFU) assay and an alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)) CFU assay. OVX rats treated with Scl-Ab for 8 weeks had significantly increased bone mineral density and relative bone volume compared with OVX rats treated with saline. Similarly, maximum loading, energy to maximum load and stiffness in Scl-Ab-treated OVX rats were significantly higher than those in saline controls. The mineral apposition rate (MAR), mineralising surface (MS/BS) and bone formation rate (BFR/BS) were also significantly increased in Scl-Ab-treated group compared with the saline-treated group in OVX rats. Furthermore, the Scl-Ab-treated group had more CFUs and ALP(+) CFUs than the saline-treated group in OVX rats. No significant difference in angiogenesis at the fracture site was found between the groups. Our study demonstrated that Scl-Ab helped to increase bone mass, bone strength and bone formation at the fracture site in a closed femoral fracture

  9. Absence of femoral cortical thickening in long-term bisphosphonate users: Implications for atypical femur fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Foster; Wang, Zhong; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The radiographs of patients on long term bisphosphonates with atypical femur fractures demonstrate markedly thick cortices at the site of the fracture. We conducted a prospective clinical study to determine if cortical thickening is increased in long term bisphosphonate users. We recruited 43 patients who had taken bisphosphonates for more than 5 years. A group of 45 healthy volunteers and 12 patients recently diagnosed with osteoporosis served as controls. We measured the cortical thickening as the ratio of femoral cortical thickness to diameter of the femur, and looked for cortical beaking. No difference in the cortical thickness ratio was observed between long term bisphosphonate users and osteoporotic controls (0.53 vs. 0.54, p= 0.659). No cases of cortical beaking were seen and no increase in thigh pain was observed. The power of the study was 95% to detect a 10% difference in cortical thickness ratio. We conclude that long term bisphosphonate use does not produce a generalized increase in subtrochanteric femoral cortical thickening in the majority of patients. PMID:24468718

  10. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN) Versus Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS)

    PubMed Central

    Jonnes, Cyril; SM, Shishir; Najimudeen, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) is still considered the gold standard for treating intertrochanteric fractures by many. Not many studies compare the DHS with Proximal femoral nail (PFN), in Type II intertrochanteric fractures (Boyd and Griffin classification). This study was done to compare the functional and radiological outcome of PFN with DHS in treatment of Type II intertrochanteric fractures. Methods: From October 2012 to March 2015, a prospective comparative study was done where 30 alternative cases of type II intertrochanteric fractures of hip were operated using PFN or DHS. Intraoperative complications were noted. Functional outcome was assessed using Harris Hip Score and radiological findings were compared at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results: The average age of the patients was 60 years. In our series we found that patients with DHS had increased intraoperative blood loss (159ml), longer duration of surgery (105min), and required longer time for mobilization while patients who underwent PFN had lower intraoperative blood loss (73ml), shorter duration of surgery (91min), and allowed early mobilization. The average limb shortening in DHS group was 9.33 mm as compared with PFN group which was only 4.72 mm. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early post-op period. At the end of 12th month, there was not much difference in the functional outcome between the two groups. Conclusion: PFN is better than DHS in type II intertrochanteric fractures in terms of decreased blood loss, reduced duration of surgery, early weight bearing and mobilization, reduced hospital stay, decreased risk of infection and decreased complications. PMID:26894214

  11. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

    PubMed

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R; Abrahamsen, Bo; Adler, Robert A; Brown, Thomas D; Cheung, Angela M; Cosman, Felicia; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Dell, Richard; Dempster, David; Einhorn, Thomas A; Genant, Harry K; Geusens, Piet; Klaushofer, Klaus; Koval, Kenneth; Lane, Joseph M; McKiernan, Fergus; McKinney, Ross; Ng, Alvin; Nieves, Jeri; O'Keefe, Regis; Papapoulos, Socrates; Sen, Howe Tet; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Weinstein, Robert S; Whyte, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent published reports concerning atypical femur fractures, as well as preclinical studies that could provide insight into their pathogenesis. A case definition was developed so that subsequent studies report on the same condition. The task force defined major and minor features of complete and incomplete atypical femoral fractures and recommends that all major features, including their location in the subtrochanteric region and femoral shaft, transverse or short oblique orientation, minimal or no associated trauma, a medial spike when the fracture is complete, and absence of comminution, be present to designate a femoral fracture as atypical. Minor features include their association with cortical thickening, a periosteal reaction of the lateral cortex, prodromal pain, bilaterality, delayed healing, comorbid conditions, and concomitant drug exposures, including BPs, other antiresorptive agents, glucocorticoids, and proton pump inhibitors. Preclinical data evaluating the effects of BPs on collagen cross-linking and maturation, accumulation of microdamage and advanced glycation end products, mineralization, remodeling, vascularity, and angiogenesis lend biologic plausibility to a potential association with long-term BP use. Based on published and unpublished data and the widespread use of BPs, the incidence of atypical femoral fractures associated with BP therapy for osteoporosis appears to be very low, particularly compared with the number of vertebral, hip, and other fractures that are prevented by BPs. Moreover, a causal association between BPs and atypical fractures has not been established. However, recent observations suggest that the risk rises with increasing duration of

  12. The Result of In Situ Pinning for Valgus Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures of Patients over 70 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Chung; Lee, Joo-Yup; Oh, Seungbae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the outcome of fixation with cannulated screws for valgus impacted femoral neck fractures in patients over 70 years of age. Materials and Methods We reviewed the outcome in 33 patients older than 70 years with valgus impacted femoral neck fractures who were treated with cannulated screws fixation from May 2007 to December 2010. These patients were followed for at least a year. We assessed the fixation failure rate, body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD) of proximal femur, distance between screw tip and joint, number of screws and time from fracture to operation. Results We identified six patients (18.2%) with failure. Two patients with subtrochanteric fractures through the screw insertion site and another patient with osteonecrosis were excluded from the fixation failure group. No difference was found in age, BMI, BMD of proximal femur, distance between screw tip and joint, number of screws and time from fracture to operation between failure and non-failure groups. Conclusion The failure rate of cannualted screw fixation for valgus impacted femoral neck fractures in the elderly patients was not low. Risk of failure should be considered in the management of these patients and accurate assessment for fracture type should be performed using computed tomogram and clinical evaluation.

  13. Bone fracture in a rat femoral fracture model is associated with the activation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, QIANKUN; LUO, DEQING; LI, TENG; LIU, ZHIRONG; ZOU, WEITAO; WANG, LEI; LIN, DASHENG; LIAN, KEJIAN

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, which is a mechanism for the turnover of intracellular molecules and organelles, protects cells during stress responses; however, the role of autophagy in the stages of bone fracture remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the process of autophagy in bone tissue at different time-points after fracture. A femur fracture model was established in male adult Wistar rats via surgery. The protein expression of microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II) was analyzed in a femur fracture (experimental) group and a sham-surgery group using immunofluorescence. The protein expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was used to investigate the cell proliferation in bone tissue following fracture via immunohistochemical analysis. The correlation between cell proliferation and autophagy was analyzed using linear regression. LC3-II protein was constitutively expressed in the sham-surgery group; however, compared with the expression in the sham-surgery group, the LC3-II expression in the experimental group was significantly increased at each time-point (P<0.05). Similarly, immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of PCNA-positive cells in each section was significantly increased following fracture injury (P<0.01). A comparison of the LC3-II- and PCNA-positive rates in the experimental group rats at each time-point revealed a linear correlation (R2=0.43, P<0.01). In conclusion, surgically induced fracture in rats is associated with an increase in LC3-II and PCNA protein expression during the initial stages of fracture injury, and a correlation exists between the expression of the two proteins. These results suggest that potential treatment aimed at improving fracture healing should target the process of autophagy. PMID:26640535

  14. Bone Fragility Beyond Strength and Mineral Density: Raman Spectroscopy Predicts Femoral Fracture Toughness in a Murine Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Maher, Jason R.; Takahata, Masahiko; Schwarz, Edward M.; Berger, Andrew J.; Awad, Hani A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical prediction of bone fracture risk primarily relies on measures of bone mineral density (BMD). BMD is strongly correlated with bone strength, but strength is independent of fracture toughness, which refers to the bone’s resistance to crack initiation and propagation. In that sense, fracture toughness is more relevant to assessing fragility-related fracture risk, independent of trauma. We hypothesized that bone biochemistry, determined by Raman spectroscopy, predicts bone fracture toughness better than BMD. This hypothesis was tested in tumor necrosis factor-transgenic mice (TNF-tg), which develop inflammatory-erosive arthritis and osteoporosis. The left femurs of TNF-tg and wild type (WT) littermates were measured with Raman spectroscopy and micro-computed tomography. Fracture toughness was assessed by cutting a sharp notch into the anterior surface of the femoral mid-diaphysis and propagating the crack under 3 point bending. Femoral fracture toughness of TNF-tg mice was significantly reduced compared to WT controls (p=0.04). A Raman spectrum-based prediction model of fracture toughness was generated by partial least squares regression (PLSR). Raman spectrum PLSR analysis produced strong predictions of fracture toughness, while BMD was not significantly correlated and produced very weak predictions. Raman spectral components associated with mineralization quality and bone collagen were strongly leveraged in predicting fracture toughness, reiterating the limitations of mineralization density alone. PMID:23261243

  15. Bilateral Femoral Neck Fractures in A Young Patient Suffering from Hypophosphatasia, Due to A First Time Epileptic Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, N; Bache, E; Clare, T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We report a case of an adolescent sustaining bilateral femoral neck fractures due to a first time epileptic seizure, as a result of expansion of his known syrinx. Case Report: A 19-year-old patient suffering from hypophosphatasia (HPP), Arnold-Chiari malformation, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt sustained a trivial fall with profound pain and an inability to mobilize. Radiographs demonstrated a right-sided Garden-4 femoral neck and left-sided multi-fragmentary intracapsular/extracapsular fractures. The patient had previously suffered bilateral proximal femoral shaft fractures, treated with intramedullary unlocked nail fixation that was still in situ. Operative treatment with an exchange to Synthes Adolescent Lateral Recon nail was performed on the right with two Recon screws inserted into the femoral head. On the left, the existing Pedinail was preserved with an additional single screw inserted into the femoral head. In addition, 3 months of non-mobilization was required for adequate bone healing. After 1-year from time of injury, there is no avascular necrosis on radiographs and the patient is mobilizing pain-free. Conclusion: Patients with hypophosphatasia have delayed bone healing. We recommend surgical fixation with an intramedullary device and periods of non-mobilization until there is radiographical evidence of adequate bone healing. PMID:27299074

  16. Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation in Treatment of Intertrochanteric Hip Fractures: a Retrospective Study in 113 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadic, Sahmir; Custovic, Svemir; Jasarevuc, Mahir; Fazlic, Mirsad; Krupic, Ferid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The best treatment for intertrochanteric fractures remains controversial. Many methods have been recommended. Aim: We aimed to assess the results of osteosynthesis using the Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation (PFNA) system. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 113 consecutive patients with intertrochanteric fractures treated with PFNA. Fractures were classified in accordance with the AO/OTA classification system into the groups A1, A2 and A3. The postoperative quality of fracture reduction was described as good, acceptable or poor. The location of the blade within the head was recorded as per the Cleveland method. Tip-apex distance (TAD) was used as a method for evaluating screw position. Pre-fracture and postoperative functional level were evaluated by the new mobility score (NMS). Results: The average age at the time of surgery was 75.9 years. The majority, 75 (66.3 %), were unstable fracture types. The reduction was good in 67 (61.4 %) cases. Of the 24 deaths, 19 patients had comorbidities (p < 0.001). The number of deaths in the first 6 months was significantly higher than in the next 6 months (p = 0.001). The mean TAD was 25.6 mm. The Cleveland zone centre-centre was the most common placement of the blade, accounting for 33 (29 %) of the cases. Reoperation was required in four patients. There were four patients with cut-out. The pre-facture mean value NMS was 8.6 (SD 1.1) and the postoperative mean value was 4.3 (SD 3.6). Conclusion: We concluded that PFNA offers biomechanical advantages, but the best position of the blade is still unknown. PMID:26843723

  17. Cemented hemiarthroplasty in traumatic displaced femoral neck fractures and deep vein thrombosis: is there really a link?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Nashi, Nazrul; Makandura, Milindu Chanaka; Krishna, Lingaraj

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Traumatic displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly can be treated with cemented or uncemented hemiarthroplasty with good outcomes. Earlier studies reported a higher incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) associated with cemented prostheses in elective total hip or knee arthroplasty. In addition, the hypercoagulable state after a traumatic femoral neck fracture and possible thrombogenic properties of bone cement could put these patients at greater risk for thromboembolism. We aimed to compare the incidence of DVT and progression to pulmonary embolism (PE) or mortality in cemented and uncemented hemiarthroplasty. METHODS The data of 271 patients treated with cemented or uncemented hemiarthroplasty after a traumatic displaced femoral neck fracture was retrospectively analysed for the incidence of DVT. The level of thrombosis, progression to PE and mortality were compared. RESULTS There were 133 (49.1%) patients with cemented hemiarthroplasty, while 138 (50.9%) had uncemented hemiarthroplasty. The patients had an average age of 76.6 (range 53–99) years and 11 (4.1%) patients had DVT. There were no significant differences in development of DVT, level of thrombosis, PE and mortality regardless of whether a cemented or an uncemented prosthesis was used. CONCLUSION Cemented hemiarthroplasty is not associated with higher risks of DVT, PE or mortality in patients with traumatic displaced femoral neck fracture. Cemented prostheses can be safely used for this group of patients. PMID:26892829

  18. Tissue level microstructure and mechanical properties of the femoral head in the proximal femur of fracture patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linwei; Meng, Guangwei; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Gao, Jiazi; Fan, Yubo

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the regional variations of trabecular morphological parameters and mechanical parameters of the femoral head, as well as to determine the relationship between trabecular morphological and mechanical parameters. Seven femoral heads from patients with fractured proximal femur were scanned using a micro-CT system. Each femoral head was divided into 12 sub-regions according to the trabecular orientation. One trabecular cubic model was reconstructed from each sub-region. A total of 81 trabecular models were reconstructed, except three destroyed sub-regions from two femoral heads during the surgery. Trabecular morphological parameters, i.e. trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), specific bone surface (BS/BV), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), structural model index (SMI), and degree of anisotropy (DA) were measured. Micro-finite element analyses were performed for each cube to obtain the apparent Young's modulus and tissue level von Mises stress distribution under 1 % compressive strain along three orthogonal directions, respectively. Results revealed significant regional variations in the morphological parameters (). Young's moduli along the trabecular orientation were significantly higher than those along the other two directions. In general, trabecular mechanical properties in the medial region were lower than those in the lateral region. Trabecular mechanical parameters along the trabecular orientation were significantly correlated with BS/BV, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and DA. In this study, regional variations of microstructural features and mechanical properties in the femoral head of patients with proximal femur fracture were thoroughly investigated at the tissue level. The results of this study will help to elucidate the mechanism of femoral head fracture for reducing fracture risk and developing treatment strategies for the elderly.

  19. Fracture of Uncemented Revision Femoral Stems in three Arthroplasty Patients: A Case Series with three different brands

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Rajiv; Kelly, Ian; Quinlan, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture of stems in primary total hip arthroplasty is a known complication and has been attributed to varus positioning, excessive weight of the patient, resorption of the femoral calcar and failure of the cement mantle. Fractures in uncemented revision femoral stems are rare and are attributed to reduction in proximal support either in the form of bone loss or an extended trochanteric osteotomy [ETO] against a distally well- fixed stem. Also, undersized stems and high BMI to increase the risk of stem fracture. Case Report: We report 3 cases of uncemented revision stem fractures. Case 1 is a 77 year old male, Case 2 is a 71- year-old female, case 3 an 82-year-old male. All three patients had significant proximal femoral osteolysis. All three had an extended trochanteric osteotomy for the revision surgery. The hips had remained in-situ for 4, 2 and 5 years respectively prior to fracture. Conclusion: When planning complex revision cases involving long uncemented stems, attention should be given to the above-mentioned variables. ETO non-union and proximal bone loss play an important role in stem fractures. Stem failure can occur irrespective of the make, and factors such as adequate stem size and good diaphyseal fit are non negotiable. PMID:27298992

  20. [Non-dislocated osteoporotic insufficiency fracture of the medial femoral neck. SPECT/CT makes the diagnostic difference].

    PubMed

    Rieger, B; Friederich, N F; Rasch, H; Hirschmann, M T

    2014-04-01

    Osteoporotic fragility fractures of the femoral neck are the most common type of fractures in the elderly and are associated with a high mortality. Most frequently these fractures are due to falls but spontaneous onset has also been described. In these patients the insufficient quantity and quality of the osteoporotic bone finally leads to the development of a fragility or insufficiency fracture. In some cases of nondisplaced insufficiency fractures the diagnosis cannot be established by conventional radiographs alone and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single proton emission computed tomography (SPECT) or SPECT/CT are considered as diagnostic adjuncts. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient who had complained of ongoing weight-bearing pelvic pain for over 6 months. There was no history of trauma. The clinical conventional radiographs as well as CT could not elucidate the cause of the problems. To differentiate between lumbal and hip pain a SPECT/CT was performed and the diagnosis of a medial femoral neck insufficiency fracture was established. In the delayed phase a band-like increased tracer uptake within the medial femoral neck was observed. The SPECT/CT procedure is a promising diagnostic alternative for geriatric patients and can be particularly recommended in cases of persistent unclear pelvic or lumbar spine pain in the elderly. PMID:23949134

  1. Simultaneous Bilateral Femoral Neck Stress Fracture in a Young Stone Mason

    PubMed Central

    Khadabadi, Nikhil A.; Patil, Kiran S.

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral stress fractures of the femoral neck are very uncommon and bilateral involvement is even rarer. They commonly occur in athletes, military recruits, older persons, or individuals with underlying metabolic disorders and very seldom in normal individuals. We present a rare case of simultaneous bilateral fracture neck of femur in a 25-year-old man who came with complaints of pain in bilateral groin for 1 month. There was no history of trauma or history suggestive of excessive activity prior to the onset of pain, but there was history of lifting heavy weights daily. On evaluation with MRI scan bilateral fracture of the femur neck was diagnosed and patient was operated on bilaterally with internal fixation done using dynamic hip screw. Patient then regained his routine activity over a period of 6 months and on follow-up at 1 year no avascular necrosis changes were seen in the femur head. We presented this case because of its unusual presentation and the diagnostic challenge it poses. PMID:26101680

  2. Atypical femoral fracture in a 51-year-old woman: Revealing a hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Maman, Esther; Briot, Karine; Roux, Christian

    2016-05-01

    We report a 51-year old woman who suffered 2 atypical subtrochanteric femoral fractures (AFFs). She had a history of several metatarsal fractures. She had a normal bone densitometry. An adult form of hypophosphatasia (HPP) was diagnosed from low serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue nonspecific isoenzyme of ALP (TNSALP) mutation analysis revealing 2 heterozygous mutations: c.299C>T (p. T100M) and c.571G>A (p. E191K). Low ALP is the hallmark of the diagnosis of HPP; which is associated in adults with premature loss of deciduous teeth, recurrent metatarsal stress fractures, and joints and tendons disorders. The incidence of AFFs in the population is 5.9 per 100,000 person-years. Physicians and patients with bone fragility must pay attention to prodromal pain, which require urgent radiographic evaluation of both femurs. Rheumatoid arthritis, use of glucocorticoids, and proton pump inhibitors have been associated with an excess risk of AFFs. Healthy subjects carrying a TNSALP mutation with low ALP value may be exposed to develop AFF spontaneously or while receiving potent anti-resorptive drugs. Low ALP must be checked as a cause of bone fragility. PMID:26992955

  3. Biomechanical analysis and clinical effects of bridge combined fixation system for femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-xing; Xiong, Ying; Deng, Hong; Jia, Fu; Gu, Shao; Liu, Bai-lian; Li, Qun-hui; Pu, Qi; Zhang, Zhong-Zi

    2014-09-01

    This work aimed to compare the stress distribution and mechanical properties of our bridge combined fixation system and commonly used metal locking plate screw system by finite element analysis and by using the Zwick/Z100 testing machine. In addition, we also investigated the clinical outcome of our bridge combined fixation system for femoral fractures in 59 patients from June 2005 to January 2013. As a result, the stress distribution in the bone plate and screws of metal locking plate screw system during walking and climbing stairs was significantly lower than that of metal locking plate screw system. No significant difference in the displacement was observed between two systems. The equivalent bending stiffness of bridge combined fixation system was significantly lower than that of metal locking plate screw system. There were no significant differences in the bending strength, yield load, and maximum force between two systems. All the cases were followed up for 12-24 months (average 18 months). The X-ray showed bone callus was formed in most patients after 3 months, and the fracture line was faint and disappeared at 6-9 months postoperatively. No serious complications, such as implant breakage and wound infection, occurred postoperatively. According to self-developed standard for bone healing, clinical outcomes were rated as excellent or good in 55 out of 59 patients (success rate: 93.2%). Therefore, our findings suggest that our bridge combined fixation system may be a promising approach for treatment of long-bone fractures. PMID:25201264

  4. Revision arthroplasty for periprosthetic femoral fracture using an uncemented modular tapered conical stem.

    PubMed

    da Assunção, R E; Pollard, T C B; Hrycaiczuk, A; Curry, J; Glyn-Jones, S; Taylor, A

    2015-08-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) is a potentially devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty, with historically high rates of complication and failure because of the technical challenges of surgery, as well as the prevalence of advanced age and comorbidity in the patients at risk. This study describes the short-term outcome after revision arthroplasty using a modular, titanium, tapered, conical stem for PFF in a series of 38 fractures in 37 patients. The mean age of the cohort was 77 years (47 to 96). A total of 27 patients had an American Society of Anesthesiologists grade of at least 3. At a mean follow-up of 35 months (4 to 66) the mean Oxford Hip Score (OHS) was 35 (15 to 48) and comorbidity was significantly associated with a poorer OHS. All fractures united and no stem needed to be revised. Three hips in three patients required further surgery for infection, recurrent PFF and recurrent dislocation and three other patients required closed manipulation for a single dislocation. One stem subsided more than 5 mm but then stabilised and required no further intervention. In this series, a modular, tapered, conical stem provided a versatile reconstruction solution with a low rate of complications. PMID:26224817

  5. COMPARISON OF VOLUMES OCCUPIED BY DIFFERENT INTERNAL FIXATION DEVICES FOR FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lauxen, Daniel; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto; Souza, Ralf Wellis de; Zimmer, Cinthia Gabriely; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. Methods: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dynamic hip screws (DHS) available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displacement. Results: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively), fixation with three screws did not show any statistically significant difference (p= 0.123, 0.08 and 0.381, respectively) and fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes than shown by DHS (p=0.072, 0.161 and 0.033). Conclusions: Fixation of the femoral neck with two cannulated screws occupied less volume than DHS, with a statistically significant difference. The majority of screw combinations did not reach statistical significance, although fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes on average than those occupied by DHS. PMID:27047886

  6. Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation in Treatment of Fractures of Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Sadic, Sahmir; Custovic, Svemir; Jasarevic, Mahir; Fazlic, Mirsad; Smajic, Nedim; Hrustic, Asmir; Vujadinovic, Aleksandar; Krupic, Ferid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fractures of the proximal femur and hip are relatively common injuries in adults and common source of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Many methods have been recommended for the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. Material and methods: We retrospective analyzed all the patients with fractures of the hip treated with proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) at the Clinic of Orthopedic and Traumatology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla from the first of January 2012 to 31 December 2012 years. The study included 63 patients averaged 73.6±11.9 years (range, 29 to 88 years). Fracture type was classified as intertrochanteric (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen classification 31.A.1, A.2 and A.3) and subtrochanteric fractures (Seinsheimer classification). Results and discussion: The ratio between the genders female-male was 1.6:1. There was statistically significant difference prevalence of female compared to male patients (p=0.012). There were 31 left and 32 right hip fractured. Low energy trauma was the cause of fractures in 57(90.5%) patients. Averaged waiting time for hospitalization was 3.2±7.5 days (range, 0 to 32 days). 44 patients were admitted the same day upon injuring. The average waiting time for the treatment was 3.6±5.7 days. The ratio between with or without co-existent disease was 4.7:1. During the three months postoperatively with ASA score 3 and 4 six patients died. There were no significant differences in deaths from ASA score 1 and 2 (p=0.52). Reoperation for the treatment of implant or fracture-related complications was required in three (4.7%) patients (infection, reimplantation and extraction). Three patient developed deep vein thrombosis. Statistically significant difference was found in the deaths in the first three months compared to the next three months (p=0.02). We found statistically significant difference between pre-injury and postoperative mobility score (p=0.0001). Conclusion: PFNA is an

  7. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head treated with Core Decompression and Bone Void Filler Support

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hiren; Kamath, Atul F.

    2016-01-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head (SIFFH) is characterized by acute onset hip pain without overt trauma. It appears as a low intensity band with bone marrow edema on T1-weighted MRI. The most common course of treatment is protected weight bearing for a period of several weeks. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been commonly used if the patient does not respond to the initial protected weight bearing treatment. We present a case of a 48-year-old male with SIFFH who was treated with core hip decompression and bone void filler as a hip-preserving alternative to THA. The patient has an excellent clinical and radiographic result at final follow up. Core hip decompression with bone void filler is a less invasive alternative to THA, and may be a preferred initial treatment strategy for SIFFH in the young and active patient who has failed conservative measures. PMID:27517074

  8. Humeral cortical thickness in female Bantu - its relationship to the incidence of femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, R.A.; Pogrund, H.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of the humeral cortical thickness demonstrate that generalised osteoporosis in female Bantu commences in the fifth decade and gradually increases until, in the ninth decade, all subjects are osteoporotic. The combined cortical thickness (CCT) of the humerus in young adults is very similar to that found previously in a white London population and the loss of cortex with age is very similar. It is concluded that the known low incidence of femoral neck fracture in Bantu is not due to a lower incidence of generalised osteoporosis but to environmental factors. The chief environmental factor postulated is the greater amount of physical work performed by the Bantu. A more careful mode of walking is suggested as a subsidiary cause.

  9. CORRELATION BETWEEN AVASCULAR NECROSIS AND EARLY STABILIZATION OF PROXIMAL FEMORAL FRACTURES IN CHILDHOOD

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego da Costa; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Nascimento, Carolina Lins e Silva; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Fonseca, Marcio José Alher; Dobashi, Eiffel Tsuyoshi; Pinto, José Antonio; Ishida, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We developed this study with the aim of evaluating the results from treating patients with proximal femoral fractures, in a series of cases. We sought to observe the influence of the most prevalent complications on the final results after a minimum follow-up of two years. We especially considered the relationship between establishment of avascular necrosis and the time between the accident and the therapeutic intervention. Method: We retrospectively studied proximal extremity fractures of the femur in 29 patients under 14 years of age between 1988 and 2007. We analyzed the following variables: sex, age, mechanism of injury, fracture classification (Delbet), treatment administered, complications (pseudarthrosis, varus deformity, leg length discrepancy and avascular necrosis), duration of surgery and results (Ratliff). We carried out individual descriptive analysis on each variable. The tests were used in accordance with the premise that normality applied. For the evaluation, we used Fisher's exact test. Results: Five patients (17.2%) had avascular necrosis, and three of them (60.0%) were over 10 years of age. 73.3% of the patients treated within the first 24 hours showed good results. The most common cause of fractures was traffic accidents (44.8%). The best results were observed among patients who were treated surgically. 41.4% developed some type of complication. Conclusions: Among the 29 patients treated, 58.6% had good, 27.6% had regular and 13.8% had poor results, according to the Ratliff criteria. When conservative treatment was applied, only 17.0% had good results, while 69.3% had good results from surgical intervention. Likewise, 73.3% of the results were good results when surgery was performed within the first 24 hours and only 42.8% of the results were good among patients who underwent surgery after this period. Patients operated within the first 24 hours developed necrosis of the femoral head in 13.3% of cases, while 21.4% of those operated

  10. Improve the Efficiency of Surgery for Femoral Shaft Fractures with A Novel Instrument: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Peichun; Qin, Hui; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To improve the efficacy of closed reduction and wire guiding during intramedullary nail internal fixation in femoral shaft fractures. Methods A novel instrument was designed and manufactured. Sixty-eight patients were enrolled from February 2011 to December 2013. The instrument designed was used during the operation in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Results All patients exhibited fracture union, excluding 1 patient in the experimental group and 2 in the control group who had non-union; all of whom achieved fracture union with reoperation. There were no statistically significant differences in operative blood loss or duration of hospital stay between the groups (P > 0.05). The operative time, frequency of wire drilling, and number of open reduction cases, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Femoral shaft fractures are difficult to reduce using general methods; the novel instrument showed high clinical value and proved effective and safe in assisting with closed reduction and intramedullary nail fixation for femoral shaft fractures. Trial Registration ChiCTR ChiCTR-ICR-15007335 PMID:27115752

  11. Outcome Analysis of Hemiarthroplasty vs. Total Hip Replacement in Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Bhanu; Kumar, Krishna; Kohli, Navneet; Katoch, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of displaced fracture neck femur in the elderly population is frequently done by Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Replacement (THR). It avoids high rates of nonunion and avascular necrosis which usually occur after internal fixation of neck femur fractures in this age group. Aim The present study aimed to evaluate patient function and complications following hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in elderly population with displaced femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods Patients above 60 years of age with displaced fracture neck femur were studied over the period of four years. All the clinical parameters and co-morbid conditions were noted at the time of presentation. The patients associated with co-morbid conditions and underlying pathology were excluded from study. Garden’s classification was used for classification of neck femur fractures. After due informed consent patients of displaced fracture neck femur were randomized by simple randomization and allocated for hemiarthroplasty or THR. Antibiotics were given preoperatively at the time of induction and postoperatively for 5-7 days. Surgery was carried out by Modified Gibson approach. Any complications during pre and postoperative period were noted. Follow-up of patients was done 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year interval with the help of Harris hip score. Results Total 80 patients were enrolled in the study group, with 40 patients in each group. The mean age of patients was 73 years in hemiarthroplasty group and 78 years in THR group. Female to male ratio was 55:45. Mean operative time was 35 minutes in hemiarthroplasty group and 45 minutes in THR. Average intraoperative blood loss was 200cc and 300cc in hemiarthroplasty and THR respectively. The mean hospital stay was 14 days in both the groups. Superficial wound infection was noted in hemiarthroplasty group while in THR group deep wound infection (n=1) and prolonged ICU stay (n=1) were noted. The mean Harris hip score

  12. Neck fracture of a cementless forged titanium alloy femoral stem following total hip arthroplasty: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, Theodoros B; Savvidou, Olga D; Psarakis, Spyridon A; Bernard, Pierre-Francois; Triantafyllopoulos, George; Kovanis, Ioannis; Alexandropoulos, Panagiotis

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Fractures of the neck of the femoral component have been reported in uncemented total hip replacements, however, to our knowledge, no fractures of the neck of a cementless forged titanium alloy femoral stem coated in the proximal third with hydroxy-apatite have been reported in the medical literature. Case presentation This case report describes a fracture of the neck of a cementless forged titanium alloy stem coated in the proximal third with hydroxy-apatite. Conclusion The neck of the femoral stem failed from fatigue probably because of a combination of factors described analytically below. PMID:18062807

  13. Fixation of supraglenoid tubercle fractures using distal femoral locking plates in three Warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Frei, Sina; Fürst, Anton E; Sacks, Murielle; Bischofberger, Andrea S

    2016-05-18

    Three horses that were presented with supraglenoid tubercle fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using distal femoral locking plates (DFLP). Placing the DFLP caudal to the scapular spine in order to preserve the suprascapular nerve led to a stable fixation, however, it resulted in infraspinatus muscle atrophy and mild scapulohumeral joint instability (case 1). Placing the DFLP cranial to the scapular spine and under the suprascapular nerve resulted in a stable fixation, however, it resulted in severe atrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and scapulohumeral joint instability (case 2). Placing the DFLP cranial to the scapular spine and slightly overbending it at the suprascapular nerve passage site resulted in the best outcome (case 3). Only a mild degree of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle atrophy was apparent, which resolved quickly and with no effect on scapulohumeral joint stability. In all cases, fixation of supraglenoid tubercle fractures using DFLP in slightly different techniques led to stable fixations with good long-term outcome. One case suffered from a mild incisional infection and plates were removed in two horses. Placement of the DFLP cranial to the scapular spine and slightly overbending it at the suprascapular nerve passage prevented major nerve damage. Further cases investigating the degree of muscle atrophy following the use of the DFLP placed in the above-described technique are justified to improve patient outcome. PMID:27070124

  14. Clinical profile of delirium in patients treated for femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Edlund, A; Lundström, M; Lundström, G; Hedqvist, B; Gustafson, Y

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of delirium, its predisposing factors, clinical profile, associated symptoms and consequences were investigated in 54 consecutive patients, 19 men and 35 women, mean age 77.1 years, admitted to an 'ortho-geriatric unit' with femoral neck fractures. The incidence of postoperative delirium was 15/54 (27.8%) and a logistic regression model found that dementia and a prolonged waiting time for the operation increased the risk of postoperative delirium. Delirium during the night was most common but in 5 patients the delirium was worst in the morning. Patients with delirium suffered more anxiety, depressed mood, emotionalism, delusions and hallucinations. A larger proportion of patients with delirium could not return to their previous dwelling, and a larger proportion of delirious patients were either dead, wheelchair-bound or bedridden at the 6-month follow-up (p < 0.005). The conclusion is that delirium is common and has a serious impact on the outcome after hip fracture surgery. PMID:10473932

  15. Modern trends in internal fixation of femoral shaft fractures in children. A critical review.

    PubMed

    Parsch, K D

    1997-04-01

    Elastic intramedullary (IM) devices, which avoid the physeal region like Nancy and Ender nails do, can be used in children younger than even 4 years without compromising the trochanter physis or risking an avascular necrosis. Intramedullary fixation of femoral shaft fractures leads to satisfactory results of alignment and union. Prerequisites for intramedullary closed nailing are a traction table, especially for older children and adolescents, and an image intensifer. Interlocking IM, Ender, and Nancy nails all have the equal advantage of early weight bearing and reduced hospitalization time compared with traction and cast management. Küntscher or interlocking nails should only be used in adolescents close to the end of growth to avoid growth arrest of the trochanterocervical physis. Küntscher nails and interlocking IM nails are both associated with the small but troublesome risk of avascular necrosis. Ender and Nancy nails, with retrograde or antegrade pinning, have a low complication rate and a short learning curve for surgeons. Overgrowth in late controls after IM rodding of shaft fractures is about the same as the other types of treatment with an average overgrowth of 7 mm. Short hospital stay for children with IM nails reduces cost of treatment to about one half compared with in-hospital traction and cast management. PMID:9165440

  16. Hemiarthroplasty or internal fixation for intracapsular displaced femoral neck fractures: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Objective To compare the functional results after displaced fractures of the femoral neck treated with internal fixation or hemiarthroplasty. Design Randomised trial with blinding of assessments of functional results. Setting University hospital. Participants 222 patients; 165 (74%) women, mean age 83 years. Inclusion criteria were age above 60, ability to walk before the fracture, and no major hip pathology, regardless of cognitive function. Interventions Closed reduction and two parallel screws (112 patients) and bipolar cemented hemiarthroplasty (110 patients). Follow-up at 4, 12, and 24 months. Main outcome measures Hip function (Harris hip score), health related quality of life (Eq-5d), activities of daily living (Barthel index). In all cases high scores indicate better function. Results Mean Harris hip score in the hemiarthroplasty group was 8.2 points higher (95% confidence interval 2.8 to 13.5 points, P=0.003) at four months and 6.7 points (1.5 to 11.9 points, P=0.01) higher at 12 months. Mean Eq-5d index score at 24 months was 0.13 higher in the hemiarthroplasty group (0.01 to 0.25, P=0.03). The Eq-5d visual analogue scale was 8.7 points higher in the hemiarthroplasty group after 4 months (1.9 to 15.6, P=0.01). After 12 and 24 months the percentage scoring 95 or 100 on the Barthel index was higher in the hemiarthroplasty group (relative risk 0.67, 0.47 to 0.95, P=0.02. and 0.63, 0.42 to 0.94, P=0.02, respectively). Complications occurred in 56 (50%) patients in the internal fixation group and 16 (15%) in the hemiarthroplasty group (3.44, 2.11 to 5.60, P<0.001). In each group 39 patients (35%) died within 24 months (0.98, 0.69 to 1.40, P=0.92) Conclusions Hemiarthroplasty is associated with better functional outcome than internal fixation in treatment of displaced fractures of the femoral neck in elderly patients. Trial registration NCT00464230. PMID:18056740

  17. Combined with Bone Marrow-Derived Cells and rhBMP-2 for Osteonecrosis after Femoral Neck Fractures in Children and Adolescents: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fuqiang; Sun, Wei; Guo, Wanshou; Wang, Bailiang; Cheng, Liming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) following femoral neck fractures is a rare, yet severe, disorder in children and adolescents. This study evaluated the effectiveness of core decompression (CD) combined with implantation of bone marrow–derived cells (BMDC) and rhBMP-2 for osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) after femoral neck fractures in children and adolescents. This study included 51 patients, aged 11.4–18.1 years, with ARCO stages I–III ONFH after femoral neck fractures between 2004 and 2010. The hips were divided into two groups based on whether the lateral pillar of the femoral head (LPFH) was preserved: LPFH and non-LPFH groups. All patients were followed up clinically and radiographically for a minimum of 5 years. 44 patients (86.3%) had improved clinical outcome. Radiologically, 9 of the 51 hips (17.6%) exhibited collapse onset or progression of the femoral head or narrowing of the hip joint space, and one patient in the non-LPFH group required hip arthroplasty due to the worsened syndrome. The technique provided an effective therapeutic option for children and adolescents with ONFH following femoral neck fractures. It relieves hip pain and prevents the progression of osteonecrosis in young patients lasting more than 5 years after surgery. PMID:27477836

  18. Combined with Bone Marrow-Derived Cells and rhBMP-2 for Osteonecrosis after Femoral Neck Fractures in Children and Adolescents: A case series.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fuqiang; Sun, Wei; Guo, Wanshou; Wang, Bailiang; Cheng, Liming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) following femoral neck fractures is a rare, yet severe, disorder in children and adolescents. This study evaluated the effectiveness of core decompression (CD) combined with implantation of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) and rhBMP-2 for osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) after femoral neck fractures in children and adolescents. This study included 51 patients, aged 11.4-18.1 years, with ARCO stages I-III ONFH after femoral neck fractures between 2004 and 2010. The hips were divided into two groups based on whether the lateral pillar of the femoral head (LPFH) was preserved: LPFH and non-LPFH groups. All patients were followed up clinically and radiographically for a minimum of 5 years. 44 patients (86.3%) had improved clinical outcome. Radiologically, 9 of the 51 hips (17.6%) exhibited collapse onset or progression of the femoral head or narrowing of the hip joint space, and one patient in the non-LPFH group required hip arthroplasty due to the worsened syndrome. The technique provided an effective therapeutic option for children and adolescents with ONFH following femoral neck fractures. It relieves hip pain and prevents the progression of osteonecrosis in young patients lasting more than 5 years after surgery. PMID:27477836

  19. Comparison between external fixation and elastic stable intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children younger than 8 years of age.

    PubMed

    Andreacchio, Antonio; Marengo, Lorenza; Canavese, Federico; Pedretti, Leopoldo; Memeo, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare external fixation (EF) with elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children aged 8 or younger. Fifteen children with femoral shaft fractures treated by EF and 23 children with femoral shaft fractures treated by ESIN were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were pain free at the last follow-up, with good ranges of motion in the hip and knee. Partial and full weight bearing occurred sooner in patients treated with EF than with ESIN, although more polytrauma patients were present in the ESIN group. In conclusion, EF and ESIN can be considered as safe and effective methods for femoral shaft fracture treatment in children younger than 8 years of age. PMID:27261769

  20. [Femoral nerve block as pain relief in hip fracture. A good alternative in perioperative treatment proved by a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Kullenberg, Björn; Ysberg, Benita; Heilman, Martin; Resch, Sylvia

    2004-06-10

    Almost 25% of all patients with hip fracture experience temporary confusion pre- and directly postoperatively due to trauma, advanced age, transport between units, and the use of analgesics, 35-50% of the patients suffer temporary or chronic decubitus. Analgesics often lead to nausea. A femoral nerve block can interrupt sensory impulses from the hip joint and provide complete pain relief without affecting the CNS, thus making preoperative care easier and postoperative rehabilitation can be started earlier. 80 consecutive patients with hip fracture were randomized to femoral nerve block or pharmacological treatment only. Paracetamol and tramadol were the standard analgesics used. All patients were followed up with regard to pain, duration of the block, number of analgesics doses, temporary confusion and time for postoperative mobilization. Pain was estimated by the patients using the visual analogue scale (VAS). A nerve block was performed to block the femoral nerve, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and the obturator nerve with 30 ml of ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml. Mental status was evaluated with Pfeiffer-test. All patients experienced relatively intense pain on admission with an average VAS of 6. After nerve block the VAS was 2. Pain relief was the same in the control group. Pain relief was sustained for 15 hours. The time for mobilization after surgery was significantly lower, 23 hours compared to 36 for the control group. There was a lower number of patients temporarily confused in the block group compared to the control group, however no significant differences were seen. Femoral nerve block provides adequate pain relief, equivalent to pharmacological treatment in most patients. The time for postoperative mobilization was shorter and less temporary confusion was seen. There were no complications in this group, making nerve block a good alternative to traditional pharmacological preoperative treatment for patients with hip fractures. PMID:15282985

  1. Cement augmentation of implants--no general cure in osteoporotic fracture treatment. A biomechanical study on non-displaced femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Nicolino, Tomas I; Barla, Jorge; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Richards, R Geoff; Blauth, Michael; Windolf, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Femoral neck fractures in the elderly are a common problem in orthopedics. Augmentation of screw fixation with bone cement can provide better stability of implants and lower the risk of secondary displacement. This study aimed to investigate whether cement augmentation of three cannulated screws in non-displaced femoral neck fractures could increase implant fixation. A femoral neck fracture was simulated in six paired human cadaveric femora and stabilized with three 7.3 mm cannulated screws. Pairs were divided into two groups: conventional instrumentation versus additional cement augmentation of screw tips with 2 ml TraumacemV+ each. Biomechanical testing was performed by applying cyclic axial load until failure. Failure cycles, axial head displacement, screw angle changes, telescoping and screw cut-out were evaluated. Failure (15 mm actuator displacement) occurred in the augmented group at 12,500 cycles (± 2,480) compared to 15,625 cycles (± 4,215) in the non-augmented group (p = 0.041). When comparing 3 mm vertical displacement of the head no significant difference (p = 0.72) was detected between the survival curves of the two groups. At 8,500 load-cycles (early onset failure) the augmented group demonstrated a change in screw angle of 2.85° (± 0.84) compared to 1.15° (± 0.93) in the non-augmented group (p = 0.013). The results showed no biomechanical advantage with respect to secondary displacement following augmentation of three cannulated screws in a non-displaced femoral neck fracture. Consequently, the indication for cement augmentation to enhance implant anchorage in osteoporotic bone has to be considered carefully taking into account fracture type, implant selection and biomechanical surrounding. PMID:26177609

  2. [Bipolar endoprosthesis in fractures of the femoral neck. Apropos of 201 cases, 116 after a 6-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Lortat-Jacob, A; Videcoq, P; Hardy, P; Fontes, D; de Somer, B; Benoit, J

    1992-01-01

    We report our experience with 201 SEM bipolar prostheses used to treat femoral neck fractures in patients with a mean age of 70 years and a mean follow-up of 57 months (median 75 months). Clinical outcome was favorable with 94 per cent satisfactory results (very good and good). Femoral complications requiring reoperation (conversion to total hip replacement) occurred in 2.2 per cent of cases. Among the 163 patients for whom roentgenographic data were available, 5 (3.6 per cent) developed evidence of acetabular wear but remained symptom-free and did not require reoperation. As compared with Moore's prosthesis, the SEM bipolar prosthesis seems to provide substantially better clinical and roentgenographic results. For the treatment of femoral neck fractures, total hip replacement seems to provide results comparable to those reported here but requires a more sophisticated operative technique and carries a greater risk of subsequent dislocation. Two factors prevent the widespread use of the bipolar prosthesis at present: the need for femoral grouting which carries a well-documented risk of hemodynamic complications, and the higher cost of the device. PMID:1439032

  3. Strains caused by daily loading might be responsible for delayed healing of an incomplete atypical femoral fracture.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna; Schilcher, Jörg; Grassi, Lorenzo; Aspenberg, Per; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are insufficiency fractures in the lateral femoral diaphysis or subtrochanteric region that mainly affect older patients on bisphosphonate therapy. Delayed healing is often seen in patients with incomplete fractures (cracks), and histology of bone biopsies shows mainly necrotic material inside the crack. We hypothesized that the magnitude of the strains produced in the soft tissue inside the crack during normal walk exceeds the limit for new bone formation, and thereby inhibit healing. A patient specific finite element model was developed, based on clinical CT images and high resolution μCT images of a biopsy from the crack site. Strain distributions in the femur and inside the crack were calculated for load cases representing normal walk. The models predicted large strains inside the crack, with strain levels above 10% in more than three quarters of the crack volume. According to two different tissue differentiation theories, bone would only form in less than 1-5% of the crack volume. This can explain the impaired healing generally seen in incomplete atypical fractures. Furthermore, the microgeometry of the crack highly influenced the strain distributions. Hence, a realistic microgeometry needs to be considered when modeling the crack. Histology of the biopsy showed signs of remodeling in the bone tissue adjacent to the fracture line, while the crack itself contained mainly necrotic material and signs of healing only in portions that seemed to have been widened by resorption. In conclusion, the poor healing capacity of incomplete atypical femoral fractures can be explained by biomechanical factors, and daily low impact activities are enough to cause strain magnitudes that prohibit bone formation. PMID:27113528

  4. Biomechanical effect of different femoral neck blade position on the fixation of intertrochanteric fracture: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Yuan; Lin, Kun-Jhih; Wei, Hung-Wen; Hu, Jin-Jia; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Tsai, Cheng-Lun; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Medial migration or cutout of the neck helical blade has commonly occurred in the treatment of trochanteric fracture of the femur. The position of the helical blade within the femoral head is one of the influencing factors that cause the blade to perforate the intact joint surface; however, the ideal placement of the helical blade is not currently known. A finite element model of a femur/nail construct was utilized to analyze five possible blade positions in the femoral head. Normal strain at the fracture surface, the minimum principal strain in the cancellous bone, and the von Mises stress in the implant itself were calculated and compared between different blade positions. The results showed that a large area of normal compressive strain at the fracture surface was observed in the inferior and posterior blade positions. The volume of cancellous bone strained to yielding in the femoral head and neck was lower for the inferior and posterior positions, whereas it was the highest for the superior position. The inferior and posterior positions had lower von Mises stress in the implant itself. The inferior and posterior positions may be the ideal position for the intramedullary nail with a helical neck blade. PMID:26351785

  5. Adverse reaction to metal bearing leading to femoral stem fractures: a literature review and report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azzani, Waheeb A.K.; Iqbal, Hafiz J.; John, Alun

    2016-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing in total hip replacement (THR) has a high failure rate due to adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). There is a spectrum of soft tissue and bony changes in ARMD including muscle necrosis and osteolysis. In our institution, more than 1500 MoM THRs were implanted since 2003. Recently, we have revised significant numbers of these. We report our experience and management of a mode of failure of MoM THR that has been infrequently reported—the distal femoral stem fracture. We report on two patients who presented with worsening pain attributable to fracture of the femoral stem. Severe femoral osteolysis led to loss of proximal stem support and eventual fatigue fracture of the component. Both patients were revised employing a posterior approach. Bone trephine was used to extract a well-fixed distal stem fragment without any windows. Both patients had successful outcome after revision with excellent pain relief and no complications. PMID:26846269

  6. A comparison of outcomes and dislocation rates using dual articulation cups and THA for intracapsular femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Tarasevicius, Sarunas; Robertsson, Otto; Dobozinskas, Paulius; Wingstrand, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty for intracapsular femoral neck fractures (FNF) is associated with a greater risk of dislocation. Dual articulation systems in this group of patients may provide better implant stability and a reduced dislocation rate. The aim of our study was to investigate FNF patients treated with dual articulation cups (DAC) and conventional THA and compare their clinical results at four months and one year after surgery. Our study compared femoral neck fracture patients treated with either DAC or conventional THA during two different time periods. Before surgery and during follow-up, the patients answered questions regarding their mobility, pain and usage of walking aids. Additionally at four-month and one-year follow-ups EQ-5D and HOOS questionnaires were applied for those patients qualifying for functional and quality of life analysis. Out of 125 femoral neck fracture patients 58 were treated with DAC and 67 with conventional THA. At four months and one year follow-up the HOOS and EQ-5D results did not differ significantly between DAC and conventional THA. Five hips in the THA group were revised for recurrent dislocation and two had a single dislocation. One year after surgery, the functional result of DAC and conventional THA are comparable but DAC have a lower risk of dislocation. PMID:23397197

  7. A Comparison of Internal Fixation and Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty for the Treatment of Reverse Oblique Intertrochanteric Femoral Fractures in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong-Ju; Min, Woong-Bae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical and radiological results between internal fixation using the proximal femoral nail system and bipolar hemiarthroplasty (BHA) in reverse oblique intertrochanteric hip fractures in elderly patients. Materials and Methods From January 2005 to July 2012, we reviewed the medical records of 53 patients who had been treated surgically for reverse oblique intertrochanteric fracture and had been followed-up on for a minimum of two years. All patients were ≥70 years of age, and divided into two groups for retrospective evaluation. One group was treated with internal fixation using the proximal femoral nail system (31 cases), and the other group was treated with BHA (22 cases). Results Early ambulation postoperatively and less pain at postoperative three month were significantly superior in the BHA group. However, by 24 months postoperatively, the internal fixation group exhibited higher Harris scores and correspondingly less pain than the BHA group. There were no significant differences in union rate, duration of hospitalization or lateral wall fracture healing between the two groups. Four patients in the internal fixation group underwent reoperation. Conclusion In the treatment of intertrochanteric fracture of the reverse oblique type, open reduction and internal fixation should be considered to be the better choice for patients with good health and bone quality. However, in cases of severe comminition of fracture and poor bone quality, BHA is an alternative offering advantages including early ambulation, less pain at early stages, and a lower risk of reoperation.

  8. Computerized fluoroscopy with zero-dose image updates for minimally invasive femoral diaphyseal fracture reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Dong, Xiao

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a computerized fluoroscopy with zero-dose image updates for femoral diaphyseal fracture reduction is proposed. It is achieved with a two-step procedure. Starting from a few (normally 2) calibrated fluoroscopic image, the first step, data preparation, automatically estimates the size and the pose of the diaphyseal fragments through three-dimensional morphable object fitting using a parametric cylinder model. The projection boundary of each estimated cylinder, a quadrilateral, is then fed to a region information based active contour model to extract the fragment contours from the input fluoroscopic images. After that, each point on the contour is interpolated relative to the four vertices of the corresponding quadrilateral, which resulted in four interpolation coefficients per point. The second step, image updates, repositions the fragment projection on each acquired image during bony manipulation using a computerized method. It starts with interpolation of the new position of each point on the fragment contour using the interpolation coefficients calculated in the first step and the new position of the corresponding quadrilateral. The position of the quadrilateral is updated in real time according to the positional changes of the associated bone fragments, as determined by the navigation system during fracture reduction. The newly calculated image coordinates of the fragment contour are then fed to a OpenGL® based texture warping pipeline to achieve a real-time image updates. The presented method provides a realistic augmented reality for the surgeon. Its application may result in great reduction of the X-ray radiation to the patient and to the surgical team.

  9. [A case of acute renal failure following compartment syndrome after the surgery for femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Koda, Kenichiro; Uzawa, Masashi; Ide, Yasuo; Harada, Masaki; Sanbe, Norie; Sugano, Takayuki; Satoh, Yasuo; Tagami, Megumi

    2013-02-01

    Compartment syndrome is known to develop after a prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. We experienced acute renal failure following compartment syndrome after the surgery in hemilithotomy position. A 62-year-old man underwent a left hip fixation for femoral neck fracture. The surgical leg was placed into traction in a foot piece and the intact leg was placed in the hemilithotomy position. Because of the difficulty in repositioning and the trouble with fluoroscope, the surgery took over 5 hours. He suffered acute pain, swelling and spasm in his intact leg placed into hemilithotomy after the surgery. Creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine markedly increased and myoglobinuria was recognized. We diagnosed an acute renal failure following compartment syndrome and treated him in the ICU on close monitoring. In spite of the treatment with massive transfusion and diuretics, he needed hemodialysis twice and then his renal function improved. Prevention is most essential for compartment syndrome after a prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. Risk factors should be recognized before surgery and appropriate action should be taken such as using Allen stirrups and avoiding hypotension, hypovolemia and the prolonged lithotomy position with exaggerated elevation of legs. PMID:23479927

  10. Hypovitaminosis D and Other Risk Factors of Femoral Neck Fracture in South Indian Postmenopausal Women: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Selvan, Sivan Arul; Asha, Hesarghatta Shyamasunder; Thomas, Nihal; Venkatesh,, Krishnan; Oommen, Anil Thomas; Mathai, Thomas; Seshadri, MandalamSubramanian

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases like hip fractures are a significant problem in a developing country like India. The risk factors for hip fractures vary according to local practices and the availability of preventive health care delivery systems. There is paucity of data on risk factors for hip fracture in the south Indian population. Aim This study was undertaken to assess risk factors associated with femoral neck (FN) fracture in South Indian postmenopausal women along with subsequent one year mortality. Materials and Methods One hundred four postmenopausal women with FN fracture and 104 age and BMI matched controls were included. Sedative use, visual impairment and other relevant risk factors were assessed. Bone biochemistry and Bone Mineral Density (BMD) were evaluated. A telephonic interview was done at the end of one year to ascertain the well-being. Results Sedative use, visual impairment, low FN BMD and vitamin-D deficiency (<20 ng/ml) were seen more in fracture subjects compared to controls (p≤0.05). At the end of one year, 20% of the fracture subjects and 5% of the controls had died (p=0.001). Conclusion Risk factors identified in our study are potentially correctable, and needs special attention in an Indian context to prevent hip fractures. PMID:26266149

  11. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of periprosthetic femoral fractures associated with hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhendong; Zhuo, Qi; Chai, Wei; Ni, Ming; Li, Heng; Chen, Jiying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) is a complicated complication of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty with an increasing incidence. The present study aimed to summarize the clinical characteristics and identify the risk factors for PFF which would be potentially helpful in the prevention and treatment of PFF. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 89 cases of PFF, and a case–control study was designed to identify the potential risk for intraoperative and postoperative PFF in both primary and revision hip arthroplasty. The overall incidence of PFF was 2.08% (intraoperative: 1.77%, postoperative: 0.30%, revision: 13.60%, and primary: 0.97%). The most commonly used treatment strategy was fixation with cerclage wire or band for intraoperative PFF, whereas long stem revision with plate or cortical allograft strut fixation was the main treatment strategy for postoperative PFF. The risk factors for intraoperative PFF in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) included the diagnosis of development dysplasia of the hip (DDH) (odds ratio [OR] = 5.01, 95%CI, 1.218–20.563, P=0.03) and CBR ≥ 0.49 (OR = 3.34, 95%CI, 1.138–9.784, P = 0.03). The increased age was associated with increased incidence of postoperative PFF in primary THA (OR = 1.09, 95%CI, 1.001–1.194, P = 0.04). As for the intraoperative PFF in revision THA, we found that receiving multiple operations before revision (OR = 2.45, 95%CI, 1.06–5.66, P = 0.04), revisions due to prosthetic joint infection (OR = 6.72, 95%CI, 1.007–44.832, P = 0.04), the presence of cementless implant before revision (OR = 13.54, 95%CI, 3.103–59.08, P = 0.001), and femoral deformity (OR = 8.03, 95%CI, 1.656–38.966, P = 0.01) were all risk factors. Screening for high-risk patients, preoperative templating, and detailed discharge instructions may be the potential strategies to reduce the incidence of PFF. The treatment of PFFs should take

  12. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of periprosthetic femoral fractures associated with hip arthroplasty: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhendong; Zhuo, Qi; Chai, Wei; Ni, Ming; Li, Heng; Chen, Jiying

    2016-08-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) is a complicated complication of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty with an increasing incidence. The present study aimed to summarize the clinical characteristics and identify the risk factors for PFF which would be potentially helpful in the prevention and treatment of PFF.We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 89 cases of PFF, and a case-control study was designed to identify the potential risk for intraoperative and postoperative PFF in both primary and revision hip arthroplasty.The overall incidence of PFF was 2.08% (intraoperative: 1.77%, postoperative: 0.30%, revision: 13.60%, and primary: 0.97%). The most commonly used treatment strategy was fixation with cerclage wire or band for intraoperative PFF, whereas long stem revision with plate or cortical allograft strut fixation was the main treatment strategy for postoperative PFF. The risk factors for intraoperative PFF in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) included the diagnosis of development dysplasia of the hip (DDH) (odds ratio [OR] = 5.01, 95%CI, 1.218-20.563, P=0.03) and CBR ≥ 0.49 (OR = 3.34, 95%CI, 1.138-9.784, P = 0.03). The increased age was associated with increased incidence of postoperative PFF in primary THA (OR = 1.09, 95%CI, 1.001-1.194, P = 0.04). As for the intraoperative PFF in revision THA, we found that receiving multiple operations before revision (OR = 2.45, 95%CI, 1.06-5.66, P = 0.04), revisions due to prosthetic joint infection (OR = 6.72, 95%CI, 1.007-44.832, P = 0.04), the presence of cementless implant before revision (OR = 13.54, 95%CI, 3.103-59.08, P = 0.001), and femoral deformity (OR = 8.03, 95%CI, 1.656-38.966, P = 0.01) were all risk factors.Screening for high-risk patients, preoperative templating, and detailed discharge instructions may be the potential strategies to reduce the incidence of PFF. The treatment of PFFs should take into account Vancouver

  13. Dose-Effect Relationships for Femoral Fractures After Multimodality Limb-Sparing Therapy of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Proximal Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Sabolch, Aaron; Chugh, Rashmi; Biermann, Janet Sybil; Feng, Mary

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V{sub d}) receiving specified doses ({>=}30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Results: Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 {+-} 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 {+-} 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 {+-} 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 {+-} 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 {+-} 20.8 Gy, 4.8 {+-} 5.6 cc, 2.5 {+-} 3.9 cc, and 0.8 {+-} 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p < 0.03 for all). The femoral neck fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. Conclusions: These dose-volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients.

  14. Modified Pauwels' intertrochanteric osteotomy in the management of nonunion of a femoral neck fracture following failed osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Magu, N K; Singla, R; Rohilla, R; Gogna, P; Mukhopadhyay, R; Singh, A

    2014-09-01

    We report the outcome of 39 patients who underwent a modified Pauwels' intertrochanteric osteotomy for nonunion of a femoral neck fracture following failed osteosynthesis. There were 31 men and eight women with a mean age of 47.2 years (34 to 59). By Pauwels' classification, there were 11 Type II fractures and 28 Type III fractures. The mean follow-up was 7.9 years (2 to 19). In the 11 patients whose initial treatment had been osteotomy, union was achieved in nine (81.8%). In 28 patients whose initial treatment had been with a lag screw or a dynamic hip screw, union was achieved in 27 (96.4%). Limb lengths were equalised in 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with pre-operative shortening. The mean neck-shaft angle improved significantly from 100.5° (80° to 120°) to 131.6° (120° to 155°) (p = 0.004). The mean modified Harris hip score was 85.6 points (70 to 97) and the mean modified Merle d'Aubigné score was 14.3 (11 to 18). Good to excellent functional outcomes were achieved in 32 patients (88.8%). A modified Pauwels' intertrochanteric osteotomy is a reliable method of treating ununited fractures of the femoral neck following failed osteosynthesis: coxa vara and shortening can also simultaneously be addressed. PMID:25183590

  15. Novel Nonsurgical Approach to Stabilization of Bilateral Pathologic Femoral Fractures in an Egg-laying Maroon-bellied Conure (Pyrrhura frontalis).

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Julia S; Lightfoot, Teresa L; Raffa, Gregory F

    2016-06-01

    A 2-year-old, egg-laying maroon-bellied conure (Pyrrhura frontalis) was referred for treatment of bilateral femoral fractures believed to be secondary to recent egg laying and nutritional and husbandry deficiencies. On radiographs, all skeletal components were diffusely osteopenic, precluding surgical fixation. A novel device to stabilize the bilateral femoral fractures was manufactured with polyvinyl chloride piping, which braced the bird's feet at the level of the perch and supported its upper body weight via a breast plate, thus maintaining the bird in a physiologically appropriate perching position. The conure was ambulatory and returned to normal function after 3 weeks of external coaptation with this device. After 6 weeks, callus formation was palpable over both fracture sites even though minimal bone remodeling was visible radiographically. This body splint device may present a viable alternative to euthanasia in select cases of bilateral femoral fractures in companion birds. PMID:27315387

  16. Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in the Setting of a Complex Acetabulum Fracture without Hip Dislocation Treated Surgically Using Ilio-inguinal Approach: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis in isolated fractures of the acetabulum without dislocation of hip seems to be a known complication, but to our knowledge it has not been reported adequately. The causative nature of post-traumatic femoral head osteonecrosis has not been studied critically. The pathophysiology of osteonecrosis in this case also eludes us. Striking evidence points towards the intra-operative blood loss and low mean arterial pressure possibly leading to hypo-perfusion of femoral head leading to osteonecrosis. Fractures of the acetabulum pose a difficult problem for the patient and the surgeon because of possible complications. Thus any surgeon involved in surgery for fractures of the acetabulum should be aware of the possibility of this potential complication. Here is a 61-year male, who sustained a complex fracture of the acetabulum without hip dislocation, subsequently was treated surgically with internal fixation using an anterior approach, 10 months after surgery patient developed osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

  17. The effectiveness of the antegrade reamed technique: the experience and complications from 415 traumatic femoral shaft fractures

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitriou, George; Theodoratos, Gerasimos; Papanikolaou, Anastasios; Maris, John

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective study presents the experience gained through use of reamed femoral nails and reports results and respective complications. This study included 415 femur fractures (312 men and 101 women with a mean age of 27.8 years) that were treated from 1993 to 2004. The fractures were classified according to AO, and 74 open fractures were included and typed according to the Gustilo classification. Dynamic nailing was performed for nearly all type A fractures and static nailing for types B and C. After a mean follow-up of 1.5 years, union rate was 97.8%. The complications were: 9 non-unions, 14 delayed-unions, 4 torsional malunions, 6 limb length discrepancies (shortening) and 30 nerve pareses due to traction. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) occurred below the knee in 4 patients, while there were recorded 3 pulmonary and 2 fat embolisms, 1 superficial and 1 deep infection. There were 28 broken screws identified postoperatively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that type B and C were associated with increased risk of complications, with respective odds ratios of 3.1 (95% CI = 1.3–7.2, P = 0.011) and 4.3 (95% CI = 1.8–10.3, P = 0.001) when compared to type A patterns. All patients returned to their activities in a mean time of 10 months. Intramedullary nailing is still the treatment of choice for femoral shaft fractures, but knowledge of potential complications and their association with certain fracture patterns is needed. PMID:19936887

  18. Retrograde Intramedullary Nailing with a Blocking Pin Technique for Reduction of Periprosthetic Supracondylar Femoral Fracture after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Technical Note with a Compatibility Chart of the Nail to Femoral Component

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Takasago, Tomoya; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) present a clear management challenge, and retrograde intramedullary nails have recently gained widespread acceptance in treatment of these fractures. In two cases, we found a blocking screw technique, first reported by Krettek et al., was useful in the reduction of the fractures. Both patients attained preinjury mobility after intramedullary nailing. Moreover, we present a chart summarizing the notch designs of various femoral components because some prosthetic knee designs are not amenable to retrograde nailing. We hope this will be helpful in determining indications for retrograde nailing in periprosthetic fractures after TKA. PMID:25574411

  19. Microindentation for in vivo measurement of bone tissue material properties in atypical femoral fracture patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Güerri-Fernández, Roberto C; Nogués, Xavier; Quesada Gómez, José M; Torres Del Pliego, Elisa; Puig, Lluís; García-Giralt, Natalia; Yoskovitz, Guy; Mellibovsky, Leonardo; Hansma, Paul K; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFF) associated with long-term bisphosphonates (LTB) are a growing concern. Their etiology is unknown, but bone material properties might be deteriorated. In an AFF series, we analyzed the bone material properties by microindentation. Four groups of patients were included: 6 AFF, 38 typical osteoporotic fractures, 6 LTB, and 20 controls without fracture. Neither typical osteoporotic fractures nor controls have received any antiosteoporotic medication. A general laboratory workup, bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and microindentation testing at the tibia were done in all patients. Total indentation distance (Total ID), indentation distance increase (IDI), and creep indentation distance (Creep ID) were measured (microns). Age-adjusted analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used for comparisons. Controls were significantly younger than fracture groups. Bisphosphonate exposure was on average 5.5 years (range 5 to 12 years) for the AFF and 5.4 years (range 5 to 8 years) for the LTB groups. Total ID (microns) showed better material properties (lower Total ID) for controls 36 (± 6; mean ± SD) than for AFF 46 (± 4) and for typical femoral fractures 47 (± 13), respectively. Patients on LTB showed values between controls and fractures, 38 (± 4), although not significantly different from any of the other three groups. IDI values showed a similar pattern 13 (± 2), 16 (± 6), 19 (± 3), and 18 (± 5). After adjusting by age, significant differences were seen between controls and typical (p < 0.001) and atypical fractures (p = 0.03) for Total ID and for IDI (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). There were no differences in Creep ID between groups. Our data suggest that patients with AFF have a deep deterioration in bone material properties at a tissue level similar to that for the osteoporotic fracture group. The LTB group shows levels that are in between controls and both type of

  20. Treatment of femoral neck fractures in elderly patients over 60 years of age - which is the ideal modality of primary joint replacement?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Femoral neck fractures in the elderly are frequent, represent a great health care problem, and have a significant impact on health insurance costs. Reconstruction options using hip arthroplasty include unipolar or bipolar hemiarthroplasty (HA), and total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this review is to discuss the indications, limitations, and pitfalls of each of these techniques. Methods The Pubmed database was searched for all articles on femoral neck fracture and for the reconstruction options presented in this review using the search terms "femoral neck fracture", "unipolar hemiarthroplasty", "bipolar hemiarthroplasty", and "total hip arthroplasty". In addition, cross-referencing was used to cover articles eventually undetected by the respective search strategies. The resulting articles were then reviewed with regard to the different techniques, outcome and complications of the distinct reconstruction options. Results THA yields the best functional results in patients with displaced femoral neck fractures with complication rates comparable to HA. THA is beneficially implanted using an anterior approach exploiting the internervous plane between the tensor fasciae latae and the sartorius muscles allowing for immediate full weight-bearing. Based on our findings, bipolar hemiarthroplasty, similar to unipolar hemiarthroplasty, cannot restorate neither anatomical nor biomechanical features of the hip joint. Therefore, it can only be recommended as a second line of defense-procedure for patients with low functional demands and limited live expectancy. Conclusions THA is the treatment of choice for femoral neck fractures in patients older than 60 years. HA should only be implanted in patients with limited life expectancy. PMID:20961437

  1. Treatment of Adult Femoral Shaft Fractures Using the Perkins Traction at Addis Ababa Tikur Anbessa University Hospital: The Ethiopian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bezabeh, Bahiru; Wamisho, Biruk L.; Coles, Maxime J.M.

    2012-01-01

    This is a prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of the Perkins traction in the treatment of adult femoral shaft fractures from October 1, 2007, to the present at the Black Lion Hospital in Addis Ababa University Hospital in Ethiopia. All femur fractures admitted to the hospital were reviewed and evaluated for treatment. Black Lion Hospital (Tikur Anbessa) is the university hospital in Addis Ababa and the highest tertiary teaching hospital in a country of 85 million inhabitants. A 67-bed orthopedic department offers the main ground for teaching to the undergraduate medical students. The hospital is also the pivotal center for the formation of the orthopedic residents. Patients from different parts of the country are referred to this institution for orthopedic care. A total of 68 adult (older than 16 years) patients with 69 femoral shaft fractures were considered for treatment during the study period. Consent was obtained and prospective treatment initiated. A standard Perkins traction was applied by an orthopedic team composed of consultants, orthopedic residents, physical therapists, and nurses. A protocol was developed for patients undergoing such traction. The physiotherapists will supervise all individual or group therapy sessions. Progressive knee range of motion to facilitate quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengthening exercises were implemented four times a day and recorded. Demographic information, fracture patterns, duration of traction, thigh circumference leg length discrepancy, and pin sites were routinely monitored and charted. Data were computerized and analyzed weekly, and appropriate adjustments were made accordingly. Clinical evidence of a competent callus and confirmation by radiographic studies will influence the cessation of traction to allow gait training with toe-touch crutch ambulation. Progress will be monitored during the following outpatient visits in the fracture clinic. A total of 68 consecutive patients with 69 femoral shaft

  2. Cemented versus uncemented arthroplasty in patients with a displaced fracture of the femoral neck: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Inngul, C; Blomfeldt, R; Ponzer, S; Enocson, A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this randomised controlled study was to compare functional and radiological outcomes between modern cemented and uncemented hydroxyapatite coated stems after one year in patients treated surgically for a fracture of the femoral neck. A total of 141 patients aged > 65 years were included. Patients were randomised to be treated with a cemented Exeter stem or an uncemented Bimetric stem. The patients were reviewed at four and 12 months. The cemented group performed better than the uncemented group for the Harris hip score (78 vs 70.7, p = 0.004) at four months and for the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assesment Questionnaire dysfunction score at four (29.8 vs 39.2, p = 0.007) and 12 months (22.3 vs 34.9, p = 0.001). The mean EQ-5D index score was better in the cemented group at four (0.68 vs 0.53, p = 0.001) and 12 months (0.75 vs 0.58, p = < 0.001) follow-up. There were nine intra-operative fractures in the uncemented group and none in the cemented group. In conclusion, our data do not support the use of an uncemented hydroxyapatite coated stem for the treatment of displaced fractures of the femoral neck in the elderly. PMID:26530648

  3. Mini-open versus closed reduction in titanium elastic nailing of paediatric femoral shaft fractures: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Altay, Mehmet Akif; Erturk, Cemil; Cece, Hasan; Isikan, Ugur Erdem

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare retrospectively intraoperative fluoroscopy time and clinical-radiological results in pediatric femoral shaft fractures treated with titanium elastic nailing (TEN), with a mini-open "blind-hand" technique versus closed reduction. The study included 87 children (18 girls and 69 boys) who underwent surgical treatment with TEN for femoral shaft fractures. Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 42 patients (mean age : 83 +/- 2.7 years) treated with a mini-open "blind-ha nd" technique (a 2-3 cm lateral incision at the level of the fracture ; reduction achieved with one or two fingers, without visualization of the fracture). Group 2 consisted of 45 patients (mean age: 8.8 +/- 2.6 years) treated with a closed reduction technique. Duration of surgery and intraoperative fluoroscopy time were recorded in both groups. Clinical and radiologic results were assessed using the TEN scoring system after mean follow-up periods of 213 +/- 5.8 months and 193 +/- 5.6 months in group 1 and group 2, respectively. Mean duration of surgery was 31.7 +/- 7.6 and 52.1 +/- 14.4 minutes, and mean fluoroscopy time 32.9 +/- 22.1 and 75.1 +/- 31.5 seconds in group 1 and group 2, respectively. Both surgical and fluoroscopy time were significantly longer in group 2 (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical and radiological results. All fractures healed with solid union, and there was no complication that was expected to cause permanent disability. Although successful clinical and radiological results were obtained with both techniques, duration of surgery and intraoperative fluoroscopy time were significantly higher in the closed reduction group 2. We suggest the "blind-hand" technique as an alternative to closed reduction to prevent extensive intraoperative radiation exposure and to decrease the length of the surgical procedure. PMID:21667733

  4. Application of a medial buttress plate may prevent many treatment failures seen after fixation of vertical femoral neck fractures in young adults.

    PubMed

    Mir, Hassan; Collinge, Cory

    2015-05-01

    Femoral neck fractures in young adults with normal bone are mostly vertically oriented and may have variable amounts of comminution, which result from shearing forces during high-energy trauma. These factors play a role in the high rate of complications after this injury, including nonunion, malunion, failure of fixation, and avascular necrosis. These problems often occur together and inter-relate, for example, nonunion or malunion frequently result from fixation failure and varus collapse of the femoral head after reconstruction. The orthopaedic surgeon's goals of obtaining and maintaining anatomic reduction until bony union have been addressed by a number of surgical approaches and fixation constructs, however, complications are still common and no consensus exists on how these problematic fractures may be best treated. For optimal treatment of vertical femoral neck fractures, anatomic reduction must be achieved and fixation must be able to resist the high shear forces across the fracture with hip motion, weight-bearing, and muscle tone. Buttress plate fixation is a common method for stabilizing fractures that require resistance to shear forces and stands as one of the basic principles of fracture care. This technique has not been widely applied to this injury pattern. We propose that the concepts of modern fracture care should be applied together for vertical femoral neck fractures in young adults. Specifically, we propose that anatomic reduction and fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures with the addition of a medial buttress plate to resist shearing forces will improve on the historically high rate of complications after these difficult injuries. PMID:25744726

  5. Bilateral atypical insufficiency fractures of the proximal tibia and a unilateral distal femoral fracture associated with long-term intravenous bisphosphonate therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Atypical insufficiency fractures of the femur in patients on long-term bisphosphonate therapy have been well described in recent literature. The majority of cases are associated with minimal or no trauma and occur in the subtrochanteric or diaphyseal region. Case presentation We describe the case of a 76-year-old British Caucasian woman who presented initially to an emergency department and then to her primary care physician with a long-standing history of bilateral knee pain after minor trauma. Plain radiographs showed subtle linear areas of sclerosis bilaterally in her proximal tibiae. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the presence of insufficiency fractures in these areas along with her left distal femur. There are very few reports of atypical insufficiency fractures involving the tibia in patients on long-term bisphosphonate therapy and this appears to be the only documented bilateral case involving the metaphyseal regions of the proximal tibia and distal femur. Conclusion In addition to existing literature describing atypical fractures in the proximal femur and femoral shaft, there is a need for increased awareness that these fractures can also occur in other weight-bearing areas of the skeleton. All clinicians involved in the care of patients taking long-term bisphosphonates need to be aware of the growing association between new onset lower limb pain and atypical insufficiency fractures. PMID:22309438

  6. Three-Dimensional Computed Tomographic Analysis for Comminution of Pertrochanteric Femoral Fracture: Comminuted Anterior Cortex as a Predictor of Cutting Out

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, Sachiyuki; Wakui, Motohiro; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi; Miyao, Masunao; Honma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fixed angle sliding hip screw devices allow controlled impaction between the head neck fragment and the femoral shaft fragment in the surgical treatment of pertrochanteric fractures. This study was performed to evaluate the frequency and pattern of comminution at the fracture site, which may prevent the intended impaction. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to investigate 101 pertrochanteric fractures treated with fixed angle sliding hip screw devices, with emphasis on the comminuted cortex. A comminuted fracture was defined as a fracture that had a third fracture fragment at the main fracture line. Results: There were 40 fractures without comminution and 61 with comminution. All 61 comminuted fractures had a comminuted posterior cortex, and 3 of 61 fractures also had comminution at the anterior cortex. The prevalence of cutting out of the implant from the femoral head was significantly higher in cases involving comminution at both the posterior and anterior cortices than in cases involving comminution only at the posterior cortex (66.7 % and 3.4 %, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The posterior cortex was comminuted in 60.4% of pertrochanteric fractures and the anterior cortex in 3.0%. Intended impaction at the fracture site could not be obtained at any cortex in cases with comminution at both the anterior and posterior cortices; comminution at the anterior cortex may be a predictor of cutting out. PMID:27347234

  7. Late-diagnosed large osteochondral fracture of the lateral femoral condyle in an adolescent: a case report.

    PubMed

    Enea, Davide; Busilacchi, Alberto; Cecconi, Stefano; Gigante, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    In this case report, we describe a large osteochondral fracture of the anterolateral femoral condyle in an adolescent athlete while dancing. At 3 months after the misdiagnosed injury, the condylar defect was covered by a layer of disorganized fibrous tissue rich in blood vessels. To achieve good repair, an accurate curettage of the fractured surfaces, a precise reduction, and a stable internal fixation of the fragments were performed. Two poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable screws were used to obtain appropriate compression. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and had resumed her previous dancing activity. An MRI scan showed no interruptions of the cartilage layer at the boundary with the healthy tissue, but cartilage thinning and extensive subchondral remodeling were detected. PMID:23511583

  8. Bilateral Femoral Neck Insufficiency Fractures after Use of a Long-term Anti-resorptive Drug Therapy for Osteoporosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong-Ki; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman developed an insufficiency fracture on her right femoral neck without trauma after four years of treatment with a bisphosphonate. Her fracture was fixed by two screws and her anti-osteoporotic drug was changed from an anti-resorptive to an anabolic agent. Seven months later, however, she sustained similar insufficiency fracture on the left femoral neck and was treated with the same method. She developed right inguinal pain again approximately eight months after her right side operation. The results of imaging tests revealed that her insufficiency fracture was converted to complete fracture, and that the fracture gap had widened as well. Her right hip was revised with hemiarthroplasty. A histological exam of the fracture site revealed evidence of decreased bone healing. Long-term administration of anti-resorptive drug prevents bone healing and remodeling and can result in atypical fractures of the femoral neck. Osteosynthesis was difficult to accomplish despite the application of proactive fixation. Therefore, more rigid fixation and careful postoperative treatment should be considered.

  9. Impact of intraprosthetic drilling on the strength of the femoral stem in periprosthetic fractures: A finite element investigation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Stephan; Bauer, Michael; Petri, Maximilian; Schrader, Julian; Maier, Hans J; Krettek, Christian; Hassel, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of periprosthetic femur fractures after total hip arthroplasty remains a major challenge in orthopedic surgery. Recently, a novel surgical technique using intraprosthetic screw fixation has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of drilling the femoral hip stem on integrity and strength of the implant. The hypothesis was that intraprosthetic drilling and screw fixation would not cause the load limit of the prosthesis to be exceeded and that deformation would remain within the elastic limit. A sawbone model with a conventional straight hip stem was used and a Vancouver C periprosthetic fracture was created. The fracture was fixed with a nine-hole less invasive stabilization system plate with two screws drilled and inserted through the femoral hip stem. Three different finite element models were created using ANSYS software. The models increased in complexity including joint forces and stress risers from three different dimensions. A variation of drilling positions was analyzed. Due to the complexity of the physiological conditions in the human femur, the most complex finite element model provided the most realistic results. Overall, significant changes in the stresses to the prosthesis caused by the drilling procedure were observed. While the stresses at the site of the bore hole decreased, the load increased in the surrounding stem material. This effect is more pronounced and further the holes were apart, and it was found that increasing the number of holes could counteract this. The maximum load was still found to be in the area of the prosthesis neck. No stresses above the load limit of titanium alloy were detected. All deformations of the prosthesis stem remained in the elastic range. These results may indicate a potential role for intraprosthetic screw fixation in the future treatment of periprosthetic femur fractures. PMID:27272200

  10. A displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with female athlete triad: A case report.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shinichi; Arai, Yuji; Hara, Kunio; Tsuzihara, Takashi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a case of a displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with amenorrhea. Both reduction and internal fixation were performed early after the injury. At 24 months postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy showed no positive signs of femoral head necrosis and bone union was confirmed on plain X-ray. A medical examination for the presence of the signs of the female athlete triad by checking weight, calorie intake and menstrual cycles is most important to prevent such stress fractures. Athletes as well as their coaches or parents therefore need to understand female athlete triad. PMID:20205723

  11. Early intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fracture on outcomes in patients with severe chest injury: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Meng; Li, Changli; Yi, Chengla; Tang, Shaotao

    2016-01-01

    Early intramedullary nailing (IMN) within the first 24 hours for multiply injured patients with femoral fracture and concomitant severe chest injury is still controversial. This review aimed to investigate the association between early IMN and pulmonary complications in such patients. We searched the literature up to Jan 2016 in the main electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane library databases) to identify eligible studies. Data were extracted and analyzed using a Mantel-Haenszel method with random-effects model to estimate pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven retrospective cohort studies were identified eventually. The pooled estimates demonstrated that the application of early IMN did not significantly increase the risk of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (OR, 0.65; 95% CI: 0.38-1.13), mortality (OR, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.43-1.47), pneumonia (OR, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.55-1.54), multiple organ failure (MOF) (OR, 0.87; 95% CI: 0.45-1.71) and pulmonary embolism (OR, 1.81; 95% CI: 0.28-11.83). In subgroup analysis according to the type of IMN (reamed or undreamed), we did not find any significant difference either. Our results indicated that early IMN of femoral shaft fracture was not associated with increased rates of pulmonary complications in severe chest-injured patients. PMID:27457468

  12. Bipolar Hemarthroplasty Using Cementless Conical Stem for Treatment of Dorr Type B and C Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study aims to evaluate the clinical and the radiological outcome of bipolar hemiarthroplasty using cementless cone stem to treat osteoporotic femoral neck fracture and compare the results according to the proximal femur geometry. Materials and Methods Seventy-five hips (75 patients) that underwent bipolar hemiarthroplasty with cementless cone stem between September 2006 and December 2011 were analyzed. The minimum follow-up period was 3 years. Thirty-three hips were classified as type B and 41 as type C. The clinical outcome was assessed using Harris hip score and the walking ability score. Radiographic evaluation was performed to evaluate the stability of the prosthesis. Results At the most recent follow up, the mean Harris hip score was 86 (range, 70-92) and 65% recovered to preoperative ambulatory status. In the radiographic exam, stable stem fixation was achieved in all cases. For the complications, eight hips developed deep vein thrombosis while three hips showed heterotopic ossification. Dislocation and delayed deep infection occurred in one hip resepectively. There were no significance differences in Harris hip score and walking ability score when the type B group was compare with the type C. Conclusion Bipolar hemiarthroplasty with cementless cone stem showed an excellent early outcome both clinically and radiographically regardless of the shape of the proximal femur. We believe this prosthesis can provide early stability to the Dorr type B and C femur and is an effective treatment for treating osteoporotic femoral neck fracture. PMID:27536631

  13. Early intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fracture on outcomes in patients with severe chest injury: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meng; Li, Changli; Yi, Chengla; Tang, Shaotao

    2016-01-01

    Early intramedullary nailing (IMN) within the first 24 hours for multiply injured patients with femoral fracture and concomitant severe chest injury is still controversial. This review aimed to investigate the association between early IMN and pulmonary complications in such patients. We searched the literature up to Jan 2016 in the main electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane library databases) to identify eligible studies. Data were extracted and analyzed using a Mantel–Haenszel method with random-effects model to estimate pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven retrospective cohort studies were identified eventually. The pooled estimates demonstrated that the application of early IMN did not significantly increase the risk of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (OR, 0.65; 95% CI: 0.38–1.13), mortality (OR, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.43–1.47), pneumonia (OR, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.55–1.54), multiple organ failure (MOF) (OR, 0.87; 95% CI: 0.45–1.71) and pulmonary embolism (OR, 1.81; 95% CI: 0.28–11.83). In subgroup analysis according to the type of IMN (reamed or undreamed), we did not find any significant difference either. Our results indicated that early IMN of femoral shaft fracture was not associated with increased rates of pulmonary complications in severe chest-injured patients. PMID:27457468

  14. Periprosthetic femoral fractures around well fixed implants: a simple method of fixation using LC-DCP with trochanteric purchase.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ramesh; Prasad, Prabhudev; Kumar, Senthil; Nagi, Onkarnath

    2007-04-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are among the most serious complications in hip surgery. Various classifications have been suggested. At present the Vancouver classification system probably comes closest to the ideal. Most authors recommend internal fixation of the fractures in well-fixed implants (Vancouver type B1). However as the fixation to the proximal fragment has always been a problem, many types of fixation devices have been used. This retrospective study was done to evaluate the efficacy of an LC-DCP with trochanteric purchase, in the fixation of Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic femoral fractures. Our study included 12 patients, 7 male and 5 female with a mean age of 73 years (range: 57 to 91). One patient died due to complications not related to surgery and in another patient the plate was found broken with a loose implant, which was revised. All cases were primary arthroplasties. A long broad LC-DCP was used for the fixation. Purchase in the proximal fragment was obtained with screws in the greater trochanter. Ten fractures united in an average period of 7 months. The mean duration of follow-up was 6.5 years. The final results were evaluated using the Harris hip score. The mean Harris hip score was 85 with a range of 75 to 94. PMID:17515232

  15. Technique of Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Comminuted Proximal Humerus Fractures With Allograft Femoral Head Metaphyseal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Parada, Stephen A; Makani, Amun; Stadecker, Monica J; Warner, Jon J P

    2015-10-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are common injuries that can require operative treatment. Different operative techniques are available, but the hallmark of fixation for 3- and 4-part fractures is a locking-plate-and-screw construct. Despite advances in this technology, obtaining anatomical reduction and fracture union can be difficult, and complications (eg, need for revision) are not uncommon. These issues can be addressed by augmenting the fixation with an endosteally placed fibular allograft. Although biomechanical and clinical results have been good, the technique can lead to difficulties in future revision to arthroplasty, a common consequence of failed open reduction and internal fixation. The technique described, an alternative to placing a long endosteal bone graft, uses a trapezoidal, individually sized pedestal of allograft femoral head to facilitate the reduction and healing of the humeral head and tuberosity fragments in a displaced 3- or 4-part fracture of the proximal humerus. It can be easily incorporated with any plate-and-screw construct and does not necessitate placing more than 1 cm of bone into the humeral intramedullary canal, limiting the negative effects on any future revision to arthroplasty. PMID:26447409

  16. [Body temperature regulation as a prognostic criterion for the postoperative period in patients with femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Samokhin, A V

    2002-01-01

    Frequency is studied of adequate, redundant, inert, and reduced types of thermoreactivity in healthy subjects and patients with fractures. Definition of type of thermoreactivity to cooling in patients with fractures of the thighbone permits prognosticating the course of the bone fracture healing process. The symptom of distal hyperthermia/hypothermia is unspecific but is regarded as a supplementary index of the type of thermoreactivity and character of the course of the fracture healing process. PMID:12073260

  17. Atypical Femoral Fractures-Ongoing and History of Bone-Specific Therapy, Concomitant Diseases, Medications, and Survival.

    PubMed

    Muschitz, Christian; Thaler, Heinrich W; Dimai, Hans Peter; Resch, Heinrich; Kocijan, Roland; Kostic, Martina; Geiger, Corinna; Kaider, Alexandra; Muschitz, Gabriela K; Szivak, Michael; Pietschmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) are generally rare events; several studies have indicated a potential link between AFF and long-term bone-specific therapies (BSTs). The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of AFF and potential associations with prior or ongoing BST. A total of 8851 Caucasian female and male patients with de novo hip fractures treated in the largest Austrian level 1 trauma center from 2000 to 2013 were selected. Of the total, 194 patients with a de novo low-traumatic subtrochanteric or shaft fractures were identified: 35 atypical and 159 typical fractures. Of these patients, concomitant diseases, medication, previous fractures, and survival data were retrieved and analyzed. Female patients in both groups were significantly older. The median survival was significantly shorter in patients with AFF (9 vs 18 months; p < 0.0001). Cardiovascular disease, sarcopenia, chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes, smoking (past or current history), and prevalent fragility fractures were more frequent in AFF patients, as well as the concomitant use of phenprocoumon, furosemide, and sulfonylurea. Although the number of patients with current BST was less in (14.5%) both groups, more patients in the AFF group were previously treated with BST (71% vs 49%; p = 0.016), and they received these therapies for a longer time period. A combination of severe comorbidities, long-term pharmaceutical therapies, and a history of previous or ongoing BST was associated with an increased individual risk for AFF. PMID:26116181

  18. Meta-Analysis of a Complex Network of Non-Pharmacological Interventions: The Example of Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Rémy; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical interventions raise specific methodological issues in network meta-analysis (NMA). They are usually multi-component interventions resulting in complex networks of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), with multiple groups and sparse connections. Purpose To illustrate the applicability of the NMA in a complex network of surgical interventions and to prioritize the available interventions according to a clinically relevant outcome. Methods We considered RCTs of treatments for femoral neck fracture in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and ClinicalTrials.gov up to November 2015. Two reviewers independently selected trials, extracted data and used the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing the risk of bias. A group of orthopedic surgeons grouped similar but not identical interventions under the same node. We synthesized the network using a Bayesian network meta-analysis model. We derived posterior odds ratios (ORs) and 95% credible intervals (95% CrIs) for all possible pairwise comparisons. The primary outcome was all-cause revision surgery. Results Data from 27 trials were combined, for 4,186 participants (72% women, mean age 80 years, 95% displaced fractures). The median follow-up was 2 years. With hemiarthroplasty (HA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) as a comparison, risk of surgical revision was significantly higher with the treatments unthreaded cervical osteosynthesis (OR 8.0 [95% CrI 3.6–15.5] and 5.9 [2.4–12.0], respectively), screw (9.4 [6.0–16.5] and 6.7 [3.9–13.6]) and plate (12.5 [5.8–23.8] and 7.8 [3.8–19.4]). Conclusions In older women with displaced femoral neck fractures, arthroplasty (HA and THA) is the most effective treatment in terms of risk of revision surgery. Systematic Review Registration PROSPERO no. CRD42013004218. Level of Evidence Network Meta-Analysis, Level 1. PMID:26735922

  19. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge

  20. Bisphosphonate Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaw: An Update on Pathophysiology, Risk Factors, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rasmusson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients treated with bisphosphonates is a relatively rare but well known complication at maxillofacial units around the world. It has been speculated that the medication, especially long-term i.v. bisphosphonate treatment, could cause sterile necrosis of the jaws. The aim of this narrative review of the literature was to elaborate on the pathological mechanisms behind the condition and also to gather an update on incidence, risk factors, and treatment of bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaw. In total, ninety-one articles were reviewed. All were published in internationally recognized journals with referee systems. We can conclude that necrotic lesions in the jaw seem to be following upon exposure of bone, for example, after tooth extractions, while other interventions like implant placement do not increase the risk of osteonecrosis. Since exposure to the bacterial environment in the oral cavity seems essential for the development of necrotic lesions, we believe that the condition is in fact chronic osteomyelitis and should be treated accordingly. PMID:25254048

  1. Comparison of bone tissue trace-element concentrations and mineral density in osteoporotic femoral neck fractures and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Mutlu, Mahmut; Mermerkaya, Musa Uğur; Karaoğlu, Sinan; Saçmaci, Şerife; Kartal, Şenol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the role of trace elements in osteoporosis by comparing the trace-element concentrations in bone and the radiographic bone density and bone mineral density (BMD) of patients with osteoporotic femur fractures and osteoarthritis. Patients and methods The study enrolled 30 patients operated on for proximal femoral fractures after falls, and another 30 patients undergoing hip arthroplasty at the same center for hip osteoarthritis. Bone samples were obtained during the surgical procedures. The density of the bone samples was assessed using computed tomography and the Hounsfield scale. The levels of Ca(II), Mg(II), and other trace elements in the bone samples were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In addition, BMD, Z-scores, and T-scores were measured in the unaffected hips of all patients using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Magnesium (1,908±507 versus 2,540±435, P<0.05), calcium (10.4±3.5 versus 13.9±3.7, P<0.05), and zinc (2,342±1,252 versus 3,145±1,604, P<0.05) μg g−1, levels were significantly lower in the bone samples in the fracture group. The groups did not differ in the other biochemical parameters. All dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry findings were significantly worse in the fracture group than in the osteoarthritis group. However, the groups did not differ in femoral neck density assessed radiologically using the Hounsfield scale. The following parameters were negatively correlated with age: magnesium, r=−0.436, P<0.001; calcium, r=−0.331, P=0.01; T-score, r=−0.381, P=0.003; Z-score, r=−0.267, P=0.043; and BMD, r=−0.365, P=0.004. Conclusion Ca(II), Mg(II), and Zn(II) appear to play important roles in bone breakdown/synthesis. Further studies of the roles of trace elements in the etiology and treatment of osteoporosis are warranted. We found decreased bone levels of Ca, Mg, and Zn in patients with osteoporotic fractures compared to

  2. A Study of Inflammatory/Necrosis Biomarkers in the Fracture of the Femur Treated with Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Mariapaola; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Peruzzi, Marco; Scuderi, Flavia; Bartoccioni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Pertrochanteric fractures are common injuries in adults and source of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Different surgical techniques were recommended for their treatment but undoubtedly they add an additional inflammatory trauma along the fracture itself. Many attempts to quantify the degree of approach-related trauma are carried out through measurements of systemic inflammatory parameters. In this study we prospectively analyzed laboratory data of 20 patients over eighty with pertrochanteric fracture of the femur treated with proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA). This is an excellent device for osteosynthesis because it can be easily and quickly inserted by a mini-incision providing stable fixation and early full mobilization. Serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and plasma creatin kinase (CK) were evaluated 1 hour preoperatively and 24 hours postoperatively. Our results show that PFNA did not induce significant increments in serum levels of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6; CRP was elevated preoperatively in correlation with waiting time for surgery; CRP and CK showed a significant increment in the first postoperatory day; CK increment was correlated with surgical time length. We conclude that, for the markers we analyzed, PFNA shows a low biomechanical-inflammatory profile that represents an advantage over other techniques. PMID:26074676

  3. Factors affecting the outcome of fractures of the femoral neck in children and adolescents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yeranosian, M; Horneff, J G; Baldwin, K; Hosalkar, H S

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the femoral neck in children are rare, high-energy injuries with high complication rates. Their treatment has become more interventional but evidence of the efficacy of such measures is limited. We performed a systematic review of studies examining different types of treatment and their outcomes, including avascular necrosis (AVN), nonunion, coxa vara, premature physeal closure (PPC), and Ratliff's clinical criteria. A total of 30 studies were included, comprising 935 patients. Operative treatment and open reduction were associated with higher rates of AVN. Delbet types I and II fractures were most likely to undergo open reduction and internal fixation. Coxa vara was reduced in the operative group, whereas nonunion and PPC were not related to surgical intervention. Nonunion and coxa vara were unaffected by the method of reduction. Capsular decompression had no effect on AVN. Although surgery allows a more anatomical union, it is uncertain whether operative treatment or the type of reduction affects the rate of AVN, nonunion or PPC, because more severe fractures were operated upon more frequently. A delay in treatment beyond 24 hours was associated with a higher incidence of AVN. PMID:23307688

  4. Trabecular Plate Loss and Deteriorating Elastic Modulus of Femoral Trabecular Bone in Intertrochanteric Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Zhou, Bin; Parkinson, Ian; Thomas, C. David L.; Clement, John G.; Fazzalari, Nick; Guo, X. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporotic hip fracture is associated with significant trabecular bone loss, which is typically characterized as low bone density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and altered microstructure by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Emerging morphological analysis techniques, e.g. individual trabecula segmentation (ITS), can provide additional insights into changes in plate-like and rod-like trabeculae, two major microstructural types serving different roles in determining bone strength. Using ITS, we evaluated trabecular microstructure of intertrochanteric bone cores obtained from 23 patients undergoing hip replacement surgery for intertrochanteric fracture and 22 cadaveric controls. Micro-finite element (μFE) analyses were performed to further understand how the abnormalities seen by ITS might translate into effects on bone strength. ITS analyses revealed that, near fracture site, plate-like trabeculae were seriously depleted in fracture patients, but trabecular rod volume was maintained. Besides, decreased plate area and rod length were observed in fracture patients. Fracture patients also showed decreased elastic moduli and shear moduli of trabecular bone. These results provided evidence that in intertrochanteric hip fracture, preferential loss of plate-like trabeculae led to more rod-like microstructure and deteriorated mechanical competence adjacent to the fracture site, which increased our understanding of the biomechanical pathogenesis of hip fracture in osteoporosis. PMID:26273512

  5. [Infection following centro-medullary nailing of diaphyseal femoral and tibial fractures].

    PubMed

    Lortat-Jacob, A; Sutour, J M; Beaufils, P

    1986-01-01

    The authors have treated 51 cases of infection arising after intramedullary nailing of the femur or tibia. In 3 cases amputation was required, 48 united, but 10 were still draining. The final result was obtained after an average of 15 months. An average of four procedures per patient were needed. All the cases were septic non-unions at the onset of treatment, except 18 cases which had already united. In these cases, simple removal of the femoral nail led to rapid healing. In contrast, healing was less easy to obtain in the tibia. In 33 septic non-unions, 12 femoral and 21 tibial, the best results at the femoral level were obtained by retaining the nail in situ. At the tibial level, retention of the nail was rarely followed by bony union. Removal of the nail and the use of external fixation gave good results for the infection, but rarely resulted in bony union (1 case out of 14). The failures were treated by further operation of bone resection and grafting. The authors recommend, in cases of tibial septic non-union after nailing that primary removal of the nail should be associated with bony resection and external fixation, followed by reconstructive grafting, either by open cancellous grafting extending to the fibula or conventional tibio fibular grafting. In 8 cases, 7 in the femur and 1 in the tibia, the infection extended throughout the entire diaphysis and in 3 of these cases, a large diaphyseal resection was required. PMID:3823510

  6. Differences in monthly variation, cause, and place of injury between femoral neck and trochanteric fractures: 6-year survey (2008–2013) in Kyoto prefecture, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Motoyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mikami, Yasuo; Ikeda, Takumi; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiharu; Nagae, Masateru; Oka, Yoshinobu; Sawada, Koshiro; Kuriyama, Nagato; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The incidence of femoral neck and trochanteric fractures reportedly differ by age and regionality. We investigated differences in monthly variations of the occurrence of femoral neck and trochanteric fractures as well as place and cause of injury in the Kyoto prefecture over a 6-year period. Methods Fracture type (neck or trochanteric fracture), age, sex, place of injury, and cause of injury were surveyed among patients aged ≥ 65 years with hip fractures that occurred between 2008 and 2013 who were treated in 1 of 13 participating hospitals (5 in an urban area and 8 in a rural area). The proportion of sick beds in the participating hospitals was 24.7% (4,151/16,781). Monthly variations in the number of patients were investigated in urban and rural areas in addition to the entire Kyoto prefecture. Place of injury was classified as indoors or outdoors, and cause of injury was categorized as simple fall, accident, or uncertain. Results There were 2,826 patients with neck fractures (mean age, 82.1 years) and 3,305 patients with trochanteric fractures (mean age, 85.0 years). There were similarities in the monthly variation of the number of fractures in addition to the place and cause of injury between neck and trochanteric fractures. Indoors (approximately 74%) and simple falls (approximately 78%) were the primary place and cause of injury, respectively. The place of injury was not significantly different by fracture type with each age group. Significantly more patients with neck fracture had “uncertain” as the cause of injury than trochanteric fracture in all age groups. Conclusions Based on the results of the present study, the injury pattern might not have a great effect on the susceptibility difference between neck and trochanteric fractures. PMID:27252738

  7. [A case of acute chronic respiratory failure due to fat embolism syndrome after the left femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Oda, Keishi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Kozaki, Minako; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Yamasaki, Kei; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    A 78 year old Japanese woman was transferred to our hospital for the treatment of a fracture of the left femoral neck in April, 2010. She had been taking oral corticosteroid (prednisolone 5 mg/day) for the treatment of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia since 2003, and had been treated by home oxygen therapy since 2007. She fell in the restroom at home and hurt herself, and was transferred to our hospital for treatment of a left femoral neck fracture in April, 2010. Her respiratory status was stable just after the transfer; however, she was transferred to the intensive care unit and started to receive mechanical ventilation due to rapidly progressive respiratory failure on the fourth day after admission. Chest X-ray and computed tomography revealed rapid progression of bilateral ground-glass attenuations, and acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was clinically suspected. However, the elevation of D-dimer over time and characteristic findings of petechial hemorrhagic lesions on her palpebral conjunctivae and neck with microscopic findings of phagocytized lipid in alveolar macrophages in her endobronchial secretion led to the diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. She was successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroid and sivelestat sodium, and she was discharged on the 21st day after admission. Although a differential diagnosis of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia and fat embolism syndrome was necessary and difficult in the present case, characteristic findings of petechial hemorrhagic lesions of skin, palpebral conjunctiva and lipid-laden alveolar macrophages in endotracheal aspirate were useful for the accurate and prompt diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. PMID:21913383

  8. Femoral nerve block Intervention in Neck of Femur fracture (FINOF): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are very painful leading to lengthy hospital stays. Conventional methods of treating pain are limited. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories are relatively contraindicated and opioids have significant side effects.Regional anaesthesia holds promise but results from these techniques are inconsistent. Trials to date have been inconclusive with regard to which blocks to use and for how long. Interpatient variability remains a problem. Methods/Design This is a single centre study conducted at Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham; a large regional trauma centre in England. It is a pragmatic, parallel arm, randomized controlled trial. Sample size will be 150 participants (75 in each group). Randomization will be web-based, using computer generated concealed tables (service provided by Nottingham University Clinical Trials Unit). There is no blinding. Intervention will be a femoral nerve block (0.5 mls/kg 0.25% levo-bupivacaine) followed by ropivacaine (0.2% 5 ml/hr−1) infused via a femoral nerve catheter until 48 hours post-surgery. The control group will receive standard care. Participants will be aged over 70 years, cognitively intact (abbreviated mental score of seven or more), able to provide informed consent, and admitted directly through the Emergency Department from their place of residence. Primary outcomes will be cumulative ambulation score (from day 1 to 3 postoperatively) and cumulative dynamic pain scores (day 1 to 3 postoperatively). Secondary outcomes will be cumulative dynamic pain score preoperatively, cumulative side effects, cumulative calorific and protein intake, EUROQOL EQ-5D score, length of stay, and rehabilitation outcome (measured by mobility score). Discussion Many studies have shown the effectiveness of regional blockade in neck of femur fractures, but the techniques used have varied. This study aims to identify whether early and continuous femoral nerve block can be effective in relieving pain and enhancing mobilization

  9. Prevalence of bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaws in multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws (BP-ONJ) is an adverse effect of bisphosphonate treatment with varying reported incidence rates. Methods In two neighboring German cities, prevalence and additional factors of the development of BP-ONJ in multiple myeloma patients with bisphosphonates therapy were recorded using a retrospective (RS) and cross-sectional study (CSS) design. For the RS, all patients treated from Jan. 2000 - Feb. 2006 were contacted by letter. In the CSS, all patients treated from Oct. 2006 - Mar. 2008 had a physical and dental examination. Additionally, a literature review was conducted to evaluate all articles reporting on BP-ONJ prevalence. PubMed search terms were: bisphosphonat, diphosphonate, osteonecrosis, prevalence and incidence. Results In the RS, data from 81 of 161 patients could be obtained; four patients (4.9%) developed BP-ONJ. In the CSS, 16 of 78 patients (20.5%) developed BP-ONJ. All patients with BP-ONJ had received zoledronate; 12 of these had had additional bisphosphonates. All except one had an additional trigger factor (tooth extraction [n = 14], dental surgical procedure [n = 2], sharp mylohyoid ridge [n = 3]). Conclusion The prevalence of BP-ONJ may have been underestimated to date. The oral examination of all patients in this CSS might explain the higher prevalence, since even early asymptomatic stages of BP-ONJ and previously unnoticed symptomatic BP-ONJ were recorded. Since nearly all patients with BP-ONJ had an additional trigger factor, oral hygiene and dental care might help to reduce BP-ONJ incidence. PMID:20615236

  10. Fractal dimension evaluation of cone beam computed tomography in patients with bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, SR; Chen, CSK; Leroux, BG; Lee, PP; Hollender, LG; Schubert, MM

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to (1) evaluate the fractal dimension (FD) in regions of the mandible on cone beam CT (CBCT) images of patients with bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws (BP-ONJ) and (2) to select the most suitable region of interest (ROI) for further study on detection of bone alterations associated with bisphosphonates. Methods CBCT images of patients with BP-ONJ were included with matched controls. Values of FD were compared between groups. Selected ROIs were: ROI-1 — below the mandibular foramen; ROI-2 — above the mandibular foramen; ROI-3 — anterior to the mental foramen; ROI-4 — above the mandibular canal. The area of bone exposure was included as ROI-5. The results were analysed using generalized estimating equations and conditional logistic regression. Results There were 36 patients (67% female) with a mean age of 60.7 years. The mean FDs were: ROI-1 — 1.678 for controls and 1.673 for patients (P = 0.81); ROI-2 — 1.657 for controls and 1.653 for patients (P = 0.78); ROI-3 — 1.661 for controls and 1.684 for patients (P = 0.17); and ROI-4 — 1.670 for controls and 1.698 for patients (P = 0.03). The value of the FD in the area of exposed bone was the highest (1.729). The odds of being a BP-ONJ patient vs being a control was six times as high for individuals with a higher FD score at ROI-4, although the confidence interval was quite wide owing to the small sample size. Conclusion In this preliminary study, BP-ONJ patients had higher FD values than controls at regions close to the alveolar process. The results suggest that FD is a promising tool for detection of bone alterations associated with BP-ONJ. PMID:22065799

  11. Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the mandible: reliable soft tissue reconstruction using a local myofascial flap.

    PubMed

    Lemound, Juliana; Eckardt, Andrè; Kokemüller, Horst; von See, Constantin; Voss, Pit Jacob; Tavassol, Frank; Rücker, Martin; Rana, Majeed; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2012-08-01

    For the treatment of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw (BP-associated ONJ), poor cure rates are reported. In many cases, repeated osseous exposition and infection may occur. The currently recommended management of affected patients is antibiotic treatment and bony decortication, which is often complicated by soft tissue deficits due to chronic infection. In severe cases osteonecrosis can be managed often only by continuity resections of the mandible. For this purpose, we developed a new surgical procedure, which allows an effective closure of difficult jaw wounds in the lateral mandible. In the last 3 years, 20 patients with BP-associated osteonecrosis of the lower jaw were treated successfully with a modified defect-covering method using a myofascial flap. A mylohyoid muscle flap was detached from mylohyoid line and used to cover the bony defect. During 19 months mean follow-up, 90% of patients were asymptomatic, the oral mucosa was intact, and no exposed bone was observed. In consequence, we are able to demonstrate that a mylohyoid muscle flap provides a reliable wound closure in the lower jaw in patients treated with BPs. Although there are still no consensual therapy guidelines for patients affected by BP-associated ONJ, the results of the presented study provide evidence for an effective surgical therapy with long-term success. Covering compromised bone with well-vascularized tissue, a muscle flap, increased healing chances by enabling and supporting the necessary nutrition and defense against opportunistic infections. This therapy concept showed a good clinical outcome. PMID:21818568

  12. Effect of early surgery in high surgical risk geriatric patients with femoral neck fracture and taking antiplatelet agents

    PubMed Central

    Sa-ngasoongsong, Paphon; Kulachote, Noratep; Sirisreetreerux, Norachart; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Laohajaroensombat, Sukij; Pinsiranon, Nithiwut; Woratanarat, Patarawan; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj; Suphachatwong, Chanyut; Wajanavisit, Wiwat

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of early surgical intervention on the high surgical risk elderly patients who sustained femoral neck fracture (FNF) and taking concomitant antiplatelet agents. METHODS: Between 2010 and 2012, a prospective study was conducted on 49 geriatric patients, who took antiplatelet agents, sustained FNF and underwent surgery within 72 h [early surgery (ES) group], and these were compared with a retrospective consecutive case series of patients with similar characteristics (45 cases) who had delayed surgery (DS group) after 72 h during an earlier 3-year period. Postoperative outcomes were followed for one year and compared. RESULTS: There were non-significant differences in perioperative blood loss, blood transfusion, intensive care unit requirement and postoperative mortality (P > 0.05 all). There were 2 patients (4%) in the DS group who died after surgery (P = 0.23). However, the ES group showed a significantly better postoperative outcome in terms of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and functional outcome (P < 0.05 all). CONCLUSION: Early hip surgery in geriatric hip fracture patients with ongoing antiplatelet treatment was not associated with a significant increase of perioperative blood loss and postoperative mortality. Moreover, ES resulted in a better postoperative surgical outcome. In early hip surgery protocol, the antiplatelet agents are discontinued and the patient is operated on within 72 h after admission, which is safe and effective for the medically fit patients. PMID:26716093

  13. Closed reduction and internal fixation for intertrochanteric femoral fractures is safer and more efficient using two fluoroscopes simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Brin, Y S; Palmanovich, E; Aliev, E; Laver, L; Yaacobi, E; Nyska, M; Kish, B J

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess whether using two fluoroscopes simultaneously in closed reduction and internal fixation of a stable intertrochanteric fracture reduces radiation and operation time. Patients who sustained a stable intertrochanteric femoral fracture were operated in our institution with closed reduction and internal fixation. They were randomly allocated to be operated with the assistance of one or two fluoroscopes. With one device, the radiology technician controlled and moved it to the desired anterior-posterior or axial view. With two fluoroscopes, one was positioned in the anterior-posterior view and the other in the axial view, both controlled by the surgeon. Total radiation and operation time were collected for all patients and compared between the two groups. A total of 27 patients participated in the study. One fluoroscope was used for 13 surgeries and two in 14. Total radiation time was shorter with two fluoroscopes compared to the use of one (36.6±8.6s versus 51.2±18.9s, respectively; p<0.02), as was total operation time (24.3±4.2min and 34.7±11.9min, respectively; p<0.01). Working simultaneously with two fluoroscopic devices is safer for the medical team in the operating theatre, because it decreases the patient's radiation exposure, wound exposure time, and anaesthesia time. It saves operating room time and fluoroscopy personnel during the operation. When operating on hip fractures that are planned to be reduced and fixated, we recommend working with two fluoroscopes simultaneously. PMID:24656301

  14. In-Vivo Assessment of Femoral Bone Strength Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) Based on Routine MDCT Imaging: A Preliminary Study on Patients with Vertebral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Hans; Garcia, Eduardo Grande; Holzner, Fabian; Noel, Peter B.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To experimentally validate a non-linear finite element analysis (FEA) modeling approach assessing in-vitro fracture risk at the proximal femur and to transfer the method to standard in-vivo multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) data of the hip aiming to predict additional hip fracture risk in subjects with and without osteoporosis associated vertebral fractures using bone mineral density (BMD) measurements as gold standard. Methods One fresh-frozen human femur specimen was mechanically tested and fractured simulating stance and clinically relevant fall loading configurations to the hip. After experimental in-vitro validation, the FEA simulation protocol was transferred to standard contrast-enhanced in-vivo MDCT images to calculate individual hip fracture risk each for 4 subjects with and without a history of osteoporotic vertebral fractures matched by age and gender. In addition, FEA based risk factor calculations were compared to manual femoral BMD measurements of all subjects. Results In-vitro simulations showed good correlation with the experimentally measured strains both in stance (R2 = 0.963) and fall configuration (R2 = 0.976). The simulated maximum stress overestimated the experimental failure load (4743 N) by 14.7% (5440 N) while the simulated maximum strain overestimated by 4.7% (4968 N). The simulated failed elements coincided precisely with the experimentally determined fracture locations. BMD measurements in subjects with a history of osteoporotic vertebral fractures did not differ significantly from subjects without fragility fractures (femoral head: p = 0.989; femoral neck: p = 0.366), but showed higher FEA based risk factors for additional incident hip fractures (p = 0.028). Conclusion FEA simulations were successfully validated by elastic and destructive in-vitro experiments. In the subsequent in-vivo analyses, MDCT based FEA based risk factor differences for additional hip fractures were not mirrored by according BMD measurements. Our

  15. Revision total hip arthroplasty after removal of a fractured well-fixed extensively porous-coated femoral component using a trephine.

    PubMed

    Amanatullah, D F; Siman, H; Pallante, G D; Haber, D B; Sierra, R J; Trousdale, R T

    2015-09-01

    When fracture of an extensively porous-coated femoral component occurs, its removal at revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) may require a femoral osteotomy and the use of a trephine. The remaining cortical bone after using the trephine may develop thermally induced necrosis. A retrospective review identified 11 fractured, well-fixed, uncemented, extensively porous-coated femoral components requiring removal using a trephine with a minimum of two years of follow-up. The mean time to failure was 4.6 years (1.7 to 9.1, standard deviation (sd) 2.3). These were revised using a larger extensively porous coated component, fluted tapered modular component, a proximally coated modular component, or a proximal femoral replacement. The mean clinical follow-up after revision THA was 4.9 years (2 to 22, sd 3.1). The mean diameter of the femoral component increased from 12.7 mm (sd 1.9) to 16.2 mm (sd 3.4; p > 0.001). Two revision components had radiographic evidence of subsidence that remained radiographically stable at final follow-up. The most common post-operative complication was instability affecting six patients (54.5%) on at least one occasion. A total of four patients (36.4%) required further revision: three for instability and one for fracture of the revision component. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean Harris hip score before implant fracture (82.4; sd 18.3) and after trephine removal and revision THA (81.2; sd 14.8, p = 0.918). These findings suggest that removal of a fractured, well-fixed, uncemented, extensively porous-coated femoral component using a trephine does not compromise subsequent fixation at revision THA and the patient's pre-operative level of function can be restored. However, the loss of proximal bone stock before revision may be associated with a high rate of dislocation post-operatively. PMID:26330584

  16. Influence of various types of damage on the fracture strength of ceramic femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Viola; Witte, Hartmut; Kempf, Katrin; Oberbach, Thomas; Delfosse, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic articulations are a frequently used bearing for total hip replacements. This success mainly is due to their excellent tribological properties. Ceramics can withstand high pressure loads due to its brittleness but only low bending stresses. A ceramic ball head fracture is the result of subcritical crack growth. This kind of fracture in vivo can abet by damage or contamination of the stem cone. The main goal of this work is to provide a risk assessment of different possible damage mechanisms and contaminations that may result in lower fracture strength of a ceramic ball head. To simulate potential causes, different types and dimensions of metal wire, foils, hair, and lubricants were inserted between the ceramic ball head and the metal cone of the stem. The test results clearly show that fracture strength is negatively influenced by most of the inhomogeneities between the cone and the head because they increase the peak stresses acting on a part of the ceramic ball head. The results of this article clearly confirm the demand for an undamaged taper fit "free of contamination" between the ceramic head and the metal cone during implantation. PMID:22149922

  17. Better Axial Stiffness of a Bicortical Screw Construct Compared to a Cable Construct for Comminuted Vancouver B1 Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jamie T; Taheri, Arash; Day, Robert E; Yates, Piers J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to biomechanically evaluate the Locking attachment plate (LAP) construct in comparison to a Cable plate construct, for the fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures after cemented total hip arthroplasty. Each construct incorporated a locking compression plate with bi-cortical locking screws for distal fixation. In the Cable construct, 2 cables and 2 uni-cortical locking screws were used for proximal fixation. In the LAP construct, the cables were replaced by a LAP with 4 bi-cortical locking screws. The LAP construct was significantly stiffer than the cable construct under axial load with a bone gap (P=0.01). The LAP construct offers better axial stiffness compared to the cable construct in the fixation of comminuted Vancouver B1 proximal femoral fractures. PMID:26239233

  18. Ceramic femoral component fracture in total knee arthroplasty: an analysis using fractography, fourier-transform infrared microscopy, contact radiography and histology.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Alexander P; Singh, Gurpal; Beil, Frank Timo; Feuerstein, Bernd; Ruether, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Christoph H

    2014-05-01

    Ceramic components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are evolving. We analyze the first case of BIOLOX delta ceramic femoral component fracture. A longitudinal midline fracture in the patellar groove was present, with an intact cement mantle and no bony defects. Fractographic analysis with laser scanning microscopy and white light interferometry showed no evidence of arrest lines, hackles, wake hackles, material flaws, fatigue or crack propagation. Analysis of periprosthetic tissues with Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microscopy, contact radiography, histology, and subsequent digestion and high-speed centrifugation did not show ceramic debris. A macrophage-dominated response was present around polyethylene debris. We conclude that ceramic femoral component failure in this case was related to a traumatic event. Further research is needed to determine the suitability of ceramic components in TKA. PMID:24360338

  19. Assessment of mortality risk in elderly patients after proximal femoral fracture.

    PubMed

    Meessen, Jennifer M T A; Pisani, Salvatore; Gambino, Maria L; Bonarrigo, Domenico; van Schoor, Natasja M; Fozzato, Stefania; Cherubino, Paolo; Surace, Michele F

    2014-02-01

    Mortality after hip fracture is a major problem in the Western world, but its mechanisms remain uncertain. This study assessed the 2-year mortality rate after hip fracture in elderly patients by including hospital factors (eg, intervention type, surgical delay), underlying health conditions, and, for a subset, lifestyle factors (eg, body mass index, smoking, alcohol). A total of 828 patients (183 men) 70 to 99 years old experiencing a hip fracture in 2009 in the province of Varese were included in the study. The risk factors for death were assessed through Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Hip fracture incidence per 1000 persons was higher in women (8.4 vs 3.7 in men) and in elderly patients (12.4 for 85-99 years vs 4.4 for 70-84 years). The mortality rate after 1, 6, 12, and 24 months was 4.7%, 16%, 20.7%, and 30.4%, respectively. For the province of Varese, sex (hazard ratio, 0.39 for women), age group (hazard ratio, 2.2 for 85-99 years), and Charlson Comorbidity Index score (hazard ratio, 2.06 for score greater than 1) were found to be statistically significant. The 2-year mortality rate in hip fractures is associated with sex, age, and comorbidities. Male sex, age older than 85 years, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score greater than 1 are associated with a higher risk. Surgical delay was significant in the Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis but not in the Cox hazard analysis, suggesting that early surgery reduces risk in patients with numerous comorbidities. PMID:24679208

  20. Implant failure in a proximal femoral fracture treated with dynamic hip screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Dabis, John; Abdul-Jabar, Hani B.; Dabis, Hosam

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw fixation is a common orthopaedic procedure and to date, still can cause difficulties to the senior trauma surgeon. We present a case where an extra-capsular fracture of the proximal femur was managed with a dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation. She proceeded to the operating theatre, where the fracture was stabilized with a 75-mm DHS and short-barrelled plate. The implant position was checked with intraoperative screening and the position accepted. Following attempted mobilization at 11 days post-operatively, the patient developed a recurrence of her preoperative pain. X-ray showed that the implant screw had separated from the barrel. Later scrutiny of the intraoperative screening films revealed that the barrel and screw were not engaged at the time of surgery. Intraoperative screening films should be carefully checked to ensure congruity of implant components. PMID:26136561

  1. Implant failure in a proximal femoral fracture treated with dynamic hip screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Dabis, John; Abdul-Jabar, Hani B; Dabis, Hosam

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw fixation is a common orthopaedic procedure and to date, still can cause difficulties to the senior trauma surgeon. We present a case where an extra-capsular fracture of the proximal femur was managed with a dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation. She proceeded to the operating theatre, where the fracture was stabilized with a 75-mm DHS and short-barrelled plate. The implant position was checked with intraoperative screening and the position accepted. Following attempted mobilization at 11 days post-operatively, the patient developed a recurrence of her preoperative pain. X-ray showed that the implant screw had separated from the barrel. Later scrutiny of the intraoperative screening films revealed that the barrel and screw were not engaged at the time of surgery. Intraoperative screening films should be carefully checked to ensure congruity of implant components. PMID:26136561

  2. Femoral diaphyseal stress fracture as the initial presentation of acute leukaemia in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Chase, Helen Emily; Pang, Joe Hwong; Sanghrajka, Anish Pradip

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy was referred to the orthopaedic clinic by his general practitioner, reporting of a 6-week history of left thigh pain. Clinical examination was unremarkable. Radiographs demonstrated a periosteal reaction at the proximal femur. MRI scans demonstrated a stress fracture of the femur, with no associated sinister features and no evidence of a pathological lesion. As the fracture healed and symptoms improved, the patient became unwell with weight loss, lethargy, chest and jaw pain and fevers. After multiple blood tests over a 25-day period, including five full blood counts and two normal blood films, a third blood film finally demonstrated blasts in keeping with acute leukaemia. We discuss a literature review of musculoskeletal manifestations of leukaemia and the often atypical presentations found. PMID:27353177

  3. The effect of simvastatin treatment on bone repair of femoral fracture in animal model.

    PubMed

    Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Ingraci de Lucia, Conrado; Dos Santos Kotake, Bruna Gabriela; Gonçalves Gonzaga, Miliane; Tocchini de Figueiredo, Fellipe Augusto; Mizusaki Iyomasa, Daniela; Macedo, Ana Paula; Ervolino, Edilson

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the fracture healing area in osteoporotic femur of female rats restrained by stainless steel wire by statin administration in two different doses (5 mg and 20 mg). Ninety female rats were divided into six groups (n = 15): SH, SH-5 mg, SH-20 mg, OVX, OVX-5 mg, and OVX-20 mg. The surgery consisted of the fracture of the left femur bone and stabilization by K-wire and the administration was restricted and weekly controlled in the drinking water. The euthanasia was conducted at three different moments, five animals per period: 7 d, 14 d, and 28 d. Densitometry, zymography, and histological analyses showed a significant difference between some groups. According to these findings, simvastatin promoted a positive action for bone repair, especially in the osteometabolic group treated with 20 mg of the drug. PMID:25798995

  4. Hospital case volume and outcomes for proximal femoral fractures in the USA: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, David; Salim, Ali; Olufajo, Olubode; Gabbe, Belinda; Zogg, Cheryl; Harris, Mitchel B; Perry, Daniel C; Costa, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore whether older adults with isolated hip fractures benefit from treatment in high-volume hospitals. Design Population-based observational study. Setting All acute hospitals in California, USA. Participants All individuals aged ≥65 that underwent an operation for an isolated hip fracture in California between 2007 and 2011. Patients transferred between hospitals were excluded. Primary and secondary outcomes Quality indicators (time to surgery) and patient outcomes (length of stay, in-hospital mortality, unplanned 30-day readmission, and selected complications). Results 91 401 individuals satisfied the inclusion criteria. Time to operation and length of stay were significantly prolonged in low-volume hospitals, by 1.96 (95% CI 1.20 to 2.73) and 0.70 (0.38 to 1.03) days, respectively. However, there were no differences in clinical outcomes, including in-hospital mortality, 30-day re-admission, and rates of pneumonia, pressure ulcers, and venous thromboembolism. Conclusions These data suggest that there is no patient safety imperative to limit hip fracture care to high-volume hospitals. PMID:27056592

  5. Biopolymer augmentation of the lag screw in the treatment of femoral neck fractures--a biomechanical in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Paech, A; Wilde, E; Schulz, A P; Heinrichs, G; Wendlandt, R; Queitsch, C; Kienast, B; Jürgens, Ch

    2010-04-01

    The cut-out of the sliding screw is one of the most common complications in the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. The reasons for the cut-out are: a suboptimal position of the hip-screw in the femoral head, the type of fracture and poor bone quality. The aim of this study was to reproduce the cut-out event biomechanically and to evaluate the possible prevention of this event by the use of a biopolymer augmentation of the hip screw. Concerning the density and compression force of osteoporotic femoral bone polyurethane foam according to the terms of the Association for Standard Testing Material (ASTMF 1839-97) was used as test material. The polyurethane foam Lumoltan 200 with a compression force of 3.3 Mpa and a density of 0.192 g/cm(3) was used to reproduce the osteoporotic bone of the femoral fragment (density 12 lbm/ft(3)). A cylinder of 50 mm of length and 50 mm of width was produced by a rotary splint raising procedure with planar contact. The axial load of the system was performed by a hydraulic force cylinder of a universal test machine type Zwick 1455, Ulm, Germany. The CCD-angle of the used TGN-System was preset at 130 degrees. The migration pattern of the hip screw in the polyurethane foam was measured and expressed as a curve of the distance in millimeter (mm) against the applied load in Newton (N) up to the cut-out point. During the tests the implants reached a critical changing point from stable to unstable with an increased load progression of steps of 50 Newton. This unstable point was characterized by an increased migration speed in millimeters and higher descending gradient in the migration curve. This peak of the migration curve served as an indicator for the change of the hip screw position in the simulated bone material. The applied load in the non-augmented implant showed that in this group for a density degree of 12 (0,192 g/cm(3)) the mean force at the failure point was 1431 Newton (+/- 52 Newton). In the augmented implant we found that

  6. Biopolymer augmentation of the lag screw in the treatment of femoral neck fractures - a biomechanical in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The cut-out of the sliding screw is one of the most common complications in the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. The reasons for the cut-out are: a suboptimal position of the hip-screw in the femoral head, the type of fracture and poor bone quality. The aim of this study was to reproduce the cut-out event biomechanically and to evaluate the possible prevention of this event by the use of a biopolymer augmentation of the hip screw. Concerning the density and compression force of osteoporotic femoral bone polyurethane foam according to the terms of the Association for Standard Testing Material (ASTMF 1839-97) was used as test material. The polyurethane foam Lumoltan 200 with a compression force of 3.3 Mpa and a density of 0.192 g/cm3 was used to reproduce the osteoporotic bone of the femoral fragment (density 12 lbm/ft3). A cylinder of 50 mm of length and 50 mm of width was produced by a rotary splint raising procedure with planar contact. The axial load of the system was performed by a hydraulic force cylinder of a universal test machine type Zwick 1455, Ulm, Germany. The CCD-angle of the used TGN-System was preset at 130 degrees. The migration pattern of the hip screw in the polyurethane foam was measured and expressed as a curve of the distance in millimeter [mm] against the applied load in Newton [N] up to the cut-out point. During the tests the implants reached a critical changing point from stable to unstable with an increased load progression of steps of 50 Newton. This unstable point was characterized by an increased migration speed in millimeters and higher descending gradient in the migration curve. This peak of the migration curve served as an indicator for the change of the hip screw position in the simulated bone material. The applied load in the non-augmented implant showed that in this group for a density degree of 12 (0,192 g/cm3) the mean force at the failure point was 1431 Newton (± 52 Newton). In the augmented implant we found that the

  7. FIXATION OF SUPRACONDYLAR FEMORAL FRACTURES: A BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS COMPARING 95° BLADE PLATES AND DYNAMIC CONDYLAR SCREWS (DCS)

    PubMed Central

    Percope Andrade, Marco Antônio; Rodrigues, André Soares; Mendonça, Celso Junio; Santos Portela, Luiz Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine, by means of comparative biomechanical tests, whether greater compressive load resistance and flexion is presented by 95° angled blade plates or by dynamic condylar screws (DCS), and to correlate the failure type presented during the tests with each type of plate. Methods: Sixty-five porcine femurs were subjected to 1 cm medial wedge osteotomy, in the metaphysis, to simulate an unstable supracondylar femoral fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed on these pieces: 35 were fixed using 95° lateral blade plates and 30 with DCS plates. Another variable studied was the failure type presented in each group, in an attempt to correlate this with the type of plate. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in biomechanical resistance between the two types of plates, or between the failure type and the plate type used for the osteosynthesis. Conclusion: The two types of plate behaved in a similar fashion. However, the angled blade plate proved to be superior to the DCS in the flexion test. No statistical difference in failure type or type of plate used was observed. PMID:27022525

  8. Comparison of the reconstruction trochanteric antigrade nail (TAN) with the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) in the management of reverse oblique intertrochanteric hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Makki, Daoud; Matar, Hosam E; Jacob, Nebu; Lipscombe, Stephen; Gudena, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Reverse oblique intertrochanteric fractures have unique mechanical characteristics and are often treated with intramedullary implants. We compared the outcomes of the reconstruction trochanteric antegrade nail (TAN) with the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA). Between July 2008 and February 2014, we reviewed all patients with reverse oblique intertrochanteric fractures treated at our hospital. Patients with pathological fractures and those who were treated with other than TAN and PFNA nailing systems were excluded. Preoperative assessment included the Abbreviated mental test score (AMT), the ASA grade, pre-injury mobility and place of residence. Postoperative outcome measures included the type of implant used, time to fracture union, failures of fixation and revision surgeries. Fifty-eight patients were included and divided into two groups based on the treatment: 22 patients treated with TAN and 36 patients treated with PFNA systems. The two groups were well matched with regards to demographics and fracture type. The overall union rate was similar in both groups but the time to union was shorter in the TAN group. There were 8 implant failures in the PFNA (22.2%) group compare to none in the TAN group. Implant failure was associated with the severity of fracture (AO 31.A3.3) but was not related to fracture malreduction or screw position (Tip-apex-distance). Our study suggests that the use of reconstruction system with two screws such as TAN may be more suitable implant for reverse oblique intertrochanteric hip fractures. PMID:26482482

  9. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  10. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. Material/Methods A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Results There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  11. Knee megaprosthesis: a salvage solution for severe open and complex distal femoral fracture associated with an ipsilateral brachial plexus injury (a case report with literature review).

    PubMed

    Ennaciri, Badr; Vasile, Christian; Lebredonchel, Thierry; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; Montbarbon, Eric; Beaudouin, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex distal femoral fractures in the young patient often occur as a result of high velocity trauma. Timely recognition and treatment is everything in such a situation, and it needs a robust staged management pathway to optimize the chance of limb preservation. We report a case of a motorcyclist admitted to the department of orthopedics at Chambery hospital, France, with a complex comminuted and open distal femoral fracture of the left leg, associated with a brachial plexus injury to the ipsilateral upper limb. On arrival to the emergency department, damage control stabilization and surgery was commenced, debridement of contaminated non-viable tissue, abundant antiseptic lavage and application of external fixation coupled with the use of antibiotic spacer. Following normalization of inflammatory markers and ensuring no clinical signs of infection, subsequent management consisted of joint reconstruction to achieve a functional knee. The external fixator and femoral spacer was removed and a modular megaprosthesis was implanted with a lateral gastrocnemius flap to cover the exposed knee joint and reinforce the extensor apparatus. Nerve graft to the left brachial plexus injury was performed at University Hospital of Grenoble. Our patient entered an intensive rehabilitation program and at 1 year follow-up achieved good knee function and sensation to the left upper limb. PMID:26421102

  12. Demineralized Bone Matrix Add-On for Acceleration of Bone Healing in Atypical Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture: A Consecutive Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kulachote, Noratep; Sirisreetreerux, Norachart; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Fuangfa, Praman; Suphachatwong, Chanyut; Wajanavisit, Wiwat

    2016-01-01

    Background. Delayed union and nonunion are common complications in atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) despite having good fracture fixation. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a successfully proven method for enhancing fracture healing of the long bone fracture and nonunion and should be used in AFFs. This study aimed to compare the outcome after subtrochanteric AFFs (ST-AFFs) fixation with and without DBM. Materials and Methods. A prospective study was conducted on 9 ST-AFFs patients using DBM (DBM group) during 2013-2014 and compared with a retrospective consecutive case series of ST-AFFs patients treated without DBM (2010–2012) (NDBM group, 9 patients). All patients were treated with the same standard guideline and followed up until fractures completely united. Postoperative outcomes were then compared. Results. DBM group showed a significant shorter healing time than NDBM group (28.1 ± 14.4 versus 57.9 ± 36.8 weeks, p = 0.04). Delayed union was found in 4 patients (44%) in DBM group compared with 7 patients (78%) in NDBM group (p > 0.05). No statistical difference of nonunion was demonstrated between both groups (DBM = 1 and NDBM = 2, p > 0.05). Neither postoperative infection nor severe local tissue reaction was found. Conclusions. DBM is safe and effective for accelerating the fracture healing in ST-AFFx and possibly reduces nonunion after fracture fixation. Trial registration number is TCTR20151021001. PMID:27022610

  13. Impact of the Method of Initial Stabilization for Femoral Shaft Fractures in Patients With Multiple Injuries at Risk for Complications (Borderline Patients)

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Hans-Christoph; Rixen, Dieter; Morley, John; Husebye, Elisabeth Ellingsen; Mueller, Michael; Dumont, Clemens; Gruner, Andreas; Oestern, Hans Joerg; Bayeff-Filoff, Michael; Garving, Christina; Pardini, Dustin; van Griensven, Martijn; Krettek, Christian; Giannoudis, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The timing of definitive fixation for major fractures in patients with multiple injuries is controversial. To address this gap, we randomized patients with blunt multiple injuries to either initial definitive stabilization of the femur shaft with an intramedullary nail or an external fixateur with later conversion to an intermedullary nail and documented the postoperative clinical condition. Methods: Multiply injured patients with femoral shaft fractures were randomized to either initial (<24 hours) intramedullary femoral nailing or external fixation and later conversion to an intramedullary nail. Inclusion: New Injury Severity Score >16 points, or 3 fractures and Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥2 points and another injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥2 points), and age 18 to 65 years. Exclusion: patients in unstable or critical condition. Patients were graded as stable or borderline (increased risk of systemic complications). Outcomes: Incidence of acute lung injuries. Results: Ten European Centers, 165 patients, mean age 32.7 ± 11.7 years. Group intramedullary nailing, n = 94; group external fixation, n = 71. Preoperatively, 121 patients were stable and 44 patients were in borderline condition. After adjusting for differences in initial injury severity between the 2 treatment groups, the odds of developing acute lung injury were 6.69 times greater in borderline patients who underwent intramedullary nailing in comparison with those who underwent external fixation, P < 0.05. Conclusion: Intramedullary stabilization of the femur fracture can affect the outcome in patients with multiple injuries. In stable patients, primary femoral nailing is associated with shorter ventilation time. In borderline patients, it is associated with a higher incidence of lung dysfunctions when compared with those who underwent external fixation and later conversion to intermedullary nail. Therefore, the preoperative condition should be when deciding on the type of

  14. [Fracture of the femoral diaphysis in children. Ascending or descending centro-medullary nailing? A choice of principle or of necessity?].

    PubMed

    Bourdelat, D; Sanguina, M

    1991-01-01

    Over a period of 4 years, 40 children between the ages of 6 and 14 years (mean: 10 years) were treated for a fracture of the femoral shaft (39 closed fractures and 1 Cauchoix type I open fracture) by flexible medullary nailing, either ascending (5 cases) or descending (35 cases). Although it is classical to use the ascending route described by the Nancy team, the sub-trochanteric descending route was preferred for its simplicity; non-involvement of the knee by the insertion of the nail allows earlier autonomy in children. The results have been found to be satisfactory; no complications related to the method were observed. The biomechanical principles are also conserved. PMID:1669956

  15. Differences in the trajectory of bone mineral density change measured at the total hip and femoral neck between men and women following hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, Alan M.; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hebel, J. Richard; Hicks, Gregory E.; Beck, Thomas; Hochberg, Marc C.; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Summary Research has not examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD) between men and women following hip fracture. The aim was to evaluate sex differences in BMD following hip fracture. Men experienced significant declines in BMD, while not statistically greater than women, underscoring the necessity for better osteoporosis care in men. Introduction Each year in the USA, approximately 260,000 older adults experience a hip fracture. Women experiencing hip fracture have excess decline in BMD in the year following fracture compared to expected decrements due to aging, but few studies have assessed sex differences in the sequelae of hip fracture. Thus, our objective was to examine sex differences in BMD change in the year after hip fracture. Methods The sample (n = 286) included persons enrolled in the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort, a study that matched (1:1) men and women experiencing hip fracture. Weighted estimating equations that accounted for missing data and selective survival were used to estimate sex differences in 12-month total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD changes. Results Men had larger average adjusted percent decline in TH and FN BMD. Adjusted 12-month decreases at the FN showed a statistically significant decline of −4.60 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] −7.76 %, −0.20 %) in men and an insignificant change of-1.62 % (95 % CI −4.57 %, 1.32 %) in women. Yet, the difference in change between men and women was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The estimated sex differences for TH BMD loss were smaller in magnitude. Conclusions There is evidence of significant BMD loss among men at the FN in the year after hip fracture. Although not statistically greater than women, these clinically significant findings highlight the need for improved osteoporosis care among men prior to and after hip fracture. PMID:26847627

  16. Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw, with healing after teriparatide: a review of the literature and a case report

    PubMed Central

    Narongroeknawin, Pongthorn; Danila, Maria I.; Humphreys, Lewis G.; Barasch, Andrei; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the case history of a patient who had bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in which adjunctive treatment with teriparatide was used. The patient was treated for 5 years with alendronate for osteoporosis and developed ONJ after extraction of maxillary teeth. An implant was placed at the site of the extracted teeth. The pathology report confirmed the clinical diagnosis of ONJ; treatment was changed from alendronate to teriparatide and the ONJ resolved. To our knowledge, this is the third case history reported in the literature in which teriparatide was successfully used as adjunct therapy in ONJ because it has an anabolic effect and presumed role in accelerating bone healing. ONJ is a serious but infrequent condition that has been recently associated with nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate therapy. Teriparatide may be a useful adjunctive therapy when ONJ develops. PMID:20415805

  17. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; et al

    2016-02-16

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibrilmore » deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. We find the significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.« less

  18. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.

  19. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates. PMID:26879146

  20. Osteopetrosis, femoral fracture, and chronic osteomyelitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants (SCV) treated by girdlestone resection--6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rolauffs, B; Bernhardt, T M; von Eiff, C; Hart, M L; Bettin, D

    2002-12-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in combination with osteopetrosis is a unique combination of disorders that confronted us with major challenges. The therapeutic approach included four serial debridements and antimicrobial therapy. The aggressive treatment led to an instability of the brittle and hard osteopetrotic bone, and after 11 weeks, a fracture of the femoral neck occurred. A salvage procedure of the femur was performed, and the cultures obtained during this intervention remained negative. At a 6-year follow-up, the girdlestone situation still showed an acceptable functional outcome without any recurrence of osteomyelitis. PMID:12483342

  1. In vitro and in vivo studies on the degradation of high-purity Mg (99.99wt.%) screw with femoral intracondylar fractured rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Han, Pei; Cheng, Pengfei; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Changli; Ni, Jiahua; Zhang, Yuanzhuang; Zhong, Wanrun; Hou, Peng; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zheng, Yufeng; Chai, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    High-purity magnesium (HP Mg) takes advantage in no alloying toxic elements and slower degradation rate in lack of second phases and micro-galvanic corrosion. In this study, as rolled HP Mg was fabricated into screws and went through in vitro immersion tests, cytotoxicity test and bioactive analysis. The HP Mg screws performed uniform corrosion behavior in vitro, and its extraction promoted cell viability, bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation related gene, i.e. ALP, osteopontin (OPN) and RUNX2 of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Then HP Mg screws were implanted in vivo as load-bearing implant to fix bone fracture and subsequently gross observation, range of motion (ROM), X-ray scanning, qualitative micro-computed tomography (μCT) analysis, histological analysis, bending-force test and SEM morphology of retrieved screws were performed respectively at 4, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. As a result, the retrieved HP Mg screws in fixation of rabbit femoral intracondylar fracture showed uniform degradation morphology and enough bending force. However, part of PLLA screws was broken in bolt, although its screw thread was still intact. Good osseointegration was revealed surrounding HP Mg screws and increased bone volume and bone mineral density were detected at fracture gap, indicating the rigid fixation and enhanced fracture healing process provided by HP Mg screws. Consequently, the HP Mg showed great potential as internal fixation devices in intra-articular fracture operation. PMID:26117658

  2. Intravenous analgesia with opioids versus femoral nerve block with 0.2% ropivacaine as preemptive analgesic for fracture femur: A randomized comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder Pal; Kohli, Vaneet; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Femoral fractures are extremely painful and pain invariably worsens on any movement. Anesthesia for fracture femur surgery is usually provided by spinal block. This study was undertaken to compare the analgesic effects of femoral nerve block (FNB) using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and intravenous (I.V.) fentanyl before patient positioning for fracture femur surgery under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, comparative study was conducted on 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients (18–60 years) scheduled for femur surgery under combined spinal epidural anesthesia. Patients in Group I (n = 30), were administered FNB using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and in Group II patients (n = 30), I.V. fentanyl 0.5 μg/kg was given as preemptive analgesia. Parameters observed included time to spinal anesthesia, intra-operative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for any pain and postoperative epidural top-ups dosages. Results: Demographic profile was comparable in both the groups. VAS at 2 min in Group I was 5.63 and in Group II it was 8.00. Satisfaction score was better in Group I as compared to Group II patients. Time to administer subarachnoid block was 17.80 min in patients of Group I as compared to 25.03 min in Group II patients. Postoperatively, VAS scores were lower in Group I than Group II patients. The frequency of epidural top-ups was higher in Group II than in Group I patients. Conclusions: FNB is comparatively better in comparison to I.V. fentanyl when used as preemptive and postoperative analgesic in patients being operated for fracture femur. PMID:27212771

  3. Preoperative posterior tilt of at least 20° increased the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dolatowski, Filip C; Adampour, Mina; Frihagen, Frede; Stavem, Knut; Erik Utvåg, Stein; Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose It has been suggested that preoperative posterior tilt of the femoral head may increase the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures. To investigate this association, we studied a cohort of 322 such patients. Patients and methods Patients treated with internal fixation between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively identified using hospital records and the digital image bank. 2 raters measured the preoperative posterior tilt angle and categorized it into 3 groups: < 10°, 10–20°, and ≥ 20°. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) was determined. Patients were observed until September 2013 (with a minimum follow-up of 18 months) or until failure of fixation necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The risk of fixation failure was assessed using competing-risk regression analysis, adjusting for time to surgery. Results Patients with a posterior tilt of ≥ 20° had a higher risk of fixation failure: 19% (8/43) as compared to 11% (14/127) in the 10–20° category and 6% (9/152) in the < 10° category (p = 0.03). Posterior tilt of ≥ 20° increased the risk of fixation failure, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.3–8.9; p = 0.01). The interclass correlation coefficient for angular measurements of posterior tilt was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.92), and the IRR for the categorization of posterior tilt into 3 groups was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69–0.81). Interpretation Preoperative posterior tilt of ≥ 20° in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures increased the risk of fixation failure necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The reliability of the methods that we used to measure posterior tilt ranged from good to excellent. PMID:26937557

  4. Preoperative posterior tilt of at least 20° increased the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Dolatowski, Filip C; Adampour, Mina; Frihagen, Frede; Stavem, Knut; Erik Utvåg, Stein; Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - It has been suggested that preoperative posterior tilt of the femoral head may increase the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures. To investigate this association, we studied a cohort of 322 such patients. Patients and methods - Patients treated with internal fixation between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively identified using hospital records and the digital image bank. 2 raters measured the preoperative posterior tilt angle and categorized it into 3 groups: < 10°, 10-20°, and ≥ 20°. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) was determined. Patients were observed until September 2013 (with a minimum follow-up of 18 months) or until failure of fixation necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The risk of fixation failure was assessed using competing-risk regression analysis, adjusting for time to surgery. Results - Patients with a posterior tilt of ≥ 20° had a higher risk of fixation failure: 19% (8/43) as compared to 11% (14/127) in the 10-20° category and 6% (9/152) in the < 10° category (p = 0.03). Posterior tilt of ≥ 20° increased the risk of fixation failure, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.3-8.9; p = 0.01). The interclass correlation coefficient for angular measurements of posterior tilt was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87-0.92), and the IRR for the categorization of posterior tilt into 3 groups was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69-0.81). Interpretation - Preoperative posterior tilt of ≥ 20° in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures increased the risk of fixation failure necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The reliability of the methods that we used to measure posterior tilt ranged from good to excellent. PMID:26937557

  5. Assessment of femur geometrical parameters using EOS™ imaging technology in patients with atypical femur fractures; preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Morin, Suzanne N; Wall, Michelle; Belzile, Etienne L; Godbout, Benoit; Moser, Thomas P; Michou, Laëtitia; Ste-Marie, Louis-Georges; de Guise, Jacques A; Rahme, Elham; Brown, Jacques P

    2016-02-01

    Atypical femur fractures (AFF) arise in the subtrochanteric and diaphyseal regions. Because of this unique distribution, we hypothesized that patients with AFF demonstrate specific geometrical variations of their lower limb whereby baseline tensile forces applied to the lateral cortex are higher and might favor the appearance of these rare stress fractures, when exposed to bisphosphonates. Using the low irradiation 2D-3D X-ray scanner EOS™ imaging technology we aimed to characterize and compare femur geometric parameters between women who sustained bisphosphonate-associated AFF and those who had experienced similar duration of exposure to bisphosphonates but did not sustain fractures. Conditional logistic regression models were constructed to estimate the association between selected geometric parameters and the occurrence of AFF. We identified 16 Caucasian women with AFF and recruited 16 ethnicity-, sex-, age-, height- and cumulative bisphosphonate exposure-matched controls from local osteoporosis clinics. Compared to controls, those with AFF had more lateral femur bowing (-3.2° SD [3.4] versus -0.8° SD [1.9] p=0.02). In regression analysis, lateral femur bowing was associated with the risk of AFF (aOR 1.54; 95% CI 1.04-2.28, p=0.03). Women who sustained a subtrochanteric AFF demonstrated a lesser femoral neck shaft angle (varus geometry) than those with a fracture at a diaphyseal site (121.9 [3.6]° versus 127.6 [7.2]°, p=0.07), whereas femur bowing was more prominent in those with a diaphyseal fracture compared to those with a subtrochanteric fracture (-4.3 [3.2]° versus -0.9 [2.7]°, p=0.07). Our analyses support that subjects with AFF exhibit femoral geometry parameters that result in higher tensile mechanical load on the lateral femur. This may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AFF and requires further evaluation in a larger size population. PMID:26541215

  6. A Case of Variegate Porphyria in Association With Coeliac Disease and Bisphosphonate Associated Dental Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ogundipe, Olayinka A.

    2009-01-01

    This case describes an older patient with a rare diagnosis of variegate porphyria presenting with acute abdominal pains and bloating, intermittent loose stools and jaw pains following surgical repair of an osteoporotic hip fracture. She was noted to have acute hyponatraemia. All the abdominal symptoms and the hyponatraemia were initially attributed to an acute episode of variegate porphyria with an accompanying syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. However, following further evaluations necessitated by the incomplete resolution of the abdominal symptoms, it became apparent that some of the persisting symptoms were due to a concurrent and new presentation of serology positive coeliac disease. The jaw pains were established to be due to dental osteonecrosis in association with the use of bisphosphonate therapy for treatment of osteoporosis. The various symptoms and signs subsequently settled uneventfully following institution of appropriate management options for the various coexisting diagnoses. Keywords Abdominal pain; Abdominal bloating; Loose stools; Hyponatraemia; Variegate porphyria; Coeliac disease; Osteoporosis; Bisphosphonates; Osteonecrosis PMID:22481993

  7. Damage Control Orthopedics Management as Vital Procedure in Elderly Patients with Femoral Neck Fractures Complicated with Chronic Renal Failure: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenhui; Wang, Yunjiao; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Yu; Wu, Siyu; Du, Quanyin; Wang, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure (CRF) predisposes to hip fractures in elderly patients, with high subsequent mortality. Selection and timing of the surgical procedure of such patients is a serious challenge. Many clinicians believe in earlier surgery as preferable and providing better outcomes. Damage control orthopedics (DCO) aids to adjust and optimize the overall condition of patients. Methods In 32 patients with femoral neck fractures complicated with CRF, we evaluated how the timing of the surgery determines the mortality rates if the DCO approach is applied. Preoperative ASA grading, POSSUM score, P-POSSUM score and DCO were carried out. Based on the assessment, timing of the surgery was ascertained. Results Of a total of 32 patients, twenty-nine patients were accepted for either early (< 48 hours; n = 18) or delayed (3–10 days; n = 10) surgery. Hip arthroplasty (total hip arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty) was the principal surgery option. All patients survived operation and were followed up postoperatively with the average time of 30 days. Postoperative complications tended to occur at higher rates in the early vs. delayed surgery group (7/18 vs. 5/10). During follow up, a total of 3 patients died in both groups (2/18 in the early surgery and 1/10 in the delayed surgery group), mostly from multi-organ failures and acute respiratory distress syndrome. There was no significant difference in complication rates and Harris hip score between both groups. Conclusion In patients with femoral neck fracture complicated with CRF, delaying the surgery for several days does not increase the incidence of postoperative adverse events. PMID:27149117

  8. Applying low-intensity pulsed ultrasounds (LIPUS) to a zoledronate-associated atypical femoral shaft fracture without cessation of zoledronate therapy for 3 years follow up: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Shoutaro; Saito, Mitsuru; Kubota, Makoto; Suzuki, Hidehiko; Tsuchida, Shigeki; Hashimoto, Kurando; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Reports are increasing regarding atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) caused by minor trauma in patients using bisphosphonates (BPs) for long periods. Patients with malignant skeletal metastases potentially are at greater risk for these AFFs, especially considering the high dose and the duration of treatment with BPs. We evaluated a case of atypical femoral shaft fracture treated with an intramedullary nail in a patient treated for five years with zoledronate who had breast cancer with metastases to bone. Although bone union was achieved without cessation of zoledronate therapy by applying low-intensity pulsed ultrasounds (LIPUS), the remodeling phase of the fracture healing process was delayed. For BPs-associated AFFs, LIPUS is an alternative to parathyroid hormone (PTH) analogs such as teriparatide that are contraindicated in patients with malignant skeletal metastases. LIPUS is an effective treatment for fracture healing and may avoid the necessity to discontinue BP therapy. PMID:26811711

  9. Transesophageal echocardiography and clinical features of fat embolism during cemented total hip arthroplasty. A randomized study in patients with a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Pitto, R P; Blunk, J; Kössler, M

    2000-01-01

    Forty patients suffering from a medial femoral neck fracture participated in a prospective, randomized study. In 20 patients, the femoral component was cemented using a contemporary technique. In the patient group operated on with the bone vacuum technique, the medullary cavity was drained during the insertion of the stem. The proximal draining hole was placed in the intertrochanteric region, along the prolongation of the linea aspera. The distal hole was placed 2 cm below the tip of the femoral component. Embolic phenomena were documented intraoperatively by continuous transesophageal echocardiographic imaging of the right atrium and ventricle. The clinical relevance of the emboli was noted simultaneously by recording hemodynamic and blood gas parameters. Patients of the control group showed severer and longer-lasting episodes of embolism than patients of the bone vacuum group. Ongoing emboli were first seen during the injection of the cement, and continued during stem insertion. Massive emboli of small particles could be verified in 19 patients (95%) of the control group and in 1 patient (5%) of the bone vacuum group (P < 0.05). During massive emboli, a distinct decrease in the arterial oxygen saturation and the end-expiratory carbon dioxide level was observed. The calculated average pulmonary shunt volume showed an increase after the insertion of the stem using the contemporary technique (36.5%; P < 0.05). These distinct hemodynamic changes were not observed in the bone vacuum group. This study was able to show a clearly reduced risk of pulmonary emboli using the bone vacuum cementing technique. The presence of pre-existing disease greatly magnified the clinical relevance of fat embolism. PMID:10653105

  10. [BQS1 indicators as a monitoring tool for guideline implementation using selected quality indicators in the treatment of patients with breast cancer and femoral neck fractures].

    PubMed

    Schräder, Peter; Reiter, Anne; Boy, Oliver; Fischer, Burkhard; Döbler, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Successfully implemented clinical guidelines can contribute to improvement in the quality of care. In the context of clinical guidelines, quality indicators play an important role. Quality indicators can contribute to the further development and updating of existing guidelines by analysing their results. In addition, these results support internal and external quality improvement activities and supply information on the implementation status of guideline recommendations giving an impression of the actual quality of care. In this paper the data of the mandatory German performance measurement (specimen radiograph of impalpable breast lesions, preoperative waiting time with femoral neck fracture) were analysed in respect to the extent that guideline recommendations have been implemented in clinical care. We analysed a database of 189,756 and 331,087 patients for the quality indicators 'specimen radiograph' and 'preoperative waiting time', respectively. Depending on the quality of the clinical guideline the results varied. After the publication of this recommendation as part of the German high-quality guideline for neoplasms of the breast in 2004 the proportion of radiographic controls of specimens after breast cancer surgery increased from initially 36% to 84% in 2006, and the variance as a measure of the variability of care decreased considerably. By contrast, the percentage of patients with femoral neck fracture undergoing surgery within 48h did not change noticeably (2003: 19%; 2006: 16%). A German high-quality guideline making a clear recommendation for early surgery does not yet exist. Quality indicators of the German mandatory performance measurement system are suitable for measuring the extent to which guideline recommendations have been implemented and for supporting their (further) development. PMID:19374283

  11. Outcome of Hemiarthroplasty and Total Hip Replacement for Active Elderly Patients with Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures: A Meta-Analysis of 8 Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yiqiong; Fu, Dong; Chen, Kai; Li, Guodong; Cai, Zhengdong; Shi, Yan; Yin, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Background Displaced fracture of the femoral neck has been a common clinical problem, especially in aged patients. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of randomized clinical trials assessing the results of hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in patients undergoing either alternative using meta-analysis. Methods A literature search for randomized clinical trials was conducted through Medline, Embase and Cochrane library between 1969 and 2013 with no restrictions. Additional relevant articles were referred as source of information by way of manual searches on major orthopedic journals. Upon the search, two authors independently evaluated study quality and relevant data was extracted. Results A total of 8 studies with 983 patients were included in this meta-analysis. After pooling the available data, a significant dominance of Harris hip score was found for total hip replacement compared with hemiarthroplasty (SMD: −7.11, 95%:−10.70,−3.53) one year postoperatively and the advantage kept over (SMD: −6.91, 95%:−12.98, −0.85) two years after surgery. A trend toward a higher dislocation rate was found in total hip replacement group (RR: 0.46, 95%: 0.21, 1.02), of which the difference was considered insignificant. The risk of revision in group hemiarthroplasty appeared to be more than two folds higher than that after total hip replacement (RR: 4.14, 95%CI: 2.09, 8.19). Conclusion Even though there is a higher rate of dislocation after total hip replacement, this disadvantage could be accounted for, on the basis of a better functional score and the lower revision rate. However, from the results, it stands to reason that total hip replacement should be strongly suggested in elderly active patients with femoral neck fracture. PMID:24854195

  12. The effect of lower limb rehabilitation gymnastics on postoperative rehabilitation in elderly patients with femoral shaft fracture: A retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Dong; Ning, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Da-Long

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of lower limb rehabilitation gymnastics on postoperative rehabilitation in elderly patients with femoral shaft fracture after undergoing intramedullary nail fixation surgery.We collected medical records of elderly patients aged ≥ 60 years with femoral shaft fracture between 03/2010 and 03/2015 in Longyao County Hospital. Totally, 160 patients were identified and divided into the intervention group (n = 80) and the control group (n = 80). During the postoperative period, the intervention group received lower limb rehabilitation gymnastics treatment for 3 months, but the control group did not. All patients were routinely asked to return hospital for a check in the 1st postoperative week, as well as the 2nd week, the 1st month, and the 3rd month, after surgery. The clinical rehabilitation effect was evaluated by checking lower limb action ability, detecting the lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT), scoring muscle strength of quadriceps and visual analog scale (VAS) score, and performing satisfaction survey.At the 1st week and 2nd week after surgery, the clinical rehabilitation effect in the intervention group was better regarding lower limb action ability, lower limb DVT, muscle strength of quadriceps, VAS score, and patient satisfaction, as compared with the control group. However, there was no significant difference at the 1st month and the 3rd month after surgery when comparing the intervention group to the control group.In the early postoperative stage, lower limb rehabilitation gymnastics can effectively improve the recovery of lower limb function, beneficial to reducing postoperative complications such as lower limb DVT and muscle atrophy, and increasing patient satisfaction rate. PMID:27537579

  13. Prophylactic titanium elastic nailing (TEN) following femoral lengthening (Lengthening then rodding) with one or two nails reduces the risk for secondary interventions after regenerate fractures: a cohort study in monolateral vs. bilateral lengthening procedures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Femoral fracture rates of up to 30% have been reported following lengthening procedures using fixators. “Lengthening then rodding” uses one or two titanium elastic nails (TENs) for prophylactic intramedullary nailing to reduce this complication. The aim of the study was to decide if usage of only one TEN is safe or has it a higher risk of getting a fracture? And we asked if there is a difference between patients with monolateral or bilateral lengthening procedures according to their fracture rate? Methods One or two TENs were implanted in two groups of patients (monolateral and bilateral) after femoral lengthening procedures. The regenerate quality was classified using the Li system and fractures were categorized using the Simpson and Kenwright classification. The follow-up period was at least 1 year after removal of the frame. Results Sixty-seven patients with 101 femoral lengthening procedures were included in 2007–2011. Group A included 34 patients with bilateral lengthening due to congenital short stature. Group B consisted of 33 patients with congenital disorders with leg length discrepancies. Seven fractures in six patients were seen in group A and five fractures in group B. One patient had residual shortening of 1 cm, and 11 fractures healed without relevant deviation (< 5°) or shortening (< 5 mm). A soft-tissue infection in one patient led to early removal of one TEN. Conclusions Fractures occurred in both groups of patients in total in 12 of the 101 cases (12%). The rate of secondary interventions was markedly reduced. Usage of one or two TENs did not influence the fracture rate. PMID:24156728

  14. Diminished Cartilage Creep Properties and Increased Trabecular Bone Density Following a Single, Sub-Fracture Impact of the Rabbit Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Joseph; Zaegel, Melissa A.; Martinez, Mario D.; Silva, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to articular cartilage can lead to post-traumatic arthritis. We used a custom pendulum device to deliver a single, near-fracture impact to the medial femoral condyles of rabbits. Impact was localized to a region ~3 mm in diameter, and impact stress averaged ~100 MPa. Animals were euthanized at 0, 1 and 6 months after impact. Cartilage mechanical properties from impacted and sham knees were evaluated by creep-indentation testing and periarticular trabecular bone was evaluated by microCT and histomorphometry. Impact caused immediate and statistically significant loss of cartilage thickness (-40% vs. sham) and led to a greater than two-fold increase in creep strain. From 0 to 6 months after impact, the ability of cartilage to recover from creep deformation became significantly impaired (percent recovery different from control at 1 and 6 months). At 1 month, there was a 33% increase in the trabecular bone volume fraction of the epiphysis beneath the site of impact compared to control, and increased bone formation was observed histologically. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that a single, high-energy impact below the fracture threshold leads to acute deleterious changes in the viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage that worsen with time, while at the same time stimulating increased bone formation beneath the impact site. PMID:20225288

  15. Outcome of short proximal femoral nail antirotation and dynamic hip screw for fixation of unstable trochanteric fractures. A randomised prospective comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhavuk; Marimuthu, Kanniraj; Kumar, Vijay; Malhotra, Rajesh; Kotwal, Prakash P

    2011-01-01

    A prospective, randomised, controlled trial was performed to compare the outcome of treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures with either a short proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) or dynamic hip screw (DHS). Eighty one patients with unstable fracture of the proximal part of the femur were randomised, at the time of admission, for fixation with either a short PFNA (n=42) or DHS (n= 39). The primary outcome measure was reoperation within the first postoperative year and mortality at the end of one year. Operative time, fluoroscopy time, blood loss, and any intra-operative complication were recorded for each patient. Clinical and radiological follow-up was undertaken for a minimum of 36 months. Any changes in the position of the implant or fixation failure were recorded. Hip range of motion, pain in the hip or thigh and return to work were used to compare the outcomes. There was no significant difference between 1 year mortality rates for the two groups. The mean operative time was significantly less in PFNA group (25 min) than in the DHS group (38 min). Patients treated with a PFNA experienced a shorter fluoroscopy time and less blood loss. Six patients in DHS group had implant failure while none experienced this in PFNA group. The PFNA group had a better functional outcome than the DHS group. PMID:21948030

  16. Risk of hip, subtrochanteric, and femoral shaft fractures among mid and long term users of alendronate: nationwide cohort and nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Eiken, Pia; Eastell, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the skeletal safety and efficacy of long term (≥10 years) alendronate use in patients with osteoporosis. Design Open register based cohort study containing two nested case control studies. Setting Nationwide study of population of Denmark. Participants 61 990 men and women aged 50-94 at the start of treatment, who had not previously taken alendronate, 1996-2007. Interventions Treatment with alendronate. Main outcome measures Incident fracture of the subtrochanteric femur or femoral shaft (ST/FS) or the hip. Non-fracture controls from the cohort were matched to fracture cases by sex, year of birth, and year of initiation of alendronate treatment. Conditional logistic regression models were fitted to calculate odds ratios with and without adjustment for comorbidity and comedications. Sensitivity analyses investigated subsequent treatment with other drugs for osteoporosis. Results 1428 participants sustained a ST/FS (incidence rate 3.4/1000 person years, 95% confidence interval 3.2 to 3.6), and 6784 sustained a hip fracture (16.2/1000 person years, 15.8 to 16.6). The risk of ST/FS was lower with high adherence to treatment with alendronate (medication possession ratio (MPR, a proxy for compliance) >80%) compared with poor adherence (MPR <50%; odds ratio 0.88, 0.77 to 0.99; P=0.05). Multivariable adjustment attenuated this association (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 0.77 to 1.01; P=0.08). The risk was no higher in long term users (≥10 dose years; 0.70, 0.44 to 1.11; P=0.13) or in current compared with past users (0.91, 0.79 to 1.06; P=0.22). Similarly, MPR >80% was associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture (0.73, 0.68 to 0.78; P<0.001) as was longer term cumulative use for 5-10 dose years (0.74, 0.67 to 0.83; P<0.001) or ≥10 dose years (0.74, 0.56 to 0.97; P=0.03). Conclusions These findings support an acceptable balance between benefit and risk with treatment with alendronate in terms of fracture outcomes, even for over 10

  17. Fixation using alternative implants for the treatment of hip fractures (FAITH): design and rationale for a multi-centre randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws and cancellous screws on revision surgery rates and quality of life in the treatment of femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are a common type of fragility fracture that afflict 293,000 Americans (over 5,000 per week) and 35,000 Canadians (over 670 per week) annually. Despite the large population impact the optimal fixation technique for low energy femoral neck fractures remains controversial. The primary objective of the FAITH study is to assess the impact of cancellous screw fixation versus sliding hip screws on rates of revision surgery at 24 months in individuals with femoral neck fractures. The secondary objective is to determine the impact on health-related quality of life, functional outcomes, health state utilities, fracture healing, mortality and fracture-related adverse events. Methods/Design FAITH is a multi-centre, multi-national randomized controlled trial utilizing minimization to determine patient allocation. Surgeons in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit a total of at least 1,000 patients with low-energy femoral neck fractures. Using central randomization, patients will be allocated to receive surgical treatment with cancellous screws or a sliding hip screw. Patient outcomes will be assessed at one week (baseline), 10 weeks, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post initial fixation. We will independently adjudicate revision surgery and complications within 24 months of the initial fixation. Outcome analysis will be performed using a Cox proportional hazards model and likelihood ratio test. Discussion This study represents major international efforts to definitively resolve the treatment of low-energy femoral neck fractures. This trial will not only change current Orthopaedic practice, but will also set a benchmark for the conduct of future Orthopaedic trials. Trial registration The FAITH trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT00761813). PMID:24965132

  18. Compression type stress fracture of femoral neck with equivocal X-ray features diagnosed on (99m)Tc-MDP SPECT/CT in a case of trivial hip pain.

    PubMed

    Vitalkar, Saurabh; Manglunia, Ashmi S; Kulkarni, Arvind; Puranik, Ameya D

    2016-01-01

    Stress insufficiency fracture is usually diagnosed clinically and on the basis of routine X-ray imaging findings. However, the absence of any known predisposing factors and negative or occult radiographic findings pose diagnostic challenges. We report the case of an elderly male patient who presented with a chief complaint of trivial left hip pain and with equivocal radiographic findings. Triphasic (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography helped in arriving at the diagnosis of stress insufficiency fracture involving femoral neck. PMID:27385898

  19. Compression type stress fracture of femoral neck with equivocal X-ray features diagnosed on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT in a case of trivial hip pain

    PubMed Central

    Vitalkar, Saurabh; Manglunia, Ashmi S.; Kulkarni, Arvind; Puranik, Ameya D.

    2016-01-01

    Stress insufficiency fracture is usually diagnosed clinically and on the basis of routine X-ray imaging findings. However, the absence of any known predisposing factors and negative or occult radiographic findings pose diagnostic challenges. We report the case of an elderly male patient who presented with a chief complaint of trivial left hip pain and with equivocal radiographic findings. Triphasic 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography helped in arriving at the diagnosis of stress insufficiency fracture involving femoral neck. PMID:27385898

  20. [Surgical treatment of a displaced femoral head fracture with a cement-free dual-headed prosthesis using a minimally invasive approach. Clinical and radiographic outcome].

    PubMed

    Wick, M; Muhr, G; Rincon, R; Lester, D

    2005-03-01

    One hundred patients treated with a cementless bipolar prosthesis for a displaced subcapital hip fracture were prospectively evaluated for clinical and radiographic outcome. All patients were operated via a minimally invasive approach; in every case we implanted a Zweymuller stem. There were 77 women and 33 men with a mean age of 80 years (29-98 years). The mean duration of the operation was 29 min (20-95 min). Full weight bearing on crutches was allowed 1 day after the operation. The mean follow-up was 2.5 years (6 months to 7 years). Two years after the operation there were 40% of the remaining 65 patients who scored between 90 and 100 on the Harris hip score, 23% between 80 and 89, 20% between 70 and 79, and 17% below 70. No patient complained about thigh pain and up to now there has been no need for femoral revision due to loosening. There was no infection or nerve lesion. In three patients there was a luxation of the prosthesis which could be reduced by closed means. Radiographs from 81 patients showed stress shielding in 97.5% mainly in Gruen zones 1 and 7. Radiolucent lines in two or more Gruen zones were found in two patients. These findings suggest that the noncemented, pressfit, grit-blasted bipolar prosthesis demonstrated similar stability and radiographic results to cemented bipolar prostheses. Stress shielding was common but did not influence longevity of the implant. We did not find any signs of protrusion. Especially in older patients with a history of cardiac disease, the noncemented bipolar prosthesis is a rational alternative to avoid intra- and postoperative complications despite the higher costs for the implant. The minimally invasive approach helps to reduce operation time and intraoperative blood loss. PMID:15778832

  1. Retrospective comparison of the effects of epidural anesthesia versus peripheral nerve block on postoperative outcomes in elderly Chinese patients with femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jianwen; Wang, Gang; Gong, Maowei; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Junle

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric patients with femoral neck fracture (FNF) have unacceptably high rates of postoperative complications and mortality. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of epidural anesthesia versus peripheral nerve block (PNB) on postoperative outcomes in elderly Chinese patients with FNF. Methods This retrospective study explored mortality and postoperative complications in geriatric patients with FNF who underwent epidural anesthesia or PNB at the Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital from January 2008 to December 2012. The electronic database at the Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital includes discharge records for all patients treated in the hospital. Information on patient demographics, preoperative comorbidity, postoperative complications, type of anesthesia used, and in-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year mortality after surgery was obtained from this database. Results Two hundred and fifty-eight patients were identified for analysis. The mean patient age was 79.7 years, and 71.7% of the patients were women. In-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year postoperative mortality was 4.3%, 12.4%, and 22.9%, respectively, and no differences in mortality or cardiovascular complications were found between patients who received epidural anesthesia and those who received PNB. More patients with dementia or delirium were given PNB. No statistically significant differences were found between groups for other comorbidities or intraoperative parameters. The most common complications were acute cardiovascular events (23.6%), electrolyte disturbances (20.9%), and hypoxemia (18.2%). Patients who received PNB had more postoperative delirium (P=0.027). Postoperative acute respiratory events were more common (P=0.048) and postoperative stroke was less common (P=0.018) in the PNB group. There were fewer admissions to intensive care (P=0.024) in the epidural anesthesia group. Key factors with a negative influence on mortality were acute

  2. A laboratory investigation to assess the influence of cement augmentation of screw and plate fixation in a simulation of distal femoral fracture of osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Wähnert, D; Lange, J H; Schulze, M; Gehweiler, D; Kösters, C; Raschke, M J

    2013-10-01

    The augmentation of fixation with bone cement is increasingly being used in the treatment of severe osteoporotic fractures. We investigated the influence of bone quality on the mechanics of augmentation of plate fixation in a distal femoral fracture model (AO 33 A3 type). Eight osteoporotic and eight non-osteoporotic femoral models were randomly assigned to either an augmented or a non-augmented group. Fixation was performed using a locking compression plate. In the augmented group additionally 1 ml of bone cement was injected into the screw hole before insertion of the screw. Biomechanical testing was performed in axial sinusoidal loading. Augmentation significantly reduced the cut-out distance in the osteoporotic models by about 67% (non-augmented mean 0.30 mm (sd 0.08) vs augmented 0.13 mm (sd 0.06); p = 0.017). There was no statistical reduction in this distance following augmentation in the non-osteoporotic models (non-augmented mean 0.15 mm (sd 0.02) vs augmented 0.15 mm (sd 0.07); p = 0.915). In the osteoporotic models, augmentation significantly increased stability (p = 0.017). PMID:24078541

  3. Effect of plate working length on plate stiffness and cyclic fatigue life in a cadaveric femoral fracture gap model stabilized with a 12-hole 2.4 mm locking compression plate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several factors that can affect the fatigue life of a bone plate, including the mechanical properties of the plate and the complexity of the fracture. The position of the screws can influence construct stiffness, plate strain and cyclic fatigue of the implants. Studies have not investigated these variables in implants utilized for long bone fracture fixation in dogs and cats. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of plate working length on construct stiffness, gap motion and resistance to cyclic fatigue of dog femora with a simulated fracture gap stabilized using a 12-hole 2.4 mm locking compression plates (LCP). Femora were plated with 12-hole 2.4 mm LCP using 2 screws per fracture segment (long working length group) or with 12-hole 2.4 mm LCP using 5 screws per fracture segment (a short working length group). Results Construct stiffness did not differ significantly between stabilization techniques. Implant failure did not occur in any of the plated femora during cycling. Mean ± SD yield load at failure in the short plate working length group was significantly higher than in the long plate working length group. Conclusion In a femoral fracture gap model stabilized with a 2.4 mm LCP applied in contact with the bone, plate working length had no effect on stiffness, gap motion and resistance to fatigue. The short plate working length constructs failed at higher loads; however, yield loads for both the short and long plate working length constructs were within physiologic range. PMID:23800317

  4. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  5. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  6. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  7. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  8. Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw is linked to suppressed TGFβ1-signaling and increased Galectin-3 expression: A histological study on biopsies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) implies an impairment in oral hard- and soft tissue repair. An understanding of the signal transduction alterations involved can inform therapeutic strategies. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) is a critical regulator of tissue repair; galectin-3 mediates tissue differentiation and specifically modulates periodontopathic bacterial infection. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of TGFβ1-related signaling molecules and Galectin-3 in BRONJ-affected and healthy mucosal tissues. To discriminate between BRONJ-specific impairments in TGFβ1 signaling and secondary inflammatory changes, the results were compared to the expression of TGFβ1 and Galectin-3 in mucosal tissues with osteoradionecrosis. Methods Oral mucosal tissue samples with histologically-confirmed BRONJ (n = 20), osteoradionecrosis (n = 20), and no lesions (normal, n = 20) were processed for immunohistochemistry. Automated staining with an alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase kit was used to detect TGFβ1, Smad-2/3, Smad-7, and Galectin-3. We semiquantitatively assessed the ratio of stained cells/total number of cells (labeling index, Bonferroni-adjustment). Results TGFβ1 and Smad-2/3 were significantly decreased (p < 0.032 and p(0.028, respectively) in the BRONJ samples and significantly increased (p < 0.04 and p <0.043, respectively) in the osteoradionecrosis samples compared to normal tissue. Smad-7 was significantly increased (p < 0.031) in the BRONJ group and significantly decreased (p < 0.026) in the osteoradionecrosis group. Galectin-3 staining was significantly (p < 0.025) increased in both the BRONJ and the osteoradionecrosis (p < 0.038) groups compared to the normal tissue group. However, Galectin-3 expression was significantly higher in the BRONJ samples than in the osteoradionecrosis samples (p < 0.044). Conclusion Our results showed that disrupted TGFβ1 signaling was associated with delayed

  9. Mechanical thrombectomy using Rotarex system and stent-in-stent placement for treatment of distal femoral artery occlusion secondary to stent fracture – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dys, Krzysztof; Drelichowska-Durawa, Justyna; Dołega-Kozierowski, Bartosz; Lis, Michał; Sokratous, Kyriakos; Iwanowski, Wojciech; Drelichowski, Stanisław; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: Treatment of peripheral arterial diseases may be distinguished into conservative and interventional management; the latter is divided into surgical and endovascular procedures. Management of peripheral artery stenosis and occlusion with vascular stents is associated with the risk of late complications such as restenosis, stent fracture or dislocation. Case Report: A 62-year-old woman with generalized atherosclerosis, particularly extensive in lower limb arteries, was admitted to the Department of Angiology 11 months after having an endovascular procedure performed due to critical ischemia of left lower limb. Because of stent occlusion, a decision to perform angiographic examination of lower limb arteries was made. Examination revealed occlusion of the superficial femoral artery along its entire length, including previously implanted stents. Distal stent was fractured with slight dislocation of the proximal segment. A decision was made to perform mechanical thrombectomy using a Rotarex system followed by a stent-in-stent placement procedure. Follow-up angiography and ultrasound scan performed 24 hours after the procedure revealed a patent vessel with satisfactory blood flow. Discussion: Nowadays, imaging diagnostics of peripheral artery stenosis involves non-invasive examinations such as ultrasound, minimally invasive examinations such as angio-MRI and MDCT, or invasive examinations such as DSA and IVUS. DSA examinations are used to confirm significant stenosis or occlusion of a vessel, particularly when qualifying a patient for endovascular treatment. Due to their anatomic location, the superficial femoral artery and the popliteal artery are subject to various forces e.g. those exerted by the working muscles. Mechanical thrombectomy and atherectomy are efficient methods of arterial recanalization used in the treatment of acute, subacute or even chronic occlusions or stenosis of peripheral vessels. Conclusions: Frequency of angioplasty and

  10. Intramedullary locking femoral nails. Experience with the AO nail.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, A. B.; Yeates, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The AO interlocking nail was introduced to the Ulster Hospital, Dundonald in 1988 and since then has been used in over 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures. We have reviewed 45 patients with 46 femoral shaft fractures treated between June 1988 and April 1990. These included four compound fractures and 13 comminuted fractures. The results compare favourably with other series. The union rate was 98% and there were no instances of deep infection. The alternative treatment methods available are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. Images Fig 3 Fig 5 PMID:1785145

  11. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  12. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball of the hip joint from the thigh bone (femur) at ... A slipped capital femoral epiphysis may affect both hips. An epiphysis is an area at the end of a long bone . ...

  13. Is It a Simple Stress Fracture or Bisphosphonate-related Atypical Fracture?

    PubMed

    Kang, Soo Yong; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Kang, Bun Jung; Kim, Min Kyu; Lee, Han-Jun

    2012-11-01

    A number of reports regarding atypical fractures of the femur have raised questions concerning the possible correlation between long-term bisphosphonate treatment and the occurrence of insufficiency fractures in the proximal femur. However, clinically, it is often confused whether is it a fatigue fracture because of implant induced stress concentration or a bisphosphonate-related atypical fracture, especially in a patient with a subtrochanteric fracture who receive bisphosphonate therapy after open reduction and internal fixation, such as dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation for previous ipsilateral femoral neck or intertrochanteric fracture. The authors experienced a case of a progressive femoral insufficiency fracture in a woman who had been on Fosamax (Alendronic acid with Vitamin D; Merck & Co. Inc, NJ, USA) therapy for four years after ipsilateral femoral neck fracture treated with a two hole DHS system. Despite a high suspicion of an insufficiency femoral subtrochanteric fracture by bone scan, the occult fracture progressed to a displaced femoral subtrochanteric fracture one year after. The fracture site was fixed with a 6 hole DHS plate, and six months after reoperation the patient had no symptoms and the fracture site had united without any complication. PMID:24524043

  14. Stress fractures in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hulkko, A; Orava, S

    1987-06-01

    During the 14-year period of 1971-1985, 368 stress fractures in 324 athletes were treated. The series contained 268 fractures in males and 100 fractures in females; 32 fractures occurred in children (less than 16 years), 117 in adolescents (16-19 years), and 219 in adults. Forty-six fractures were incurred by athletes at an international level, 274 by athletes at a national or district level and 48 by recreational athletes. Of the total cases, 72% occurred to runners and a further 12% to athletes in other sports after running exercises. The distribution of the stress fractures by site was: tibia 182, metatarsal bones 73, fibula 44, big toe sesamoid bones 15, femoral shaft 14, femoral neck 9, tarsal navicular 9, pelvis 7, olecranon 5 and other bones 10. Of the total fractures, 342 were treated conservatively and 26 fractures required surgical treatment. The operative indication was dislocation in 5 cases and delayed union/nonunion in 21 cases. The sites most often affected by delayed union were: anterior midtibia, sesamoid bones of the big toe, base of the fifth metatarsal, olecranon, and tarsal navicular. The athletes at an international level experienced the greatest risk of multiple separate fractures, protracted healing, or fractures requiring surgery. PMID:3623785

  15. Venting during prophylactic nailing for femoral metastases: current orthopedic practice

    PubMed Central

    Dalgorf, Dustin; Borkhoff, Cornelia M.; Stephen, David J.G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Reamed intramedullary nailing, recommended for impending fracture of a femur weakened by bone metastases, causes a rise in intramedullary pressure and increases the risk of a fat embolism syndrome. The pressure can be equalized by the technique of venting — drilling a hole into the distal cortex of the femur. Our objective was to study the current practice of orthopedic surgeons in Ontario with respect to venting during prophylactic intramedullary nailing for an impending femoral fracture due to bone metastases. Methods We mailed a questionnaire to all orthopedic surgeons from the Province of Ontario listed in the 1999 Canadian Medical Directory or on the Canadian Orthopaedic Association membership list, asking if they vent when prophylactically nailing an impending pathologic femoral fracture. The responses were modelled as a function of surgeon volume and year of graduation. Results Of the 415 surveys mailed, 223 (54%) surgeons responded. Of these, 81% reported having prophylactically treated a femoral metastatic lesion during the previous year; 67% treated 1 to 3 metastatic lesions and 14% treated more than 3; 19% did not treat a metastatic femoral lesion prophylactically. Over two-thirds of surgeons had never considered venting, whereas one-third always or sometimes vented the femoral canal. More recent graduates were 3 times more likely to vent than earlier (before 1980) graduates (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–6.5) as were those who treat a greater number of impending fractures (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.7). Conclusions Although there is a theoretical rationale for routine venting, there is disagreement among Ontario orthopedic surgeons regarding the use of this technique during prophylactic nailing for femoral metastatic lesions. Prospective evidence will be required to warrant a change in the standard of care. PMID:14680349

  16. [Recent progress in orthopaedic managements of osteoporosis-related fractures].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seizo

    2011-07-01

    Recent progress in orthopaedic treatment of osteoporosis-related fractures was reviewed. In the treatment of femoral neck fractures, impacted or nondisplaced type is treated by three cannulated cancellous pins. Displaced type of femoral neck fracture is treated by bipolar prosthesis. Results of femoral neck fractures are influenced by the complications of each patients. Osteoporotic spine fractures are commonly healed within 2 or 3 months. Spinal compression with paraparesis or paraplegia is unusual complication in burst type of spine fractures. Surgical decompression, bone grafting and stabilization with instrumentation can result in some correction of deformity and neurogenic recovery. Distal radius fractures are common fractures in the eldery. Recently advances includes external fixation and plate fixation for the comminuted fractures in the distal radius. Treatments of osteoporosis-related fractures are still difficult problems to be resolved. PMID:21774371

  17. Risk of Anterior Femoral Notching in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and risk factors after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using an image-free navigation system. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 148 consecutive TKAs in 130 patients beginning in July 2005. Seventy knees (62 patients) underwent conventional TKA, and 78 knees (68 patients) received navigated TKA. We investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and measured notching depth by conventional and navigated TKA. Additionally, the navigated TKA group was categorized into two subgroups according to whether anterior femoral notching had occurred. The degree of preoperative varus deformity, femoral bowing, and mediolateral suitability of the size of the femoral component were determined by reviewing preoperative and postoperative radiographs. The resection angle on the sagittal plane and the angle of external rotation that was set by the navigation system were checked when resecting the distal femur. Clinical outcomes were compared using range of motion (ROM) and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAX) scores between the two groups. Results The prevalence of anterior femoral notching by conventional TKA was 5.7%, and that for navigated TKA was 16.7% (p = 0.037). Mean notching depth by conventional TKA was 2.92 ± 1.18 mm (range, 1.8 to 4.5 mm) and 3.32 ± 1.54 mm (range, 1.55 to 6.93 mm) by navigated TKA. Preoperative anterior femoral bowing was observed in 61.5% (p = 0.047) and both anterior and lateral femoral bowing in five cases in notching group during navigated TKA (p = 0.021). Oversized femoral components were inserted in 53.8% of cases (p = 0.035). No differences in clinical outcomes for ROM or the HSS and WOMAX scores were observed between the groups. A periprosthetic fracture, which was considered a notching-related side effect, occurred in one case each in the conventional and navigated TKA groups

  18. Radiographic anatomy of the proximal femur: correlation with the occurrence of fractures

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Prata, Eric Fontes; Gibram, Athos Vilela; Santos, Leandro Emilio Nascimento; Lourenço, Paulo Roberto Barbosa de Toledo; Belloti, João Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between radiographic parameters of the proximal femur anatomy and fractures. Methods Three hundred and five digital x-rays of the pelvis were analyzed in the anteroposterior view. Of these x-rays, twenty-seven showed femoral neck or transtrochanteric fractures. The anatomical parameters analyzed were: femoral neck width (FNW), femoral neck length (FNL), femoral axis length (FAL), cervicodiaphyseal angle (CDA), acetabular tear-drop distance (ATD) and great trochanter-pubic symphysis distance (GTPSD). The analysis was performed by comparing the results of the x-rays with and without proximal femoral fracture, to establish a correlation between them. Results No differences were found between the anatomical parameters of the groups with and without proximal femoral fracture. Conclusion There was no association between anatomical changes in the proximal femur and greater susceptibility to fractures. Level of evidence IV, Cross-sectional Study. PMID:24453585

  19. USE OF CORTICAL STRUCTURAL HOMOLOGOUS BONE GRAFT IN FEMORAL RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Milton Valdomiro; Roos, Bruno Dutra; Giora, Taís Stedile Busin; Taglietti, Thiago Martins

    2015-01-01

    To perform a clinical and radiographic assessment of patients undergoing surgical treatment using a cortical structural homologous bone graft for femoral reconstruction following mechanical failure of total hip arthroplasty and periprosthetic fractures. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 27 patients who underwent surgical treatment for femoral reconstruction following mechanical failure of total hip arthroplasty (12 cases) and periprosthetic fractures (15 cases), using a cortical structural homologous bone graft and cemented implants, between June 1999 and February 2008. Of these, 21 fulfilled all the criteria required for this study. The patients underwent pre and postoperative clinical assessments using the Harris Hip Score. Preoperative, immediate postoperative and late postoperative radiographs were also evaluated, with comparisons of fracture consolidation, radiographic signs of graft consolidation, changes to the bone stock and femoral bone quality, and femoral alignment. Results: Nine patients (42.9%) underwent femoral reconstruction following mechanical failure of total hip arthroplasty and 12 cases (57.1%) underwent femoral reconstruction following periprosthetic fracture. Regarding the postoperative clinical classification, the results were considered satisfactory in 85.7% of the cases and unsatisfactory in 14.3%. Radiographic signs of graft consolidation were seen in all cases. There was an increase in bone stock in 90.5% of the hip reconstructions, as measured by the cortical index. Furthermore, the changes to femoral bone quality were considered good in 66.7% of the cases. Conclusion: The use of cortical structural homologous bone grafts for both femoral reconstructive surgery on total hip arthroplasty and periprosthetic fractures is a good treatment option for selected cases, enabling satisfactory clinical and radiographic results. PMID:27026955

  20. Mortality and complications following stabilization of femoral metastatic lesions: a population-based study of regional variation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ristevski, Bill; Jenkinson, Richard J.; Stephen, David J.G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Schemitsch, Emil H.; McKee, Michael D.; Kreder, Hans J.

    2009-01-01

    Background It is considered that patients at risk for spontaneous fracture due to metastatic lesions should undergo surgical stabilization before fracture occurs; however, prophylactic stabilization is associated with surgical morbidity and mortality. We sought to compare pathological fracture fixation versus prophylactic stabilization of diaphyseal femoral lesions for patients with femoral metastases and assess the rate of prophylactic surgery completed in all regions of Ontario. Methods Using population data sets, we identified all patients who had undergone femoral stabilization, either for pathological femoral fractures or for prophylactic fixation of femoral metastases before pathological fractures, between 1992 and 1997 in Ontario. We compared the rates of survival, serious medical and surgical complications and length of stay in hospital between the 2 groups. Results A total of 624 patients underwent surgical stabilization for femoral metastases. The most common sites of primary metastases were the lungs (26%), breasts (16%), kidneys (6%) and prostate (6%); 46% of patients had other or multiple primary metastases. Overall, 37% of lesions were fixed prophylactically, with wide variation by region (17.6%–72.2%). Patients who underwent prophylactic stabilization had better overall survival at all postoperative time points. This held true after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities and type of cancer (p < 0.001). Conclusion These data demonstrate a survival advantage with prophylactic fixation of metastatic femoral lesions combined with a relatively low perioperative risk excluding concomitant bilateral procedures. Ontario regional rates of prophylactic fixation vary enormously, with most patients not receiving prophylactic treatment. PMID:19680515

  1. A Case of Late Femoral Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Stent Disconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele Tozzi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2010-10-15

    We present the case of a late superficial femoral artery stent disconnection causing an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm successfully treated with a stent-graft. A 67-year-old female was referred to our department for evaluation of claudication of the left lower limb and was diagnosed to have a total occlusion of the superficial femoral artery. Three nitinol stents were used to revascularize this artery. At 48 months, duplex-ultrasonography control revealed the presence of a 45-mm saccular femoral dilatation; X-rays and CT angiography showed fractures of the proximal stents and the presence of a pseudoaneurysm at the site of the distal stents disconnection. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded using two stent-grafts. We conclude that patients and surgeons should be aware of structural complications with all stents. Rigorous follow-up controls should be mandatory. Endovascular repair proved to be feasible and durable to manage a previous endovascular procedure.

  2. [Treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hack, Juliana; Bliemel, Christopher; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bücking, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Hip fractures are among the most common fractures in elderly people. The annual number of femoral fractures is even expected to increase because of an aging society. Due to the high number of comorbidities, there are special challenges in treating geriatric hip fracture patients, which require a multidisciplinary management. This includes surgical treatment allowing full weight bearing in the immediate postoperative period, osteoporosis treatment and falls prevention as well as an early ortho-geriatric rehabilitation program. PMID:25919823

  3. Influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the different types of hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizhong; Lin, Jinkuang; Cai, Siqing; Yan, Lisheng; Pan, Yuancheng; Yao, Xuedong; Zhuang, Huafeng; Wang, Peiwen; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were 95 menopausal females of age ≥ 50 years with fragility fracture of hip, including 55 cases of femoral neck fracture and 40 cases of trochanteric fracture. Another 63 non-fractured females with normal bone mineral density (BMD) were chosen as control. BMD, hip axis length, neck-shaft angle and structural parameters including cross surface area, cortical thickness and buckling ratio were detected and compared. Compared with control group, the patients with femoral neck fracture or trochanteric fractures had significantly lower BMD of femoral neck, as well as lower cross surface area and cortical thickness and higher buckling ratio in femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were no significant differences of BMD and structural parameters in the femoral neck fracture group and intertrochanteric fracture group. Hip axis length and neck-shaft angle were not significantly different among three groups. The significant changes of BMD and proximal femur geometry were present in the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. The different types of hip fractures cannot be explained by these changes. PMID:26773177

  4. Computer assisted measurement of femoral cortex thickening on radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Yixun; Chen, Foster; Summers, Ronald M.; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Radiographic features such as femoral cortex thickening have been frequently observed with atypical subtrochanteric fractures. These features may be a valuable finding to help prevent fractures before they happen. The current practice of manual measurement is often subjective and inconsistent. We developed a semi-automatic tool to consistently measure and monitor the progress of femoral cortex thickening on radiographs. By placing two seed points on each side of the femur, the program automatically extracts the periosteal and endosteal layers of the cortical shell by active contour models and B-spline fitting. Several measurements are taken along the femur shaft, including shaft diameter, cortical thickness, and integral area for medial and lateral cortex. The experiment was conducted on 52 patient datasets. The semi-automatic measurements were validated against manual measurements on 52 patients and demonstrated great improvement in consistency and accuracy (p<0.001).

  5. Short-term Results of Muscle-Pedicle Bone Grafting with Tensor Fascia Lata for Delayed Femoral Neck Fractures; Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Salgotra, Kuldip; Kohli, Sarabjeet; Vishwakarma, Nilesh

    2016-01-01

    Neglected, untreated and delayed femur neck fractures are commonly encountered and the treatment dilemma arises especially when the patient is physiologically young and osteosynthesis is the preferred option. Controversy exists in the current literature as the various head salvage surgeries like valgus subtrochanteric osteotomy, non-vascularized fibular bone grafting, muscle pedicle bone grafting (Tensor fascia lata and Quadratus femoris graft) and vascularized bone grafting do not have clear lines of indications. The current study is a case series of 7 patients with femur neck fractures with delayed presentation beyond the vascular emergency period who were treated with osteosynthesis with muscle pedicle bone graft (MPBG) using tensor fascia lata muscle pedicle graft. Patients were followed clinical and radiologically at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, 1 year and 3 years and patients were regularly followed. The mean age of the patients was 47 ± 1.1 ranging from 38 to 55 years. There were 6 (85.7%) men and 1 (14.3%) women among the patients. Overall 5 (71.5%) patients had transcervical and 2 (28.5%) had subcapital fractures. At the end of 6 months, 6 (85.7%) patients were pain free and on plain radiographs fracture union was noted. One (14.3%) patient developed collapse and persistent nonunion. Younger group less than 50 years presenting with neglected fracture neck femur should always be give an option of head salvage surgery in selected cases. Muscle pedicle bone grafting has been proven although inconsistently as a valid option for fracture neck femur. We encourage osteosynthesis with the use of tensor fascia lata muscle pedicle grafting along with cancellous cannulated screws as a first option in selected cases of neglected femur neck fractures. PMID:27331067

  6. Hoffa's fracture - lateral meniscus obstructing the fracture reduction - a case report.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sumit Kumar; Jadaan, Mutaz; Rahall, Elias

    2015-02-01

    Hoffa's fracture is a coronal fracture of the posterior femoral condyle and is an unusual injury. It can be easily missed on plain radiographs. There is no dearth of literature on Hoffa's fracture, its various presentations, management and rehabilitation principles. The intra-articular nature of the fracture, vulnerable blood supply of the posterior femoral condyle, involvement of the weight bearing articular surface of the knee and the unstable fracture pattern necessitate the surgical management. We encountered an unusual case of Hoffa's fracture where the lateral meniscus was blocking the reduction of fractured fragments. The patient required mini arthrotomy to remove the meniscus from in between the bone fragments. The fracture was fixed with two anteroposterior screws and knee was immobilised in extension. A gentle knee range of movements was commenced after the wound had healed but weight bearing was delayed for 12 weeks. PMID:25554423

  7. Femoral neck non-union treatment by valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy in femoral neck non-union. METHODS : Forty-two patients with femoral neck fractures with non-union treated using Pauwels' intertrochanteric osteotomy were reviewed. Demographics, time elapsed between fracture and surgery, follow--up, osteosynthesis used, Garden's classification, limb shortening, and x-rays were evaluated. RESULTS : Twenty-two men and 20 women were reviewed. The youngest patient was 18 years old and the oldest 65 years old, with a mean age of 42.4 years (±11.2). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, with a mean of 10.2 years. The average time elapsed between initial fracture and osteotomy was 6.5 months. Twel-ve cases were neglected femoral neck fractures. Nineteen patients were classified as Garden III, and 23 patients as Garden IV. After valgus osteotomy, non-union healing was observed in 38 patients (38/42; 90.4%). Healing of thirty-seven cases of pseudoarthrosis were obtained after the first-attempt osteotomy, and one case required two operations for healing. The osteotomy failed in four cases. Conside-ring the healed osteotomies, good to excellent functional results were achieved in 80.9% (34/42) of the patients. Total hip replacement was subsequently performed in 14.2% (6/42) of the patients for unfavoura-ble outcomes (two for cutting out, two for osteonecrosis, and two for osteoarthritis). CONCLUSIONS : Valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy has a high success rate in archiving healing in femoral neck non-union with good functional results. It is a biological and effective method. Level of Evidence IV, Therapeutic Study. PMID:27057146

  8. Effects of Hip Geometry on Fracture Patterns of Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Seyyed Morteza; Qoreishy, Mohamad; Keipourfard, Ali; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza Minator; Shokraneh, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some studies have previously shown that geometry of proximal femur can affect the probability of fracture and type of fracture. It happens since the geometry of the proximal femur determines how a force is applied to its different parts. In this study, we have compared proximal femur’s geometric characteristics in femoral neck (FNF), intertrochanteric (ITF) and Subtrochanteric (STF) fractures. Methods: In this study, 60 patients who had hip fractures were studied as case studies. They were divided into FNF, ITF and STF groups based on their fracture types (20 patients in each group). Patients were studied with x-ray radiography and CT scans. Radiological parameters including femoral neck length from lateral cortex to center of femoral head (FNL), diameter of femoral head (FHD), diameter of femoral neck (FND), femoral head neck offset (FHNO), neck-shaft angle (alpha), femoral neck anteversion (beta) were measured and compared in all three groups. Results: Amount of FNL was significantly higher in STF group compared to FNF (0.011) while ITF and STF as well as FNT and ITF did not show a significant different. Also, FND in FNF group was significantly lower than the other two groups, i.e. ITF and STF. In other cases there were no instances of significant statistical difference. Conclusion: Hip geometry can be used to identify individuals who are at the risk of fracture with special pattern. Also, it is important to have more studies in different populations and more in men. PMID:27517071

  9. Strength and reliability of alumina ceramic femoral heads: Review of design, testing, and retrieval analysis.

    PubMed

    Huet, Roland; Sakona, Ashlyn; Kurtz, Steven M

    2011-04-01

    Ceramic components are used increasingly in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Compared with metallic components, ceramic femoral heads for THA have the potential advantage of lower wear rates in articulations with acetabular liners. However, the use of ceramic components is also associated with unique risks, including sudden fracture and intolerable bearing noise or squeaking. This review paper summarizes the published literature regarding alumina ceramic femoral heads and tries to identify areas where uncertainties remain. We will discuss the following topics: (1) the fracture mechanics of ceramic materials; (2) design-related stresses acting on the femoral head, especially at the interface between the stem trunnion and the head; (3) gradual loss of strength in service by fatigue or slow crack growth and simulation using a proof test; and (4) information that can be gathered from examination of fractured explants. PMID:21316636

  10. Femoral metastases from ovarian serous/endometroid adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beresford–Cleary, NJA; Mehdi, SA; Magowan, B

    2012-01-01

    Bony metastases from ovarian cancer are rare, tend to affect the axial skeleton and are associated with abdomino-pelvic disease. The median time interval between diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma and presentation of bony metastases is 44 months (1). We describe a rare case of high grade left ovarian serous / endometrioid adenocarcinoma presenting with a pathological right femoral fracture 4 weeks following diagnosis and optimal debulking of the ovarian tumour. Orthopaedic surgeons must be vigilant when planning treatment of fractures presenting in patients with a history of ovarian cancer. PMID:24960734

  11. Biomechanical Consequences of Anterior Femoral Notching in Cruciate-Retaining Versus Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jethanandani, Rishabh; Patwary, Mahbubul B; Shellito, Adam D; Meehan, John P; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2016-01-01

    Anterior femoral notching during total knee arthroplasty is a potential risk factor for periprosthetic supracondylar femur fracture. We conducted a study to determine if the design of the femoral implant changes the risk for periprosthetic supracondylar femur fractures after anterior cortical notching. An anterior cortical defect was created in 12 femoral polyurethane models. Six femora were instrumented with cruciate-retaining implants and 6 with posterior-stabilized implants. Each femur was loaded in external rotation along the anatomical axis. Notch depth and distance from anterior cortical notch to implant were recorded before loading, and fracture pattern was recorded after failure. There were no statistically significant differences in notch depth, distance from notch to implant, torsional stiffness, torque at failure, final torque, or fracture pattern between cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized femoral component designs. Periprosthetic fracture after anterior femoral notching is independent of the bone removed from the intercondylar notch. After notching, there likely is no significant difference in femoral strength in torsion between cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs. PMID:27552464

  12. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  13. [Risk of infection in centro-medullary locking nailing of open fractures of the femur and tibia].

    PubMed

    Jenny, J Y; Jenny, G; Gaudias, J; Kempf, I

    1995-01-01

    Intramedullary reamed locking nail of open fractures remains controversial because of the risk of infection. 1,474 closed reamed locked nailings were performed between 1974 and 1989 for femoral (744 cases) or tibial (730 cases) fractures. 349 fractures were open: 100 femoral fractures (51 Gustilo and Anderson Grade I and 49 Grade II) and 249 tibial fractures (140 Grade I, 99 Grade II et 10 Grade III). 24 femoral (3.2%) and 46 tibial (6.3%) nails were followed by infection. This difference is significant (p < 0.01). Reoperations for infection occur more frequently for femoral than tibial fractures (p < 0.05). There is no difference between the results of infection treatment between femoral or tibial fractures. Traumatic opening of the femoral fracture site does not affect the occurrence of an infection, its severity or the results of its treatment. Traumatic opening of the tibial fracture site significantly increases the infection rate (p < 0.001), and the incidence of infection increases with the severity of the soft tissue lesions; but the severity of the infection and the results of its treatment are not modified. Acute closed reamed intramedullary locking nail is the best treatment for open femoral or tibial fractures with respect to the bone healing and infection rate for Grade I and II fractures. For Grade III fractures, nailing must be followed by a coverage flap. PMID:8623602

  14. Femoral approach to lead extraction.

    PubMed

    Mulpuru, Siva K; Hayes, David L; Osborn, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Laser and radiofrequency energy-assisted lead extraction has greatly facilitated this complex procedure. Although success rates are high, in some instances alternate methods of extraction are required. In this review, we discuss techniques for femoral extraction of implanted leads and retained fragments. The major tools available, including commonly used snares and delivery tools, are discussed. We briefly describe combined internal jugular and femoral venous extraction approaches, as well as complimentary utilization of more than one technique via the femoral vein. Animated and procedural sequences are included to help the reader visualize the key components of these techniques. PMID:25311643

  15. [MRI-controlled rehabilitation of femur head dislocation fracture].

    PubMed

    Panoussopoulos, A; Imhoff, A

    1994-12-01

    As exemplified by the case of a 58-year old patient with a femoral head fracture dislocation, which could not be reduced for 15 hours, the early stage of femoral head revitalisation is well documented by computed tomography before and after reduction, as well as MR imaging after 6 weeks, 6 months and one year. PMID:7855725

  16. Biophysical stimulation in osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Massari; Milena, Fini; Ruggero, Cadossi; Stefania, Setti; GianCarlo, Traina

    2009-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is the endpoint of a disease process that results from insufficient blood flow and bone-tissue necrosis, leading to joint instability, collapse of the femoral head, arthritis of the joint, and total hip replacement. Pain is the most frequent clinical symptom. Both bone tissue and cartilage suffer when osteonecrosis of the femoral head develops. Stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been shown to be useful for enhancing bone repair and for exerting a chondroprotective effect on articular cartilage. Two Italian studies on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head with PEMFs were presented in this review. In the first study, 68 patients suffering from avascular necrosis of the femoral head were treated with PEMFs in combination with core decompression and autologous bone grafts. The second one is a retrospective analysis of the results of treatment with PEMFs of 76 hips in 66 patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. In both studies clinical information and diagnostic imaging were collected at the beginning of the treatment and at the time of follow up. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test. Both authors hypothesize that the short-term effect of PEMF stimulation may be to protect the articular cartilage from the catabolic effect of inflammation and subchondral bone-marrow edema. The long-term effect of PEMF stimulation may be to promote osteogenic activity at the necrotic area and prevent trabecular fracture and subchondral bone collapse. PEMF stimulation represents an important therapeutic opportunity to resolve the Ficat stage-I or II disease or at least to delay the time until joint replacement becomes necessary. PMID:19753174

  17. Spontaneous modular femoral head dissociation complicating total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Sharp, Kinzie G; Malinowska, Magdalena; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; LaReau, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Modular femoral heads have been used successfully for many years in total hip arthroplasty. Few complications have been reported for the modular Morse taper connection between the femoral head and trunnion of the stem in metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Although there has always been some concern over the potential for fretting, corrosion, and generation of particulate debris at the modular junction, this was not considered a significant clinical problem. More recently, concern has increased because fretting and corrosive debris have resulted in rare cases of pain, adverse local tissue reaction, pseudotumor, and osteolysis. Larger femoral heads, which have gained popularity in total hip arthroplasty, are suspected to increase the potential for local and systemic complications of fretting, corrosion, and generation of metal ions because of greater torque at the modular junction. A less common complication is dissociation of the modular femoral heads. Morse taper dissociation has been reported in the literature, mainly in association with a traumatic event, such as closed reduction of a dislocation or fatigue fracture of the femoral neck of a prosthesis. This report describes 3 cases of spontaneous dissociation of the modular prosthetic femoral head from the trunnion of the same tapered titanium stem because of fretting and wear of the Morse taper in a metal-on-polyethylene bearing. Continued clinical and scientific research on Morse taper junctions is warranted to identify and prioritize implant and surgical factors that lead to this and other types of trunnion failure to minimize complications associated with Morse taper junctions as hip implants and surgical techniques continue to evolve. PMID:24972443

  18. Acute fracture of the neck of the femur. An assessment of perfusion of the head by dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Konishiike, T; Makihata, E; Tago, H; Sato, T; Inoue, H

    1999-07-01

    We performed dynamic MRI of the femoral head within 48 hours of injury on 22 patients with subcapital fracture of the neck of the femur and on a control group of 20 of whom ten were healthy subjects and ten were patients with an intertrochanteric fracture. Three MRI patterns emerged when the results between the fractured side and the contralateral femoral head were compared. In all of the control group and in those patients who had undisplaced fractures (Garden stages I and II), perfusion of the femoral head was considered to be at the same level as on the unaffected side. In patients with displaced fractures (Garden stages III and IV) almost all the femoral heads on the fractured side were impaired or totally avascular, although some had the same level of perfusion as the unaffected side. We conclude that dynamic MRI, a new non-invasive imaging technique, is useful for evaluating the perfusion of the femoral head. PMID:10463727

  19. Complete Traumatic Separation of Proximal Femoral Epiphysis in A 2 Year Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandra Prakash; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Pulkesh; Gaurav, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fractures are very common in adults, but are rare in children, comprising less than 1% of all pediatric fractures. Separation of the proximal femoral epiphysis can occur in a child with a traumatic hip dislocation and an open epiphysis. Regardless of the mechanism of proximal femoral epiphyseal separation, the prognosis is poor secondary to the development of osteonecrosis. Case Report: Here we are reporting a case of complete separation of the proximal epiphysis of the femur in a 2 year old female child. She was treated by open reduction and internal fixation by a single k-wire of proximal femoral epiphysis. Regular follow up showed fusion of proximal femoral epiphysis at about 3 months of post operative period. After 8 months of follow up she can stand and walk without support. Long term outcome is awaited. Conclusion: Traumatic separation of the proximal femoral epiphysis is a rare but devastating injury because osteonecrosis occurs in most cases. In our study we found fusion of the proximal femoral epiphysis to the neck after 3 months of postoperative period. But to comment upon the final outcome a long follow up is awaited.

  20. Distal Femoral Complications Following Antegrade Intramedullary Nail Placement

    PubMed Central

    Fantry, Amanda J.; Elia, Gregory; Vopat, Bryan G.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    While antegrade nailing for proximal and diaphyseal femur fractures is a commonly utilized fixation method with benefits including early mobilization and high rates of fracture union, both intraoperative and postoperative complications may occur. Intraoperative errors include leg length discrepancy, anterior cortical perforation, malreduction of the fracture, and neurovascular injury, and postoperative complications include nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. This case series reviews complications affecting the distal femur after intramedullary nailing including fracture surrounding a distal femoral interlocking screw (Case #1), nonunion after dynamization with nail penetration into the knee joint (Case #2), and anterior cortical perforation (Case #3). Prevention of intraoperative and postoperative complications surrounding intramedullary nailing requires careful study of the femoral anatomy and nail design specifications (radius of curvature), consideration of the necessity of distal interlocking screws, the need for close radiographic follow-up after nail placement with X-rays of the entire length of the nail, and awareness of possible nail penetration into the knee joint after dynamization. PMID:25874066

  1. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It usually occurs after an injury and often occurs with ...

  2. Bone scintigraphy in slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, M.J.; Strife, J.L.; Graham, E.J.; Crawford, A.H.

    1983-12-01

    Tc-/sub 99m/ diphosphonate bone scans were performed on 11 children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis. On pinhole hip images, seven hips in seven patients had increased radionuclide uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis where the slip had occurred. Three hips in three patients had decreased radionuclide uptake in the femoral head on the side of the slipped epiphysis, indicating compromise of the femoral head blood supply. Three or more months following internal fixation, three children had scintigraphy that showed loss of the usual focal uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis. Bone scintigraphy in pediatric patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis is valuable in defining the metabolic status of the femoral head. Absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the affected femoral head indicates that the femoral head is at risk for development of radiographic changes associated with aseptic necrosis.

  3. [Severe fractures while driving a Segway personal transporter].

    PubMed

    Heiselberg, Svend Erik; Brink, Ole

    2014-07-21

    We present two cases of patients who sustained severe fractures while driving a Segway in an amusement park. The first, a 59-year-old man, had a displaced femoral neck fracture operated with three screws. After two and a half months he had a total hip replacement. After three weeks he had another re-placement due to infection. The second, a 26-year-old male, had a displaced femoral neck fracture operated with three screws. The fracture healed uneventfully. The Segway's legal position, in Denmark, is like bicycles. For statistics, we have specific codes for trauma with a Segway. PMID:25292235

  4. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture ... Skull fractures may occur with head injuries . The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact ...

  5. Femoral Condyles Tangential Views: An Effective Method to Detect the Screw Penetration of Femoral Condyles After Retrograde Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhan-Le; Yu, Xian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Ju; Yu, Kun-Lun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative knee soft tissue irritation is a common complication after retrograde nail fixation of femoral fractures. Distal locking screw prominence is one of the causes for soft tissue irritation. This study aimed to determine whether the use of the femoral condyles tangential views improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with anteroposterior (A-P) view in detecting distal locking screw penetrations during retrograde femoral nailing. Methods: The angle between the sagittal plane and lateral aspect of the condyle and the angle between the sagittal plane and medial aspect of condyle were measured on computed tomography (CT) images. After the angles were measured and recorded, cadaveric femurs were used in a simulated surgical procedure. The retrograde femoral nail was inserted into the femur and placed distal locking screws, which were left 2, 4, and 6 mm proud of the medial and lateral condyles for each femur. A-P view, lateral condyle tangential view and medial condyle tangential view were obtained. All fluoroscopic images were recorded and sent to three observers blinded to the experimental procedure to determine whether screws penetrated the condyle cortex or not. Results: According to the results of CT scan, the lateral condyle view was 20.88 ± 0.98° and the medial condyle view was 40.46 ± 3.14°. In the A-P view, we detected 0% at 2 mm penetration, 16.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 25.0% (medial condyle screw) at 4 mm, and 41.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 58.3% (medial condyle screw) at 6 mm. In the lateral tangential view, we detected 91.7% at 2 mm penetration of the lateral condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. In the medial tangential view, we detected 66.7% at 2 mm penetration of the medial condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. The femoral condyle tangential views provided significant improvement in detecting screw penetrations at all lengths (2, 4, and 6 mm) compared with the A-P view (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The femoral condyles tangential

  6. A biomechanical evaluation of proximal femoral nail antirotation with respect to helical blade position in femoral head: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Ho; Garg, Anant Kumar; Oh, Jong-Keon; Oh, Chang-Wug; Lee, Sung-Jae; Myung-Rae, Cho; Kim, Min-Keun; Kim, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Despite new developments in the management of osteoporotic fractures, complications like screw cutout are still found in the fixation of proximal femur fractures even with biomechanically proven better implants like proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA). The purpose of this cadaveric study was to investigate the biomechanical stability of this device in relation to two common positions (center-center and inferior-center) of the helical blade in the femoral head in unstable trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Eight pairs of human cadaveric femurs were used; in one group [center-center (C-C) group], the helical blade of PFNA was fixed randomly in central position both in anteroposterior and lateral view, whereas in the other group it was fixed in inferior one-third position in anteroposterior and in central position in lateral view [inferior-center (I-C) group]. Unstable intertrochanteric fracture was created and each specimen was loaded cyclically till load to failure Results: Angular and rotational displacements were significantly higher within the C-C group compared to the I-C group in both unloaded and loaded condition. Loading to failure was higher in the I-C group compared to the C-C group. No statistical significance was found for this parameter. Correlations between tip apex distance, cyclic loading which lead to femoral head displacement, and ultimate load to failure showed a significant positive relationship. Conclusion: The I-C group was superior to the C-C group and provided better biomechanical stability for angular and rotational displacement. This study would be a stimulus for further experimental studies with larger number specimens and complex loading protocols at multicentres. PMID:23325963

  7. [Vascular injuries complicating osteosynthesis in proximal femur fractures].

    PubMed

    Manner, M; Rösch, B; Roy, K

    1999-03-01

    While there are quite a number of reports on vascular injuries complicating hip arthropasty by acetabular component screw fixation, retractor tip pressure or extruding bone cement, the incidence of deep femoral vessel injuries in operative fixation of proximal femoral fractures is comparatively seldom described. We report on two patients with per- and subtrochanteric femoral fractures who sustained injuries of deep femoral artery branches during the implantation of a dynamic hip screw (DHS) and a dynamic condylar screw (DCS), which resulted in a massive thigh hematoma and a fist-size pseudoaneurysm respectively and necessitated surgical intervention in either case. We blame these vascular injuries on the pressure of Hohmann retractors exposing the femoral bone or on the drilling of boreholes for plate attachment. After discussing various operative procedures, we conclude that intramedullar implants are safer than plates with regard to potential vascular complications. PMID:10232039

  8. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications. PMID:25126492

  9. Differences in Femoral Geometry and Structure Due to Immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiratli, Beatrice Jenny; Yamada, M.; Smith, A.; Marcus, R. M.; Arnaud, S.; vanderMeulen, M. C. H.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Reduction in bone mass of the lower extremity is well documented in individuals with paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI). The consequent osteopenia leads to elevated fracture risk with fractures occurring more commonly in the femoral shaft and supracondylar regions than the hip. A model has recently been described to estimate geometry and structure of the femoral midshaft from whole body scans by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Increases in femoral geometric and structural properties during growth were primarily related to mechanical loading as reflected by body mass. In this study, we investigate the relationship between body mass and femoral geometry and structure in adults with normal habitual mechanical loading patterns and those with severely reduced loading. The subjects were 78 ambulatory men (aged 20-72 yrs) and 113 men with complete paralysis from SCI of more than 4 years duration (aged 21 73 yrs). Subregional analysis was performed on DXA whole body scans to obtain bone mineral content (BMC, g), cortical thickness (cm), crosssectional moment of inertia (CSMI, cm4), and section modulus (cm3) of the femoral midshaft. All measured bone variables were significantly lower in SCI compared with ambulatory subjects: -29% (BMC), -33% (cortical thickness), -23% (CSMI), and -22% (section modulus) while body mass was not significantly different. However, the associations between body mass and bone properties were notably different; r2 values were higher for ambulatory than SCI subjects in regressions of body mass on BMC (0.48 vs 0.20), CSMI (0.59 vs 0.32), and section modulus (0.59 vs 0.31). No association was seen between body mass and cortical thickness for either group. The greatest difference between groups is in the femoral cortex, consistent with reduced bone mass via endosteal expansion. The relatively lesser difference in geometric and structural properties implies that there is less effect on mechanical integrity than would be expected from

  10. What is the role of bosentan in healing of femur fractures in a rat model?

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ali; Halici, Zekai; Akpinar, Erol; Aksakal, A Murat; Saritemur, Murat; Yayla, Muhammed; Kunak, C Semih; Cadirci, Elif; Atmaca, H Tarik; Karcioglu, S Sena

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects bosentan (which is a strong vasoconstrictor) on bone fracture pathophysiology, and investigate the roles of the nonselective endothelin 1 receptor blocker bosentan on the bone fractures formed in rats through radiographic, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical methods. The rats were divided into three groups (six rats in each group): a femoral fracture control group, a femoral fracture plus bosentan at 50 mg/kg group, and a femoral fracture plus bosentan at 100 mg/kg group. The femoral fracture model was established by transversely cutting the femur at the midsection. After manual reduction, the fractured femur was fixed with intramedullary Kirschner wires. The radiographic healing scores of the bosentan 100 and 50 mg/kg groups were significantly better that those of the fracture control group. The fracture callus percent of new bone in the bosentan 100 mg/kg group was significantly greater than that in the control group. Also, semiquantitative analysis showed higher positive vascular endothelial growth factor and osteocalcin staining and lower positive endothelin receptor type A staining in the treatment groups than in the control group. Bosentan treatment also decreased tissue endothelin 1 expression relative to that in the fracture control group. As a result of our study, the protective effect of bosentan was shown in experimental femoral fracture healing in rats by radiographic, histopathologic, and molecular analyses. PMID:25298328

  11. Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder and necrosis is a major skeletal problem in broiler breeders since they are maintained for a long time in the farm. The etiology of this disease is not well understood. A field study was conducted to understand the basis of this metabolic disease. Six ...

  12. Tibial hemimelia and femoral bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Ugras, Ali Akin; Sungur, Ibrahim; Akyildiz, Mustafa Fehmi; Ercin, Ersin

    2010-02-01

    Femoral bifurcation and tibial agenesis are rare anomalies and have been described in both the Gollop-Wolfgang complex and tibial agenesis-ectrodactyly syndrome. This article presents a case of Gollop-Wolfgang complex without hand ectrodactyly. Tibial agenesis-ectrodactyly syndrome and Gollop-Wolfgang complex are variants of tibial field defect, which includes distal femoral duplication, tibial aplasia, oligo-ectrodactylous toe defects, and preaxial polydactyly, occasionally associated with hand ectrodactyly.This article describes the case of a patient with bilateral tibial hemimelia and left femoral bifurcation. The proximal tibial anlage had not been identified in the patient's left leg. After failed fibular transfer procedure, the knee was disarticulated. The other leg was treated with tibiofibular synostosis and centralization of fibula to os calcis. At 7-year follow-up, the patient ambulates with an above-knee prosthesis and uses an orthopedic boot for ankle stability.In patients with a congenital absence of the tibia, accurate diagnosis is of the utmost importance in planning future treatment. In the absence of proximal tibial anlage, especially in patients with femoral bifurcation, the knee should be disarticulated. Tibiofibular synostosis is a good choice in the presence of a proximal tibial anlage and good quadriceps function. PMID:20192156

  13. An Unusual Variant of Pipkin's Fracture Dislocation of Hip: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jangir, Rajat; Mishra, Diwakar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Injuries of the hip joint from pure hip dislocations to fracture dislocations have been described and classified by various authors. These descriptions do not include fracture dislocation of hip associated with fracture of the greater trochanter. Case Report: We report an unusual case of fracture dislocation of hip in which posterior dislocation of hip was associated with fracture of acetabulum, femoral head, femoral neck, greater trochanter and ipsilateral shaft of tibia. The fracture dislocation was managed with open reduction and internal fixation. Such fracture dislocation has not been reported in literature to the best of our knowledge. Conclusion: We believe that fracture dislocations associate with fractures of greater trochanter should be included in current classification systems of fracture dislocations of hip. PMID:27298974

  14. Large diameter femoral heads: is bigger always better?

    PubMed

    Cooper, H J; Della Valle, C J

    2014-11-01

    Dislocation remains among the most common complications of, and reasons for, revision of both primary and revision total hip replacements (THR). Hence, there is great interest in maximising stability to prevent this complication. Head size has been recognised to have a strong influence on the risk of dislocation post-operatively. As femoral head size increases, stability is augmented, secondary to an increase in impingement-free range of movement. Larger head sizes also greatly increase the 'jump distance' required for the head to dislocate in an appropriately positioned cup. Level-one studies support the use of larger diameter heads as they decrease the risk of dislocation following primary and revision THR. Highly cross-linked polyethylene has allowed us to increase femoral head size, without a marked increase in wear. However, the thin polyethylene liners necessary to accommodate larger heads may increase the risk of liner fracture and larger heads have also been implicated in causing soft-tissue impingement resulting in groin pain. Larger diameter heads also impart larger forces on the femoral trunnion, which may contribute to corrosion, metal release, and adverse local tissue reactions. Alternative large bearings including large ceramic heads and dual mobility bearings may mitigate some of these risks, and several of these devices have been used with clinical success. PMID:25381403

  15. Femoral head viability following resurfacing arthroplasty. A clinical positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Ullmark, Gösta; Sundgren, Kent; Milbrink, Jan; Nilsson, Olle

    2011-01-01

    Hip resurfacing (HR) carries attendant risks of avascular necrosis (AVN) and femoral neck fracture. We used fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) scans to analyze bone metabolism 2-5 years after surgery in 35 cases. Three of the patients had been clinical failures. Using PET scans in the remaining 32 cases, 7 were found to have an area of non-viable bone in the femoral head. This was seen following both posterior and antero lateral approaches. Fluoride PET is a sensitive and useful method for evaluating bone metabolism following HR. PMID:21298626

  16. Jumbo Cutter for Removal of A Bent Femoral Interlocking Nail: A Cost Effective Method.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Manjeet Singh; Madan, Harnam Singh; Sharma, Sansar C; Ali, Nadeem; Bhat, Abedullah

    2015-06-01

    Closed diaphyseal femoral shaft fractures can be treated with multiple surgical options. It is more challenging to remove a bent nail than a broken one because it is difficult to retrieve the bent nail through the intramedullary canal. Various authors have published their techniques for removal of bent femoral interlocking nail. This article describes a simple technique using Jumbo cutter for sectioning and removal of bent interlocking nail. This technique will help orthopaedic surgeons to remove bent nail without using any specialised metal cutting instruments. PMID:26266173

  17. Jumbo Cutter for Removal of A Bent Femoral Interlocking Nail: A Cost Effective Method

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Manjeet Singh; Sharma, Sansar C; Ali, Nadeem; Bhat, Abedullah

    2015-01-01

    Closed diaphyseal femoral shaft fractures can be treated with multiple surgical options. It is more challenging to remove a bent nail than a broken one because it is difficult to retrieve the bent nail through the intramedullary canal. Various authors have published their techniques for removal of bent femoral interlocking nail. This article describes a simple technique using Jumbo cutter for sectioning and removal of bent interlocking nail. This technique will help orthopaedic surgeons to remove bent nail without using any specialised metal cutting instruments. PMID:26266173

  18. Aneurysmal femoral neck cyst: Report of a paediatric case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, Oumar; Boseba, Rodia; Damipi, Jacque Barre; Nibagora, Juvenal; Fall, Aimée Lakh Faye; Ngom, Gabriel; Ndoye, Mamadou

    2016-01-01

    The aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign tumour of children and young adults. It represents approximately 1-2% of all bone tumours. The ABC may develop on all skeletal bones, but the proximal end of the femur is the most common location. The authors report a ABC femoral neck in a child of 13 years. This location is pretty special. Indeed, the fragility of the femoral neck due partly to the pathology itself and secondarily curettage requires a judicious attitude surgical (excisional curettage + bone graft + screw) to prevent the risk of high local recurrence and pathological fracture. PMID:27251662

  19. Curvature analysis of femoral shaft in total knee arthroplasty patient and control group.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ki Seon; Oh, Wang Kyun; Shin, Ji Yun; Cho, Byung Ki; Lee, Tae Soo

    2013-01-01

    For some patients with joint illnesses such as rheumarthritis or varus deformity, the total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures are performed. However, when inserting metal cutting guide for the procedures, due to the femoral shaft bowing, complications such as the cortex of the femoral shaft damages or secondary fractures can be caused. If the central coordinate value of the femoral shaft is known, the metal cutting guide could be inserted into the anatomical center, so such complications can be prevented. In this study, CT images of femoral shafts of 10 individuals in the experiment group who are in need of receiving the total knee arthroplasty procedures and those of 10 individuals in the control group without illness in the femoral shaft have been utilized to locate the 3-dimensional coordinate values. Then, Matlab was utilized to identify the central coordinate value in order to obtain a graph reflecting the anatomical shapes as well as to acquire the 3-dimensional curvature values by section. As a result, the average curvature range of femoral shafts of the experiment group was determined to be 631.2 mm whereas the average curvature range of femoral shafts of the control group was determined to be 1430.4 mm. The statistical significant of the measured results was verified through ANOVA analysis. Based on these results, it was verified that the level of curvature of the femoral shaft of the experiment group was higher. If the anatomical central points are located and analyzed using this methodology, it would be helpful in performing orthopedic operations such as the total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24110202

  20. Complications of hip fractures: A review.

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-09-18

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  1. Proximal Femoral Morphology and the Relevance to Design of Anatomically Precontoured Plates: A Study of the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Lee, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Adequately shaped femoral plate is critical for the fixation of fracture in the pertrochanteric regions. Lateral aspect of greater trochanter is an important region where the proximal femoral plate anchored. However, little is known regarding the morphology of greater trochanter. The objective of this study was to measure main dimensions of greater trochanter and other regions in the proximal end of the femur to provide an anatomical basis for the design of the proximal femoral plate. Anthropometric data on the proximal femur were performed utilizing three-dimensional computational modeling. Computed tomography images of healthy femurs in 53 women and 47 men were contributed to three-dimensional femur modeling. All data were compared between male and female femora. The results showed that mean values for male group were found to be greater in most of measured femoral dimensions. Oppositely, females demonstrated higher neck-shaft angle on anteroposterior view and femoral anteversion angle. The anthropometric data can be used for the anatomical shape design of femoral plates for osteosynthesis of fractures in the trochanteric regions. A distinct plate design may be necessary to accommodate differences between the genders. PMID:25530989

  2. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  3. Rotational osteoplasty and bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation in Pipkin type 2 fracture with acute osteochondral defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Tommaso; Micheloni, Gian Mario; Sandri, Andrea; Regis, Dario; Costanzo, Alessandro; Magnan, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Pipkin fractures are relative rare high-energy lesions characterized by an intra-articular fracture of the femoral head after posterior hip dislocation. Early anatomic reduction and stable fixation are the main goals of treatment. This case evaluates the outcome of managing Pipkin type 2 fracture with acute osteochondral defect of the femoral head using "rotational osteoplasty" and bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation. 24-year-old male patient was involved in a motorcycle accident, suffering from a left hip fracture-dislocation, and pelvic Computed Tomography revealed a Pipkin type 2 lesion. An open urgent treatment was performed. After  anatomic reduction of the femoral head fragment a large osteochondral defect in the anterior-superior weight bearing surface was evident. The pattern of the fracture allowed us to perform a "rotational osteoplasty" including rotation of the femoral head fragment, to obtain an osteochondral cartilage congruence of the anterior-superior surface. Stable fixation was obtained by three bioabsorbable polylactate pins. At four-year follow up the patient had an excellent outcome and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed fracture healing, minimal signs of arthritis, excluding osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The reported case confirms that Pipkin fractures are very insidious surgical urgencies. In selected cases, "rotational osteoplasty" may be an alternative to osteochondral transplant for acute osteochondral defect of the femoral head. Bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation allowed us to have a stable fixation evaluating the bone healing process and vitality of femoral head by MRI. PMID:27104330

  4. Conservative femoral stem revision: avoiding therapeutic escalation.

    PubMed

    Pinaroli, Alban; Lavoie, Frédéric; Cartillier, Jean-Claude; Neyret, Philippe; Selmi, Tarik Ait Si

    2009-04-01

    A conservative approach to femoral revision is assessed. We report on 41 femoral revisions using an extensively coated hydroxyapatite primary femoral stem. Clinical, operative, and radiological data were gathered. Harris hip scores increased from 65/100 to 90/100 at the minimal follow-up of 1 year (P < .05). All stems showed signs of osseous integration. No significant migration was measured. No patient had to be reoperated because of problems related to the stem. Good results are reported for femoral revision with Paprosky type I and II bone defects with no significant difference between the 2 subgroups, hereby proving that conservative femoral revision is a reasonable treatment alternative. Reproducible results with such a technique may bring surgeons to be more aggressive when noticing early signs of femoral loosening. PMID:18534426

  5. Risk Factors for Severity and Type of the Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Jane A.; Lui, Li-Yung; Genant, Harry K.; Salamone, Loran; Browner, Warren; Fink, Howard A.; Cohen, Peter; Hillier, Teresa; Bauer, Doug C.; Cummings, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    More severe hip fractures such as displaced femoral neck (FN) fractures and unstable intertrochanteric (IT) fractures lead to poorer outcomes, but risk factors for severe fractures have not been studied. To identify risk factors for severe types of hip fracture, we performed a prospective cohort study and obtained preoperative hip radiographs from women who sustained an incident hip fracture (excluding traumatic fractures). A single radiologist scored the severity of FN fractures by the Garden System: grades I and II, undisplaced; grades III and IV, displaced. The severity of IT hip fractures was rated by the Kyle System: grades I and II, stable; grades III and IV, unstable. A total of 249 women had FN fractures: 75 (30%) were undisplaced. A total of 213 women had IT fractures: 59 (28%) were stable. Both types of hip fracture increased with age, but older age was even more strongly associated with more severe hip fractures. Low BMD was more strongly related to undisplaced FN fractures (p interaction BMD × FN type, p = 0.0008) and stable IT fractures (p interaction BMD × IT type, p = 0.04). Similar findings were observed for estimated volumetric BMD and hip geometric parameters. Corticosteroid use was only associated with displaced FN fractures, and Parkinson's disease was only associated with stable IT fractures. Little difference was reported in the self-reported circumstances surrounding each type of fracture. In conclusion, the lower the BMD, the greater the likelihood of experiencing a hip fracture that is less displaced and more stable. PMID:19113930

  6. Microcrack density and nanomechanical properties in the subchondral region of the immature piglet femoral head following ischemic osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Aruwajoye, Olumide O; Patel, Mihir K; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B; Aswath, Pranesh B; Kim, Harry K W

    2013-02-01

    Development of a subchondral fracture is one of the earliest signs of structural failure of the immature femoral head following ischemic osteonecrosis, and this eventually leads to a flattening deformity of the femoral head. The mechanical and mineralization changes in the femoral head preceding subchondral fracture have not been elucidated. We hypothesized that ischemic osteonecrosis leads to early material and mechanical alterations in the bone of the subchondral region. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the bone of the subchondral region for changes in the histology of bone cells, microcrack density, mineral content, and nanoindentation properties at an early stage of ischemic osteonecrosis in a piglet model. This large animal model has been shown to develop a subchondral fracture and femoral head deformity resembling juvenile femoral head osteonecrosis. The unoperated, left femoral head of each piglet (n=8) was used as a normal control, while the right side had a surgical ischemia induced by disrupting the femoral neck vessels with a ligature. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and TUNEL assay were performed on femoral heads from 3 piglets. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging, nanoindentation, and microcrack assessments were performed on the subchondral region of both control and ischemic femoral heads from 5 piglets. H&E staining and TUNEL assay showed extensive cell death and an absence of osteoblasts in the ischemic side compared to the normal control. Microcrack density in the ischemic side (3.2±0.79 cracks/mm(2)) was significantly higher compared to the normal side (0.27±0.27 cracks/mm(2)) in the subchondral region (p<0.05). The weighted mean of the weight percent distribution of calcium (CaMean) also was significantly higher in the ischemic subchondral region (p<0.05). Furthermore, the nanoindentation modulus within localized areas of subchondral bone was significantly increased in the ischemic side (16.8±2.7GPa) compared to the

  7. Evaluation of radiation resistance of the bacterial contaminants from femoral heads processed for allogeneic transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer

    2009-09-01

    Femoral heads excised during surgery were obtained from patients who had a fractured neck of the femur and were processed as bone allograft. The bacterial contaminants were isolated from femoral heads at different stages of processing and identified based on morphological characteristics and biochemical tests. Bacterial contaminants on bone were mainly Gram-positive bacilli and cocci (58.3%). Twenty-four isolates from bone samples were screened for resistance to radiation. The D10 values for Gram-negative bacteria isolated from femoral heads ranged from 0.17 to 0.65 kGy. Higher D10 values 0.56-1.04 kGy were observed for Gram-positive bacterial isolates.

  8. Thoracic kyphosis and rate of incident vertebral fractures: the Fracture Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vittinghoff, E.; Kado, D. M.; Lane, N. E.; Ensrud, K. E.; Shipp, K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Biomechanical analyses support the theory that thoracic spine hyperkyphosis may increase risk of new vertebral fractures. While greater kyphosis was associated with an increased rate of incident vertebral fractures, our analysis does not show an independent association of kyphosis on incident fracture, after adjustment for prevalent vertebral fracture. Excessive kyphosis may still be a clinical marker for prevalent vertebral fracture. Introduction Biomechanical analyses suggest hyperkyphosis may increase risk of incident vertebral fracture by increasing the load on vertebral bodies during daily activities. We propose to assess the association of kyphosis with incident radiographic vertebral fracture. Methods We used data from the Fracture Intervention Trial among 3038 women 55–81 years of age with low bone mineral density (BMD). Baseline kyphosis angle was measured using a Debrunner kyphometer. Vertebral fractures were assessed at baseline and follow-up from lateral radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar spine. We used Poisson models to estimate the independent association of kyphosis with incident fracture, controlling for age and femoral neck BMD. Results Mean baseline kyphosis was 48° (SD = 12) (range 7–83). At baseline, 962 (32 %) participants had a prevalent fracture. There were 221 incident fractures over a median of 4 years. At baseline, prevalent fracture was associated with 3.7° greater average kyphosis (95 % CI 2.8–4.6, p < 0.0005), adjusting for age and femoral neck BMD. Before adjusting for prevalent fracture, each 10° greater kyphosis was associated with 22 % increase (95 % CI 8–38 %, p = 0.001) in annualized rate of new radiographic vertebral fracture, adjusting for age and femoral neck BMD. After additional adjustment for prevalent fracture, estimated increased annualized rate was attenuated and no longer significant, 8 % per 10° kyphosis (95 % CI −4 to 22 %, p = 0.18). Conclusions While greater kyphosis increased the rate of

  9. Association of ABO blood group with fracture pattern and mortality in hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Smith, RP; Khan, A; Aghedo, D; Venkatesan, M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mechanism of falling has been proposed as the exclusive explanation for hip fracture pattern. Evidence exists that other genetic factors also influence proximal femoral fracture configuration. The ABO blood group serotype has been associated with other pathologies but any role in hip fracture has yet to be definitively characterised. Methods Our National Hip Fracture Database was interrogated over a four-year period. All patients had their blood group retrieved, and this was compared with hip fracture pattern and mortality rates. Confounding factors were accounted for using logistic regression and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results A total of 2,987 consecutive patients presented to our institution. Those with blood group A were significantly more likely to sustain intracapsular fractures than ‘non-A’ individuals (p=0.009). The blood group distribution of patients with intracapsular fractures was identical to that of the national population of England. However, blood group A was less common in patients with intertrochanteric fractures than in the general population (p=0.0002). Even after correction for age and sex, blood group A was associated with a decrease in the odds of suffering an intertrochanteric fracture to 80% (p=0.002). Blood group A had inferior survivorship correcting for age, sex and hip fracture pattern (hazard ratio: 1.14, p=0.035). This may be due to associated increased prevalence of co-morbid disease in this cohort. Conclusions Blood group is an independent predictor of hip fracture pattern, with group A patients more likely to sustain an intracapsular fracture and non-A individuals more likely to sustain an intertrochanteric fracture. The determinants of fracture pattern are likely to be related to complex interactions at a molecular level based on genetic susceptibility. The mechanism of fall may not be the only aetiological determinant of proximal femoral fracture configuration. PMID:25198976

  10. Intraoperative cone-beam CT for correction of periaxial malrotation of the femoral shaft: A surface-matching approach

    SciTech Connect

    Khoury, Amal; Whyne, Cari M.; Daly, Michael; Moseley, Douglas; Bootsma, Greg; Skrinskas, Tomas; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Jaffray, David

    2007-04-15

    Limb length, alignment and rotation can be difficult to determine in femoral shaft fractures. Shaft axis rotation is particularly difficult to assess intraoperatively. Femoral malpositioning can cause deformity, pain and secondary degenerative joint damage. The aim of this study is to develop an intraoperative method based on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to guide alignment of femoral shaft fractures. We hypothesize that bone surface matching can predict malrotation even with severe comminution. A cadaveric femur was imaged at 16 femoral periaxial malrotations (-51.2 deg. to 60.1 deg.). The images were processed resulting in an unwrapped bone surface plot consisting of a pattern of ridges and valleys. Fracture gaps were simulated by removing midline CT slices. The gaps were reconstituted by extrapolating the existing proximal and distal fragments to the midline of the fracture. The two bone surfaces were then shifted to align bony features. Periaxial malrotation was accurately assessed using surface matching (r{sup 2}=0.99, slope 1.0). The largest mean error was 2.20 deg. and the average difference between repeated measurements was 0.49 deg. CBCT can provide intraoperative high-resolution images with a large field of view. This quality of imaging enables surface matching algorithms to be utilized even with large areas of comminution.

  11. Clinical evaluation of a true percutaneous technique for antegrade femoral nailing.

    PubMed

    Ziran, Bruce H; Smith, Wade R; Zlotolow, D A; Manion, C; Grosskreuz, R; Agudelo, Juan F; Morgan, Steven J

    2005-10-01

    From July 1997 to March 2001, 209 consecutive patients with 215 femoral shaft fractures amenable to antegrade femoral nailing were enrolled. A true percutaneous insertion technique was performed using a stab wound incision. One hundred ninety-seven (92%) fractures achieved primary union with anatomic or near anatomic alignment. Eighteen (8%) healing problems and two deep infections (1%) responded to repeat interventions. There was one iatrogenic complication related to an anterior starting point. External blood loss was minimal (generally <100 cc). Incisions averaged 16 mm and healed uneventfully. At one-year follow-up only 10% of patients had hip abductor pain. The percutaneous technique appears to be a safe and effective alternative to the standard technique. Hip pain at one year appears decreased compared to reports using a traditional approach. PMID:16237882

  12. Repairing Femoral Fractures: A Model Lesson in Biomaterial Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakakeeny, Jarred

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterial science is a rapidly growing field that has scientists and doctors searching for new ways to repair the body. A merger between medicine and engineering, biomaterials can be complex subject matter, and it can certainly capture the minds of middle school students. In the lesson described in this article, seventh graders generally learn…

  13. [Aneurysm of the femoral and popliteal vein].

    PubMed

    Hansen, L G; Boris, P

    1986-04-01

    Aneurysms of the popliteal and femoral veins are rare and may be seen as casual findings with no clinical manifestations whatsoever. On the other hand they may be potential source of recurrent pulmonary embolism. A case is reported, where an aneurysm of the femoral vein was found in a clinically symptomless woman aged 48. PMID:3715020

  14. Outcomes following surgical treatment of periprosthetic femur fractures: a single centre series

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Natasha; Papp, Steve; Gofton, Wade; Beaulé, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Periprosthetic femoral fracture after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an increasing clinical problem and a challenging complication to treat surgically. The aim of this retrospective study was to review the treatment of periprosthetic fractures and the complication rate associated with treatment at our institution. Methods We reviewed the cases of patients with periprosthetic femoral fractures treated between January 2004 and June 2009. We used the Vancouver classification to assess fracture types, and we identified the surgical interventions used for these fracture types and the associated complications. Results We treated 45 patients with periprosthetic femoral fractures during the study period (15 men, 30 women, mean age 78 yr). Based on Vancouver classification, 2 patients had AL fractures, 9 had AG, 15 had B1, 24 had B2, 2 had B3 and 4 had C fractures. Overall, 82% of fractures united with a mean time to union of 15 (range 2–64) months. Fourteen patients (31%) had complications; 11 of them had a reoperation: 6 to treat an infection, 6 for nonunion and 2 for aseptic femoral component loosening. Conclusion Periprosthetic fractures are difficult to manage. Careful preoperative planning and appropriate intraoperative management in the hands of experienced surgeons may increase the chances of successful treatment. However, patients should be counselled on the high risk of complications when presenting with this problem. PMID:24869614

  15. Risk of septic knee following retrograde intramedullary nailing of open and closed femur fractures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One potential complication of retrograde femoral nailing in the treatment of femur fractures is the risk of septic knee. This risk theoretically increases in open fractures as a contaminated fracture site has the potential to seed the instrumentation being passed in and out of the sterile intraarticular starting point. There are few studies examining this potential complication in a relatively commonly practiced technique. Methods All patients who received a retrograde femoral nail for femur fracture between September 1996 and November 2006 at a Level 1 trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. This yielded 143 closed fractures, 38 open fractures and 4 closed fractures with an ipsilateral traumatic knee arthrotomy. Patient follow-up records were reviewed for documentation of septic knee via operative notes, wound culture or knee aspirate data, or the administration of antibiotics for suspected septic knee. Results No evidence of septic knee was found in the 185 fractures examined in the dataset. Utilizing the Wilson confidence interval, the rate of septic knee based on our population was no greater than 2%, with that of the open fracture group alone being 9%. Conclusions Based on these results and review of the literature, the risk of septic knee in retrograde femoral nailing of both open and closed femoral shaft fractures appears low but potentially not insignificant. Funding There was no outside source of funding from either industry or other organization for this study. PMID:22340770

  16. Association between femur size and a focal defect of the superior femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Gee, A H; Treece, G M; Tonkin, C J; Black, D M; Poole, K E S

    2015-12-01

    Within each sex, there is an association between hip fracture risk and the size of the proximal femur, with larger femurs apparently more susceptible to fracture. Here, we investigate whether the thickness and density of the femoral cortex play a role in this association: might larger femurs harbour focal, cortical defects? To answer this question, we used cortical bone mapping to measure the distribution of cortical mass surface density (CMSD, mg/cm(2)) in cohorts of 308 males and 125 females. Principal component analysis of the various femoral surfaces led to a measure of size that is linearly independent from shape. After mapping the data onto a canonical femur surface, we used statistical parametric mapping to identify any regions where CMSD depends on size, allowing for other confounding covariates including shape. Our principal finding was a focal patch on the superior femoral neck, where CMSD is reduced by around 1% for each 1% increase in proximal-distal size (p<0.000005 in the males, p<0.001 in the females). This finding appears to be consistent with models of functional adaptation, and may help with the design of interventional strategies for reducing fracture risk. PMID:26142930

  17. Fragility Fractures in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Costa, Luisa; Benigno, Carla; Del Puente, Aurora; Foglia, Francesca; Oriente, Alfonso; Bottiglieri, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) can have peculiar effects on bone, including mechanisms of bone loss such as erosions, but also of bone formation, such as ankylosis or periostitis. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of fractures in patients with PsA as compared to healthy controls and to investigate determinants of fractures among cases. For both cases and controls, radiographs were read to identify vertebral fractures (VF), and the presence of femoral neck or other nonvertebral fractures was obtained from patients' medical history. The prevalence of fragility fractures on radiographic readings did not differ between cases and controls. The number of subjects showing a VF was 33 (36%) among PsA patients and 36 (36%) among controls, with a prevalence of severe VF of 8% among cases and 4% among controls. Controlling for covariates in a logistic model, the only variables showing a significant correlation with the presence of nonvertebral fractures (NVF) were disease duration (p=0.02), age (p=0.03), and bone mineral density at femoral neck (inverse correlation, p=0.04). Fractures should be carefully considered when evaluating the global picture of the patient with PsA for their contribution to the "fragility" profile. PMID:26523054

  18. Epidemiology of fractures in people with severe and profound developmental disabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glick, N.R.; Fischer, M.H.; Heisey, D.M.; Leverson, G.E.; Mann, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Fractures are more prevalent among people with severe and profound developmental disabilities than in the general population. In order to characterize the tendency of these people to fracture, and to identify features that may guide the development of preventive strategies, we analyzed fracture epidemiology in people with severe and profound developmental disabilities who lived in a stable environment. Data from a 23-year longitudinal cohort registry of 1434 people with severe and profound developmental disabilities were analyzed to determine the effects of age, gender, mobility, bone fractured, month of fracture, and fracture history upon fracture rates. Eighty-five percent of all fractures involved the extremities. The overall fracture rate increased as mobility increased. In contrast, femoral shaft fracture risk was substantially higher in the least mobile [relative risk (RR), 10.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.29-32.66] compared with the most mobile group. Although the overall fracture rate was not associated with age, the femoral shaft fractures decreased but hand/foot fractures increased with age. Overall fracture risk declined in August and September (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.89), being especially prominent for tibial/fibular fractures (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.13-0.70). Gender was not a factor in fracture risk. Two primary fracture mechanisms are apparent: one, largely associated with lack of weight-bearing in people with the least mobility, is exemplified by femoral fractures during non-traumatic events as simple as diapering or transfers; the other, probably due to movement- or fall-related trauma, is exemplified by hand/foot fractures in people who ambulate. The fracture experience of people with severe and profound developmental disabilities is unique and, because it differs qualitatively from postmenopausal osteoporosis, may require population-specific methods for assessing risk, for improving bone integrity, and for reduction of falls and accidents

  19. Treatment of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractureswith Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation II: Our Experience in Indian Patients§

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G.N. Kiran; Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Kavin; Farooque, Kamran; Lakhotia, Devendra; Sharma, Vijay; Meena, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Unstable intertrochanteric fractures are difficult to manage and the choice of implant is critical for fracture fixation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of proximal femoral nail antirotationII (PFNA II) in the treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 45 patients of unstable intertrochanteric fractures, who were treated with the PFNA II between 2011 and 2013. Of which, 3 patients were died within 6 months of follow up. Hence, 42 patients were available for the study including 26 men and 16 women. The mean age was 61 years (range, 35 -90). Clinical evaluation was done using Harris hip score. The position of the blade in the femoral head was evaluated using Cleveland zones and tip apex distance. The fracture reduction was assessed using the Garden Alignment Index and postoperative fracture gap (mm) measurement. Results: The mean follow up period was 15.3 months (range, 9-27). Excellent to good results were accounted for 78% of cases according to Harris hip score. No cases of cut out or breakage of the implant noted. Implant removal was done in 2 patients due to persistent anterior thigh pain. Conclusion: We recommend PFNA II for fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures with less operative time and low complication rate. However, proper operative technique is important for achieving fracture stability and to avoid major complications.

  20. Periprosthetic Fractures Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty may occur in any part of the femur, tibia and patella, and the most common pattern involves the supracondylar area of the distal femur. Supracondylar periprosthetic fractures frequently occur above a well-fixed prosthesis, and risk factors include anterior femoral cortical notching and use of the rotational constrained implant. Periprosthetic tibial fractures are frequently associated with loose components and malalignment or malposition of implants. Fractures of the patella are much less common and associated with rheumatoid arthritis, use of steroid, osteonecrosis and malalignment of implants. Most patients with periprosthetic fractures around the knee are the elderly with poor bone quality. There are many difficulties and increased risk of nonunion after treatment because reduction and internal fixation is interfered with by preexisting prosthesis and bone cement. Additionally, previous soft tissue injury is another disadvantageous condition for bone healing. Many authors reported good clinical outcomes after non-operative treatment of undisplaced or minimally displaced periprosthetic fractures; however, open reduction or revision arthroplasty was required in displaced fractures or fractures with unstable prosthesis. Periprosthetic fractures around the knee should be prevented by appropriate technique during total knee arthroplasty. Nevertheless, if a periprosthetic fracture occurs, an appropriate treatment method should be selected considering the stability of the prosthesis, displacement of fracture and bone quality. PMID:25750888

  1. Complications With Long Cemented Stems in Proximal Femoral Replacement.

    PubMed

    Naik, Amish A; Lietman, Steven A

    2016-05-01

    This study attempted to determine whether patients undergoing cemented long-stem proximal femoral replacement had: (1) an increased short-term mortality rate; (2) greater intraoperative hemodynamic instability; (3) a greater need for resuscitation; and (4) a decreased risk of periprosthetic fracture. The current study reviewed intraoperative and short-term events related to clinical outcomes in 24 consecutive patients who were treated at a single institution over a 5-year period. These patients underwent primary long-stem (≥250 mm, n=13) vs short-stem (<250 mm, n=11) cemented proximal femoral replacement. Other than stem length, the 2 groups were not significantly different in terms of patient age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, diagnosis, or preoperative American Society of Anesthesiologists functional score. Primary outcomes were intraoperative death, blood loss, blood transfusions, fluid resuscitation, hypotension, oxygen desaturation, mortality up to 1 year, and need for revision surgery. At 1 year, a significantly increased mortality rate (77% vs 27%, P=.03) was noted in patients receiving long-stem vs short-stem arthroplasty. Patients who received longer stems also required more intraoperative blood transfusions and fluid resuscitation (P=.04) for greater hypotension (P=.04) and oxygen desaturation (P=.04). Two intraoperative deaths occurred in the long-stem group, and none occurred in the short-stem group. The findings suggest that there is an increased risk of intraoperative hemodynamic instability with long-stem vs short-stem proximal femoral replacement, with a need for greater resuscitative efforts and an increased risk of mortality at 1 year. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e423-e429.]. PMID:27064780

  2. Lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia: an anatomical insight.

    PubMed

    Dias Filho, L C; Valença, M M; Guimarães Filho, F A V; Medeiros, R C; Silva, R A M; Morais, M G V; Valente, F P; França, S M L

    2003-07-01

    A detailed anatomic study was carried out on the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve to better understand the etiology and treatment of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. As it passed from the pelvis into the thigh, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve ran through an "aponeuroticofascial tunnel," beginning at the iliopubic tract and ending at the inguinal ligament; as it passed through the tunnel, an enlargement in its side-to-side diameter was observed, suggesting that the fascial structures proximal to the inguinal ligament may be implicated in the genesis of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. The finding of pseudoneuromas at this location, distant from the inguinal ligament, supports this hypothesis. The anterior superior iliac spine is located approximately 0.7 cm from the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and serves as the bony landmark for nerve localization. Within the first 3 cm of leaving the pelvis, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was observed deep to the fascia lata; therefore, surgical dissection within the subcutaneous fascia may be conducted with relative impunity near the anterior superior iliac spine just inferior to the inguinal ligament. In 36% of cases there was no posterior branch of the nerve, which is correlated to lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia symptoms often being limited to the anterior branch region. An accessory nerve was found in 30% of cases. PMID:12794914

  3. Technical considerations and functional results in primary uncemented hip arthroplasty using short femoral stems through mini-invasive techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moga, M; Pogarasteanu, ME

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Primary hip arthroplasty is a surgical procedure through which the coxofemoral joint is replaced with a prosthetic implant. Arthroplasties can be total or partial, cemented or uncemented. These procedures are generally indicated as a form of treatment for arthritic pain or in the case of severe trauma, such as femoral neck fractures. The most commonly used approaches are: Smith Peterson, Watson Jones, Hardinge, Moore Southern and Ludloff. Recently, mini-invasive approaches have started being used, while correlated with short femoral stems. Short metaphyseal femoral stems have been introduced as an alternative to conventional stems, having a series of advantages: preservation of bone stock (high cervical osteotomies), preservation of the anatomical anteversion of the femural neck, decrease in cortical stress forces, decrease in the remaining thigh pain, a longer life of the prosthesis, with the possibility of revision to a conventional prosthesis, and the possibility to be used in correlation with mini-invasive procedures. Short femoral stems implanted through a mini-invasive approach allow the conservation of the femoral bone stock, permitting an ulterior re-intervention, in the context of an ageing population, with a globally rising long-term survival rate. Moreover, the superiority of the total hip arthroplasty with a short femoral stem was discussed through mini-invasive approaches, in the day-to-day realities of our Clinic. PMID:25408765

  4. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  5. The Vascularized Medial Femoral Corticoperiosteal Flap for Thumb Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kavit; Darhouse, Nagham; Sivakumar, Bran; Floyd, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present an interesting method of shaping a vascularized medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap into a “neophalanx” for phalangeal reconstruction. Our patient presented with limited strength and function secondary to fracture nonunion of the proximal phalanx of the dominant thumb. Following excision of the pseudarthrosis, an MFC corticoperiosteal flap was harvested, sculpted into a prism shape and inset. The superomedial genicular pedicle was anastomosed to the princeps pollicis artery and a cephalic tributary. On follow-up, new bone growth was seen on radiographs and the patient had substantially improved function, with full metacarpophalangeal extension, a Kapandji score of 9, and a markedly reduced Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score of 2.68. The MFC flap is useful for reconstruction of bony defects, with minimal donor morbidity. This versatile vascularized flap can be crafted to requisite shapes and is useful for small defects in the hand, including phalangeal reconstruction. PMID:26495205

  6. Bilateral Femoral Nutrient Foraminal Cement Penetration during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross; Bhumbra, Rej S; Marston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cement pressurisation is important for the insertion of both the acetabular and femoral components during Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Secondary to pressurization the rare phenomenon of unilateral cement incursion into the nutrient foramen has previously been reported. No bilateral case has been reported to date. This has implications both for misdiagnosis of periprosthetic fractures and for medico-legal consequences due to a presumed adverse intra-operative event. Case Report: We present a case report of a 59 year old, caucasian female who underwent staged bilateral cemented Stanmore THA. The post-operative radiographs demonstrate evidence of bilateral nutrient foramen penetration intra-operatively by standard viscosity cement. The patient suffered no adverse consequences. Conclusions: In summary, cement extravasation into the nutrient foramen is an important differential to be considered in presence of posterior-medial cement in the diaphysis of femur following THA. This requires no further intervention and has no effect on the outcome.

  7. Imaging evaluation of patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Mont, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Imaging modalities for the diagnosis of osteonecrosis (ON) of the femoral head have been studied extensively, but there have been few reports strictly addressing radiographic evaluation. The purpose of this report is to examine the use and role of (1) plain radiographs, (2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), (3) computerized tomography (CT), (4) bone scanning, and (5) positron emission topography (PET) for the diagnostic evaluation of ON. Plain radiographs are a mainstay in diagnosis but have very low sensitivity for early ON. MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic evaluation but may not identify subchondral fractures on collapse as well as CT scan or tomogram. Bone scanning should not be used for diagnosis due to its low sensitivity. PET scanning does not have a definitive role in diagnosis yet. Future research should focus on the role of new imaging technologies in evaluation. PMID:26045084

  8. Genetic Contribution of Femoral Neck Bone Geometry to the Risk of Developing Osteoporosis: A Family-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Malouf, Jorge; Laiz, Ana; Marin, Ana; Herrera, Silvia; Farrerons, Jordi; Soria, Jose Manuel; Casademont, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Femoral neck geometry parameters are believed to be as good as bone mineral density as independent factors in predicting hip fracture risk. This study was conducted to analyze the roles of genetic and environmental factors in femoral properties measured in a sample of Spanish families with osteoporotic fractures and extended genealogy. The “Genetic Analysis of Osteoporosis (GAO) Project” involved 11 extended families with a total number of 376 individuals. We studied three categorical phenotypes of particular clinical interest and we used a Hip structural analysis based on DXA to analyze 17 strength and geometrical phenotypes of the hip. All the femoral properties had highly significant heritability, ranging from 0.252 to 0.586. The most significant correlations were observed at the genetic level (ρG). Osteoporotic fracture status (Affected 2) and, particularly, low bone mass and osteoporotic condition (Affected 3) had the highest number of significant genetic correlations with diverse femoral properties. In conclusion, our findings suggest that a relatively simple and easy to use method based on DXA studies can provide useful data on properties of the Hip in clinical practice. Furthermore, our results provide a strong motivation for further studies in order to improve the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism underlying bone architecture and the genetics of osteoporosis. PMID:27163365

  9. Genetic Contribution of Femoral Neck Bone Geometry to the Risk of Developing Osteoporosis: A Family-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-de Sosa, Nerea; Athanasiadis, Georgios; Malouf, Jorge; Laiz, Ana; Marin, Ana; Herrera, Silvia; Farrerons, Jordi; Soria, Jose Manuel; Casademont, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Femoral neck geometry parameters are believed to be as good as bone mineral density as independent factors in predicting hip fracture risk. This study was conducted to analyze the roles of genetic and environmental factors in femoral properties measured in a sample of Spanish families with osteoporotic fractures and extended genealogy. The "Genetic Analysis of Osteoporosis (GAO) Project" involved 11 extended families with a total number of 376 individuals. We studied three categorical phenotypes of particular clinical interest and we used a Hip structural analysis based on DXA to analyze 17 strength and geometrical phenotypes of the hip. All the femoral properties had highly significant heritability, ranging from 0.252 to 0.586. The most significant correlations were observed at the genetic level (ρG). Osteoporotic fracture status (Affected 2) and, particularly, low bone mass and osteoporotic condition (Affected 3) had the highest number of significant genetic correlations with diverse femoral properties. In conclusion, our findings suggest that a relatively simple and easy to use method based on DXA studies can provide useful data on properties of the Hip in clinical practice. Furthermore, our results provide a strong motivation for further studies in order to improve the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism underlying bone architecture and the genetics of osteoporosis. PMID:27163365

  10. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  11. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  12. A curious case of stress fracture in a transsexual athlete.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Tom; Grant, Michael; Chandran, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Femoral neck stress fractures in young healthy individuals are rare and occur in those who take part in physical training with repetitive loading and those with osteoporosis. Bone density is related to sex hormone status, which is artificially manipulated during gender reassignment. Conflicting evidence currently exists on the effect of cross sex hormone treatment on bone density, with no literature suggesting a link between hormone treatment in gender reassignment and stress fractures. Our aim is to highlight the potential risk of stress fractures amongst transsexual patients receiving cross sex hormones as part of gender reassignment. The patient presented with groin pain after competing in a running event. Despite a number of risk factors, there was a delay in diagnosis, which could have led to complications compromising outcome. Femoral neck stress fractures should be considered in the differential diagnosis of transsexual patients receiving hormone treatment with non-specific groin/thigh pain following exercise. PMID:27033288

  13. Investigation of a fatigue failure in a stainless steel femoral plate.

    PubMed

    Marcomini, J B; Baptista, C A R P; Pascon, J P; Teixeira, R L; Reis, F P

    2014-10-01

    Surgical implants are exposed to severe working conditions and therefore a wide range of failure mechanisms may occur, including fatigue, corrosion, wear, fretting and combinations of them. The mechanical failures of metallic implants may also be influenced by several other factors, including the design, material, manufacturing, installation, postoperative complications and misuse. An 83-year-old patient suffered an oblique femoral shaft fracture due to a fall at home. A stainless steel locking compression plate (LCP) employed in the fracture reduction failed after four months and was sent back to the producer. A second LCP of the same type was implanted and also failed after six months. A failure analysis of the second femoral LCP is performed in this paper. The results demonstrate that poor material quality was decisive to the failure. The chemical analysis revealed a high P content in the steel, which is not in accordance to the standards. A combination of factors lead to LCP fracture and these include: brittle crack initiation due to phosphorus, segregation at grain boundaries, crack propagation due to cyclic loading and final fast fracture favored by the loss of ductility due to cold work. PMID:25023519

  14. Habitual physical inertia and other factors in relation to risk of fracture of the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Boyce, W J; Vessey, M P

    1988-09-01

    Physical inactivity is associated with low bone mass in adults, and might therefore be a risk factor for proximal femoral fracture in old age. This hypothesis was tested in a case-control study of 139 selected patients with confirmed proximal femoral fracture and 139 age- and sex-matched community controls, using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Patients had been significantly less physically active in middle age than had controls, a difference that was greater in the younger subjects. It is suggested that the progressive decrease during the present century in the amount of physical activity associated with everyday life has resulted in increased numbers of elderly people being at risk of femoral fracture and may be the cause of the rises in age-specific incidence rates now being observed. If this explanation is correct, a planned increase in leisure-time physical activity in middle age and beyond may be the most effective method of preventing these fractures. PMID:3232586

  15. The treatment of femoral bone loss by axial external fixation and susbequent locking plate application: a case report.

    PubMed

    Boero, Emanuele; Mogollo, Maria del Amparo Paredes

    2015-12-01

    A 20-year-old man was admitted to our hospital having sustianed bilateral high-energy femoral fractures. The right femoral fracture was an open grade 3B with OTA grade 3 bone loss. The patient had also a brain contusion with a subdural haematoma and a closed fracture of the left clavicle. Initial management included temporarily stabilisation of the femoral fractures wth external fixators and prompt transfer to the intensive care unit. Three weeks later the external fixator of the right femur was converted to an hybrid system, and the fixator of the left side was removed and a reamed intramedullary locking nail was applied. Two months after the accident the patient underwent bone transport (11 cm long) of the right femur with an monolateral external fixation. When the final length was achieved there were knee stiffness (ROM 0° to 30°) and non-union of the docking site. Therefore, the patient underwent a Judet's procedure to treat the knee stiffness and stabilisation of the non united femur with a locking plate (LISS). After the operation the patient started progressive weight bearing. A year after trauma and following union of the femur, the patient underwent soft tissue reconstruction of the anterior side of the thigh with a free vascularised flap. At final follow upo the patient had a good functional recovery with return to his previous occupation. PMID:26738458

  16. Fracture initiates systemic inflammatory response syndrome through recruiting polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Haipeng; Liu, Jia; Yao, Jianhua; Zhong, Jianfeng; Guo, Lei; Sun, Tiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Fracture, a common type injury in trauma patients, often results in the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Though the mechanism of the fracture-initiated SIRS still remains not well characterized, it is well documented that the polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) play an important role in the inflammatory process. We hypothesize that fractures recruit PMN to the local tissue, which is followed by an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and initiation of SIRS. In the current study, we established a closed femoral fracture rat model. We evaluated the levels of MPO, IL-1β and CINC-1 in fractured tissue homogenate, and we measured the levels of IL-6 and IL-10, the biomarkers for systemic inflammatory response, in the rat sera. In clinical part of the study, we collected blood from patients with isolated closed femoral fractures and evaluated PMN-related chemoattractants (IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF) and the number of peripheral PMN. We further evaluated the level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of the patients with fracture. In the animal model of closed femoral fracture, we found a significant recruitment of PMN to the local tissue after fracture, which correlates with the elevated MPO level. We also showed that the concentration of IL-1β and CINC-1 in local tissue is significantly increased and might be responsible for the PMN recruitment. Recruitment of PMN to the local tissue was accompanied with a significant increase in the systemic levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in serum. In the patients with closed femoral fracture, we observed an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and PMN-related chemoattractants, including IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF. The level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of patients were significantly higher compared to the healthy volunteers. Our data suggest that fracture released mitochondrial DNA into the local haematoma of

  17. Novel venting technique for intramedullary rod fixation of pathologic fractures.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Kenneth J; Nicolaou, Daemeon A M; Lee, Mark A

    2011-10-01

    This article introduces a novel technique to vent the femur and potentially decrease the embolic load created by reaming during intramedullary rod fixation of impending pathologic femur fractures. We used readily available operating room equipment to create a distal femoral vent hole without interfering with standard intramedullary instrumentation and with minimal increase in surgical time. This technique can be used for the prophylactic intramedullary stabilization of impending pathologic femur fractures from metabolic bone disease, metastatic cancer, and bisphosphonate use. PMID:21956178

  18. Stress fractures: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Matcuk, George R; Mahanty, Scott R; Skalski, Matthew R; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Gottsegen, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Stress fracture, in its most inclusive description, includes both fatigue and insufficiency fracture. Fatigue fractures, sometimes equated with the term "stress fractures," are most common in runners and other athletes and typically occur in the lower extremities. These fractures are the result of abnormal, cyclical loading on normal bone leading to local cortical resorption and fracture. Insufficiency fractures are common in elderly populations, secondary to osteoporosis, and are typically located in and around the pelvis. They are a result of normal or traumatic loading on abnormal bone. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the hip or knee may cause acute pain that may present in the emergency setting. Medial tibial stress syndrome is a type of stress injury of the tibia related to activity and is a clinical syndrome encompassing a range of injuries from stress edema to frank-displaced fracture. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy is also a recently discovered entity that needs early recognition to prevent progression to a complete fracture. Imaging recommendations for evaluation of stress fractures include initial plain radiographs followed, if necessary, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is preferred over computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy. Radiographs are the first-line modality and may reveal linear sclerosis and periosteal reaction prior to the development of a frank fracture. MRI is highly sensitive with findings ranging from periosteal edema to bone marrow and intracortical signal abnormality. Additionally, a brief description of relevant clinical management of stress fractures is included. PMID:27002328

  19. Removal of a well-fixed cementless femoral component with an extended proximal femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Younger, T I; Bradford, M S; Paprosky, W G

    1995-05-01

    Removal of a stable, well-fixed cementless femoral arthroplasty component occasionally is necessary because of infection, component malposition, persistent pain, or incompatibility with a femoral revision component. Restricted access to ingrowth surfaces may make implant removal exceedingly difficult and increases the risk of iatrogenic damage to the proximal femur. A new extended proximal femoral osteotomy technique is described for use in removing well-fixed cementless femoral components. Previous techniques have been modified to allow access to the bone-implant interface and to provide straight-shot access to the femoral canal for proper sizing and positioning of the revision implant. The osteotomy can be extended to accommodate the entire length of the porous coating on the revision component. If a shorter osteotomy is desired, access to the prosthesis for transection with a metal-cutting burr is possible. The osteotomy is easily repositioned with cerclage wires or cables and reliable healing has been demonstrated. PMID:10150358

  20. Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw: the rheumatologist's role

    PubMed Central

    Capsoni, Franco; Longhi, Matteo; Weinstein, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Several recent reports have described osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ) associated with the use of bisphosphonates. Rheumatologists treating bone diseases with bisphosphonate need, therefore, to be aware of this potential risk and plan the prophylaxis, early diagnosis and prevention of potential consequences. We review the literature on this newly described complication, with particular focus on systemic and local predisposing pathologies, preventive measures suggested before and during therapy with bisphosphonates, and the most frequent clinical presentation of the oral lesions. The expert panel recommendations for the management of care of patients who develop ONJ are summarized. PMID:17049069

  1. Femoral tunnel malposition in ACL revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joseph A; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific "technical cause of failure." Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  2. Femoral Tunnel Malposition in ACL Revision Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific “technical cause of failure.” Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  3. The epidemiology and treatment of femur fractures at a northern tanzanian referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Alexander Conor; Ebbs, Samuel Robert; Mandari, Faiton Ndesanjo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Femoral fractures are the most common presenting injury at the orthopaedic department in a large Tanzanian hospital. To date, there has been no current examination of the epidemiology of femoral fractures and the disease burden has not been quantified. Methods A retrospective descriptive study of patient records in the orthopaedic department at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) was performed. Patient demographics, aetiology of fractures, diagnosis and treatment were all recorded. Results A total of 540 consecutive patient admission records were reviewed over a 9 month period. Of these 540 cases, 213 (39%) were diagnosed with a femoral fracture. The 21-30 age group were the most commonly affected by femur fractures (20% n = 42). Within this group, motor traffic accidents (MTA) were the cause of 71% of injuries (n = 30). For males, MTA's caused 59% of all femur fractures (n = 80), while falls were the most common cause of femur fractures in females (70%; n = 49). 80% of the fractures in the 51-100 age group were caused by falls (n = 52). In both the male and female groups the most common fracture seen was mid shaft femoral fracture (males 33% (n = 48), females 25% (n = 18)). The most common treatment was skeletal traction used in 40% (n = 85) of patients. Conclusion Femur fracture most commonly presented in males under age 30. Femur fracture was most commonly cause by MTAs in males and by falls in females. The most common diagnosis was mid shaft of femur fracture. Skeletal traction was the most frequent treatment. PMID:26977245

  4. Accelerated bone mineral loss following a hip fracture: a prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Dirschl, D R; Henderson, R C; Oakley, W C

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to monitor the bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and contralateral femoral neck in the first year following an osteoporosis-related fracture of the hip. Eighty-three elderly patients (mean age 77 years) who had sustained a hip fracture had determinations of BMD made at the time of fracture; 49 of these patients were available for reassessment of BMD 1 year later. The change in BMD was correlated with pre- and postinjury variables, such as ambulatory ability, dietary intake of calcium, serum vitamin D levels, mental status, and routine serologies. The mean decrease in BMD in the year following fracture was 5.4% from the contralateral femoral neck and 2.4% from the lumbar spine. Calcium intake correlated with the loss of BMD from the femoral neck (p = 0.015), but not the lumbar spine. Patients with daily calcium intakes of less than 500 mg/day had a more than 10% decrease in femoral neck BMD in the year following their hip fracture. Serum 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D level correlated with loss of MBD from the lumbar spine (p = 0.001), but not from the femoral neck. There was no correlation between the loss of bone mineral from either measurement site and age, sex, level of ambulation, or mental status. The loss of BMD from the femoral neck in the year following a hip fracture is more than five times that reported in the nonfractured population. This accelerated rate of loss can have drastic consequences in an elderly population already exhibiting osteopenia and propensity to fall. Investigation of pharmacologic or other interventions in the first critical year following a hip fracture may potentially blunt this accelerated rate of bone loss and lessen the risk of subsequent fractures. PMID:9213011

  5. Mortality after distal radial fractures in the Medicare population

    PubMed Central

    Shauver, Melissa J.; Zhong, Lin; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a low energy fracture of the distal radius increases the risk for another, more serious fracture such as a proximal femoral fracture. Early mortality after proximal femoral fracture has been widely studied, but the association between distal radial fracture and mortality is unknown. The date of death for all Medicare beneficiaries who sustained an isolated distal radial fracture in 2007 was determined using Medicare Vital Statistics files. The adjusted mortality rate for each age-sex group was calculated and compared with published US mortality tables. Distal radial fractures were not associated with an increased mortality rate. In fact, beneficiaries had a significantly lower mortality rate after distal radial fractures than the general population. This may be related to the injured beneficiaries’ involvement in the healthcare system. Mortality rate did not vary significantly based on time from injury. Our results indicate that any mortality is unlikely to be attributable to the distal radial fracture or its treatment. Level of Evidence: III PMID:26085186

  6. Role of Fracture and Repair Type on Pain and Opioid Use After Hip Fracture in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Strike, Sophia A.; Sieber, Frederick E.; Gottschalk, Allan; Mears, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Pain after hip fracture repair is related to worse functional outcomes and higher fracture care costs than that for patients with no or less pain. However, to our knowledge, few studies have examined the roles of hip fracture type or surgical procedure as factors influencing postoperative pain or opioid analgesic requirements. Our goal was to determine whether the type of hip fracture or hip fracture repair affects postoperative pain or opioid analgesic requirements in the elderly patient. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 231 patients ≥65 years old admitted to a hip fracture center for surgical repair. Fracture patterns were classified into femoral neck (FN) versus intertrochanteric (IT), stable versus unstable, and type of surgical repair. Demographic and intraoperative variables, postoperative pain scores, and opioid analgesic use data were collected and analyzed according to the type of hip fracture and type of surgical repair. Results: There were no differences in postoperative pain when comparing FN versus IT fractures, stable versus unstable fractures, or type of surgical repair. Patients with FN fractures had higher analgesic requirements on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. There was no difference in postoperative analgesic requirements among patients with stable versus unstable fractures or type of surgical repair. Otherwise, there were no differences in postoperative pain or opioid analgesic use based on the surgical repair or fracture type. Overall, patients with hip fracture experienced low levels of pain. PMID:24600530

  7. Atypical Fractures are Mainly Subtrochanteric in Singapore and Diaphyseal in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Schilcher, Jörg; Howe, Tet Sen; Png, Meng Ai; Aspenberg, Per; Koh, Joyce S B

    2015-11-01

    We have previously noted a dichotomy in the location of atypical fractures along the femoral shaft in Swedish patients, and a mainly subtrochanteric location of atypical fractures in descriptions of patients from Singapore. These unexpected differences were now investigated by testing the following hypotheses in a cross-sectional study: first, that there is a dichotomy also in Singapore; second, that the relation between subtrochanteric and diaphyseal location is different between the two countries; third, that the location is related to femoral bow. The previously published Swedish sample (n = 151) was re-measured, and a new Singaporean sample (n = 75) was established. Both samples were based on radiographic classification of all femoral fractures in women above 55 years of age. The distance between the fracture line and the lesser trochanter was measured. Femoral bow was classified as present or absent on frontal radiographs. Frequency distribution of the measured distances was analyzed using the Bayesian information criterion to choose the best description of the observed variable distribution in terms of a compilation of normally distributed subgroups. The analysis showed a clear dichotomy of the fracture location: either subtrochanteric or diaphyseal. Subtrochanteric fractures comprised 48% of all fractures in Singapore, and 17% in Sweden (p = 0.0001). In Singapore, femoral bow was associated with more fractures in the diaphyseal subgroup (p = 0.0001). This was not seen in Sweden. A dichotomous location of atypical fractures was confirmed, because it was found also in Singapore. The fractures showed a different localization pattern in the two countries. This difference may be linked to anatomical variations, but might also be related to cultural differences between the two populations that influence physical activity. PMID:25950861

  8. Femoral lipectomy increases postprandial lipemia in women.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Teri L; Bessesen, Daniel H; Cox-York, Kimberly A; Erickson, Christopher B; Law, Christopher K; Anderson, Molly K; Wang, Hong; Jackman, Matthew R; Van Pelt, Rachael E

    2015-07-01

    Femoral subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) appears to be cardioprotective compared with abdominal SAT, possibly through better triglyceride (TG) sequestration. We hypothesized that removal of femoral SAT would increase postprandial TG through a reduction in dietary fatty acid (FA) storage. Normal-weight (means ± SD; BMI 23.9 ± 2.6 kg/m(2)) women (n = 29; age 45 ± 6 yr) were randomized to femoral lipectomy (LIPO) or control (CON) and followed for 1 yr. Regional adiposity was measured by DEXA and CT. A liquid meal labeled with [(14)C]oleic acid was used to trace the appearance of dietary FA in plasma (6-h postprandial TG), breath (24-h oxidation), and SAT (24-h [(14)C]TG storage). Fasting LPL activity was measured in abdominal and femoral SAT. DEXA leg fat mass was reduced after LIPO vs. CON (Δ-1.4 ± 0.7 vs. 0.1 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.001) and remained reduced at 1 yr (-1.1 ± 1.4 vs. -0.2 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.05), as did CT thigh subcutaneous fat area (-39.6 ± 36.6 vs. 4.7 ± 14.6 cm(2), P < 0.05); DEXA trunk fat mass and CT visceral fat area were unchanged. Postprandial TG increased (5.9 ± 7.7 vs. -0.6 ± 5.3 × 10(3) mg/dl, P < 0.05) and femoral SAT LPL activity decreased (-21.9 ± 22.3 vs. 10.5 ± 26.5 nmol·min(-1)·g(-1), P < 0.05) 1 yr following LIPO vs. CON. There were no group differences in (14)C-labeled TG appearing in abdominal and femoral SAT or elsewhere. In conclusion, femoral fat remained reduced 1 yr following lipectomy and was accompanied by increased postprandial TG and reduced femoral SAT LPL activity. There were no changes in storage of meal-derived FA or visceral fat. Our data support a protective role for femoral adiposity on circulating TG independent of dietary FA storage and visceral adiposity. PMID:25968576

  9. Elbow Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and held together with pins and wires or plates and screws. Fractures of the distal humerus (see ... doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are stable. SIGNS ...

  10. Microvascular medial femoral condylar flaps in 107 consecutive reconstructions in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Brandtner, Christian; Hachleitner, Johannes; Bottini, Gian Battista; Buerger, Heinz; Gaggl, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We have assessed the role of the medial femoral condylar flap in 107 patients who had reconstructions of the head and neck. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records for indications, complications, and outcomes. The flap was primarily used for coverage of alveolar ridge defects (n=67), secondly for defects of the facial bone, calvaria, or skull base (n=35), and thirdly for partial laryngeal defects (n=5). Two flaps were lost. One patient fractured a femur 5 weeks postoperatively. The duration of follow up ranged from 6 months to 12 years. The medial femoral condylar flap is well-suited to individual reconstructions of the alveolar ridge, midface, calvaria, skull base, and part of the larynx with poor recipient sites. The flap does not replace other wellknown flaps, but offers new solutions for solving special problems in head and neck surgery. PMID:27020752

  11. [Aseptic osteonecrosis of the femoral head in cancer patients with neuropathies caused by vincristine and vinblastine].

    PubMed

    Meneghello, A; Presacco, D; Di Maggio, C

    1989-06-01

    Aseptic osteonecrosis has been described in many and dissimilar pathologic conditions--most frequently as the aftermath of fractures or dislocations; in falciform anemia, obesity, alcoholism; in diseases requiring constant and heavy corticosteroid therapy, and also following renal transplantation. Many of these pathologies, especially alcoholism, diabetes, uremia, and collagen vascular diseases, have a common denominator: peripheral neuropathy, which is believed to be a pathogenetic factor supporting osteonecrosis. The authors analyze 3 cases of aseptic osteonecrosis of the femoral head in cancer patients treated with vincristine and/or vinblastine. Since in these subjects severe and persistent neuropathy preceded the onset of osteonecrosis, a possible relationship is postulated between the vincristine/vinblastine treatment and the onset of femoral head osteonecrosis, through the pathogenetic mechanism of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:2756179

  12. Large-diameter femoral heads in total hip arthroplasty: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Pivec, Robert; Issa, Kimona; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Khanuja, Harpal S; Mont, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in the wear characteristics and material properties of highly cross-linked polyethyl-ene and fourth-generation ceramic bearings have led to increasing use of large-diameter (≥ 36 mm) femoral heads in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this article, we review the current concepts and principles behind use of large-diameter ceramic or cobalt-chromium femoral heads on polyethylene bearings in THA. We specifically review the biomechanics, some of the early concerns about polyethylene wear and rim fractures, recent improvements in material properties of polyethylene and ceramic bearings, dislocation rates, and clinical and functional outcomes of large-diameter heads in THA. Recent literature suggests that the incidence of dislocation has been substantially reduced because of improvements in jump distance and impingement-free range of motion with use of large-diameter heads. Limited evidence suggests excellent short-term and midterm clinical and functional outcomes with these heads. PMID:25379747

  13. [FLS - three letters alter secondary fracture prevention].

    PubMed

    Suhm, N; Meier, C; Kraenzlin, M; Kungler, E; Savic, B; Mueller, S; Jakob, M; Rikli, D

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance of preventive measures in the field of orthopedics and trauma surgery becomes apparent because of the demographic changes and the high risk for secondary fractures following osteoporotic fractures. Within the fracture treatment chain, orthopedics and trauma surgery are in the "pole position" to initiate these measures in geriatric patients. In the past orthopedists and trauma surgeons have constantly accused of neglecting secondary fracture prevention in fragility fracture patients. There are several reasons that speak in favor of us undertaking a role in secondary fracture prevention: osteoporosis medication is highly effective in fracture prevention when correctly indicated, the positive effects of osteoporosis therapy on fracture healing and legal issues. Arguments that have been used to justify neglect of secondary fracture prevention are undesired side effects related to osteoporosis medications, such as atypical femoral fractures and osteonecrosis of the jaws, interference of some specific drugs with fracture healing and the working conditions in emergency departments. These run contrary to the consideration of chronic diseases such as osteoporosis, secondary osteoporosis and the underlying disease could be overlooked and the increasing complexity of medicinal osteoporosis therapy. In the first part of the article these arguments are weighed against each other. In the second part the concept of a fracture liaison service (FLS) is discussed. The FLS framework now allows an active role to be taken with respect to secondary fracture prevention despite the busy daily routine schedule. Implementation of an FLS is facilitated by dedicated instruction protocols and programs. Self-financing of an FLS is currently possible only in some specific healthcare systems. In healthcare systems in German-speaking areas a cross-financing must be available and the value of an FLS indirectly presented. Apart from the financial aspects, implementation of

  14. Laparoscopic repair of an incarcerated femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Yagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A femoral hernia is a rare, acquired condition, which has been reported in less than 5% of all abdominal wall hernias, with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Presentation of case We report a case in a female patient who had a previous open inguinal herniorrhaphy three years previously. She presented with right sided groin pain of one month duration. Ultrasound gave a differential diagnosis of a recurrent inguinal hernia or a femoral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal repair was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Discussion Laparoscopic repair of a femoral hernia is still in its infancy and even though the outcomes are superior to an open repair, open surgery remains the standard of care. The decision to perform a laparoscopic trans abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair was facilitated by the patient having previous open hernia surgery. The learning curve for laparoscopic femoral hernia repair is steep and requires great commitment from the surgeon. Once the learning curve has been breached this is a feasible method of surgical repair. This is demonstrated by the fact that this case report is from a rural hospital in Canada. Conclusion Laparoscopic femoral hernia repair involves more time and specialized laparoscopic skills. The advantages are a lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of inguinodynia. PMID:26581083

  15. Olecranon Fractures.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Tyler J; Throckmorton, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Olecranon fractures are common upper extremity injuries, with all but nondisplaced fractures treated surgically. There has been a recent shift in the surgical management of these fractures from tension band wiring to locking plate fixation and intramedullary nailing; however, this comes with increased implant cost. Although most patients can expect good outcomes after these various techniques, there is little information to guide a surgeon's treatment plan. This article reviews the epidemiology, classification, treatment, and outcomes of olecranon fractures. PMID:26498547

  16. Changes in the stress in the femoral head neck junction after osteochondroplasty for hip impingement: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Jimenez-Cruz, David; Bailey, Colin G; Mandal, Parthasarathi; Board, Tim

    2012-12-01

    The surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) often involves femoral osteochondroplasty. One risk of this procedure is fracture of the femoral neck. We developed a finite element (FE) model to investigate the relationship between depth of resection and femoral neck stress. CT data were used to obtain the geometry of a typical cam-type hip, and a 3D FE model was constructed to predict stress in the head-neck after resection surgery. The model accounted for the forces acting on the head and abductor muscular forces. Bone resection was performed virtually to incremental resection depths. The stresses were calculated for five resection depths and for five different activities (i) standing on one leg (static case); (ii) two-to-one-to-two leg standing; (iii) normal walking; (iv) walking down stairs; and (v) a knee bend. In general, both the average Von Mises stresses and the area of bone that yielded significantly increased at a resection depth of ≥10 mm. The knee bend and walking down stairs demonstrated the highest stresses. The FE model predicts that fracture is likely to occur in the resection area first following removal of a third (10 mm) or more of the diameter of the femoral neck. We suggest that when surgeons perform osteochondroplasty for hip impingement, the depth of resection should be limited to 10 mm. PMID:22707347

  17. Effectiveness of Selected Fitness Exercises on Stress of Femoral Neck using Musculoskeletal Dynamics Simulations and Finite Element Model.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing-Guang; Li, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Hong; Bian, Rong; Zhang, Songning

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the study was to establish a dynamics model and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model to analyze loading characteristics of femoral neck during walking, squat, single-leg standing, and forward and lateral lunges. One male volunteer performed three trials of the five movements. The 3D kinematic data were captured and imported into the LifeMOD to establish a musculoskeletal dynamics model to obtain joint reaction and muscle forces of iliacus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, psoas major and adductor magnus. The loading data LfeMOD were imported and transformed into a hip finite-element model. The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc. In addition, the trabecular bone and tension lines of the Ward's triangle also demonstrated high stress. The compact bone received the greatest peak stress in the forward lunge and the least stress in the squat. However, the spongy bone in the femoral neck region had the greatest stress during the walk and the least stress in the squat. The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures. Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture. PMID:25114732

  18. Effectiveness of Selected Fitness Exercises on Stress of Femoral Neck using Musculoskeletal Dynamics Simulations and Finite Element Model

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing-Guang; Li, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Hong; Bian, Rong; Zhang, Songning

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish a dynamics model and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model to analyze loading characteristics of femoral neck during walking, squat, single-leg standing, and forward and lateral lunges. One male volunteer performed three trials of the five movements. The 3D kinematic data were captured and imported into the LifeMOD to establish a musculoskeletal dynamics model to obtain joint reaction and muscle forces of iliacus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, psoas major and adductor magnus. The loading data LfeMOD were imported and transformed into a hip finite-element model. The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc. In addition, the trabecular bone and tension lines of the Ward’s triangle also demonstrated high stress. The compact bone received the greatest peak stress in the forward lunge and the least stress in the squat. However, the spongy bone in the femoral neck region had the greatest stress during the walk and the least stress in the squat. The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures. Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward’s triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture. PMID:25114732

  19. Self-reported weight at birth predicts measures of femoral size but not volumetric BMD in eldery men: MrOS.

    PubMed

    Javaid, M Kassim; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Lui, Li-Yung; Cawthon, Peggy; Arden, Nigel K; Lang, Thomas; Lane, Nancy E; Orwoll, Eric; Barrett-Conner, Elizabeth; Nevitt, Michael C; Cooper, Cyrus; Cummings, Steven R

    2011-08-01

    The mechanism whereby poor intrauterine growth increases risk of adult hip fracture is unclear. We report the association between birth weight and proximal femoral geometry and density in community-dwelling elderly men. We used self-reported birth weight, measured adult height and weight and proximal femoral quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measurements of femoral neck axis length, cross-sectional area, and volumetric BMD (vBMD) among the participants in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS), a cohort study of community-dwelling US men aged 65 and older. We compared men with birth weight <7 pounds (lower birth weight [LBW]; n = 501) and ≥ 9 pounds (higher birth weight [HBW]; n = 262) with those weighing 7-8.9 pounds (medium birth weight [MBW], referent group; n = 1068) using linear regression adjusting for current age, height, and BMI. The mean age of the 1831 men who had both birth weight and QCT measurements was 73 years (SD 5.9). Compared with the referent MBW, HBW men had concordantly longer femoral neck (+0.16 SD; p = .028) and cross-sectional area (+0.24 SD, p = .001). LBW men had a smaller cross-sectional (-0.26 SD, p < .001) but longer femoral neck for their height (+0.11 SD, p = .05). Neither cortical nor trabecular vBMD at the femoral neck was associated with birth weight. These findings support the hypothesis that the skeletal envelope, but not density, is set, in part, at birth. Further research exploring the association between early developmental factors and lifetime fracture risk is needed and may inform primary preventative strategies for fracture prevention. PMID:21509824

  20. Micromotion of cemented and uncemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the initial stability of cemented and uncemented femoral components within the femoral canals of cadaver femurs during simulated single limb stance and stair climbing. Both types were very stable in simulated single limb stance (maximum micromotion of 42 microns for cemented and 30 microns for uncemented components). However, in simulated stair climbing, the cemented components were much more stable than the uncemented components (76 microns as against 280 microns). There was also greater variation in the stability of uncemented components in simulated stair climbing, with two of the seven components moving 200 microns or more. Future implant designs should aim to improve the initial stability of cementless femoral components under torsional loads; this should improve the chances of bony ingrowth. PMID:1991771

  1. Guide wire migration during femoral vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Abbasi, Rozita; Sadigh, Gelareh

    2010-10-01

    Central vein catheterization is a routine and relatively safe procedure in critically ill patients. Complications with this procedure depend to the site of catheterization and the skill of the operator. In addition to the common complications with femoral vein catheterization there are some rare usually preventable side effects related to guide wire and catheter. In our patient who underwent femoral catheterization for acute hemodialysis, we report migration of guide wire through the systemic circulation from the femoral vein to the jugular vein. This is a very rare complication that is a human error and is totally preventable by doing the procedure by a skilled doctor and considering the standards described for central vein catheter insertion. PMID:20852377

  2. Emergency intravenous access through the femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Swanson, R S; Uhlig, P N; Gross, P L; McCabe, C J

    1984-04-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of femoral venous catheterization for resuscitation of critically ill patients in the emergency department setting. From May 1982 to April 1983, 100 attempts were made at percutaneous insertion of a large-bore catheter into the femoral veins of patients presenting to our emergency department in cardiac arrest or requiring rapid fluid resuscitation. Eighty-nine attempts were successful. Insertion was generally considered easy, and flow rates were excellent. The only noted complications were four arterial punctures and one minor groin hematoma. This study suggests that short-term percutaneous catheterization of the femoral vein provides rapid, safe, and effective intravenous access. PMID:6703430

  3. Adventitial cystic disease of common femoral vein

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Bo-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Adventitial cystic disease (ACD) of venous system is an extremely rare condition. Very few reports of ACD in venous system have been described. In this report we discuss two cases of common femoral vein ACD that presented with a swollen leg by the obstruction of the vein. Ultrasound imaging showed the typical hypoechoic fluid filled cyst with a posterior acoustic window. Computed tomography scan and ascending venogram showed a stenosis to flow in the common femoral vein caused by an extrinsic mass. Trans-adventitial evacuation of cyst with removal of vein wall was performed for both cases. During operation we found the gelatinous material in the cysts arising in the wall of the common femoral vein and compressing the lumen. The patients were released after short hospitalization and have remained symptom free with no recurrence. PMID:22066091

  4. Sports fractures.

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, T. A.; Stevens, M. A.; Albright, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Fractures occur in athletes and dramatically influence performance during competitive and recreational activities. Fractures occur in athletes as the result of repetitive stress, acute sports-related trauma and trauma outside of athletics. The literature provides general guidelines for treatment as well as a variety of statistics on the epidemiology of fractures by sport and level of participation. Athletes are healthy and motivated patients, and have high expectations regarding their level of function. These qualities make them good surgical candidates. Although closed treatment methods are appropriate for most sports fractures, an aggressive approach to more complicated fractures employing current techniques may optimize their subsequent performance. PMID:7719781

  5. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  6. Novel methods to evaluate fracture risk models

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, M.G.; Cawthon, P. M.; Schousboe, J.T.; Ensrud, K.E.; Lui, L.Y.; Cauley, J.A.; Hillier, T.A.; Taylor, B.C.; Hochberg, M.C.; Bauer, D.C.; Cummings, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Fracture prediction models help identify individuals at high risk who may benefit from treatment. Area Under the Curve (AUC) is used to compare prediction models. However, the AUC has limitations and may miss important differences between models. Novel reclassification methods quantify how accurately models classify patients who benefit from treatment and the proportion of patients above/below treatment thresholds. We applied two reclassification methods, using the NOF treatment thresholds, to compare two risk models: femoral neck BMD and age (“simple model”) and FRAX (”FRAX model”). The Pepe method classifies based on case/non-case status and examines the proportion of each above and below thresholds. The Cook method examines fracture rates above and below thresholds. We applied these to the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures. There were 6036 (1037 fractures) and 6232 (389 fractures) participants with complete data for major osteoporotic and hip fracture respectively. Both models for major osteoporotic fracture (0.68 vs. 0.69) and hip fracture (0.75 vs. 0.76) had similar AUCs. In contrast, using reclassification methods, each model classified a substantial number of women differently. Using the Pepe method, the FRAX model (vs. simple model), missed treating 70 (7%) cases of major osteoporotic fracture but avoided treating 285 (6%) non-cases. For hip fracture, the FRAX model missed treating 31 (8%) cases but avoided treating 1026 (18%) non-cases. The Cook method (both models, both fracture outcomes) had similar fracture rates above/below the treatment thresholds. Compared with the AUC, new methods provide more detailed information about how models classify patients. PMID:21351143

  7. Distal femoral derotational osteotomy with external fixation for correction of excessive femoral anteversion in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Skiak, Eyad; Karakasli, Ahmet; Basci, Onur; Satoglu, Ismail S; Ertem, Fatih; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2015-09-01

    16-year-old female who had sustained a knee flexion contracture of 30° because of a delay in the physiotherapy program. One 13-year-old female patient with a bilateral osteotomy had a nondisplaced fracture in her right femur after a direct trauma 2 weeks after removal of an external fixator, and was treated by a cast. Another 17-year-old male patient developed a nonunion because of loosening of two pins and achieved solid union after revision by dynamic compression plate plating. Besides four cases with superficial pin-tract infection, no other complications were documented. Minimally invasive supracondylar femoral derotational osteotomy fixed with a unilateral external fixators crossing the knee joint is a reliable procedure in CP patients. Most patients can be treated with early postoperative full weight-bearing. However, removal of the knee joint crossing fixator should be performed as early as possible to achieve a full range of motion. PMID:25794115

  8. Revision Arthroplasty Using a MUTARS® Prosthesis in Comminuted Periprosthetic Fracture of the Distal Femur.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Nho, Jae Hwi; Kim, Chung Hyun; Kwon, Sai Won; Park, Jong Seok; Suh, You Sung

    2016-11-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are gradually increasing, reflecting extended lifespan, osteoporosis, and the increasing proportion of the elderly during the past decade. Supracondylar periprosthetic femoral fracture is a potential complication after TKA. Generally, open reduction and internal fixation are the conventional option for periprosthetic fracture after TKA. However, the presence of severe comminution with component loosening can cause failure of internal fixation. Although the current concept for periprosthetic fracture is open reduction and internal fixation, we introduce an unusual case of revision arthroplasty using a MUTARS® prosthesis for a comminuted periprosthetic fracture in the distal femur after TKA, with technical tips. PMID:27593884

  9. Retrograde nailing for distal femur fractures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Giddie, Jasdeep; Sawalha, Seif; Parker, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We report the results of treating a series of 56 fractures in 54 elderly patients with a distal femur fracture with a retrograde femoral nail. Methods: Fifty-four of the nails were inserted percutaneously with a closed reduction. After surgery all patients were allowed to weight bear as tolerated. Four fractures were supported in a temporary external splint. Results: The mean age of patients was 80.6 years (range 51–103 years), 52/54 (96%) were females. There were no cases of nail related complications and no re-operations were required. One patient was lost to follow up. The 30-day mortality was 5/54 (9.3%) and the one year mortality was 17/54 (31.5%). Conclusions: Distal femoral nail fixation provides a good method of fixation allowing immediate mobilisation for this group of patients. PMID:27163086

  10. Comparison of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail and interlocking intramedullary nail in the treatment of long bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical effects of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail (RSIN) and interlocking intramedullary nail (IIN) for long bone fractures. Methods A retrospective study was performed in 1,704 patients who suffered bone fractures and underwent RSIN or IIN operation in our hospital between March 1999 and March 2013, including 494 with femoral fractures, 572 with humeral fractures, and 638 with tibial fractures. Among them, 634 patients were followed up for more than 1 year. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative complications, healing rate, and the excellent and good rate of functional recovery were compared between two groups. Results Compared with IIN group, RSIN group exhibited significantly shorter operative time and less intraoperative blood loss no matter for humeral, femoral, or tibial fractures (all p < 0.001). The healing rate in patients with more than 1 year follow-up was significantly higher in RSIN group for femoral and tibial fractures (both p < 0.05). In RSIN group, no nail breakage or loosening occurred, but radial nerve injury and incision infection were respectively observed in one patient with humeral fracture. In IIN group, nail breakage or loosening occurred in 7 patients with femoral fractures and 16 patients with tibial fractures, radial nerve injury was observed in 8 patients with humeral fractures, and incision infection was present in 2 patients with humeral fractures and 1 patient with femoral fracture. The complication rate of IIN group was significantly higher than that of RSIN group (p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the excellent and good rate of shoulder, elbow, knee, and ankle joint functional recovery between RSIN group and IIN group. Conclusion RSIN may be a reliable and practical alternative method for the treatment of long bone fractures. PMID:25047454

  11. Femoral neck version affects medial femorotibial loading.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, T A; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch; Karamoulas, V; Magnissalis, E A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (-10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  12. Femoral development in chronically centrifuged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    Groups of 30-d-old male and female rats were centrifuged at 2.00 G (RE, Rotation Experimental), 1.05 G (RC, Rotation Control) or exposed to the noise and wind of the centrifuge at 1.00 G (EC, Earth Control) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements of their femurs indicated that exposure to centrifugation a) decreased femoral length in RE animals, b) increased femoral length in RC animals, c) reduced femoral diameter in RE and RC animals, d) increased L/D ratios in RC animals, e) decreased L/D ratios in RE animals, f) increased femur length/body weight in RE animals, g) decreased cortical thickness (CT) in RE animals, h) increased relative CT in RE animals, and decreased it in RC animals, i) accelerated ossification in RC femoral heads, j) thinned and distorted RE epiphyseal plates, and k) thickened condylar cartilage in RE females. The effects tended to be strongly sexually dimorphic, with females more severely affected by the stress than males.

  13. Growth and aging of proximal femoral bone: a study with women spanning three generations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Chen, Decai; Cheng, Shu Mei; Nicholson, Patrick; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2015-03-01

    Osteoporotic hip fracture is a serious clinical event associated with high morbidity and mortality. Understanding femoral growth patterns is important for promoting bone health in the young and preventing fractures in later life. In this study, growth patterns of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and geometric properties of the proximal femur were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. They were studied in 251 girls from premenarche (11.2 ± 0.7 years) to late adolescence (18.3 ± 1.1 years) and compared with their premenopausal mothers (n = 128, aged 44.9 ± 4.1 years) and postmenopausal grandmothers (n = 128, aged 70.0 ± 6.3 years). Hip axis length (HAL) was the first to reach peak growth velocity (-10.5 months before menarche), followed by neck diameter (ND) and neck cross-sectional area (CSA), (-7.1 and -4.1 months before menarche, respectively). Both neck-shaft angle (NSA) and aBMD of neck and total hip peaked at menarche. At 18 years (7-year follow-up), girls already had higher femoral neck aBMD but similar HAL and NSA compared with their mothers. Grandmothers had the longest HAL, narrowest NSA, widest ND but lowest aBMD and CSA. Hip strength index (HSI), an index of femoral neck strength during a fall, dropped rapidly after menarche in girls but thereafter remained relatively constant. Grandmothers had lower HSI than either mothers or girls. In conclusion, differences in proximal femoral bone mass and structure in adulthood are largely established before menarche, indicating that heritable factors are responsible for most of the individual variance. The development of geometric properties precedes aBMD in puberty, resulting in relatively constant hip strength after menarche. This asynchronous growth leads to adaptation of bone strength to the imposed loads, avoiding fractures in a biologically efficient manner. Both deterioration of aBMD and inadequate compensatory change in bone geometry after menopause contribute to the

  14. [Multidimensional corrective osteotomy of the distal femur using a retrograde femoral nail].

    PubMed

    Wich, M; Veltin, J; Höllen, I; Letsch, R

    1999-08-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with marked valgus and limitation of extension of the right knee joint as the result of a supracondylar fracture of the femur, originally treated by internal fixation with a dynamic condylar screw. Two years later, revision osteotomy with retrograde femoral nailing was carried out to achieve variation and improve extension. Within a week of operation the patient's right leg was fully weight bearing with normal axial positioning. A retrograde locking nail provides satisfactory and stable internal fixation in cases of revision. PMID:10484909

  15. A Dual Biomechanical Failure: Exeter Stem and Pubic Rami Insufficiency Fracture, following Hybrid Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Inderpaul; Paliobeis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Incidence of Exeter stem fracture is extremely uncommon. Pubic rami insufficiency fractures following arthroplasty are also rare. To our knowledge no cases of spontaneous stem failure with previous insufficiency fractures have yet been reported. Case Presentation. This report describes a case of spontaneous fracture through a cemented Exeter stem in a 66-year-old patient who had previously undergone a hybrid total hip replacement and was found to have bifocal pubic rami insufficiency fractures. The patient presented 18-year postprimary surgery with spontaneous fracture of the middle third of the cemented femoral stem and adjacent proximal femur. Conclusion. This report demonstrates a unique case of Exeter stem fracture with previous pelvic insufficiency fractures. The case adds to the rare occurrences of Exeter stem failure in the literature and highlights the risk of potential insufficiency fractures in patients undergoing total hip replacement. PMID:26236519

  16. HIF-1α change in serum and callus during fracture healing in ovariectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenliang; Wang, Kejie; Liu, Zhiwei; Ding, Wenge

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to detect the effects of ovariectomy (OVX) on femoral fracture healing through different angiogenesis and HIF-1α expression in mice. Thirty-six young female C57 mice were randomized into two groups: OVX and age-matched intact control (CON). The femoral fracture was generated at 3 weeks after OVX or CON. At 2 or 4 weeks after fracture, the femoral fracture area was evaluated healing status by bone mineral density (BMD), callus formation and mineralization and neovascularization in callus, biomechanical analysis, and HIF-1α tests. OVX mice showed lower BMD as compared with CON mice. Callus geometric microstructural parameters of the femora in OVX mice were significantly lower than CON mice. OVX induced significant changes of biomechanical parameters in the femoral fracture healing area. The callus forming, callus neovascularization and HIF-1α tests in OVX mice were significantly lower than in CON mice. HIF-1α results have the positive proportion with osteoporotic fracture healing. PMID:25755698

  17. Femoral mononeuropathy caused by a malignant sarcoma: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, Patrícia; Pumarola, Martí; Zamora, Angels; Espada, Ivonne; Lloret, Albert; Añor, Sònia

    2008-11-01

    A 9-year old miniature poodle and a 6-year old American Staffordshire terrier were evaluated for slowly progressive lameness and atrophy of the left pelvic limb. Neurological examinations of both animals were consistent with femoral nerve lesions. In both cases, neoplastic masses were identified within the left psoas muscle, invading the left femoral nerve or, in one case, its nerve roots. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate and histopathological examination of the masses revealed that these were malignant sarcomas. Femoral mononeuropathies are very rare in dogs, and most descriptions of femoral nerve lesions are caused by traumatic injuries. Descriptions of neoplastic processes affecting the femoral nerve are limited to peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNST). These cases provide the first descriptions of malignant neoplasms other than PNSTs that infiltrate the femoral nerve or its nerve roots and cause unilateral femoral mononeuropathy and lameness of obscure origin. PMID:17889576

  18. Open Calcaneus Fractures and Associated Injuries.

    PubMed

    Worsham, Jacob R; Elliott, Mark R; Harris, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Open calcaneus fractures are usually the result of high-energy mechanisms and are associated with other orthopedic and whole body system injures. Understanding the difference between open versus closed fractures is essential for the provider, and they must be vigilant for the associated injuries that present with this condition. We performed a retrospective medical record review of 62 patients (64 calcaneus fractures) with open calcaneus fractures from January 2003 to January 2013 presenting at a level 1 trauma center. Sex, age, laterality, mechanism of injury, wound appearance, initial management, and associated injures were recorded. The most common mechanisms were motor vehicle accidents (35 [56.4%]) and falls from >6 ft (15 [24.1%]). Four (6.4%) patients had a posterior tibial artery transection. Eight (12.9%) patients had a femoral shaft fracture, 14 (22.5%) an ipsilateral ankle fracture, 16 (25.8%) a metatarsal fracture, and 11 (17.7%) had associated midfoot fractures. Of the midfoot fractures, 12 (19.3%) patients had a talus fracture and 5 (8.0%) a cuboid fracture. Spinal fractures were present in 9 (14.5%) of the patients, with lumbar fractures occurring in 6 (9.6%) patients. Fifteen (24.1%) patients had associated upper extremity fractures. Thirteen (20.9%) patients had an associated pulmonary injury, including 8 pneumothoraces. Ten (16.1%) patients had a closed head injury and 6 (9.6%) had an abdominal injury. Fifteen (23.4%) patients were treated with percutaneous wire fixation and 7 (10.9%) with open reduction internal fixation. A total of 44 (68.7%) fractures were treated without internal fixation. Overall, 5 (8.0%) patients with an open calcaneus fracture eventually underwent a below-the-knee amputation. Open calcaneus fractures are severe, high-energy injuries with the potential for considerable morbidity to the patient, given the high rate of concomitant orthopedic and whole body system injuries. Type III open injuries have an increased risk of

  19. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C.; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C.; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing. PMID:26106256

  20. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur

    PubMed Central

    Lord, James K.; Langton, David J.; Nargol, Antoni V.F.; Meek, R.M. Dominic; Joyce, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN). Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into “worn” and “unworn”. Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture. PMID:26501331

  1. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur.

    PubMed

    Lord, James K; Langton, David J; Nargol, Antoni V F; Meek, R M Dominic; Joyce, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN). Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into "worn" and "unworn". Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture. PMID:26501331

  2. Histopathology of a well-functioning hydroxyapatite-coated femoral prosthesis after 52 months.

    PubMed

    Hardy, D C; Frayssinet, P; Krallis, P; Descamps, P Y; Fabeck, L; Delplancke, J L; Delince, P E

    1999-03-01

    A fully hydroxyapatite-coated femoral implant was retrieved during autopsy. This component, provided with a bipolar femoral head, had been inserted for a displaced fracture of the femoral neck 52 months before. Osseointegration of the implant was evident, without any formation of fibrous tissue :39.9% of the perimeter of the prosthesis at the level of its proximal third was interfaced with bone (62.8% at the mid-third and 65.2% at the distal third). Remodeling of bone had ensued. Deposition of bone was most prominent in the calcar zone, along the medial and lateral aspects and around the tip. Proximally, cortical porosity was found to be increased by 73%, whereas medullary bone porosity was increased by a factor of 2. Cell-mediated resorption of the coating was systematically present in these bone remodeling areas. The average thickness of the coating was respectively 10.8, 50.2 and 151.2 microns in the proximal, mid- and distal thirds of the implant. Formation of new bone was often coupled with resorption. No debris from the coating was found in the joint tissues or in the articulating surface of the polyethylene insert. These overall histopathological features support mechanical stability of the implant and active remodelling of bone along with focal removal of HA coating associated with osteoclastic activity. No side effects from coating degradation could be demonstrated. PMID:10217005

  3. New Approach and Stem Increased Femoral Revision Rate in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Panichkul, Phonthakorn; Parks, Nancy L; Ho, Henry; Hopper, Robert H; Hamilton, William G

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the femoral stem revision and loosening rates in primary total hip arthroplasty between 2 different approaches and stem designs. Recent reports comparing the direct anterior approach with either the posterior or lateral approach showed that patients undergoing the direct anterior approach have less pain and an accelerated functional recovery in the early postoperative period. After converting to an anterior approach, the authors observed an increased rate of femoral stem revision. From 2003 to 2009, a posterior or lateral approach was used to insert 514 stems of 2 designs. These cases included the use of an extensively coated cobalt-chrome stem (n=232) or a straight, dual-tapered, proximally porous-coated titanium stem (n=282). In the following years, from 2009 to 2012, 594 short, proximally coated, titanium tapered-wedge stems were inserted through a direct anterior approach. The revision rates of femoral stems inserted through a posterior approach or a lateral approach were compared with those inserted via a direct anterior approach. No stem revisions occurred in the posterior approach group or the lateral approach group, and 5 stems were revised in the anterior approach group for periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening (0.8%). Significantly more stem revisions occurred after the use of the new stem design and a direct anterior approach (P=.04). PMID:26726989

  4. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Wang, Y. S.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, G. L.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.

    2007-07-01

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  5. Assessment of femoral bone quality using co-occurrence matrices and adaptive regions of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritscher, Karl David; Schuler, Benedikt; Grünerbl, Agnes; Hänni, Markus; Schwieger, Karsten; Suhm, Norbert; Schubert, Rainer

    2007-03-01

    The surgical treatment of femur fractures, which often result from osteoporosis, is highly dependent on the quality of the femoral bone. Unsatisfying results of surgical interventions like early loosening of implants may be one result of altered bone quality. However, clinical diagnostic techniques to quantify local bone quality are limited and often highly observer dependent. Therefore, the development of tools, which automatically and reproducibly place regions of interest (ROI) and asses the local quality of the femoral bone in these ROIs would be of great help for clinicians. For this purpose, a method to position and deform ROIs automatically and reproducibly depending on the size and shape of the femur will be presented. Moreover, an approach to asses the femur quality, which is based on calculating texture features using co-occurrence matrices and these adaptive regions, will be proposed. For testing purposes, 15 CT-datasets of anatomical specimen of human femora are used. The correlation between the texture features and biomechanical properties of the proximal femoral bone is calculated. First results are very promising and show high correlation between the calculated features and biomechanical properties. Testing the method on a larger data pool and refining the algorithms to further increase its sensitivity for altered bone quality will be the next steps in this project.

  6. Implant/bone constructs in femoral neck osteotomy. An autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Benterud, J G; Alho, A; Höiseth, A

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that three rather than two screws may give better results in the treatment of femoral neck fractures. In the present study, the strength of various screw/bone constructs in femoral neck osteotomy was analyzed. Transverse osteotomies on 65 cadaver femora were fixed with two or three screws of two types: one with a shank diameter of 6 mm and thread diameter of 8 mm, and a prototype screw with equal shank and thread diameter of 7 mm. The femoral heads were subjected to static and cyclic loads in the one-legged stance position. Single-energy quantitative computed tomography measurements were correlated to load. The two experimental models resulted in different patterns of failure of the bone/implant constructs, otherwise the results were similar. Three of the prototype screws gave the strongest construct, while two of the other screw type were stronger than three. The explanations for the diverging properties of the different bone/implant constructs may be that large threads destroy too much of the bone trabeculae, and that screw threads larger than the shank may destroy the drill canal and produce an unstable situation compared with screws with equal shank and thread diameter. PMID:8186057

  7. Endovascular Treatment of In-Stent Occlusion: New Technique for Recanalization of Long Superficial Femoral Artery Occlusion (Direct Stent Puncture Technique)

    SciTech Connect

    Palena, Luis Mariano Cester, Giacomo; Manzi, Marco

    2012-04-15

    In-stent reocclusion is a frequent complication of endovascular treatment and stenting, especially in the superficial femoral artery. Neointimal hyperplasia is the main cause of this problem, but in many cases, it occurs as a result of the presence of stent strut fractures. The two treatment options are endovascular and surgical intervention. The effectiveness of endovascular interventions in patients with critical limb ischemia has been well established, but in some cases, crossing the occluded stent is difficult. We describe a new technique to recanalize long in-stent superficial femoral artery occlusions characterized by direct stent puncture, followed by retrograde-antegrade recanalization after antegrade failures.

  8. Comparing the In Vitro Stiffness of Straight-DCP, Wave-DCP, and LCP Bone Plates for Femoral Osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mariolani, José Ricardo Lenzi; Belangero, William Dias

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the Locking Compression Plate (LCP) with the more cost-effective straight-dynamic compression plate (DCP) and wave-DCPs by testing in vitro the effects of plate stiffness on different types of diaphyseal femur fractures (A, B, and C, according to AO classification). The bending structural stiffness of each plate was obtained from four-point bending tests according to ASTM F382-99(2008). The plate systems were tested by applying compression/bending in different osteosynthesis simulation models using wooden rods to simulate the fractured bone fragments. Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant difference in the bending structural stiffness between the three plate models. Rank-transformed two-way ANOVA showed significant influence of plate type, fracture type, and interaction plate versus fracture on the stiffness of the montages. The straight-DCP produced the most stable model for types B and C fractures, which makes its use advantageous for complex nonosteoporotic fractures that require minimizing focal mobility, whereas no difference was found for type A fracture. Our results indicated that DCPs, in straight or wave form, can provide adequate biomechanical properties for fixing diaphyseal femoral fractures in cases where more modern osteosynthesis systems are cost restrictive. PMID:24959354

  9. Comparing the In Vitro Stiffness of Straight-DCP, Wave-DCP, and LCP Bone Plates for Femoral Osteosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mariolani, José Ricardo Lenzi; Belangero, William Dias

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the Locking Compression Plate (LCP) with the more cost-effective straight-dynamic compression plate (DCP) and wave-DCPs by testing in vitro the effects of plate stiffness on different types of diaphyseal femur fractures (A, B, and C, according to AO classification). The bending structural stiffness of each plate was obtained from four-point bending tests according to ASTM F382-99(2008). The plate systems were tested by applying compression/bending in different osteosynthesis simulation models using wooden rods to simulate the fractured bone fragments. Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant difference in the bending structural stiffness between the three plate models. Rank-transformed two-way ANOVA showed significant influence of plate type, fracture type, and interaction plate versus fracture on the stiffness of the montages. The straight-DCP produced the most stable model for types B and C fractures, which makes its use advantageous for complex nonosteoporotic fractures that require minimizing focal mobility, whereas no difference was found for type A fracture. Our results indicated that DCPs, in straight or wave form, can provide adequate biomechanical properties for fixing diaphyseal femoral fractures in cases where more modern osteosynthesis systems are cost restrictive. PMID:24959354

  10. Periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Historically, the treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFFs) has been associated with a high frequency of complications and reoperations. The preferred treatment is internal fixation, a revision of the femoral stem, or a combination of both. An improved understanding of plate use during internal fixation, and the introduction of locking-plate osteosynthesis may lead to improved outcome. We evaluated the outcome of Vancouver type B1 and C PFFs treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis, by assessing rates of fracture union and reoperations and by analyzing failure cases. Patients and methods From 2002 through 2011, 58 consecutive patients (60 fractures) with low-energy PFF around or below a stable femoral stem, i.e. Vancouver type B1 and C fractures, underwent osteosynthesis with a locking plate. All patients had a total hip replacement (THR). They were followed up clinically and radiographically, with 6 weeks between visits, until fracture union or until death. Fracture union was evaluated 6 months postoperatively. Results At a median follow-up time of 23 (0–121) months after PFF, 8 patients (8 fractures) had been reoperated due either to infection (n = 4), failure of fixation (n = 3), or loosening of the femoral stem (n = 1). All the patients who had been followed up for at least 6 months—and who did not undergo reoperation or die—went on to fracture union (n = 43). Interpretation Locking-plate osteosynthesis of periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures gives good results regarding fracture union. It appears that spanning of the prosthesis to avoid stress-rising areas is important for successful treatment. Infection is the major cause of failure. PMID:23140109

  11. The Effect of Hydroxyapatite Coating on Long-term Results of Total Hip Arthroplasty with Hydroxyapatite-coated Anatomic Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Im, Chae-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Hee; Heo, Ju-Yeong; Jang, Young-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical and radiological results, as well as the survival rate, associated with total hip arthroplasty using a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated anatomical femoral stem at a follow-up of ≥12 years. Materials and Methods From April 1992 to May 1997, 86 patients (102 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty with a HA-coated ABG I (Anatomical Benoist Giraud; Howmedica) hip prosthesis. The average age at the time of surgery was 53.4 years and the mean duration of follow-up was 17.1 years (range, 12.1-21.0 years). The Harris hip score (HHS) and radiographic assessments of thigh pain were used to evaluate the clinical results. We observed osteointegration, cortical hypertrophy, reactive line, calcar resorption and osteolysis around the femoral stems. The survival rate of the femoral stems was evaluated by using the span of time to a revision operation for any reasons was defined as the end point. Results The mean HHS was 50.5 preoperatively and 84.2 at the time of last follow-up. Osteolysis only around the HA-coated proximal portion of the femoral stem was observed in 72 hips, cortical hypertrophy all around the distal portion of the femoral stem was observed in 38 hips, and calcar resorption was observed in 44 hips. A reactive line was observed in 13 hips, but was unrelated to component loosening. Stem revision operations were performed in 24 (23%) hips due to osteolysis (14 hips), fracture (5 hips) and infection (5 hips). The femoral stem survival rate was 75% over the mean duration of follow-up. Conclusion Total hip arthroplasty using a HA-coated anatomical femoral stem showed necessitated a high rate of revision operations due to osteolysis around the femoral stem in this long term follow-up study.

  12. [Nailing of inter- and subtrochanteric fractures - operative technique].

    PubMed

    Douša, P; Skála-Rosenbaum, J

    2013-10-01

    Intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures are a quite heterogeneous and imprecisely defined group of fractures. These fractures can be essentially divided into two basic groups. The first one belongs to trochanteric fractures. In the AO/ASIF classification; these fractures are called intertrochanteric (31A3). In the second group, the term subtrochanteric fracture is used by most authors for fractures about 5 cm distally from lesser trochanter. In both intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures, the proximal fragment is formed by femoral head, neck and greater trochanter including its base with vastus ridge (tuberculum vastoadductorium or innominate tubercle). On this tubercle, the gluteus medius muscle (proximally) and the origin of the vastus lateralis muscle (distally) are attached. Tension of these muscles may cause dislocation of the proximal fragment. For this reason, reduction of the fracture can be troublesome and it is more difficult than in pertrochanteric fractures It seems that intramedullary nailing will remain the favorite technique of most of the surgeons dealing with intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fractures. We use short reconstruction nail in intertrochanteric fractures. It is useful to use long reconstruction nail in subtrochanteric fractures. Distal locking of the nail is necessary. Dynamic distal locking is preferred because the two main fragments are compressed along the axis of the nail. The number of complications was largely related to technical errors, such as insufficient reduction or an incorrectly inserted implant. No implant can compensate for errors due to surgery. Serious complications can be reduced by the correct assessment of fracture type, the use of an appropriate operative technique and early treatment of potential complications. The necessity of restoring continuity in the medial cortex of the femoral neck (Adams arch) is the requirement that should be observed. Pseudoarthrosis or varus malalignment in a healed

  13. Treatment Options for Distal Femur Fractures.

    PubMed

    von Keudell, Arvind; Shoji, Kristin; Nasr, Michael; Lucas, Robert; Dolan, Robert; Weaver, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in implant design, the management of distal femur fractures remains challenging. Fracture comminution and intra-articular extension can make it difficult to obtain an adequate reduction while preserving the soft tissue attachments to bone fragments to allow for bone healing. Many implant manufacturers have developed optimal anatomically contoured, distal femoral locking plates with percutaneous guides. This environment allows for the application of lateral locked plates in a biologically friendly manner. Although initial reports had high success rates, more recently a high rate of nonunion has been found, particularly in elderly patients. Limited literature is available for the treatment of patients with osteoporotic bone and associated ipsilateral total knee replacement and hip replacement. We present a patient with a distal femur fracture with significant comminution in the setting of an ipsilateral total hip replacement. PMID:27441931

  14. Postcatheterization Femoral Arteriovenous Fistulas: Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Baran Kosar, Sule; Gumus, Terman; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Akpek, Sergin

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To report our results of stent-graft implantation for the endovascular treatment of postcatheterization femoral arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) occurring between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein.Methods: Endovascular treatment of iatrogenic femoral AVFs as a result of arterial puncture for coronary angiography and/or angioplasty was attempted in 10 cases. Balloon-expandable stent-grafts, one for each lesion, were used to repair the fistulas, which were between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein in all cases. Stent-graft implantation to the deep femoral artery was performed by a contralateral retrograde approach.Results: All stent-grafts were deployed successfully. Complete closure of the fistulas was accomplished immediately in nine of 10 cases. In one case, complete closure could not be obtained but the fact that the complaint subsided was taken to indicate clinical success. In three cases, side branch occlusion of the deep femoral artery occurred. No complications were observed after implantation. Follow-up for 8-31 months (mean 18.5 months) with color Doppler ultrasonography revealed patency of the stented arterial segments without recurrent arteriovenous shunting in those nine patients who had successful immediate closure of their AVFs.Conclusion: Our results with a mean follow-up 18.5 months suggest that stent-graft implantation for the closure of postcatheterization femoral AVFs originating from the deep femoral artery is an effective, minimally invasive alternative procedure.

  15. The Short-term Clinical Outcome of Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Short Metaphyseal Loading Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoo Wang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the short-term clinical and radiological outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) with short metaphyseal loading femoral stem. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 56 cases in 47 patients who had undergone THA with short metaphyseal loading femoral stem from April 2010 to December 2011. There were 20 males and 27 females. The mean age was 54 years (range, 26-77 years). The average follow up period was 4.6 years. Clinical results were evaluated by Harris hip scores (HHS) before the operation and at the last follow-up. Radiographic analysis was done by evaluating osteolysis, loosening, stress shielding, and alignement. Results The mean HHS significantly improved from 45 (range, 15-58) preoperatively to 98 (range, 85-100) at the last follow-up. In radiographic analyses, there was no evidence of osteolysis or loosening around the stems and the acetabuluar components. All cases showed rounding off of the calcar, grade 1 bone resorption of the proximal femur. With regard to implant alignment, 51 femoral component (91.1%) were in neutral position, and 5 (8.9%) were in varus position. There was 1 intraoperative fracture treated by cerclage wiring and no case was revised during follow-up period. Conclusion Although longer follow-up is needed to confirm the durability of the short metaphyseal loading femoral stem, this short stem might provide stable fixation without diaphyseal fixation and demonstrated good clinical result at mean 4.6 year short term follow-up. PMID:27536649

  16. The role of imaging in diagnosis and management of femoral head avascular necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Manenti, Guglielmo; Altobelli, Simone; Pugliese, Luca; Tarantino, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this paper is to critically review the literature documenting the imaging approach in adult Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis (FHAVN). For this purpose we described and evaluated different radiological techniques, such as X-ray, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and Nuclear Medicine. Plain films are considered the first line imaging technique due to its ability to depict femoral head morphological changes, to its low costs and high availability. CT is not a routinely performed technique, but is useful to rule out the presence of a subchondral fracture when MRI is doubtful or contraindicated. MRI is unanimously considered the gold standard technique in the early stages, being capable to detect bone marrow changes such as edema and s