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Sample records for bladder neck descent

  1. Weakness of the Pelvic Floor Muscle and Bladder Neck Is Predicted by a Slight Rise in Abdominal Pressure During Bladder Filling: A Video Urodynamic Study in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the significance of slowly rising abdominal pressure (SRAP), which is often observed in nonneurogenic children during bladder filling in video urodynamic studies (VUDSs). Methods: The records of patients who underwent VUDS from July 2011 to June 2013 were reviewed. SRAP was defined as a rising curve over 5 cm H2O from the baseline abdominal pressure during the filling phase in VUDS. Bladder descent was defined when the base of the bladder was below the upper line of the pubic symphysis. An open bladder neck was defined as the opening of the bladder neck during the filling phase. Results: Of the 488 patients, 285 were male patients. The mean age at VUDS was 3.7 years (range, 0.2–17.6 years). The VUDS findings were as follows: SRAP, 20.7% (101 of 488); descending bladder, 14.8% (72 of 488); and bladder neck opening, 4.3% (21 of 488). Of the 72 patients with a descending bladder, 84.7% had SRAP. A significant difference in the presence of SRAP was found between the descending bladder and the normal bladder (P<0.001). Of the 101 patients with SRAP, 40 (39.6%) did not have a descending bladder. Of the 40 patients, 14 (35.0%) had a bladder neck opening, which was a high incidence compared with the 4.3% in all subjects (P<0.001). Conclusions: SRAP was associated with a descending bladder or a bladder neck opening, suggesting that SRAP is a compensatory response to urinary incontinence. SRAP may also predict decreased function of the bladder neck or pelvic floor muscle. PMID:27032558

  2. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ?4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter?? procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  3. Metal Fatigue Causing Cystoscope Rupture During Bladder Neck Incision

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    The modern cystoscope is the result of the advancement in technology in numerous areas and is an invaluable tool that allows the urologist to perform a number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Although various degrees of endoscope failure have been widely reported, instrument breakage that leads to a foreign body has not. While performing a bladder neck stricture incision for a 72-year-old male patient with a previous radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and a resulting bladder neck stricture, we documented a major 17-French cystoscope malfunction and a resulting foreign body that was retrieved from the bladder using a 22-French scope and alligator forceps. PMID:21985739

  4. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is one of the inhibitory mediators in the urinary bladder outlet region. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced relaxations of the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach Urothelium-denuded strips of pig bladder were mounted in organ baths for isometric force recordings of responses to 5-HT and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Key results After phenylephrine-induced contraction, 5-HT and 5-HT receptor agonists concentration-dependently relaxed the preparations, with the potency order: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) > 5-HT = RS67333 > (±)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralinhydrobromide > m-chlorophenylbiguanide > α-methyl-5-HT > ergotamine. 5-HT and 5-CT relaxations were reduced by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride and potentiated by (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide dihydrochloride (WAY 100135) and cyanopindolol, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonists respectively. Inhibitors of 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A and 5-HT6 receptors failed to modify 5-HT responses. Blockade of monoamine oxidase A/B, noradrenergic neurotransmission, α-adrenoceptors, muscarinic and purinergic receptors, nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and prostanoid synthesis did not alter relaxations to 5-HT. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ and ATP-dependent K+ channels failed to modify 5-HT responses but blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na+-, Ca2+-and voltage-gated K+ (Kv)-channels potentiated these relaxations. Adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibition potentiated and reduced, respectively, 5-HT-induced responses. Under non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic conditions, EFS induced neurogenic, frequency-dependent, relaxations which were resistant to WAY 100135 and cyanopindolol. Conclusions and implications 5-HT relaxed the pig urinary bladder neck through muscle 5-HT7 receptors linked to the cAMP-PKA pathway. Prejunctional 5-HT1A receptors and Kv channels modulated 5-HT-induced relaxations whereas postjunctional K+ channels were not involved in such responses. 5-HT7 receptor antagonists could be useful in the therapy of urinary incontinence produced by intrinsic sphincter deficiency. PMID:19309355

  5. Closure of the bladder neck in patients undergoing continent vesicostomy for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Reid, R; Schneider, K; Fruchtman, B

    1978-07-01

    The continent vesicostomy has been done on 24 patients, 10 of whom had severe urinary incontinence requiring closure of the bladder neck or urethra as well. Therefore, the bladder was converted to a closed cavity and intermittent catheterization is done through an abdominal stoma. No dressings or appliances are necessary. Bladder neck (or urethral) closure was successful in 8 of the 10 patients. One of the failures had been incontinent and was rendered continent on attempted bladder neck closure and there is urethral leakage at night in the other patient. Intermittent catheterization through a vesicostomy stoma has been cleaner and more aesthetically pleasing to the patients. The bladder neck closure has resulted in a dry perineum with fewer skin problems. PMID:671603

  6. Bladder Neck Rupture Following Perineal Bull Horn Injury: A Surgical Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Fernandez, B.; Diaz-Alferez, F.J.; Garcia-Garcia, M.A.; Herrero-Polo, M.; Velasquez-Saldarriaga, J.F.; Lorenzo-Gomez, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Pelvic-abdominal injuries caused by goring are serious lesions which require rapid diagnosis and urgent treatment in the context of a polytraumatized patient. The simultaneous rupture of both the bladder and the prostatic-membranous urethra occurs in 10%–29% of males with pelvic fractures but bladder neck injuries in adults are rarer. Unstable pelvic fractures, bilateral fractures of the ischiopubic branches (also referred to as fractures from falling astride) and the diastasis of the pubic symphysis are those that have the greatest likelihood of injuring both the posterior urethra and the bladder. We present a case of perineal bull horn injury with muscle laceration, bone fractures, scrotal avulsion and rupture of the bladder neck involving the right ureter which required two operations to be repaired. PMID:23066348

  7. Emergency primary repair of grade V bladder neck injury complicating pelvic fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a grade V bladder injury complicating an open-book pelvic fracture following a road traffic accident. The bladder neck injury was primarily repaired in the emergency setting of a poor-resourced area with successful outcome. The dangers of urinary extravasation are still to be considered of importance and we advocate and encourage immediate/emergency open intervention although it remains controversial to say the least in a lesser resourced healthcare set up. PMID:25076980

  8. Management of Urinary Incontinence in Complete Bladder Duplication by Injection of Bulking Agent at Bladder Neck Level into the Proximal Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Khorramirouz, Reza; Ladi Seyedian, Seyedeh Sanam; Keihani, Sorena; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Bladder duplication is a rare entity in children. The term encompasses a wide spectrum of anomalies from isolated bladder duplication in coronal or sagittal planes to duplicated bladder exstrophy and associated musculoskeletal and visceral anomalies. Given this wide variability, the treatment of these patients is not standardized. We hereby present a female patient with chief complaint of long-standing urinary incontinence who had complete bladder and urethral duplication and pubic diastasis. The patient was treated with bulking agent injection at the incompetent bladder neck and proximal urethra with resolution of incontinence, obviating the need for extensive surgeries. PMID:26904349

  9. Management of Urinary Incontinence in Complete Bladder Duplication by Injection of Bulking Agent at Bladder Neck Level into the Proximal Urethra.

    PubMed

    Khorramirouz, Reza; Ladi Seyedian, Seyedeh Sanam; Keihani, Sorena; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Bladder duplication is a rare entity in children. The term encompasses a wide spectrum of anomalies from isolated bladder duplication in coronal or sagittal planes to duplicated bladder exstrophy and associated musculoskeletal and visceral anomalies. Given this wide variability, the treatment of these patients is not standardized. We hereby present a female patient with chief complaint of long-standing urinary incontinence who had complete bladder and urethral duplication and pubic diastasis. The patient was treated with bulking agent injection at the incompetent bladder neck and proximal urethra with resolution of incontinence, obviating the need for extensive surgeries. PMID:26904349

  10. Biomechanical study on the bladder neck and urethral positions: simulation of impairment of the pelvic ligaments.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sofia; Parente, Marco; Mascarenhas, Teresa; da Silva, Ana Rita Gomes; Ramos, Isabel; Jorge, Renato Natal

    2015-01-21

    Excessive mobility of the bladder neck and urethra are common features in stress urinary incontinence. We aimed at assessing, through computational modelling, the bladder neck position taking into account progressive impairment of the pelvic ligaments. Magnetic resonance images of a young healthy female were used to build a computational model of the pelvic cavity. Appropriate material properties and constitutive models were defined. The impairment of the ligaments was simulated by mimicking a reduction in their stiffness. For healthy ligaments, valsalva maneuver led to an increase in the α angle (between the bladder neck-symphysis pubis and the main of the symphysis) from 91.8° (at rest) to 105.7°, and 5.7 mm of bladder neck dislocation, which was similar to dynamic imaging of the same woman (α angle from 80° to 103.3°, and 5mm of bladder neck movement). For 95% impairment, they enlarged to 124.28° and 12 mm. Impairment to the pubourethral ligaments had higher effect than that of vaginal support (115° vs. 108°, and 9.1 vs. 7.3mm). Numerical simulation could predict urethral motion during valsalva maneuver, for both healthy and impaired ligaments. Results were similar to those of continent women and women with stress urinary incontinence published in the literature. Biomechanical analysis of the pubourethral ligaments complements the biomechanical study of the pelvic cavity in urinary incontinence. It may be useful in young women presenting stress urinary incontinence without imaging evidence of urethral and muscle lesions or organ descend during valsalva, and for whom fascial damage are not expected. PMID:25527889

  11. Intralesional Injection of Mitomycin C at Transurethral Incision of Bladder Neck Contracture May Offer Limited Benefit: TURNS Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Redshaw, Jeffrey D.; Broghammer, Joshua A.; Smith, Thomas G.; Voelzke, Bryan B.; Erickson, Bradley A.; McClung, Christopher D.; Elliott, Sean P.; Alsikafi, Nejd F.; Presson, Angela P.; Aberger, Michael E.; Craig, James R.; Brant, William O.; Myers, Jeremy B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Injection of mitomycin C may increase the success of transurethral incision of the bladder neck for the treatment of bladder neck contracture. We evaluated the efficacy of mitomycin C injection across multiple institutions. Materials and Methods Data on all patients who underwent transurethral incision of the bladder neck with mitomycin C from 2009 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed from 6 centers in the TURNS. Patients with at least 3 months of cystoscopic followup were included in the analysis. Results A total of 66 patients underwent transurethral incision of the bladder neck with mitomycin C and 55 meeting the study inclusion criteria were analyzed. Mean ± SD patient age was 64 ± 7.6 years. Dilation or prior transurethral incision of the bladder neck failed in 80% (44 of 55) of patients. Overall 58% (32 of 55) of patients achieved resolution of bladder neck contracture after 1 transurethral incision of the bladder neck with mitomycin C at a median followup of 9.2 months (IQR 11.7). There were 23 patients who had recurrence at a median of 3.7 months (IQR 4.2), 15 who underwent repeat transurethral incision of the bladder neck with mitomycin C and 9 of 15 (60%) who were free of another recurrence at a median of 8.6 months (IQR 8.8), for an overall success rate of 75% (41 of 55). Incision with electrocautery (Collins knife) was predictive of success compared with cold knife incision (63% vs 50%, p=0.03). Four patients experienced serious adverse events related to mitomycin C and 3 needed or are planning cystectomy. Conclusions The efficacy of intralesional injection of mitomycin C at transurethral incision of the bladder neck was lower than previously reported and was associated with a 7% rate of serious adverse events. PMID:25200807

  12. Bladder neck contractureincidence and management following contemporary robot assisted radical prostatectomy technique

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Jaspreet Singh; Ha, Yun-Sok; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-recognized complication following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for treatment of localized prostate cancer with a reported incidence of up to 1.4%. In this series, we report our institutional experience and management results. Methods: A prospectively collected database of patients who underwent RARP by a single surgeon from 2006 to 2012 was reviewed. Watertight bladder neck to urethral anastomosis was performed over 18-French foley catheter. BNC was diagnosed by flexible cystoscopy in patients who developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction. Subsequently, these patients underwent cold knife bladder neck incisions. Patients then followed a strict self regimen of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). We identify the patient demographics, incidence of BNC, associated risk factors and success of subsequent management. Results: Total of 930 patients who underwent RARP for localized prostate cancer was identified. BNC was identified in 15 patients, 1.6% incidence. Mean patient age and preoperative prostate-specific antigen was 58.8 years old and 7.83 ng/mL (range, 2.514.55 ng/mL) respectively. Mean estimated blood loss was 361193 mL (range, 50650 mL). Follow-up was mean of 23.4 months. Average time to BNC diagnosis was 5.5 months. In three patients, a foreign body was identified at bladder neck. On multivariate analysis, estimated blood loss was significantly associated with development of BNC. All patients underwent cystoscopy and bladder neck incision with a 3-month CIC regimen. Out of 15 index patients, none had a BNC recurrence over the follow-up period. Conclusions: BNC was identified in 1.6% of patients in our series following RARP. Intraoperative blood loss was a significant risk factor for BNC. In 20% of BNC patients a migrated foreign body was noted at vesicourethral anastomosis. Primary management of patients with BNC following RARP should be bladder neck incision and self CIC regimen. PMID:24693529

  13. Using transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection to treat urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Juanjie; Dai, Shengguo; Huang, Xuyuan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Huiguo; Shi, Hongmin

    2005-07-01

    Objective: Ho:YAG laser had been used to treat the common diseases of urinary system such as bladder cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia in our hospital. This study is to assess the efficacy and safety of transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection to treat the urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture. Methods: From May 1997 to August 2004, 26 cases of urethral stricture and 33 cases of bladder neck contracture were treated by transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection. These patients were followed up at regular intervals after operation. The uroflow rate of these patients was detected before and one-month after operation. The blood loss and the energy consumption of holmium-laser during the operation as well as the complications and curative effect after operation were observed. Results: The therapeutic effects were considered successful, with less bleeding and no severe complications. The Qmax of one month postoperation increased obviously than that of preoperation. Of the 59 cases, restenosis appeared in 11 cases (19%) with the symptoms of dysuria and weak urinary stream in 3-24 months respectively. Conclusions: The Ho:YAG-laser demonstrated good effect to treat the obstructive diseases of lower urinary tract such as urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture. It was safe, minimal invasive and easy to operate.

  14. Botulinum Toxin A Injection in the Bladder Neck: A Promising Treatment for Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Marianne; Zgheib, Joseph; El Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Secondary to failure of optimal medical therapy and the high morbidity that accompanies surgical techniques in high risk patients, the use of de novo treatments including botulinum toxin A is emerging in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the treatment of urinary retention secondary to BPH via injecting botulinum toxin into the bladder neck is not well established in the literature. This case report describes the case of a 75-year-old male patient with a chronic history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and multiple comorbidities who was admitted to the hospital for management of recurrent urinary retention. The patient was not a surgical candidate for transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Botulinum toxin injection into the bladder neck was performed with very satisfying results. Botulinum toxin injection in the bladder neck presents a promising minimally invasive, tolerated, and cost-effective approach for the treatment of urinary retention in patients with benign prostatic obstruction who are not candidates for surgery or in whom medical treatment has failed. More research is needed to identify the efficacy of this novel approach. PMID:27088032

  15. [Female urethral obstruction and bladder neck stenosis - fact or myth - how to proceed].

    PubMed

    Gunnemann, A; Liedl, B; Palma, P C R; Yoshimura, Y; Muctar, S

    2015-09-01

    The female urethra is probably the most neglected organ in women. Female urethral stricture and primary bladder neck obstruction are rare clinical entities. Traditional and new surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of female urethral stricture. However, they are based on limited data. There is no consensus on best management. The techniques of urethroplasty all have a higher mean success rate (80-94%) than urethral dilatation (bladder neck obstruction (PBNO) is a condition in which the bladder neck fails to open adequately during voiding. This leads to increased striated sphincter activity or obstruction of urinary flow without another anatomic cause being present, for example an obstruction caused by genitourinary prolapse in women. Watchful waiting, pharmacotherapy and surgical intervention are possible treatments. PMID:26378388

  16. A new technique of bladder neck reconstruction during radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tolkach, Yuri; Godin, Konstantin; Petrov, Sergey; Schelin, Sonny; Imkamp, Florian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate continence after radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients, in whom a new method of the bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) using deep dorsal stitch was implemented (deep single stitch through all bladder layers directly dorsal to the bladder opening after “tennis racket” reconstruction) and to provide justification for its use by means of anatomical study in cadavers. Material and Methods: Open radical retropubic prostatectomy was performed in 84 patients: 39 patients with a new BNR method used to improve continence and control group of 45 patients with standard “tennis racket” BNR. Median follow-up was 14 months in control group and 12 months in study group. Continence recovery was accessed early postoperatively and every 3 months thereafter. Anatomical study was performed on 2 male fresh cadavers reproducing two different BNR techniques to clarify any underlying continence related mechanisms. Results: Patients with new BNR achieved full continence significantly faster (p=0.041), but the continence rates after 12 months were similar between groups. The severity of incontinence up to month 9 was significantly reduced in BNR group. The anastomotic stricture rate was not affected. Applying new BNR to the cadaver model revealed effects on early continence, namely presence of proximal passive closure mechanism in area of bladder neck. Conclusions: Continence in patients with the new BNR method using deep dorsal stitch recovered significantly faster. Moreover, a reduced grade of residual incontinence was documented. The effect was non-significant at month 12 of follow-up, meaning that only early effect was present. PMID:26200563

  17. An appraisal of a technical modification for prevention of bladder neck stenosis in retropubic prostatectomy: An initial report

    PubMed Central

    Ajape, Abdulwahab Akanbi; Kuranga, Sulyman Alege; Babata, AbdulLateef; Kura, Mustapha Mohammed; Bello, Jibril O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report the experience with our technical modification of the trigone-bladder neck complex management in the prevention of bladder neck stenosis (BNS) following open simple retropubic prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective review of data of patients that underwent open simple retropubic prostatectomy with technical modification of the trigone-bladder neck complex in two Nigerian tertiary hospitals, by a single surgeon, from January 2007 to December 2011. The data analysed included the demographic variables, the modes of presentation, need for blood transfusion, duration of catheterization and the duration of hospital stay. The primary end-point was the development or otherwise of BNS. Results: Eighty-seven patients’ data were available for analysis from a total of 91 patients. The mean age (±standard deviation [SD]) was 65.14 years (±10.55). Preoperative urinary retention was present in 58% of the patients. The maximal flow rate (Qmax) was 12.05 ml/s among the 20 patients that had preoperative uroflowmetry. The transfusion rate was 35%, but almost two-third of them had only one unit of blood transfused. The mean weight (±SD) of the enucleated adenoma was 82.64 g (±36.63). Bladder irrigation was required in 14% of the patients, majority of the patients had urethral catheter removed after 96 h and the mean hospital stay was 6.52 days. No patient developed BNS after a mean follow-up duration of 16.39 months. Conclusion: Bladder neck stenosis can be a distressing complication of prostatectomy. The result of our technical modification of managing the trigone-bladder-neck complex looks promising for prevention or delaying the onset of BNS. A long-term observation and a prospective randomised control trial to ascertain this initial experience is needed. PMID:26834392

  18. Bladder neck suspension using bone anchors for the treatment of female stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Nativ, O; Moskovitz, B; Issaq, E; Condrea, A; Kastin, A; Halachmi, S; Burbara, J; Madjar, S; Beyar, M

    1997-01-01

    A new technique and related devices for the treatment of urinary incontinence in women was developed and tested. The technique involves soft tissue to bone fixation by means of miniature bone anchors and a bone anchor inserter. The novel bone anchors are made of a shape-memory nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) attached to Polypropylene or Gortex suture. A spring-loaded bone anchor inserter drives the anchors through the vaginal wall to a predetermined depth into the pubic bone medulla regardless of the bone's hardness, with no incision or drilling required. The device allows for the performance of a minimally invasive transvaginal bladder neck suspension. The procedure has minimal morbidity and a short learning curve. This technique was evaluated clinically in 15 women with incontinence, with a mean follow-up of 6 months. Good urinary continence was achieved in all patients, with no mechanical failures. PMID:9152492

  19. The Musculature of the Bladder-neck of the Male in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Macalpine, J. B.

    1934-01-01

    Two muscles, one voluntary the other involuntary, and an inch or more apart, exist at the bladder-neck, both functioning as sphincters. This dual musculature is explained by the emergence of the ejaculatory ducts between them. If both these muscles are open when semen is discharged, secretion may escape into the bladder or to the exterior; also any urine in the bladder would flow out. The internal sphincter is usually tightly contracted during ejaculation. Instances are given in which the internal sphincter is paralysed or injured, e.g. after operation, in prostatic hypertrophy, and in certain nervous diseases. Two instances are reported of direct injury to this localized area, with the result, in all cases, that ejaculation failed. In prostatic hypertrophy the internal sphincter is dilated by the growing adenoma, and at operation it is further stretched and perhaps cut across. Continence then depends on the external sphincter. Two cases are reported in which the external sphincter had previously been paralysed, total incontinence resulting. Recent work on the trigonal muscle; its function in opening the internal sphincter. Influence of this muscle on prostatic enlargement. In central nervous disease the dilatation of the internal sphincter resulting in funnel-neck is very common. Series of cases of nervous disease examined in order to determine the frequency of this sign are reported. Other cases occurring apart from nervous disease are also reported. The part played by the sphincters in ejaculation is discussed and illustrated by reports of further cases of paralysis of the sphincter. It is shown that in the normal way the external sphincter weakens during coitus, and especially during ejaculation, but when the internal sphincter is paralysed no weakening is evident. Penile erection is associated with spasm of the internal sphincter, and spasm of the internal sphincter is produced by irritation, e.g. vesical stone may produce priapism. The varying types of adenoma bear different relationship to the internal sphincter. The view that submucosal glands give rise to prostatic enlargement is supported. The influence of prostatic enlargement on the internal sphincter is discussed. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:19990023

  20. A Case of Bifid Phallus and Bladder Neck Incompetence: Is This a Variant of Epispadias or Hypospadias?

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Onitake, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Futoshi; Shimada, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Diphallia or duplication of the penis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly. Based on the presence of one or two corpora cavernosa in each of the penises, diphallia is classified into two major groups: bifid phallus and true diphallia. Because true diphallia associated with various anomalies is dominant in published studies, little is known about bifid phallus or isolated cases. Here we present a 9-month-old boy with an isolated bifid phallus. After successful reconstruction of the penis and urethra, urinary incontinence became apparent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of complete bifid phallus associated with bladder neck incompetence. PMID:26610674

  1. Neuronal and smooth muscle receptors involved in the PACAP- and VIP-induced relaxations of the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M; Barahona, M V; Recio, P; Benedito, S; Martínez, A C; Rivera, L; García-Sacristán, A; Prieto, D; Orensanz, L M

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: As pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP 38)- and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) are widely distributed in the urinary tract, the current study investigated the receptors and mechanisms involved in relaxations induced by these peptides in the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach: Urothelium-denuded strips were suspended in organ baths for isometric force recordings and the relaxations to VIP and PACAP analogues were investigated. Key results: VIP, PACAP 38, PACAP 27 and [Ala11,22,28]-VIP produced similar relaxations. Inhibition of neuronal voltage-gated Ca2+ channels reduced relaxations to PACAP 38 and increased those induced by VIP. Blockade of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents (CSPA), nitric oxide (NO)-synthase or guanylate cyclase reduced the PACAP 38 relaxations but failed to modify the VIP responses. Inhibition of VIP/PACAP receptors and of voltage-gated K+ channels reduced PACAP 38 and VIP relaxations, which were not modified by the K+ channel blockers iberiotoxin, charybdotoxin, apamin or glibenclamide. The phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor rolipram and the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin produced potent relaxations. Blockade of protein kinase A (PKA) reduced PACAP 38- and VIP-induced relaxations. Conclusions and implications: PACAP 38 and VIP relax the pig urinary bladder neck through muscle VPAC2 receptors linked to the cAMP-PKA pathway and involve activation of voltage-gated K+ channels. Facilitatory PAC1 receptors located at CSPA and coupled to NO release, and inhibitory VPAC receptors at motor endings are also involved in the relaxations to PACAP 38 and VIP, respectively. VIP/PACAP receptor antagonists could be useful in the therapy of urinary incontinence produced by intrinsic sphincter deficiency. PMID:16847435

  2. Aggressive Angiomyxoma of the Bladder Neck Requiring Local Excision and Mitrofanoff Formation

    PubMed Central

    Davari, M.; Lamb, B. W.; Chowdhury, S.; Jameson, C.; Kelly, J. D.; Greenwell, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare mesenchymal tumour predominantly affecting the female pelvis and perineum but has also been described in males. This tumour can often present a diagnostic challenge and has a propensity for local recurrence after surgical excision. We present an unusual case of aggressive angiomyxoma arising from the bladder of a female patient which required local excision and Mitrofanoff formation. PMID:26605101

  3. Role of neuronal voltage-gated K+ channels in the modulation of the nitrergic neurotransmission of the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Hernndez, M; Barahona, M V; Recio, P; Navarro-Dorado, J; Bustamante, S; Benedito, S; Garca-Sacristn, A; Prieto, D; Orensanz, L M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: As nitric oxide (NO) plays an essential role in the inhibitory neurotransmission of the bladder neck of several species, the current study investigates the mechanisms underlying the NO-induced relaxations in the pig urinary bladder neck. Experimental approach: Urothelium-denuded bladder neck strips were dissected and mounted in isolated organ baths containing a physiological saline solution at 37?C and continuously gassed with 5% CO2 and 95% O2, for isometric force recording. The relaxations to transmural nerve stimulation (EFS), or to exogenously applied acidified NaNO2 solution were carried out on strips pre-contracted with phenylephrine, and treated with guanethidine and atropine, to block noradrenergic neurotransmission and muscarinic receptors, respectively. Key results: EFS (0.21?Hz) and addition of acidified NaNO2 solution (1??M1?mM) evoked frequency- and concentration-dependent relaxations, respectively. These responses were potently reduced by the blockade of guanylate cyclase and were not modified by the K+ channel blockers iberiotoxin, charybdotoxin, apamin or glibenclamide. The voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels inhibitor 4-aminopyridine, greatly enhanced the nitrergic relaxations evoked by EFS, but did not affect the NaNO2 solution-induced relaxations. Conclusions and implications: NO, whose release is modulated by pre-junctional Kv channels, relaxes the pig urinary bladder neck through a mechanism dependent on the activation of guanylate cyclase, in which post-junctional K+ channels do not seem to be involved. Modulation of Kv channels could be useful in the therapy of the urinary incontinence produced by intrinsic sphincteric deficiency. PMID:18223671

  4. Steepest Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, Juan

    2010-02-12

    The steepest descent method has a rich history and is one of the simplest and best known methods for minimizing a function. While the method is not commonly used in practice due to its slow convergence rate, understanding the convergence properties of this method can lead to a better understanding of many of the more sophisticated optimization methods. Here, we give a short introduction and discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages of this method. Some recent results on modified versions of the steepest descent method are also discussed.

  5. Randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of Nd:YAG prostate ablation with or without KTP laser bladder neck incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Stephen; Gallegos, Christopher; Moisey, Clifford

    1997-05-01

    A randomized, double blind, power determined, prospective study compared patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia undergoing endoscopic laser ablation of prostate, ELAP, -- Group 1 -- to those with KTP bladder neck incision and ELAP -- Group 2. A dual wavelength Laserscope KPT/532TM laser was used with add/stat side-firing fibers. Post-operatively a urethral catheter was inserted, which was removed at 18 hours. Patients unable to void at this stage where then re-catheterized, discharged and readmitted two weeks later for catheter removal. Patients were followed up at three month intervals. Eighty eight patients were studied, pre-operatively there was no statistical difference between Group 1 and Group 2 in mean age, 68.0, 68.4 yrs; prostate size 28, 29 g; post void residual, PVR, 141, 126 ml; max flow rate, Qmax, 9.8, 9.4 ml/s; or AUA score 18.0, 20.4; respectively. Post-operatively 57% of Group 1 patients were able to void on catheter removal at 18 hours compared to 80% from Group 2; p less than 0.05, (chi) 2. After one month, two patients from Group 2 and one from Group 1 failed to void and required further surgery. At six months, data for Group 1 and 2 respectively: PVR equals 78.7, 61.4 ml, Qmax equals 16.2, 18.1 ml/s, AUA score equals 9.6, 6.38, p less than 0.005 for each. Group 2 had a significantly greater improvement in AUA7 score than Group 1.

  6. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  7. Selective Transurethral Resection of the Prostate Combined with Transurethral Incision of the Bladder Neck for Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Patients with Small Volume Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH): A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Pan, Jin-hong; Liu, Qi-gui; He, Peng; Song, Si-ji; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Zhan-song

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has a high failure rate in patients with small volume benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). We describe and report the results of an alternative surgical method, selective transurethral resection of the prostate (STURP) in combination with transurethral incision of the bladder neck (TUIBN). Methods Patients were randomized to receive TURP or STRUP+TUIBN in combination with TUIBN. Maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), voided volume, and post voiding residual volume (PVR) were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. Efficacy of treatment was assessed by lower urinary tract symptoms and IPSS. Results Sixty three patients received STRUP+TUIBN and 61 received TURP. Surgical time, amount of prostate tissue resected, and blood loss was the same in both groups (all, p>0.05). The mean duration of follow-up was 9.02 and 8.53 months in patients receiving TURP and STRUP+TUIBN, respectively. At 6 months postoperatively, IPSS was 4.26±1.22 and 4.18±1.47 in patients receiving TURP and STRUP+TUIBN, respectively (p>0.05), and the Qmax in patients receiving STRUP+TUIBN was markedly higher than in those receiving TURP (28.28±6.46 mL/s vs. 21.59±7.14 mL/s; p<0.05). Bladder neck contracture and urinary tract infections were observed in 3 and 5 patients receiving TURP, respectively, and none in STURP. Conclusions STRUP+TUIBN may offer a more effective and safer alternative to TURP for small volume BPH patients. PMID:23691002

  8. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  9. Bladder Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Bladder Health About Bladder Health People rarely talk about bladder health, but ... to keep their bladder healthy. What is the bladder? Click for more information The bladder is a ...

  10. Analysis of risk factors leading to postoperative urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture following transurethral resection of prostate

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Huang; Jiang, Yu Yong; Jun, Qi; Ding, Xu; Jian, Duan Liu; Jie, Ding; Ping, Zhu Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine risk factors of postoperative urethral stricture (US) and vesical neck contracture (BNC) after transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) from perioperative parameters. Materials and Methods: 373 patients underwent TURP in a Chinese center for lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (LUTS/BPO), with their perioperative and follow-up clinical data being collected. Univariate analyses were used to determine variables which had correlation with the incidence of US and BNC before logistic regression being applied to find out independent risk factors. Results: The median follow-up was 29.3 months with the incidence of US and BNC being 7.8% and 5.4% respectively. Resection speed, reduction in hemoglobin (ΔHb) and hematocrit (ΔHCT) levels, incidence of urethral mucosa rupture, re-catheterization and continuous infection had significant correlation with US, while PSA level, storage score, total prostate volume (TPV), transitional zone volume (TZV), transitional zone index (TZI), resection time and resected gland weight had significant correlation with BNC. Lower resection speed (OR=0.48), urethral mucosa rupture (OR=2.44) and continuous infection (OR=1.49) as well as higher storage score (OR=2.51) and lower TPV (OR=0.15) were found to be the independent risk factors of US and BNC respectively. Conclusions: Lower resection speed, intraoperative urethral mucosa rupture and postoperative continuous infection were associated with a higher risk of US while severer storage phase symptom and smaller prostate size were associated with a higher risk of BNC after TURP.

  11. Ascent/Descent Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Charles; Andrew, Robert; Roe, Scott; Frye, Ronald; Harvey, Michael; Vu, Tuan; Balachandran, Krishnaiyer; Bly, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Software Suite has been used to support a variety of NASA Shuttle Program mission planning and analysis activities, such as range safety, on the Integrated Planning System (IPS) platform. The Ascent/Descent Software Suite, containing Ascent Flight Design (ASC)/Descent Flight Design (DESC) Configuration items (Cis), lifecycle documents, and data files used for shuttle ascent and entry modeling analysis and mission design, resides on IPS/Linux workstations. A list of tools in Navigation (NAV)/Prop Software Suite represents tool versions established during or after the IPS Equipment Rehost-3 project.

  12. Comparison between Two Different Two-Stage Transperineal Approaches to Treat Urethral Strictures or Bladder Neck Contracture Associated with Severe Urinary Incontinence that Occurred after Pelvic Surgery: Report of Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Simonato, A.; Ennas, M.; Benelli, A.; Gregori, A.; Oneto, F.; Daglio, E.; Traverso, P.; Carmignani, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The recurrence of urethral/bladder neck stricture after multiple endoscopic procedures is a rare complication that can follow prostatic surgery and its treatment is still controversial. Material and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed our data on 17 patients, operated between September 2001 and January 2010, who presented severe urinary incontinence and urethral/bladder neck stricture after prostatic surgery and failure of at least four conservative endoscopic treatments. Six patients underwent a transperineal urethrovesical anastomosis and 11 patients a combined transperineal suprapubical (endoscopic) urethrovesical anastomosis. After six months the patients that presented complete incontinence and no urethral stricture underwent the implantation of an artificial urethral sphincter (AUS). Results. After six months 16 patients were completely incontinent and presented a patent, stable lumen, so that they underwent an AUS implantation. With a mean followup of 50.5 months, 14 patients are perfectly continent with no postvoid residual urine. Conclusions. Two-stage procedures are safe techniques to treat these challenging cases. In our opinion, these cases could be managed with a transperineal approach in patients who present a perfect operative field; on the contrary, in more difficult cases, it would be preferable to use the other technique, with a combined transperineal suprapubical access, to perform a pull-through procedure. PMID:22593765

  13. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePlus

    Neurogenic bladder is a problem in which a person lacks bladder control due to a brain, spinal cord, or ... muscles and nerves must work together for your bladder to hold urine until you are ready to ...

  14. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer usually starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  15. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  16. Neck dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Radical neck dissection; Modified radical neck dissection; Selective neck dissection; Lymph node removal - neck ... spread. There are three main types of neck dissection surgery: Radical neck dissection: All the tissue on the side of ...

  17. Overactive Bladder

    MedlinePlus

    Overactive bladder is a condition in which the bladder squeezes urine out at the wrong time. You may have overactive bladder if you have two or more of these ... You also may have incontinence, a loss of bladder control. Nerve problems, too much fluid, or too ...

  18. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SM. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 89. Sharma R, Dill CE, Gelman DY. Urinary ...

  19. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  20. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Vivek; George, Arun Jacob Philip; Chandrasingh, J.; Panda, Arabind; Devasia, Antony

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy. PMID:27127361

  1. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  2. Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... family history of bladder cancer or who are older, white, or male have a higher risk. Treatments for bladder cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biologic therapy. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  3. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation

    This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  4. Urinary Bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anatomy & Physiology » Urinary System » Components of the Urinary System » Urinary Bladder Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  5. Complete transurethral bladder eversion 3 months after hemipelvectomy.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Gregory; Mandalapu, Subbarao; Gilleran, Jason

    2010-02-01

    A 46-year-old white female underwent a left hemipelvectomy for chondrosarcoma. She presented with total incontinence and a bulging vaginal mass. Exam confirmed complete transurethral bladder eversion that was addressed with transvaginal multilayer bladder neck closure and suprapubic tube placement. Eventually she underwent abdominal hysterectomy, mesh sacral colpopexy, and catheterizable stoma creation. Patient is continent of urine 3 months postoperatively. We present the first reported case of bladder eversion after hemipelvectomy and propose possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:19629370

  6. Overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Karen M.; Drake, Marcus J.

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is highly prevalent, and increasingly so with aging. It is characterized by the presence of urinary urgency, and can be associated with incontinence, increased voiding frequency, and nocturia. Assessment needs to exclude serious medical disorders that might present with similar symptoms, and a bladder diary is an invaluable part of understanding the presentation. Initial management is conservative, comprising education, bladder training, and advice on fluid intake. Drug therapy options include antimuscarinic medications and beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonists. Persistent overactive bladder syndrome, despite initial therapy, requires a review of the patient’s understanding of conservative management and compliance, and adjustment of medications. For refractory cases, specialist review and urodynamic testing should be considered; this may identify detrusor overactivity or increased filling sensation, and needs to exclude additional factors, such as stress incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Botulinum neurotoxin-A bladder injections can be used in severe overactivity, provided the patient is able and willing to do intermittent self-catheterisation, which is necessary in about 5% of treated patients. Sacral nerve stimulation and tibial nerve stimulation are other approaches. Major reconstructive surgery, such as augmentation cystoplasty, is rarely undertaken in modern practice but remains a possibility in extreme cases. PMID:26918151

  7. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  8. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeremy B; Mayer, Erik N; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  9. EXOMARS Descent Module GNC Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portigliotti, S.; Capuano, M.; Montagna, M.; Martella, P.; Venditto, P.

    2007-08-01

    The ExoMars mission is the first ESA led robotic mission of the Aurora Programme and combines technology development with investigations of major scientific interest. Italy is by far the major contributor to the mission through the strong support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). ExoMars will search for traces of past and present life, characterize the Mars geochemistry and water distribution, improve the knowledge of the Mars environment and geophysics, and identify possible surface hazards to future human exploration missions. ExoMars will also validate the technology for safe Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) of a large size Descent Module (DM) carrying a Rover with medium range surface mobility and the access to subsurface. The ExoMars project is presently undergoing its Phase B1 with Thales Alenia Space-Italia as Industrial Prime Contractor. Additionally, as Descent Module responsible, a dedicated simulation tool is under development in Thales Alenia Space-Italia, Turin site, for the end-to-end design and validation / verification of the DM Entry Descent and Landing.

  10. Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    White, Nicola; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a condition affecting millions of individuals in the United States. Anticholinergics are the mainstay of treatment. Bladder botulinum toxin injections have shown an improvement in symptoms of OAB equivalent to anticholinergic therapy. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation can decrease symptoms of urinary frequency and urge incontinence. Sacral neuromodulation for refractory patients has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of OAB, urge incontinence, and urinary retention. Few randomized, head-to-head comparisons of the different available alternatives exist; however, patients now have increasing options to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life. PMID:26880508

  11. Intramuscular nerve distribution in bladder and the relationship between intramuscular ganglia and bladder function in man and dog

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zeju; Xu, Qian; Lu, Li; Luo, Xu; Fu, Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    In clinical, the relationship between bladder intramuscular nerve and function is also elusive. This study aims to compare the bladder intramuscular nerve distribution and its characteristics and significance in human and dog. Eleven dogs’ bladders were stained by Sihler’s and HE techniques. Fifteen human bladders were adopted by Sihler’s staining, using 10% formaldehyde to fix 12 weeks, 7 by HE dyeing fixes 24 hours. Results indicated that man’s bladder was triangularpyramid-shaped. While dog’s bladder was spherical-shaped and its muscle fibers arrange were irregularly shaped. Longitudinal muscle of the outer layer is fleshy, the terminal is at the bladder neck without exception, and vesical trigone has relatively obvious three layers of structure. After dyeing dog’s bladder was transparent jelly, the nerve was purple color, enter bladder at the ureter-bladder junction with different forms. Man’s bladder nerves, no ganglion, were more trivial than that of dogs, and with smaller branches, the large nerve ganglion. The links with the nerve fibers and forms the network on the dog’s bladder wall, and the nerve fibers crosses comparatively little on both the left and right sides in the midline. The right nerve branch gains advantage on the man’s bladder wall, the situations is opposite on the dog’s. In conclusion, bladder nerves which scatter to the bladder wall have branches to lower ureter at the ureter-bladder junction, the structure and distribution of intramuscular nerves are different, the existence of intramuscular ganglia is relating to the bladder function both in man and dog. PMID:25664008

  12. Transvaginal Resection of a Bladder Leiomyoma Misdiagnosed with a Vaginal Mass: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fu-Fen; Wang, Ning; Wang, You-Lin; Bi, Xiao-Ning; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yan-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Bladder leiomyoma is a rare benign tumor and it could be easily misdiagnosed with many other pelvic diseases, especially obstetrical and gynecological diseases; abdominal, laparoscopic, and transurethral resection of bladder leiomyoma have been reported. Herein, we present a case of bladder leiomyoma misdiagnosed with a vaginal mass preoperatively; the mass was isolated, enucleated from the bladder neck, and removed transvaginally; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of intramural leiomyoma of bladder neck that has been enucleated transvaginally only without cystotomy. PMID:26693368

  13. Urinary Incontinence: Bladder Training

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Urinary Incontinence | Bladder Training for Urinary Incontinence What is bladder training? Bladder training is a way of learning to manage urinary incontinence. It is generally used ...

  14. Cystocele (Fallen Bladder)

    MedlinePlus

    ... print versions from our online catalog. Additional Links Bladder Control for Women Urinary Incontinence in Women Urinary ... A cystocele, also called a prolapsed or dropped bladder, is the bulging or dropping of the bladder ...

  15. Consert during the Philae Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herique, Alain; Berquin, Yann; Blazquez, Alejandro; Antoine Foulon, Marc; Hahnel, Ronny; Hegler, Sebastian; Jurado, Eric; Kofman, Wlodek; Plettemeier, Dirk; Rogez, Yves; Statz, Christoph; Zine, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    The CONSERT experiment on board Rosetta and Philae is to perform the tomography of the 67P/CG comet nucleus measuring radio waves transmission from the Rosetta S/C to the Philae Lander and using the 67P nucleus rotation to cover different geometries. CONSERT will operate during the Philae descent. This geometry strongly differs from the "nominal" bistatic tomography where the orbiter is on the opposite side of the nucleus by regard to the lander. During the descent, CONSERT will measure direct wave propagating from orbiter to lander and waves reflected / scattered by the 67P surface and subsurface. This signal will provide information of the greatest interest for both scientific investigations of 67P and technical operations of Philae. The landing site position is known a priori with a large ellipse of dispersion due to uncertainties on the Rosetta velocity and Rosetta/Philae separation strength. This dispersion is increased by the difference between nominal and emergency separation strength. An accurate estimation of the landing position as soon as possible after landing is of the greatest interest to optimize Philae operation during FSS. So propagation delay of the direct and reflected waves measured by CONSERT will help to reconstruct the descent geometry in order to more precisely estimate the landing position. The reflected signal is determined by the surface properties: its dielectric permittivity, its roughness and layering. The signal power inversion will allow to map surface properties especially in the vicinity of the landing site. This paper details the measurement configuration. It presents the data retrieval based on Monte-Carlo simulation using Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and expected performances for both science and operations.

  16. Spirit's Descent to Mars-1706

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's lander, shows a view of Gusev Crater as the lander descends to Mars. The picture is taken at an altitude of 1706 meters. Numerous small impact craters can be seen on the surface of the planet. These images help the onboard software to minimize the lander's horizontal velocity before its bridle is cut, and it falls freely to the surface of Mars.

  17. Spirit's Descent to Mars-1433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's lander, shows a view of Gusev Crater as the lander descends to Mars. The picture is taken at an altitude of 1433 meters. Numerous small impact craters can be seen on the surface of the planet. These images help the onboard software to minimize the lander's horizontal velocity before its bridal is cut, and it falls freely to the surface of Mars.

  18. Spirit's Descent to Mars-1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's lander, shows a view of Gusev Crater as the lander descends to Mars. The picture is taken at an altitude of 1983 meters. Numerous small impact craters can be seen on the surface of the planet. These images help the onboard software to minimize the lander's horizontal velocity before its bridal is cut, and it falls freely to the surface of Mars.

  19. Algorithm for Fuel-Conservative Airplane Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Vicroy, D. D.; Simmon, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Federal Aviation Administration implementing automated, time-based metering form of air-traffic control (ATC) with profile-descent procedures for arrivals into terminal area. Measures provide fuel savings by matching arrival of airplanes to airport acceptance rate through time-control computations and allowing pilot to descend at his discretion from cruise altitude to designated metering-fix altitude in idle-thrust clean configuration. Airborne descent algorithm developed compatible with time-based metering and profile-descent procedures and designed to improve accuracy of delivering airplane during fuel-efficient descent to metering fix at time designated by the ATC system.

  20. The 2001 Mars Descent Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, M. C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    The overall objective of the 2001 Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) experiment is to acquire and analyze close-up pictures of surface features at and in the immediate vicinity of the Mars Surveyor 2001 (MS'01) landing site, in order to provide geologic and physical context for the results of lander and rover investigations, to provide near-realtime planning information for lander and rover operations, and to study specific attributes of the geology and geomorphology of Mars. Observational goals include studies of. 1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); 2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments--precise location, detailed local relief); and 3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. Based on the MS'98 MARDI experiment, it is anticipated that the MS'01 descent imager will provide panchromatic images of the landing site over a 73.4 degrees field-of-view (FOV) with a resolution of 1.25 mrad/pixel (12.5 cm/pixel from 100 m Nested images at a scale ratios of 2.5: 1 or better will be acquired. The anticipated results of this investigation include: 1) detailed knowledge of the local and regional setting of the MS'01 landing site, documented using geologic and topographic maps, 2) a specific link between the landing site and the rest of Mars as seen from orbit, and 3) serendipitous discovery of geomorphic processes at scales between those seen from orbit and those seen from the surface. MARDI consists of optics and four small electronics boards: the focal plane assembly, clock board, data acquisition system electronics, and power supply. The original design was developed under Planetary Definition and Development Program funding, although the flight design is considerably simplified for reliability and ease of manufacturing. It is characterized by relatively small physical size (about 5.5 x 8.5 x 12 cm about 500 gm) low power (<4 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise images, and ultimate geometric resolution better than 1 cm/pixel). Depending on the descent profile that actually occurs, MARDI will acquire up to 100 Mbits of image data, spanning three orders of magnitude in scale, during the roughly 60 seconds between heatshield jettison and spacecraft touchdown.

  1. Stem Cell Therapy in Bladder Dysfunction: Where Are We? And Where Do We Have to Go?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Rae; Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun

    2013-01-01

    To date, stem cell therapy for the bladder has been conducted mainly on an experimental basis in the areas of bladder dysfunction. The therapeutic efficacy of stem cells was originally thought to be derived from their ability to differentiate into various cell types. Studies about stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to an experimental basis and have been less focused than bladder regeneration. Bladder dysfunction was listed in MESH as urinary bladder neck obstruction, urinary bladder, overactive, and urinary bladder, neurogenic. Using those keywords, several articles were searched and studied. The bladder dysfunction model includes bladder outlet obstruction, cryoinjured, diabetes, ischemia, and spinal cord injury. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle derived stem cells (SkMSCs) are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The main mechanisms of stem cells to reconstitute or restore bladder dysfunction are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction and to provide the status of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction. PMID:24151627

  2. The embryology of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Wensing, C J

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of the role of the gubernaculum testis in the migration of the testis from the intra-abdominal to the scrotal position. The morphological differences in the process between carnivores, ungulates and man on the one hand and rodents on the other are stressed. The importance of gubernacular outgrowth, gubernacular regression as well as the importance of intra-abdominal pressure is emphasized. The effects of some forms of abnormal gubernacular development on testicular descent are described. The hormonal factors possibly involved in the regulation of the gubernacular reaction are evaluated. LH-RH, gonadotropins, AMH and testosterone seem not to be responsible for gubernacular outgrowth but a low molecular weight fraction of a fetal testicular extract, called descendin, is stimulatory to gubernacular cells. There are indications that testosterone plays a role in the initiation of gubernacular regression. PMID:2907890

  3. Predictability of Top of Descent Location for Operational Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its uncertainty models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents at a specified descent speed, and the recorded data included the specified descent speed profile, aircraft weight, and the winds entered into the FMS as well as the radar data. The FMS computed the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and the controllers and pilots then endeavored to allow the FMS to fly the descent to the meter fix with minimal human intervention. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location were extracted from the radar data. Using approximately 70 descents each in Boeing 757 and Airbus 319/320 aircraft, multiple regression estimated TOD location as a linear function of the available predictive factors. The cruise and meter fix altitudes, descent speed, and wind clearly improve goodness of fit. The aircraft weight improves fit for the Airbus descents but not for the B757. Except for a few statistical outliers, the residuals have absolute value less than 5 nmi. Thus, these predictive factors adequately explain the TOD location, which indicates the data do not include excessive noise.

  4. Neck dissection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radical neck dissection - discharge; Modified radical neck dissection - discharge; Selective neck dissection - discharge ... Neck dissection is surgery to remove the lymph nodes in your neck. Cells from cancers in the mouth ...

  5. Gall bladder Adenocarcinoma in a Young Girl.

    PubMed

    Date, Shivprasad V; Rizvi, S J

    2015-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with abdominal discomfort, weakness, and jaundice. General examination revealed deep icterus with hard lymph nodes in left supraclavicular region. On gastrointestinal examination, we appreciated a hard intra-abdominal lump in the right hypochondrium. Biochemical evaluation showed features of obstructive jaundice. Imaging confirmed the presence of gall bladder lump with multiple intra-abdominal lymph nodes. Fine needle aspiration cytology of neck nodes demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the gall bladder lump (done under sonographic guidance) confirmed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, malignancy of the gall bladder has not been reported in individuals less than 18 years in India, and only three cases have been reported worldwide in English literature. PMID:26139973

  6. MR Imaging in Diagnosis of Pelvic Floor Descent: Supine versus Sitting Position

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Adolfo; Monaco, Luigi; Serra, Nicola; Feragalli, Beatrice; Iacomino, Aniello; Brunese, Luca; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Functional disorders of the pelvic floor represent have a significant impact on the quality of life. The advent of open-configuration systems allowed for the evaluation of defecation with MR imaging in sitting position. The purpose of the present study is to compare the results of static and dynamic pelvic MR performed in supine position versus sitting position, using a new MR prototype machine, in the diagnosis of pelvic floor descent. Materials and Methods. Thirty-one patients with pelvic floor disorders were enrolled, and underwent MR Defecography in supine position with 1.5 T closed magnet (MAGNETOM Symphony, Siemens, Germany) and in sitting position with a 0.25-Tesla open magnet system (G-Scan ESAOTE, Italy). Results. In rest and squeezing phases, positions of bladder, vagina, and ARJ were significantly different when the patient was imaged in supine versus sitting position. In the defecation phase, a significant difference for the bladder and vagina position was detected between the two exams whereas a significant difference for the ARJ was not found. A statistically significant difference exists when the pelvic floor descent is evaluated in sitting versus supine position. Conclusion. Our results show that MR Defecography in sitting position may represent a useful tool to correctly diagnose and grade the pelvic organ descent. PMID:26880893

  7. [Fiddler's neck].

    PubMed

    Knierim, C; Goertz, W; Reifenberger, J; Homey, B; Meller, S

    2013-10-01

    The fiddler's neck is an uncommon variant of acne mechanica in violinists and violists. It is a single firm red-brown dermal nodule usually on the left side of neck. This special form of acne mechanica represents a therapeutic challenge since the triggering mechanical factors persist, unless they can be corrected by changes in positioning or modifications of the chin pad. A 72-year-old woman who had played the violin since childhood presented with a red-brown nodule on her neck for 18 months. Cushioning provided no relief. Excision of the affected area with primary closure represented one therapeutic option. Further supportive measures include improved posture to reduce the pressure between skin and instrument and interposing a neck cloth. PMID:23989244

  8. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... falls can cause severe neck injuries, such as vertebral fractures, whiplash, blood vessel injury, and even paralysis. Other ... fibromyalgia Cervical arthritis or spondylosis Ruptured disk ... spine from osteoporosis Spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal ...

  9. Neck lump

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more lumps. This can be due to thyroid disease or cancer. Most cancers of the thyroid gland ... be caused by: Bacterial or viral infection Cancer Thyroid disease Allergic reaction Lumps in the neck due to ...

  10. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... also may be from RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS, an inflammatory joint disease, or FIBROMYALGIA, a chronic condition affecting muscles and ... stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be ...

  11. Descent advisor preliminary field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  12. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  13. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an innovative, first-of-its-kind bladder cancer treatment, establishing ... Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium BCRN Management Committee BCAN Scientific Advisory Board GET INVOLVED Donate & ...

  14. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  15. Bladder catheterization, female (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... balloon tip) may be inserted into the urinary bladder when there is a urinary obstruction, following surgical ... or for any other problem in which the bladder needs to be kept empty (decompressed) and urinary ...

  16. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  17. Anteroposterior Knee Stability During Stair Descent.

    PubMed

    Borque, Kyle A; Gold, Jonathan E; Incavo, Stephen J; Patel, Rupal M; Ismaily, Sabir E; Noble, Philip C

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the influence of tibio-femoral conformity on anteroposterior (AP) knee stability during stair descent, particularly with a dished cruciate sacrificing (CS) design. A joint simulator simulated stair descent of cadaveric knees. Tibio-femoral displacement was measured. Knees were tested in intact, ACL-deficient, and TKA with cruciate-retaining (CR), CS and posterior-stabilizing (PS) inserts. Loading during stair descent simulation caused femur displacement anteriorly prior to quadriceps contraction. Quadriceps contraction reestablished the initial femoral AP position. During simulated stair descent, AP stability was restored using PS, CR or CS inserts with an intact PCL. The CS design without the PCL did not provide AP stability. Increasing quadriceps force to restore AP stability may explain the clinical findings of pain and fatigue experienced by some patients after TKA. PMID:25659935

  18. Descent relations in cubic superstring field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Y.; Gorbachev, R.; Medvedev, P. B.; Rychkov, D. V.

    2008-01-01

    The descent relations between string field theory (SFT) vertices are characteristic relations of the operator formulation of SFT and they provide self-consistency of this theory. The descent relations langleV2|V1rangle and langleV3|V1rangle in the NS fermionic string field theory in the κ and discrete bases are established. Different regularizations and schemes of calculations are considered and relations between them are discussed.

  19. Apollo experience report: Descent propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammock, W. R., Jr.; Currie, E. C.; Fisher, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    The propulsion system for the descent stage of the lunar module was designed to provide thrust to transfer the fully loaded lunar module with two crewmen from the lunar parking orbit to the lunar surface. A history of the development of this system is presented. Development was accomplished primarily by ground testing of individual components and by testing the integrated system. Unique features of the descent propulsion system were the deep throttling capability and the use of a lightweight cryogenic helium pressurization system.

  20. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Ultrasound: Bladder KidsHealth > For Parents > Ultrasound: Bladder Print A A A Text Size What's ... español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  1. Bladder Cancer Interest Group

    Cancer.gov

    Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer, and is considered one of the most expensive cancers to live with due to long-term surveillance and treatments. Clinically, there are only limited options for bladder cancer management and no new bladder-c

  2. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  3. Reference energy-altitude descent guidance: Simulator evaluation. [aircraft descent and fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbot, K. H.; Knox, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Descent guidance was developed to provide a pilot with information to ake a fuel-conservative descent and cross a designated geographical waypoint at a preselected altitude and airspeed. The guidance was designed to reduce fuel usage during the descent and reduce the mental work load associated with planning a fuel-conservative descent. A piloted simulation was conducted to evaluate the operational use of this guidance concept. The results of the simulation tests show that the use of the guidance reduced fuel consumption and mental work load during the descent. Use of the guidance also decreased the airspeed error, but had no effect on the altitude error when the designated waypoint was crossed. Physical work load increased with the use of the guidance, but remained well within acceptable levels. The pilots found the guidance easy to use as presented and reported that it would be useful in an operational environment.

  4. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy, physical treatments, postural techniques (yoga, pilates, Alexander technique), pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment, soft collars and special pillows, spray and stretch, surgery, traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). PMID:19445809

  5. Mars Science Laboratory Rover and Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In this February 17, 2009, image, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory rover is attached to the spacecraft's descent stage. The image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    This is the way the spacecraft will look after it comes out of its protective aeroshell and is descending to the Martian surface in 2012. Here, the descent stage sits on top of the rover, with its eight main engines straddling the rover structure. The rover is the big white box below the descent stage. At this point, the rover lacks its appendages (robotic arm, mast and most wheels), as these elements are still being assembled and were not needed for space-simulation testing of the spacecraft in late 2008.

  6. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2013-12-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ∼32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, has been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3 hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaign conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half-an-hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record also the observations when the balloon is descending as this information is also useful for scientific purposes.

  7. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; Babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2014-04-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH) and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ~ 32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, have been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3-hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaigns conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half an hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record the observations also when the balloon is descending as this information is useful for scientific purposes.

  8. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice. PMID:21775962

  9. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmospheres for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions.

  10. Portable Bladder Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Data from the National Population Health Survey indicate prevalence rates of urinary incontinence are 2.5% in women and 1.4 % in men in the general population. Prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women than men and prevalence increases with age. Identified risk factors for urinary incontinence include female gender, increasing age, urinary tract infections (UTI), poor mobility, dementia, smoking, obesity, consuming alcohol and caffeine beverages, physical activity, pregnancy, childbirth, forceps and vacuum-assisted births, episiotomy, abdominal resection for colorectal cancer, and hormone replacement therapy. For the purposes of this review, incontinence populations will be stratified into the following; the elderly, urology patients, postoperative patients, rehabilitation settings, and neurogenic bladder populations. Urinary incontinence is defined as any involuntary leakage of urine. Incontinence can be classified into diagnostic clinical types that are useful in planning evaluation and treatment. The major types of incontinence are stress (physical exertion), urge (overactive bladder), mixed (combined urge and stress urinary incontinence), reflex (neurological impairment of the central nervous system), overflow (leakage due to full bladder), continuous (urinary tract abnormalities), congenital incontinence, and transient incontinence (temporary incontinence). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, which is the amount of urine in the bladder immediately after urination, represents an important component in continence assessment and bladder management to provide quantitative feedback to the patient and continence care team regarding the effectiveness of the voiding technique. Although there is no standardized definition of normal PVR urine volume, measurements greater than 100 mL to 150 mL are considered an indication for urinary retention, requiring intermittent catheterization, whereas a PVR urine volume of 100 mL to 150 mL or less is generally considered an acceptable result of bladder training. Urinary retention has been associated with poor outcomes including UTI, bladder overdistension, and higher hospital mortality rates. The standard method of determining PVR urine volumes is intermittent catheterization, which is associated with increased risk of UTI, urethral trauma and discomfort. The Technology Being Reviewed Portable bladder ultrasound products are transportable ultrasound devices that use automated technology to register bladder volume digitally, including PVR volume, and provide three-dimensional images of the bladder. The main clinical use of portable bladder ultrasound is as a diagnostic aid. Health care professionals (primarily nurses) administer the device to measure PVR volume and prevent unnecessary catheterization. An adjunctive use of the bladder ultrasound device is to visualize the placement and removal of catheters. Also, portable bladder ultrasound products may improve the diagnosis and differentiation of urological problems and their management and treatment, including the establishment of voiding schedules, study of bladder biofeedback, fewer UTIs, and monitoring of potential urinary incontinence after surgery or trauma. Review Strategy To determine the effectiveness and clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound as reported in the published literature, the Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases. Nonsystematic reviews, nonhuman studies, case reports, letters, editorials, and comments were excluded. Summary of Findings Of the 4 included studies that examined the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound in the elderly population, all found the device to be acceptable. One study reported that the device underestimated catheterized bladder volume In patients with urology problems, 2 of the 3 studies concerning portable bladder ultrasound found the device acceptable to use. However, one study did not find the device as accurate for small PVR volume as for catheterization and another found that the device overestimated catheterized bladder volume. In the remaining study, the authors reported that when the device’s hand-held ultrasound transducers (scanheads) were aimed improperly, bladders were missed, or lateral borders of bladders were missed resulting in partial bladder volume measurements and underestimation of PVR measurements. They concluded that caution should be used in interpreting PVR volume measured by portable bladder ultrasound machines and that catheterization may be the preferred assessment modality if an accurate PVR measurement is necessary. All 3 studies with post-operative populations found portable bladder ultrasound use to be reasonably acceptable. Two studies reported that the device overestimated catheter-derived bladder volumes, one by 7% and the other by 21 mL. The third study reported the opposite, that the device underestimated catheter bladder volume by 39 mL but that the results remained acceptable In rehabilitation settings, 2 studies found portable bladder ultrasound to underestimate catheter-derived bladder volumes; yet, both authors concluded that the mean errors were within acceptable limits. In patients with neurogenic bladder problems, 2 studies found portable bladder ultrasound to be an acceptable alternative to catheterization despite the fact that it was not as accurate as catheterization for obtaining bladder volumes. Lastly, examinations concerning avoidance of negative health outcomes showed that, after use of the portable bladder ultrasound, unnecessary catheterizations and UTIs were decreased. Unnecessary catheterizations avoided ranged from 16% to 47% in the selected articles. Reductions in UTI ranged from 38% to 72%. In sum, all but one study advocated the use of portable bladder ultrasound as an alternative to catheterization. Economic Analysis An economic analysis estimating the budget-impact of BladderScan in complex continuing care facilities was completed. The analysis results indicated a $192,499 (Cdn) cost-savings per year per facility and a cost-savings of $2,887,485 (Cdn) for all 15 CCC facilities. No economic analysis was completed for long-term care and acute care facilities due to lack of data. Considerations for Policy Development Rapid diffusion of portable bladder ultrasound technology is expected. Recently, the IC5 project on improving continence care in Ontario’s complex continuing care centres piloted portable bladder ultrasound at 12 sites. Preliminary results were promising. Many physicians and health care facilities already have portable bladder ultrasound devices. However, portable bladder ultrasound devices for PVR measurement are not in use at most health care facilities in Ontario and Canada. The Verathon Corporation (Bothell, Wisconsin, United States), which patents BladderScan, is the sole licensed manufacturer of the portable bladder ultrasound in Canada. Field monopoly may influence the rising costs of portable bladder ultrasound, particularly when faced with rapid expansion of the technology. Several thousand residents of Ontario would benefit from portable bladder ultrasound. The number of residents of Ontario that would benefit from the technology is difficult to quantify, because the incidence and prevalence of incontinence are grossly under-reported. However, long-term care and complex continuing care institutions would benefit greatly from portable bladder ultrasound, as would numerous rehabilitation units, postsurgical care units, and urology clinics. The cost of the portable bladder ultrasound devices ranges from $17,698.90 to $19,565.95 (Cdn) (total purchase price per unit as quoted by the manufacturer). Additional training packages, batteries and battery chargers, software, gel pads, and yearly warranties are additional costs. Studies indicate that portable bladder ultrasound is a cost-effective technology, because it avoids costs associated with catheterization equipment, saves nursing time, and reduces catheter-related complications and UTIs. The use of portable bladder ultrasound device will affect the patient directly in terms of health outcomes. Its use avoids the trauma related to the urinary tract that catheterization inflicts, and does not result in UTIs. In addition, patients prefer it, because it preserves dignity and reduces discomfort. PMID:23074481

  11. America's Descent into Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes America's descent into madness under the regime of neoliberalism that has emerged in the United States since the late 1970s. In part, this is due to the emergence of a public pedagogy produced by the corporate-owned media that now saturates Americans with a market-driven value system that undermines those formative…

  12. Descent Assisted Split Habitat Lunar Lander Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The Descent Assisted Split Habitat (DASH) lunar lander concept utilizes a disposable braking stage for descent and a minimally sized pressurized volume for crew transport to and from the lunar surface. The lander can also be configured to perform autonomous cargo missions. Although a braking-stage approach represents a significantly different operational concept compared with a traditional two-stage lander, the DASH lander offers many important benefits. These benefits include improved crew egress/ingress and large-cargo unloading; excellent surface visibility during landing; elimination of the need for deep-throttling descent engines; potentially reduced plume-surface interactions and lower vertical touchdown velocity; and reduced lander gross mass through efficient mass staging and volume segmentation. This paper documents the conceptual study on various aspects of the design, including development of sortie and outpost lander configurations and a mission concept of operations; the initial descent trajectory design; the initial spacecraft sizing estimates and subsystem design; and the identification of technology needs

  13. Research study: STS-1 Orbiter Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of STS-1 orbiter descent data from AVE-SESAME contact programs to the REEDA system and the reduction of raw radiosonde data is summarized. A first difference program, contact data program, plot data program, and 30 second data program were developed. Six radiosonde soundings were taken. An example of the outputs of each of the programs is presented.

  14. A Descent Rate Control Approach to Developing an Autonomous Descent Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Travis D.

    Circular parachutes have been used for aerial payload/personnel deliveries for over 100 years. In the past two decades, significant work has been done to improve the landing accuracies of cargo deliveries for humanitarian and military applications. This dissertation discusses the approach developed in which a circular parachute is used in conjunction with an electro-mechanical reefing system to manipulate the landing location. Rather than attempt to steer the autonomous descent vehicle directly, control of the landing location is accomplished by modifying the amount of time spent in a particular wind layer. Descent rate control is performed by reversibly reefing the parachute canopy. The first stage of the research investigated the use of a single actuation during descent (with periodic updates), in conjunction with a curvilinear target. Simulation results using real-world wind data are presented, illustrating the utility of the methodology developed. Additionally, hardware development and flight-testing of the single actuation autonomous descent vehicle are presented. The next phase of the research focuses on expanding the single actuation descent rate control methodology to incorporate a multi-actuation path-planning system. By modifying the parachute size throughout the descent, the controllability of the system greatly increases. The trajectory planning methodology developed provides a robust approach to accurately manipulate the landing location of the vehicle. The primary benefits of this system are the inherent robustness to release location errors and the ability to overcome vehicle uncertainties (mass, parachute size, etc.). A separate application of the path-planning methodology is also presented. An in-flight path-prediction system was developed for use in high-altitude ballooning by utilizing the path-planning methodology developed for descent vehicles. The developed onboard system improves landing location predictions in-flight using collected flight information during the ascent and descent. Simulation and real-world flight tests (using the developed low-cost hardware) demonstrate the significance of the improvements achievable when flying the developed system.

  15. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing ...

  16. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy. PMID:26907529

  17. Angiomyolipoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Huan, Youming; Dillon, Robert W; Unger, Pamela D

    2002-12-01

    Angiomyolipoma of the bladder is an extremely rare neoplasm. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman with an angiomyolipoma of the bladder visualized on pelvic sonogram as a 5 mm polyp in the floor of the bladder. The lesional tissue consisted of spindle cells, epithelioid cells, and adipocytes, with occasional thick-walled blood vessels. Immunohistochemical studies showed the spindle and epithelioid cells to be focally positive for HMB-45 and diffusely positive for actin and muscle cell antigen (HHF-35), which confirmed the diagnosis of angiomyolipoma. A review of the recent literature on the pathogenesis of angiomyolipoma follows. PMID:12478489

  18. Bladder operated robotic joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a robotic joint which is operated by inflatable bladders and which can be used in applications where it is desired to move or hold an object. A support block supports an elongated plate to which is pivotally attached a finger. A tension strip passes over a lever attached to the finger and is attached at its ends to the support block on opposite sides of the plate. Bladders positioned between the plate and the tension strip on opposite sides of the plate can be inflated by pumps to pivot the finger, with one of the bladders being inflated while the other is being deflated.

  19. Epidemiology of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Silverman, D T; Hartge, P; Morrison, A S; Devesa, S S

    1992-02-01

    Approximately 49,000 persons in the United States develop bladder cancer each year, and about 9700 die of it. White men face a lifetime risk of almost 3%; white women and black men face a risk of about 1%, and black women, about 0.5%. Cigarette smoking is accepted widely as a cause of bladder cancer. Smoking accounts for about half of bladder cancer diagnosed among men and about one third of that among women. Moderate to heavy smokers typically show a two to five fold risk of bladder cancer, compared with persons who never smoked. When cigarette smokers quit smoking, their bladder cancer risk falls measurably within 2 to 4 years, but probably does not continue to decline with increasing years since quitting and does not appear to return to the baseline level of nonsmokers. Occupational exposure to certain aromatic amines causes human bladder cancer. Clear evidence of bladder cancer risk also is apparent for a small number of occupational groups: dye workers, rubber workers, leather workers, painters, truck drivers, and aluminum workers. Many other occupational groups have been reported to have increased bladder cancer risk, but evidence for these is not as strong. Coffee drinking has been studied extensively as a potential risk factor, but the inconsistency of the observed associations suggests that the relationship is either quite weak, noncausal, or dependent in a complex way on unmeasured factors. Artificial sweeteners confer little or no excess bladder cancer risk. Alcohol consumption apparently does not affect risk either. Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and foods high in vitamin A have been suggested as possible protective factors; consumption of high-fat foods, pork, and beef have been suggested as possible risk factors. Further epidemiologic research is needed to elucidate the role of diet in human bladder carcinogenesis. Less common risk factors for bladder cancer include ionizing radiation, cyclophosphamide use, and abuse of phenacetin-containing analgesics. Schistosomiasis infection may contribute substantially to the bladder cancer burden in Egypt and elsewhere, though not in the United States.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1556044

  20. Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-06

    The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

  1. What Is Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... much less common than urothelial (transitional cell) cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma: In the United States, only about 1% to 2% of bladder cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. Under a microscope, the cells look much like ...

  2. Robotic Bladder Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1995-01-01

    Reliable, lightweight robotic joint suitable for variety of applications, actuated hydraulically, without need for heavy mechanical cylinders or gears on joint itself. Includes two members; first member rotates about pin at end of second member. Includes cam, over which tension line stretched. Ends of tension line anchored at end of second member opposite end that holds pin. Bladder placed on each side of second member, squeezed between second member and tension line. Pressures and/or amounts of fluid in bladders controlled by use of conventional equipment like pumps, valves, and reservoirs. Bladder on one side inflated more than on other side; greater inflation on one side causes greater stretching of tension line on that side. Greater tension pulls on cam, turning first member toward that side. Angle of joint controlled by controlling differential inflation of two bladders.

  3. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  4. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Melissa T; Suskind, Anne M

    2016-02-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  5. Squamous Dysplasia of the Urinary Bladder: A Consecutive Cystectomy Series.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Joshua I; Kaag, Matthew; Raman, Jay D; Chan, Wilson; Tran, Truc; Kunchala, Sudhir; DeGraff, David; Chen, Guoli

    2016-06-01

    Squamous dysplasia of the urinary bladder is uncommon and may represent a precursor to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Though significant focus has been devoted to squamous differentiation in invasive bladder cancer, relatively little attention has been given to squamous dysplasia. We methodically reviewed microscopic slides from a consecutive cystectomy series at our institution (n = 303; 2001-2014), with special attention given to squamous dysplasia and squamous differentiation within association invasive carcinoma. Of these 303 cases, 3% (9 cases) had squamous dysplasia. The majority (89%; 8/9) had a similar morphological appearance to squamous dysplasia of the head and neck (ie, cytological atypia, architectural disturbances, and abnormal keratinization). Invasive carcinoma was present in 230 of the cystectomy cases. Of these 230 cases with invasive carcinoma, 4% (8 cases) also had squamous dysplasia. The invasive carcinoma had evidence of squamous differentiation in all cases with concurrent squamous dysplasia. Concurrent flat urothelial carcinoma in situ was present in 3 of the 8 cases with both invasive carcinoma and squamous dysplasia. Squamous dysplasia was not associated with clinical outcomes data, including death from bladder cancer and bladder cancer recurrence. The data from this study indicate that squamous dysplasia is uncommon in the cystectomy setting, frequently has the morphology of head and neck dysplasia, and is often associated with invasive carcinoma with squamous differentiation. PMID:26860905

  6. Kinetic analysis of stair descent: Part 1. Forwards step-over-step descent.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Tyler; Robertson, D Gordon E

    2011-03-01

    This study examined lower extremity biomechanics during the initiation of stair descent from an upright, static posture. Seventeen healthy subjects (aged 23±2.4 years) descended a five-step, steel-reinforced, wooden laboratory staircase (34° decline). Ten trials of stair descent were separated into two blocks of five trials. Beginning from an upright posture, subjects descended the staircase at their preferred velocity (0.53±0.082 m/s) and continued the length of the laboratory walkway (∼4 m). Joint mechanics were contrasted between gait cycles. Relative to the initiation cycle at the top of the staircase, the dissipative knee extensor (K3) and hip flexor (H2) moments and powers were independent of progression velocity and approximated steady-state (i.e., constant) values after the first cycle of the trail limb (Step 5 to Step 3). In contrast, a salient relationship was observed between progression velocity and ankle joint mechanics at initial-contact. The plantiflexor moment, power and work at initial-contact (A1) increased with centre of mass velocity. Our results demonstrate that while the knee extensor moment is the primary dissipater of mechanical energy in stair descent, the ankle plantiflexors are the primary dissipaters associated with increased progression velocity. In addition, the results show that steady-state stair descent may not be attained during the first gait cycle of the trail limb. These data shed light on locomotive strategies used in stair descent and can be applied in biomechanical models of human stair gait. Researchers and practitioners should take into consideration the influence of gait cycle and progression velocity when evaluating lower extremity function in stair descent. PMID:21292489

  7. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  8. The Other Bladder Syndrome: Underactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Miyazato, Minoru; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Detrusor underactivity, or underactive bladder (UAB), is defined as a contraction of reduced strength and/or duration resulting in prolonged bladder emptying and/or a failure to achieve complete bladder emptying within a normal time span. UAB can be observed in many neurologic conditions and myogenic failure. Diabetic cystopathy is the most important and inevitable disease developing from UAB, and can occur silently and early in the disease course. Careful neurologic and urodynamic examinations are necessary for the diagnosis of UAB. Proper management is focused on prevention of upper tract damage, avoidance of overdistension, and reduction of residual urine. Scheduled voiding, double voiding, al-blockers, and intermittent self-catheterization are the typical conservative treatment options. Sacral nerve stimulation may be an effective treatment option for UAB. New concepts such as stem cell therapy and neurotrophic gene therapy are being explored. Other new agents for UAB that act on prostaglandin E2 and EP2 receptors are currently under development. The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries that have a pipeline in urology and women’s health may want to consider UAB as a potential target condition. Scientific counsel and review of the current pharmaceutical portfolio may uncover agents, including those in other therapeutic fields, that may benefit the management of UAB. PMID:23671401

  9. APOLLO 11: Lunar Module Separates for descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Separation of the Lunar module for descent to the Lunar surface From the film documentary 'APOLLO 11:'The eagle Has Landed'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLLO 11: First manned lunar landing and return to Earth with Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin. Landed in the Sea of Tranquilityon July 20, 1969; deployed TV camera and EASEP experiments, performed lunar surface EVA, returned lunar soil samples. Mission Duration 195 hrs 18 min 35sec

  10. System for Estimating Horizontal Velocity During Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew; Cheng, Yang; Wilson, Reg; Goguen, Jay; Martin, Alejandro San; Leger, Chris; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The descent image motion estimation system (DIMES) is a system of hardware and software, designed for original use in estimating the horizontal velocity of a spacecraft descending toward a landing on Mars. The estimated horizontal velocity is used in generating rocket-firing commands to reduce the horizontal velocity as part of an overall control scheme to minimize the landing impact. DIMES can also be used for estimating the horizontal velocity of a remotely controlled or autonomous aircraft for purposes of navigation and control.

  11. Biomarkers in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Richard T; Zeegers, Maurice P; James, Nicholas D; Wallace, D Michael A; Cheng, Kar Keung

    2010-03-01

    Detailed molecular insights into bladder cancer biology might allow more detailed prognostication and optimization of treatment with the objective of improving patient outcome and quality of life. However, in bladder cancer research the search for biomarkers has been called into question and has even obtained notoriety. It is unlikely that any single marker will be able to improve prognostication for patients with bladder cancer above and beyond grade and stage, but a combination of multiple independent markers might more precisely predict the outcome. From a previous review, we identified seven biomarkers to study within the setting of the Bladder Cancer Prognosis Programme (BCPP), a 5-year multicentre programme of research based at the University of Birmingham and funded by Cancer Research UK, investigating their effectiveness in predicting recurrence and progression. As part of the ongoing quality-assurance process for BCPP we present an updated review of our selected biomarkers, as well as highlighting other recent important developments in bladder cancer research. PMID:19793380

  12. Regression Analysis of Top of Descent Location for Idle-thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel; Bronsvoort, Jesper; McDonald, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, multiple regression analysis is used to model the top of descent (TOD) location of user-preferred descent trajectories computed by the flight management system (FMS) on over 1000 commercial flights into Melbourne, Australia. The independent variables cruise altitude, final altitude, cruise Mach, descent speed, wind, and engine type were also recorded or computed post-operations. Both first-order and second-order models are considered, where cross-validation, hypothesis testing, and additional analysis are used to compare models. This identifies the models that should give the smallest errors if used to predict TOD location for new data in the future. A model that is linear in TOD altitude, final altitude, descent speed, and wind gives an estimated standard deviation of 3.9 nmi for TOD location given the trajec- tory parameters, which means about 80% of predictions would have error less than 5 nmi in absolute value. This accuracy is better than demonstrated by other ground automation predictions using kinetic models. Furthermore, this approach would enable online learning of the model. Additional data or further knowl- edge of algorithms is necessary to conclude definitively that no second-order terms are appropriate. Possible applications of the linear model are described, including enabling arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the FMS even in congested airspace. In particular, a model for TOD location that is linear in the independent variables would enable decision support tool human-machine interfaces for which a kinetic approach would be computationally too slow.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... RT, Hussain SA, James ND, Jankowski JA, Wallace DM. Molecular pathways in bladder cancer: part 1. BJU ... RT, Hussain SA, James ND, Jankowski JA, Wallace DM. Molecular pathways in bladder cancer: part 2. BJU ...

  14. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807488

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans ...

  16. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... increases your risk. In fact, 85 percent of head and neck cancers are linked to tobacco use, including smoking ...

  17. Long-term complications following bladder augmentations in patients with spina bifida: bladder calculi, perforation of the augmented bladder and upper tract deterioration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background We desire to review our experience with bladder augmentation in spina bifida patients followed in a transitional and adult urologic practice. This paper will specifically focus on three major complications: bladder calculi, the most frequent complication found following bladder augmentation, perforation of the augmentation, its most lethal complication and finally we will address loss of renal function as a direct result of our surgical reconstructive procedures. Methods We reviewed a prospective data base maintained on patients with spina bifida followed in our transitional and adult urology clinic from 1986 to date. Specific attention was given to patients who had developed bladder calculi, sustained a spontaneous perforation of the augmented bladder or had developed new onset of renal scarring or renal insufficiency (≥ stage 3 renal failure) during prolonged follow-up. Results The development of renal stones (P<0.05) and symptomatic urinary tract infections (P<0.0001) were found to be significantly reduced by the use of high volume (≥240 mL) daily bladder wash outs. Individuals who still developed bladder calculi recalcitrant to high volume wash outs were not benefited by the correction of underlying metabolic abnormalities or mucolytic agents. Spontaneous bladder perforations in the adult patient population with spina bifida were found to be directly correlated to substance abuse and noncompliance with intermittent catheterization, P<0.005. Deterioration of the upper tracts as defined by the new onset of renal scars occurred in 40% (32/80) of the patients managed by a ileocystoplasty and simultaneous bladder neck outlet procedure during a median follow-up interval 14 years (range, 8–45 years). Development of ≥ stage 3 chronic renal failure occurred within 38% (12/32) of the patients with scarring i.e., 15% (12/80) of the total patient population. Prior to the development of the renal scarring, 69% (22/32) of the patients had been noncompliant with intermittent catheterization. The onset of upper tract deterioration (i.e., new scar formation, hydronephrosis, calculus development, decrease in renal function) was silent, that is, clinically asymptomatic in one third (10/32 pts). Conclusions This paper documents the need for high volume bladder irrigations to both prevent the most common complication following bladder augmentation, which is the development of bladder calculi and to reduce the incidence of symptomatic urinary tract infections. It provides a unique perspective regarding the impact of substance abuse and patient non-compliance with medical directives as being both the most common cause for both spontaneous bladder rupture following augmentation cystoplasty and for deterioration of the upper tracts. These findings should cause the surgeon to reflect on his/her assessment of a patient prior to performing a bladder augmentation procedure and stress the need for close follow-up. PMID:26904407

  18. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10.14 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS General § 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This section identifies...

  19. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10.14 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS General § 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This section identifies...

  20. Hair Breakage in Patients of African Descent: Role of Dermoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Martinez Velasco, María Abril; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy represents a useful technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of hair and scalp disorders. To date, little has been published regarding dermoscopy findings of hair disorders in patients of African descent. This article illustrates how dermoscopy allows fast diagnosis of hair breakage due to intrinsic factors and chemical damage in African descent patients. PMID:27170942

  1. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Performance: Uncontrolled descent. 31.19 Section 31.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a) The following must be...

  2. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Rivellini, Tomasso P.; Chen, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory project recently places the Curiosity rove on the surface of Mars. With the success of the landing system, the performance envelope of entry, descent and landing capabilities has been extended over the previous state of the art. This paper will present an overview to the MSL entry, descent and landing system design and preliminary flight performance results.

  3. A Gradient Descent Approximation for Graph Cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Alparslan; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    Graph cuts have become very popular in many areas of computer vision including segmentation, energy minimization, and 3D reconstruction. Their ability to find optimal results efficiently and the convenience of usage are some of the factors of this popularity. However, there are a few issues with graph cuts, such as inherent sequential nature of popular algorithms and the memory bloat in large scale problems. In this paper, we introduce a novel method for the approximation of the graph cut optimization by posing the problem as a gradient descent formulation. The advantages of our method is the ability to work efficiently on large problems and the possibility of convenient implementation on parallel architectures such as inexpensive Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). We have implemented the proposed method on the Nvidia 8800GTS GPU. The classical segmentation experiments on static images and video data showed the effectiveness of our method.

  4. Distributed Control by Lagrangian Steepest Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Bieniawski, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Often adaptive, distributed control can be viewed as an iterated game between independent players. The coupling between the players mixed strategies, arising as the system evolves from one instant to the next, is determined by the system designer. Information theory tells us that the most likely joint strategy of the players, given a value of the expectation of the overall control objective function, is the minimizer of a function o the joint strategy. So the goal of the system designer is to speed evolution of the joint strategy to that Lagrangian mhimbhgpoint,lowerthe expectated value of the control objective function, and repeat Here we elaborate the theory of algorithms that do this using local descent procedures, and that thereby achieve efficient, adaptive, distributed control.

  5. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:24083315

  6. Error Analysis of Stochastic Gradient Descent Ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2012-12-31

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:23292808

  7. Planetary entry, descent, and landing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichkhadze, K.; Vorontsov, V.; Polyakov, A.; Ivankov, A.; Taalas, P.; Pellinen, R.; Harri, A.-M.; Linkin, V.

    2003-04-01

    Martian meteorological lander (MML) is intended for landing on the Martian surface in order to monitor the atmosphere at landing point for one Martian year. MMLs shall become the basic elements of a global network of meteorological mini-landers, observing the dynamics of changes of the atmospheric parameters on the Red Planet. The MML main scientific tasks are as follows: (1) Study of vertical structure of the Martian atmosphere throughout the MML descent; (2) On-surface meteorological observations for one Martian year. One of the essential factors influencing the lander's design is its entry, descent, and landing (EDL) sequence. During Phase A of the MML development, five different options for the lander's design were carefully analyzed. All of these options ensure the accomplishment of the above-mentioned scientific tasks with high effectiveness. CONCEPT A (conventional approach): Two lander options (with a parachute system + airbag and an inflatable airbrake + airbag) were analyzed. They are similar in terms of fulfilling braking phases and completely analogous in landing by means of airbags. CONCEPT B (innovative approach): Three lander options were analyzed. The distinguishing feature is the presence of inflatable braking units (IBU) in their configurations. SELECTED OPTION (innovative approach): Incorporating a unique design approach and modern technologies, the selected option of the lander represents a combination of the options analyzed in the framework of Concept B study. Currently, the selected lander option undergoes systems testing (Phase D1). Several MMLs can be delivered to Mars in frameworks of various missions as primary or piggybacking payload: (1) USA-led "Mars Scout" (2007); (2) France-led "NetLander" (2007/2009); (3) Russia-led "Mars-Deimos-Phobos sample return" (2007); (4) Independent mission (currently under preliminary study); etc.

  8. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future. PMID:26327873

  9. Bladder outlet obstruction triggers neural plasticity in sensory pathways and contributes to impaired sensitivity in erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Malykhina, Anna P; Lei, Qi; Chang, Shaohua; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Villamor, Antonio N; Smith, Ariana L; Seftel, Allen D

    2013-05-15

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction (ED) are common problems in aging males worldwide. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of bladder neck nerve damage induced by partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) on sensory innervation of the corpus cavernosum (CC) and CC smooth muscle (CCSM) using a rat model of PBOO induced by a partial ligation of the bladder neck. Retrograde labeling technique was used to label dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that innervate the urinary bladder and CC. Contractility and relaxation of the CCSM was studied in vitro, and expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was evaluated by Western blotting. Concentration of the sensory neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide was measured by ELISA. Partial obstruction of the bladder neck caused a significant hypertrophy of the urinary bladders (2.5-fold increase at 2 wk). Analysis of L6-S2 DRG sections determined that sensory ganglia received input from both the urinary bladder and CC with 5-7% of all neurons double labeled from both organs. The contractile responses of CC muscle strips to KCl and phenylephrine were decreased after PBOO, followed by a reduced relaxation response to nitroprusside. A significant decrease in neuronal NOS expression, but not in endothelial NOS or protein kinase G (PKG-1), was detected in the CCSM of the obstructed animals. Additionally, PBOO caused some impairment to sensory nerves as evidenced by a fivefold downregulation of SP in the CC (P ≤ 0.001). Our results provide evidence that PBOO leads to the impairment of bladder neck afferent innervation followed by a decrease in CCSM relaxation, downregulation of nNOS expression, and reduced content of sensory neuropeptides in the CC smooth muscle. These results suggest that nerve damage in PBOO may contribute to LUTS-ED comorbidity and trigger secondary changes in the contraction/relaxation mechanisms of CCSM. PMID:23535456

  10. Bridle Device in Mars Science Laboratory Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view of a portion of the descent stage of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory shows two of the stage's three spherical fuel tanks flanking the bridle device assembly. The photograph was taken in early October 2008 from the center of the descent stage looking outward. The top of the descent stage is toward the top of the image.

    The bridle device assembly is about two-thirds of a meter, or 2 feet, from top to bottom, and has two main parts. The cylinder on the top is the descent brake. The conical-shaped mechanism below that is the bridle assembly, including a spool of nylon and Vectran cords that will be attached to the rover.

    When pyrotechnic bolts fire to sever the rigid connection between the rover and the descent stage, gravity will pull the tethered rover away from the descent stage. The bridle or tether, attached to three points on the rover, will unspool from the bridle assembly, beginning from the larger-diameter portion. The rotation rate of the assembly, hence the descent rate of the rover, will be governed by the descent brake. Inside the housing of that brake are gear boxes and banks of mechanical resistors engineered to prevent the bridle from spooling out too quickly or too slowly. The length of the bridle will allow the rover to be lowered about 7.5 meters (25 feet) while still tethered to the descent stage.

    The Starsys division of SpaceDev Inc., Poway, Calif., provided the descent brake. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., built the bridle assembly. Vectran is a product of Kuraray Co. Ltd., Tokyo. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  11. Simulator Evaluation of a New Cockpit Descent Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Barry; Palmer, Everett; Smith, Nancy; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate flight crew performance of the "Precision Descent," a new cockpit procedure designed to support the Descent Advisor (DA), one of the components in a new air traffic control advisory system called the "Center-TRACON Automation System" (CTAS). The DA predicts when aircraft will reach a specific waypoint on the arrival route, and presents controllers with clearance advisories designed to improve the sequencing of arriving aircraft. The effectiveness of the DA depends on the aircraft's descent trajectory: where it begins descent, what speed it maintains, how fast and at what altitude it crosses the bottom-of-descent waypoint. The Precision Descent allows controllers to assign these descent parameters to the flight crew. A Field Evaluation of the DA was conducted in Denver in 1995. Three separate clearances using standard ATC phraseology were used to support the cockpit descent procedure during this evaluation. The number and length of these clearances caused problems for both controllers and flight crews, causing readback errors, repeat requests and procedure misunderstandings. These observations led to a focus group meeting in which controller and pilot participants in the 1995 FE assisted in the redesign of the procedure. The Precision Descent eliminates one clearance used in the earlier study, and greatly reduces the length of the remaining clearances. This was accomplished by using non-standard clearance phraseology that relies on a published procedure chart for correct interpretation. Eight type-rated flight crews flew eight Precision Descents in a Boeing 747-400 simulator. No training was provided: crews received either a procedure chart or a procedure chart with a flight manual bulletin describing procedure techniques. Video and digital data were recorded for each descent. Preliminary results indicate that moving information from the verbal clearance to the chart was successful: the shorter clearances and the procedure's default crossing restriction were understood, and procedure compliance of 81% was observed across all descents on six independent compliance measures. Some readback errors and procedure misunderstandings were still observed, however; particularly when descent clearances deviated from the normative procedure.

  12. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  13. Vesicoureteral reflux and bladder dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Lee, Yong Seung; Im, Young Jae

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between vesicoureteral reflux and bladder dysfunction is inseparable and has long been emphasized. However, the primary concern of all physicians treating patients with vesicoureteral reflux is the prevention of renal scarring and eventual deterioration of renal function. Bladder dysfunction, urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux are the three important factors which are closely related to each other and contribute to the formation of renal scar. Especially, there is ongoing discussion regarding the role of bladder dysfunction in the prognosis of both medically and surgically treated vesicoureteral reflux. The effect of bladder dysfunction on VUR is mostly via inadequate sphincter relaxation during infancy which is closer to immature bladder dyscoordination rather than true dysfunction. But after toilet training, functional obstruction caused by voluntary sphincter constriction during voiding is responsible through elevation in bladder pressure, thus distorting the architecture of bladder and ureterovesical junction. Reports suggest that voiding phase abnormalities in lower urinary tract dysfunction contributes to lower spontaneous resolution rate of VUR. However, filling phase abnormalities such as involuntary detrusor contraction can also cause VUR even in the absence of dysfunctional voiding. With regards to the effect of bladder dysfunction on treatment, meta-analysis reveals that the cure rate of VUR following endoscopic treatment is less in children with bladder bowel dysfunction but there is no difference for open surgery. The pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction associated with UTI can be explained by the milk-back of contaminated urine back into the bladder and significant residual urine resulting from functional outlet obstruction. In addition, involuntary detrusor contraction can decrease perfusion of the bladder mucosa thus decreasing mucosal immunity and creating a condition prone to UTI. In terms of renal scarring, dysfunctional voiding seems to be more closely related to renal damage in association with VUR than overactive bladder. However, studies show that UTI can induce renal scarring even without VUR present and urodynamic abnormalities are quite often detected in these cases. Whether reflux of sterile urine in bladder dysfunction can cause significant renal scarring, especially when intrarenal reflux is present remains controversial. Another issue that warrants further research is the direct relationship between bladder dysfunction and renal scarring, since some reports suggest that these two conditions share a common genotype. Recently some studies have suggest VUR as a causal factor of bladder dysfunction, supported by the fact that bladder dysfunction resolves after injection therapy of VUR. Further study with more objective evaluation of bladder dysfunction may be needed. PMID:26816705

  14. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutton, R.E.; Moore, H.J.; Scott, R.F.; Shorthill, R.W.; Spitzer, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift material, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  15. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, R. E.; Moore, H. J.; Scott, R. F.; Shorthill, R. W.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift materials, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock.

  16. Female Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Daniel S; Nitti, Victor W

    2016-04-01

    The non-specific symptoms the patients express upon the presentation of female bladder outlet obstruction make it a challenge to diagnose. There are subtle differences between the obstructed patient and those whose bladders are underactive and/or fail to mount a detrusor contraction. These disparities can be extracted through a thorough history and examination. At times, the clinician may utilize nomograms, non-invasive uroflow, and urodynamics with the addition of fluoroscopy to establish the diagnosis of obstruction. Management of the obstruction depends on the nature of the condition, whether functional or anatomical. The increase in the number of sling procedures performed to treat stress urinary incontinence has resulted in a rise in the number of iatrogenic obstructions. The temporal relationship between surgery and obstruction is the key to identifying the problem. PMID:26902625

  17. Overactive bladder in males

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowski, Roger R.; Gomelsky, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms is considerable in both men and women and the impact on quality of life (QOL) is equally substantial. Ironically, despite nearly equal prevalence, OAB symptoms in men are infrequently treated, and often with medical therapies aimed at bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). In this review, we examine the pathophysiology of OAB and its evaluation in the context of benign prostatic hypertrophy and concomitant BOO. We then consider the efficacy and safety of individual therapeutic options for lower urinary tract symptoms in men, focusing on the mainstays of medical therapy: α-adrenergic blockers, 5-α reductase inhibitors, and antimuscarinic agents. Finally, we aim to comment on new therapeutic strategies and targets that may one day be available for the treatment of male OAB. PMID:21789068

  18. Emerging technology in head and neck ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Holtel, Michael R

    2010-12-01

    Increased use of ultrasonography of the head and neck by clinicians has resulted from more compact, higher resolution ultrasound machines that can be more readily used in the office setting. Palm-sized machines are already used for vascular access and bladder assessment. As the resolution of these machines becomes adequate for head and neck assessment, ultrasonography is likely to become a routine adjunct to the office physical examination. Further techniques to reduce artifact beyond spatial compounding, second harmonics, and broadband inversion techniques are likely to be developed to improve ultrasound images. Manual palpation using the ultrasound transducer or "sound palpation," using sound to recreate vibration provides information on tissue "stiffness," which has been successfully used to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions in the head and neck (particularly thyroid nodules). Microbubble contrast-enhanced ultrasound provides improved resolution of ultrasound images. Three- and four-dimensional ultrasonography provides for more accurate diagnosis. The ability of microbubbles with ligands affixed to their outer surface to target specific tissue makes them excellent delivery vehicles. DNA plasmids, chemotherapy agents, and therapeutic drugs can be released at a specific anatomic site. The motion of microbubbles stimulated by ultrasound can be used to increase drug penetration through tissues and has been shown to be effective in breaking up clots in stroke patients (without increased risk). High-intensity focused ultrasound can be used to create coagulation necrosis without significant damage to adjacent tissue. It has been effectively used in neurosurgery and urology, but its effectiveness in the head and neck is still being determined. A prototype for surgical navigation with ultrasound has been developed for the head and neck, which allows real-time imaging of anatomic surgical changes. PMID:21044741

  19. Metabonomic profiling of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Hong, Yanjun; Ho, Paul C; Mahendran, Ratha; Raman Nee Mani, Lata; Chiong, Edmund; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan

    2015-02-01

    Early diagnosis and life-long surveillance are clinically important to improve the long-term survival of bladder cancer patients. Currently, a noninvasive biomarker that is as sensitive and specific as cystoscopy in detecting bladder tumors is lacking. Metabonomics is a complementary approach for identifying perturbed metabolic pathways in bladder cancer. Significant progress has been made using modern metabonomic techniques to characterize and distinguish bladder cancer patients from control subjects, identify marker metabolites, and shed insights on the disease biology and potential therapeutic targets. With its rapid development, metabonomics has the potential to impact the clinical management of bladder cancer patients in the future by revolutionizing the diagnosis and life-long surveillance strategies and stratifying patients for diagnostic, surgical, and therapeutic clinical trials. An introduction to metabonomics, typical metabonomic workflow, and critical evaluation of metabonomic investigations in identifying biomarkers for the diagnosis of bladder cancer are presented. PMID:25388527

  20. Distributed Method to Optimal Profile Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geun I.

    Current ground automation tools for Optimal Profile Descent (OPD) procedures utilize path stretching and speed profile change to maintain proper merging and spacing requirements at high traffic terminal area. However, low predictability of aircraft's vertical profile and path deviation during decent add uncertainty to computing estimated time of arrival, a key information that enables the ground control center to manage airspace traffic effectively. This paper uses an OPD procedure that is based on a constant flight path angle to increase the predictability of the vertical profile and defines an OPD optimization problem that uses both path stretching and speed profile change while largely maintaining the original OPD procedure. This problem minimizes the cumulative cost of performing OPD procedures for a group of aircraft by assigning a time cost function to each aircraft and a separation cost function to a pair of aircraft. The OPD optimization problem is then solved in a decentralized manner using dual decomposition techniques under inter-aircraft ADS-B mechanism. This method divides the optimization problem into more manageable sub-problems which are then distributed to the group of aircraft. Each aircraft solves its assigned sub-problem and communicate the solutions to other aircraft in an iterative process until an optimal solution is achieved thus decentralizing the computation of the optimization problem.

  1. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing simulation was created over the past two years to serve as the primary Crew Exploration Vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis tool at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) simulation is a six degree-of-freedom tool with a unique design architecture which has a high level of flexibility. This paper describes the decision history and motivations that guided the creation of this simulation tool. The capabilities of the models within ANTARES are presented in detail. Special attention is given to features of the highly flexible GN&C architecture and the details of the implemented GN&C algorithms. ANTARES provides a foundation simulation for the Orion Project that has already been successfully used for requirements analysis, system definition analysis, and preliminary GN&C design analysis. ANTARES will find useful application in engineering analysis, mission operations, crew training, avionics-in-the-loop testing, etc. This paper focuses on the entry simulation aspect of ANTARES, which is part of a bigger simulation package supporting the entire mission profile of the Orion vehicle. The unique aspects of entry GN&C design are covered, including how the simulation is being used for Monte Carlo dispersion analysis and for support of linear stability analysis. Sample simulation output from ANTARES is presented in an appendix.

  2. Optical system design of descent camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Li, Yingcai; Miao, Xinghua; Wen, Desheng; Zhao, Baochang

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents two optical systems of descent cameras. These two lens systems have the same parameter whose effective focal length is 14 mm, F-number is F/8, field of view is 72 degree and the working wavelength rang is 0.5-0.8μm. Two different optical structures were used respectively in these two systems. This paper analyses and compares their capacity respectively. Only two kinds of glass material were used in these two optical systems, the difference from the usual imaging system is that this system is required to be fit for the demand of spaceflight environment. It should be small and light enough on the one hand, and the imaging quality should be high on the other hand. The detector whose image element size is 14 um, its Nyquist cut-off frequency is 35.711p/mm, its diffraction limit MTF is 0.76. Program 1's 1.0 field MTF>=0.58 at the Nyquist cut-off frequency. The biggest relative distortion of this system is+0.2%, Image irradiance at the edge of the field was found to be 50% of the central value. In the design of program 2, MTF approach diffraction limit, the biggest relative distortion in 1.0 field is 0.7%. Because of the structure of telecentric beam path design, the relative illumination in 72° view field is comparatively average.

  3. Bladder outlet obstruction treated with transurethral ultrasonic aspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Terrence R.

    1991-07-01

    Fifty-nine males with bladder outlet obstruction were treated with transurethral ultrasonic aspiration of the prostate. Utilizing a 26.5 French urethral sheath, surgery was accomplished with a 10 French, 0-700 micron vibration level ultrasonic tip with an excursion rate of 39 kHz. Complete removal of the adenoma was accomplished, followed by transurethral electrocautery biopsies of both lateral lobes to compare pathologic specimens. One-year follow-up revealed satisfactory voiding patterns in 57 of 59 men (96%). Two men developed bladder neck contractures. Pathologic comparisons showed 100% correlation between aspirated and TUR specimens (56 BPH, 3 adeno-carcinoma). Forty-sevel men were active sexually preoperatively (6 with inflatable penile prostheses). Post ultrasonic aspiration, 46 men had erectile function similar to preoperative levels with one patient suffering erectile dysfunction. Forty men (85%) had antegrade ejaculation while 7 (15%) experienced retrograde or retarded ejaculation. No patients were incontinent.

  4. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  5. Design and Development of the MSL Descent Stage Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Guernsey, Carl S.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, The Mars Science Laboratory mission successfully landed the largest interplanetary rover ever built, Curiosity, on the surface of Mars. The Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of this mission was by far the most complex landing ever attempted on a planetary body. The Descent Stage Propulsion System played an integral and critical role during Curiosity's EDL. The Descent Stage Propulsion System was a one of a kind hydrazine propulsion system designed specifically for the EDL phase of the MSL mission. It was designed, built, and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the design and development of the MSL Descent Stage Propulsion System. Driving requirements, system design, component selection, operational sequence of the system at Mars, new developments, and key challenges will be discussed.

  6. Automation for Accommodating Fuel-Efficient Descents in Constrained Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coopenbarger, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous descents at low engine power are desired to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and noise during arrival operations. The challenge is to allow airplanes to fly these types of efficient descents without interruption during busy traffic conditions. During busy conditions today, airplanes are commonly forced to fly inefficient, step-down descents as airtraffic controllers work to ensure separation and maximize throughput. NASA in collaboration with government and industry partners is developing new automation to help controllers accommodate continuous descents in the presence of complex traffic and airspace constraints. This automation relies on accurate trajectory predictions to compute strategic maneuver advisories. The talk will describe the concept behind this new automation and provide an overview of the simulations and flight testing used to develop and refine its underlying technology.

  7. Ascent/descent ancillary data production user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brans, H. R.; Seacord, A. W., II; Ulmer, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Product, also called the A/D BET because it contains a Best Estimate of the Trajectory (BET), is a collection of trajectory, attitude, and atmospheric related parameters computed for the ascent and descent phases of each Shuttle Mission. These computations are executed shortly after the event in a post-flight environment. A collection of several routines including some stand-alone routines constitute what is called the Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Production Program. A User's Guide for that program is given. It is intended to provide the reader with all the information necessary to generate an Ascent or a Descent Ancillary Data Product. It includes descriptions of the input data and output data for each routine, and contains explicit instructions on how to run each routine. A description of the final output product is given.

  8. Neck skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Duplechain, J Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The author of this article uses the pulsed ablative CO2 laser for resurfacing of the neck and face, based on the gold standard status of the CO2 laser and a novel post-treatment plan that greatly reduces adverse effects traditionally associated with fully ablative resurfacing. The croton oil peel is an inexpensive and effective modality for rejuvenating neck skin. The use of either technique as an adjunct to neck lift surgery, with or without facelift surgery, permits surgeons to fulfill the expectations of patients who want the skin of their face and neck to be homogeneous and more attractive. PMID:24745383

  9. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Keay, Susan K.; Birder, Lori A.; Chai, Toby C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology. PMID:24900993

  10. Bladder conservation for muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Peter; Dubash, Suraiya

    2012-08-01

    In the UK alone, approximately 10,000 patients are diagnosed with bladder cancer each year. Of these, muscle-invasive bladder cancer stage T2 or T3 accounts for 10-15%, with the remainder being non-muscle-invasive tumors, dealt with by local intravesical treatment. This group of patients are often older, the median age at presentation being 65-70 years and since this is a smoking-associated cancer there are often significant comorbidities. Transitional cell carcinoma is the most common histological type and comprises >90% of bladder cancers. Other cell types include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, sarcoma, carcinosarcoma, lymphoma and melanoma. In bladder cancer, the most important prognostic factors are stage and grade. Cystectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy all have a role in the management of bladder cancer. In many centers across the world, the standard management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer, stage T2 and T3, is radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. There is now increasing evidence that modern nonsurgical approaches using chemoradiation achieve results at least as good as those with surgery and enable bladder preservation in the majority of patients. Optimal chemoradiation schedules and the role of radiosensitizers remain important areas of research to optimize the bladder-preserving approach. Ultimately, a prospective randomized trial is needed to compare modern state-of-the-art surgery with chemoradiation to provide high-level evidence on which informed patient choices can be made. PMID:23030221

  11. Promotion in urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S M

    1983-01-01

    Aromatic amines, including 2-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl and benzidine, are known urinary bladder carcinogens in man and other species, but in rodents, aromatic amines and amides have usually induced liver tumors, occasionally also with tumors of the bladder and other tissues. Variations in organ specificity are related to differences in metabolism; for the production of bladder tumors, the rates of acetylation and deacetylation appear to be critical. Bladder specific carcinogens in rodents and other species have subsequently been identified, including N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) administered in the drinking water, N-[(4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl]formamide (FANFT) in the diet and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) instilled intravesically. When low doses of several bladder carcinogens (BBN, FANFT, 2-acetylaminofluorene, and 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine) are administered to rats, either simultaneously or sequentially, a synergistic effect is observed with respect to bladder carcinogenesis. In addition, a multistage carcinogenesis process has been demonstrated for the rat bladder using MNU or FANFT as initiators, and dietary sodium saccharin, sodium cyclamate, or tryptophan as promoters. Calculi (or pellets) appear to enhance the promotion process but are not necessary for it to occur. Recent studies also indicate that urine has a role in the promoting process. The urothelium normally has a very low mitotic rate. If mucosal proliferation is increased, such as during fetal development or during regeneration and repair of an ulcer, the bladder appears to be considerably more sensitive to the effects of promoting substances. For example, if sodium saccharin is administered to rats after ulceration of the bladder, even without prior administration of an initiator, bladder carcinoma develops. Under these conditions, the substance appears as a carcinogen. Human populations with increased bladder epithelial proliferation, such as fetus, infants, patients with bacterial cystitis or men with partially obstructive prostatism, may have increased susceptibility to the action of carcinogenic or promoting stimuli. PMID:6873031

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Ye, Yuanqing; Siddiq, Afshan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Kooperberg, Charles; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Prescott, Jennifer; Porru, Stefano; Dinney, Colin P.; Malats, Núria; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark; Jacobs, Eric J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Tang, Wei; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth; Tjønneland, Anne; Brenan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Conti, David; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Kamat, Ashish M.; Lerner, Seth P.; Barton Grossman, H.; Lin, Jie; Gu, Jian; Pu, Xia; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Johnson, Alison; Schned, Alan; Armenti, Karla R.; Hosain, G.M.; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Ryan Diver, W.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Haiman, Chris A.; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Vineis, Paolo; Wu, Xifeng; Silverman, Debra T.; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 11 independent susceptibility loci associated with bladder cancer risk. To discover additional risk variants, we conducted a new GWAS of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls, followed by a meta-analysis with two independently published bladder cancer GWAS, resulting in a combined analysis of 6911 cases and 11 814 controls of European descent. TaqMan genotyping of 13 promising single nucleotide polymorphisms with P < 1 × 10−5 was pursued in a follow-up set of 801 cases and 1307 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs10936599 on 3q26.2 (P = 4.53 × 10−9) and rs907611 on 11p15.5 (P = 4.11 × 10−8). Two notable loci were also identified that approached genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 on 20p12.2 (P = 7.13 × 10−7) and rs4510656 on 6p22.3 (P = 6.98 × 10−7); these require further studies for confirmation. In conclusion, our study has identified new susceptibility alleles for bladder cancer risk that require fine-mapping and laboratory investigation, which could further understanding into the biological underpinnings of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24163127

  13. A descent of the aurora over Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiter, Daniel; Partamies, Noora

    2014-05-01

    A very large statistical study (? 4 105 measurements) into the peak emission height of the aurora has shown that the aurora over Lapland descended significantly between 1996 and 2007. The study was performed using images from a network of ground-based all-sky cameras which form part of the MIRACLE (Magnetometers-Ionospheric Radar-All-sky Cameras Large Experiment) network, and are located at various observation stations across northern Finland and Sweden. The height of the aurora was first measured about a century ago. Since then, it has generally been assumed that the peak emission height of any particular auroral emission is constant for similar geomagnetic conditions. The present work was motivated by the need to improve estimates of the height of the aurora used to calculate other ionospheric and auroral properties, such as optical flow velocities and auroral arc widths. In recent years MIRACLE has produced approximately 105 images of the aurora per station per year. In order to analyse such a large number of images, a novel fast and automatic method was developed for finding the peak emission height of an auroral structure from a pair of all-sky camera images with overlapping fields of view. This method has been applied to all auroral images recorded by the MIRACLE intensified CCD cameras in operation between 1996 and 2007. Such a large data set allows the study of variations in the height of the aurora with time (yearly, monthly, hourly) and with solar and geomagnetic indices such as F10.7 and Kp. Results from the statistical study show that the peak emission height of green (557.7 nm, O1S - O1D transition) aurora over Lapland descended by about 10 km between 1996 and 2007. This descent occurred independently of the solar cycle, and is thought to be due to a cooling and contraction of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  14. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (QTVR)

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is an approximately true-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. Seams between individual frames have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  15. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  16. Vulvar Metastasis from Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; El Rassy, Elie; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Hawaux, Eric; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is a very rare entity; few cases are reported in the English literature. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological characteristics, evolution, and treatment of a patient with vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder followed by a brief review of the reported cases in the literature. PMID:26000184

  17. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  18. Human Scleral Structural Stiffness Increases More Rapidly With Age in Donors of African Descent Compared to Donors of European Descent

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Massimo A.; Grytz, Rafael; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Bruno, Luigi; Girkin, Christopher A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We tested the hypothesis that the variation of peripapillary scleral structural stiffness with age is different in donors of European (ED) and African (AD) descent. Methods. Posterior scleral shells from normal eyes from donors of European (n = 20 pairs; previously reported) and African (n = 9 pairs) descent aged 0 and 90 years old were inflation tested within 48 hours post mortem. Scleral shells were pressurized from 5 to 45 mm Hg and the full-field, 3-dimensional (3D) deformation of the outer surface was recorded at submicrometric accuracy using speckle interferometry (ESPI). Mean maximum principal (tensile) strain of the peripapillary and midperipheral regions surrounding the optic nerve head (ONH) were fit using a functional mixed effects model that accounts for intradonor variability, same-race correlation, and spatial autocorrelation to estimate the effect of race on the age-related changes in mechanical scleral strain. Results. Mechanical tensile strain significantly decreased with age in the peripapillary sclera in the African and European descent groups (P < 0.001), but the age-related stiffening was significantly greater in the African descent group (P < 0.05). Maximum principal strain in the peripapillary sclera was significantly higher than in the midperipheral sclera for both ethnic groups. Conclusions. The sclera surrounding the ONH stiffens more rapidly with age in the African descent group compared to the European group. Stiffening of the peripapillary sclera with age may be related to the higher prevalence of glaucoma in the elderly and persons of African descent. PMID:25237162

  19. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS History AHNS Leadership Past Presidents In Memory Professionalism & Ethics Find A Specialist Humanitarian Efforts AHNS ...

  20. Medical management of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ubee, Sarvpreet S.; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Singh, Gurpreet

    2010-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB), as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat. PMID:20877608

  1. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, M. C.; Caplinger, M. A.; Carr, M. H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-08-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (~6 × 6 × 12 cm, including baffle; <500 gm), low power requirements (<2.5 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 × 1000 pixel, low noise). The intent of the investigation is to acquire nested images over a range of resolutions, from 8 m/pixel to better than 1 cm/pixel, during the roughly 2 min it takes the MPL to descend from 8 km to the surface under parachute and rocket-powered deceleration. Observational goals will include studies of (1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes) (2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief) and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 × 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 × 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a ``best final nonpowered descent image'' will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 × 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view.

  2. Design of automation tools for management of descent traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Nedell, William

    1988-01-01

    The design of an automated air traffic control system based on a hierarchy of advisory tools for controllers is described. Compatibility of the tools with the human controller, a key objective of the design, is achieved by a judicious selection of tasks to be automated and careful attention to the design of the controller system interface. The design comprises three interconnected subsystems referred to as the Traffic Management Advisor, the Descent Advisor, and the Final Approach Spacing Tool. Each of these subsystems provides a collection of tools for specific controller positions and tasks. This paper focuses primarily on the Descent Advisor which provides automation tools for managing descent traffic. The algorithms, automation modes, and graphical interfaces incorporated in the design are described. Information generated by the Descent Advisor tools is integrated into a plan view traffic display consisting of a high-resolution color monitor. Estimated arrival times of aircraft are presented graphically on a time line, which is also used interactively in combination with a mouse input device to select and schedule arrival times. Other graphical markers indicate the location of the fuel-optimum top-of-descent point and the predicted separation distances of aircraft at a designated time-control point. Computer generated advisories provide speed and descent clearances which the controller can issue to aircraft to help them arrive at the feeder gate at the scheduled times or with specified separation distances. Two types of horizontal guidance modes, selectable by the controller, provide markers for managing the horizontal flightpaths of aircraft under various conditions. The entire system consisting of descent advisor algorithm, a library of aircraft performance models, national airspace system data bases, and interactive display software has been implemented on a workstation made by Sun Microsystems, Inc. It is planned to use this configuration in operational evaluations at an en route center.

  3. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malin, M.C.; Caplinger, M.A.; Carr, M.H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (???6 ?? 6 ?? 12 cm, including baffle; <500 gm), low power requirements (<2.5 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise). The intent of the investigation is to acquire nested images over a range of resolutions, from 8 m/pixel to better than 1 cm/pixel, during the roughly 2 min it takes the MPL to descend from 8 km to the surface under parachute and rocket-powered deceleration. Observational goals will include studies of (1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); (2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief); and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 x 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 X 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a "best final nonpowered descent image" will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 x 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a possibility with long-term administration, the dose should be decreased to 16,000 IU after 3 years. High doses of beta-carotene should be avoided based on a large clinical trial reporting a 25% increase in the number of cases of prostate cancer and a statistically significant increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Vitamin B6 has been studied in several clinical trials in bladder cancer. The US-based Veterans Administration cooperative study found benefit for vitamin B6 when given as a single agent. Data for vitamins C and E are insufficient to recommend either agent as stand-alone treatment. Nonetheless, each of these vitamins is known to have beneficial effects, including improved function of the immune system. It is possible that only a small percentage of patients with bladder cancer respond to vitamins B6, C, or E, yet each is safe, nontoxic, and inexpensive. In an effort to pool the efficacy of individual agents and to increase the power of study, the authors evaluated the combination of vitamins A, B6, C, and E in a double-blind trial. The observed 50% 5-year reduction in tumor recurrence was highly significant and greater than would be expected for any of the individual ingredients and suggests that combinations of nutritional agents may be most appropriate. A large-volume study along similar lines is being conducted. Among the numerous other compounds and dietary substances purported to have chemopreventive effect, soybeans, garlic, and green tea stand out as having the greatest promise and can freely be recommended to patients. For synthetically synthesized agents such as celecoxib, piroxicam, or DFMO, recommendations must be deferred until the results of clinical trials are conclusively in favor of their use. Many of the dietary factors found to be protective against bladder cancer are being investigated in other cancers and are beneficial to general health. Although naturally occurring nutrients are ideal, especially because the delicate balance of various micronutrients might be impossible to synthesize in the laboratory, the general population finds it easier to take vitamin supplements. Unfortunately, dietary changes such as decreasing fat and increasing fruit and vegetable intake are more difficult to initiate. There is a mistaken notion that simply because an agent is naturally occurring, it cannot be as beneficial as taking a substance synthesized in the laboratory. Even in a high-risk group such as nuclear-bomb survivors in Japan, high consumption of vegetables and fruit is protective against bladder cancer [44]. Encouraging patients to follow an essentially healthy food habit lifestyle will be a significant contribution in the fight against cancer. PMID:12109342

  5. Ureteral bladder augmentation.

    PubMed

    Churchill, B M; Aliabadi, H; Landau, E H; McLorie, G A; Steckler, R E; McKenna, P H; Khoury, A E

    1993-08-01

    Virtually all segments of the gastrointestinal tract have been used successfully in augmentation cystoplasty. The complications inherent in enterocystoplasty are well described. Megaureters subtending effete kidneys (poorly or nonfunctioning) provide a novel and excellent source of augmentation material with urothelium and muscular backing, free of the electrolyte and acid base disturbances, and mucus production that plague enterocystoplasty. Augmentation cystoplasty using detubularized, reconfigured, otherwise disposable megaureter, with or without ipsilateral total or partial nephrectomy, was performed in 16 patients (mean age 8.8 years, range 1 to 25) with inadequate and dysfunctional bladders. Postoperative followup varied between 8 and 38 months (mean 22). The overall renal function and radiographic appearance of the remaining upper tracts have remained stable or improved in all patients. Of the 16 patients 15 require intermittent catheterization and 1 voids spontaneously. Ten patients are continent day and night, 5 have improved continence (4 damp at night and 1 stress incontinence) and 1 has failed to gain continence despite good capacity and compliance. Complete postoperative urodynamic evaluations in 12 of 13 patients show good capacity, low pressure bladders with no instability. Complications occurred in 5 patients, including transient urine extravasation in 2, contralateral ureterovesical obstruction in 2 and Mitrofanoff stomal stenosis in 1. Augmentation ureterocystoplasty combines the benefits common to all enterocystoplasties without adding any of the untoward complications or risks associated with nonurothelial augmentations. PMID:8326632

  6. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  7. A rare urinary bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Haddad-Lacle, Judella Edwina Maria; Haddad, Charles Joseph; Villas, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 54-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician with low back pain. During his workup, an incidental finding of a bladder mass was diagnosed. He underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumour and the resulting pathology was consistent with extra nodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma). Presentation of MALT lymphoma in the urinary bladder is rare. This malignancy is more commonly found in the stomach. The prognosis for this rare tumour is excellent. Our patient showed no sign of recurrence with transurethral excision and radiation alone. PMID:24835803

  8. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  9. Neck dissections: radical to conservative

    PubMed Central

    Harish, K

    2005-01-01

    Background Neck dissection is an important surgical procedure for the management of metastatic nodal disease in the neck. The gold standard of neck nodal management has been the radical neck dissection. Any modification in the neck dissection is always compared with this standard. Over the last few decades, in order to alleviate the morbidity of radical neck dissection, several modifications and conservative procedures have been advocated. These procedures retain certain lymphatic or non-lymphatic structures and have been shown not to compromise oncological safety. Methods A literature search of the Medline was carried out for all articles on neck dissections. The articles were systematically reviewed to analyze and trace the evolution of neck dissection. These were then categorized to address the nomenclature, management of node positive and node negative neck including those who had received chemoradiation. Results The present article discusses the neck nodal nomenclature, the radical neck dissection, its modifications and migration to more conservative procedures and possible advances in the near future. Conclusion Radical neck dissection is now replaced with modified radical neck dissections in most situations. Attempts are being made to replace modified radical neck dissections with selective neck dissections for early node positivity. Sentinel node biopsy is being studied to address the issue of node negative neck. More conservative surgeries are likely to replace the 'radical' surgeries of bygone era. This process is facilitated by earlier detection of the disease and better understanding of cancer biology. PMID:15836786

  10. Possible Descent From Stratosphere To Troposphere In Antarctic Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, H. K.

    Descent from stratosphere to troposphere in Antarctic winter is feasible because of forcing from above by subsidence in the stratosphere and wave-breaking friction in the stratosphere and mesosphere, together with suction from below to resupply the katabatic winds in the boundary layer. These winds flow down the slope at the edge of the Antarctic Plateau due to radiative cooling and subsidence. In Antarctic winter, there is no tropopause or tropospheric convection to prevent such descent. It would be important because there would be an alternative fractionation pathway for H2O18 in Antarctic ice-cores; because the dryness and low precipitation over the Antarctic Plateau would not be altered during global warming; and because the ozone budget in the unpolluted troposphere of the southern hemisphere would be significantly different. Ways of observing such descent are discussed.

  11. Crew Procedures for Continuous Descent Arrivals Using Conventional Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Williams, David H.; Lewis, Elliot T,

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study which investigated the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures for conducting a descent through a busy terminal area, using conventional transport-category automation. This research was part of the Low Noise Flight Procedures (LNFP) element within the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project, that addressed development of flight guidance, and supporting pilot and Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures for low noise operations. The procedures and chart were designed to be easy to understand, and to make it easy for the crew to make changes via the Flight Management Computer Control-Display Unit (FMC-CDU) to accommodate changes from ATC. The test runs were intended to represent situations typical of what exists in many of today's terminal areas, including interruptions to the descent in the form of clearances issued by ATC.

  12. Rosetta Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and Philae's Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-09-01

    In November 2014 the Rosetta mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its Philae lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more challenging. Philae fell almost radially towards 67P, as shown in an animation produced by the European Space Agency (ESA) prior to the event. Below, we investigate whether it is possible to model the spacecraft's descent time and impact speed using concepts taught in an introductory physics course.

  13. Space shuttle descent design: From development to operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crull, T. J.; Hite, R. E., III

    1985-01-01

    The descent guidance system, the descent trajectories design, and generating of the associated flight products are discussed. The programs which allow the successful transitions from development to STS operations, resulting in reduced manpower requirements and compressed schedules for flight design cycles are addressed. The topics include: (1) continually upgraded tools for the job, i.e., consolidating tools via electronic data transfers, tailoring general purpose software for needs, easy access to tools through an interactive approach, and appropriate flexibility to allow design changes and provide growth capability; (2) stabilizing the flight profile designs (I-loads) in an uncertain environment; and (3) standardizing external interfaces within performance and subsystems constraints of the Orbiter.

  14. Flight Data Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Elmain M.; Winterhalter, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Winterhalter, NASA Engineering and Safety Center Chief Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsor a 3-year effort to collect entry, descent, and landing material and to establish a NASA-wide archive to serve the material. The principle focus of this task was to identify entry, descent, and landing repository material that was at risk of being permanently lost due to damage, decay, and undocumented storage. To provide NASA-wide access to this material, a web-based digital archive was created. This document contains the outcome of the effort.

  15. Mars Smart Lander Simulations for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, S. A.; Way, D. W.; Balaram, J.

    2002-01-01

    Two primary simulations have been developed and are being updated for the Mars Smart Lander Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). The high fidelity engineering end-to-end EDL simulation that is based on NASA Langley's Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) and the end-to-end real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation testbed, which is based on NASA JPL's (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS). This paper presents the status of these Mars Smart Lander EDL end-to-end simulations at this time. Various models, capabilities, as well as validation and verification for these simulations are discussed.

  16. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study: Phase 1 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Komar, David R.; Munk, Michelle M.; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Powell, Richard W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wilhite, Alan W.; Kinney, David J.; McGuire, M. Kathleen; Arnold, James O.; Howard, Austin R.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Studak, Joseph W.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.; Llama, Eduardo G.; Casoliva, Jordi; Ivanov, Mark C.; Clark, Ian; Sengupta, Anita

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the motivation, approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission

  17. Talar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

    2001-01-01

    Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

  18. Neck-Tongue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nancy; Dougherty, Carrie

    2016-03-01

    Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is a headache disorder often initiated by rapid axial rotation of the neck resulting in unilateral neck and/or occipital pain and transient ipsilateral tongue sensory disturbance. In this review, we examine reported cases of NTS since its initial description in 1980 to highlight the significance of this condition in the differential diagnosis of headache in patients presenting with neck pain and altered tongue sensation. The anatomical basis of NTS centers on the C1-C2 facet joint, C2 ventral ramus, and inferior oblique muscle in the atlanto-axial space. NTS may be categorized as complicated (secondary to another disease process) or uncomplicated (hereditary, related to trauma, or idiopathic). Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion after a thorough history and physical without a pathognomonic radiologic finding. It is typically treated conservatively with medications, local injections, immobilization with cervical collars, or physical therapy; rarely is surgical intervention pursued. PMID:26984539

  19. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  20. Melanoma - neck (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  1. J incision in neck dissections.

    PubMed

    Acar, A; Dursun, G; Aydin, O; Akbaş, Y

    1998-01-01

    Metastasis in the neck lymph system of primary tumours of the head and neck is frequently seen. In order to prevent this metastasis, neck dissection is carried out by various types of skin incisions. In this study, types of skin incision used in neck dissections were defined, and the advantages, disadvantages and results of J incisions, which have been performed on 320 radical neck dissection patients in our clinic between 1985-1996, were compared with those of other incision types. PMID:9538447

  2. Inflammatory myofibroblastic bladder tumor in a patient with wolf-hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marte, Antonio; Indolfi, Paolo; Ficociello, Carmine; Russo, Daniela; Oreste, Matilde; Bottigliero, Gaetano; Gualdiero, Giovanna; Barone, Ciro; Vigliar, Elena; Indolfi, Cristiana; Casale, Fiorina

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare neoplasm described in several tissues and organs including genitourinary system, lung, head, and neck. The etiology of IMT is contentious, and whether it is a postinflammatory process or a true neoplasm remains controversial. To our knowledge, we report the first reported case of IMT of urinary bladder in a pediatric patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn (WHS). We also review the literature about patients with associated neoplasia. PMID:24024066

  3. Spontaneous bladder rupture of a urinary bladder with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hadjipavlou, Marios; Tharakan, Tharu; Khan, Shahid A A; Swinn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 65-year-old man who developed spontaneous bladder rupture after picking up his suitcase from a squatting position. He was known to have non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), managed previously with transurethral resections and intravesical chemotherapy. CT scan showed a large amount of free intraperitoneal fluid anterior to the bladder, suggestive of a urinoma. Management was initially conservative, with insertion of urethral catheter, intravenous antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Follow-up CT scan showed resolution of the urinoma with the patient making a full recovery after 3 weeks. PMID:24618866

  4. Spontaneous bladder rupture of a urinary bladder with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipavlou, Marios; Tharakan, Tharu; Khan, Shahid A A; Swinn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 65-year-old man who developed spontaneous bladder rupture after picking up his suitcase from a squatting position. He was known to have non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), managed previously with transurethral resections and intravesical chemotherapy. CT scan showed a large amount of free intraperitoneal fluid anterior to the bladder, suggestive of a urinoma. Management was initially conservative, with insertion of urethral catheter, intravenous antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Follow-up CT scan showed resolution of the urinoma with the patient making a full recovery after 3 weeks. PMID:24618866

  5. [Evolution of urinary bladder substitution].

    PubMed

    Kock, N G

    1992-11-01

    The historical background to the currently used methods for continent bladder substitution is shortly outlined. The significance for the patient's quality of life of various methods for bladder reconstruction or urinary diversion is briefly discussed. The importance of reservoir configuration for achieving a high compliant urinary receptacle is pointed out. Factors affecting reabsorption of urinary constituents are stressed and the significance of an antireflux mechanism is discussed. Currently the majority of patients undergoing cystectomy for cancer or for other reasons can be offered bladder substitutes providing continence and easy emptying; that is, complete control over voiding. This can be achieved by orthotopic bladder reconstruction or by diverting the urine to the augmented and valved rectum or to the skin via a continent intestinal reservoir. PMID:1492767

  6. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  7. [Melanosis of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Wöllner, J; Janzen, J; Pannek, J

    2016-01-01

    Melanosis of the bladder is rare. Only 10 cases have been described in the literature. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal paralysis. During the diagnostic work-up which included cystoscopy, black spots in the bladder wall were observed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a benign suburothelial melanosis. Thus, with cystoscopic suspicion of a malignancy (melanoma), a biopsy is mandatory and regular cystoscopic follow-up is recommended. PMID:26358438

  8. The neurogenic bladder: medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Buyse, Gunnar M.

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder sphincter dysfunction (NBSD) can cause severe and irreversible renal damage and bladder-wall destruction years before incontinence becomes an issue. Therefore, the first step in adequate management is to recognize early the bladder at risk for upper- and lower-tract deterioration and to start adequate medical treatment proactively. Clean intermittent catheterization combined with anticholinergics (oral or intravesical) is the standard therapy for NBSD. Early institution of such treatment can prevent both renal damage and secondary bladder-wall changes, thereby potentially improving long-term outcomes. In children with severe side effects or with insufficient suppression of detrusor overactivity despite maximal dosage of oral oxybutynin, intravesical instillation is an effective alternative. Intravesical instillation eliminates systemic side effects by reducing the first-pass metabolism and, compared with oral oxybutynin, intravesical oxybutynin is a more potent and long-acting detrusor suppressor. There is growing evidence that with early adequate treatment, kidneys are saved and normal bladder growth can be achieved in children so they will no longer need surgical bladder augmentation to achieve safe urinary continence in adolescence and adulthood. PMID:18095004

  9. A Portfolio of Outstanding Americans of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelevier, Benjamin, Jr.

    A cross section of Mexican American achievement is presented in a portfolio of 37 portraits of outstanding Americans of Mexican descent. Drawn in black and white on heavy paper stock by Mr. David L. Rodriguez, the sketches are suitable for display purposes. With the likenesses are biographical sketches in both English and Spanish which were…

  10. LANDER program manual: A lunar ascent and descent simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    LANDER is a computer program used to predict the trajectory and flight performance of a spacecraft ascending or descending between a low lunar orbit of 15 to 500 nautical miles (nm) and the lunar surface. It is a three degree-of-freedom simulation which is used to analyze the translational motion of the vehicle during descent. Attitude dynamics and rotational motion are not considered. The program can be used to simulate either an ascent from the Moon or a descent to the Moon. For an ascent, the spacecraft is initialized at the lunar surface and accelerates vertically away from the ground at full thrust. When the local velocity becomes 30 ft/s, the vehicle turns downrange with a pitch-over maneuver and proceeds to fly a gravity turn until Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). The spacecraft then coasts until it reaches the requested holding orbit where it performs an orbital insertion burn. During a descent simulation, the lander begins in the holding orbit and performs a deorbit burn. It then coasts to pericynthion, where it reignites its engines and begins a gravity turn descent. When the local horizontal velocity becomes zero, the lander pitches up to a vertical orientation and begins to hover in search of a landing site. The lander hovers for a period of time specified by the user, and then lands.

  11. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more

  12. Origin of INSL3-mediated testicular descent in therian mammals

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Il; Semyonov, Jenia; Chang, Chia Lin; Yi, Wei; Warren, Wesley; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2008-01-01

    Testicular descent is a unique physiological adaptation found in therian mammals allowing optimal spermatogenesis below core body temperature. Recent studies show that INSL3, produced by Leydig cells, and its receptor LGR8 (RXFP2) are essential for mediating the transabdominal phase of testicular descent during early development. However, the origin and genetic basis for this physiological adaptation is not clear. Using syntenic mapping and the functional characterization of contemporary and resurrected relaxin family hormones, we show that derivation of INSL3-mediated testicular descent involved the duplication of an ancestral RLN3-like gene that encodes an indiscriminate ligand for LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8. This event was followed by acquisition of the LGR7-selective characteristics by a daughter gene (RLN3) prior to the evolution of the common ancestor of monotremes, marsupials, and placentals. A subsequent mutation of the other daughter gene (INSL3) occurred before the emergence of therian mammals, which then led to the derivation of the reciprocal LGR8-specific characteristics of INSL3. The stepwise evolution of these independent signaling pathways through gene duplication and subsequent divergence is consistent with Darwinian theory of selection and adaptation, and the temporal proximity suggests an association between these genetic events and the concurrent evolution of testicular descent in ancestral therian mammals. PMID:18463305

  13. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent. PMID:24636222

  14. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a... from any single tear in the balloon envelope between tear stoppers: (1) The maximum vertical velocity..., with the balloon descending at the maximum vertical velocity determined in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  15. The Challenge of Mars EDL (Entry, Descent, and Landing)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sostaric, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the some of the challenges of Martian atmospheric entry, descent and landing (EDL) on the surface of Mars. It reviews some of the technological difficulties, and some solutions that are being developed for future unmanned missions with larger payloads than previous landers, and ultimately human spacecraft landing.

  16. Abuse against Women with Disabilities of Mexican Descent: Cultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Noreen M.; Reed, Bruce J.; Sanchez, Rubi

    2008-01-01

    Although considerable attention has been focused on violence against women with disabilities, environmental and cultural factors that contribute to this violence have received limited attention. This paper examines violence against women of Mexican descent with disabilities. Recommendations are offered to researchers, educators, and service…

  17. Stress within a Bicultural Context for Adolescents of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Andrea J.; Roberts, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Folkman and Lazarus's theory of stress and coping was used to develop a measure assessing the perceived stress within a bicultural context. Middle school students of Mexican descent (N=881) reported their perceived stress from intergenerational acculturation gaps, within-group discrimination, out-group discrimination, and monolingual stress.

  18. Simulation Results for Airborne Precision Spacing along Continuous Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a fast-time simulation experiment and a high-fidelity simulator validation with merging streams of aircraft flying Continuous Descent Arrivals through generic airspace to a runway at Dallas-Ft Worth. Aircraft made small speed adjustments based on an airborne-based spacing algorithm, so as to arrive at the threshold exactly at the assigned time interval behind their Traffic-To-Follow. The 40 aircraft were initialized at different altitudes and speeds on one of four different routes, and then merged at different points and altitudes while flying Continuous Descent Arrivals. This merging and spacing using flight deck equipment and procedures to augment or implement Air Traffic Management directives is called Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing, an important subset of a larger Airborne Precision Spacing functionality. This research indicates that Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing initiated while at cruise altitude and well prior to the Terminal Radar Approach Control entry can significantly contribute to the delivery of aircraft at a specified interval to the runway threshold with a high degree of accuracy and at a reduced pilot workload. Furthermore, previously documented work has shown that using a Continuous Descent Arrival instead of a traditional step-down descent can save fuel, reduce noise, and reduce emissions. Research into Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing is a cooperative effort between government and industry partners.

  19. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more…

  20. Women of African Descent: Persistence in Completing Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddrisu, Vannetta Bailey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the educational persistence of women of African descent (WOAD) in pursuit of a doctorate degree at universities in the southeastern United States. WOAD are women of African ancestry born outside the African continent. These women are heirs to an inner dogged determination and spirit to survive despite all odds (Pulliam, 2003,…

  1. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group and the Reconstruction of the Huygens Probe Entry and Descent Trajectory at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton*, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of NASA, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997 and arrived at Saturn in 2004. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. It was recognized early in the Huygens program that to correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for ground truth calibration of the Cassini orbiter remote sensing observations, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location would be necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG) was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team. With membership comprising representatives from all the probe engineering and instrument teams as well as representatives of industry and the Cassini and Huygens Project Scientists, the DTWG presented an organizational framework within which instrument data was shared, the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction implemented, and the trajectory reconstruction efficiently disseminated. The primary goal of the Descent Trajectory Working Group was to develop retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry interface altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe, and to provide a reconstruction of the Huygens probe trajectory from entry to the surface of Titan that is maximally consistent with all available engineering and science data sets. The official project entry and descent trajectory reconstruction effort was published by the DTWG in 2007. A revised descent trajectory was released in 2010 that accounts for updated measurements of Titan's pole coordinates derived from radar images of Titan taken during Cassini flybys after 2007. The effect of the updated pole positions on Huygens is a southward shift of the trajectory by about 0.3 degrees with a much smaller effect of less than 0.01 degree in the zonal (west to east) direction. The revised Huygens landing coordinates of 192.335 degrees West and 10.573 degrees South with longitude and latitude residuals of respectively 0.035 degrees and 0.007 degrees, respectively, are in excellent agreement with results of recent landing site investigations using visual and radar images from the Cassini VIMS instrument. Acknowledgements *J.-P.L's work was performed while at ESA/ESTEC. DA and BK would like to express appreciation to the European Space Agency's Research and Scientific Support Department for funding the Descent Trajectory Working Group. The work of the Descent Trajectory Working Group would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of all the Huygens principal investigators and their teams, and the science and engineering data provided from each experiment team, including M. Fulchignoni and the HASI Team, H. Niemann and the GCMS Team, J. Zarnecki and the SSP Team, M. Tomasko and the DISR Team, M. Bird and the DWE Team, and G. Israel and the ACP Team. Additionally, special thanks for many years of support to D.L. Matson, R.T. Mitchell, M. Pérez-Ayúcar, O. Witasse; J. Jones, D. Roth, N. Strange on the Cassini Navigation Team at JPL; A.-M. Schipper and P. Couzin at Thales Alenia; C. Sollazzo, D. Salt, J. Wheadon and S. Standley from the Huygens Ops Team; and R. Trautner and H. Svedhem on the Radar Team at ESTEC.

  2. Huygens probe entry and descent trajectory analysis and reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Kazeminejad, B.; Gaborit, V.; Ferri, F.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2005-04-01

    Cassini/Huygens is a joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/European Space Agency (ESA)/Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) mission on its way to explore the Saturnian system. The ESA Huygens Probe is scheduled to be released from the Orbiter on 25 December 2004 and enter the atmosphere of Titan on 14 January 2005. Probe delivery to Titan, arbitrarily defined to occur at a reference altitude of 1270 km above the surface of Titan, is the responsibility of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). ESA is then responsible for safely delivering the probe from the reference altitude to the surface. The task of reconstructing the probe trajectory and attitude from the entry point to the surface has been assigned to the Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG), a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team. The DTWG will use data provided by the Huygens Probe engineering subsystems and selected data sets acquired by the scientific payload. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for possible "ground-truthing" Orbiter remote sensing measurements, it is essential that the trajectory reconstruction be performed as early as possible in the post-flight data analysis phase. The reconstruction of the Huygens entry and descent trajectory will be based primarily on the probe entry state vector provided by the Cassini Navigation Team, and measurements of acceleration, pressure, and temperature made by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI). Other data sets contributing to the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction include the mean molecular weight of the atmosphere measured by the probe Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) in the upper atmosphere and the Surface Science Package (SSP) speed of sound measurement in the lower atmosphere, accelerations measured by the Central and Radial Accelerometer Sensor Units (CASU/RASU), and the probe altitude by the two probe radar altimeters during the latter stages of the descent. In the last several hundred meters, the altitude determination will be constrained by measurements from the SSP acoustic sounder. Other instruments contributing data to the entry and descent trajectory and attitude determination include measurements of the zonal wind drift by the Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE), and probe zonal and meridional drift and probe attitude by the Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer (DISR). In this paper, the need for and the methods by which the Huygens Probe entry and descent trajectory will be reconstructed are reviewed.

  3. Measurement of CPAS Main Parachute Rate of Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is being designed to land the Orion Crew Module (CM) at a safe rate of descent at splashdown. Flight test performance must be measured to a high degree of accuracy to ensure this requirement is met with the most efficient design possible. Although the design includes three CPAS Main parachutes, the requirement is that the system must not exceed 33 ft/s under two Main parachutes, should one of the Main parachutes fail. Therefore, several tests were conducted with clusters of two Mains. All of the steady-state rate of descent data are normalized to standard sea level conditions and checked against the limit. As the Orion design gains weight, the system is approaching this limit to within measurement precision. Parachute "breathing," cluster interactions, and atmospheric anomalies can cause the rate of descent to vary widely and lead to challenges in characterizing parachute terminal performance. An early test had contradictory rate of descent results from optical trajectory and Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS). A thorough analysis of the data sources and error propagation was conducted to determine the uncertainty in the trajectory. It was discovered that the Time Space Position Information (TSPI) from the optical tracking provided accurate position data. However, the velocity from TPSI must be computed via numerical differentiation, which is prone to large error. DGPS obtains position through pseudo-range calculations from multiple satellites and velocity through Doppler shift of the carrier frequency. Because the velocity from DGPS is a direct measurement, it is more accurate than TSPI velocity. To remedy the situation, a commercial off-the-shelf product that combines GPS and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was purchased to significantly improve rate of descent measurements. This had the added benefit of solving GPS dropouts during aircraft extraction. Statistical probability distributions for CPAS Main parachute rate of descent and drag coefficient were computed and plotted. Using test data, a terminal rate of descent at splashdown can be estimated as a function of canopy loading.

  4. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Martin, Susana

    2015-04-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface. Our development and assessments show clearly that this kind of inflatable technology originally developed for the Martian atmosphere, is feasible for use by Earth entry and descent applications. The preliminary results are highly promising indicating that the current Mars probe design could be used as it is for the Earth. According tp our analyses, the higher atmospheric pressure at an altitude of 12 km and less requires an additional pressurizing device for the in atable system increasing the entry mass by approximately 2 kg. These analyses involved the calculation of 120 different atmospheric entry and descent trajectories. The analysis of the existing technologies and current trends have indicated that the kind of inflatable technology pursued by RITD has high potential to enhance the European space technology expertise. This kind of technology is clearly feasible for utilization by Earth entry and descent applications.

  5. Bladder Cancer in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Milowsky, Matthew; Droller, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Age is now widely accepted as the greatest single risk factor for developing bladder cancer, and bladder cancer is considered as primarily a disease of the elderly. Because of the close link between age and incidence of bladder cancer, it can be expected that this disease will become an enormous challenge with the growth of an aging population in the years ahead. Methods Using MEDLINE, a search of the literature between January 1966 and July 2007 was performed to describe normative physiologic changes associated with aging, elucidate genetic and epigenetic alterations that associate aging with bladder cancer and its phenotypes; and to characterize how aging influences efficacies, risks, side effects and potential complications of the treatments needed for the various stages of bladder cancer.. Results We discuss influence of aging on host physiology, genetic and epigenetic changes, environmental influences, and host factors in the development and treatment of bladder cancer. Treatments with intravesical Bacille Calmette Guerin, radical cystectomy, and perioperative chemotherapy are less well tolerated and have poorer response in elderly patients compared to their younger counterparts. Elderly patients face both clinical and broader institutional barriers to appropriate treatment and may receive less aggressive treatment and sub-therapeutic dosing. However, when appropriately selected, elderly patients tolerate and respond well to cancer treatments. Conclusions The decision to undergo treatment for cancer is a tradeoff between loss of function and/or independence and extension of life which is complicated by a host of concomitant issues such as co-morbid medical conditions, functional declines and “frailty”, family dynamics, and social and psychological issues. Chronological age should not preclude definitive surgical therapy. It is imperative that healthcare practitioners and researchers from disparate disciplines collectively focus efforts towards gaining a better understanding of what the consequences of bladder cancer and its treatments are for older adults and how to appropriately meet the multifaceted medical and psychosocial needs of this growing population. PMID:19879476

  6. Crile's neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Silver, Carl E; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2007-11-01

    George Crile, after a long experience with treatment of head and neck cancer and study of a large number of cases, appreciated that these tumors almost always drained through the lymphatic pathways of the neck, rarely metastasized distantly, and were thus theoretically curable by resection of the primary tumor and its lymphatic draining shed. After evaluation of his early failures, he found that a block resection of all of the lymph node-bearing tissue of the neck in addition to resection of the primary tumor was the most effective means of obtaining a cure, particularly in patients with clinical evidence of spread of disease to the neck. Such radical surgery, at the time, was fraught with difficulty because of the lack of blood transfusion, antibiotics, and endotracheal anesthesia, but Crile devised several strategies for combating these obstacles. Crile performed 36 such block resections with a determinate 3-year survival of 75% compared with 19% 3-year survival in patients who had not undergone block resection. The surgical precepts developed by Crile laid the foundation for the effective modern surgical treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:17828045

  7. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; MacDiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-01-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, healthy bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the recommendations for improving and maintaining bladder health presented herein. PMID:21923844

  8. Caudal clonidine-bupivicaine block with bladder hydrodistension: a novel combined treatment for the painful bladder.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Heidi; Stoneham, Mark; Frampton, Claire; Noble, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a new combination procedure consisting of bladder hydrodistension with clonidine-bupivicaine caudal block for the symptomatic relief of bladder pain. They report this new technique whereby patients who had tried multiple forms of therapy with little response, including bladder hydrodistension under general anaesthesia for their chronic pelvic bladder pain, responded to this novel combination therapy. PMID:22696635

  9. Extraperitoneally Ruptured, Everted, and Prolapsed Bladder: A Very Rare Complication of Pelvic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ojewola, Rufus Wale; Tijani, Kehinde Habeeb; Badmus, Olakunle Olaleke; Oliyide, Abisola Ekundayo; Osegbe, Chukwudi Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic rupture of the bladder with eversion and protrusion via the perineum is a rare complication of pelvic injury. We present a 36-year-old lady who sustained severe pelvic injury with a bleeding right-sided deep perineal laceration. She had closed reduction of pelvic fracture with pelvic banding and primary closure of perineal laceration at a private hospital. She subsequently had dehiscence of repaired perineal laceration with protrusion of fleshy mass from vulva and leakage of urine per perineum five weeks later. Examination revealed a fleshy mucosa-like mass protruding anteriorly with a bridge of tissue between it and right anterolateral vaginal wall. Upward pressure on this mass revealed the bladder neck and ureteric orifices. She had perineal and pelvic exploration with findings of prolapsed, completely everted bladder wall through a transverse anterior bladder wall rent via the perineum, and an unstable B1 pelvic disruption. She had repair of the ruptured, everted, and prolapsed bladder, double-plate and screw fixation of disrupted pelvis and repair of the pelvic/perineal defect. She commenced physiotherapy and ambulation a week after surgery. Patient now walks normally and is continent of urine. We conclude that the intrinsic urethral continent mechanism plays a significant role in maintaining continence in females. PMID:26417472

  10. Bilateral neck paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Mumoli, N; Cei, M; Pauletti, M; Ferrito, G; Scazzeri, F

    2009-10-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare neoplasms presented as cervical mass, generally bilateral, that arise from chemoreceptors located at the carotid bifurcation (carotid body tumors), along the vagus nerve (vagal paragangliomas), and in the jugular fossa and tympanic cavity (jugulotympanic paragangliomas). They are typically asymptomatic at the beginning, highly vascular, slow-growing and compressing the surrounding anatomic structures. Only radical surgery is the curative treatment for paragangliomas. We present a case of a 62- year-old woman with a diagnosis of bilateral neck paragangliomas where surgical removal was judged burdened by excessive risk because of the size of the tumor. PMID:19622673

  11. α1-, α2- and β-adrenoceptors in the urinary bladder, urethra and prostate

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Martin C; Vrydag, Wim

    2006-01-01

    We have systematically reviewed the presence, functional responses and regulation of α1-, α2- and β-adrenoceptors in the bladder, urethra and prostate, with special emphasis on human tissues and receptor subtypes. α1-Adrenoceptors are only poorly expressed and play a limited functional role in the detrusor. α1-Adrenoceptors, particularly their α1A-subtype, show a more pronounced expression and promote contraction of the bladder neck, urethra and prostate to enhance bladder outlet resistance, particularly in elderly men with enlarged prostates. α1-Adrenoceptor agonists are important in the treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, but their beneficial effects may involve receptors within and outside the prostate. α2-Adrenoceptors, mainly their α2A-subtype, are expressed in bladder, urethra and prostate. They mediate pre-junctional inhibition of neurotransmitter release and also a weak contractile effect in the urethra of some species, but not humans. Their overall post-junctional function in the lower urinary tract remains largely unclear. β-Adrenoceptors mediate relaxation of smooth muscle in the bladder, urethra and prostate. The available tools have limited the unequivocal identification of receptor subtypes at the protein and functional levels, but it appears that the β3- and β2-subtypes are important in the human bladder and urethra, respectively. β3-Adrenoceptor agonists are promising drug candidates for the treatment of the overactive bladder. We propose that the overall function of adrenoceptors in the lower urinary tract is to promote urinary continence. Further elucidation of the functional roles of their subtypes will help a better understanding of voiding dysfunction and its treatment. PMID:16465187

  12. Bladder tumors: virtual MR cystoscopy.

    PubMed

    Suleyman, E; Yekeler, E; Dursun, M; Zorba, U O; Tunc, M; Tunaci, A; Acunas, B

    2006-01-01

    Virtual cystoscopy is a promising new technique based on computer-simulated rendering of the inner surface of the urinary bladder using volumetric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data, thus enabling maneuvers that normally are not possible with conventional cystoscopy. Due to several distinct advantages over conventional cystoscopy such as minimal invasiveness, evaluation of the urethral orifice from a cranial point of view and an opportunity to observe diverticula formations and the inner urethral space, gadolinium-enhanced MR cystoscopy has a great potential for competing with conventional cystoscopy under some clinical circumstances. The recent improvement in MR scanners has significantly facilitated virtual cystoscopic evaluation of the urinary bladder lumen by MR imaging. Volumetric data associated with powerful postprocessing procedures allow imaging of the inner urinary bladder surface with excellent detail. In this article, imaging techniques and clinical applications of gadolinium-enhanced virtual MR cystoscopy are presented. PMID:16568363

  13. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  14. Ultrasonic Device Monitors Fullness Of The Bladder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Blalock, Travis; Companion, John A.; Cavalier, AL; Mineo, Beth A.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic device monitors fullness of bladder is self-contained, lightweight, portable, powered by battery, and tailored for specific patient through software modified as patient's behavior changes. Essentially quantifies amount of urine in bladder by measuring relative distension of bladder and gives suitable alarm telling patient to eliminate. Intended for use in training people who are incontinent and cannot identify when elimination necessary.

  15. Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Bresser, P; Monasch, E

    1990-12-01

    A patient is described with isolated idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRPF) of the bladder causing overhydration due to postrenal oliguria. IRPF is known to spread to the bladder; restriction of the bladder, however, is extremely rare. The patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids. The potential role of corticosteroids in the management of IRPF is discussed. PMID:2074918

  16. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  17. Bladder Hamartoma in a Fetus: Case Report☆

    PubMed Central

    Pieretti, Alberto; Wu, Chin-Lee; Pieretti, Rafael V.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of the youngest reported patient with a bladder hamartoma detected prenatally by ultrasonography. Bladder tumors in newborns are rare, but a hamartoma should not be discarded among the diagnostic possibilities when evaluating a fetus or a newborn with a polypoid bladder lesion.

  18. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  19. Neurogenic inflammation of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Bjorling, Dale E; Beckman, Matt; Saban, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence suggests multiple and redundant pathways through which the nervous system can initiate, amplify, and perpetuate inflammation. Many of the processes initiated by neurogenic inflammation have the capacity to recruit the participation of additional sensory nerves. These observations indicate that effective strategies for prevention or treatment of neurogenic inflammation of the bladder will entail or require intervention at multiple points. It has been observed that pain management in the future will be based on selective intervention tailored to the specific processes modulating pain perception in individual patients. It is exciting to contemplate the same approach to prevention and treatment of neurogenic bladder inflammation. PMID:15176313

  20. Actinomycosis of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun; Al-Essawi, Turki

    2013-01-01

    Actinomycosis of the urinary bladder is a rare anaerobic bacterial infection caused by Actinomyces isrealii. Initial diagnosis is often difficult and this disease is easily misdiagnosed as a urothelial or urachal tumour. The definitive diagnosis is usually made postoperatively via tissue pathology. We discuss a case of a 54-year-old male with a smoking history and a 2.5-week history of gross hematuria. Ultrasound, computed tomography and cystoscopy revealed a large inflammatory mass adherent to the right, anterior bladder wall, suggesting malignancy. Transurethral resection and histological pathology subsequently confirmed inflammatory urothelium and gram-positive bacteria consistent with actinomyces species. PMID:23914269

  1. Efficient Sensor Placement Optimization Using Gradient Descent and Probabilistic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Vahab; Lévesque, Julien-Charles; Gagné, Christian; Parizeau, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing an adaptation of the gradient descent method to optimize the position and orientation of sensors for the sensor placement problem. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the combination of gradient descent optimization with a realistic model, which considers both the topography of the environment and a set of sensors with directional probabilistic sensing. The performance of this approach is compared with two other black box optimization methods over area coverage and processing time. Results show that our proposed method produces competitive results on smaller maps and superior results on larger maps, while requiring much less computation than the other optimization methods to which it has been compared. PMID:25196164

  2. A Symmetric Time-Varying Cluster Rate of Descent Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    A model of the time-varying rate of descent of the Orion vehicle was developed based on the observed correlation between canopy projected area and drag coefficient. This initial version of the model assumes cluster symmetry and only varies the vertical component of velocity. The cluster fly-out angle is modeled as a series of sine waves based on flight test data. The projected area of each canopy is synchronized with the primary fly-out angle mode. The sudden loss of projected area during canopy collisions is modeled at minimum fly-out angles, leading to brief increases in rate of descent. The cluster geometry is converted to drag coefficient using empirically derived constants. A more complete model is under development, which computes the aerodynamic response of each canopy to its local incidence angle.

  3. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, H.; Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface.

  4. Helicopter optimal descent and landing after power loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    An optimal control solution is obtained for the descent and landing of a helicopter after the loss of power in level flight. The model considers the helicopter vertical velocity, horizontal velocity, and rotor speed; and it includes representations of ground effect, rotor inflow time lag, pilot reaction time, rotor stall, and the induced velocity curve in the vortex ring state. The control (rotor thrust magnitude and direction) required to minimize the vertical and horizontal velocity at contact with the ground is obtained using nonlinear optimal control theory. It is found that the optimal descent after power loss in hover is a purely vertical flight path. Good correlation, even quantitatively, is found between the calculations and (non-optimal) flight test results.

  5. Observation of the Descent of Mesospheric Air above the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor Hoffmann, Christoph; Raffalski, Uwe; Palm, Mathias; Golchert, Sven; Hochschild, Gerd; Notholt, Justus

    In the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, radicals are produced by solar high-energy radiation. They can be transported into the polar winter stratosphere by the large-scale circulation of the middle atmosphere. In this region, they are able to contribute to ozone depletion. To quantify this influence of mesospheric radicals on polar ozone, detailed knowledge about the respective descent rates is needed. This information can be obtained from measurements of CO profiles, since CO is a tracer for dynamics in this region. We work on ground-based microwave observations of CO above Kiruna, Sweden (67.8° N), covering an altitude range of 40 km to 80 km. Retrieved CO profiles for the winter 2007/2008 together with an estimation of the descent rates for this period will be presented.

  6. Flight Management System Execution of Idle-Thrust Descents in Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2011-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its error models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents, and the recorded data includes the target speed profile and FMS intent trajectories. The FMS computes the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and any intervention by the controllers that alters the FMS execution of the descent is recorded so that such flights are discarded from the analysis. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location are extracted from the radar data. Using more than 60 descents in Boeing 777 aircraft, the actual speeds are compared to the intended descent speed profile. In addition, three aspects of the accuracy of the FMS intent trajectory are analyzed: the meter fix crossing time, the TOD location, and the altitude at the meter fix. The actual TOD location is within 5 nmi of the intent location for over 95% of the descents. Roughly 90% of the time, the airspeed is within 0.01 of the target Mach number and within 10 KCAS of the target descent CAS, but the meter fix crossing time is only within 50 sec of the time computed by the FMS. Overall, the aircraft seem to be executing the descents as intended by the designers of the onboard automation.

  7. [Bladder replacement with sigmoid colon for bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Suzu, H; Yushita, Y; Yamashita, S; Kanetake, H; Saito, Y; Sakuragi, T

    1991-01-01

    From 1972 to 1989, 21 patients underwent bladder replacement with sigmoid colon after cystectomy for bladder cancer. A portion of sigmoid colon (about 15 to 20 cm) was isolated and anastomosed to the urethral stump. Then the ureters were implanted in the sigmoid colon via submucosal tunnels. There were 20 men and 1 woman, ranging in age from 24 to 71 years (average 51 years). Preoperative investigations showed that all the cases were free of metastasis. Five years survival rate was 60.7% and there was no operative mortality. There was urethral recurrence in one case and in that case postoperative histopathology revealed carcinoma in situ with tumor. All patients were able to void by themselves without any difficulty. Five patients complained mild incontinence at daytime and all patients had mild incontinence during deep sleep at night, but all of them could maintain their normal daily life like before. The major postoperative complications were: leak at the site of anastomosis (between sigmoid colon and urethra) in 6 cases, hydronephrosis in 2 cases, VUR in 2 cases and bladder stone in 1 case. The patients who underwent bladder replacement with sigmoid colon were well satisfied, because there were no external stoma and the patients could void by themselves. From now, we want to improve our operative method in order to avoid postoperative incontinence. PMID:2046199

  8. Flight-Management Algorithm for Fuel-Conservative Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Cannon, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Federal Aviation Administration has developed an automated time-based metering form of air traffic control for arrivals into terminal area called local flow management/profile descent (LFM/PD). LFM/PD saves fuel by matching airplane arrival flow to airport acceptance rate through time-control computations and by allowing pilot to descend at his discretion from cruise altitude to metering fix in an idle-thrust, clean configuration (landing gear up, flaps zero, speed brakes retracted).

  9. Social stress induces changes in urinary bladder function, bladder NGF content, and generalized bladder inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Peterson, Abbey; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Nelson, Mark T; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2014-10-01

    Social stress may play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we explored changes in bladder function caused by social stress using mouse models of stress and increasing stress. In the stress paradigm, individual submissive FVB mice were exposed to C57BL/6 aggressor mice directly/indirectly for 1 h/day for 2 or 4 wk. Increased stress was induced by continuous, direct/indirect exposure of FVB mice to aggressor mice for 2 wk. Stressed FVB mice exhibited nonvoiding bladder contractions and a decrease in both micturition interval (increased voiding frequency) and bladder capacity compared with control animals. ELISAs demonstrated a significant increase in histamine protein expression with no change in nerve growth factor protein expression in the urinary bladder compared with controls. Unlike stressed mice, mice exposed to an increased stress paradigm exhibited increased bladder capacities and intermicturition intervals (decreased voiding frequency). Both histamine and nerve growth factor protein expression were significantly increased with increased stress compared with control bladders. The change in bladder function from increased voiding frequency to decreased voiding frequency with increased stress intensity suggests that changes in social stress-induced urinary bladder dysfunction are context and duration dependent. In addition, changes in the bladder inflammatory milieu with social stress may be important contributors to changes in urinary bladder function. PMID:25100077

  10. Social stress induces changes in urinary bladder function, bladder NGF content, and generalized bladder inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Abbey; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Nelson, Mark T.; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Social stress may play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we explored changes in bladder function caused by social stress using mouse models of stress and increasing stress. In the stress paradigm, individual submissive FVB mice were exposed to C57BL/6 aggressor mice directly/indirectly for 1 h/day for 2 or 4 wk. Increased stress was induced by continuous, direct/indirect exposure of FVB mice to aggressor mice for 2 wk. Stressed FVB mice exhibited nonvoiding bladder contractions and a decrease in both micturition interval (increased voiding frequency) and bladder capacity compared with control animals. ELISAs demonstrated a significant increase in histamine protein expression with no change in nerve growth factor protein expression in the urinary bladder compared with controls. Unlike stressed mice, mice exposed to an increased stress paradigm exhibited increased bladder capacities and intermicturition intervals (decreased voiding frequency). Both histamine and nerve growth factor protein expression were significantly increased with increased stress compared with control bladders. The change in bladder function from increased voiding frequency to decreased voiding frequency with increased stress intensity suggests that changes in social stress-induced urinary bladder dysfunction are context and duration dependent. In addition, changes in the bladder inflammatory milieu with social stress may be important contributors to changes in urinary bladder function. PMID:25100077

  11. Airborne Management of Traffic Conflicts in Descent With Arrival Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    NASA is studying far-term air traffic management concepts that may increase operational efficiency through a redistribution of decisionmaking authority among airborne and ground-based elements of the air transportation system. One component of this research, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows trained pilots of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for traffic separation. Ground-based air traffic controllers would continue to separate traffic unequipped for autonomous operations and would issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To evaluate En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a human-in-the-loop experiment was jointly conducted by the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. In this experiment, test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve conflicts in cruise and descent, and to adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by test subject controllers. Simulators at NASA Langley were equipped with a prototype Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) flight deck toolset to assist pilots with conflict management and constraint compliance tasks. Results from the experiment are presented, focusing specifically on operations during the initial descent into the terminal area. Airborne conflict resolution performance in descent, conformance to traffic flow management constraints, and the effects of conflicting traffic on constraint conformance are all presented. Subjective data from subject pilots are also presented, showing perceived levels of workload, safety, and acceptability of autonomous arrival operations. Finally, potential AOP functionality enhancements are discussed along with suggestions to improve arrival procedures.

  12. A new method for forecasting the solar cycle descent time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, Bharati; Kakad, Amar; Sai Ramesh, Durbha

    2015-08-01

    The prediction of an extended solar minimum is extremely important because of the severity of its impact on the near-earth space. Here, we present a new method for predicting the descent time of the forthcoming solar cycle (SC); the method is based on the estimation of the Shannon entropy. We use the daily and monthly smoothed international sunspot number. For each nth SC, we compute the parameter [Tpre]n by using information on the descent and ascent times of the n - 3th and nth SCs, respectively. We find that [Tpre] of nth SC and entropy can be effectively used to predict the descent time of the n + 2th SC. The correlation coefficient between [Td]n+2 - [Tpre]n and [E]n is found to be 0.95. Using these parameters the prediction model is developed. Solar magnetic field and F10.7 flux data are available for SCs 21-22 and 19-23, respectively, and they are also utilized to get estimates of the Shannon entropy. It is found that the Shannon entropy, a measure of randomness inherent in the SC, is reflected well in the various proxies of the solar activity (viz sunspot, magnetic field, F10.7 flux). The applicability and accuracy of the prediction model equation is verified by way of association of least entropy values with the Dalton minimum. The prediction model equation also provides possible criteria for the occurrence of unusually longer solar minima.

  13. Free-falls and parachute descents in the standard atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, A P

    1947-01-01

    A detailed table of the standard equilibrium velocity and standard equilibrium time is presented for bodies falling in the standard atmosphere. This table gives the velocity at various altitudes and the time of fall from sea level to -4000 feet and from 80,000 feet to sea level. In addition to this standard table, there are given short tables and charts of an open-parachute descent and free-falls; the terminal velocity at sea level, and the variation of the weight-to-drag ratio (2w/cds)1/2 for various weight jumpers from 90 to 30 feet in open-parachute descent; and estimations of drag coefficients of silk and nylon parachutes. The table of standard equilibrium velocities and standard equilibrium times may be used directly for open-parachute descents, given the weight of the jumper, the diameter of the parachute, and the drag coefficient. For free-falls starting from horizontal flight, approximately 14 seconds must be added to the equilibrium time given in the table to obtain the total time to sea level. (author)

  14. Titan Explorer Entry, Descent and Landing Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Jody L.; Lindberg, Robert E.; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    2006-01-01

    The Titan Explorer mission concept includes an orbiter, entry probe and inflatable airship designed to take remote and in-situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere. A modified entry, descent and landing trajectory at Titan that incorporates mid-air airship inflation (under a parachute) and separation is developed and examined for Titan Explorer. The feasibility of mid-air inflation and deployment of an airship under a parachute is determined by implementing and validating an airship buoyancy and inflation model in the trajectory simulation program, Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2). A nominal POST2 trajectory simulation case study is generated which examines different descent scenarios by varying airship inflation duration, orientation, and separation. The buoyancy model incorporation into POST2 is new to the software and may be used in future trajectory simulations. Each case from the nominal POST2 trajectory case study simulates a successful separation between the parachute and airship systems with sufficient velocity change as to alter their paths to avoid collision throughout their descent. The airship and heatshield also separate acceptably with a minimum distance of separation from the parachute system of 1.5 km. This analysis shows the feasibility of airship inflation on a parachute for different orientations, airship separation at various inflation times, and preparation for level-flight at Titan.

  15. Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance of the Mars Phoenix Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Prince, Jill L.; Wueen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.; Grover, Myron R.

    2008-01-01

    On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander successfully landed on the northern arctic plains of Mars. An overview of a preliminary reconstruction analysis performed on each entry, descent, and landing phase to assess the performance of Phoenix as it descended is presented and a comparison to pre-entry predictions is provided. The landing occurred 21 km further downrange than the predicted landing location. Analysis of the flight data revealed that the primary cause of Phoenix s downrange landing was a higher trim total angle of attack during the hypersonic phase of the entry, which resulted in Phoenix flying a slightly lifting trajectory. The cause of this higher trim attitude is not known at this time. Parachute deployment was 6.4 s later than prediction. This later deployment time was within the variations expected and is consistent with a lifting trajectory. The parachute deployment and inflation process occurred as expected with no anomalies identified. The subsequent parachute descent and powered terminal landing also behaved as expected. A preliminary reconstruction of the landing day atmospheric density profile was found to be lower than the best apriori prediction, ranging from a few percent less to a maximum of 8%. A comparison of the flight reconstructed trajectory parameters shows that the actual Phoenix entry, descent, and landing was close to pre-entry predictions. This reconstruction investigation is currently ongoing and the results to date are in the process of being refined.

  16. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Erika; Forbes, John C.; Thornton, Randall J.

    2010-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform multiple burns including the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine technology testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  17. Data-Analysis System for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Timothy; Chang, Christine; Sartorius, Edgar; Finley, Susan; White, Leslie; Estabrook, Polly; Fort, David

    2005-01-01

    A report describes the Entry Descent Landing Data Analysis (EDA), which is a system of signal-processing software and computer hardware for acquiring status data conveyed by multiple-frequency-shift-keying tone signals transmitted by a spacecraft during descent to the surface of a remote planet. The design of the EDA meets the challenge of processing weak, fluctuating signals that are Doppler-shifted by amounts that are only partly predictable. The software supports both real-time and post processing. The software performs fast-Fourier-transform integration, parallel frequency tracking with prediction, and mapping of detected tones to specific events. The use of backtrack and refinement parallel-processing threads helps to minimize data gaps. The design affords flexibility to enable division of a descent track into segments, within each of which the EDA is configured optimally for processing in the face of signal conditions and uncertainties. A dynamic-lock-state feature enables the detection of signals using minimum required computing power less when signals are steadily detected, more when signals fluctuate. At present, the hardware comprises eight dual-processor personal-computer modules and a server. The hardware is modular, making it possible to increase computing power by adding computers.

  18. [Development of invasive urinary bladder carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shoji; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Wei, Min; Morimura, Keiichirou

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we report on invasive urinary bladder carcinomas as follows, (1) p53 mutations have an important role in promotion and progression stages of carcinogenesis, (2) invasive bladder carcinomas occur multi-centrically in the bladder, (3) an organic arsenic, dimethylarsinic acid exerts carcinogenicity in the bladder of rats, (4) p53 mutations in carcinomas are caused by different carcinogens, and (5) bladder urothelium of people living in 137Cs-contaminated areas of Ukraine showed chronic proliferative atypical cystitis (so-called Chernobyl cystitis). PMID:16848359

  19. Bladder health across the life course.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, P; Marschall-Kehrel, D; King, S; Lukacz, E

    2013-05-01

    Influences on bladder health begin during infancy and continue throughout the lifespan. Bladder anatomy and physiology change as individuals age, and the risk and propensity for bladder conditions, including lower urinary tract symptoms, throughout life are related to factors specific to age, sex, and life events. Bladder habits and dysfunctions at one stage of life may affect bladder health in subsequent stages. However, bladder problems are neither a normal part of aging nor inevitable at any stage of life. Many of the factors that negatively impact bladder health at all ages may be modifiable, and healthy bladder habits may prevent or reverse bladder dysfunctions that can occur naturally or in response to life events. There are opportunities to further define and promote healthy bladder habits through focused research and heightened public awareness of the importance of bladder health, which may lead to improvements in overall health and quality of life. It is our hope that this paper will inform and encourage public health initiatives and research programs aimed at this goal. PMID:23574100

  20. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; SanMartin, A. Miguel; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2007-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of Mars. This paper describes the current MSL EDL system performance as predicted by end-to-end EDL simulations, highlights the sensitivity of this baseline performance to several key environmental assumptions, and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering such an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  1. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, Alejandro M.; Burkhart, Paul D.; mendeck, Gavin F.

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of Mars. This paper describes the current MSL EDL system performance as predicted by end-to-end EDL simulations, highlights the sensitivity of this baseline performance to several key environmental assumptions, and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering such an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  2. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  3. Cancer of the Urinary Bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 76,960 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 16,390 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 587,426 people living with bladder cancer in ...

  4. Immunotherapeutic strategies for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Jichlinski, Patrice; Derré, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common urologic malignancy with rising incidence in the elderly population. In most cases, bladder cancer is non-muscle-invasive at diagnosis and shows dramatically high recurrence rates, although current treatments often reduce the risk of disease progression. Immunotherapy using intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the most effective therapy for patients with high risk tumors. However, BCG-therapy has important limitations including substantial adverse events and frequent treatment failure. Thus, it appears crucial to either improve or replace current therapy using new immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we discuss the clinical trials that assessed therapeutic vaccination of bladder cancer patients using tumor associated antigens and we also argue for novel approaches arising from murine models. Vaccination routes to induce appropriate T-cell homing in the tumor site as well as the use of local immunostimulation to enhance recruitment of vaccine-induced T cells are discussed to highlight what we believe is a promising therapeutic vaccination strategy for patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:24384699

  5. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  7. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  8. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Clark, Roderick; Welk, Blayne

    2016-02-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can't be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  9. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase-2 (SHMT2), resulting in an increased glycine and purine ring of nucleotides synthesis, thus supporting cells proliferation. A deep understanding of the metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer will provide novel opportunities for targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:26975021

  10. Entry, Descent, and Landing for Human Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Michelle M.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of a human mission to Mars is landing safely on the Martian surface. Mars has such low atmospheric density that decelerating large masses (tens of metric tons) requires methods that have not yet been demonstrated, and are not yet planned in future Mars missions. To identify the most promising options for Mars entry, descent, and landing, and to plan development of the needed technologies, NASA's Human Architecture Team (HAT) has refined candidate methods for emplacing needed elements of the human Mars exploration architecture (such as ascent vehicles and habitats) on the Mars surface. This paper explains the detailed, optimized simulations that have been developed to define the mass needed at Mars arrival to accomplish the entry, descent, and landing functions. Based on previous work, technology options for hypersonic deceleration include rigid, mid-L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) aeroshells, and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (IADs). The hypersonic IADs, or HIADs, are about 20% less massive than the rigid vehicles, but both have their technology development challenges. For the supersonic regime, supersonic retropropulsion (SRP) is an attractive option, since a propulsive stage must be carried for terminal descent and can be ignited at higher speeds. The use of SRP eliminates the need for an additional deceleration system, but SRP is at a low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) in that the interacting plumes are not well-characterized, and their effect on vehicle stability has not been studied, to date. These architecture-level assessments have been used to define the key performance parameters and a technology development strategy for achieving the challenging mission of landing large payloads on Mars.

  11. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  12. STS-1 operational flight profile. Volume 5: Descent, cycle 3. Appendix C: Monte Carlo dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of three nonlinear the Monte Carlo dispersion analyses for the Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) Orbiter Descent Operational Flight Profile, Cycle 3 are presented. Fifty randomly selected simulation for the end of mission (EOM) descent, the abort once around (AOA) descent targeted line are steep target line, and the AOA descent targeted to the shallow target line are analyzed. These analyses compare the flight environment with system and operational constraints on the flight environment and in some cases use simplified system models as an aid in assessing the STS-1 descent flight profile. In addition, descent flight envelops are provided as a data base for use by system specialists to determine the flight readiness for STS-1. The results of these dispersion analyses supersede results of the dispersion analysis previously documented.

  13. Apollo 16, LM-11 descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of the LM-11 descent propulsion system during the Apollo 16 missions was evaluated and found satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted one sigma uncertainty of 0.2 seconds. Several flight measurement discrepancies existed during the flight as follows: (1) the chamber pressure transducer had a noticeable drift, exhibiting a maximum error of about 1.5 psi at approximately 130 seconds after engine ignition, (2) the fuel and oxidizer interface pressure measurements appeared to be low during the entire flight, and (3) the fuel propellant quantity gaging system did not perform within expected accuracies.

  14. Shuttle program: OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Knoedler, J.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of the orbital flight test (OFT) flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. The A/D ancillary data support for OFT mission evaluation activities is confined to providing postflight position, velocity, attitude, and associated navigation and attitude derived parameters for the Orbiter over particular flight phases and time intervals.

  15. OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Abramson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of orbital flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. It was intended that this document serve as the sole requirements control instrument between MPB/MPAD and the A/D ancillary data users. The requirements are primarily functional in nature, but some detail level requirements are also included.

  16. Emulating a Fish Swim Bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesenka, James; Meredith, Dawn; Bolker, Jessica; Schubert, Christopher; Kraut, Gertrud

    2009-10-01

    The University of New Hampshire and the University of New England are developing biologically relevant physics laboratories for their predominantly health science audiences. Buoyancy plays an important role in a variety of biological processes. We describe an inexpensive laboratory activity based on the Cartesian Diver that allows students to quantitatively emulate the swim bladder of a fish. Inflation of the ``bladder'' is externally controlled through an external gas syringe or squeezing on the plastic water containment vessel (a 2L soda bottle). The students can accurately determine the volume of a ``fish'' at the point of neutral buoyancy by visual measurement of the trapped air pocket. A simple electronic gas pressure sensor allows the hydrostatic pressure on the fish to be analyzed simultaneously.

  17. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Patra, Phani B; Patra, Sayani

    2015-05-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  18. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  19. Pharmacologic management of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Sum; Hilas, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a prevalent and costly condition that can affect any age group. Typical symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence and nocturia. OAB occurs as a result of abnormal contractions of the bladder detrusor muscle caused by the stimulation of certain muscarinic receptors. Therefore, antimuscarinic agents have long been considered the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for OAB. Currently, there are five such agents approved for the management of OAB in the United States: oxybutynin, tolterodine, trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin. This article summarizes the efficacy, contraindications, precautions, dosing and common side effects of these agents. All available clinical trials on trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin were reviewed to determine its place in therapy. PMID:18044184

  20. Genetic Variations rs11892031 and rs401681 Are Associated with Bladder Cancer Risk in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Yan; Chen, Tao; Hu, Hailong; Xie, Wanqin; Qiao, Zhihui; Ding, Na; Xie, Linguo; Li, Sheng; Wang, Wenlong; Xing, Chen; Wang, Yihan; Qie, Yunkai; Wu, Changli

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a number of genetic variants associated with risk of bladder cancer in populations of European descent. Here, we assessed association of two of these variants, rs11892031 (2q37.1 region) and rs401681 (5p15.33 region) in a Chinese case-control study, which included 367 bladder cancer cases and 420 controls. We found that the AC genotype of rs11892031 was associated with remarkably decreased risk of bladder cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 0.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.09–0.81; p = 0.019), compared with the AA genotype of rs11892031; and that CT/CC genotypes of rs401681 were associated with significantly increased risk of bladder cancer (adjusted OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.10–2.91; p = 0.02), compared with the TT genotype of rs401681. We further conducted stratification analysis to examine the correlation between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11892031/rs401681 and tumor grade/stage. Results showed that heterogeneity in ORs of tumor categories was not significant for either rs11892031 or rs401681 (p > 0.05), indicating that the two SNPs seemingly do not associate with tumor grade and stage of bladder cancer in our study population. The present study suggests that the SNPs rs11892031 and rs401681 are associated with bladder cancer risk in a Chinese population. Future analyses will be conducted with more participants recruited in a case-control study. PMID:25347272

  1. An evaluation of descent strategies for TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Groce, J. L.; Coote, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated were the effects on system throughput and fleet fuel usage of arrival aircraft utilizing three 4D RNAV descent strategies (cost optimal, clean-idle Mach/CAS and constant descent angle Mach/CAS), both individually and in combination, in an advanced air traffic control metering environment. Results are presented for all mixtures of arrival traffic consisting of three Boeing commercial jet types and for all combinations of the three descent strategies for a typical en route metering airport arrival distribution.

  2. Conceptual design of "Exomars-2018" Descent Module developed by federal enterprise "Lavochkin Association"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khartov, V. V.; Martynov, M. B.; Lukiyanchikov, A. V.; Alexashkin, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Goals and tasks for "ExoMars-2018" mission and share of responsibilities between European partners and p]Russia are presented. The main design requirements for a Descent Module (DM) that define its design concept as well as design specific features are given. The structure of the descent module, thermal control, means for securing systems interaction onboard the spacecraft "ExoMars-2018", and radio communication with the descent module are examined.

  3. Ruptured urinary bladder attributable to urethral compression by a haematoma after vertebral fracture in a bull

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In male cattle, rupture of the urinary bladder is usually associated with urethral obstruction by uroliths. Less common causes include urethral compression or stricture. This case report describes the findings in a young Limousion breeding bull with rupture of the urinary bladder because of urethral compression by a haematoma after coccygeal fracture. Case presentation The bull had been introduced into a 40-head Red-Holstein herd one week before being injured. One week after introduction to the herd, the bull had an acute onset of anorexia and he was referred to the clinic. There was marked abdominal distension, reduced skin turgor and enophthalmus. The serum concentration of urea and creatinine was increased. Ultrasonographic examination revealed severe ascites and abdominocentesis yielded clear yellow fluid with high urea and creatinine concentrations, which supported a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. The bull was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed a comminuted fracture of the first two coccygeal vertebrae associated with a massive haematoma that obstructed entire pelvic cavity. The haematoma compressed the urethra thereby preventing outflow of urine, which resulted in a 5-cm tear ventrally at the neck of the bladder. It was assumed that the newly-introduced bull had sustained the vertebral fractures when he was mounted by a cow. Conclusions The present case study serves to expand the differential diagnosis of urinary bladder rupture. Therefore, in addition to obstructive urolithiasis, compression and stricture of the urethra might be considered in male cattle with uroperitoneum. PMID:24666697

  4. From toad bladder to kidney.

    PubMed

    Leaf, A

    1982-02-01

    Studies using the urinary bladder of the toad to elucidate the mechanism of transepithelial ion transport are reviewed. Sodium ions are reabsorbed from bladder urine across the granular cells, accounting for all the electrical activity of this epithelium. Sodium ions enter the granular cells passively through selective sodium channels down an electrochemical gradient, mix in the intracellular "active transport pool," and are pumped actively out of the cell across the basolateral plasma membrane. The concentration of sodium within the active transport pool is normally low, 10-14 mM, with Ringer solution bathing both surfaces. The apical plasma membrane is the major resistance barrier; both vasopressin and aldosterone stimulate sodium transport across the tissue by increasing the permeability of this barrier. The apical plasma membrane is impermeable to chloride ions and they are reabsorbed passively, in response to the transepithelial electrical potential established by active sodium transport, through paracellular channels. The bladder reabsorbs 18 sodium ions per molecule of suprabasal oxygen consumed. The relatively high apical membrane resistance buffers the basolateral active transport system from changes in osmotic work in pumping sodium out of the cell over the physiologic range of transepithelial potentials. PMID:7039340

  5. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-07

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  6. Bladder calculi complicating intermittent clean catheterization.

    PubMed

    Amendola, M A; Sonda, L P; Diokno, A C; Vidyasagar, M

    1983-10-01

    Eight male patients on clean intermittent catheterization programs for neurogenic bladder dysfunction developed vesical calculi around pubic hairs inadvertently introduced into the bladder, acting as a nidus for incrustation. In three patients, the radiographic appearance of serpentine calcifications in the pelvis was highly consistent with calcareous deposits on strands of hair. Familiarity with this radiologic appearance should suggest the diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting and help avoid misinterpretation of these calcifications, atypical of usual bladder stones. PMID:6604429

  7. Design of a randomised acupuncture trial on functional neck/shoulder stiffness with two placebo controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional neck/shoulder stiffness is one of the most well-known indications for acupuncture treatment in Japan. There is little evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for functional neck/shoulder stiffness. Research using two different placebos may allow an efficient method to tease apart the components of real acupuncture from various kinds of ‘non-specific’ effects such as ritual with touch or ritual alone. Herein, we describe a protocol of an ongoing, single-centre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial which aims to assess whether, in functional neck/shoulder stiffness, acupuncture treatment with skin piercing has a specific effect over two types of placebo: skin-touching plus ritual or ritual alone. Methods Six acupuncturists and 400 patients with functional neck/shoulder stiffness are randomly assigned to four treatment groups: genuine acupuncture penetrating the skin, skin-touch placebo or no-touch placebo needles in a double-blind manner (practitioner-patient blinding) or no-treatment control group. Each acupuncturist applies a needle to each of four acupoints (Bladder10, Small Intestine14, Gallbladder21 and Bladder42) in the neck/shoulder to 50 patients. Before, immediately after and 24 hours after the treatment, patients are asked about the intensity of their neck/shoulder stiffness. After the treatment, practitioners and patients are asked to guess whether the treatment is “penetrating”, “skin-touch” or “no-touch” or to record “cannot identify the treatment”. Discussion In addition to intention-to-treat analysis, we will conduct subgroup analysis based on practitioners’ or patients’ guesses to discuss the efficacy and effectiveness of treatments with skin piercing and various placebo controls. The results of practitioner and patient blinding will be discussed. We believe this study will further distinguish the role of different components of acupuncture. Trial registration Current Controlled Trial ISRCTN76896018 PMID:25027157

  8. What Are the Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect called exstrophy can also lead to bladder cancer. Genes and family history: People whose family members have had bladder cancer have a higher risk. People who inherit certain gene syndromes also have a higher risk of bladder ...

  9. What I Need to Know about Bladder Control for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español What I need to know about Bladder Control for Women Page Content On ... Bladder Control Worksheets: What Your Doctor Needs to Know Your Daily Bladder Diary Kegel Exercise Tips Medicines ...

  10. Controller evaluations of the descent advisor automation aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1989-01-01

    An automation aid to assist air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting arrival times at a fix has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The automation aid, referred to as the descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent point and speed profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is interfaced with a mouse-based, menu-driven controller display that allows the air traffic controller to interactively use its accurate predictive capability to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. This paper focuses on operational issues concerning the utilization of the DA, specifically, how the DA can be used for prediction, intrail spacing, and metering. In order to evaluate the DA, a real time simulation was conducted using both current and retired controller subjects. Controllers operated in teams of two, as they do in the present environment; issues of training and team interaction will be discussed. Evaluations by controllers indicated considerable enthusiasm for the DA aid, and provided specific recommendations for using the tool effectively.

  11. High mammographic density in women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and is known to be approximately 60% heritable. Here we report a finding of an association between genetic ancestry and adjusted PMD. Methods We selected self-identified Caucasian women in the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute Cohort whose screening mammograms placed them in the top or bottom quintiles of age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Our final dataset included 474 women with the highest adjusted PMD and 469 with the lowest genotyped on the Illumina 1 M platform. Principal component analysis (PCA) and identity-by-descent analyses allowed us to infer the women's genetic ancestry and correlate it with adjusted PMD. Results Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, as defined by the first principal component of PCA and identity-by-descent analyses, represented approximately 15% of the sample. Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, defined by the first principal component of PCA, was associated with higher adjusted PMD (P = 0.004). Using multivariate regression to adjust for epidemiologic factors associated with PMD, including age at parity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, did not attenuate the association. Conclusions Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, based on genetic analysis, are more likely to have high age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Ashkenazi Jews may have a unique set of genetic variants or environmental risk factors that increase mammographic density. PMID:23668689

  12. Efficient Love wave modelling via Sobolev gradient steepest descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Matt; Ferguson, John; McMechan, George

    2016-05-01

    A new method for finding solutions to ordinary differential equation boundary value problems is introduced, in which Sobolev gradient steepest descent is used to determine eigenfunctions and eigenvalues simultaneously in an iterative scheme. The technique is then applied to the 1-D Love wave problem. The algorithm has several advantages when computing dispersion curves. It avoids the problem of mode skipping, and can handle arbitrary Earth structure profiles in depth. For a given frequency range, computation times scale approximately as the square root of the number of frequencies, and the computation of dispersion curves can be implemented in a fully parallel manner over the modes involved. The steepest descent solutions are within a fraction of a per cent of the analytic solutions for the first 25 modes for a two-layer model. Since all corresponding eigenfunctions are computed along with the dispersion curves, the impact on group and phase velocity of the displacement behaviour with depth is thoroughly examined. The dispersion curves are used to compute synthetic Love wave seismograms that include many higher order modes. An example includes addition of attenuation to a model with a low-velocity zone, with values as low as Q = 20. Finally, a confirming comparison is made with a layer matrix method on the upper 700 km of a whole Earth model.

  13. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Simulation Using DSENDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Casoliva, Jordi; Balaram, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The most recent planetary science mission to Mars is Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with the Curiosity rover, launched November 26, 2011 and landed at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. This spacecraft was the first use at Mars of a complete closed-loop Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system, including guided entry with a lifting body that greatly reduces dispersions during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase to achieve a 25 km x 20 km landing error relative to the selected Gale Crater landing target. In order to confirm meeting the above landing criteria, high-fidelity simulation of the EDL phase is required. The tool used for 6DOF EDL trajectory verification analysis is Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS), which is a high-fidelity simulation tool from JPLs Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation Laboratory for the development, test and operations of aero-flight vehicles. DSENDS inherent capability is augmented for MSL with project-specific models of atmosphere, aerodynamics, sensors and thrusters along with GN&C flight software to enable high-fidelity trajectory simulation. This paper will present the model integration and independent verification experience of the JPL EDL trajectory analysis team.

  14. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Simulation Using DSENDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Casoliva, Jordi; Balaram, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The most recent planetary science mission to Mars was Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with the Curiosity rover, launched November 26, 2011 and landed at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. This spacecraft was the first use at Mars of a complete closed-loop Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system, including guided entry with a lifting body that greatly reduces dispersions during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase to achieve a 25 km X 20 km landing error relative to the selected Gale Crater landing target. In order to confirm meeting the above landing criteria, high-fidelity simulation of the EDL phase is required. The tool used for 6DOF EDL trajectory verification analysis is Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS), which is a high-fidelity simulation tool from JPLs Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation Laboratory for the development, test and operations of aero-flight vehicles. DSENDS inherent capability is augmented for MSL with project-specific models of atmosphere, aerodynamics, sensors and thrusters along with GN&C flight software to enable high-fidelity trajectory simulation. This paper will present the model integration and independent verification experience of the JPL EDL trajectory analysis team.

  15. Mars Exploration Rover Terminal Descent Mission Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Queen, Eric M.

    2004-01-01

    Because of NASA's added reliance on simulation for successful interplanetary missions, the MER mission has developed a detailed EDL trajectory modeling and simulation. This paper summarizes how the MER EDL sequence of events are modeled, verification of the methods used, and the inputs. This simulation is built upon a multibody parachute trajectory simulation tool that has been developed in POST I1 that accurately simulates the trajectory of multiple vehicles in flight with interacting forces. In this model the parachute and the suspended bodies are treated as 6 Degree-of-Freedom (6 DOF) bodies. The terminal descent phase of the mission consists of several Entry, Descent, Landing (EDL) events, such as parachute deployment, heatshield separation, deployment of the lander from the backshell, deployment of the airbags, RAD firings, TIRS firings, etc. For an accurate, reliable simulation these events need to be modeled seamlessly and robustly so that the simulations will remain numerically stable during Monte-Carlo simulations. This paper also summarizes how the events have been modeled, the numerical issues, and modeling challenges.

  16. Efficient Love wave modeling via Sobolev gradient steepest descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Matt; Ferguson, John; McMechan, George

    2016-02-01

    A new method for finding solutions to ordinary differential equation boundary value problems is introduced, in which Sobolev gradient steepest descent is used to determine eigenfunctions and eigenvalues simultaneously in an iterative scheme. The technique is then applied to the 1-D Love wave problem. The algorithm has several advantages when computing dispersion curves. It avoids the problem of mode skipping, and can handle arbitrary Earth structure profiles in depth. For a given frequency range, computation times scale approximately as the square root of the number of frequencies, and the computation of dispersion curves can be implemented in a fully parallel manner over the modes involved. The steepest descent solutions are within a fraction of a percent of the analytic solutions for the first 25 modes for a two-layer model. Since all corresponding eigenfunctions are computed along with the dispersion curves, the impact on group and phase velocity of the displacement behavior with depth is thoroughly examined. The dispersion curves are used to compute synthetic Love wave seismograms that include many higher order modes. An example includes addition of attenuation to a model with a low velocity zone, with values as low as Q = 20. Finally, a confirming comparison is made with a layer matrix method on the upper 700 km of a whole Earth model.

  17. Arachnid aloft: directed aerial descent in neotropical canopy spiders.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Munk, Yonatan; Dudley, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The behaviour of directed aerial descent has been described for numerous taxa of wingless hexapods as they fall from the tropical rainforest canopy, but is not known in other terrestrial arthropods. Here, we describe similar controlled aerial behaviours for large arboreal spiders in the genus Selenops (Selenopidae). We dropped 59 such spiders from either canopy platforms or tree crowns in Panama and Peru; the majority (93%) directed their aerial trajectories towards and then landed upon nearby tree trunks. Following initial dorsoventral righting when necessary, falling spiders oriented themselves and then translated head-first towards targets; directional changes were correlated with bilaterally asymmetric motions of the anterolaterally extended forelegs. Aerial performance (i.e. the glide index) decreased with increasing body mass and wing loading, but not with projected surface area of the spider. Along with the occurrence of directed aerial descent in ants, jumping bristletails, and other wingless hexapods, this discovery of targeted gliding in selenopid spiders further indicates strong selective pressures against uncontrolled falls into the understory for arboreal taxa. PMID:26289654

  18. AB208. Can bladder irrigation reduce the morbidity of bladder stones in patients with spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Xie, KJ; Jiang, CH; Zeng, JW; Huang, MP; Liu, QL; Huang, JB; Huang, TH; Li, YF

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of bladder irrigation for reducing the morbidity of bladder stones in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Methods From December 2011 to July 2013, SCI patients were prospectively randomized and assigned to either a bladder irrigation group or a no bladder irrigation group. Bladder irrigations were performed twice a week by urologists. The primary outcomes were incidences of bladder stones and Incontinence-Specific Quality-of-Life Instrument (I-QoL). Secondary outcomes were related adverse events. Results A total of 80 eligible patients participated and 78 (97.5%) patients (bladder irrigation, n=39; no bladder irrigation, n=39) completed 24 weeks of follow-up. Out of the 78 patients, 19 (24.3%) developed bladder stones. All occurred in no bladder irrigation group. In 8 of the 19 patients (42.1%), stones were only detected by cystoscopy .The bladder stones were mostly thin with an eggshell appearance (78.95% for diameter of stone <5 mm, 84.21% for volume of bladder stone<0.2 cm3). Bladder stones were removed by vigorous bladder irrigation guided by ultrasound (73.68%) or endoscopic lithotripsy (26.32%). The I-QOL was significantly better in the bladder irrigation group than in no bladder irrigation group at weeks 6, 12, 18, and 24 of follow-up. Conclusions Bladder irrigation may be more effective and safer than no bladder irrigation for reducing the morbidity of bladder stone in SCI patients.

  19. Comparison of a new venous control device with a bladder box system for use in ECMO.

    PubMed

    Setz, K; Kesser, K; Kopotic, R J; Cornish, J D

    1992-01-01

    During extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), forward pump flow must not be allowed to exceed the rate of blood drainage from the patient so that excessive negative pressure does not develop within the ECMO circuit or in the patient's right atrium. A distensible reservoir ("bladder") and mechanically actuated electronic switch ("bladder box"), has typically been used for this purpose. If the rate of blood flow from the patient to the pump is insufficient to support the perfusion rate desired and adjustments in volume status and catheter position do not increase blood drainage, the only recourse is to increase the siphon pressure by elevating the patient. At the author's institution, a novel venous control module (VCM), without a reservoir, that can provide increased venous drainage without elevating the patient is used. Using an in vitro model of neonatal ECMO, the authors' compared their VCM to a commercially available "bladder box" system. Pressures were monitored in a collapsible chamber inside a water bath (simulating the right atrium), at the gravitational high point of the ECMO circuit ("neck site") and at the low point of the circuit ("venous site") at flow rates of 100, 450, 900, and 1,300 cc/min. Pump shut-off characteristics for both systems were also measured with either sudden interruption of venous drainage ("cross-clamping") or restriction of venous inflow ("hypovolemia"). Under continuous flow conditions, higher flows could be achieved with the VCM. With acute venous catheter occlusion, instantaneous ("trough") pressures at the neck site were lower, and venous monitoring site pressures were higher with the bladder box system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1450482

  20. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of uncertainties in external factors. Analysis from operational feasibility perspective suggests that two key features of the performance based Flight Management System (FMS) i.e. required time of arrival (RTA) and geometric descent path would help in reduction of unpredictability associated with arrival time and vertical profile of aircraft guided by the FMS coupled with auto-pilot (AP) and auto-throttle (AT). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA also suggests that for procedure design window type, 'AT or above' and 'AT or below' altitude and FPA constraints are more realistic and useful compared to obsolete 'AT' type altitude constraint.

  1. Influence of neck rotation and neck lateroflexion on mandibular equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Schindler, H J; Lenz, J; Türp, J C; Schweizerhof, K; Rues, S

    2010-05-01

    Neuromuscular interaction between neck and jaw muscles has been reported in several studies. However, the influence of experimentally modified posture of the neck on jaw muscle activity during isometric biting was not investigated so far. The aim of the present study was to test by the aid of simultaneous electromyographic and intraoral bite force measurements whether neck rotation and lateroflexion, in contrast to a straightforward neck position, change the isometric cocontraction patterns of masticatory muscles under identical submaximum bite forces of 50-200 N. Electric muscle activity of all masticatory muscles and changes of the reduction point (RP) of the resultant bite force vectors were examined. An anteroposterior displacement of the RPs could be observed for the rotated and lateroflexed neck position in comparison with the straightforward position. On the other hand, the results revealed no significant differences between bilateral muscle activation under the different test conditions. These findings suggest a force transmission between the neck and the masticatory system, but no essential activity changes in the masticatory muscles under short time posture modification of the neck. PMID:20180896

  2. The Yearly Variation in Fall-Winter Arctic Winter Vortex Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Newman, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Using the change in HALOE methane profiles from early September to late March, we have estimated the minimum amount of diabatic descent within the polar which takes place during Arctic winter. The year to year variations are a result in the year to year variations in stratospheric wave activity which (1) modify the temperature of the vortex and thus the cooling rate; (2) reduce the apparent descent by mixing high amounts of methane into the vortex. The peak descent amounts from HALOE methane vary from l0km -14km near the arrival altitude of 25 km. Using a diabatic trajectory calculation, we compare forward and backward trajectories over the course of the winter using UKMO assimilated stratospheric data. The forward calculation agrees fairly well with the observed descent. The backward calculation appears to be unable to produce the observed amount of descent, but this is only an apparent effect due to the density decrease in parcels with altitude. Finally we show the results for unmixed descent experiments - where the parcels are fixed in latitude and longitude and allowed to descend based on the local cooling rate. Unmixed descent is found to always exceed mixed descent, because when normal parcel motion is included, the path average cooling is always less than the cooling at a fixed polar point.

  3. Ethnic Identity and Acculturative Stress as Mediators of Depression in Students of Asian Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantrip, Crystal; Mazzetti, Francesco; Grasso, Joseph; Gill, Sara; Miller, Janna; Haner, Morgynn; Rude, Stephanie; Awad, Germine

    2015-01-01

    This study underscored the importance of addressing the well-being of college students of Asian descent, because these students had higher rates of depression and lower positive feelings about their ethnic group compared with students of European descent, as measured by the Affirmation subscale of the Ethnic Identity Scale. Affirmation mediated…

  4. Miniature coherent velocimeter and altimeter (MCVA) for terminal descent control on lunar and planetary landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dan; Cardell, Greg; Szwaykowski, Piotr; Shaffat, Syed T.; Meras, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    While the overall architecture of an Entry Descent and Landing (EDL) system may vary depending on specific mission requirementsw, measurements of the rate vector with respect to the surface is a primary requirement for the Terminal Descent Control (TDC) phase of any controlled lander.

  5. Ethnic Identity and Acculturative Stress as Mediators of Depression in Students of Asian Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantrip, Crystal; Mazzetti, Francesco; Grasso, Joseph; Gill, Sara; Miller, Janna; Haner, Morgynn; Rude, Stephanie; Awad, Germine

    2015-01-01

    This study underscored the importance of addressing the well-being of college students of Asian descent, because these students had higher rates of depression and lower positive feelings about their ethnic group compared with students of European descent, as measured by the Affirmation subscale of the Ethnic Identity Scale. Affirmation mediated

  6. The Role of la Familia for Women of Mexican Descent Who Are Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo, Sandra Gray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe the role of "la familia" for women of Mexican descent as it relates to their development as leaders and their leadership in academia. Purposeful sampling was utilized to reach the goal of 18 participants who were female academic leaders of Mexican descent teaching full time in…

  7. Delivery of DNA into bladder via electroporation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaki; Iwashita, Hitoshi; Otani, Masayuki; Masunaga, Koichi; Inadome, Akito

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of in vivo gene transfer into the rat bladder by electroporation (EP) was evaluated. The bladder was exposed through an abdominal midline incision in 8-week-old male rats. Plasmid DNA of marker genes, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and luciferase, and the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) gene were then injected into the subserosal space of the bladder and EP was applied. At 72 h after gene transfer, GFP and luciferase were assayed in the isolated bladder, and immunohistochemical staining was used to detect nNOS. NOx released from isolated bladder strips was also assessed using microdialysis procedure. From the luciferase assay, 45 V, 1 Hz, 50 ms, and 8 pulses were selected as the optimum conditions for EP. Bladder specimens with GFP genes injected by EP showed numerous bright sites of GFP expression in the smooth-muscle layer. In rats with the nNOS gene injected by EP, there was marked nNOS immunoreactivity, and NOx released from bladder strips was significantly greater than that in the control groups. These results suggest that EP is a useful technique for in vivo gene transfer into rat bladder smooth muscles, and that the nNOS gene transferred by this procedure functionally expresses and contributes to NO production. PMID:18370204

  8. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  9. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  10. Steepest descent ballistic deposition of complex shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topic, Nikola; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    We present an efficient event-driven algorithm for sequential ballistic deposition of complex-shaped rigid particles. Each of the particles is constructed from hard spheres (typically 5 … 1000) of variable radii. The sizes and relative positions of the spheres may mutually overlap and can be chosen such that the surface of the resulting particle appears relatively smooth. In the sequential deposition process, by performing steps of rolling and linear motion, the particles move along the steepest descent in a landscape formed by the boundaries and previously deposited particles. The computer time for the simulation of a deposition process depends on the total number of spheres but only weakly on the sizes and shapes of the particles. The proposed algorithm generalizes the Visscher-Bolsterli algorithm [1] which is frequently used for packing of spheres, to non-spherical particles. The proposed event-driven algorithm allows simulations of multi-million particle systems using desktop computers.

  11. A guidance law for hypersonic descent to a point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, G. R.; Hull, David G.

    1992-08-01

    A neighboring extremal control problem is formulated for a hypersonic glider to execute a maximum-terminal-velocity descent to a stationary target. The resulting two-part, feedback control scheme initially solves a nonlinear algebraic problem to generate a nominal trajectory to the target altitude. Secondly, a neighboring optimal path computation about the nominal provides the lift and side-force perturbations necessary to achieve the target downrange and crossrange. On-line feedback simulations of the proposed scheme and a form of proportional navigation are compared with an off-line parameter optimization method. The neighboring optimal terminal velocity compares very well with the parameter optimization solution and is far superior to proportional navigation.

  12. An approximate, maximum-terminal-velocity descent to a point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, G. Richard; Hull, David G.

    A neighboring extremal control problem is formulated for a hypersonic glider to execute a maximum-terminal-velocity descent to a stationary target in a vertical plane. The resulting two-part, feedback control scheme initially solves a nonlinear algebraic problem to generate a nominal trajectory to the target altitude. Secondly, quadrature about the nominal provides the lift perturbation necessary to achieve the target downrange. On-line feedback simulations are run for the proposed scheme and a form of proportional navigation and compared with an off-line parameter optimization method. The neighboring extremal terminal velocity compares very well with the parameter optimization solution and is far superior to proportional navigation. However, the update rate is degraded, though the proposed method can be executed in real time.

  13. Time-controlled descent guidance in uncertain winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menga, G.; Erzberger, H.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for constructing a statistical model of the altitude-dependent mean wind profile from the historical record of wind measurements at particular locations. The model is constructed by fitting a Markov process, with altitude as the stage variable, to the historical wind data. The wind model, together with the aircraft dynamics and the error characteristics of the navigation system, are incorporated in the design of a state estimator, which gives the minimum variance estimate of the aircraft state and the wind vector. The state and wind estimates are used as inputs to a linear feedback law for guiding the aircraft along the nominal trajectory. An example design of a time-constrained (4D RNAV) descent guidance system is presented, showing tracking accuracy, control activity, and probability of arrival time with and without the wind estimator.

  14. Mars Exploration Rovers Entry, Descent, and Landing Trajectory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Knocke, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover mission successfully landed two rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" on Mars on January 4th and 25th of 2004, respectively. The trajectory analysis performed to define the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) scenario is described. The entry requirements and constraints are presented, as well as uncertainties used in a Monte Carlo dispersion analysis to statistically assess the robustness of the entry design to off-nominal conditions. In the analysis, six-degree-of-freedom and three-degree-of-freedom trajectory results are compared to assess the entry characteristics of the capsule. Comparison of the preentry results to preliminary post-landing reconstruction data shows that all EDL parameters were within the requirements. In addition, the final landing position for both "Spirit" and "Opportunity" were within 15 km of the predicted landing location.

  15. Mars Exploration Rover: Launch, Cruise, Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, James K.; Manning, Robert M.; Adler, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Project was an ambitious effort to land two highly capable rovers on Mars and concurrently explore the Martian surface for three months each. Launched in June and July of 2003, cruise operations were conducted through January 4, 2004 with the first landing, followed by the second landing on January 25. The prime mission for the second rover ended on April 27, 2004. This paper will provide an overview of the launch, cruise, and landing phases of the mission, including the engineering and science objectives and challenges involved in the selection and targeting of the landing sites, as well as the excitement and challenges of atmospheric entry, descent and landing execution.

  16. Apollo 16 LM-11 descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of the LM-11 Descent Propulsion System during the Apollo 16 Mission was evaluated and found to be satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted 1 sigma uncertainty of 0.2 seconds. The engine performance corrected to standard inlet conditions for the FTP portion of the burn at 50 seconds after ignition was as follows: thrust, 9839 lbf; specific impulse, 306.9 sec; and propellant mixture ratio, 1.592. These values are +0.34, +0.03 and +0.0 percent different, respectively, from the values reported from engine acceptance tests and were within specification limits. Several flight measurement discrepancies that existed during the flight are discussed.

  17. Transitions and transversions in evolutionary descent - An approach to understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative theoretical groundwork is presented for determining the proportions of the possible types of base substitutions observed between 12 genes sharing a common ancestor and isolated from extant species. Three methods (direct count, regression, and informational entropy maximization) are described by which conditional base substitution probabilities that determine evolutionary descent can be estimated from experimental data. These methods are utilized to study the ratio of transversions to transitions during gene divergence. The limiting ratio is directly calculated from a knowledge of the 12 conditional probabilities for each type of base substitution and from a knowledge of the equilibrium base composition of the DNAs compared. An expression is developed for this calculation. It is concluded that multiple substitutions per se do not lead to a decrease in transition differences with increasing evolutionary divergence.

  18. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Martynov, Maxim; Schmidt, Walter; Harri, Ari-Matti; Vsevolod Koryanov, D.; Kazakovtcev, Victor; Haukka, Harri; Arruego, Ignacio; Finchenko, Valery; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrei; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    Abstract A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) or Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth’s atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth’s atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. “Mini-1” category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: - qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, - Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, - m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, - V (m/s): re-entry velocity and - theta(deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet (“Mini-1” category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being VSOL = 5268 m/s. Using the basic pre-defined parameters for MetNet-type of lander in Earth atmosphere, we get the optimal angle of = -3.06 degrees for Earth re-entry. 3. Payload Mass for Earth Entry DV One of the key elements in Earth entry lander is the amount of available payload mass. The payload mass depends on, e.g., the lander size, landing type (soil or water), heat shield durability and additional landing gear. The payload mass will have an impact to the center of gravity of the lander. The payload with a “low” CoG (compared the the lander structure) has a larger tolerance than the payload with “high” CoG. In cases where payload CoG causes instability, the extra balance mass can be used to adjust CoG. This balance mass will reduce the available payload mass. A major limitation for payload mass is the heat shielding. Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 263255. References [1] http://ritd.fmi.fi

  19. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Koryanov, Vsevolod; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valery; Martynov, Maxim; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Viktor; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    2014-05-01

    A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry. 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth's atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. 'Mini-1' category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, V (m/s): re-entry velocity and Θ (deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet ('Mini-1' category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being VSOL = 5268 m/s. Using the basic pre-defined parameters for MetNet-type of lander in Earth atmosphere, we get the optimal angle of Θ = -3.06 degrees for Earth re-entry. 3. Payload Mass for Earth Entry DV One of the key elements in Earth entry lander is the amount of available payload mass. The payload mass depends on, e.g., the lander size, landing type (soil or water), heat shield durability and additional landing gear. The payload mass will have an impact to the center of gravity of the lander. The payload with a 'low' CoG (compared the the lander structure) has a larger tolerance than the payload with 'high' CoG. In cases where payload CoG causes instability, the extra balance mass can be used to adjust CoG. This balance mass will reduce the available payload mass. A major limitation for payload mass is the heat shielding. Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 263255. References [1] http://ritd.fmi.fi

  20. Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Guerrero, H.; Schmidt, W.; Haukka, H.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ostresko, B.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Arruego, I.; Martin, S.; Siili, T.

    2013-09-01

    In 2001 - 2011 an inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Martian atmosphere was developed by FMI and the MetNet team. This MetNet Mars Lander EDLS is used in both the initial deceleration during atmospheric entry and in the final deceleration before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator to Martian surface. The EDLS design is ingenious and its applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied in the on-going project. In particular, the behavior of the system in the critical transonic aerodynamic (from hypersonic to subsonic) regime will be investigated. This project targets to analyze and test the transonic behavior of this compact and light weight payload entry system to Earth's atmosphere [1]. Scaling and adaptation for terrestrial atmospheric conditions, instead of a completely new design, is a favorable approach for providing a new re-entry vehicle for terrestrial space applications.

  1. The stabilization interval system of a tethered descent underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayvoronskiy, S. A.; Ezangina, T.; Khozhaev, I.; Efimov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    To damp the vertical oscillations of a descent submersible caused by dusting the control system utilizing a shock-absorbing hoist located on the submersible was developed. A robust proportional-plus-integral action controller was included in the control loop to ensure acceptable dynamic properties of the system by interval variations of the module mass, the rope length, the equivalent value of stiffness of a spring linkage and the equivalent value of damping factor of the spring linkage. A parametric synthesis of the controller was carried out on the basis of the robust expansion of the coefficient method of the quality rating estimation. The system operability was confirmed by the results of the digital simulation parameters

  2. Overview of the Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, Myron R., III; Cichy, Benjamin D.; Desai, Prasun N.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Phoenix Mars Lander began its journey to Mars from Cape Canaveral, Florida in August 2007, but its journey to the launch pad began many years earlier in 1997 as NASA s Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. In the intervening years, the entry, descent and landing (EDL) system architecture went through a series of changes, resulting in the system flown to the surface of Mars on May 25th, 2008. Some changes, such as entry velocity and landing site elevation, were the result of differences in mission design. Other changes, including the removal of hypersonic guidance, the reformulation of the parachute deployment algorithm, and the addition of the backshell avoidance maneuver, were driven by constant efforts to augment system robustness. An overview of the Phoenix EDL system architecture is presented along with rationales driving these architectural changes.

  3. En route Descent Advisor Concept for Efficient Arrival Metering Conformance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven; Vivona, Robert; Coppenbarger, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The En-route Descent Advisor (EDA) is a suite of decision support tool (DST) capabilities for en route sector subject to metering restrictions such as those generated by the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) Traffic Management Advisor. EDA assists controllers with high-density arrival metering by providing fuel-efficient metering-conformance advisories, integrated with conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capabilities, to minimize deviations from the user s preferred trajectory. These DST capabilities will enable controllers to change their procedures from ones that are oriented towards sector management to procedures oriented towards trajectory management. Although adaptable to current procedures and airspace structure, EDA is intended as a tool for transitioning traffic from a Free Flight environment to an efficiently organized flow into terminal airspace. This paper describes the transition airspace problem and EDA concept, defines the key benefit mechanisms that will be enabled by EDA capabilities, and presents a traffic scenario to illustrate the use of the tool.

  4. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, Ravi; Burkhart, P. Dan; Chen, Allen; Comeaux, Keith A.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Devin, M. Kipp; Mendeck, Gavin F.; Powell, Richard W.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Sell, Steven W.; Steltzner, Adam D.; Way, David W.

    2008-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than prior missions to Mars, MSL will offer access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. The MSL EDL sequence is a result of a more stringent requirement set than any of its predecessors. Notable among these requirements is landing a 900 kg rover in a landing ellipse much smaller than that of any previous Mars lander. In meeting these requirements, MSL is extending the limits of the EDL technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions.

  5. Ground reaction forces and frictional demands during stair descent: effects of age and illumination.

    PubMed

    Christina, Kathryn A; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2002-04-01

    Stair descent is an inherently risky and demanding task that older adults often encounter in everyday life. It is believed that slip between the foot or shoe sole and the stair surface may play a role in stair related falls, however, there are no reports on slip resistance requirements for stair descent. The aim of this study was to determine the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) necessary for safe stair descent in 12 young and 12 older adults, under varied illuminance conditions. The RCOF during stair descent was found to be comparable in magnitude and time to that for overground walking, and thus, with adequate footwear and dry stair surfaces, friction does not appear to be a major determinant of stair safety. Illuminance level had little effect on the dependent variables quantified in this study. However, the older participants demonstrated safer strategies than the young during stair descent, as reflected by differences in the ground reaction forces and lower RCOF. PMID:11869909

  6. Pathogenesis of human urinary bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, George T.

    1983-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bladder cancer is being analyzed at several levels of biological organization, i.e., population groups, individual whole animal, tissue, cell, molecule, etc. Each of these levels provides opportunities for mechanistic studies. Yet the integration of these several levels into a cohesive fabric is incomplete. From a clinical point of view, the following seem of importance to human bladder cancer pathogenesis. The initiation, promotion, and progression of bladder cancer involves several factors acting concurrently or sequentially. These factors appear to be naturally occurring or synthetically created chemicals present in the external environment. Human exposures to these agents may begin in utero, and varying, dynamic qualitative and quantitative exposure patterns continue through developmental and adult life. Apparent latent periods of development of clinical bladder cancer may be as short as one, or as long as 50 years or more. Individuals may exhibit differential susceptibility to vesical carcinogens, perhaps through phenotypic differences in quantitative biotransformation routes. Differences in bladder epithelial cell susceptibilities probably also occur, as well as varying local tissue and generalized resistance to neoplasia formation. Older individuals do not appear to be more resistant to bladder carcinogenesis. A number of animal model systems have been developed for the study of the in vivo, cellular, and molecular pathogenesis of bladder cancer. These models replicate many of the known salient features of human bladder cancer. Through use of appropriate whole animal models in conjunction with investigations of human and animal bladder cells and tissues in culture, controlled mechanistic and quantitative studies of bladder cancer pathogenesis should rapidly develop. PMID:6832092

  7. Vesicoscopic Treatment of Symptomatic Congenital Bladder Diverticula in Children: A 7-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Marte, Antonio; Cavaiuolo, Silvia; Esposito, Maria; Pintozzi, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to report on the use of vesicoscopy in the treatment of symptomatic congenital bladder diverticula (CBD) in children. Material and Methods In this study, 16 males, aged 4 to 12 years (median age, 6.25 years), were treated for symptomatic CBD; 3 patients presented double diverticulum and 13 presented single diverticulum. The presenting symptoms were recurrent urinary tract infection, hematuria, lower abdominal pain, and voiding dysfunctions as urgency, frequency alone, or in association. A first midline 5-mm trocar was introduced for a 0-degree telescope at the dome of the bladder, and two left and right 3- or 5-mm trocars were inserted through the anterolateral wall. The bladder was then insufflated with carbon dioxide to 10 to 12 mm Hg pressure. The diverticula were inverted into the bladder and the mucosa around the neck was circumcised by using scissors and hook. The defect was sutured and the bladder was drained. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of third grade or higher was treated endoscopically. Results Mean operative time was 90 minutes for procedures. At 6-month follow-up, ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) showed the disappearance of the diverticulum in 15 out of the 16 patients. The patient, with huge double diverticulum and fourth grade right VUR, presented recurrence of a small left diverticulum. Patients with voiding disorders presented a gradual improvement of their urgency. VUR disappeared at VCUG in all patients. Conclusion Vesicoscopic diverticulectomy resulted a safe and effective procedure and can be considered a valid alternative to the open or laparoscopic procedures. In our opinion, routine use of vesicoscopy could become the gold standard for the treatment of CBD in children. PMID:25988747

  8. A Non-Invasive Bladder Sensory Test Supports a Role for Dysmenorrhea Increasing Bladder Noxious Mechanosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    TU, Frank F.; EPSTEIN, Aliza E.; POZOLO, Kristen E.; SEXTON, Debra L.; MELNYK, Alexandra I.; HELLMAN, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Catheterization to measure bladder sensitivity is aversive and hinders human participation in visceral sensory research. Therefore, we sought to characterize the reliability of sonographically-estimated female bladder sensory thresholds. To demonstrate this techniques usefulness, we examined the effects of self-reported dysmenorrhea on bladder pain thresholds. Methods Bladder sensory threshold volumes were determined during provoked natural diuresis in 49 healthy women (mean age 24 8) using three-dimensional ultrasound. Cystometric thresholds (Vfs first sensation, Vfu first urge, Vmt maximum tolerance) were quantified and related to bladder urgency and pain. We estimated reliability (one-week retest and interrater). Self-reported menstrual pain was examined in relationship to bladder pain, urgency and volume thresholds. Results Average bladder sensory thresholds (mLs) were Vfs (160100), Vfu (310130), and Vmt (500180). Interrater reliability ranged from 0.970.99. One-week retest reliability was Vmt = 0.76 (95% CI 0.640.88), Vfs = 0.62 (95% CI 0.440.80), and Vfu = 0.63, (95% CI 0.470.80). Bladder filling rate correlated with all thresholds (r = 0.530.64, p < 0.0001). Women with moderate to severe dysmenorrhea pain had increased bladder pain and urgency at Vfs and increased pain at Vfu (ps < 0.05). In contrast, dysmenorrhea pain was unrelated to bladder capacity. Discussion Sonographic estimates of bladder sensory thresholds were reproducible and reliable. In these healthy volunteers, dysmenorrhea was associated with increased bladder pain and urgency during filling but unrelated to capacity. Plausibly, dysmenorrhea sufferers may exhibit enhanced visceral mechanosensitivity, increasing their risk to develop chronic bladder pain syndromes. PMID:23370073

  9. Cancer in the neck: Evaluation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.L.; Ballantyne, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of melanoma; Basic principles of radiobiology in head and neck oncology; Head and neck cancer: Radiotherapeutic precepts in the management of the neck; and Morbidity of modified neck dissection.

  10. SERS measurement of the bladder cancer cells with the nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di; Chen, Haige; Cao, Ming; Yang, Guoliang; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran

    2015-09-01

    The surfaced enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of bladder cancer cells and tissues were measured in this paper. Both depth SERS and map SERS of SCABER bladder cancer cells were measured with confocal Raman microscope using gold nanoparticles as the enhance substrate. We also measured SERS of normal bladder tissue and bladder cancer tissue, and analyzed the difference of two different tissues. The SERS spectra of more samples need to be measured and analyzed for bladder cancer tissue and the normal bladder tissue in the future and the spectra will be helpful for bladder cancer diagnosis. PMID:26525026

  11. Arsenic and urinary bladder cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Luster, Michael I; Simeonova, Petia P

    2004-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that a close association exists between the elevated levels of arsenic in drinking water and the incidence of certain cancers, including transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. We have employed in vitro and in vivo models to examine the effects of sodium arsenite on the urinary bladder epithelium. Mice exposed to 0.01% sodium arsenite in drinking water demonstrated hyperproliferation of the bladder uroepithelium within 4 weeks after initiating treatment. This occurred in the absence of amorphous precipitates and was accompanied by the accumulation of trivalent arsenite (iAs(3+)), and to a lesser extent dimethylarsenic (DMA), arsenate (iAs(5+)), and monomethylarsenic (MMA) in bladder tissue. In contrast to the bladder, urinary secretion was primarily in the form of DMA and MMA. Arsenic-induced cell proliferation in the bladder epithelium was correlated with activation of the MAP kinase pathway, leading to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase activity, AP-1 activation, and expression of AP-1-associated genes involved in cell proliferation. Activation of the MAP kinase pathway involved both epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-dependent and -independent events, the latter involving Src activation. Studies summarized in this review suggest that arsenic accumulates in urinary bladder epithelium causing activation of specific signaling pathways that lead to chronic increased cell proliferation. This may play a non-epigenetic role in carcinogenesis by increasing the proliferation of initiated cells or increasing the mutational rate. PMID:15276422

  12. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  13. Childhood Head and Neck Irradiation

    MedlinePlus

    American Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in the lower front ...

  14. The vertebrate urinary bladder: osmoregulatory and other uses.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    The bladder may serve more biological uses than simple storage. The importance of bladder functions can be inferred from its presence among vertebrates, its anatomy and histology. From an evolutionary perspective, bladders have evolved at least twice in the vertebrates. The variability of permeability of the urinary bladder to water and solutes among species is discussed. Finally, the urinary bladder may play an osmoregulatory role. PMID:538956

  15. Potter sequence complicated by congenital cystic lesion of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Mizuno, Katsumi; Horie, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Yamaoka, Akiko; Mizutani, Kayo; Takeuchi, Toshio; Iikura, Yoji

    2002-07-01

    We report a case complicated by oligohydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, bilateral renal dysplasia, and cystic lesion of the bladder. He was clinically compatible with Potter sequence. Congenital cystic bladder is the rarest form of the bladder. We can find no report of Potter sequence complicated by cystic lesion of the bladder. This lesion was similar to multilocular bladder. The diagnosis was confirmed it by autopsy, magnetic resonance imaging, and urography after his death. PMID:12152145

  16. Urinary Bladder Leiomyosarcoma: Primary Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Slaoui, Hakim; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Validire, Pierre; Barret, Eric; Rozet, François; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Cases of bladder leiomyosarcoma represent 0.1% of all nonurothelial tumors. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy for a high-grade bladder leiomyosarcoma with an ileal diversion. The patient recovered uneventfully and no surgical margins were verified in final pathology. Early follow-up at 3 months shows no signs of computed tomography recurrence and adequate adaptation to ileal diversion. Although bladder sarcomas were once thought to have a grim prognosis, recent studies suggest that adequate surgical treatment is able to achieve optimal cancer control outcomes. PMID:26839792

  17. Bladder base impressions in women: "female prostate".

    PubMed

    Pope, T L; Harrison, R B; Clark, R L; Cuttino, J T

    1981-06-01

    Bladder base impressions due to prostate hypertrophy are a common urographic finding in older males. A similar appearance may be occasionally seen in females and presents a more difficult diagnostic problem. Sixteen such cases of bladder base defects in females at two institutions were identified. The impressions were caused by symphysis pubis asymmetry, postoperative change, urethral diverticulum, levator ani impression, or "urethral syndrome." Vaginal fibromyoma, ectopic ureterocele, and intramural bladder neoplasm can also cause this defect, although no such cases were found in this series. PMID:6786021

  18. [Placenta percreta with bladder invasion. Case report].

    PubMed

    Torres Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Torres Farías, Emigdio; Rodríguez Sandoval, Rosa María

    2007-09-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old woman, who had two previous caesarean sections, attended for the first time at 18 weeks of gestation. Pelvic ultrasonography and color Doppler imaging showed a placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder. A caesarean section was carried out at 27th week of gestation for preterm premature rupture of membranes. Placental tissue was firmly attached to the anterior surface of the bladder. A cesarean hysterectomy was performed with bilateral anterior internal iliac artery ligation before hysterectomy was finished. The bladder was repaired, leaving a suprapubic catheter. PMID:18293630

  19. Bladder reconstruction: The past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    EL-TAJI, OMAR M.S.; KHATTAK, ALTAF Q.; HUSSAIN, SYED A.

    2015-01-01

    Ileal conduit urinary diversion is the gold standard treatment for urinary tract reconstruction following cystectomy. This procedure uses gastrointestinal segments for bladder augmentation, a technique that is often associated with significant complications. The substantial progression in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine over the previous two decades has resulted in the development of techniques that may lead to the construction of functional de novo urinary bladder substitutes. The present review identifies and discusses the complications associated with current treatment options post-cystectomy. The current techniques, achievements and perspectives of the use of biomaterials and stem cells in the field of urinary bladder reconstruction are also reviewed. PMID:26170968

  20. [Overactive bladder syndrome: etiology, pathogenesis, treatment].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, V H

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the causes of hyperactive detrusory contractions, considered etiopathogenesis and treatment of patients with overactive bladder syndrome (OBS). Two groups of patients with overactive bladder syndrome were examined, analyzed etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. A new method for increasing the threshold sensitivity of spinal centers under the OBS by using the local lesions of the mucous membrane of the bladder by electrical coagulation or local microwave hyperthermia of the prostate are proposed. The high efficiency of these methods in dealing with OBS is shown. PMID:23713359

  1. Bladder Stromal Loss of Transforming Growth Factor Receptor II Decreases Fibrosis After Bladder Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Anumanthan, Govindaraj; Tanaka, Stacy T.; Adams, Cyrus M.; Thomas, John C.; Wills, Marcia L.; Adams, Mark C.; Hayward, Simon W.; Matusik, Robert J.; Bhowmick, Neil A.; Brock, John W.; Pope, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor-β is a potent stimulator of extracellular matrix production. Several studies show that loss of transforming growth factor-β signaling decreases kidney, liver and lung fibrosis. However, the role of transforming growth factor-β signaling in bladder fibrosis is not entirely understood. We investigated the effect of stromal loss of such signaling in mice after partial bladder outlet obstruction. Materials and Methods We performed partial bladder outlet obstruction by urethral ligation in 5-week-old female Tgfbr2colTKO mice. These mice were compared to WT mice with partial bladder outlet obstruction and to WT nonobstructed controls. After 4 weeks and before sacrifice urodynamics were performed. Bladder tissue was harvested, and p-Smad2 and collagen (Masson’s trichrome) staining were performed. Results Bladder compliance was increased in partially obstructed Tgfbr2colTKO mice and decreased in partially obstructed WT mice. The latter had increased smooth muscle hypertrophy and increased collagen deposition between smooth muscle bundles compared to those in Tgfbr2colTKO mice and nonobstructed controls. Transforming growth factor-β responsive collagen promoter activity was significantly decreased in Tgfbr2 knockout bladder stromal cells vs WT stromal cells. Conclusions Stromal loss of transforming growth factor-β signaling decreased collagen deposition after partial bladder outlet obstruction. In contrast to collagen production by recruited macrophages, stromal transforming growth factor-β signaling appears to be the primary source of fibrosis after partial bladder outlet obstruction. These findings further support the hypothesis that manipulating transforming growth factor-β signaling in bladder stromal cells would provide a future avenue for neuropathic bladder and bladder fibrosis treatment. PMID:19692014

  2. Headache and neck.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Maurice B

    2011-08-01

    Cervicogenic headache (CeH) is a relatively common syndrome. The paroxysmal and rather intense head pain usually is unilateral, spreading from the back of the head to the frontal and temporal regions, and triggered by certain movements or sustained provocative head positions. Digital pressure over triggering areas at the upper nuchal area reproduces the spontaneous pain pattern. Available clinical criteria differentiate this picture from other headache disorders, although superposition may be present in some cases. The neck is involved with other pain disorders apart from CeH. Migraine may be induced by cervical trigger factors in some cases, and whiplash lesions produce CeH-like symptoms as well as others. Occipital neuralgia refers to pain restricted to the distribution of the affected nerve and should not be mistaken as CeH. There is no definite, universal treatment for CeH yet. Options include physical therapy, preventive medicines, anesthetic blocks, denervation procedures, and surgery. The treatment choice must be performed on individual basis. PMID:21465114

  3. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a convex optimization based method that can rapidly generate the fuel optimal asteroid powered descent trajectory. The ultimate goal is to autonomously design the optimal powered descent trajectory on-board the spacecraft immediately prior to the descent burn. Compared to a planetary powered landing problem, the major difficulty is the complex gravity field near the surface of an asteroid that cannot be approximated by a constant gravity field. This paper uses relaxation techniques and a successive solution process that seeks the solution to the original nonlinear, nonconvex problem through the solutions to a sequence of convex optimal control problems.

  4. Descent strategy comparisons for TNAV-equipped aircraft under airplane-preferred operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.

    1989-01-01

    Three 4-D descent strategies were evaluated which were employed by TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering air traffic control environment. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to assess performance using three criteria when traffic enters the simulation under preferred cruise operating conditions (altitude and speed): throughput, fuel usage, and conflict probability. In comparison to an evaluation previously performed under NASA contract, the current analysis indicates that the optimal descent strategy is preferred over the clean-idle and constant descent angle (CFPA) strategies when all three criteria are considered.

  5. [Management of metastatic bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Hélène; Serrate, Camille; Pouessel, Damien; Le Maignan, Christine; Teixeira, Luis; Culine, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The management of patients with metastatic bladder cancer is mainly based on cytotoxic chemotherapy. The reference molecule is cisplatin. In 2014, first-line regimens include gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC protocol) or methotrexate, vinblastine, and cisplatin doxorubicin (MVAC protocol). When cisplatin is contra-indicated, another platinum Salt, carboplatin, is used in combination with gemcitabine. Vinflunine is the only molecule to have obtained a marketing approval for patients who failed first-line chemotherapy including a platinum salt. The overall prognosis of patients remains dismal, since the median overall survival is 12 to 14 months for patients being treated with cisplatin, whereas it is less than 1 year for patients receiving carboplatin. The identification of new effective drugs is a major challenge for the coming years. PMID:25668832

  6. Phasic Changes in Bladder Compliance During Filling Cystometry of the Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Ko, Sung Hwa; Shin, Myung Jun; Park, Yeo Jin; Park, Ji Sang; Lee, Ko Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate phasic changes during filling cystometry that most accurately represent detrusor properties, regardless of other factors affecting detrusor contractility. Methods Seventy-eight patients (59 males, 19 females; mean age, 48.2 years) with spinal cord injuries were enrolled. Urodynamic studies were performed using a normal saline filling rate of 24 mL/min. We calculated bladder compliance values of the detrusor muscle in each of three filling phase intervals, which divided the filling cystometrogram into three phases referable to the cystometric capacity or maximum cystometric capacity. The three phases were sequentially delineated by reference to the pressure-volume curve reflecting bladder filling. Results Bladder compliance during the first and second phases of filling cystometry was significantly correlated with overall bladder compliance in overactive detrusors. The highest coefficient of determination (r2=0.329) was obtained during the first phase of the pressure-volume curve. Bladder compliance during all three phases was significantly correlated with overall bladder compliance of filling cystometry in underactive detrusors. However, the coefficient of determination was greatest (r2=0.529) during the first phase of filling cystometry. Conclusion Phasic bladder compliance during the early filling phase (first filling phase) was the most representative assessment of overall bladder compliance during filling cystometry. Careful determination of early phase filling is important when seeking to acquire reliable urodynamic data on neurogenic bladders. PMID:25024957

  7. Lack of association between MTHFR Ala222Val and Glu429Ala polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk: A meta-analysis of case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    SHI, RONG; ZHAO, ZHEN; ZHOU, HUI; ZHOU, JUEYU; TAN, WANLONG

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a commom malignancy in the urinary tract that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The role of functional polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with bladder cancer risk remains to be determined. This meta-analysis was performed to derive a more precise estimation of MTHFR Ala222Val and Glu429Ala polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk. Data were collected with the last report up to September 2013. A total of 3,463 cases and 3,927 controls for Ala222Val, and 3,177 cases and 3,502 controls for Glu429Ala were analyzed. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated for the association with bladder cancer risk. Overall, no significant associations of Ala222Val and Glu429Ala polymorphisms with bladder cancer risk were found (for Ala222Val: Val/Val vs. Ala/Ala: OR, 1.02; 95% CI: 0.80–1.29; Val/Ala vs. Ala/Ala: OR, 1.02; 95% CI: 0.92–1.12; dominant model: OR, 1.01; 95% CI: 0.87–1.17; recessive model: OR, 1.00; 95% CI: 0.87–1.15; and for Glu429Ala: Ala/Ala vs. Glu/Glu: OR, 1.11; 95% CI: 0.78–1.58; Ala/Glu vs. Glu/Glu: OR, 1.16; 95% CI: 0.95–1.40; dominant model: OR, 1.15; 95% CI: 0.94–1.41; recessive model: OR, 0.96; 95% CI: 0.79–1.15). In stratified analyses by ethnicity, significant associations were observed for Glu429Ala polymorphism in individuals of Middle Eastern descent (Ala/Glu vs. Glu/Glu: OR, 2.11; 95% CI: 1.26–3.53; dominant model: OR, 2.16; 95% CI: 1.16–4.01; recessive model: OR, 1.82; 95% CI: 1.11–3.01). This meta-analysis demonstrated that overall there was no association of MTHFR Ala222Val and Glu429Ala polymorphisms with bladder cancer risk. However, in the stratified analysis by ethnicity the MTHFR Glu429Ala polymorphism was significantly associated with increased bladder cancer risk in individuals of Middle Eastern descent. PMID:24748982

  8. Description of the computations and pilot procedures for planning fuel-conservative descents with a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.; Knox, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm and the vertical performance modeling required for the DC-10 airplane is described.

  9. A coupled interplanetary---entry, descent and landing targeting procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidner, Jeremy David

    In NASA's past, targeting to a Mars landing site has required iteration between the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) analysts at NASA Langley Research Center and the interplanetary navigators at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). JPL would develop thousands of arrival states at Mars based on an assumed, constant entry flight path angle and down range angle from entry to landing. Langley would perform the EDL analysis using the arrival states from JPL. Feasible trajectories developed by Langley had varying flight path and down range angles over the entire launch/arrival window forcing an iteration of the trajectory design between JPL and Langley. The iteration process was inefficient, stretching out the design phase while introducing the possibility for error. The purpose of this study is to develop a method that calculates an interplanetary trajectory from Earth to Mars and seamlessly couples the tool with Langley's EDL analysis. The method will show a novel extension to current Lambert solution methods while incorporating a multiple revolution capabili ty.

  10. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance and Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, Joel M.; Johnson, Wyatt

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Vehicle is the next spacecraft to take humans into space and will include missions to ISS as well as missions to the Moon. As part of that challenge, the vehicle will have to accommodate multiple mission design concepts, since return from Low Earth Orbit and return from the Moon can be quite different. Commonality between the different missions as it relates to vehicle systems, guidance capability, and operations concepts is the goal. Several unique mission design concepts include the specification of multiple land-based landing sites for a vehicle with closed-loop direct and skip entry guidance, followed by a parachute descent and landing attenuation system. This includes the ability of the vehicle to accurately target and land at a designated landing site, including site location aspects, landing site size, and landing opportunities assessments. Analyses associated with these mission design and flight performance challenges and constraints will be discussed as well as potential operational concepts to provide feasibility and/or mission commonality.

  11. Evolution and ecology of directed aerial descent in arboreal ants.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Munk, Yonatan; Dudley, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Directed aerial descent (DAD) is used by a variety of arboreal animals to escape predators, to remain in the canopy, and to access resources. Here, we build upon the discovery of DAD in ants of tropical canopies by summarizing its known phylogenetic distribution among ant genera, and within both the subfamily Pseudomyrmecinae and the genus Cephalotes. DAD has multiple evolutionary origins in ants, occurring independently in numerous genera in the subfamilies Myrmicinae, Formicinae, and Pseudomyrmecinae. Ablation experiments and video recordings of ants in a vertical wind tunnel showed that DAD in Cephalotes atratus is achieved via postural changes, specifically orientation of the legs and gaster. The occurrence of DAD in Formicinae indicates that the presence of a postpetiole is not essential for the behavior. Evidence to date indicates that gliding behavior is accomplished by visual targeting mediated by the compound eyes, and is restricted to diurnally active ants that nest in trees. Occlusion of ocelli in Pseudomyrmex gracilis workers had no effect on their success or performance in gliding. Experimental assessment of the fate of ants that fall to the understory showed that ants landing in water are 15 times more likely to suffer lethal attacks than are ants landing in leaf litter. Variation in both the aerodynamic mechanisms and selective advantages of DAD merits further study given the broad taxonomic diversity of arboreal ants that engage in this intriguing form of flight. PMID:21562023

  12. STS-40 descent BET products: Development and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.; Wood, James S.; Findlay, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Descent Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) Data were generated for the final Orbiter Experiments Flight, STS-40. This report discusses the actual development of these post-flight products: the inertial BET, the Extended BET, and the Aerodynamic BET. Summary results are also included. The inertial BET was determined based on processing Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRSS) coherent Doppler data in conjunction with observations from eleven C-band stations, to include data from the Kwajalein Atoll and the usual California coastal radars, as well as data from five cinetheodolite cameras in the vicinity of the runways at EAFB. The anchor epoch utilized for the trajectory reconstruction was 53,904 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) seconds which corresponds to an altitude at epoch of approximately 708 kft. Atmospheric data to enable development of an Extended BET for this mission were upsurped from the JSC operational post-flight BET. These data were evaluated based on Space Shuttle-derived considerations as well as model comparisons. The Aerodynamic BET includes configuration information, final mass properties, and both flight-determined and predicted aerodynamic performance estimates. The predicted data were based on the final pre-operational databook, updated to include flight determined incrementals based on an earlier ensemble of flights. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are presented and correlated versus statistical results based on twenty-two previous missions.

  13. Estimating Controller Intervention Probabilities for Optimized Profile Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Erzberger, Heinz; Huynh, Phu V.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of arrival traffic at Dallas/Fort-Worth and Denver airports were conducted to evaluate incorporating scheduling and separation constraints into advisories that define continuous descent approaches. The goal was to reduce the number of controller interventions required to ensure flights maintain minimum separation distances of 5 nmi horizontally and 1000 ft vertically. It was shown that simply incorporating arrival meter fix crossing-time constraints into the advisory generation could eliminate over half of the all predicted separation violations and more than 80% of the predicted violations between two arrival flights. Predicted separation violations between arrivals and non-arrivals were 32% of all predicted separation violations at Denver and 41% at Dallas/Fort-Worth. A probabilistic analysis of meter fix crossing-time errors is included which shows that some controller interventions will still be required even when the predicted crossing-times of the advisories are set to add a 1 or 2 nmi buffer above the minimum in-trail separation of 5 nmi. The 2 nmi buffer was shown to increase average flight delays by up to 30 sec when compared to the 1 nmi buffer, but it only resulted in a maximum decrease in average arrival throughput of one flight per hour.

  14. Race, language, and mental evolution in Darwin's descent of man.

    PubMed

    Alter, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Charles Darwin was notoriously ambiguous in his remarks about the relationship between human evolution and biological race. He stressed the original unity of the races, yet he also helped to popularize the notion of a racial hierarchy filling the gaps between the highest anthropoids and civilized Europeans. A focus on Darwin's explanation of how humans initially evolved, however, shows that he mainly stressed not hierarchy but a version of humanity's original mental unity. In his book The Descent of Man, Darwin emphasized a substantial degree of mental development (including the incipient use of language) in the early, monogenetic phase of human evolution. This development, he argued, necessarily came before primeval man's numerical increase, geographic dispersion, and racial diversification, because only thus could one explain how that group was able to spread at the expense of rival ape-like populations. This scenario stood opposed to a new evolutionary polygenism formulated in the wake of Darwin's Origin of Species by his ostensible supporters Alfred Russel Wallace and Ernst Haeckel. Darwin judged this outlook inadequate to the task of explaining humanity's emergence. PMID:17623873

  15. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  16. Development of a Mars Airplane Entry, Descent, and Flight Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    2001-01-01

    An entry, descent, and flight (EDF) trajectory profile for a Mars airplane mission is defined as consisting of the following elements: ballistic entry of an aeroshell; supersonic deployment of a decelerator parachute; subsonic release of a heat shield; release, unfolding, and orientation of an airplane to flight attitude; and execution of a pull up maneuver to achieve trimmed, horizontal flight. Using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) a trajectory optimization problem was formulated. Model data representative of a specific Mars airplane configuration, current models of the Mars surface topography and atmosphere, and current estimates of the interplanetary trajectory, were incorporated into the analysis. The goal is to develop an EDF trajectory to maximize the surface-relative altitude of the airplane at the end of a pull up maneuver, while subject to the mission design constraints. The trajectory performance was evaluated for three potential mission sites and was found to be site-sensitive. The trajectory performance, examined for sensitivity to a number of design and constraint variables, was found to be most sensitive to airplane mass, aerodynamic performance characteristics, and the pull up Mach constraint. Based on the results of this sensitivity study, an airplane-drag optimized trajectory was developed that showed a significant performance improvement.

  17. Eigenanalysis of SNP data with an identity by descent interpretation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuwen; Weir, Bruce S

    2016-02-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and the principal component axes often represent perpendicular gradients in geographic space. The explanation of PCA results is of major interest for geneticists to understand fundamental demographic parameters. Here, we provide an interpretation of PCA based on relatedness measures, which are described by the probability that sets of genes are identical-by-descent (IBD). An approximately linear transformation between ancestral proportions (AP) of individuals with multiple ancestries and their projections onto the principal components is found. In addition, a new method of eigenanalysis "EIGMIX" is proposed to estimate individual ancestries. EIGMIX is a method of moments with computational efficiency suitable for millions of SNP data, and it is not subject to the assumption of linkage equilibrium. With the assumptions of multiple ancestries and their surrogate ancestral samples, EIGMIX is able to infer ancestral proportions (APs) of individuals. The methods were applied to the SNP data from the HapMap Phase 3 project and the Human Genome Diversity Panel. The APs of individuals inferred by EIGMIX are consistent with the findings of the program ADMIXTURE. In conclusion, EIGMIX can be used to detect population structure and estimate genome-wide ancestral proportions with a relatively high accuracy. PMID:26482676

  18. Minimum Landing Error Powered-Descent Guidance for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Acikmese, Behcet

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm improves the accuracy with which a lander can be delivered to the surface of Mars. The main idea behind this innovation is the use of a lossless convexification, which converts an otherwise non-convex constraint related to thruster throttling to a convex constraint, enabling convex optimization to be used. The convexification leads directly to an algorithm that guarantees finding the global optimum of the original nonconvex optimization problem with a deterministic upper bound on the number of iterations required for convergence. In this innovation, previous work in powered-descent guidance using convex optimization is extended to handle the case where the lander must get as close as possible to the target given the available fuel, but is not required to arrive exactly at the target. The new algorithm calculates the minimum-fuel trajectory to the target, if one exists, and calculates the trajectory that minimizes the distance to the target if no solution to the target exists. This approach poses the problem as two Second-Order Cone Programs, which can be solved to global optimality with deterministic bounds on the number of iterations required.

  19. Direct Temperature Measurements during Netlander Descent on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombatti, G.; Angrilli, F.; Ferri, F.; Francesconi, A.; Fulchignoni, M.; Lion Stoppato, P. F.; Saggi, B.

    1999-09-01

    A new design for a platinum thermoresistance temperature sensor has been developed and tested in Earth's atmosphere and stratosphere. It will be one of the sensors equipping the scientific package ATMIS (Atmospheric and Meteorology Instrument System), which will be devoted to the measurement of the meteorological parameters during both the entry/descent phase and the surface phase, aboard the Netlanders. In particular vertical profiles of temperature, density and pressure will allow the resolution of vertical gradients to investigate the atmospheric structure and dynamics. In view of the future missions to Mars, Netlander represents a unique chance to increase significantly the climate record both in time and in space, doubling the current knowledge of the atmospheric parameters. Furthermore is the only opportunity to conduct direct measurement of temperature and pressure (outside the boundary layer of the airbags used for the landing). The temperature sensor proposed is a platinum thermoresistance, enhancement of HASI TEM (Cassini/Huygens Mission); a substantial improvement of the performances, i.e. a faster dynamic response, has been obtained. Two different prototypes of new design sensor have been built, laboratory test are proceeding and the second one has been already flown aboard a stratospheric balloon.

  20. Engineering description of the ascent/descent bet product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, A. W., II

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent output product is produced in the OPIP routine from three files which constitute its input. One of these, OPIP.IN, contains mission specific parameters. Meteorological data, such as atmospheric wind velocities, temperatures, and density, are obtained from the second file, the Corrected Meteorological Data File (METDATA). The third file is the TRJATTDATA file which contains the time-tagged state vectors that combine trajectory information from the Best Estimate of Trajectory (BET) filter, LBRET5, and Best Estimate of Attitude (BEA) derived from IMU telemetry. Each term in the two output data files (BETDATA and the Navigation Block, or NAVBLK) are defined. The description of the BETDATA file includes an outline of the algorithm used to calculate each term. To facilitate describing the algorithms, a nomenclature is defined. The description of the nomenclature includes a definition of the coordinate systems used. The NAVBLK file contains navigation input parameters. Each term in NAVBLK is defined and its source is listed. The production of NAVBLK requires only two computational algorithms. These two algorithms, which compute the terms DELTA and RSUBO, are described. Finally, the distribution of data in the NAVBLK records is listed.

  1. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; Burkhart, P. Dan; Chen, Allen; Comeaux, Keith A.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Kipp, Devin M.; Lorenzoni, Leila V.; Mendeck, Gavin F.; Powell, Richard W.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Sell, Steven W.; Prakash, Ravi; Way, David W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than prior missions to Mars, MSL will offer access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. The MSL EDL sequence is a result of a more stringent requirement set than any of its predecessors. Notable among these requirements is landing a 900 kg rover in a landing ellipse much smaller than that of any previous Mars lander. In meeting these requirements, MSL is extending the limits of the EDL technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions. Thus, there are many design challenges that must be solved for the mission to be successful. Several pieces of the EDL design are technological firsts, such as guided entry and precision landing on another planet, as well as the entire Sky Crane maneuver. This paper discusses the MSL EDL architecture and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  2. Preliminary Study of a Model Rotor in Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, K. W.; Tung, C.; Sharpe, D. L.; Huang, S.; Hendley, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    Within a program designed to develop experimental techniques for measuring the trajectory and structure of vortices trailing from the tips of rotor blades, the present preliminary study focuses on a method for quantifying the trajectory of the trailing vortex during descent flight conditions. This study also presents rotor loads and blade surface pressures for a range of tip-path plane angles and Mach numbers. Blade pressures near the leading edge and along the outer radius are compared with data obtained on the same model rotor, but in open jet facilities. A triangulation procedure based on two directable laser-light sheets, each containing an embedded reference, proved effective in defining the spatial coordinates of the trailing vortex. When interrogating a cross section of the flow that contains several trailing vortices, the greatest clarity was found to result when the flow is uniformly seeded. Surface pressure responses during blade-vortex interactions appeared equally sensitive near the leading edge and along the outer portion of the blade, but diminished rapidly as the distance along the blade chord increased. The pressure response was virtually independent of whether the tip-path plane angle was obtained through shaft tilt or cyclic pitch. Although the shape and frequency of the pressure perturbations on the advancing blade during blade-vortex interaction are similar to those obtained in open-jet facilities, the angle of the tip-path plane may need to be lower than the range covered in this study.

  3. Physics-based Entry, Descent and Landing Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Huynh, Loc C.; Manning, Ted

    2014-01-01

    A physics-based risk model was developed to assess the risk associated with thermal protection system failures during the entry, descent and landing phase of a manned spacecraft mission. In the model, entry trajectories were computed using a three-degree-of-freedom trajectory tool, the aerothermodynamic heating environment was computed using an engineering-level computational tool and the thermal response of the TPS material was modeled using a one-dimensional thermal response tool. The model was capable of modeling the effect of micrometeoroid and orbital debris impact damage on the TPS thermal response. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the effects of uncertainties in the vehicle state at Entry Interface, aerothermodynamic heating and material properties on the performance of the TPS design. The failure criterion was set as a temperature limit at the bondline between the TPS and the underlying structure. Both direct computation and response surface approaches were used to compute the risk. The model was applied to a generic manned space capsule design. The effect of material property uncertainty and MMOD damage on risk of failure were analyzed. A comparison of the direct computation and response surface approach was undertaken.

  4. Aging changes in the kidneys and bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... and urethra. Muscle changes and changes in the reproductive system can affect bladder control. Aging Changes and Their ... the bones, muscles, and joints In the male reproductive system In the female reproductive system In organs, tissues, ...

  5. Neurogenic Inflammation of Guinea-Pig Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Saban, M. R.; Saban, R.

    1994-01-01

    Capsaicin, substance P, and ovalbumin, instilled into the bladders of naive and ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized guineapigs caused inflammation, as indicated by increased vascular permeability. Histological changes after exposure to these compounds progressed with time from intense vasodilatation to marginalization of granulocytes followed by interstitial migration of leukocytes. In vitro incubation of guinea-pig bladder tissue with substance P and ovalbumin stimulated release of prostaglandin D2 and leukotrienes. In vitro incubation of bladder tissue with capsaicin, OVA, prostaglandin D2, leukotriene C4, histamine, or calcium ionophore A-23587 all stimulated substance P release. These data suggest that bladder inflammation initiated by a variety of stimuli could lead to a cyclic pattern of release of inflammatory mediators and neuropeptides, which could result in amplification and persistence of cystitis after the inciting cause has subsided. PMID:18472941

  6. Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... present since birth the presence of blockages or kidney stones complications of a urinary tract infection (UTI) cysts ... and Related Conditions Urinary Tract Infections Wilms Tumor Kidney Stones Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) Glomerulonephritis Ultrasound: Abdomen Ultrasound: Bladder ...

  7. Bladder cancer in the aluminium industry.

    PubMed

    Thriault, G; Tremblay, C; Cordier, S; Gingras, S

    1984-04-28

    The incidence of bladder cancer is unusually high in aluminium smelter workers. An epidemiological study showed that workers in Soderberg potrooms are at highest risk for bladder cancer, the adjusted overall relative risk being 2.39 (1.34-4.28). Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, of which benz(a)pyrene (BaP) served as an indicator, seems to be the causative factor. The relative risk was evaluated at 12.38 for workers with 20 or more equivalent years of BaP exposure. Cigarette smoking contributed significantly to the appearance of bladder cancer in the population studied. There is a synergistic effect when cigarette smoking and BaP exposure are combined; the numbers in our population are too small to determine whether this interaction effect is multiplicative or additive. It is concluded that bladder cancer is associated with aluminium smelting (primarily with the Soderberg process). PMID:6143877

  8. Recent advances in management of bladder overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Alan J

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacologic therapies, primarily antimuscarinic agents, have been the mainstay of treatment for overactive bladder. These drugs produce variable efficacy, a moderate rate of side effects, and rare occurrences of cure. The search for newer and better formulations and derivatives of this class of medication as well as novel therapies is ongoing and primarily fueled by the high prevalence of overactive bladder and the tremendous number of health care dollars spent on current therapy. Surgical options for overactive bladder have evolved slowly and are currently reserved for medical treatment failures and drug intolerance. This article will highlight the new drugs and therapies brought into clinical use for the treatment of overactive bladder over the last few years as well as a promising new agent in the advanced stages of development. PMID:20948824

  9. Holmium laser lithotripsy of bladder calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Although the overall incidence of bladder calculi has been decreasing, it is still a significant disease affecting adults and children. Prior treatment options have included open cystolitholapaxy, blind lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and visual lithotripsy with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes. The holmium laser has been found to be extremely effective in the treatment of upper tract calculi. This technology has also been applied to the treatment of bladder calculi. We report our experience with the holmium laser in the treatment of bladder calculi. Twenty- five patients over a year and a half had their bladder calculi treated with the Holmium laser. This study was retrospective in nature. Patient demographics, stone burden, and intraoperative and post-operative complications were noted. The mean stone burden was 31 mm with a range of 10 to 60 mm. Preoperative diagnosis was made with either an ultrasound, plain film of the abdomen or intravenous pyelogram. Cystoscopy was then performed to confirm the presence and determine the size of the stone. The patients were then taken to the operating room and given a regional or general anesthetic. A rigid cystoscope was placed into the bladder and the bladder stone was then vaporized using the holmium laser. Remaining fragments were washed out. Adjunctive procedures were performed on 10 patients. These included transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral incision of the prostate, optic internal urethrotomy, and incision of ureteroceles. No major complications occurred and all patients were rendered stone free. We conclude that the Holmium laser is an effective and safe modality for the treatment of bladder calculi. It was able to vaporize all bladder calculi and provides a single modality of treating other associated genitourinary pathology.

  10. Inhibition of NMDAR Reduces Bladder Hypertrophy and Improves Bladder Function in Cyclophosphamide Induced Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Shen, Shanwei; Kendig, Derek M.; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; Grider, John R.; Qiao, Li-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the role of NMDAR in the regulation of bladder hypertrophy and function in a rat model of cyclophosphamide induced cystitis. Materials and Methods Cystitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg body weight). NMDAR phosphorylation (activity) and signal transduction pathways were examined by direct measurement and by specific inhibitors in vivo. Bladder hypertrophy was measured by bladder weight/body weight and type I collagen expression. Bladder function was examined by metabolic recording, conscious cystometry and detrusor muscle strip contractility in response to carbachol. Results NMDAR activity measured by the phosphorylation level of the NMDAR1 (NR1) subunit was expressed in the spinal cord but not in the bladder at 48 hours of cystitis. NMDAR inhibition with dizocilpine (MK-801) reduced the cystitis induced increment of bladder weight and type I collagen up-regulation in the bladder. NMDAR regulated type I collagen up-regulation was mediated by the PI3K/Akt pathway. NMDAR inhibition also attenuated cystitis induced urinary frequency measured by metabolic cage and cystometry. Cystitis decreased the responsiveness of detrusor muscle strips to carbachol, which was reversed by MK-801 in vivo. Unlike MK-801 the NMDAR antagonist D-AP5, which could not block central NMDAR activity, had no effect on bladder hypertrophy, type I collagen up-regulation or Akt activation caused by cystitis in the bladder. Conclusions Findings suggest that NMDAR activity has a role in cystitis induced bladder hypertrophy and overactivity. NMDAR mediated Akt activation may underlie the mechanism of bladder dysfunction. PMID:25572034

  11. Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Technology Investments Within NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, M. M.

    2014-06-01

    NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate has several investments in entry, descent and landing technologies, across its nine programs. This presentation will give a top-level view of the various investments.

  12. Atmospheric Properties Reconstruction from the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Withers, P.

    2014-07-01

    Data acquired during the entry, descent and landing of the Mars Science Laboratory were used to reconstruct the atmospheric profiles for density, pressure and temperature with excellent vertical resolution and extent.

  13. Fabrication Assembly and Test of the Mars Science Laboratory Descent Stage Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Morgan; Baker, Ray; Casillas, Art; Strommen, Dellon; Tanimoto, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    The Descent Stage Propulsion System (DSPS) is the most challenging and complex propulsion system ever built at JPL. Performance requirements, such as the entry Reaction Control System (RCS) requirements, and the terminal descent requirements (3300 N maximum thrust and approximately 835,000 N-s total impulse in less than a minute), required a large amount of propellant and a large number of components for a spacecraft that had to fit in a 4.5 meter aeroshell. The size and shape of the aeroshell, along with the envelope of the stowed rover, limited the configuration options for the Descent Stage structure. The configuration and mass constraints of the Descent Stage structure, along with performance requirements, drove the configuration of the DSPS. This paper will examine some of the challenges encountered and solutions developed during the fabrication, assembly, and test of the DSPS.

  14. Challenges of Dealing With Atmospheres: Entry, Descent and Landing - Duration: 31 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Whether landing on Mars or returning to Earth, one of the most challenging parts of any mission is the entry, descent and landing. Just think -- a spacecraft hurtling through space at thousands of ...

  15. Antarctic Polar Descent and Planetary Wave Activity Observed in ISAMS CO from April to July 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Nakamura, N.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Taylor, F. W.; Remedios, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Antarctic polar descent and planetary wave activity in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are observed in ISAMS CO data from April to July 1992. CO-derived mean April-to-May upper stratosphere descent rates of 15 K/day (0.25 km/day) at 60 S and 20 K/day (0.33 km/day) at 80 S are compared with descent rates from diabatic trajectory analyses. At 60 S there is excellent agreement, while at 80 S the trajectory-derived descent is significantly larger in early April. Zonal wavenumber 1 enhancement of CO is observed on 9 and 28 May, coincident with enhanced wave 1 in UKMO geopotential height. The 9 May event extends from 40 to 70 km and shows westward phase tilt with height, while the 28 May event extends from 40 to 50 km and shows virtually no phase tilt with height.

  16. 2007 Mars Phoenix Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation and Modeling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jill L.; Grover, Myron R.; Desai, Prasun N.; Queen, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the entry, descent, and landing of the 2007 Mars Phoenix lander. Aerodynamics characteristics along with Monte Carlo analyses are also presented for launch and landing site opportunities.

  17. User's manual for a fuel-conservative descent planning algorithm implemented on a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. An explanation and examples of how the algorithm is used, as well as a detailed flow chart and listing of the algorithm are contained.

  18. A conflict analysis of 4D descent strategies in a metered, multiple-arrival route environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Harris, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    A conflict analysis was performed on multiple arrival traffic at a typical metered airport. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to simulate arrival operations using Denver Stapleton's arrival route structure. Sensitivities of conflict performance to three different 4-D descent strategies (clear-idle Mach/Constant AirSpeed (CAS), constant descent angle Mach/CAS and energy optimal) were examined for three traffic mixes represented by those found at Denver Stapleton, John F. Kennedy and typical en route metering (ERM) airports. The Monte Carlo technique was used to generate simulation entry point times. Analysis results indicate that the clean-idle descent strategy offers the best compromise in overall performance. Performance measures primarily include susceptibility to conflict and conflict severity. Fuel usage performance is extrapolated from previous descent strategy studies.

  19. Evaluation of bladder microvasculature with high resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhixing; Roberts, William; Carson, Paul; Liu, Xiaojun; Tao, Chao; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    We explored the potential of an emerging laser-based technology, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), for bladder cancer diagnosis through high resolution imaging of microvasculature in the bladder tissues. Imaging results from ex vivo canine bladders demonstrated the excellent ability of PAI in mapping three-dimensional microvasculature in optically scattering bladder tissues. By comparing the results from human bladder specimens affected by cancer to those from the normal control, the feasibility of PAI in differentiate malignant from benign bladder tissues was also explored. The distinctive morphometric characteristics of tumor microvasculature can be seen in the images from cancer samples, suggesting that PAI may allow in vivo assessment of neoangiogenesis that is closely associated with bladder cancer generation and progression. By presenting subsurface morphological and physiological information in bladder tissues, PAI, when performed in a similar way as in conventional endoscopy, provides an opportunity for improved diagnosis, staging and treatment guidance of bladder cancer. PMID:22179893

  20. Analysis of Flight Management System Predictions of Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the predictor and its uncertainty models, descents from cruise to the meter fix were executed using vertical navigation in a B737-700 simulator and a B777-200 simulator, both with commercial FMSs. For both aircraft types, the FMS computed the intended descent path for a specified speed profile assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and then it controlled the avionics without human intervention. The test matrix varied aircraft weight, descent speed, and wind conditions. The first analysis in this paper determined the effect of the test matrix parameters on the FMS computation of TOD location, and it compared the results to those for the current ground predictor in the Efficient Descent Advisor (EDA). The second analysis was similar but considered the time to fly a specified distance to the meter fix. The effects of the test matrix variables together with the accuracy requirements for the predictor will determine the allowable error for the predictor inputs. For the B737, the EDA prediction of meter fix crossing time agreed well with the FMS; but its prediction of TOD location probably was not sufficiently accurate to enable idle-thrust descents in congested airspace, even though the FMS and EDA gave similar shapes for TOD location as a function of the test matrix variables. For the B777, the FMS and EDA gave different shapes for the TOD location function, and the EDA prediction of the TOD location is not accurate enough to fully enable the concept. Furthermore, the differences between the FMS and EDA predictions of meter fix crossing time for the B777 indicated that at least one of them was not sufficiently accurate.

  1. THE AFRICAN DESCENT AND GLAUCOMA EVALUATION STUDY (ADAGES): PREDICTORS OF VISUAL FIELD DAMAGE IN GLAUCOMA SUSPECTS

    PubMed Central

    Khachatryan, Naira; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Sharpsten, Lucie; Bowd, Christopher; Sample, Pamela A.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Miki, Atsuya; Hammel, Na’ama; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate racial differences in the development of visual field (VF) damage in glaucoma suspects. Design Prospective, observational cohort study. Methods Six hundred thirty six eyes from 357 glaucoma suspects with normal VF at baseline were included from the multicenter African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study (ADAGES). Racial differences in the development of VF damage were examined using multivariable Cox Proportional Hazard models. Results Thirty one (25.4%) of 122 African descent participants and 47 (20.0%) of 235 European descent participants developed VF damage (p=0.078). In multivariable analysis, worse baseline VF mean deviation, higher mean arterial pressure during follow up, and a race *mean intraocular pressure (IOP) interaction term were significantly associated with the development of VF damage suggesting that racial differences in the risk of VF damage varied by IOP. At higher mean IOP levels, race was predictive of the development of VF damage even after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. At mean IOPs during follow-up of 22, 24 and 26 mmHg, multivariable hazard ratios (95%CI) for the development of VF damage in African descent compared to European descent subjects were 2.03 (1.15–3.57), 2.71 (1.39–5.29), and 3.61 (1.61–8.08), respectively. However, at lower mean IOP levels (below 22 mmHg) during follow-up, African descent was not predictive of the development of VF damage. Conclusion In this cohort of glaucoma suspects with similar access to treatment, multivariate analysis revealed that at higher mean IOP during follow-up, individuals of African descent were more likely to develop VF damage than individuals of European descent. PMID:25597839

  2. Apollo 15 mission report, supplement 4: Descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.; Wood, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of a postflight analysis of the LM-10 Descent Propulsion System (DPS) during the Apollo 15 Mission are reported. The analysis determined the steady state performance of the DPS during the descent phase of the manned lunar landing. Flight measurement discrepancies are discussed. Simulated throttle performance results are cited along with overall performance results. Evaluations of the propellant quantity gaging system, propellant loading, pressurization system, and engine are reported. Graphic illustrations of the evaluations are included.

  3. Differences in anal sensation in continent and incontinent patients with perineal descent.

    PubMed

    Miller, R; Bartolo, D C; Cervero, F; Mortensen, N J

    1989-01-01

    Neuropathic damage secondary to pelvic floor descent is considered to be an important aetiological factor in idiopathic faecal incontinence. Perineal descent however does not necessarily result in a loss of motor function or incontinence. To elucidate the role of anal sensation in the continence mechanism we measured mucosal electrosensitivity and thermal sensitivity in normal controls and in both continent and incontinent patients with perineal descent. A catheter carrying two platinum electrodes was used to assess mucosal electrosensitivity and a water perfused thermode 1 cm long to measure thermal sensory thresholds. In addition, routine anal manometry was performed. The degree of perineal descent and anorectal angle was assessed radiographically. Anal sensation was largely preserved in continent patients with perineal descent (Controls vs continent perineal descent, Mucosal electrosensitivity (ma), lower anal canal: 4 (2-7) vs 5 (2.6-8) ns; middle anal canal 4 (2-7) vs 4.2 (2-15) ns; upper anal canal 6.5 (4-13) vs 8.3 (3.6-16) p less than 0.05, thermal sensitivity, median threshold (degrees C), lower anal canal 0.92 (0.5-2.5) vs 0.95 (0.3-3.6) ns; middle anal canal 0.83 (0.4-1.5) vs 0.75 (0.2-2) ns; upper anal canal 0.98 (0.6-2.4) vs 2.2 (0.5-4.8) p less than 0.05). There was a severe impairment of anal sensation in the incontinent patients with perineal descent despite a greater degree of perineal descent in the continent group. Loss of anal sensation is associated with the development of incontinence and is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of the condition. PMID:2708882

  4. A simple method for estimating minimum autorotative descent rate of single rotor helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, P. D.; Schroers, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    Flight test results of minimum autorotative descent rate are compared with calculations based on the minimum power required for steady level flight. Empirical correction factors are derived that account for differences in energy dissipation between these two flight conditions. A method is also presented for estimating the minimum power coefficient for level flight for any helicopter for use in the empirical estimation procedure of autorotative descent rate.

  5. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing System Development Challenges and Preliminary Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory project recently landed the Curiosity rover on the surface of Mars. With the success of the landing system, the performance envelope of entry, descent, and landing capabilities has been extended over the previous state of the art. This paper will present an overview of the MSL entry, descent, and landing system, a discussion of a subset of its development challenges, and include a discussion of preliminary results of the flight reconstruction effort.

  6. What is the correct staging and treatment strategy for locally advanced prostate cancer extending to the bladder?

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Özgür Haki; Verit, Ayhan; Ürkmez, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    In locally advanced prostate cancer with bladder invasion, frequently encountered problems such as bleeding, urinary retention, hydronephrosis, and pain create distress for the patients. Therefore patients' quality of life is disrupted and duration of hospitalization is prolonged. Relevant literature about accurate staging and treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with bladder invasion was investigated. Locally advanced prostate cancer can present as a large-volume aggressive tumor extending beyond boundaries of prostate gland, and involving neighboring structures which can be involved as recurrence(s) following initial local therapy. Survival times of these patients can range between 5 and 8 years. Their common characteristics are adverse and severe local symptoms unfavorably affecting quality of life Control of local symptoms and their effective palliation are independent clinical targets influencing survival outcomes of these patients. The treatment outcomes of locally advanced prostate cancer into the bladder are currently debatable. Although in the current TNM classification, it is defined in T4a, we think that this may be categorized as a subgroup of T3 and thus encourage surgeons for the indication of radical surgeries (radical prostatectomy, radical cystoprostatectomy) in selected patient populations after discussing issues concerning consequences of the treatment alternatives, and expectations with the patients. Cystoprostatectomy followed by immediate androgen deprivation therapy may be a feasible option for selected patients with previously untreated prostate cancer involving the bladder neck because of excellent local control and long term survival. PMID:26150029

  7. Supervised descent method with low rank and sparsity constraints for robust face alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yubao; Hu, Bin; Deng, Jiankang; Li, Xing

    2015-03-01

    Supervised Descent Method (SDM) learns the descent directions of nonlinear least square objective in a supervised manner, which has been efficiently used for face alignment. However, SDM still may fail in the cases of partial occlusions and serious pose variations. To deal with this issue, we present a new method for robust face alignment by utilizing the low rank prior of human face and enforcing sparse structure of the descent directions. Our approach consists of low rank face frontalization and sparse descent steps. Firstly, in terms of the low rank prior of face image, we recover such a low-rank face from its deformed image and the associated deformation despite significant distortion and corruption. Alignment of the recovered frontal face image is more simple and effective. Then, we propose a sparsity regularized supervised descent model by enforcing the sparse structure of the descent directions under the l1constraint, which makes the model more effective in computation and robust to partial occlusion. Extensive results on several benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to facial occlusions and pose variations

  8. The Huygens Probe Descent Trajectory Working Group: Organizational framework, goals, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Witasse, Olivier; Pérez-Ayúcar, Miguel; Matson, Dennis L.

    2007-11-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided in situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments, and to provide a reference set of data for ground-truth calibration of orbiter remote sensing measurements, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location is necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team to develop and implement an organizational framework and retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe. This paper presents an overview of the Descent Trajectory Working Group, including the history, rationale, goals and objectives, organizational framework, rules and procedures, and implementation.

  9. Pharmacogenomics of warfarin in populations of African descent.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; Botton, Mariana R

    2013-02-01

    Warfarin is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant worldwide despite its narrow therapeutic index and the notorious inter- and intra-individual variability in dose required for the target clinical effect. Pharmacogenetic polymorphisms are major determinants of warfarin pharmacokinetic and dynamics and included in several warfarin dosing algorithms. This review focuses on warfarin pharmacogenomics in sub-Saharan peoples, African Americans and admixed Brazilians. These 'Black' populations differ in several aspects, notably their extent of recent admixture with Europeans, a factor which impacts on the frequency distribution of pharmacogenomic polymorphisms relevant to warfarin dose requirement for the target clinical effect. Whereas a small number of polymorphisms in VKORC1 (3673G > A, rs9923231), CYP2C9 (alleles *2 and *3, rs1799853 and rs1057910, respectively) and arguably CYP4F2 (rs2108622), may capture most of the pharmacogenomic influence on warfarin dose variance in White populations, additional polymorphisms in these, and in other, genes (e.g. CALU rs339097) increase the predictive power of pharmacogenetic warfarin dosing algorithms in the Black populations examined. A personalized strategy for initiation of warfarin therapy, allowing for improved safety and cost-effectiveness for populations of African descent must take into account their pharmacogenomic diversity, as well as socio-economical, cultural and medical factors. Accounting for this heterogeneity in algorithms that are 'friendly' enough to be adopted by warfarin prescribers worldwide requires gathering information from trials at different population levels, but demands also a critical appraisal of racial/ethnic labels that are commonly used in the clinical pharmacology literature but do not accurately reflect genetic ancestry and population diversity. PMID:22676711

  10. Mars Exploration Rover Entry, Descent, and Landing: A Thermal Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Sunada, Eric T.; Novak, Keith S.; Kinsella, Gary M.; Phillip, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    Perhaps the most challenging mission phase for the Mars Exploration Rovers was the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). During this phase, the entry vehicle attached to its cruise stage was transformed into a stowed tetrahedral Lander that was surrounded by inflated airbags through a series of complex events. There was only one opportunity to successfully execute an automated command sequence without any possible ground intervention. The success of EDL was reliant upon the system thermal design: 1) to thermally condition EDL hardware from cruise storage temperatures to operating temperature ranges; 2) to maintain the Rover electronics within operating temperature ranges without the benefit of the cruise single phase cooling loop, which had been evacuated in preparation for EDL; and 3) to maintain the cruise stage propulsion components for the critical turn to entry attitude. Since the EDL architecture was inherited from Mars Pathfinder (MPF), the initial EDL thermal design would be inherited from MPF. However, hardware and implementation differences from MPF ultimately changed the MPF inheritance approach for the EDL thermal design. With the lack of full inheritance, the verification and validation of the EDL thermal design took on increased significance. This paper will summarize the verification and validation approach for the EDL thermal design along with applicable system level thermal testing results as well as appropriate thermal analyses. In addition, the lessons learned during the system-level testing will be discussed. Finally, the in-flight EDL experiences of both MER-A and -B missions (Spirit and Opportunity, respectively) will be presented, demonstrated how lessons learned from Spirit were applied to Opportunity.

  11. Optimal sliding guidance algorithm for Mars powered descent phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibben, Daniel R.; Furfaro, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Landing on large planetary bodies (e.g. Mars) with pinpoint accuracy presents a set of new challenges that must be addressed. One such challenge is the development of new guidance algorithms that exhibit a higher degree of robustness and flexibility. In this paper, the Zero-Effort-Miss/Zero-Effort-Velocity (ZEM/ZEV) optimal sliding guidance (OSG) scheme is applied to the Mars powered descent phase. This guidance algorithm has been specifically designed to combine techniques from both optimal and sliding control theories to generate an acceleration command based purely on the current estimated spacecraft state and desired final target state. Consequently, OSG yields closed-loop trajectories that do not need a reference trajectory. The guidance algorithm has its roots in the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance and its mathematical equations are naturally derived by defining a non-linear sliding surface as a function of the terms Zero-Effort-Miss and Zero-Effort-Velocity. With the addition of the sliding mode and using Lyapunov theory for non-autonomous systems, one can formally prove that the developed OSG law is globally finite-time stable to unknown but bounded perturbations. Here, the focus is on comparing the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance with the OSG law to explicitly demonstrate the benefits of the sliding mode augmentation. Results show that the sliding guidance provides a more robust solution in off-nominal scenarios while providing similar fuel consumption when compared to the non-sliding guidance command. Further, a Monte Carlo analysis is performed to examine the performance of the OSG law under perturbed conditions.

  12. Atmospheric Environments for Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, Carl G.; Braun, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Scientific measurements of atmospheric properties have been made by a wide variety of planetary flyby missions, orbiters, and landers. Although landers can make in-situ observations of near-surface atmospheric conditions (and can collect atmospheric data during their entry phase), the vast majority of data on planetary atmospheres has been collected by remote sensing techniques from flyby and orbiter spacecraft (and to some extent by Earth-based remote sensing). Many of these remote sensing observations (made over a variety of spectral ranges), consist of vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature as a function of atmospheric pressure level. While these measurements are of great interest to atmospheric scientists and modelers of planetary atmospheres, the primary interest for engineers designing entry descent and landing (EDL) systems is information about atmospheric density as a function of geometric altitude. Fortunately, as described in in this paper, it is possible to use a combination of the gas-law relation and the hydrostatic balance relation to convert temperature-versus-pressure, scientific observations into density-versus-altitude data for use in engineering applications. The following section provides a brief introduction to atmospheric thermodynamics, as well as constituents, and winds for EDL. It also gives methodology for using atmospheric information to do "back-of-the-envelope" calculations of various EDL aeroheating parameters, including peak deceleration rate ("g-load"), peak convective heat rate. and total heat load on EDL spacecraft thermal protection systems. Brief information is also provided about atmospheric variations and perturbations for EDL guidance and control issues, and atmospheric issues for EDL parachute systems. Subsequent sections give details of the atmospheric environments for five destinations for possible EDL missions: Venus. Earth. Mars, Saturn, and Titan. Specific atmospheric information is provided for these destinations, and example results are presented for the "back-of-the-envelope" calculations mentioned above.

  13. Mars 2020 Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Wright, Henry; White, Todd; Schoenenberger, Mark; Santos, Jose; Karlgaard, Chris; Kuhl, Chris; Oishi, TOmo; Trombetta, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    This paper will introduce Mars Entry Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2) on NASA's Mars2020 mission. Mars2020 is a flagship NASA mission with science and technology objectives to help answer questions about possibility of life on Mars as well as to demonstrate technologies for future human expedition. Mars2020 is scheduled for launch in 2020. MEDLI2 is a suite of instruments embedded in the heatshield and backshell thermal protection systems of Mars2020 entry vehicle. The objectives of MEDLI2 are to gather critical aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and TPS performance data during EDL phase of the mission. MEDLI2 builds up the success of MEDLI flight instrumentation on Mars Science Laboratory mission in 2012. MEDLI instrumentation suite measured surface pressure and TPS temperature on the heatshield during MSL entry into Mars. MEDLI data has since been used for unprecedented reconstruction of aerodynamic drag, vehicle attitude, in-situ atmospheric density, aerothermal heating, transition to turbulence, in-depth TPS performance and TPS ablation. [1,2] In addition to validating predictive models, MEDLI data has highlighted extra margin available in the MSL forebody TPS, which can potentially be used to reduce vehicle parasitic mass. MEDLI2 expands the scope of instrumentation by focusing on quantities of interest not addressed in MEDLI suite. The type the sensors are expanded and their layout on the TPS modified to meet these new objectives. The paper will provide key motivation and governing requirements that drive the choice and the implementation of the new sensor suite. The implementation considerations of sensor selection, qualification, and demonstration of minimal risk to the host mission will be described. The additional challenges associated with mechanical accommodation, electrical impact, data storage and retrieval for MEDLI2 system, which extends sensors to backshell will also be described.

  14. Reproducibility of the bladder shape and bladder shape changes during filling

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, Heidi T.; Herk, Marcel van; Betgen, Anja; Pos, Floris; Lebesque, Joos V.; Remeijer, Peter

    2005-08-15

    The feasibility of high precision radiotherapy to the bladder region is limited by bladder motion and volume changes. In the near future, we plan to begin treatment delivery of bladder cancer patients with the acquisition of a cone beam CT image on which the complete bladder will be semi-automatically localized. Subsequently, a bladder shape model that was developed in a previous study will be used for bladder localization and for the prediction of shape changes in the time interval between acquisition and beam delivery. For such predictions, knowledge about urinary inflow rate is required. Therefore, a series of MR images was acquired over 1 h with time intervals of 10 min for 18 healthy volunteers. To gain insight in the reproducibility of the bladder shape over longer periods of time, two additional MRI series were recorded for 10 of the volunteers. To a good approximation, the bladder volume increased linearly in time for all individuals. Despite receiving drinking instructions, we found a large variation in the inflow rate between individuals, ranging from 2.1 to 15 cc/min (mean value: 9{+-}3 cc/min). In contrast, the intravolunteer variation was much smaller, with a mean standard deviation (SD) of 0.4 cc/min. The inflow rate was linearly correlated with age (negative slope). To study the reproducibility of the bladder shape, we compared bladder shapes of equal volume. For all individuals, the caudal part of the bladder was the most reproducible (variations<0.3 cm in all cases). The cranial and posterior parts of the bladder was much less reproducible, with local SD values up to {approx}1.2 cm for bladders with a volume of 200 cc. These large long-term variations were primarily caused by changes in position and filling of the small bowel and rectum. However, for short time intervals, the rectal filling was (nearly) constant. Therefore, the reproducibility of urinary inflow, combined with the previously developed shape model gives us an excellent tool to predict short-term shape changes. We intend to use this tool for further improvement of image-guided radiotherapy for bladder cancer patients.

  15. Cone Beam CT Imaging Analysis of Interfractional Variations in Bladder Volume and Position During Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Rathee, Satyapal; Ghosh, Sunita; Ko, Lawrence; Murray, Brad

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm). The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (+- standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm{sup 3} (SD, 29.71 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm{sup 3} (SD, 21.64 cm{sup 3}). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm{sup 3} (SD, 36.51 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm{sup 3} (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm{sup 3} (SD, 3.97 cm{sup 3}). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.

  16. Work Capacity of the Bladder During Voiding: A Novel Method to Evaluate Bladder Contractile Function and Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Man, Li-Bo; He, Feng; Huang, Guang-Lin; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Work in voiding (WIV) of the bladder may be used to evaluate bladder status throughout urination rather than at a single time point. Few studies, however, have assessed WIV owing to the complexity of its calculations. We have developed a method of calculating work capacity of the bladder while voiding and analyzed the associations of bladder work parameters with bladder contractile function and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 160 men and 23 women, aged >40 years and with a detrusor pressure at maximal flow rate (Pdet Qmax) of ≥40 cmH2O in men, who underwent urodynamic testing. The bladder power integration method was used to calculate WIV; WIV per second (WIV/t) and WIV per liter of urine voided (WIV/v) were also calculated. In men, the relationships between these work capacity parameters and Pdet Qmax and Abrams-Griffiths (AG) number were determined using linear-by-linear association tests, and relationships between work capacity parameters and BOO grade were investigated using Spearman's association test. Results: The mean WIV was 1.15 ± 0.78 J and 1.30 ± 0.88 J, mean WIV/t was 22.95 ± 14.45 mW and 23.78 ± 17.02 mW, and mean WIV/v was 5.59 ± 2.32 J/L and 2.83 ± 1.87 J/L in men and women, respectively. In men, WIV/v showed significant positive associations with Pdet Qmax (r = 0.845, P = 0.000), AG number (r = 0.814, P = 0.000), and Schafer class (r = 0.726, P = 0.000). Conversely, WIV and WIV/t showed no associations with Pdet Qmax or AG number. In patients with BOO (Schafer class > II), WIV/v correlated positively with increasing BOO grade. Conclusions: WIV can be calculated from simple urodynamic parameters using the bladder power integration method. WIV/v may be a marker of BOO grade, and the bladder contractile function can be evaluated by WIV and WIV/t. PMID:26668148

  17. Multiple head and neck malignancies.

    PubMed

    Odette, J; Szymanowski, R T; Nichols, R D

    1977-01-01

    Case histories of 47 patients with multiple head and neck neoplasms were reviewed at the Henry Ford Hospital. Data were obtained on the site of the malignancy and treatment program. Follow-up data have been good, utilizing clinic records. Several patients have had more than two malignancies of the head and neck, and one patient has just completed treatment for his fifth epidermoid carcinoma. The incidence of carcinoma of the esophagus is high in this series (16 of 47 patients). The literature is reviewed in relation to the present findings. Follow-up care is described at the Henry Ford Hospital. PMID:919150

  18. A case–control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. Methods This case–control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Results Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. Conclusions These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening. PMID:23497224

  19. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  20. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  1. Mirabegron for overactive bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    Urinary incontinence, the involuntary leakage of urine, can result from abnormalities of the urinary tract or may be caused by other conditions and is sub-divided into a number of classifications including stress incontinence and urge urinary incontinence.(1) Urge urinary incontinence (UUI) is involuntary urine leakage accompanied by urgency of micturition.(2) Overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is defined as urgency occurring with or without UUI and usually occurs with frequency and nocturia.(1) Wet OAB is associated with UUI, while dry OAB is not associated with incontinence. Current drug therapy for OAB involves the use of an antimuscarinic drug, of which there are a number available, such as oxybutynin, darifenacin, solifenacin and tolterodine.(1,3) ▾Mirabegron is the first of a new class of drug, beta-3-adrenoreceptor agonists, licensed for symptomatic treatment of urgency, increased micturition frequency and/or urgency incontinence as may occur in adult patients with OAB syndrome.(4) Here we review the evidence for mirabegron. PMID:23949821

  2. Neck pain or spasms - self care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck stiffness-self-care; Cervicalgia-self-care; Whiplash-self-care ... improve blood flow to your muscles and promote healing. They also ... neck stretching and strengthening exercises and how to do them.

  3. Status Needs Positive Change. Report of the Subcommittee on the Immigrant Community of African Descent. Volume 4, Immigrants of African Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Governor's Advisory Committee for Black Affairs, Albany.

    This document comprises an analysis of the needs of immigrants of African descent to New York State in the following areas: (1) economic planning; (2) culture and the arts; (3) immigration reform and amnesty; and (4) health care. Immigrants from the Caribbean and Africa comprise rapidly growing segments of the State's population. These immigrants…

  4. 49 CFR 572.17 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Neck. 572.17 Section 572.17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.17 Neck. (a)(1) The neck for use with the head...

  5. 49 CFR 572.7 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Neck. 572.7 Section 572.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 50th Percentile Male § 572.7 Neck. (a) The neck consists of the assembly shown...

  6. 49 CFR 572.7 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Neck. 572.7 Section 572.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 50th Percentile Male § 572.7 Neck. (a) The neck consists of the assembly shown...

  7. 49 CFR 572.17 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Neck. 572.17 Section 572.17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.17 Neck. (a)(1) The neck for use with the head...

  8. The eleventh nerve in radical neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, J H; Lee, C Y

    1981-11-01

    The greatest morbidity associated with the radical neck dissection has been the "shoulder syndrome" due to the sacrifice of the spinal accessory nerve. Despite the fact that the XIth nerve can be spared by a careful dissection of the postcervical triangle, to do so remains a controversial issue. The 125 radical neck dissections performed at the University of Wisconsin Clinical Science Center from 1970 through 1975 were carefully evaluated to determine the incidence of recurrent tumor in the operated-on neck. In 60 cases the spinal accessory nerve was resected with the neck specimen, and in 65 cases the nerve was preserved. A second study was then undertaken involving 245 neck dissections performed from 1975-1978 in the Wisconsin Head and neck Cancer Control Network Hospitals. In 69 instances the spinal accessory nerve was spared. The total number of neck dissections (370 cases) from both studies were analyzed. The overall rate for recurrent tumor in the neck with the classical neck dissection was 12%. When the spinal accessory nerve was spared, the recurrent rate was 6%. On the basis of these observations we propose that the classical neck dissection can be modified to preserve the spinal accessory nerve without jeopardizing the chances for a cure in elective neck dissections and selected therapeutic neck dissections. PMID:7300535

  9. Nutrition, total fluid and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2008-09-01

    Bladder cancer is a major health concern for older males in Western populations. About 30 years ago there was a suggestion that nutrition may have a role in the aetiology of the disease. Although the literature has been accumulating since then, owing to heterogeneity between studies results have often been inconsistent and unclear. The aim of this paper was to present an updated summary of the scientific evidence on the association between nutrition, total fluid intake and bladder cancer. A search of computerized databases, PubMed, ISI, Embase and Cochrane Library, was conducted to identify all epidemiological studies published between 1966 and October 2007. The level of scientific evidence for the various nutritional factors and total fluid intake was ranked according to the number of studies reporting a statistically significant association and the existence of mechanistic evidence. The levels of association were based on a ranking of statistically significant relative risks. Fruit and yellow-orange vegetables, particularly carrots and selenium, are probably associated with a moderately reduced risk of bladder cancer. Citrus fruits and cruciferous vegetables were also identified as having a possible protective effect. Possible risk factors are salted and barbecued meat, pork, total fat, pickled vegetables, salt, soy products, spices and artificial sweeteners. No clear association could be determined for beef, eggs, processed meats and total fluid intake. In conclusion, specific fruit and vegetables may act to reduce the risk of bladder cancer. Future studies on bladder cancer should investigate the effect of food categorization, amount and gender. PMID:18815914

  10. Shake rattle and roll: the bony labyrinth and aerial descent in squamates.

    PubMed

    Boistel, Renaud; Herrel, Anthony; Lebrun, Renaud; Daghfous, Gheylen; Tafforeau, Paul; Losos, Jonathan B; Vanhooydonck, Bieke

    2011-12-01

    Controlled aerial descent has evolved many times independently in vertebrates. Squamates (lizards and snakes) are unusual in that respect due to the large number of independent origins of the evolution of this behavior. Although some squamates such as flying geckos of the genus Ptychozoon and the flying dragons of the genus Draco show obvious adaptations including skin flaps or enlarged ribs allowing them to increase their surface area and slow down their descent, many others appear unspecialized. Yet, specializations can be expected at the level of the sensory and neural systems allowing animals to maintain stability during controlled aerial descent. The vestibular system is a likely candidate given that it is an acceleration detector and is well-suited to detect changes in pitch, roll and yaw. Here we use conventional and synchrotron μCT scans to quantify the morphology of the vestibular system in squamates able to perform controlled aerial descent compared to species characterized by a terrestrial or climbing life style. Our results show the presence of a strong phylogenetic signal in the data with the vestibular system in species from the same family being morphologically similar. However, both our shape analysis and an analysis of the dimensions of the vestibular system showed clear differences among animals with different life-styles. Species able to perform a controlled aerial descent differed in the position and shape of the inner ear, especially of the posterior ampulla. Given the limited stability of squamates against roll and the fact that the posterior ampulla is tuned to changes in roll this suggests an adaptive evolution of the vestibular system in squamates using controlled aerial descent. Future studies testing for similar differences in other groups of vertebrates known to use controlled aerial descent are needed to test the generality of this observation. PMID:21700578

  11. Shaping Bladder and Bowel Continence in Developmentally Retarded Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Glenn

    1983-01-01

    A program to improve bowel and bladder continence with four developmentally retarded preschoolers used a regular schedule and social and liquid reinforcement, verbal reprimand, and correction for accidents. Ss showed improvement in bowel and bladder continence. (Author/CL)

  12. Erosion of repaired exstrophy bladder by a large vesical calculus

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Abdul; Sinha, Arvind; Bisht, Mayank; Gola, Neelkamal

    2011-01-01

    Formation of stones in repaired exstrophy bladder is common; however, erosion of stone through the repaired bladder and anterior abdominal wall has never been reported. We report one such case of erosion after three years of repair. PMID:21897570

  13. FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158937.html FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer Tecentriq boosted survival ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug to treat bladder cancer was approved by ...

  14. Aerodynamics of Reentry Vehicle Clipper at Descent Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Yu. P.; Reshetin, A. G.; Dyadkin, A. A.; Petrov, N. K.; Simakova, T. V.; Tokarev, V. A.

    2005-02-01

    From Gagarin spacecraft to reusable orbiter Buran, RSC Energia has traveled a long way in the search for the most optimal and, which is no less important, the most reliable spacecraft for manned space flight. During the forty years of space exploration, in cooperation with a broad base of subcontractors, a number of problems have been solved which assure a safe long stay in space. Vostok and Voskhod spacecraft were replaced with Soyuz supporting a crew of three. During missions to a space station, it provides crew rescue capability in case of a space station emergency at all times (the spacecraft life is 200 days).The latest modification of Soyuz spacecraft -Soyuz TMA -in contrast to its predecessors, allows to become a space flight participant to a person of virtually any anthropometric parameters with a mass of 50 to 95 kg capable of withstanding up to 6 g load during descent. At present, Soyuz TMA spacecraft are the state-of-the-art, reliable and only means of the ISS crew delivery, in-flight support and return. Introduced on the basis of many years of experience in operation of manned spacecraft were not only the principles of deep redundancy of on-board systems and equipment, but, to assure the main task of the spacecraft -the crew return to Earth -the principles of functional redundancy. That is, vital operations can be performed by different systems based on different physical principles. The emergency escape system that was developed is the only one in the world that provides crew rescue in case of LV failure at any phase in its flight. Several generations of space stations that have been developed have broadened, virtually beyond all limits, capabilities of man in space. The docking system developed at RSC Energia allowed not only to dock spacecraft in space, but also to construct in orbit various complex space systems. These include large space stations, and may include in the future the in-orbit construction of systems for the exploration of the Moon and Mars.. Logistics spacecraft Progress have been flying regularly since 1978. The tasks of these unmanned spacecraft include supplying the space station with all the necessities for long-duration missions, such as propellant for the space station propulsion system, crew life support consumables, scientific equipment for conducting experiments. Various modifications of the spacecraft have expanded the space station capabilities. 1988 saw the first, and, much to our regret, the last flight of the reusable orbiter Buran.. Buran could deliver to orbit up to 30 tons of cargo, return 20 tons to Earth and have a crew of up to 10. However, due to our country's economic situation the project was suspended.

  15. Treatment of advanced neck metastases

    PubMed Central

    Spriano, G; Pellini, R; Manciocco, V; Ruscito, P

    2006-01-01

    Summary Despite the use of aggressive single or multimodality treatment protocols, patients with advanced cervical metastases, N2 and N3, have a poor prognosis because of their high risk of regional and distal failure. Moreover, N3 class does not allow resectability and curability to be defined. Numerous trials have been carried out in order to improve the oncological outcomes of patients with advanced metastases to the neck using a variety of multimodality therapy. At present, there is a trend toward the use of a definitive radiochemotherapy followed, or not, by neck dissection. In order to offer a panoramic view of the treatment protocols in use, data available in the literature, regarding the management of advanced neck disease using surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, in different associations, have been reviewed and our experience reported. The presence of advanced cervical metastases is a very poor prognostic factor. The combined treatment modality offers better chances of cure than single modality treatment. Surgery followed by radiotherapy or chemo-radiation therapy is an effective and well standardized approach. The use of planned neck dissection following chemoradiation is still debated. PMID:17633156

  16. Penetrating injuries of the neck.

    PubMed Central

    Demetriades, D.; Stewart, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of 271 patients with penetrating wounds of the neck is presented. A policy of selective conservative management appears totally justified in view of the low mortality and morbidity in this series. Particular attention has been paid to the presentation and surgical approach to the injured vertebral artery. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3977261

  17. Planning fuel-conservative descents in an airline environmental using a small programmable calculator: Algorithm development and flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Vicroy, D. D.; Simmon, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A simple, airborne, flight-management descent algorithm was developed and programmed into a small programmable calculator. The algorithm may be operated in either a time mode or speed mode. The time mode was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel-conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The speed model was designed for planning fuel-conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path for both modes was calculated for a constant with considerations given for the descent Mach/airspeed schedule, gross weight, wind, wind gradient, and nonstandard temperature effects. Flight tests, using the algorithm on the programmable calculator, showed that the open-loop guidance could be useful to airline flight crews for planning and executing fuel-conservative descents.

  18. A flowgraph model for bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Superficial bladder cancer has been the subject of numerous studies for many years, but the evolution of the disease still remains not well understood. After the tumor has been surgically removed, it may reappear at a similar level of malignancy or progress to a higher level. The process may be reasonably modeled by means of a Markov process. However, in order to more completely model the evolution of the disease, this approach is insufficient. The semi-Markov framework allows a more realistic approach, but calculations become frequently intractable. In this context, flowgraph models provide an efficient approach to successfully manage the evolution of superficial bladder carcinoma. Our aim is to test this methodology in this particular case. Results We have built a successful model for a simple but representative case. Conclusion The flowgraph approach is suitable for modeling of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:25080066

  19. Botulinum Toxin to Treat Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher P; Chancellor, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    Alteration in neural control from suprapontine areas to the nerves innervating the bladder can lead to bladder dysfunction and the development of a neurogenic bladder (NGB). Patients with NGB often suffer from urinary incontinence, which can lead to adverse events such as urinary tract infections and decubiti, in addition to creating a large care burden for family members or healthcare providers and significantly impairing patient quality of life. The common failure of anticholinergic medications has spurned the development of second-line treatments, including the use of botulinum toxin. OnabotulinumtoxinA (onaBoNT-A; BOTOX, Allergan, Inc.) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with urinary incontinence resulting from a NGB. In this review the authors summarize pertinent results from key trials leading to FDA approval of onaBoNT-A as well as more recent long-term data. PMID:26866490

  20. Bladder carcinoma: MDCT cystography and virtual cystoscopy.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Sciarra, Alessandro; Di Martino, Michele; Bernardo, Silvia; Vergari, Valeria; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the most common tumor among the low urinary tract, accounting for 90% of cancer cases. Conventional cystoscopy represents the gold standard for diagnosis and local management of bladder carcinoma. As the prevalence of transitional cell carcinoma is four-fold greater in men than in women, the endoscopic procedure presents objective difficulties related to the length and bending of male urethra. The most important problems are represented by intense discomfort for the patient and bleeding; furthermore, the high cost, invasivity, and local complications such as infections and mechanical lesions are well-known drawbacks. Additionally, conventional cystoscopy does not provide information about extravescical extensions of the tumor. CT cystography, combined with virtual cystoscopy, is mandatory for TNM staging of the tumor and also is useful when conventional cystoscopy is inconclusive or cannot be performed. We presents the CT cystography findings with virtual endoscopy correlation and bladder carcinoma appearance. PMID:19471998

  1. [Recent advances in bladder urothelial carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pignot, Géraldine; le Goux, Constance; Bieche, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth cause of cancer mortality in France and prognosis of muscle-invasive tumors remains poor due to lack of effective treatments. Recent advances in molecular biology applied to tumors and results of recent genome-wide studies have brought a important impact on the understanding of bladder carcinogenesis. Main molecular alterations concern FGFR3, TP53 and HER2, and it is now possible to distinguish three subgroups of tumors according to molecular profile. This paper proposes a review of different genetic and epigenetic alterations in bladder cancer, their potential role as theranostic markers in clinical oncology and new targeted therapies according to the concept of personalized medicine. PMID:26617115

  2. Neural reconstruction methods of restoring bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, Sandra M.; Barbe, Mary F.; de Groat, William C.; Brown, Justin M.; Tuite, Gerald F.; Corcos, Jacques; Fecho, Susan B.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, diverse studies have focused on the development of surgical strategies to restore function of a decentralized bladder after spinal cord or spinal root injury via repair of the original roots or by transferring new axonal sources. The techniques included end-to-end sacral root repairs, transfer of roots from other spinal segments to sacral roots, transfer of intercostal nerves to sacral roots, transfer of various somatic nerves to the pelvic or pudendal nerve, direct reinnervation of the detrusor muscle, or creation of an artificial reflex pathway between the skin and the bladder via the central nervous system. All of these surgical techniques have demonstrated specific strengths and limitations. The findings made to date already indicate appropriate patient populations for each procedure, but a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of each technique to restore urinary function after bladder decentralization is required to guide future research and potential clinical application. PMID:25666987

  3. Bladder volume estimation from electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Schlebusch, T; Nienke, S; Leonhardt, S; Walter, M

    2014-09-01

    Non-invasive estimation of bladder volume is required to progress from scheduled voiding to a demand-driven emptying scheme for patients with impaired bladder volume sensation. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a promising candidate for the non-invasive monitoring of bladder volume. This article focuses on four estimation algorithms used to map recorded EIT data to a volume estimate. Two different approaches are presented: the tomographic algorithms (one based on global impedance, the other on equivalent circular diameter) rely on the reconstruction of a tomographic image and then extract a volume estimate, whereas the parametric algorithms (one based on neural networks, the other on the singular value difference method) directly map the raw data to a volume estimate. The four algorithms presented here are evaluated for volume estimation error, noise tolerance and suppression of varying urine conductivity based on finite element simulation data. PMID:25139037

  4. 9 CFR 96.7 - Dried bladders, weasands, and casings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dried bladders, weasands, and casings. 96.7 Section 96.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... bladders, weasands, and casings. Dried animal bladders, dried weasands, and all other dried animal...

  5. Tracer-based Determination of Vortex Descent in the 1999/2000 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffrey B.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Hurst, Dale F.; Elkins, James W.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Herman, Robert L.; Webster, Chrisotopher R.

    2002-01-01

    A detailed analysis of available in situ and remotely sensed N2O and CH4 data measured in the 1999/2000 winter Arctic vortex has been performed in order to quantify the temporal evolution of vortex descent. Differences in potential temperature (theta) among balloon and aircraft vertical profiles (an average of 19-23 K on a given N2O or CH4 isopleth) indicated significant vortex inhomogeneity in late fall as compared with late winter profiles. A composite fall vortex profile was constructed for 26 November 1999, whose error bars encompassed the observed variability. High-latitude extravortex profiles measured in different years and seasons revealed substantial variability in N2O and CH4 on theta surfaces, but all were clearly distinguishable from the first vortex profiles measured in late fall 1999. From these extravortex-vortex differences we inferred descent prior to 26 November: as much as 397 plus or minus 15 K (lsigma) at 30 ppbv N2O and 640 ppbv CH4, and falling to 28 plus or minus 13 K above 200 ppbv N2O and 1280 ppbv CH4. Changes in theta were determined on five N2O and CH4 isopleths from 26 November through 12 March, and descent rates were calculated on each N2O isopleth for several time intervals. The maximum descent rates were seen between 26 November and 27 January: 0.82 plus or minus 0.20 K/day averaged over 50- 250 ppbv N2O. By late winter (26 February to 12 March), the average rate had decreased to 0.10 plus or minus 0.25 K/day. Descent rates also decreased with increasing N2O; the winter average (26 November to 5 March) descent rate varied from 0.75 plus or minus 0.10 K/day at 50 ppbv to 0.40 plus or minus 0.11 K/day at 250 ppbv. Comparison of these results with observations and models of descent in prior years showed very good overall agreement. Two models of the 1999/2000 vortex descent, SLIMCAT and REPROBUS, despite theta offsets with respect to observed profiles of up to 20 K on most tracer isopleths, produced descent rates that agreed very favorably with the inferred rates from observation.

  6. Tracer-Based Determination of Vortex Descent in the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Hurst, Dale F.; Elkins, James W.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Herman, Robert L.; Webster, Christopher R.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed analysis of available in situ and remotely sensed N2O and CH4 data measured in the 1999-2000 winter Arctic vortex has been performed in order to quantify the temporal evolution of vortex descent. Differences in potential temperature (theta) among balloon and aircraft vertical profiles (an average of 19-23 K on a given N2O or CH4 isopleth) indicated significant vortex inhomogeneity in late fall as compared with late winter profiles. A composite fall vortex profile was constructed for November 26, 1999, whose error bars encompassed the observed variability. High-latitude, extravortex profiles measured in different years and seasons revealed substantial variability in N2O and CH4 on theta surfaces, but all were clearly distinguishable from the first vortex profiles measured in late fall 1999. From these extravortex-vortex differences, we inferred descent prior to November 26: 397+/-15 K (1sigma) at 30 ppbv N2O and 640 ppbv CH4, and 28+/-13 K above 200 ppbv N2O and 1280 ppbv CH4. Changes in theta were determined on five N2O and CH4 isopleths from November 26 through March 12, and descent rates were calculated on each N2O isopleth for several time intervals. The maximum descent rates were seen between November 26 and January 27: 0.82+/-0.20 K/day averaged over 50-250 ppbv N2O. By late winter (February 26-March 12), the average rate had decreased to 0.10+/-0.25 K/day. Descent rates also decreased with increasing N2O; the winter average (November 26-March 5) descent rate varied from 0.75+/-0.10 K/day at 50 ppbv to 0.40+/-0.11 K/day at 250 ppbv. Comparison of these results with observations and models of descent in prior years showed very good overall agreement. Two models of the 1999-2000 vortex descent, SLIMCAT and REPROBUS, despite theta offsets with respect to observed profiles of up to 20 K on most tracer isopleths, produced descent rates that agreed very favorably with the inferred rates from observation.

  7. Comparison of minimum-action and steepest-descent paths in gradient systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Leines, Grisell; Rogal, Jutta

    2016-02-01

    On high-dimensional and complex potential energy surfaces, the identification of the most likely mechanism for the transition between local minima is a challenging task. Usually the steepest-descent path is used interchangeably with the minimum-energy path and is associated with the most likely path. Here we compare the meaning of the steepest-descent path in complex energy landscapes to the path integral formulation of a trajectory that minimizes the action functional for Brownian dynamics. In particular, for energy landscapes with bifurcation points and multiple minima and saddle points, there can be several steepest-descent paths associated with specific saddles that connect two predetermined states but largely differ from the path of maximum likelihood. The minimum-action path, however, additionally takes into account the scalar work along the trajectory. Minimizing the scalar work can be less ambiguous in the identification of the most likely path in different gradient systems. It can also be used to distinguish between multiple steepest-descent paths that connect reactant and product states. We illustrate that in systems with complex energy landscapes a careful assessment of the steepest-descent path is thus advisable. Here the evaluation of the action can provide valuable information on the analysis and description of the most likely path.

  8. Global Patterns of Prostate Cancer Incidence, Aggressiveness, and Mortality in Men of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Devesa, Susan S.; Chang, Bao-Li; Bunker, Clareann H.; Cheng, Iona; Cooney, Kathleen; Eeles, Rosalind; Fernandez, Pedro; Giri, Veda N.; Gueye, Serigne M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Heyns, Chris F.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue Ann; Isaacs, William; Jalloh, Mohamed; John, Esther M.; Kibel, Adam S.; Kidd, LaCreis R.; Layne, Penelope; Leach, Robin J.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Okobia, Michael N.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Park, Jong Y.; Patrick, Alan L.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Ragin, Camille; Roberts, Robin A.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Stanford, Janet L.; Strom, Sara; Thompson, Ian M.; Witte, John; Xu, Jianfeng; Yeboah, Edward; Hsing, Ann W.; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the leading cancer among men of African descent in the USA, Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The estimated number of CaP deaths in SSA during 2008 was more than five times that among African Americans and is expected to double in Africa by 2030. We summarize publicly available CaP data and collected data from the men of African descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate (MADCaP) Consortium and the African Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) to evaluate CaP incidence and mortality in men of African descent worldwide. CaP incidence and mortality are highest in men of African descent in the USA and the Caribbean. Tumor stage and grade were highest in SSA. We report a higher proportion of T1 stage prostate tumors in countries with greater percent gross domestic product spent on health care and physicians per 100,000 persons. We also observed that regions with a higher proportion of advanced tumors reported lower mortality rates. This finding suggests that CaP is underdiagnosed and/or underreported in SSA men. Nonetheless, CaP incidence and mortality represent a significant public health problem in men of African descent around the world. PMID:23476788

  9. Analysis of foot clearance in firefighters during ascent and descent of stairs.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Richard M; Horn, Gavin P; Rosengren, Karl S; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    Slips, trips, and falls are a leading cause of injury to firefighters with many injuries occurring while traversing stairs, possibly exaggerated by acute fatigue from firefighting activities and/or asymmetric load carriage. This study examined the effects that fatigue, induced by simulated firefighting activities, and hose load carriage have on foot clearance while traversing stairs. Landing and passing foot clearances for each stair during ascent and descent of a short staircase were investigated. Clearances decreased significantly (p < 0.05) post-exercise for nine of 12 ascent parameters and increased for two of eight descent parameters. Load carriage resulted in significantly decreased (p < 0.05) clearance over three ascent parameters, and one increase during descent. Decreased clearances during ascent caused by fatigue or load carriage may result in an increased trip risk. Increased clearances during descent may suggest use of a compensation strategy to ensure stair clearance or an increased risk of over-stepping during descent. PMID:26360190

  10. Quadratic steepest descent on potential energy surfaces. I. Basic formalism and quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun-Qiang; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    1993-10-01

    A novel second-order algorithm is formulated for determining steepest-descent lines on potential energy surfaces. The reaction path is deduced from successive exact steepest-descent lines of local quadratic approximations to the surface. At each step, a distinction is made between three points: the center for the local quadratic Taylor expansion of the surface, the junction of the two adjacent local steepest-descent line approximations, and the predicted approximation to the true steepest-descent line. This flexibility returns a more efficient yield from the calculated information and increases the accuracy of the local quadratic approximations by almost an order of magnitude. In addition, the step size is varied with the curvature and, if desired, can be readjusted by a trust region assessment. Applications to the Gonzalez-Schlegel and the Mller-Brown surfaces show the method to compare favorably with existing methods. Several measures are given for assessing the accuracy achieved without knowledge of the exact steepest-descent line. The optimal evaluation of the predicted gradient and curvature for dynamical applications is discussed.

  11. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:26475949

  12. Catheterisation: best practice in bladder care.

    PubMed

    Blease, Megan

    2016-03-01

    Bladder care is an integral part of caring for a woman in labour and the immediate postpartum period (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2014a). To ensure effective bladder care, the skill of urinary catheterisation is often undertaken by a midwife and can be required in a variety of different situations. Catheterisation is a necessary intervention whether it is intermittent, indwelling, short-term or, less often, long-term. This article addresses the current recommended guidance, highlights best practice measures and provides useful hints and tips to support catheter care. PMID:27044190

  13. [Intravesical distension in the corrugated tuberculotic bladder].

    PubMed

    Slavov, Ch; Kumanov, Kh; Donovski, L

    1991-01-01

    The treatment problem of urinary tract post-tuberculous changes is not completely solved. Current methods do not always give good results and are accompanied by some complications. The authors describe their own modified method of hydrostatic intravesical distension of the tuberculotic-cirrhotic bladder, using epidural anesthesia, and worked out indications for it. The results show an increase in the bladder volume from 100-120 to 250-300 ml with a decreased urination frequency in 8 patients. The method occurred to be very convenient-to-use due to the absence of any complications. PMID:1858207

  14. Integration of a smoking cessation program in the treatment protocol for patients with head and neck and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Bruin-Visser, J C; Ackerstaff, A H; Rehorst, H; Retèl, V P; Hilgers, F J M

    2012-02-01

    Smoking is the main causative factor for development of head and neck and lung cancer. In addition, other malignancies such as bladder, stomach, colorectal, kidney and pancreatic cancer have a causative relation with smoking. Continued smoking after having been diagnosed with cancer has many negative consequences: effectiveness of radiotherapy is diminished, survival time is shortened and risks of recurrence, second primary malignancies and treatment complications are increased. In view of the significant health consequences of continued smoking, therefore, additional support for patients to stop smoking seems a logical extension of the present treatment protocols for smoking-related cancers. For prospectively examining the effect of nursing-delivered smoking cessation programme for patients with head and neck or lung cancer, 145 patients with head and neck or lung cancer enrolled into this programme over a 2-year period. Information on smoking behaviour, using a structured, programme specific questionnaire, was collected at baseline, and after 6 and 12 months. At 6 months, 58 patients (40%) had stopped smoking and at 12 months, 48 patients (33%) still had refrained from smoking. There were no differences in smoking cessation results between patients with head and neck and lung cancer. The only significant factor predicting success was whether the patient had made earlier attempts to quit smoking. A nurse-managed smoking cessation programme for patients with head and neck or lung cancer shows favourable long-term success rates. It seems logical, therefore, to integrate such a programme in treatment protocols for smoking-related cancers. PMID:21698416

  15. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-27

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  16. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function

    PubMed Central

    Walker, K. A.; Ikeda, Y.; Zabbarova, I.; Schaefer, C. M.; Bushnell, D.; De Groat, W. C.; Kanai, A.

    2015-01-01

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2BM−/−). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2BM−/− bladders had thin muscle layers with less α-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2BM−/− bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2BM−/− bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  17. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function.

    PubMed

    Walker, K A; Ikeda, Y; Zabbarova, I; Schaefer, C M; Bushnell, D; De Groat, W C; Kanai, A; Bates, C M

    2015-04-15

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2(BM-/-)). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders had thin muscle layers with less α-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2(BM-/-) versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2(BM-/-) versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  18. Descent and Landing Triggers for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Exploration Flight Test-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Brian D.; Semrau, Jeffrey D.; Duke, Charity J.

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will perform a flight test known as Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) currently scheduled for 2014. One of the primary functions of this test is to exercise all of the important Guidance, Navigation, Control (GN&C), and Propulsion systems, along with the flight software for future flights. The Descent and Landing segment of the flight is governed by the requirements levied on the GN&C system by the Landing and Recovery System (LRS). The LRS is a complex system of parachutes and flight control modes that ensure that the Orion MPCV safely lands at its designated target in the Pacific Ocean. The Descent and Landing segment begins with the jettisoning of the Forward Bay Cover and concludes with sensing touchdown. This paper discusses the requirements, design, testing, analysis and performance of the current EFT-1 Descent and Landing Triggers flight software.

  19. Advances in POST2 End-to-End Descent and Landing Simulation for the ALHAT Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jody L.; Striepe, Scott A.; Maddock, Robert W.; Hines, Glenn D.; Paschall, Stephen, II; Cohanim, Babak E.; Fill, Thomas; Johnson, Michael C.; Bishop, Robert H.; DeMars, Kyle J.; Sostaric, Ronald r.; Johnson, Andrew E.

    2008-01-01

    Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) is used as a basis for an end-to-end descent and landing trajectory simulation that is essential in determining design and integration capability and system performance of the lunar descent and landing system and environment models for the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project. The POST2 simulation provides a six degree-of-freedom capability necessary to test, design and operate a descent and landing system for successful lunar landing. This paper presents advances in the development and model-implementation of the POST2 simulation, as well as preliminary system performance analysis, used for the testing and evaluation of ALHAT project system models.

  20. Control of stair ascent and descent with a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Brian Edward; Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Huff, Amanda; Erdemir, Erdem; Goldfarb, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a finite state-based control system for a powered transfemoral prosthesis that provides stair ascent and descent capability. The control system was implemented on a powered prosthesis and evaluated by a unilateral, transfemoral amputee subject. The ability of the powered prosthesis to provide stair ascent and descent capability was assessed by comparing the gait kinematics, as recorded by a motion capture system, with the kinematics provided by a passive prosthesis, in addition to those recorded from a set of healthy subjects. The results indicate that the powered prosthesis provides gait kinematics that are considerably more representative of healthy gait, relative to the passive prosthesis, for both stair ascent and descent. PMID:23096120

  1. Preliminary assessment of the Mars Science Laboratory entry, descent, and landing simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, David W.

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, successfully landed inside Gale Crater. This landing was the seventh successful landing and fourth rover to be delivered to Mars. Weighing nearly one metric ton, Curiosity is the largest and most complex rover ever sent to investigate another planet. Safely landing such a large payload required an innovative Entry, Descent, and Landing system, which included the first guided entry at Mars, the largest supersonic parachute ever flown at Mars, and the novel Sky Crane landing system. A complete, end-to-end, six degree-of-freedom, multi-body computer simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing sequence was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. In-flight data gathered during the successful landing is compared to pre-flight statistical distributions, predicted by the simulation. These comparisons provide insight into both the accuracy of the simulation and the overall performance of the Entry, Descent, and Landing system.

  2. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-01-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence. PMID:26793538

  3. Malignant melanoma of the bladder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sayar, Hamide; Erdogan, Seyda; Adamhasan, Fulya; Gurbuz, Esma; Inci, Mehmet Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the bladder is very rare. Rather than being a primary lesion, malignant melanomas of the bladder are more commonly metastatic lesions. The histopathological appearance largely does not differ from that of melanoma at other body sites. It is often difficult to discriminate whether a bladder melanoma is primary or metastatic. Therefore, a careful review of histological features and performing necessary immunohistochemical staining procedures for S-100 protein and HMB-45 are very important in achieving a correct diagnosis. We report a case of hypomelanotic malignant melanoma of the bladder. Despite the variety of therapies available for primary melanomas of the bladder, the prognosis is still poor. PMID:24454603

  4. Eye Movement Patterns of the Elderly during Stair Descent:Effect of Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Satoko; Okabe, Sonoko; Nakazato, Naoko; Ohno, Yuko

    The relationship between the eye movement pattern during stair descent and illumination was studied in 4 elderly people in comparison with that in 5 young people. The illumination condition was light (85.0±30.9 lx) or dark (0.7±0.3 lx), and data of eye movements were obtained using an eye mark recorder. A flight of 15 steps was used for the experiment, and data on 3 steps in the middle, on which the descent movements were stabilized, were analyzed. The elderly subjects pointed their eyes mostly directly in front in the facial direction regardless of the illumination condition, but the young subjects tended to look down under the light condition. The young subjects are considered to have confirmed the safety of the front by peripheral vision, checked the stepping surface by central vision, and still maintained the upright position without leaning forward during stair descent. The elderly subjects, in contrast, always looked at the visual target by central vision even under the light condition and leaned forward. The range of eye movements was larger vertically than horizontally in both groups, and a characteristic eye movement pattern of repeating a vertical shuttle movement synchronous with descent of each step was observed. Under the dark condition, the young subjects widened the range of vertical eye movements and reduced duration of fixation. The elderly subjects showed no change in the range of eye movements but increased duration of fixation during stair descent. These differences in the eye movements are considered to be compensatory reactions to narrowing of the vertical visual field, reduced dark adaptation, and reduced dynamic visual acuity due to aging. These characteristics of eye movements of the elderly lead to an anteriorly leaned posture and lack of attention to the front during stair descent.

  5. Evolutionary analyses of non-genealogical bonds produced by introgressive descent

    PubMed Central

    Bapteste, Eric; Lopez, Philippe; Bouchard, Frdric; Baquero, Fernando; McInerney, James O.; Burian, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    All evolutionary biologists are familiar with evolutionary units that evolve by vertical descent in a tree-like fashion in single lineages. However, many other kinds of processes contribute to evolutionary diversity. In vertical descent, the genetic material of a particular evolutionary unit is propagated by replication inside its own lineage. In what we call introgressive descent, the genetic material of a particular evolutionary unit propagates into different host structures and is replicated within these host structures. Thus, introgressive descent generates a variety of evolutionary units and leaves recognizable patterns in resemblance networks. We characterize six kinds of evolutionary units, of which five involve mosaic lineages generated by introgressive descent. To facilitate detection of these units in resemblance networks, we introduce terminology based on two notions, P3s (subgraphs of three nodes: A, B, and C) and mosaic P3s, and suggest an apparatus for systematic detection of introgressive descent. Mosaic P3s correspond to a distinct type of evolutionary bond that is orthogonal to the bonds of kinship and genealogy usually examined by evolutionary biologists. We argue that recognition of these evolutionary bonds stimulates radical rethinking of key questions in evolutionary biology (e.g., the relations among evolutionary players in very early phases of evolutionary history, the origin and emergence of novelties, and the production of new lineages). This line of research will expand the study of biological complexity beyond the usual genealogical bonds, revealing additional sources of biodiversity. It provides an important step to a more realistic pluralist treatment of evolutionary complexity. PMID:23090996

  6. Protamine Sulfate-induced Bladder Injury is Protective from Distention-induced Bladder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Stemler, Kristina M.; Crock, Lara W.; Lai, H. Henry; Mills, Jason C.; Gereau, Robert W.; Mysorekar, Indira U.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bladder pain is a debilitating symptom of many urologic conditions, and there is no generally effective treatment. Abnormal urothelial turnover is common to multiple disease states, but the specific components of urothelial injury and the resulting molecular signals that lead to bladder pain are unknown. We examined mouse models of bladder injury induced by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), protamine sulfate (PS), and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to identify cellular and molecular correlates underlying pain sensitization in response to the stimuli. Materials and Methods C57BL/6 female mice were given intravesicular PS, LPS or UPEC, and the impact of each on nociception was determined by measuring the evoked visceromotor response to bladder distention at 24 hours post inoculation. Levels of pyuria and tissue inflammation were examined by urinary cytology and tissue histology. Quantitative PCR and gene expression analysis were used to identify injury profiles associated with nociception. Results PS treatment was significantly analgesic upon bladder distention. PS-treated bladders did not exhibit pyuria or extensive tissue damage. PS injury was associated with a global decrease in expression of inflammation-associated genes. In contrast, UPEC injury significantly increased the nociceptive response to bladder distention. LPS treatment did not affect nociception. Finally, injury-induced expression of inflammation-associated genes correlated with nociceptive responses. Conclusion PS treatment of the bladder is analgesic, tissue protective, and suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression normally associated with nociception. Additionally, the injury modalities that result in differential tissue response patterns provide an innovative method for identification of mediators of visceral pain. PMID:23174261

  7. High expression of Wnt7b in human superficial bladder cancer vs invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bui, T. D.; O'Brien, T.; Crew, J.; Cranston, D.; Harris, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt gene expression is involved in the development of breast cancer, but its role in other tumours is unknown. Wnts regulate cadherin function, previously shown to be more commonly deregulated in invasive bladder cancer. This study investigated whether factors upstream of cadherins were aberrantly expressed in superficial bladder cancer. The expression of one transforming (Wnt7b) and one non-transforming (Wnt5a) Wnt gene in four human bladder carcinoma cell lines, and in normal human bladder tissues (n = 8) and bladder cancers (n = 48) were analysed by ribonuclease protection analysis. All cell lines expressed an approximately equal level of Wnt7b mRNA. Wnt5a and Wnt7b mRNAs were both expressed in normal bladder tissues and bladder tumours. The median expression of Wnt7b was fourfold higher in superficial tumours (n = 29) than in normal tissues (n = 8, P = 0.002) and five fold higher than in invasive tumours (n = 17, P = 0.003). There was no significant difference between normal tissues and invasive tumours (P = 0.3). The expression of Wnt5a did not vary significantly between normal tissues and superficial tumours (P = 0.4), normal tissues and invasive tumours (P = 0.3) or superficial tumours and invasive tumours (P = 0.2). The differential expression of Wnt7b suggests a role in the early events of superficial bladder tumorigenesis involving cell adhesion and provides further evidence of different pathways of evolution of superficial and invasive cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9461004

  8. Intravesical Treatments of Bladder Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Shen, Tong; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    For bladder cancer, intravesical chemo/immunotherapy is widely used as adjuvant therapies after surgical transurethal resection, while systemic therapy is typically reserved for higher stage, muscle-invading, or metastatic diseases. The goal of intravesical therapy is to eradicate existing or residual tumors through direct cytoablation or immunostimulation. The unique properties of the urinary bladder render it a fertile ground for evaluating additional novel experimental approaches to regional therapy, including iontophoresis/electrophoresis, local hyperthermia, co-administration of permeation enhancers, bioadhesive carriers, magnetic-targeted particles and gene therapy. Furthermore, due to its unique anatomical properties, the drug concentration-time profiles in various layers of bladder tissues during and after intravesical therapy can be described by mathematical models comprised of drug disposition and transport kinetic parameters. The drug delivery data, in turn, can be combined with the effective drug exposure to infer treatment efficacy and thereby assists the selection of optimal regimens. To our knowledge, intravesical therapy of bladder cancer represents the first example where computational pharmacological approach was used to design, and successfully predicted the outcome of, a randomized phase III trial (using mitomycin C). This review summarizes the pharmacological principles and the current status of intravesical therapy, and the application of computation to optimize the drug delivery to target sites and the treatment efficacy. PMID:18369709

  9. Vaginal and bladder angiosarcoma after therapeutic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.A.; Moutos, D.M.; Pippitt, C.H. Jr.; Suda, R.R.; Smith, J.J.; Thurnau, G.R. )

    1989-11-01

    Angiosarcoma involving the female genitourinary tract is a rare soft tissue malignancy of vascular origin. We have described probably the first reported case of postirradiation angiosarcoma involving the vagina and bladder, and have reviewed the existing literature on the subject of angiosarcoma resulting from previous therapeutic irradiation for gynecologic malignancy.10 references.

  10. Safety of sequential whole bladder photodynamic therapy (WBPT) in bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nseyo, Unyime O.; Lamm, Donald L.; Carpenter, Cindy

    2001-05-01

    Bladder cancer remains a serious public health problem in many parts of the world with an estimated 300,000 new cases a year. In the US, there were 53,200 new cases of bladder cancer with 12,200 deaths in 2000. A majority (75%-90%) of these cancers are diagnosed pathologically as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Superficial TCC constitutes 85% of newly diagnosed bladder cancer cases. Superficial bladder cancer includes papillary tumors involving only the mucosa (Ta) or submucosa (T1) and flat carcinoma in suit (CIS). Transurethral resection (TUR) of bladder tumor effectively controls the primary tumors, confirms the superficial or non-muscle invasive nature of the disease, provides cytological and histological tumor characteristics for determining prognostic significance and allows for assessment of the extent of bladder tissue involvement by tumor. Intravesical therapy provides a high concentration of drug in contact with tumor-bearing mucosa for prolonged periods, reduces the likelihood of tumor implantation after resection by destroying viable cancer cells, provides a cytotoxic effect on residual carcinoma, and potentially alters precursor mucosal lesions.

  11. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    PubMed Central

    Yeniel, Ahmet zgr; Ergeno?lu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; A?kar, Niyazi; ?til, ?smail Mete

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Material and Methods Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. Results The mean age was found to be 54.512. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). Conclusion It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms. PMID:24592016

  12. Aggressive bladder carcinoma in an HIV-positive man with tetraplegia and neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Benabdallah, Justin O.; Collins, Clinton W.; Carucci, Laura R.; Moore, Kenneth E.; Gater, David R.; Klausner, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective Patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to spinal cord injury who are managed long term with an indwelling catheter are known to be at increased risk for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Immunosuppression is a known risk factor for malignancies that often are more aggressive than those seen in normal populations. Method Case report and discussion of management recommendations. Results We summarize the case of a 44-year-old HIV-positive C5C6 incomplete tetraplegic male (date of injury 1980), who was diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and succumbed to disease within 6 months of diagnosis. The patient was a non-smoker who was never managed with an indwelling catheter. There has been no such case reported in the literature. Conclusions HIV infection in the presence of a neurogenic bladder may carry an increased risk of aggressive bladder malignancy. More studies are warranted to determine whether routine annual screening with cystoscopy in all patients with HIV and neurogenic bladder is indicated. PMID:21675364

  13. The Value of Extended Nursing Services on Patients with Bladder Cancer after Endoscopic Bladder Resection

    PubMed Central

    LI, Xueqin; ZHANG, Yan; GAO, Hang; SUN, Xiujuan; LV, Weifeng; XU, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this study, specific measures of extended nursing services and its values on patients with bladder cancer after endoscopic bladder electrosection were examined. Methods: Sixty-six patients diagnosed with bladder cancer in Laiwu People’s Hospital(NO. 001, Xueyehu Street, Changshao Road, Laiwu, Shandong, China) between February 2012 and February 2014, and underwent endoscopic bladder electrosection were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into the control group (n=30 cases) or the observation group (n=36 cases) according to the order of hospitalization. Conventional nursing measures were given to the control group while extended nursing service measures were given to the observation group, and the differences of nursing effect were compared. Results: The occurrence rate of postoperative complications within the hospital for the observation group was significantly lower than that of the control group, as was the length of hospital stay. The nursing service satisfaction was also significantly improved within the observation group. These differences were statistically significance (P<0.05). The anxiety and depression scores for the observation group were significantly lower than that of control group and these differences were also of statistical significance (P<0.05). The follow-up compliance after hospitalization for the observation group was significantly enhanced, quality of life scores were significantly improved, and both differences were of statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion: Extended nursing service improves the effect and long-term prognosis of patients with bladder cancer after undergoing endoscopic bladder electrosection. PMID:27057521

  14. Minimum-Cost Aircraft Descent Trajectories with a Constrained Altitude Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G.; Sadovsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical formula for solving the speed profile that accrues minimum cost during an aircraft descent with a constrained altitude profile is derived. The optimal speed profile first reaches a certain speed, called the minimum-cost speed, as quickly as possible using an appropriate extreme value of thrust. The speed profile then stays on the minimum-cost speed as long as possible, before switching to an extreme value of thrust for the rest of the descent. The formula is applied to an actual arrival route and its sensitivity to winds and airlines' business objectives is analyzed.

  15. Steepest Descent Trajectories on Isosurfaces of the Scalar Field and of Fluctuations of the Scalar Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasukov, V. V.; Moldovanova, E. A.; Il'kin, E. E.; Novoselov, V. V.; Rozhkova, S. V.; Rozhkova, O. V.

    2015-05-01

    It has been shown that steepest descent trajectories on an isosurface of the scalar field or of fluctuations of the scalar curvature can serve as the geometric skeleton of galaxies, these trajectories simultaneously being isolines of the isosurface. Isolines and isosurfaces can generate matter via the mechanism of spontaneous emission of the Lemaître-Friedmann primordial atom. Steepest descent trajectories on an isosurface of fluctuations of the scalar curvature can also serve as the skeleton of quantum inhomogeneities of the density in GTR.

  16. Overview of the NASA Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Dwyer-Cianciolo, Alicia M.; Kinney, David J.; Howard, Austin R.; Chen, George T.; Ivanov, Mark C.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Westhelle, Carlos H.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the Study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission.

  17. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Class Simulation Overview and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and exploration or human-scale missions. The year one exploration class mission activity considered technologies capable of delivering a 40-mt payload. This paper provides an overview of the exploration class mission study, including technologies considered, models developed and initial simulation results from the EDL-SA year one effort.

  18. Initial Field Evaluation of Pilot Procedures for Flying CTAS Descent Clearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett; Goka, Tsuyoshi; Cashion, Patricia; Feary, Michael; Graham, Holly; Smith, Nancy; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) is a new support system that is designed to assist air traffic controllers in the management of arrival traffic. CTAS will provide controllers with more information about current air traffic, enabling them to provide clearances for efficient, conflict-free descents that help achieve an orderly stream of aircraft at the final approach fix. CTAS is a computer-based system that functions as a "ground-based FMS" that can predict flight trajectories and arrival times for all incoming aircraft. CTAS uses an aircraft's cruise airspeed; current air traffic, winds and temperature; performance characteristics of the aircraft type; and individual airline preferences to create a flight profile from cruise altitude to the final approach fix. Controllers can use this flight profile to provide a descent clearance that will allow an aircraft to fly an efficient descent and merge more smoothly with other arriving aircraft. A field test of the CTAS Descent Advisor software was conducted at the Denver Center for aircraft arriving at the Stapleton International Airport from September 12-29. CTAS Descent clearances were given to a NASA flight test aircraft and to 77 airline flights that arrived during low traffic periods. For the airline portion of the field test, cockpit procedures and pilot briefing packages for both FMS equipped and unequipped aircraft were developed in cooperation with an airline. The procedures developed for the FMS equipped aircraft were to fly a VNAV descent at a controller specified speed to cross a metering fix at a specified altitude and speed. For nonFMS aircraft, the clearance also specified a CTAS calculated top-of-descent point. Some CTAS related flight deck issues included how much time was available to the pilots' for compliance, the amount of information that needed to be interpreted in the clearance and possible repercussions of misunderstandings. Data collected during the study ranged from subjective data (including the airline pilots' opinions and comments about the new descent clearances and procedures) to objective data (including observations of aircraft performance from the flight deck). This paper will present data and the resulting changes in the design of the procedures and clearance phraseology.

  19. Neck Dissection Through a Facelift Incision

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Thuy-Anh N.; Eliades, Steven J.; Ha, Patrick K.; Fakhry, Carole; Saunders, John M.; Califano, Joseph A.; Blanco, Ray G. F.

    2013-01-01

    Obectives/Hypothesis To determine the feasibility and safety of neck dissection through a facelift incision. Study Design Prospective case series. Methods Cadavers and live subjects underwent neck dissection using a facelift incision with and without endoscopic assistance. In the live facelift neck dissection (FLND), the preoperative surgical indications, staging, adjuvant therapy, intraoperative technical procedure, pathology reports on lymph nodes, and short-term outcomes were reviewed. Results FLND was successfully performed in four cadavers and four live subjects, including selective (less than five neck levels removed) and comprehensive (levels I–V removed) neck dissections. All levels were accessible through this approach, with additional retraction required for levels I and IV. Endoscopic assistance was required in one neck dissection for adequate visualization. Short-term complications and number of excised lymph nodes were comparable to those from traditional neck dissection approaches. Conclusions Open neck dissection through a facelift incision is feasible and offers an alternate approach to traditional incisions. This can be performed without requiring robotic assistance and with endoscopic assistance only in certain cases. Endoscopic assistance can offer enhanced visualization of the surgical field and complement open direct approaches in neck dissection. Although FLND offers improved cosmetic outcomes when compared to those of traditional neck incisions, further study is required to determine its efficacy and indications. PMID:23023877

  20. The undescended "parathymus". An occasional cause of failed neck exploration for hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Edis, A J; Purnell, D C; van Heerden, J A

    1979-07-01

    Arrested descent of the inferior parathyroid gland ("parathymus") during embryologic development may leave the gland stranded high in the neck. Adenomas of such undescended glands are a rare cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, but they may not be uncommon among patients who have already had a failed cervical exploration. Unless the surgeon is aware of this entity, he will probably overlook it. If one is to find these tumors, it is necessary to extend the dissection upward above the superior pole of the thyroid gland, sometimes as far as the angle of the jaw. Adenomas of undescended "parathymus" glands were encountered in seven patients during a recent 20 month (May 1975 through December 1976) surgical experience encompassing 414 primary operations and 27 reoperations for hyperparathyroidism. These tumors were found at initial exploration in one patient and at reoperation in six patients. The individual case histories are presented to illustrate the difficulties posed by this anatomic variant. PMID:464681

  1. The undescended "parathymus". An occasional cause of failed neck exploration for hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Edis, A J; Purnell, D C; van Heerden, J A

    1979-01-01

    Arrested descent of the inferior parathyroid gland ("parathymus") during embryologic development may leave the gland stranded high in the neck. Adenomas of such undescended glands are a rare cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, but they may not be uncommon among patients who have already had a failed cervical exploration. Unless the surgeon is aware of this entity, he will probably overlook it. If one is to find these tumors, it is necessary to extend the dissection upward above the superior pole of the thyroid gland, sometimes as far as the angle of the jaw. Adenomas of undescended "parathymus" glands were encountered in seven patients during a recent 20 month (May 1975 through December 1976) surgical experience encompassing 414 primary operations and 27 reoperations for hyperparathyroidism. These tumors were found at initial exploration in one patient and at reoperation in six patients. The individual case histories are presented to illustrate the difficulties posed by this anatomic variant. Images Fig. 3. PMID:464681

  2. Vesicoenteric Fistula due to Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yu Jin; Park, Dong Jin; Kim, Soon; Kim, Sung Woo; Lee, Kyung Seop; Choi, Nak Gyeu

    2014-01-01

    Vesicoenteric fistula is a rare complication of bladder squamous cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 70-year-old male who complained of painless, total gross hematuria. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) revealed an approximately 2.7-cm lobulated and contoured enhancing mass in the bladder dome. We performed partial cystectomy of the bladder dome after transurethral resection of the bladder. The biopsy result was bladder squamous cell carcinoma, with infiltrating serosa histopathologically, but the resection margin was free. Postoperatively, follow-up CT was done after 3 months. Follow-up CT revealed an approximately 4.7-cm4.0-cm lobulated, contoured, and heterogeneous mass in the bladder dome. A vesicoenteric fistula was visible by cystography. Here we report this case of a vesicoenteric fistula due to bladder squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25045451

  3. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette-Guérin). PMID:22176770

  4. Bladder perforation in a peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Ounissi, M; Sfaxi, M; Fayala, H; Abderrahim, E; Ben Abdallah, T; Chebil, M; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2012-05-01

    The dysfunction of the catheter in peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a frequent complication. However, perforation of organs are rare, particularly that of the urinary bladder. This requires an early diagnosis and prompt treatment of patients. We report here the case of a 38-year-old woman having end-stage renal disease due to autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease treated by PD since November 2000. Three years later, she was treated for Staphylococcal peritonitis. Four months later, she presented with a severe urge to urinate at the time of the fluid exchanges. The biochemical analysis of the fluid from the bladder showed that it was dialysis fluid. Injection of contrast through the catheter demonstrated the presence of a fistula between the bladder and the peritoneal cavity. She underwent cystoscopic closure of the fistulous tract and the PD catheter was removed. Subsequently, the patient was treated by hemodialysis. One month later, a second catheter was implanted surgically after confirming the closure of the fistula. Ten days later, she presented with pain at the catheter site and along the tunnel, which was found to be swollen along its track. The injection of contrast produced swelling of the subcutaneous tunnel but without extravasation of the dye. PD was withdrawn and the patient was put back on hemodialysis. Bladder fistula is a rare complication in PD and diagnosis should be suspected when patient complains of an urge to pass urine during the exchanges, which can be confirmed by contrast study showing presence of dye in the bladder. PD may be possible after the closure of the fistula, but recurrence may occur. PMID:22569443

  5. Genetics of Bladder Malignant Tumors in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Zangari, Andrea; Zaini, Johan; Gulìa, Caterina

    2016-02-01

    Bladder masses are represented by either benign or malignant entities. Malignant bladder tumors are frequent causes of disease and death in western countries. However, in children they are less common. Additionally, different features are found in childhood, in which non epithelial tumors are more common than epithelial ones. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric bladder tumor, but many other types of lesions may be found, such as malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and neuroblastoma. Other rarer tumors described in literature include urothelial carcinoma and other epithelial neoplasms. Rhabdomyosarcoma is associated to a variety of genetic syndromes and many genes are involved in tumor development. PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR (P-F) fusion state has important implications in the pathogenesis and biology of RMS, and different genes alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of P-F negative and embryonal RMS, which are the subsets of tumors most frequently affecting the bladder. These genes include p53, MEF2, MYOG, Ptch1, Gli1, Gli3, Myf5, MyoD1, NF1, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, FGFR4, PIK3CA, CTNNB1, FBXW7, IGF1R, PDGFRA, ERBB2/4, MET, BCOR. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) usually shows SMARCB1/INI1 alterations. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene translocations are the most frequently associated alterations in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Few genes alterations in urothelial neoplasms have been reported in the paediatric population, which are mainly related to deletion of p16/lnk4, overexpression of CK20 and overexpression of p53. Here, we reviewed available literature to identify genes associated to bladder malignancies in children and discussed their possible relationships with these tumors. PMID:27013922

  6. Head and neck position sense.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or fails to be appropriately integrated in the CNS, errors in head position may occur, resulting in an inaccurate reference for HNPS, and conversely if neck proprioceptive information is inaccurate, then control of head position may be affected. The cerebellum and cortex also play a role in control of head position, providing feed-forward and modulatory influences depending on the task requirements. Position-matching tasks have been the most popular means of testing position sense in the cervical spine. These allow the appreciation of absolute, constant and variable errors in positioning and have been shown to be reliable. The results of such tests indicate that errors are relatively low (2-5 degrees). It is apparent that error is not consistently affected by age, a finding similar to studies undertaken in peripheral joints. Furthermore, the range of motion in which subjects are tested does not consistently affect accuracy in a predictable manner. However, it is evident that impairments in position sense are observed in individuals who have experienced whiplash-type injuries and individuals with chronic head and neck pain of non-traumatic origin (e.g. cervical spondylosis). While researchers advocate comprehensive retraining protocols, which include eye and neck motion targeting tasks and coordination exercises, as well as co-contraction exercises to reduce such impairments, some studies show that more general exercises and manipulation may be of benefit. Overall, there is limited information concerning the efficacy of treatment programmes. PMID:18201114

  7. Anatomic Variations in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Wong, Chin-Ho; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure. Variations encountered in the recipient vessels and commonly used flaps add to the complexity of surgery. This article reviews the commonly encountered variations in the recipient vessels in the neck with emphasis on alternatives and techniques to circumvent these variations. Flaps commonly used in head and neck reconstruction are also reviewed in detail. Furthermore, safety, potential pitfalls, and technical pearls are highlighted. PMID:22550436

  8. Afatinib inhibits proliferation and invasion and promotes apoptosis of the T24 bladder cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    TANG, YUNHUA; ZHANG, XIANGYANG; QI, FAN; CHEN, MINGFENG; LI, YUAN; LIU, LONGFEI; HE, WEI; LI, ZHUO; ZU, XIONGBING

    2015-01-01

    Afatinib is a highly selective, irreversible inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human EGFR 2 (HER-2). Although preclinical and clinical studies have indicated that afatinib has antitumor activity and clinical efficacy in non-small cell lung carcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and breast cancer, there are few studies investigating its inhibitory effect on human bladder carcinoma cells. In this study, the antitumor effect of afatinib was investigated on the T24 bladder cancer cell line. The T24 bladder cancer cell line was treated with afatinib at various concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10 and 20 µmol/l). MTT assay was used to estimate the proliferation of the T24 cells; flow cytometric analysis was used to estimate the effect of afatinib on T24 cell apoptosis; cell invasion ability was assessed by a Transwell invasion assay; and western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, Akt, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. The MTT assay demonstrated that afatinib inhibited the proliferation of T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the cell apoptosis rate increased as the concentration of afatinib increased. The cell invasion assay indicated that afatinib treatment significantly inhibited the invasive behavior of T24 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that with increasing afatinib concentrations, Bcl-2, phosphorylated (p)-ERK1/2, p-Akt, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression levels were significantly decreased, whereas total (t)-ERK1/2 and t-Akt expression levels remained basically unchanged, and Bax expression levels were greatly increased. The results indicate that afatinib inhibits the proliferation and invasion of T24 cells in vitro and induces the apoptosis of these cells by inhibiting the EGFR signaling network. PMID:26136904

  9. Detection of Subpubic Tumor Causing Bladder Outlet Obstruction by 3D Perineal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, S.; Steetskamp, J.; Rommens, K.; Porta, S.; Battista, M.; Hoffmann, G.; Skala, C.

    2015-01-01

    This case report shows that 3D perineal ultrasound can be superior to clinical examination and routine 2D perineal ultrasound in the detection of an unusual subpubic tumor. A 73-year-old female patient was referred to our urogynecological outpatient unit complaining of over-active bladder symptoms and voiding dysfunction for 3 years. Gynecological examination found no signs of pelvic organ prolapse or abnormality in the vaginal cavity. Routine 2D perineal ultrasound showed substantial residual urine (ca. 300 ml on catheter) and limited bladder neck mobility, but no signs of pelvic organ prolapse. Use of standardized 3D perineal ultrasound revealed a 24 × 26 × 32 mm spherical, hypoechoic tumor below the pubic symphysis between the distal urethra and the pubic bones. This structure was mistaken for the pubic symphysis in the midline on 2D ultrasound performed earlier. At surgery, the tumor was completely excised through a vaginal incision between the urethra and the pubic symphysis. After an uneventful postoperative recovery the patient developed de-novo stress urinary incontinence, which was corrected successfully by the insertion of a retropubic tension-free suburethral sling after an interval of 8 weeks. After a further follow-up of 8 weeks the patient reported well-being, urinary continence and no voiding dysfunction; no abnormalities were found on examination. In conclusion, 3D perineal ultrasound is a useful additional tool for the diagnostic workup of bladder outlet obstruction. PMID:26257409

  10. Effects of aircraft and flight parameters on energy-efficient profile descents in time-based metered traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of several parameters on the time required to fly a nominal profile descent of a B-737 from an entry fix to a metering fix 75 n.mi. away was studied. The ground distance for the constant speed segment was adjusted in each case so that the aircraft would always arrive at the metering fix position at the completion of the five segments of the profile descent. The influence of eight parameters on the same nominal profile descent is outlined, but the method used for the off nominal cases was changed. The time calculated for the constant speed segment in the nominal case is used for all off nominal cases. This method allows the aircraft to arrive at the metering fix before or after the profile descent is complete. It is shown that descent Mach number and wind speed have a large effect on the time error, whereas weight was a much smaller effect.

  11. Cytochrome P4501A2 Phenotype and Bladder Cancer Risk: The Shanghai Bladder Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Li; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Chan, Kenneth K.; Wang, Renwei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yu, Mimi C.; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is hypothesized to catalyze the activation of arylamines, known human bladder carcinogens present in cigarette smoke. The relationship between CYP1A2 phenotype and bladder cancer risk was examined in a case-control study involving 519 patients and 514 controls in Shanghai, China. Both CYP1A2 and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) phenotypic status were determined by a caffeine-based urinary assay. The present study showed that among smokers at urine collection, bladder cancer patients had statistically significantly higher CYP1A2 phenotype scores compared with control subjects (P = 0.001). The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of bladder cancer for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles of the CYP1A2 score were 1.31 (0.53–3.28), 2.04 (0.90–4.60) and 2.82 (1.32–6.05), respectively, relative to the lowest quartile (P for trend = 0.003). NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype was associated with a statistically significant 40% increased risk of bladder cancer, and the relationship was independent of subjects’ smoking status. Subjects possessing the NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype and the highest tertile of CYP1A2 scores showed the highest risk for bladder cancer. Their odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) was 2.13 (1.24–3.68) relative to their counterparts possessing the NAT2 rapid acetylation phenotype and the lowest tertile of CYP1A2 scores. The findings of the present study demonstrate that CYP1A2 phenotype may be an important contributing factor in the development of smoking-related bladder cancer in humans. PMID:21480221

  12. Direct and remote constriction of membrane necks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božič, Bojan; Guven, Jemal; Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo; Svetina, Saša

    2014-05-01

    The physical properties of membrane necks are relevant in vesiculation, a process that plays an essential role in cellular physiology. Because the neck's radius is, in general, finite, membrane scission and the consequent pinching off of the vesicle can only occur if it is narrowed to permit the necessary membrane topological reformation. Here we examine, in a simple single phase lipid vesicle, how external forces can promote neck constriction not only by direct compression at the neck but also, counterintuitively, by dilation at remote locations. These results provide a new perspective on the role played by actin polymerization in the process of endocytosis.

  13. Cinco De Mayo, Normative Whiteness, and the Marginalization of Mexican-Descent Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurd, Clayton A.

    2008-01-01

    This case study is concerned with how institutional practices of normative whiteness can impede the school involvement of Mexican-descent students. It examines how damaging forms of white normativity can operate in school settings where one might least expect to find them: in commemorations of Mexican cultural holidays. The author shows how such…

  14. A molecular signature of an arrest of descent in human parturition

    PubMed Central

    MITTAL, Pooja; ROMERO, Roberto; TARCA, Adi L.; DRAGHICI, Sorin; NHAN-CHANG, Chia-Ling; CHAIWORAPONGSA, Tinnakorn; HOTRA, John; GOMEZ, Ricardo; KUSANOVIC, Juan Pedro; LEE, Deug-Chan; KIM, Chong Jai; HASSAN, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to identify the molecular basis of an arrest of descent. Study Design Human myometrium was obtained from women in term labor (TL; n=29) and arrest of descent (AODes, n=21). Gene expression was characterized using Illumina® HumanHT-12 microarrays. A moderated t-test and false discovery rate adjustment were applied for analysis. Confirmatory qRT-PCR and immunoblot was performed in an independent sample set. Results 400 genes were differentially expressed between women with an AODes compared to those with TL. Gene Ontology analysis indicated enrichment of biological processes and molecular functions related to inflammation and muscle function. Impacted pathways included inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of HIF1A, IL-6, and PTGS2 in AODES was confirmed. Conclusion We have identified a stereotypic pattern of gene expression in the myometrium of women with an arrest of descent. This represents the first study examining the molecular basis of an arrest of descent using a genome-wide approach. PMID:21284969

  15. Feeling Frugal: Socioeconomic Status, Acculturation, and Cultural Health Beliefs among Women of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrayo, Evelinn A.; Jenkins, Sharon Rae

    2003-01-01

    Investigates influences of acculturation, socioeconomic status (SES), and cultural health beliefs on Mexican-descent women's preventive health behaviors. In 5 focus group interviews sampling across levels of acculturation and SES, women expressing more traditional Mexican health beliefs about breast cancer screening were of lower SES and were less

  16. Use of steepest descent and various approximations for efficient computation of minimum noise aircraft landing trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, G.; Witt, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The following areas related to landing trajectory optimization research were discussed: (1) programming and modifying the steepest descent optimization procedure, (2) successfully iterating toward the optimum for a four-mile trajectory, (3) beginning optimization runs for a twenty-mile trajectory, and (4) adapt wind tunnel data for computer usage. Other related areas were discussed in detail in the two previous annual reports.

  17. Showing up, Remaining Engaged, and Partaking as Students: Resilience among Students of Mexican Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which 12 high school students of Mexican descent remain resilient amid difficult and stressful realities. Through an examination of students' interview responses, a case is made that students' ability to engage in school and figure out everyday ways to partake as students are signs of resilience. This work suggests…

  18. Predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Polese, Janaine Cunha; Scianni, Aline Alvim; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine which clinical measures of walking performance and lower limb muscle strength would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent in community-dwelling individuals with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Regression analysis of cross-sectional data from 55 individuals between one and five years post-stroke was used to investigate the measures of walking (speed and distance covered during the 6-minute walk test [6MWT]), and strength of the paretic knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent. [Results] Three predictors (habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles) were kept in the model. Habitual walking speed alone explained 47% of the variance in energy cost during stair ascent and descent. When the strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles was included in the model, the explained variance increased to 53%. By adding the distance covered during the 6MWT, the variance increased to 58%. [Conclusion] Habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles were significant predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with mild walking limitations. PMID:26834342

  19. Hybrid Entry Ship: A Conceptual Entry-Descent and Surveillance Platform for Venus Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mr.; Saroha, Mr.; Priyadarshi, Mr.; Limaye, Mr.

    2015-04-01

    A hybrid entry ship concept which will enter from low Venus orbit. It will undergo series of changes in its configuration to meet an optimal entry-descent and surveillance sequence. It houses payloads upto 300 kg. Available power to payload is 250W.

  20. Access to Health Care Among Latinos of Mexican Descent in "Colonias" in Two Texas Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Larry; Arizmendi, Lydia; Cornelius, Llewellyn J.

    2004-01-01

    Critical to resolving the problem of health disparities among Latinos is examining the needs within ethnic subpopulations. This paper focused on the unique challenges encountered by one ethnic subpopulation -- Latinos of Mexican descent living in colonias. Findings reaffirm the importance of looking within ethnic subpopulations to understand the

  1. Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.

  2. Predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Polese, Janaine Cunha; Scianni, Aline Alvim; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine which clinical measures of walking performance and lower limb muscle strength would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent in community-dwelling individuals with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Regression analysis of cross-sectional data from 55 individuals between one and five years post-stroke was used to investigate the measures of walking (speed and distance covered during the 6-minute walk test [6MWT]), and strength of the paretic knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent. [Results] Three predictors (habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles) were kept in the model. Habitual walking speed alone explained 47% of the variance in energy cost during stair ascent and descent. When the strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles was included in the model, the explained variance increased to 53%. By adding the distance covered during the 6MWT, the variance increased to 58%. [Conclusion] Habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles were significant predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with mild walking limitations. PMID:26834342

  3. A Critical Analysis of Western Perspectives on Families of Arab Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitin, Ben K.; Allen, Katherine R.; Bekheet, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Western research on families of Arab descent has increased in the current decade, compared to the previous 30 years. In this review of 256 empirical articles, through a critical postcolonial lens, domestic violence and family planning were the two most established areas of study. Generally, samples have come from a small group of countries such as…

  4. Access to Health Care Among Latinos of Mexican Descent in "Colonias" in Two Texas Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Larry; Arizmendi, Lydia; Cornelius, Llewellyn J.

    2004-01-01

    Critical to resolving the problem of health disparities among Latinos is examining the needs within ethnic subpopulations. This paper focused on the unique challenges encountered by one ethnic subpopulation -- Latinos of Mexican descent living in colonias. Findings reaffirm the importance of looking within ethnic subpopulations to understand the…

  5. Showing up, Remaining Engaged, and Partaking as Students: Resilience among Students of Mexican Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which 12 high school students of Mexican descent remain resilient amid difficult and stressful realities. Through an examination of students' interview responses, a case is made that students' ability to engage in school and figure out everyday ways to partake as students are signs of resilience. This work suggests

  6. Forward stair descent with hybrid neuroprosthesis after paralysis: Single case study demonstrating feasibility.

    PubMed

    Bulea, Thomas C; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L; Schnellenberger, John R; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to negotiate stairs is important for community access and independent mobility but requires more effort and strength than level walking. For this reason, previous attempts to utilize functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore stair navigation after spinal cord injury (SCI) have had limited success and are not readily generalizable. Stair descent is particularly challenging because it requires energy absorption via eccentric muscle contractions, a task not easily accomplished with FNS. This article presents the design and initial testing of a hybrid neuroprosthesis with a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM-HNP) for stair descent. Using a 16-channel percutaneous FNS system, a muscle activation pattern was synthesized to descend stairs with the VIKM-HNP in a step-by-step fashion. A finite state control system was implemented to deactivate knee extensor stimulation and utilize the VIKM-HNP to absorb energy and regulate descent speed. Feasibility testing was performed on one individual with complete thoracic-level SCI. Stair descent was achieved with maximum upper-limb forces of less than 45% body weight compared with previously reported value of 70% with FNS only. The experiments also provided insight into design requirements for future hybrid systems for stair navigation, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:25437932

  7. Forward stair descent with hybrid neuroprosthesis after paralysis: Single case study demonstrating feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L.; Schnellenberger, John R.; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to negotiate stairs is important for community access and independent mobility but requires more effort and strength than level walking. For this reason, previous attempts to utilize functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore stair navigation after spinal cord injury (SCI) have had limited success and are not readily generalizable. Stair descent is particularly challenging because it requires energy absorption via eccentric muscle contractions, a task not easily accomplished with FNS. This article presents the design and initial testing of a hybrid neuroprosthesis with a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM-HNP) for stair descent. Using a 16-channel percutaneous FNS system, a muscle activation pattern was synthesized to descend stairs with the VIKM-HNP in a step-by-step fashion. A finite state control system was implemented to deactivate knee extensor stimulation and utilize the VIKM-HNP to absorb energy and regulate descent speed. Feasibility testing was performed on one individual with complete thoracic-level SCI. Stair descent was achieved with maximum upper-limb forces of less than 45% body weight compared with previously reported value of 70% with FNS only. The experiments also provided insight into design requirements for future hybrid systems for stair navigation, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:25437932

  8. A Wind Tunnel Study on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Lander Descent Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, J. Francisco; Coquilla, Rachael V.; Wilson, Gregory R.; Seiff, Alvin; Rivell, Tomas

    2001-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Mars Pathfinder lander local pressure readings in accordance with the actual ambient atmospheric pressures of Mars during parachute descent. In order to obtain good measurements, the plane of the lander pressure sensor opening should ideally be situated so that it is parallel to the freestream. However, due to two unfavorable conditions, the sensor was positioned in locations where correction factors are required. One of these disadvantages is due to the fact that the parachute attachment point rotated the lander's center of gravity forcing the location of the pressure sensor opening to be off tangent to the freestream. The second and most troublesome factor was that the lander descends with slight oscillations that could vary the amplitude of the sensor readings. In order to accurately map the correction factors required at each sensor position, an experiment simulating the lander descent was conducted in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Using a 115 scale model at Earth ambient pressures, the test settings provided the necessary Reynolds number conditions in which the actual lander was possibly subjected to during the descent. In the analysis and results of this experiment, the readings from the lander sensor were converted to the form of pressure coefficients. With a contour map of pressure coefficients at each lander oscillatory position, this report will provide a guideline to determine the correction factors required for the Mars Pathfinder lander descent pressure sensor readings.

  9. Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.…

  10. Smart-Divert Powered Descent Guidance to Avoid the Backshell Landing Dispersion Ellipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M.; Acikmese, Behcet

    2013-01-01

    A smart-divert capability has been added into the Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) software originally developed for Mars pinpoint and precision landing. The smart-divert algorithm accounts for the landing dispersions of the entry backshell, which separates from the lander vehicle at the end of the parachute descent phase and prior to powered descent. The smart-divert PDG algorithm utilizes the onboard fuel and vehicle thrust vectoring to mitigate landing error in an intelligent way: ensuring that the lander touches down with minimum- fuel usage at the minimum distance from the desired landing location that also avoids impact by the descending backshell. The smart-divert PDG software implements a computationally efficient, convex formulation of the powered-descent guidance problem to provide pinpoint or precision-landing guidance solutions that are fuel-optimal and satisfy physical thrust bound and pointing constraints, as well as position and speed constraints. The initial smart-divert implementation enforced a lateral-divert corridor parallel to the ground velocity vector; this was based on guidance requirements for MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) landings. This initial method was overly conservative since the divert corridor was infinite in the down-range direction despite the backshell landing inside a calculable dispersion ellipse. Basing the divert constraint instead on a local tangent to the backshell dispersion ellipse in the direction of the desired landing site provides a far less conservative constraint. The resulting enhanced smart-divert PDG algorithm avoids impact with the descending backshell and has reduced conservatism.

  11. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  12. Pathogenesis of Bladder Calculi in the Presence of Urinary Stasis

    PubMed Central

    Childs, M. Adam; Mynderse, Lance A.; Rangel, Laureano J.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Lingeman, James E.; Krambeck, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although minimal evidence exists, bladder calculi in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia are thought to be secondary to bladder outlet obstruction induced urinary stasis. We performed a prospective, multi-institutional clinical trial to determine whether metabolic differences were present in men with and without bladder calculi undergoing surgical intervention for benign prostatic hyperplasia induced bladder outlet obstruction. Materials and Methods Men who elected surgery for bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia with and without bladder calculi were assessed prospectively and compared. Men without bladder calculi retained more than 150 ml urine post-void residual urine. Medical history, serum electrolytes and 24-hour urinary metabolic studies were compared. Results Of the men 27 had bladder calculi and 30 did not. Bladder calculi were associated with previous renal stone disease in 36.7% of patients (11 of 30) vs 4% (2 of 27) and gout was associated in 13.3% (4 of 30) vs 0% (0 of 27) (p <0.01 and 0.05, respectively). There was no observed difference in the history of other medical conditions or in serum electrolytes. Bladder calculi were associated with lower 24-hour urinary pH (median 5.9 vs 6.4, p = 0.02), lower 24-hour urinary magnesium (median 106 vs 167 mmol, p = 0.01) and increased 24-hour urinary uric acid supersaturation (median 2.2 vs 0.6, p <0.01). Conclusions In this comparative prospective analysis patients with bladder outlet obstruction and benign prostatic hyperplasia with bladder calculi were more likely to have a renal stone disease history, low urinary pH, low urinary magnesium and increased urinary uric acid supersaturation. These findings suggest that, like the pathogenesis of nephrolithiasis, the pathogenesis of bladder calculi is likely complex with multiple contributing lithogenic factors, including metabolic abnormalities and not just urinary stasis. PMID:23159588

  13. Bladder Cancer: A Simple Model Becomes Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pierro, Giovanni Battista Di; Gulia, Caterina; Cristini, Cristiano; Fraietta, Giorgio; Marini, Lorenzo; Grande, Pietro; Gentile, Vincenzo; Piergentili, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in developed countries and it is also characterized by a high number of recurrences. Despite this, several authors in the past reported that only two altered molecular pathways may genetically explain all cases of bladder cancer: one involving the FGFR3 gene, and the other involving the TP53 gene. Mutations in any of these two genes are usually predictive of the malignancy final outcome. This cancer may also be further classified as low-grade tumors, which is always papillary and in most cases superficial, and high-grade tumors, not necessarily papillary and often invasive. This simple way of considering this pathology has strongly changed in the last few years, with the development of genome-wide studies on expression profiling and the discovery of small non-coding RNA affecting gene expression. An easy search in the OMIM (On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database using “bladder cancer” as a query reveals that genes in some way connected to this pathology are approximately 150, and some authors report that altered gene expression (up- or down-regulation) in this disease may involve up to 500 coding sequences for low-grade tumors and up to 2300 for high-grade tumors. In many clinical cases, mutations inside the coding sequences of the above mentioned two genes were not found, but their expression changed; this indicates that also epigenetic modifications may play an important role in its development. Indeed, several reports were published about genome-wide methylation in these neoplastic tissues, and an increasing number of small non-coding RNA are either up- or down-regulated in bladder cancer, indicating that impaired gene expression may also pass through these metabolic pathways. Taken together, these data reveal that bladder cancer is far to be considered a simple model of malignancy. In the present review, we summarize recent progress in the genome-wide analysis of bladder cancer, and analyse non-genetic, genetic and epigenetic factors causing extensive gene mis-regulation in malignant cells. PMID:23372425

  14. Fast descent routes from within or near the stratosphere to Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, H.; Narazaki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    By using high concentrations of 7Be as an indicator, we clarify fast descent routes from within or near the stratosphere to Earth's surface, with the study site being in Fukuoka, Japan. Most routes arise from high latitudes through the following processes. First, the descent associated with a tropopause fold occurs, followed by southward movement with slow descent at the rear side of a strong trough. Because this motion occurs along an isentropic surface, the descending air parcels nearly conserve the potential temperature. As an extension, a strong descent associated with a sharp drop in the isentropic-surface height occurs at the south edge of the trough; this transports air parcels to low altitudes. This process involves irreversible phenomena such as filamentation and cutoff of potential vorticity. Finally, upon meeting appropriate near-surface disturbances, parcels at low altitudes are transported to Earth's surface. In some cases, parcels descend within mid-latitudes. In such routes, because the potential temperature is much higher at high altitudes than at low altitudes, strong descent with conservation of the potential temperature is impossible, and the potential temperature decreases. In these cases, the entire flow does not move downward; instead, only part of the flow in a diffluent field descends. When parcels descend, they push low isentropic surfaces, and their potential temperature decreases upon mixing with parcels having low potential temperature in the lower layers. The prevalence of the high-latitude route is explained as follows. In the mid-latitude route, because parcels at high and relatively low altitudes mix, the high concentrations of 7Be included in high-altitude parcels are difficult to maintain. Therefore, for parcels to arrive at low altitudes in the mid-latitude while maintaining high concentrations of 7Be, i.e., conserving the potential temperature, their area of origin should be high altitudes in high latitudes where the potential temperature is almost the same as that in the arrival area. Moreover, the initial descent must occur, because parcels cannot descend in the stratosphere when moving from high to mid-latitudes; parcels must already have descended from the stratosphere to the troposphere in high latitudes for effective descent with the movement to mid-latitudes. In spring, tropopause folds are frequent in high latitudes, disturbances in the southward transport of parcels are strong, and disturbances occur by which parcels descend to the surface. Therefore, high concentrations of 7Be occur most frequently in spring.

  15. Ectopic cervical thymus as a rare cause of pediatric neck mass: the role of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Alper; Akdur, Pinar Ozdemır; Celebi, Irfan; Karasu, Rabia; Yilmaz, Banu; Basak, Muzaffer

    2015-06-01

    Ectopic cervical thymus (ECT) is an uncommon cause for cervical mass in the pediatric age group. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings of the mass (located along the thymic descent pathway along the thymopharyngeal tract and has identical echostructure and signal intensities to the native thymus in the superior mediastinum) would lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by fine needle aspiration biopsy or histopathology after resection. The management of ECT is a conservative follow up, except in symptomatic cases with tracheal compression and histologically confirmed neoplasia where surgery is indicated. We present the case of ECT presenting as a left upper neck mass in a 12 year old girl. PMID:26052578

  16. Temporal variability of the descent of high-altitude NOX inferred from ionospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clilverd, Mark A.; Seppälä, Annika; Rodger, Craig J.; Thomson, Neil R.; Lichtenberger, János; Steinbach, Péter

    2007-09-01

    In this study we investigate periods of enhanced ionization in the mesosphere during Northern Hemisphere wintertime. Long-lasting ionization enhancements (days) are typically produced by solar proton events or by the descent of thermospheric NOX during periods of sustained downward vertical transport associated with a strong underlying polar vortex. Using a new application of ground-based low-frequency radio wave remote sensing, we study the mesospheric ionization conditions during the Northern Hemisphere winters spanning 2003-2004, 2004-2005, and 2005-2006. The winter 2003-2004 subionospheric radio wave propagation data from a transmitter in Iceland shows signatures of the descent of NOX through 80 km altitude starting on 13 January 2004, during the occurrence of a strong polar vortex, indicating a thermospheric source for the NOX. Similar analysis of radio wave propagation data in the Northern Hemisphere winter of 2004-2005 does not show a NOX descent event passing through the mesosphere, due to a lack of downward vertical transport as a result of a weak underlying polar vortex, despite the occurrence of significant solar proton ionization during January 2005. In 2005-2006 there were no significant ionization events and also no descent of significant amounts of thermospheric NOX, despite a strong polar vortex and strong vertical transport. We model the signature of the descent of NOX seen in the radio wave propagation data using the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry model, confirming that the levels of NOX in the mesosphere are ~100 times the usual background levels. The combination of strong NOX sources in the thermosphere and also a strong polar vortex is required for NOX to descend into the stratosphere with significant concentration levels.

  17. A Lump in the Neck

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, F. M.; Perkin, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A lump in the neck presents the physician with a stimulating diagnostic challenge. Management of such a patient requires thoughtful analysis of the clinical findings. Investigation should result in an expeditious diagnosis with a minimum of morbidity, inconvenience and hospitalization. Diagnostic tools available today make some of these idealistic goals attainable but do not substitute for sound clinical judgment. This article reports our rationale in managing patients who have a cervical mass. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:21289668

  18. Urinary Bladder Distention Evoked Visceromotor Responses as a Model for Bladder Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Katelyn E.; Stratton, Jarred M.; Kolber, Benedict J.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 3-8 million people in the United States suffer from interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), a debilitating condition characterized by increased urgency and frequency of urination, as well as nocturia and general pelvic pain, especially upon bladder filling or voiding. Despite years of research, the cause of IC/BPS remains elusive and treatment strategies are unable to provide complete relief to patients. In order to study nervous system contributions to the condition, many animal models have been developed to mimic the pain and symptoms associated with IC/BPS. One such murine model is urinary bladder distension (UBD). In this model, compressed air of a specific pressure is delivered to the bladder of a lightly anesthetized animal over a set period of time. Throughout the procedure, wires in the superior oblique abdominal muscles record electrical activity from the muscle. This activity is known as the visceromotor response (VMR) and is a reliable and reproducible measure of nociception. Here, we describe the steps necessary to perform this technique in mice including surgical manipulations, physiological recording, and data analysis. With the use of this model, the coordination between primary sensory neurons, spinal cord secondary afferents, and higher central nervous system areas involved in bladder pain can be unraveled. This basic science knowledge can then be clinically translated to treat patients suffering from IC/BPS. PMID:24798516

  19. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering. PMID:26880982

  20. Adjustable passive stiffness in mouse bladder: regulated by Rho kinase and elevated following partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Speich, John E; Southern, Jordan B; Henderson, Sheree; Wilson, Cameron W; Klausner, Adam P; Ratz, Paul H

    2012-04-15

    Detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contributes to bladder wall tension during filling, and bladder wall deformation affects the signaling system that leads to urgency. The length-passive tension (L-T(p)) relationship in rabbit DSM can adapt with length changes over time and exhibits adjustable passive stiffness (APS) characterized by a L-T(p) curve that is a function of both activation and strain history. Muscle activation with KCl, carbachol (CCh), or prostaglandin E(2) at short muscle lengths can increase APS that is revealed by elevated pseudo-steady-state T(p) at longer lengths compared with prior T(p) measurements at those lengths, and APS generation is inhibited by the Rho Kinase (ROCK) inhibitor H-1152. In the current study, mouse bladder strips exhibited both KCl- and CCh-induced APS. Whole mouse bladders demonstrated APS which was measured as an increase in pressure during passive filling in calcium-free solution following CCh precontraction compared with pressure during filling without precontraction. In addition, CCh-induced APS in whole mouse bladder was inhibited by H-1152, indicating that ROCK activity may regulate bladder compliance during filling. Furthermore, APS in whole mouse bladder was elevated 2 wk after partial bladder outlet obstruction, suggesting that APS may be relevant in diseases affecting bladder mechanics. The presence of APS in mouse bladder will permit future studies of APS regulatory pathways and potential alterations of APS in disease models using knockout transgenetic mice. PMID:22205227

  1. Genetics Home Reference: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions head and neck squamous cell carcinoma head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Enable Javascript to view the ... body cavities such as the airways and intestines. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) develops in the mucous ...

  2. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are ... Being Treated With Radiation for Cancer in Your Head or Neck? If so, this booklet can help you. While ...

  3. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  4. Improving Systemic Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tracy L; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-05-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is integral to the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (BCa). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been increasingly utilized for muscle-invasive BCa over the past several years, and several options for cisplatin-based regimens have emerged. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be considered for select patients who did not receive neoadjuvant therapy. Systemic chemotherapy added to radiotherapy is a critical component of a bladder-preserving approach and superior to radiotherapy alone. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been the mainstay for metastatic BCa for more than three decades. Novel targeted agents are in development fueled by the recent molecular characterization of BCa. Recent trials of immunotherapy have demonstrated the possibility of a less toxic and potentially more effective treatment for metastatic disease. It is an extremely exciting time for BCa research, and much needed improvements in systemic treatment are most certainly on the horizon. PMID:26984414

  5. The underactive bladder: detection and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nadir; Mangera, Altaf; Hillary, Christopher; Inman, Richard; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The inability to generate a voiding contraction sufficient to allow efficient bladder emptying within a reasonable time frame is a common problem seen in urological practice. Typically, the symptoms that arise are voiding symptoms, such as weak and slow urinary flow. These symptoms can cause considerable bother to patients and impact upon quality of life. The urodynamic finding of inadequate detrusor contraction has been termed detrusor underactivity (DUA). Although a definition is available for this entity, there are no widely accepted diagnostic criteria. Drawing parallels to detrusor overactivity and the overactive bladder, the symptoms arising from DUA have been referred to as the “underactive bladder” (UAB), while attempts to crystallize the definition of UAB are now ongoing. In this article, we review the contemporary literature pertaining to the epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of DUA as well as discuss the definitional aspects that are currently under consideration.

  6. [Management of overactive bladder in women].

    PubMed

    Peyronnet, B; Rigole, H; Damphousse, M; Manunta, A

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is defined as urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. OAB has been reported in 9 to 43% of female patients. It is usually idiopathic. The diagnosis is clinical but an initial work-up may be needed to exclude an underlying cause (bladder tumor, stone, cystitis, neurological disorder…) using urinary tract ultrasound, urine culture or cystoscopy. The initial assessment may also include a frequency-volume chart and urodynamics. Behavioral therapy is the first line treatment. In case of failure, antimuscarinics are recommended. Nowadays, three treatment options are available for OAB refractory to antimuscarinics: sacral neuromodulation, peripheral tibial nerve stimulation and intra-detrusor injections of botulinum toxin. Surgical procedures such as augmentation cystoplasty are very rarely required. PMID:26169251

  7. Thyroid metastasis of bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, S M M; Hashemipour, S; Salehi, S; Kazemifar, A M; Madani, P S

    2016-04-01

    The thyroid gland is a rare site for cancer metastasis. We report a 75-year-old man who was referred with a history of hematuria and generalized bone pain for the past few months. He had a past history of partial left lobe thyroidectomy for follicular adenoma. Subsequently he was referred for a thyroid mass and a subtotal thyroidectomy showed a poorly-differentiated carcinoma. On the latest admission, the patient underwent resection of a bladder tumour with malignant histology and an immunohistochemical profile of CK7+/CK20+/34 Beta E12+/CEA-/PSA-. Re-examination of thyroid sections with immunohistochemical stains revealed the malignant cells to be CK7+/CK20+/34 Beta E12+/CEA-/TTF1-. The findings were compatible with metastasis of the bladder transitional cell carcinoma to the thyroid gland.Scans revealed multiple liver and bone metastases. The patient died 2 months after the diagnosis. PMID:27126668

  8. Selecting a Medical Therapy for Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H Henry; Boone, Timothy B; Appell, Rodney A

    2002-01-01

    Immediate-release oxybutynin was the gold standard for pharmacologic treatment of overactive bladder for nearly 30 years. Intolerable systemic side effects, in particular dry mouth, limited its clinical utility, resulting in poor patient compliance with dosing regimens. Multiple studies have demonstrated the vastly superior tolerability of tolterodine, extended-release tolterodine, and extended-release oxybutynin over that of immediate-release oxybutynin at equivalent doses, and in the case of extended-release oxybutynin even to twice the dose of the original immediate-release form. With different drug delivery systems and, perhaps, with better bladder selectivity, these new oral agents have favorable side effect profiles, which translate into higher patient compliance and fewer treatment withdrawals or dosage reductions. PMID:16986019

  9. Combined bladder exstrophy and epispadias repair

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Ranjit; Apte, Ashwin; Mehta, Rajkumar; Varshney, Atul; Singh, Kulwant; Jain, Nidhi; Biswas, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year-old male child of exstrophy-epispadias complex presented to us. He had not received any treatment at the time of presentation. It was decided to perform a combined bladder exstrophy and epispadias repair under general anaesthesia. There was a wide diastasis of symphysis pubis, it was decided to perform a bilateral anterior innominate and vertical iliac osteotomy. The bladder was closed in two layers. The urethroplasty and penile reconstruction was done by modified Cantwell–Ransley repair. At the completion of procedure to prevent distraction of pubis, the baby was strapped using elastoplast bandage. The child had a very good cosmetic outcome, good pubic and rectus muscle approximation. On clamping the suprapubic catheter, the patient started passing urine per urethrally and there was a small penopubic fistula. Thereafter the suprapubic catheter was removed. The urine culture was sterile and the patient was discharged on prophylactic antibiotics. The patient is due for follow-up. PMID:22679150

  10. Oncolytic Viruses in the Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Kyle G.; Hitt, Mary M.; Moore, Ronald B.

    2012-01-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Up to 85% of patients with bladder cancer are diagnosed with a tumor that is limited to the bladder mucosa (Ta, T1, and CIS). These stages are commonly termed as non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Although the treatment of NMIBC has greatly improved in recent years, there is a need for additional therapies when patients fail bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that bladder cancer may be an ideal target for oncolytic viruses engineered to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells leaving normal cells unharmed. In support of this hypothesis, here we review current treatment strategies for bladder cancer and their shortcomings, as well as recent advancements in oncolytic viral therapy demonstrating encouraging safety profiles and antitumor activity. PMID:22899907

  11. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Wagaskar, Vinayak G; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-10-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  12. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-01-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  13. MTHFR gene polymorphisms in bladder cancer in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Izmirli, Muzeyyen; Inandiklioglu, Nihal; Abat, Deniz; Alptekin, Davut; Demirhan, Osman; Tansug, Zuhtu; Bayazit, Yildirim

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the 9th most common cancer and is responsible for malignancy related death all on the world. Folate and folate related enzyme polymorphisms related to the cancer risk. The methylene tethrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) enzyme is folate related and association of bladder cancer and MTHFR gene. Our purpose was to assess the prevalence of MTHFR gene 677 CT and 1298 AC polymorphisms and Bladder cancer in Turkey. We intended that bladder cancer patients and controls and we used the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) methods. The MTHFR gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in our population (For the MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism and A1298C polymorphism; p=0.036<0.05; p=0.278>0.05 respectively). Consequently, the MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism augments the risk of bladder cancer in Turkey. PMID:22126575

  14. Fluorescence photodetection of urothelial neoplastic foci in superficial bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jichlinski, Patrice; Forrer, Martin; Mizeret, Jerome C.; Braichotte, Daniel; Wagnieres, Georges A.; Zimmer, Georges; Guillou, Louis; Schmidlin, Franz R.; Graber, Peter; van den Bergh, Hubert; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg

    1997-05-01

    The prognosis of superficial bladder cancer in terms of recurrence and disease progression is related to the bladder tumor multiplicity and the presence of concomitant 'plane' tumors such as high grade dysplasia and carcinoma in situ (CIS). This study on 33 patients tries to demonstrate the interest of fluorescence cystoscopy in transurethral resection of superficial bladder cancer The method is based on the detection of the protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced fluorescence in urothelial cancer cells by topical administration of 5- aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The sensitivity and the specificity of this procedure on apparently normal mucosa in superficial bladder cancer is respectively estimated at 82.9% and 81.3%. Thus, fluorescence cystoscopy is a simple and reliable method in mapping the bladder mucosa, especially in case of multifocal bladder disease and it facilitates the screening of occult dysplasia.

  15. Hanging Bladder calculi Secondary to Misplaced Surgical Suture

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Ali; Mostafavi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Bladder calculi, a rare condition in the pediatric population, occur most commonly as a result of either migration from the kidney or urinary stasis in the bladder. We report the case of a 3-year-old boy with recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) secondary to bladder calculi formation on the sutures from a previous herniorrhaphy.A 3-year-old boy with previous history of herniorrhaphy presented with recurrent episodes of urinary tract infection, resistant to antibiotic therapy. Physical examination was unremarkable. Ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic fixed intra-luminal lesion in the bladder. Cystoscopic evaluation was performed and confirmed presence of calculi forming around several permanent silk sutures fixed to the bladder wall. The patient undergone cystotomy and the calculi were resected. The stone analysis revealed 80% uric acid calculi. The final diagnosis was of bladder calculi due to remnant suture from past herniorrhaphy. PMID:26060550

  16. Dynamics of liquid sloshing in upright and inverted bladdered tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, F. T.; Kana, D. D.

    A system identification methodology was used to examine the dynamics of liquid sloshing in the upright and inverted bladdered hydrazine tanks of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, (TDRS) and to evaluate the effects of bladder stiffness on the sloshing parameters. Mechanical models of the two systems were developed using the numerical values derived from static stability tests and from slosh frequency response tests of a full-size model tank fitted with a prototype bladder. For the upright tank (liquid below the bladder) a modified conventional pendulum was used. In the inverted tank (liquid above the bladder) where sloshing is unconventional due to the highly nonsymmetrical orientation of the liquid held by the bladder, a mechanical model using an inverted pendulum which is able to undergo small oscillations as well as large reorientations was necessary. Both thrusting and low-gravity conditions are considered.

  17. Dynamics of liquid sloshing in upright and inverted bladdered tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, F. T.; Kana, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    A system identification methodology was used to examine the dynamics of liquid sloshing in the upright and inverted bladdered hydrazine tanks of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, (TDRS) and to evaluate the effects of bladder stiffness on the sloshing parameters. Mechanical models of the two systems were developed using the numerical values derived from static stability tests and from slosh frequency response tests of a full-size model tank fitted with a prototype bladder. For the upright tank (liquid below the bladder) a modified conventional pendulum was used. In the inverted tank (liquid above the bladder) where sloshing is unconventional due to the highly nonsymmetrical orientation of the liquid held by the bladder, a mechanical model using an inverted pendulum which is able to undergo small oscillations as well as large reorientations was necessary. Both thrusting and low-gravity conditions are considered.

  18. Diagnostics techniques in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soubra, Ayman; Risk, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is the most common presentation of bladder cancer and is often treatable with endoscopic resection and intravesical therapies. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are the gold standard in diagnosis and surveillance but are limited by their sensitivity in some situations. We seek to provide an overview of recent additions to the diagnostic armamentarium for urologists treating this disease. Methods: Articles were identified through a literature review of articles obtained through PubMed searches including the terms “bladder cancer” and various diagnostic techniques described in the article. Results: A variety of urinary biomarkers are available to assist the diagnosis and management of patients with NMIBC. Many have improved sensitivity over urine cytology, but less specificity. There are certain situations in which this has proved valuable, but as yet these are not part of the standard guidelines for NMIBC. Fluorescence cystoscopy has level 1 evidence demonstrating increased rates of tumor detection and prolonged recurrence-free survival when utilized for transurethral resection. Other technologies seeking to enhance cystoscopy, such as narrow band imaging, confocal laser endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography are still under evaluation. Conclusions: A variety of urine biomarker and adjunctive endoscopic technologies have been developed to assist the management of NMIBC. While some, such as fluorescence cystoscopy, have demonstrated a definite benefit in this disease, others are still finding their place in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Future studies should shed light on how these can be incorporated to improve outcomes in NMIBC. PMID:26604438

  19. Targeting glycogen metabolism in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Carolyn Ritterson; Guin, Sunny; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism has been a heavily investigated topic in cancer research for the past decade. Although the role of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer has been extensively studied, abnormalities in other metabolic pathways are only just being understood in cancer. One such pathway is glycogen metabolism; its involvement in cancer development, particularly in urothelial malignancies, and possible ways of exploiting aberrations in this process for treatment are currently being studied. New research shows that the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a novel tumour suppressor in bladder cancer. Loss of AGL leads to rapid proliferation of bladder cancer cells. Another enzyme involved in glycogen debranching, glycogen phosphorylase, has been shown to be a tumour promoter in cancer, including in prostate cancer. Studies demonstrate that bladder cancer cells in which AGL expression is lost are more metabolically active than cells with intact AGL expression, and these cells are more sensitive to inhibition of both glycolysis and glycine synthesis—two targetable pathways. As a tumour promoter and enzyme, glycogen phosphorylase can be directly targeted, and preclinical inhibitor studies are promising. However, few of these glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors have been tested for cancer treatment in the clinical setting. Several possible limitations to the targeting of AGL and glycogen phosphorylase might also exist. PMID:26032551

  20. Hypercompliant Apical Membranes of Bladder Umbrella Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, John C.; Zhou, Enhua H.; Yu, Weiqun; Kim, Jae Hun; Zhou, Ge; Liao, Yi; Sun, Tung-Tien; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Zeidel, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary bladder undergoes dramatic volume changes during filling and voiding cycles. In the bladder the luminal surface of terminally differentiated urothelial umbrella cells is almost completely covered by plaques. These plaques (500 to 1000 nm) are made of a family of proteins called uroplakins that are known to form a tight barrier to prevent leakage of water and solutes. Electron micrographs from previous studies show these plaques to be interconnected by hinge regions to form structures that appear rigid, but these same structures must accommodate large changes in cell shape during voiding and filling cycles. To resolve this paradox, we measured the stiffness of the intact, living urothelial apical membrane and found it to be highly deformable, even more so than the red blood cell membrane. The intermediate cells underlying the umbrella cells do not have uroplakins but their membranes are an order of magnitude stiffer. Using uroplakin knockout mouse models we show that cell compliance is conferred by uroplakins. This hypercompliance may be essential for the maintenance of barrier function under dramatic cell deformation during filling and voiding of the bladder. PMID:25229135