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Sample records for bladder neck descent

  1. Bladder neck contracture

    PubMed Central

    Simhan, Jay; Ramirez, Daniel; Morey, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-described complication of the surgical treatment of benign and malignant prostate conditions. Nevertheless, etiologies of BNC development are highly dependent on the primary treatment modality undertaken with BNC also occurring after pelvic radiation. The treatment options for BNC can range from simple, office-based dilation procedures to more invasive, complex abdomino-perineal reconstructive surgery. Although numerous strategies have been described, a patient-specific approach is usually necessary in the management of these complex patients. In this review, we highlight various therapeutic maneuvers described for the management of BNC and further delineate a tailored approach utilized at our institution in these complicated patients. PMID:26816768

  2. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ?4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter?? procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  3. Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012 You will need Adobe Flash

  4. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12%) to after childbirth (21 and 28%) in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women. PMID:20696633

  5. A comparison of bladder neck preservation and bladder neck reconstruction for urinary incontinence after radical retro pubic prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanahi, Mohammad Hossein; Honarmand, Ramin; Khorrami, Mohammad Hataf; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Alizadeh, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and will include about 30% of all malignancies in men. Since the initial report of the anatomic radical prostatectomy, refinements in the surgical technique have been made. Several studies show that bladder neck preservation (BNP) during radical prostatectomy makes improve early return of urinary continence, erectile function or both. However, some clinical trials have suggested little difference between the return of continence while using modifications. In this study, we compared outcomes of BNP and bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) during radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 60 patients at a referral university hospital from March 2010 to March 2012. Study population was all patients candidate for RRP (RRP in this period. All patients divided into two groups, A and B (30 patients in each group). Group A (n = 30) who preserved bladder neck (BNP) and Group B (n = 30) who had BNR. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) before and at 2, 6, 9, 12 and18 months after surgery, anastomotic stricture symptoms, positive bladder neck margin, Gleason score and urine incontinence were compared between two groups. Also, we compared bladder neck contracture, urinary continence and positive surgical margin rates after BNP and BNR while retropubic prostatectomy in 24 months period follow-up. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.81 ± 7.15 years (range, 50-74 years). After a follow-up period of 24 months, the PSA rising was not different between the two groups. After 2 months, 19 (63.33%) of patients in A group and the same number in B group were continent (P = 0.78). Stricture of the bladder neck at the anastomosis site requiring transurethral dilation occurred in 7 (23.33%) and 3 (10.0%) patients in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Although there was no difference in prevalence and duration of return of urinary continence after the operation between two groups, but results of our study showed that stenosis of the bladder neck was lower in BNP. Hence in the group of BNP, need for further operation and overflow incontinency due to the obstruction of urinary tract will be less likely than BNR and patients have better long time (24 months) urinary continence. PMID:25709654

  6. Closure of the bladder neck in patients undergoing continent vesicostomy for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Reid, R; Schneider, K; Fruchtman, B

    1978-07-01

    The continent vesicostomy has been done on 24 patients, 10 of whom had severe urinary incontinence requiring closure of the bladder neck or urethra as well. Therefore, the bladder was converted to a closed cavity and intermittent catheterization is done through an abdominal stoma. No dressings or appliances are necessary. Bladder neck (or urethral) closure was successful in 8 of the 10 patients. One of the failures had been incontinent and was rendered continent on attempted bladder neck closure and there is urethral leakage at night in the other patient. Intermittent catheterization through a vesicostomy stoma has been cleaner and more aesthetically pleasing to the patients. The bladder neck closure has resulted in a dry perineum with fewer skin problems. PMID:671603

  7. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is one of the inhibitory mediators in the urinary bladder outlet region. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced relaxations of the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach Urothelium-denuded strips of pig bladder were mounted in organ baths for isometric force recordings of responses to 5-HT and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Key results After phenylephrine-induced contraction, 5-HT and 5-HT receptor agonists concentration-dependently relaxed the preparations, with the potency order: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) > 5-HT = RS67333 > (±)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralinhydrobromide > m-chlorophenylbiguanide > ?-methyl-5-HT > ergotamine. 5-HT and 5-CT relaxations were reduced by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride and potentiated by (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide dihydrochloride (WAY 100135) and cyanopindolol, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonists respectively. Inhibitors of 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A and 5-HT6 receptors failed to modify 5-HT responses. Blockade of monoamine oxidase A/B, noradrenergic neurotransmission, ?-adrenoceptors, muscarinic and purinergic receptors, nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and prostanoid synthesis did not alter relaxations to 5-HT. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ and ATP-dependent K+ channels failed to modify 5-HT responses but blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na+-, Ca2+-and voltage-gated K+ (Kv)-channels potentiated these relaxations. Adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibition potentiated and reduced, respectively, 5-HT-induced responses. Under non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic conditions, EFS induced neurogenic, frequency-dependent, relaxations which were resistant to WAY 100135 and cyanopindolol. Conclusions and implications 5-HT relaxed the pig urinary bladder neck through muscle 5-HT7 receptors linked to the cAMP-PKA pathway. Prejunctional 5-HT1A receptors and Kv channels modulated 5-HT-induced relaxations whereas postjunctional K+ channels were not involved in such responses. 5-HT7 receptor antagonists could be useful in the therapy of urinary incontinence produced by intrinsic sphincter deficiency. PMID:19309355

  8. Bladder neck closure and suprapubic catheter placement as definitive management of neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Colli, Janet; Lloyd, L. Keith

    2011-01-01

    Objective Surgical management for neurogenic bladder may require abandonment of the native urethra due to intractable urinary incontinence, irreparable urethral erosion, severe scarring from previous transurethral procedures, or urethrocutaneous fistula. In these patients, bladder neck closure (BNC) excludes the native urethra and provides continence while preserving the antireflux mechanism of the native ureters. This procedure is commonly combined with ileovesicostomy or continent catheterizable stoma, with or without augmentation enterocystoplasty. Alternatively, BNC can be paired with suprapubic catheter diversion. This strategy does not require a bowel segment, resulting in shorter operative times and less opportunity for bowel-related morbidity. The study purpose is to examine preoperative characteristics, indications, complications, and long-term maintenance of renal function of BNC patients. Methods A retrospective review of medical records of 35 patients who underwent BNC with suprapubic catheter placement from 1998 to 2007 by a single surgeon (LKL) was completed. Results Neurogenic bladder was attributable to spinal cord injury in 71%, 23% had multiple sclerosis, and 9% had cerebrovascular accident. Indications for BNC included severe urethral erosion in 80%, decubitus ulcer exacerbated by urinary incontinence in 34%, urethrocutaneous fistula in 11%, and other indications in 9%. The overall complication rate was 17%. All but two patients were continent at follow-up. Forty-nine per cent of patients had imaging available for review, none of which showed deterioration of the upper tracts. Conclusions Our results suggest that BNC in conjunction with suprapubic catheter diversion provides an excellent chance at urethral continence with a reasonable complication rate. PMID:21756565

  9. Bladder neck rupture following perineal bull horn injury: a surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Fernandez, B; Diaz-Alferez, F J; Garcia-Garcia, M A; Herrero-Polo, M; Velasquez-Saldarriaga, J F; Lorenzo-Gomez, M F

    2012-01-01

    Pelvic-abdominal injuries caused by goring are serious lesions which require rapid diagnosis and urgent treatment in the context of a polytraumatized patient. The simultaneous rupture of both the bladder and the prostatic-membranous urethra occurs in 10%-29% of males with pelvic fractures but bladder neck injuries in adults are rarer. Unstable pelvic fractures, bilateral fractures of the ischiopubic branches (also referred to as fractures from falling astride) and the diastasis of the pubic symphysis are those that have the greatest likelihood of injuring both the posterior urethra and the bladder. We present a case of perineal bull horn injury with muscle laceration, bone fractures, scrotal avulsion and rupture of the bladder neck involving the right ureter which required two operations to be repaired. PMID:23066348

  10. Emergency primary repair of grade V bladder neck injury complicating pelvic fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a grade V bladder injury complicating an open-book pelvic fracture following a road traffic accident. The bladder neck injury was primarily repaired in the emergency setting of a poor-resourced area with successful outcome. The dangers of urinary extravasation are still to be considered of importance and we advocate and encourage immediate/emergency open intervention although it remains controversial to say the least in a lesser resourced healthcare set up. PMID:25076980

  11. Management of Urinary Incontinence in Complete Bladder Duplication by Injection of Bulking Agent at Bladder Neck Level into the Proximal Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Khorramirouz, Reza; Ladi Seyedian, Seyedeh Sanam; Keihani, Sorena; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Bladder duplication is a rare entity in children. The term encompasses a wide spectrum of anomalies from isolated bladder duplication in coronal or sagittal planes to duplicated bladder exstrophy and associated musculoskeletal and visceral anomalies. Given this wide variability, the treatment of these patients is not standardized. We hereby present a female patient with chief complaint of long-standing urinary incontinence who had complete bladder and urethral duplication and pubic diastasis. The patient was treated with bulking agent injection at the incompetent bladder neck and proximal urethra with resolution of incontinence, obviating the need for extensive surgeries.

  12. Biomechanical study on the bladder neck and urethral positions: simulation of impairment of the pelvic ligaments.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sofia; Parente, Marco; Mascarenhas, Teresa; da Silva, Ana Rita Gomes; Ramos, Isabel; Jorge, Renato Natal

    2015-01-21

    Excessive mobility of the bladder neck and urethra are common features in stress urinary incontinence. We aimed at assessing, through computational modelling, the bladder neck position taking into account progressive impairment of the pelvic ligaments. Magnetic resonance images of a young healthy female were used to build a computational model of the pelvic cavity. Appropriate material properties and constitutive models were defined. The impairment of the ligaments was simulated by mimicking a reduction in their stiffness. For healthy ligaments, valsalva maneuver led to an increase in the ? angle (between the bladder neck-symphysis pubis and the main of the symphysis) from 91.8° (at rest) to 105.7°, and 5.7 mm of bladder neck dislocation, which was similar to dynamic imaging of the same woman (? angle from 80° to 103.3°, and 5mm of bladder neck movement). For 95% impairment, they enlarged to 124.28° and 12 mm. Impairment to the pubourethral ligaments had higher effect than that of vaginal support (115° vs. 108°, and 9.1 vs. 7.3mm). Numerical simulation could predict urethral motion during valsalva maneuver, for both healthy and impaired ligaments. Results were similar to those of continent women and women with stress urinary incontinence published in the literature. Biomechanical analysis of the pubourethral ligaments complements the biomechanical study of the pelvic cavity in urinary incontinence. It may be useful in young women presenting stress urinary incontinence without imaging evidence of urethral and muscle lesions or organ descend during valsalva, and for whom fascial damage are not expected. PMID:25527889

  13. Bladder neck contracture–incidence and management following contemporary robot assisted radical prostatectomy technique

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Jaspreet Singh; Ha, Yun-Sok; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-recognized complication following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for treatment of localized prostate cancer with a reported incidence of up to 1.4%. In this series, we report our institutional experience and management results. Methods: A prospectively collected database of patients who underwent RARP by a single surgeon from 2006 to 2012 was reviewed. Watertight bladder neck to urethral anastomosis was performed over 18-French foley catheter. BNC was diagnosed by flexible cystoscopy in patients who developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction. Subsequently, these patients underwent cold knife bladder neck incisions. Patients then followed a strict self regimen of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). We identify the patient demographics, incidence of BNC, associated risk factors and success of subsequent management. Results: Total of 930 patients who underwent RARP for localized prostate cancer was identified. BNC was identified in 15 patients, 1.6% incidence. Mean patient age and preoperative prostate-specific antigen was 58.8 years old and 7.83 ng/mL (range, 2.5–14.55 ng/mL) respectively. Mean estimated blood loss was 361±193 mL (range, 50–650 mL). Follow-up was mean of 23.4 months. Average time to BNC diagnosis was 5.5 months. In three patients, a foreign body was identified at bladder neck. On multivariate analysis, estimated blood loss was significantly associated with development of BNC. All patients underwent cystoscopy and bladder neck incision with a 3-month CIC regimen. Out of 15 index patients, none had a BNC recurrence over the follow-up period. Conclusions: BNC was identified in 1.6% of patients in our series following RARP. Intraoperative blood loss was a significant risk factor for BNC. In 20% of BNC patients a migrated foreign body was noted at vesicourethral anastomosis. Primary management of patients with BNC following RARP should be bladder neck incision and self CIC regimen. PMID:24693529

  14. Using transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection to treat urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Juanjie; Dai, Shengguo; Huang, Xuyuan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Huiguo; Shi, Hongmin

    2005-07-01

    Objective: Ho:YAG laser had been used to treat the common diseases of urinary system such as bladder cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia in our hospital. This study is to assess the efficacy and safety of transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection to treat the urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture. Methods: From May 1997 to August 2004, 26 cases of urethral stricture and 33 cases of bladder neck contracture were treated by transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection. These patients were followed up at regular intervals after operation. The uroflow rate of these patients was detected before and one-month after operation. The blood loss and the energy consumption of holmium-laser during the operation as well as the complications and curative effect after operation were observed. Results: The therapeutic effects were considered successful, with less bleeding and no severe complications. The Qmax of one month postoperation increased obviously than that of preoperation. Of the 59 cases, restenosis appeared in 11 cases (19%) with the symptoms of dysuria and weak urinary stream in 3-24 months respectively. Conclusions: The Ho:YAG-laser demonstrated good effect to treat the obstructive diseases of lower urinary tract such as urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture. It was safe, minimal invasive and easy to operate.

  15. [Female urethral obstruction and bladder neck stenosis - fact or myth - how to proceed].

    PubMed

    Gunnemann, A; Liedl, B; Palma, P C R; Yoshimura, Y; Muctar, S

    2015-09-01

    The female urethra is probably the most neglected organ in women. Female urethral stricture and primary bladder neck obstruction are rare clinical entities. Traditional and new surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of female urethral stricture. However, they are based on limited data. There is no consensus on best management. The techniques of urethroplasty all have a higher mean success rate (80-94%) than urethral dilatation (bladder neck obstruction (PBNO) is a condition in which the bladder neck fails to open adequately during voiding. This leads to increased striated sphincter activity or obstruction of urinary flow without another anatomic cause being present, for example an obstruction caused by genitourinary prolapse in women. Watchful waiting, pharmacotherapy and surgical intervention are possible treatments. PMID:26378388

  16. Acute Raoultella planticola cystitis in a child with rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder neck.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyung; Ahn, Yo Han; Chun, Jong In; Park, Hyeon Jin; Park, Byung-Kiu

    2015-10-01

    Raoultella planticola is a Gram-negative, non-motile, aerobic bacillus. It is an environmental bacteria found in soil and water, and a very rare cause of local or systemic infection in humans. Although some adult cases of R. planticola infection have been reported, childhood local or systemic infection caused by R. planticola is very rare. Reported herein is a rare case of acute cystitis due to R. planticola in a 16-month-old boy with rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder neck, and a review of the literature. PMID:26508180

  17. An appraisal of a technical modification for prevention of bladder neck stenosis in retropubic prostatectomy: An initial report

    PubMed Central

    Ajape, Abdulwahab Akanbi; Kuranga, Sulyman Alege; Babata, AbdulLateef; Kura, Mustapha Mohammed; Bello, Jibril O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report the experience with our technical modification of the trigone-bladder neck complex management in the prevention of bladder neck stenosis (BNS) following open simple retropubic prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective review of data of patients that underwent open simple retropubic prostatectomy with technical modification of the trigone-bladder neck complex in two Nigerian tertiary hospitals, by a single surgeon, from January 2007 to December 2011. The data analysed included the demographic variables, the modes of presentation, need for blood transfusion, duration of catheterization and the duration of hospital stay. The primary end-point was the development or otherwise of BNS. Results: Eighty-seven patients’ data were available for analysis from a total of 91 patients. The mean age (±standard deviation [SD]) was 65.14 years (±10.55). Preoperative urinary retention was present in 58% of the patients. The maximal flow rate (Qmax) was 12.05 ml/s among the 20 patients that had preoperative uroflowmetry. The transfusion rate was 35%, but almost two-third of them had only one unit of blood transfused. The mean weight (±SD) of the enucleated adenoma was 82.64 g (±36.63). Bladder irrigation was required in 14% of the patients, majority of the patients had urethral catheter removed after 96 h and the mean hospital stay was 6.52 days. No patient developed BNS after a mean follow-up duration of 16.39 months. Conclusion: Bladder neck stenosis can be a distressing complication of prostatectomy. The result of our technical modification of managing the trigone-bladder-neck complex looks promising for prevention or delaying the onset of BNS. A long-term observation and a prospective randomised control trial to ascertain this initial experience is needed. PMID:26834392

  18. Bladder neck suspension using bone anchors for the treatment of female stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Nativ, O; Moskovitz, B; Issaq, E; Condrea, A; Kastin, A; Halachmi, S; Burbara, J; Madjar, S; Beyar, M

    1997-01-01

    A new technique and related devices for the treatment of urinary incontinence in women was developed and tested. The technique involves soft tissue to bone fixation by means of miniature bone anchors and a bone anchor inserter. The novel bone anchors are made of a shape-memory nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) attached to Polypropylene or Gortex suture. A spring-loaded bone anchor inserter drives the anchors through the vaginal wall to a predetermined depth into the pubic bone medulla regardless of the bone's hardness, with no incision or drilling required. The device allows for the performance of a minimally invasive transvaginal bladder neck suspension. The procedure has minimal morbidity and a short learning curve. This technique was evaluated clinically in 15 women with incontinence, with a mean follow-up of 6 months. Good urinary continence was achieved in all patients, with no mechanical failures. PMID:9152492

  19. The Musculature of the Bladder-neck of the Male in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Macalpine, J. B.

    1934-01-01

    Two muscles, one voluntary the other involuntary, and an inch or more apart, exist at the bladder-neck, both functioning as sphincters. This dual musculature is explained by the emergence of the ejaculatory ducts between them. If both these muscles are open when semen is discharged, secretion may escape into the bladder or to the exterior; also any urine in the bladder would flow out. The internal sphincter is usually tightly contracted during ejaculation. Instances are given in which the internal sphincter is paralysed or injured, e.g. after operation, in prostatic hypertrophy, and in certain nervous diseases. Two instances are reported of direct injury to this localized area, with the result, in all cases, that ejaculation failed. In prostatic hypertrophy the internal sphincter is dilated by the growing adenoma, and at operation it is further stretched and perhaps cut across. Continence then depends on the external sphincter. Two cases are reported in which the external sphincter had previously been paralysed, total incontinence resulting. Recent work on the trigonal muscle; its function in opening the internal sphincter. Influence of this muscle on prostatic enlargement. In central nervous disease the dilatation of the internal sphincter resulting in funnel-neck is very common. Series of cases of nervous disease examined in order to determine the frequency of this sign are reported. Other cases occurring apart from nervous disease are also reported. The part played by the sphincters in ejaculation is discussed and illustrated by reports of further cases of paralysis of the sphincter. It is shown that in the normal way the external sphincter weakens during coitus, and especially during ejaculation, but when the internal sphincter is paralysed no weakening is evident. Penile erection is associated with spasm of the internal sphincter, and spasm of the internal sphincter is produced by irritation, e.g. vesical stone may produce priapism. The varying types of adenoma bear different relationship to the internal sphincter. The view that submucosal glands give rise to prostatic enlargement is supported. The influence of prostatic enlargement on the internal sphincter is discussed. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:19990023

  20. Incidence of bladder neck contracture after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Benjamin N.; Davis, Cole B.; Cowan, Janet E.; Kane, Christopher J.; Carroll, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the incidence and risk factors for bladder neck contracture (BNC) in men treated with robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and open radical prostatectomy (ORP), as BNC is a well-described complication of ORP and may be partially attributable to technique. PATIENTS AND METHODS The University of California San Francisco Urologic Oncology Database was queried for patients undergoing RALP or ORP from 2002 to 2008. Patient demographics, prostate cancer-specific information, surgical data, and follow-up were collected. For each surgical approach, multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to evaluate associations of demographics and clinical characteristics with BNC. Time to BNC after RP was evaluated using life table and Kaplan–Meier methods. RESULTS From 2002 to 2008, 988 patients underwent RP as primary treatment and had at least 12 months of follow-up. Of these men, 695 underwent ORP and 293 underwent RALP. The mean (SD) age was 59.3 (6.80) years and 91% of men were Caucasian. D’Amico risk groups at diagnosis were low (38%), intermediate (38%), and high (24%). The BNC incidence was 2.2% (22 cases) overall, 1.4% (four) for RALP, and 2.6% (18) for ORP (P = 0.12). Patients with BNC were diagnosed a median (range) of 4.7 (1–15) months after surgery. At 18 months after surgery, the BNC-free rate was 97% for ORP and 99% for RALP (log-rank P = 0.13). The most common presenting complaint was slow stream, followed by urinary retention. In Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, earlier year of surgery, older age at diagnosis and higher PSA level at diagnosis were significantly associated with BNC among ORP patients. In the RALP group, none of the covariates were associated with BNC. CONCLUSIONS The overall incidence of BNC was low in both RALP and ORP groups. Technical factors such as enhanced magnification and a running bladder anastomosis may explain the lower BNC incidence in the RALP group. PMID:20438567

  1. Management of the devastated posterior urethra and bladder neck: refractory incontinence and stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kirk M.; Higuchi, Ty T.

    2015-01-01

    Stricture of the proximal urethra following treatment for prostate cancer occurs in an estimated 1-8% of patients. Following prostatectomy, urethral reconstruction is feasible in many patients. However, in those patients with prior radiation therapy (RT), failed reconstruction, refractory incontinence or multiple comorbidities, reconstruction may not be feasible. The purpose of this article is to review the evaluation and management options for patients who are not candidates for reconstruction of the posterior urethra and require urinary diversion. Patient evaluation should result in the decision whether reconstruction is feasible. In our experience, risk factors for failed reconstruction include prior radiation and multiple failed endoscopic treatments. Pre-operative cystoscopy is an essential part of the evaluations to identify tissue necrosis, dystrophic calcification, or tumor in the urethra, prostate and/or bladder. If urethral reconstruction is not feasible it is imperative to discuss options for urine diversion with the patient. Treatment options include simple catheter diversion, urethral ligation, and both bladder preserving and non-preserving diversion. Surgical management should address both the bladder and the bladder outlet. This can be accomplished from a perineal, abdominal or abdomino-perineal approach. The devastated bladder outlet is a challenging problem to treat. Typically, patients undergo multiple procedures in an attempt to restore urethral continuity and continence. For the small subset who fails reconstruction, urinary diversion provides a definitive, “end-stage” treatment resulting in improved quality of life. PMID:26816811

  2. Aggressive Angiomyxoma of the Bladder Neck Requiring Local Excision and Mitrofanoff Formation

    PubMed Central

    Davari, M.; Lamb, B. W.; Chowdhury, S.; Jameson, C.; Kelly, J. D.; Greenwell, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare mesenchymal tumour predominantly affecting the female pelvis and perineum but has also been described in males. This tumour can often present a diagnostic challenge and has a propensity for local recurrence after surgical excision. We present an unusual case of aggressive angiomyxoma arising from the bladder of a female patient which required local excision and Mitrofanoff formation. PMID:26605101

  3. Role of neuronal voltage-gated K+ channels in the modulation of the nitrergic neurotransmission of the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M; Barahona, M V; Recio, P; Navarro-Dorado, J; Bustamante, S; Benedito, S; García-Sacristán, A; Prieto, D; Orensanz, L M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: As nitric oxide (NO) plays an essential role in the inhibitory neurotransmission of the bladder neck of several species, the current study investigates the mechanisms underlying the NO-induced relaxations in the pig urinary bladder neck. Experimental approach: Urothelium-denuded bladder neck strips were dissected and mounted in isolated organ baths containing a physiological saline solution at 37?°C and continuously gassed with 5% CO2 and 95% O2, for isometric force recording. The relaxations to transmural nerve stimulation (EFS), or to exogenously applied acidified NaNO2 solution were carried out on strips pre-contracted with phenylephrine, and treated with guanethidine and atropine, to block noradrenergic neurotransmission and muscarinic receptors, respectively. Key results: EFS (0.2–1?Hz) and addition of acidified NaNO2 solution (1??M–1?mM) evoked frequency- and concentration-dependent relaxations, respectively. These responses were potently reduced by the blockade of guanylate cyclase and were not modified by the K+ channel blockers iberiotoxin, charybdotoxin, apamin or glibenclamide. The voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels inhibitor 4-aminopyridine, greatly enhanced the nitrergic relaxations evoked by EFS, but did not affect the NaNO2 solution-induced relaxations. Conclusions and implications: NO, whose release is modulated by pre-junctional Kv channels, relaxes the pig urinary bladder neck through a mechanism dependent on the activation of guanylate cyclase, in which post-junctional K+ channels do not seem to be involved. Modulation of Kv channels could be useful in the therapy of the urinary incontinence produced by intrinsic sphincteric deficiency. PMID:18223671

  4. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  5. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  6. Ascent/Descent Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Charles; Andrew, Robert; Roe, Scott; Frye, Ronald; Harvey, Michael; Vu, Tuan; Balachandran, Krishnaiyer; Bly, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Software Suite has been used to support a variety of NASA Shuttle Program mission planning and analysis activities, such as range safety, on the Integrated Planning System (IPS) platform. The Ascent/Descent Software Suite, containing Ascent Flight Design (ASC)/Descent Flight Design (DESC) Configuration items (Cis), lifecycle documents, and data files used for shuttle ascent and entry modeling analysis and mission design, resides on IPS/Linux workstations. A list of tools in Navigation (NAV)/Prop Software Suite represents tool versions established during or after the IPS Equipment Rehost-3 project.

  7. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePLUS

    Neurogenic bladder is a problem in which a person lacks bladder control due to a brain, spinal cord, ... Disorders of the central nervous system commonly cause neurogenic bladder. These can include: Alzheimer disease Birth defects of ...

  8. Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    The bladder is a hollow organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It is the sixth most common type of cancer in the United States. Symptoms ...

  9. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer usually starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  10. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  11. Factors controlling testis descent.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo L

    2008-12-01

    Descent of the testis from an intra-abdominal site in foetal life to an extracorporeal location after birth is a mandatory developmental process to ensure that the mature testis promotes normal spermatogenesis. The two phases of transabdominal and inguinoscrotal descent occur approximately during the first and last thirds of gestation respectively. Key anatomical events to release the testis from its urogenital ridge location and to guide the free gonad into the scrotum are the degeneration of the cranio-suspensory ligament and a thickening of the gubernaculum. Androgens play a role in both these processes, particularly with respect to enabling the testis to traverse the inguinal canal in the final phase of descent. Experiments in animals suggest that androgens mediate this effect via the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide by the genitofemoral nerve, but direct evidence for such a mechanism is lacking in humans. The transabdominal phase of descent is under the control of insulin-like 3 (INSL3), a product of the Leydig cells. Definitive evidence of its role in rodent testis descent is illustrated by the phenotype of bilateral cryptorchidism in Insl3-/- null mice. Circulating levels of INSL3 are higher in boys at puberty, are undetectable in girls and are lower in boys with undescended testes. A minority also have a mutation either in the INSL3 gene or affecting its receptor gene, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (LGRF8). Other factors that may play a role in testis descent include the anti-Mullerian hormone and members of the HOX gene family. Evidence that the prevalence of undescended testis may be increasing provides a phenotypic readout for the effects of postulated chemicals in the environment interfering in some way with the action of factors that control testis descent. Epidemiological studies point to profound geographical variations in prevalence in countries such as Denmark and Finland. Associations have been found with levels of chemicals labelled as endocrine disruptors being higher in breast milk samples from mothers with cryptorchid boys when compared with controls. The adverse effects of these compounds (e.g. bisphenol A) can be replicated in the offspring of dams exposed during pregnancy. A sensitive marker of an anti-androgen effect of a compound is a reduction in the anogenital distance, an anthropometric measurement that is significantly greater in males compared with females. The observation of an association between the anogenital distance in infant boys and the level of pesticides in the urine of their mothers in late gestation indicates that this has the potential to be a useful surrogate marker of the effects of environmental chemicals on testis descent in human population studies. The rightful place for the testis at birth is in the scrotum in order to provide the temperature differential essential for normal spermatogenesis. Appropriate screening programmes and early surgical intervention are the prerequisites to ensure optimal fertility in adulthood and a considerably lessened risk of testis cancer. PMID:18647820

  12. Regulation of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Hutson, John M; Li, Ruili; Southwell, Bridget R; Newgreen, Don; Cousinery, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Testicular descent occurs in two morphologically distinct phases, each under different hormonal control from the testis itself. The first phase occurs between 8 and 15 weeks when insulin-like hormone 3 (Insl3) from the Leydig cells stimulates the gubernaculum to swell, thereby anchoring the testis near the future inguinal canal as the foetus grows. Testosterone causes regression of the cranial suspensory ligament to augment the transabdominal phase. The second, or inguinoscrotal phase, occurs between 25 and 35 weeks, when the gubernaculum bulges out of the external ring and migrates to the scrotum, all under control of testosterone. However, androgen acts mostly indirectly via the genitofemoral nerve (GFN), which produces calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to control the direction of migration. In animal models the androgen receptors are in the inguinoscrotal fat pad, which probably produces a neurotrophin to masculinise the GFN sensory fibres that regulate gubernacular migration. There is little direct evidence that this same process occurs in humans, but CGRP can regulate closure of the processus vaginalis in inguinal hernia, confirming that the GFN probably mediates human testicular descent by a similar mechanism as seen in rodent models. Despite increased understanding about normal testicular descent, the common causes of cryptorchidism remain elusive. PMID:25690562

  13. Complementary curves of descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.; Lipscombe, Trevor C.

    2013-01-01

    The shapes of two wires in a vertical plane with the same starting and ending points are described as complementary curves of descent if beads frictionlessly slide down both of them in the same time, starting from rest. Every analytic curve has a unique complement, except for a cycloid (solution of the brachistochrone problem), which is self complementary. A striking example is a straight wire whose complement is a lemniscate of Bernoulli. Alternatively, the wires can be tracks down which round objects undergo a rolling race. The level of presentation is appropriate for an intermediate undergraduate course in classical mechanics.

  14. Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer? Female urinary tract Medical Illustration Copyright © 2015 Nucleus Medical Media, All rights reserved Cancer is the ... Bladder Male urinary tract Medical Illustration Copyright © 2015 Nucleus Medical Media, All rights reserved The bladder is ...

  15. Bladder stones

    MedlinePLUS

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SM. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 89. Sharma R, Dill CE, Gelman DY. Urinary ...

  16. Terminal Descent Sensor Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis W.

    2009-01-01

    Sulcata software simulates the operation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) radar terminal descent sensor (TDS). The program models TDS radar antennas, RF hardware, and digital processing, as well as the physics of scattering from a coherent ground surface. This application is specific to this sensor and is flexible enough to handle end-to-end design validation. Sulcata is a high-fidelity simulation and is used for performance evaluation, anomaly resolution, and design validation. Within the trajectory frame, almost all internal vectors are represented in whatever coordinate system is used to represent platform position. The trajectory frame must be planet-fixed. The platform body frame is specified relative to arbitrary reference points relative to the platform (spacecraft or test vehicle). Its rotation is a function of time from the trajectory coordinate system specified via dynamics input (file for open loop, callback for closed loop). Orientation of the frame relative to the body is arbitrary, but constant over time. The TDS frame must have a constant rotation and translation from the platform body frame specified at run time. The DEM frame has an arbitrary, but time-constant, rotation and translation with respect to the simulation frame specified at run time. It has the same orientation as sigma0 frame, but is possibly translated. Surface sigma0 has the same arbitrary rotation and translation as DEM frame.

  17. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  18. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation

    This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  19. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  20. Simulation Test Of Descent Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes piloted-simulation test of Descent Advisor (DA), subsystem of larger automation system being developed to assist human air-traffic controllers and pilots. Focuses on results of piloted simulation, in which airline crews executed controller-issued descent advisories along standard curved-path arrival routes. Crews able to achieve arrival-time precision of plus or minus 20 seconds at metering fix. Analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in further enhancements of algorithm to increase accuracies of its predicted trajectories. Evaluations by pilots indicate general support for DA concept and provide specific recommendations for improvement.

  1. Complete transurethral bladder eversion 3 months after hemipelvectomy.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Gregory; Mandalapu, Subbarao; Gilleran, Jason

    2010-02-01

    A 46-year-old white female underwent a left hemipelvectomy for chondrosarcoma. She presented with total incontinence and a bulging vaginal mass. Exam confirmed complete transurethral bladder eversion that was addressed with transvaginal multilayer bladder neck closure and suprapubic tube placement. Eventually she underwent abdominal hysterectomy, mesh sacral colpopexy, and catheterizable stoma creation. Patient is continent of urine 3 months postoperatively. We present the first reported case of bladder eversion after hemipelvectomy and propose possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:19629370

  2. Bladder Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Washington SCI Pamphlets: Staying Healthy after a Spinal Cord Injury The pamphlet series: • Pain and SCI • Depression and ... messages until you are ready to void. After Spinal Cord Injury The bladder, along with the rest of the ...

  3. Urinary Bladder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ureters Urinary Bladder Urethra Review Quiz Reproductive System Male Reproductive System Testes Duct System Accessory Glands Penis Male Sexual Response & Hormone Control Female Reproductive System Ovaries Genital Tract External Genitalia Female Sexual Response & ...

  4. EXOMARS Descent Module GNC Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portigliotti, S.; Capuano, M.; Montagna, M.; Martella, P.; Venditto, P.

    2007-08-01

    The ExoMars mission is the first ESA led robotic mission of the Aurora Programme and combines technology development with investigations of major scientific interest. Italy is by far the major contributor to the mission through the strong support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). ExoMars will search for traces of past and present life, characterize the Mars geochemistry and water distribution, improve the knowledge of the Mars environment and geophysics, and identify possible surface hazards to future human exploration missions. ExoMars will also validate the technology for safe Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) of a large size Descent Module (DM) carrying a Rover with medium range surface mobility and the access to subsurface. The ExoMars project is presently undergoing its Phase B1 with Thales Alenia Space-Italia as Industrial Prime Contractor. Additionally, as Descent Module responsible, a dedicated simulation tool is under development in Thales Alenia Space-Italia, Turin site, for the end-to-end design and validation / verification of the DM Entry Descent and Landing.

  5. Bladder exstrophy repair

    MedlinePLUS

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... in boys and is often linked to other birth defects. Surgery is necessary to: Allow the child to ...

  6. Overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Karen M.; Drake, Marcus J.

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is highly prevalent, and increasingly so with aging. It is characterized by the presence of urinary urgency, and can be associated with incontinence, increased voiding frequency, and nocturia. Assessment needs to exclude serious medical disorders that might present with similar symptoms, and a bladder diary is an invaluable part of understanding the presentation. Initial management is conservative, comprising education, bladder training, and advice on fluid intake. Drug therapy options include antimuscarinic medications and beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonists. Persistent overactive bladder syndrome, despite initial therapy, requires a review of the patient’s understanding of conservative management and compliance, and adjustment of medications. For refractory cases, specialist review and urodynamic testing should be considered; this may identify detrusor overactivity or increased filling sensation, and needs to exclude additional factors, such as stress incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Botulinum neurotoxin-A bladder injections can be used in severe overactivity, provided the patient is able and willing to do intermittent self-catheterisation, which is necessary in about 5% of treated patients. Sacral nerve stimulation and tibial nerve stimulation are other approaches. Major reconstructive surgery, such as augmentation cystoplasty, is rarely undertaken in modern practice but remains a possibility in extreme cases. PMID:26918151

  7. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeremy B; Mayer, Erik N; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  8. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  9. Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    White, Nicola; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a condition affecting millions of individuals in the United States. Anticholinergics are the mainstay of treatment. Bladder botulinum toxin injections have shown an improvement in symptoms of OAB equivalent to anticholinergic therapy. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation can decrease symptoms of urinary frequency and urge incontinence. Sacral neuromodulation for refractory patients has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of OAB, urge incontinence, and urinary retention. Few randomized, head-to-head comparisons of the different available alternatives exist; however, patients now have increasing options to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life. PMID:26880508

  10. Intramuscular nerve distribution in bladder and the relationship between intramuscular ganglia and bladder function in man and dog

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zeju; Xu, Qian; Lu, Li; Luo, Xu; Fu, Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    In clinical, the relationship between bladder intramuscular nerve and function is also elusive. This study aims to compare the bladder intramuscular nerve distribution and its characteristics and significance in human and dog. Eleven dogs’ bladders were stained by Sihler’s and HE techniques. Fifteen human bladders were adopted by Sihler’s staining, using 10% formaldehyde to fix 12 weeks, 7 by HE dyeing fixes 24 hours. Results indicated that man’s bladder was triangularpyramid-shaped. While dog’s bladder was spherical-shaped and its muscle fibers arrange were irregularly shaped. Longitudinal muscle of the outer layer is fleshy, the terminal is at the bladder neck without exception, and vesical trigone has relatively obvious three layers of structure. After dyeing dog’s bladder was transparent jelly, the nerve was purple color, enter bladder at the ureter-bladder junction with different forms. Man’s bladder nerves, no ganglion, were more trivial than that of dogs, and with smaller branches, the large nerve ganglion. The links with the nerve fibers and forms the network on the dog’s bladder wall, and the nerve fibers crosses comparatively little on both the left and right sides in the midline. The right nerve branch gains advantage on the man’s bladder wall, the situations is opposite on the dog’s. In conclusion, bladder nerves which scatter to the bladder wall have branches to lower ureter at the ureter-bladder junction, the structure and distribution of intramuscular nerves are different, the existence of intramuscular ganglia is relating to the bladder function both in man and dog. PMID:25664008

  11. Bladder Coding Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    Coding Guidelines BLADDER C670–C679 Primary Site C670 Trigone of bladder Base of bladder Floor Below interureteric ridge (interureteric crest, or interureteric fold) C671 D ome of bladder Vertex Roof Vault C672 L ateral wall of bladder Right

  12. Transvaginal Resection of a Bladder Leiomyoma Misdiagnosed with a Vaginal Mass: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fu-Fen; Wang, Ning; Wang, You-Lin; Bi, Xiao-Ning; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yan-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Bladder leiomyoma is a rare benign tumor and it could be easily misdiagnosed with many other pelvic diseases, especially obstetrical and gynecological diseases; abdominal, laparoscopic, and transurethral resection of bladder leiomyoma have been reported. Herein, we present a case of bladder leiomyoma misdiagnosed with a vaginal mass preoperatively; the mass was isolated, enucleated from the bladder neck, and removed transvaginally; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of intramural leiomyoma of bladder neck that has been enucleated transvaginally only without cystotomy. PMID:26693368

  13. Gall bladder carcinoma presenting with spinal metastasis: a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mohit K; Joshi, Richa; Chadha, Manish; Alam, Shan E; Varshneya, Hemant; Kumar, Sunil

    2013-05-01

    Skeletal metastasis as a primary presentation of gall bladder carcinoma is rare. A 50-year-old lady presented with neck pain and weakness in her right upper limb of 3 months duration. Clinical and imaging work-up suggested locally advanced gall bladder carcinoma with metastasis to cervical vertebra and sternum. Only one case till date has been reported where the patient presented with neurological symptoms due to pathological fracture secondary to metastasis from an occult gall bladder carcinoma. Although rare, an occult gall bladder cancer may present with neurological symptoms due to pathological fracture of spine secondary to metastasis. We present a brief review of literature of patients who presented with skeletal metastases in clinically silent gall bladder malignancy. Palliative care issues in advanced gall bladder carcinoma have also been discussed. PMID:24049354

  14. Gall Bladder Carcinoma Presenting with Spinal Metastasis: A Rare Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Mohit K; Joshi, Richa; Chadha, Manish; Alam, Shan E; Varshneya, Hemant; Kumar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastasis as a primary presentation of gall bladder carcinoma is rare. A 50-year-old lady presented with neck pain and weakness in her right upper limb of 3 months duration. Clinical and imaging work-up suggested locally advanced gall bladder carcinoma with metastasis to cervical vertebra and sternum. Only one case till date has been reported where the patient presented with neurological symptoms due to pathological fracture secondary to metastasis from an occult gall bladder carcinoma. Although rare, an occult gall bladder cancer may present with neurological symptoms due to pathological fracture of spine secondary to metastasis. We present a brief review of literature of patients who presented with skeletal metastases in clinically silent gall bladder malignancy. Palliative care issues in advanced gall bladder carcinoma have also been discussed. PMID:24049354

  15. Urinary Incontinence: Bladder Training

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Urinary Incontinence | Bladder Training for Urinary Incontinence What is bladder training? Bladder training is a way of learning to manage urinary incontinence. It is generally used ...

  16. The 2001 Mars Descent Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, M. C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    The overall objective of the 2001 Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) experiment is to acquire and analyze close-up pictures of surface features at and in the immediate vicinity of the Mars Surveyor 2001 (MS'01) landing site, in order to provide geologic and physical context for the results of lander and rover investigations, to provide near-realtime planning information for lander and rover operations, and to study specific attributes of the geology and geomorphology of Mars. Observational goals include studies of. 1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); 2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments--precise location, detailed local relief); and 3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. Based on the MS'98 MARDI experiment, it is anticipated that the MS'01 descent imager will provide panchromatic images of the landing site over a 73.4 degrees field-of-view (FOV) with a resolution of 1.25 mrad/pixel (12.5 cm/pixel from 100 m Nested images at a scale ratios of 2.5: 1 or better will be acquired. The anticipated results of this investigation include: 1) detailed knowledge of the local and regional setting of the MS'01 landing site, documented using geologic and topographic maps, 2) a specific link between the landing site and the rest of Mars as seen from orbit, and 3) serendipitous discovery of geomorphic processes at scales between those seen from orbit and those seen from the surface. MARDI consists of optics and four small electronics boards: the focal plane assembly, clock board, data acquisition system electronics, and power supply. The original design was developed under Planetary Definition and Development Program funding, although the flight design is considerably simplified for reliability and ease of manufacturing. It is characterized by relatively small physical size (about 5.5 x 8.5 x 12 cm about 500 gm) low power (<4 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise images, and ultimate geometric resolution better than 1 cm/pixel). Depending on the descent profile that actually occurs, MARDI will acquire up to 100 Mbits of image data, spanning three orders of magnitude in scale, during the roughly 60 seconds between heatshield jettison and spacecraft touchdown.

  17. The embryology of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Wensing, C J

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of the role of the gubernaculum testis in the migration of the testis from the intra-abdominal to the scrotal position. The morphological differences in the process between carnivores, ungulates and man on the one hand and rodents on the other are stressed. The importance of gubernacular outgrowth, gubernacular regression as well as the importance of intra-abdominal pressure is emphasized. The effects of some forms of abnormal gubernacular development on testicular descent are described. The hormonal factors possibly involved in the regulation of the gubernacular reaction are evaluated. LH-RH, gonadotropins, AMH and testosterone seem not to be responsible for gubernacular outgrowth but a low molecular weight fraction of a fetal testicular extract, called descendin, is stimulatory to gubernacular cells. There are indications that testosterone plays a role in the initiation of gubernacular regression. PMID:2907890

  18. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePLUS

    ... urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... bladder wall. Less than 1 in 10 pelvic fractures lead to bladder injury. Other causes of bladder ...

  19. Predictability of Top of Descent Location for Operational Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its uncertainty models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents at a specified descent speed, and the recorded data included the specified descent speed profile, aircraft weight, and the winds entered into the FMS as well as the radar data. The FMS computed the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and the controllers and pilots then endeavored to allow the FMS to fly the descent to the meter fix with minimal human intervention. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location were extracted from the radar data. Using approximately 70 descents each in Boeing 757 and Airbus 319/320 aircraft, multiple regression estimated TOD location as a linear function of the available predictive factors. The cruise and meter fix altitudes, descent speed, and wind clearly improve goodness of fit. The aircraft weight improves fit for the Airbus descents but not for the B757. Except for a few statistical outliers, the residuals have absolute value less than 5 nmi. Thus, these predictive factors adequately explain the TOD location, which indicates the data do not include excessive noise.

  20. MR Imaging in Diagnosis of Pelvic Floor Descent: Supine versus Sitting Position

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Adolfo; Monaco, Luigi; Serra, Nicola; Feragalli, Beatrice; Iacomino, Aniello; Brunese, Luca; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Functional disorders of the pelvic floor represent have a significant impact on the quality of life. The advent of open-configuration systems allowed for the evaluation of defecation with MR imaging in sitting position. The purpose of the present study is to compare the results of static and dynamic pelvic MR performed in supine position versus sitting position, using a new MR prototype machine, in the diagnosis of pelvic floor descent. Materials and Methods. Thirty-one patients with pelvic floor disorders were enrolled, and underwent MR Defecography in supine position with 1.5 T closed magnet (MAGNETOM Symphony, Siemens, Germany) and in sitting position with a 0.25-Tesla open magnet system (G-Scan ESAOTE, Italy). Results. In rest and squeezing phases, positions of bladder, vagina, and ARJ were significantly different when the patient was imaged in supine versus sitting position. In the defecation phase, a significant difference for the bladder and vagina position was detected between the two exams whereas a significant difference for the ARJ was not found. A statistically significant difference exists when the pelvic floor descent is evaluated in sitting versus supine position. Conclusion. Our results show that MR Defecography in sitting position may represent a useful tool to correctly diagnose and grade the pelvic organ descent. PMID:26880893

  1. Stem Cell Therapy in Bladder Dysfunction: Where Are We? And Where Do We Have to Go?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Rae; Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun

    2013-01-01

    To date, stem cell therapy for the bladder has been conducted mainly on an experimental basis in the areas of bladder dysfunction. The therapeutic efficacy of stem cells was originally thought to be derived from their ability to differentiate into various cell types. Studies about stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to an experimental basis and have been less focused than bladder regeneration. Bladder dysfunction was listed in MESH as “urinary bladder neck obstruction”, “urinary bladder, overactive”, and “urinary bladder, neurogenic”. Using those keywords, several articles were searched and studied. The bladder dysfunction model includes bladder outlet obstruction, cryoinjured, diabetes, ischemia, and spinal cord injury. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle derived stem cells (SkMSCs) are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The main mechanisms of stem cells to reconstitute or restore bladder dysfunction are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction and to provide the status of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction. PMID:24151627

  2. Gall bladder Adenocarcinoma in a Young Girl.

    PubMed

    Date, Shivprasad V; Rizvi, S J

    2015-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with abdominal discomfort, weakness, and jaundice. General examination revealed deep icterus with hard lymph nodes in left supraclavicular region. On gastrointestinal examination, we appreciated a hard intra-abdominal lump in the right hypochondrium. Biochemical evaluation showed features of obstructive jaundice. Imaging confirmed the presence of gall bladder lump with multiple intra-abdominal lymph nodes. Fine needle aspiration cytology of neck nodes demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the gall bladder lump (done under sonographic guidance) confirmed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, malignancy of the gall bladder has not been reported in individuals less than 18 years in India, and only three cases have been reported worldwide in English literature. PMID:26139973

  3. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  4. Descent advisor preliminary field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  5. Total endoscopic management of a large bladder leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Kalathia, Jaisukh; Agrawal, Santosh; Chipde, Saurabh Sudhir; Agrawal, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Leiomyoma of the urinary bladder is a very rare entity and represents < 0.5% of all bladder tumours, with only 250 cases reported worldwide to date. We report a case of leiomyoma of the bladder 55 -year-old female presented with chief complaints lower abdomen pain since 1 year associated with intermittency, burning, frequency and hesitancy in micturation. Bimanual examination of the patient revealed a mass on the right side near the bladder neck. USG suggested a well circumscribed polypoidal soft tissue lesion seen projecting in urinary bladder lumen and attached to the posterior wall and base of bladder with no internal vascularity. On cystoscopic examination, large smooth sessile growth arising from the right postero-lateral wall was noted with right ureteric orifice not visualized. Magnetic resonance imaging showed Large well defined rounded soft tisssue lesion close to anterior surface of the cervix and vagina which was Isointense to the skeletal muscles on T1 and T2 images with small focal irregular cystic areas of necrosis seen. It could be urinary bladder neoplasm or sub serosal cervical fibroid. Transurethral resection of tumor was performed. The pathologic diagnosis was leiomyoma of the bladder. We discuss the diagnosis and management of leiomyoma of the bladder and briefly review the literature. PMID:26692681

  6. Neck pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... causes of neck pain: Take over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or acetaminophen ( ... prescribe a muscle relaxant or a more powerful pain reliever. Over-the-counter medications often work as well ...

  7. Stiff Neck

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk X-Ray Exam: Neck Meningitis Infant Torticollis Torticollis Lyme Disease Meningitis Lyme Disease Burner (Stinger) Meningitis Lyme Disease ...

  8. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  9. Apollo experience report: Descent propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammock, W. R., Jr.; Currie, E. C.; Fisher, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    The propulsion system for the descent stage of the lunar module was designed to provide thrust to transfer the fully loaded lunar module with two crewmen from the lunar parking orbit to the lunar surface. A history of the development of this system is presented. Development was accomplished primarily by ground testing of individual components and by testing the integrated system. Unique features of the descent propulsion system were the deep throttling capability and the use of a lightweight cryogenic helium pressurization system.

  10. Descent relations in cubic superstring field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Y.; Gorbachev, R.; Medvedev, P. B.; Rychkov, D. V.

    2008-01-01

    The descent relations between string field theory (SFT) vertices are characteristic relations of the operator formulation of SFT and they provide self-consistency of this theory. The descent relations langleV2|V1rangle and langleV3|V1rangle in the NS fermionic string field theory in the κ and discrete bases are established. Different regularizations and schemes of calculations are considered and relations between them are discussed.

  11. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  12. Overview of Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back) > Overview of Neck Pain Overview of Neck Pain Page Content Developing a Program That's Right for ... activity? What Kinds of Problems Might Cause Neck Pain? Treatment for any neck condition is recommended as ...

  13. Reference energy-altitude descent guidance: Simulator evaluation. [aircraft descent and fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbot, K. H.; Knox, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Descent guidance was developed to provide a pilot with information to ake a fuel-conservative descent and cross a designated geographical waypoint at a preselected altitude and airspeed. The guidance was designed to reduce fuel usage during the descent and reduce the mental work load associated with planning a fuel-conservative descent. A piloted simulation was conducted to evaluate the operational use of this guidance concept. The results of the simulation tests show that the use of the guidance reduced fuel consumption and mental work load during the descent. Use of the guidance also decreased the airspeed error, but had no effect on the altitude error when the designated waypoint was crossed. Physical work load increased with the use of the guidance, but remained well within acceptable levels. The pilots found the guidance easy to use as presented and reported that it would be useful in an operational environment.

  14. Bladder Cancer Interest Group

    Cancer.gov

    Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer, and is considered one of the most expensive cancers to live with due to long-term surveillance and treatments. Clinically, there are only limited options for bladder cancer management and no new bladder-c

  15. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Ultrasound: Bladder KidsHealth > For Parents > Ultrasound: Bladder Print A A A Text Size What's ... español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. Mars Science Laboratory Rover and Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In this February 17, 2009, image, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory rover is attached to the spacecraft's descent stage. The image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    This is the way the spacecraft will look after it comes out of its protective aeroshell and is descending to the Martian surface in 2012. Here, the descent stage sits on top of the rover, with its eight main engines straddling the rover structure. The rover is the big white box below the descent stage. At this point, the rover lacks its appendages (robotic arm, mast and most wheels), as these elements are still being assembled and were not needed for space-simulation testing of the spacecraft in late 2008.

  17. [Value of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasonic tomography using an electronic linear scanner in staging bladder tumors].

    PubMed

    Zyb, A F; Slessarew, W I; Grischin, G N; Karjakin, O B; Duntschik, W N

    1987-07-01

    The results of sonographic studies of 48 patients with carcinoma of the urinary bladder are discussed. The value of longitudinal intracavitary sonography for assessment of the local extent of malignant tumors of the bladder was studied. This method is thought to be extremely useful when tumors are localized on the neck, base and front wall of the bladder, whereas transabdominal sonography gives valuable diagnostic information if the lateral and back walls are involved. Combined sonography must be used for assessment of the local extent of carcinoma of the urinary bladder as it is of high accuracy, non-invasive and safe. PMID:3313517

  18. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; Babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2014-04-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH) and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ~ 32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, have been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3-hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaigns conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half an hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record the observations also when the balloon is descending as this information is useful for scientific purposes.

  19. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2013-12-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ∼32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, has been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3 hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaign conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half-an-hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record also the observations when the balloon is descending as this information is also useful for scientific purposes.

  20. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy, physical treatments, postural techniques (yoga, pilates, Alexander technique), pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment, soft collars and special pillows, spray and stretch, surgery, traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). PMID:19445809

  1. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmospheres for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions.

  2. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  3. America's Descent into Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes America's descent into madness under the regime of neoliberalism that has emerged in the United States since the late 1970s. In part, this is due to the emergence of a public pedagogy produced by the corporate-owned media that now saturates Americans with a market-driven value system that undermines those formative…

  4. Research study: STS-1 Orbiter Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of STS-1 orbiter descent data from AVE-SESAME contact programs to the REEDA system and the reduction of raw radiosonde data is summarized. A first difference program, contact data program, plot data program, and 30 second data program were developed. Six radiosonde soundings were taken. An example of the outputs of each of the programs is presented.

  5. Descent Assisted Split Habitat Lunar Lander Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The Descent Assisted Split Habitat (DASH) lunar lander concept utilizes a disposable braking stage for descent and a minimally sized pressurized volume for crew transport to and from the lunar surface. The lander can also be configured to perform autonomous cargo missions. Although a braking-stage approach represents a significantly different operational concept compared with a traditional two-stage lander, the DASH lander offers many important benefits. These benefits include improved crew egress/ingress and large-cargo unloading; excellent surface visibility during landing; elimination of the need for deep-throttling descent engines; potentially reduced plume-surface interactions and lower vertical touchdown velocity; and reduced lander gross mass through efficient mass staging and volume segmentation. This paper documents the conceptual study on various aspects of the design, including development of sortie and outpost lander configurations and a mission concept of operations; the initial descent trajectory design; the initial spacecraft sizing estimates and subsystem design; and the identification of technology needs

  6. America's Descent into Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes America's descent into madness under the regime of neoliberalism that has emerged in the United States since the late 1970s. In part, this is due to the emergence of a public pedagogy produced by the corporate-owned media that now saturates Americans with a market-driven value system that undermines those formative…

  7. 14 CFR 23.69 - Enroute climb/descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... climb/descent. (a) All engines operating. The steady gradient and rate of climb must be determined at.... The steady gradient and rate of climb/descent must be determined at each weight, altitude, and...

  8. 14 CFR 23.69 - Enroute climb/descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... climb/descent. (a) All engines operating. The steady gradient and rate of climb must be determined at.... The steady gradient and rate of climb/descent must be determined at each weight, altitude, and...

  9. A Descent Rate Control Approach to Developing an Autonomous Descent Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Travis D.

    Circular parachutes have been used for aerial payload/personnel deliveries for over 100 years. In the past two decades, significant work has been done to improve the landing accuracies of cargo deliveries for humanitarian and military applications. This dissertation discusses the approach developed in which a circular parachute is used in conjunction with an electro-mechanical reefing system to manipulate the landing location. Rather than attempt to steer the autonomous descent vehicle directly, control of the landing location is accomplished by modifying the amount of time spent in a particular wind layer. Descent rate control is performed by reversibly reefing the parachute canopy. The first stage of the research investigated the use of a single actuation during descent (with periodic updates), in conjunction with a curvilinear target. Simulation results using real-world wind data are presented, illustrating the utility of the methodology developed. Additionally, hardware development and flight-testing of the single actuation autonomous descent vehicle are presented. The next phase of the research focuses on expanding the single actuation descent rate control methodology to incorporate a multi-actuation path-planning system. By modifying the parachute size throughout the descent, the controllability of the system greatly increases. The trajectory planning methodology developed provides a robust approach to accurately manipulate the landing location of the vehicle. The primary benefits of this system are the inherent robustness to release location errors and the ability to overcome vehicle uncertainties (mass, parachute size, etc.). A separate application of the path-planning methodology is also presented. An in-flight path-prediction system was developed for use in high-altitude ballooning by utilizing the path-planning methodology developed for descent vehicles. The developed onboard system improves landing location predictions in-flight using collected flight information during the ascent and descent. Simulation and real-world flight tests (using the developed low-cost hardware) demonstrate the significance of the improvements achievable when flying the developed system.

  10. Portable Bladder Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Data from the National Population Health Survey indicate prevalence rates of urinary incontinence are 2.5% in women and 1.4 % in men in the general population. Prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women than men and prevalence increases with age. Identified risk factors for urinary incontinence include female gender, increasing age, urinary tract infections (UTI), poor mobility, dementia, smoking, obesity, consuming alcohol and caffeine beverages, physical activity, pregnancy, childbirth, forceps and vacuum-assisted births, episiotomy, abdominal resection for colorectal cancer, and hormone replacement therapy. For the purposes of this review, incontinence populations will be stratified into the following; the elderly, urology patients, postoperative patients, rehabilitation settings, and neurogenic bladder populations. Urinary incontinence is defined as any involuntary leakage of urine. Incontinence can be classified into diagnostic clinical types that are useful in planning evaluation and treatment. The major types of incontinence are stress (physical exertion), urge (overactive bladder), mixed (combined urge and stress urinary incontinence), reflex (neurological impairment of the central nervous system), overflow (leakage due to full bladder), continuous (urinary tract abnormalities), congenital incontinence, and transient incontinence (temporary incontinence). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, which is the amount of urine in the bladder immediately after urination, represents an important component in continence assessment and bladder management to provide quantitative feedback to the patient and continence care team regarding the effectiveness of the voiding technique. Although there is no standardized definition of normal PVR urine volume, measurements greater than 100 mL to 150 mL are considered an indication for urinary retention, requiring intermittent catheterization, whereas a PVR urine volume of 100 mL to 150 mL or less is generally considered an acceptable result of bladder training. Urinary retention has been associated with poor outcomes including UTI, bladder overdistension, and higher hospital mortality rates. The standard method of determining PVR urine volumes is intermittent catheterization, which is associated with increased risk of UTI, urethral trauma and discomfort. The Technology Being Reviewed Portable bladder ultrasound products are transportable ultrasound devices that use automated technology to register bladder volume digitally, including PVR volume, and provide three-dimensional images of the bladder. The main clinical use of portable bladder ultrasound is as a diagnostic aid. Health care professionals (primarily nurses) administer the device to measure PVR volume and prevent unnecessary catheterization. An adjunctive use of the bladder ultrasound device is to visualize the placement and removal of catheters. Also, portable bladder ultrasound products may improve the diagnosis and differentiation of urological problems and their management and treatment, including the establishment of voiding schedules, study of bladder biofeedback, fewer UTIs, and monitoring of potential urinary incontinence after surgery or trauma. Review Strategy To determine the effectiveness and clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound as reported in the published literature, the Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases. Nonsystematic reviews, nonhuman studies, case reports, letters, editorials, and comments were excluded. Summary of Findings Of the 4 included studies that examined the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound in the elderly population, all found the device to be acceptable. One study reported that the device underestimated catheterized bladder volume In patients with urology problems, 2 of the 3 studies concerning portable bladder ultrasound found the device acceptable to use. However, one study did not find the device as accurate for small PVR volume as for catheterization and another found that the device overestimated catheterized bladder volume. In the remaining study, the authors reported that when the device’s hand-held ultrasound transducers (scanheads) were aimed improperly, bladders were missed, or lateral borders of bladders were missed resulting in partial bladder volume measurements and underestimation of PVR measurements. They concluded that caution should be used in interpreting PVR volume measured by portable bladder ultrasound machines and that catheterization may be the preferred assessment modality if an accurate PVR measurement is necessary. All 3 studies with post-operative populations found portable bladder ultrasound use to be reasonably acceptable. Two studies reported that the device overestimated catheter-derived bladder volumes, one by 7% and the other by 21 mL. The third study reported the opposite, that the device underestimated catheter bladder volume by 39 mL but that the results remained acceptable In rehabilitation settings, 2 studies found portable bladder ultrasound to underestimate catheter-derived bladder volumes; yet, both authors concluded that the mean errors were within acceptable limits. In patients with neurogenic bladder problems, 2 studies found portable bladder ultrasound to be an acceptable alternative to catheterization despite the fact that it was not as accurate as catheterization for obtaining bladder volumes. Lastly, examinations concerning avoidance of negative health outcomes showed that, after use of the portable bladder ultrasound, unnecessary catheterizations and UTIs were decreased. Unnecessary catheterizations avoided ranged from 16% to 47% in the selected articles. Reductions in UTI ranged from 38% to 72%. In sum, all but one study advocated the use of portable bladder ultrasound as an alternative to catheterization. Economic Analysis An economic analysis estimating the budget-impact of BladderScan in complex continuing care facilities was completed. The analysis results indicated a $192,499 (Cdn) cost-savings per year per facility and a cost-savings of $2,887,485 (Cdn) for all 15 CCC facilities. No economic analysis was completed for long-term care and acute care facilities due to lack of data. Considerations for Policy Development Rapid diffusion of portable bladder ultrasound technology is expected. Recently, the IC5 project on improving continence care in Ontario’s complex continuing care centres piloted portable bladder ultrasound at 12 sites. Preliminary results were promising. Many physicians and health care facilities already have portable bladder ultrasound devices. However, portable bladder ultrasound devices for PVR measurement are not in use at most health care facilities in Ontario and Canada. The Verathon Corporation (Bothell, Wisconsin, United States), which patents BladderScan, is the sole licensed manufacturer of the portable bladder ultrasound in Canada. Field monopoly may influence the rising costs of portable bladder ultrasound, particularly when faced with rapid expansion of the technology. Several thousand residents of Ontario would benefit from portable bladder ultrasound. The number of residents of Ontario that would benefit from the technology is difficult to quantify, because the incidence and prevalence of incontinence are grossly under-reported. However, long-term care and complex continuing care institutions would benefit greatly from portable bladder ultrasound, as would numerous rehabilitation units, postsurgical care units, and urology clinics. The cost of the portable bladder ultrasound devices ranges from $17,698.90 to $19,565.95 (Cdn) (total purchase price per unit as quoted by the manufacturer). Additional training packages, batteries and battery chargers, software, gel pads, and yearly warranties are additional costs. Studies indicate that portable bladder ultrasound is a cost-effective technology, because it avoids costs associated with catheterization equipment, saves nursing time, and reduces catheter-related complications and UTIs. The use of portable bladder ultrasound device will affect the patient directly in terms of health outcomes. Its use avoids the trauma related to the urinary tract that catheterization inflicts, and does not result in UTIs. In addition, patients prefer it, because it preserves dignity and reduces discomfort. PMID:23074481

  11. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium BCRN Management Committee BCAN Scientific Advisory Board GET INVOLVED Donate & Change a Life BCAN Partners Amp Up! Move to End Bladder Cancer Volunteer & Make a Difference Support a Chapter ABOUT BCAN What We Do ...

  12. Kinetic analysis of stair descent: Part 1. Forwards step-over-step descent.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Tyler; Robertson, D Gordon E

    2011-03-01

    This study examined lower extremity biomechanics during the initiation of stair descent from an upright, static posture. Seventeen healthy subjects (aged 23±2.4 years) descended a five-step, steel-reinforced, wooden laboratory staircase (34° decline). Ten trials of stair descent were separated into two blocks of five trials. Beginning from an upright posture, subjects descended the staircase at their preferred velocity (0.53±0.082 m/s) and continued the length of the laboratory walkway (∼4 m). Joint mechanics were contrasted between gait cycles. Relative to the initiation cycle at the top of the staircase, the dissipative knee extensor (K3) and hip flexor (H2) moments and powers were independent of progression velocity and approximated steady-state (i.e., constant) values after the first cycle of the trail limb (Step 5 to Step 3). In contrast, a salient relationship was observed between progression velocity and ankle joint mechanics at initial-contact. The plantiflexor moment, power and work at initial-contact (A1) increased with centre of mass velocity. Our results demonstrate that while the knee extensor moment is the primary dissipater of mechanical energy in stair descent, the ankle plantiflexors are the primary dissipaters associated with increased progression velocity. In addition, the results show that steady-state stair descent may not be attained during the first gait cycle of the trail limb. These data shed light on locomotive strategies used in stair descent and can be applied in biomechanical models of human stair gait. Researchers and practitioners should take into consideration the influence of gait cycle and progression velocity when evaluating lower extremity function in stair descent. PMID:21292489

  13. Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-06

    The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

  14. Angiomyolipoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Huan, Youming; Dillon, Robert W; Unger, Pamela D

    2002-12-01

    Angiomyolipoma of the bladder is an extremely rare neoplasm. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman with an angiomyolipoma of the bladder visualized on pelvic sonogram as a 5 mm polyp in the floor of the bladder. The lesional tissue consisted of spindle cells, epithelioid cells, and adipocytes, with occasional thick-walled blood vessels. Immunohistochemical studies showed the spindle and epithelioid cells to be focally positive for HMB-45 and diffusely positive for actin and muscle cell antigen (HHF-35), which confirmed the diagnosis of angiomyolipoma. A review of the recent literature on the pathogenesis of angiomyolipoma follows. PMID:12478489

  15. Epidemiology of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Silverman, D T; Hartge, P; Morrison, A S; Devesa, S S

    1992-02-01

    Approximately 49,000 persons in the United States develop bladder cancer each year, and about 9700 die of it. White men face a lifetime risk of almost 3%; white women and black men face a risk of about 1%, and black women, about 0.5%. Cigarette smoking is accepted widely as a cause of bladder cancer. Smoking accounts for about half of bladder cancer diagnosed among men and about one third of that among women. Moderate to heavy smokers typically show a two to five fold risk of bladder cancer, compared with persons who never smoked. When cigarette smokers quit smoking, their bladder cancer risk falls measurably within 2 to 4 years, but probably does not continue to decline with increasing years since quitting and does not appear to return to the baseline level of nonsmokers. Occupational exposure to certain aromatic amines causes human bladder cancer. Clear evidence of bladder cancer risk also is apparent for a small number of occupational groups: dye workers, rubber workers, leather workers, painters, truck drivers, and aluminum workers. Many other occupational groups have been reported to have increased bladder cancer risk, but evidence for these is not as strong. Coffee drinking has been studied extensively as a potential risk factor, but the inconsistency of the observed associations suggests that the relationship is either quite weak, noncausal, or dependent in a complex way on unmeasured factors. Artificial sweeteners confer little or no excess bladder cancer risk. Alcohol consumption apparently does not affect risk either. Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and foods high in vitamin A have been suggested as possible protective factors; consumption of high-fat foods, pork, and beef have been suggested as possible risk factors. Further epidemiologic research is needed to elucidate the role of diet in human bladder carcinogenesis. Less common risk factors for bladder cancer include ionizing radiation, cyclophosphamide use, and abuse of phenacetin-containing analgesics. Schistosomiasis infection may contribute substantially to the bladder cancer burden in Egypt and elsewhere, though not in the United States.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1556044

  16. Bladder operated robotic joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a robotic joint which is operated by inflatable bladders and which can be used in applications where it is desired to move or hold an object. A support block supports an elongated plate to which is pivotally attached a finger. A tension strip passes over a lever attached to the finger and is attached at its ends to the support block on opposite sides of the plate. Bladders positioned between the plate and the tension strip on opposite sides of the plate can be inflated by pumps to pivot the finger, with one of the bladders being inflated while the other is being deflated.

  17. System for Estimating Horizontal Velocity During Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew; Cheng, Yang; Wilson, Reg; Goguen, Jay; Martin, Alejandro San; Leger, Chris; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The descent image motion estimation system (DIMES) is a system of hardware and software, designed for original use in estimating the horizontal velocity of a spacecraft descending toward a landing on Mars. The estimated horizontal velocity is used in generating rocket-firing commands to reduce the horizontal velocity as part of an overall control scheme to minimize the landing impact. DIMES can also be used for estimating the horizontal velocity of a remotely controlled or autonomous aircraft for purposes of navigation and control.

  18. What Is Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... much less common than urothelial (transitional cell) cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma: In the United States, only about 1% to 2% of bladder cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. Under a microscope, the cells look much like ...

  19. Robotic Bladder Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1995-01-01

    Reliable, lightweight robotic joint suitable for variety of applications, actuated hydraulically, without need for heavy mechanical cylinders or gears on joint itself. Includes two members; first member rotates about pin at end of second member. Includes cam, over which tension line stretched. Ends of tension line anchored at end of second member opposite end that holds pin. Bladder placed on each side of second member, squeezed between second member and tension line. Pressures and/or amounts of fluid in bladders controlled by use of conventional equipment like pumps, valves, and reservoirs. Bladder on one side inflated more than on other side; greater inflation on one side causes greater stretching of tension line on that side. Greater tension pulls on cam, turning first member toward that side. Angle of joint controlled by controlling differential inflation of two bladders.

  20. Bladder catheterization, female (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... catheter (a hollow tube, often with an inflatable balloon tip) may be inserted into the urinary bladder ... kept empty (decompressed) and urinary flow assured. The balloon holds the catheter in place for a duration ...

  1. Giant bladder stone: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tahtal?, ?brahim Nüvit; Karata?, Turgay

    2014-01-01

    Bladder stones comprise 5% of urinary tract stones. Generally, they occur in the presence of bladder neck obstruction, urinary tract infections associated with neurogenic bladder and foreign objects. They are more common among men than women. Infection stones comprise approximately 15% of urinary tract stones. A giant bladder stone is a rare finding in contemporary urological practice. The general clinical setting is recurrent urinary tract infections, hematuria and urinary retention. We performed an open cystolithotomy on a mentally impaired patient who had a giant bladder stone. The stone removed weighed 465 grams. There was no evidence of any infravesical obstruction on the cystoscopy performed before the operation or during the operation. The stone consisted of 75% carbonate apatite and 25% struvite. Given that such a stone was found in a mentally impaired patient indicates that infection stones can form without infravesical obstruction. PMID:26328176

  2. Micturition in conscious rats with and without bladder outlet obstruction: role of spinal alpha 1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, O.; Persson, K.; Mattiasson, A.; Naylor, A.; Wyllie, M.; Andersson, K.

    1996-01-01

    1. In normal rats and rats with bladder hypertrophy secondary to outflow obstruction, undergoing continuous cytometry, we examined the responses to the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist doxazosin given intrathecally (i.t.) and intra-arterially (i.a.). In addition, we investigated the effects of the drug on L-dopa-induced bladder hyperactivity in normal, unobstructed rats. 2. Doxazosin 50 nmol (approximately 60 micrograms kg-1), given i.t., decreased micturition pressure in normal rats and in animals with post-obstruction bladder hypertrophy. The effect was much more pronounced in the animals with hypertrophied/overactive bladders. Doxazosin did not markedly affect the frequency or amplitude of the unstable contractions observed in obstructed rats. In contrast, however, doxazosin reduced L-dopa-induced bladder overactivity. When tested, the enantiomers of doxazosin produced qualitatively similar effects to doxazosin, but there was no evidence of stereoselectivity. 3. The results suggest that in addition to the well documented action on prostatic and lower urinary tract smooth muscle, and an effect on the sympathetic outflow to the bladder, bladder neck, prostate, and external urethral sphincter, doxazosin may have an action at the level of the spinal cord and ganglia, thereby reducing activity in the parasympathetic nerves to the bladder. This effect is more pronounced in rats with bladder hypertrophy than in normal rats. PMID:8851518

  3. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  4. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Melissa T; Suskind, Anne M

    2016-02-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  5. Regression Analysis of Top of Descent Location for Idle-thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel; Bronsvoort, Jesper; McDonald, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, multiple regression analysis is used to model the top of descent (TOD) location of user-preferred descent trajectories computed by the flight management system (FMS) on over 1000 commercial flights into Melbourne, Australia. The independent variables cruise altitude, final altitude, cruise Mach, descent speed, wind, and engine type were also recorded or computed post-operations. Both first-order and second-order models are considered, where cross-validation, hypothesis testing, and additional analysis are used to compare models. This identifies the models that should give the smallest errors if used to predict TOD location for new data in the future. A model that is linear in TOD altitude, final altitude, descent speed, and wind gives an estimated standard deviation of 3.9 nmi for TOD location given the trajec- tory parameters, which means about 80% of predictions would have error less than 5 nmi in absolute value. This accuracy is better than demonstrated by other ground automation predictions using kinetic models. Furthermore, this approach would enable online learning of the model. Additional data or further knowl- edge of algorithms is necessary to conclude definitively that no second-order terms are appropriate. Possible applications of the linear model are described, including enabling arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the FMS even in congested airspace. In particular, a model for TOD location that is linear in the independent variables would enable decision support tool human-machine interfaces for which a kinetic approach would be computationally too slow.

  6. Bladder Cases - MP/H Rules

    Cancer.gov

    Bladder Case 1 SURGICAL PATHOLOGY REPORT Surgical Pathology Report February 17, 2007 Specimen (s) received: Bladder Tumor Pre-operative Diagnosis: Bladder Cancer Post operative Diagnosis: Bladder Cancer Procedure: Cystoscopy, transurethral resection

  7. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. 10.14 Section 10.14 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS General § 10.14 Lineal descent and cultural affiliation. (a) General. This section identifies...

  8. 25 CFR 11.711 - Descent and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Descent and distribution. 11.711 Section 11.711 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.711 Descent and distribution. (a) The court shall distribute...

  9. 25 CFR 11.711 - Descent and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Descent and distribution. 11.711 Section 11.711 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.711 Descent and distribution. (a) The court shall distribute...

  10. Error Analysis of Stochastic Gradient Descent Ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2012-12-31

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:23292808

  11. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:24083315

  12. Distributed Control by Lagrangian Steepest Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Bieniawski, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Often adaptive, distributed control can be viewed as an iterated game between independent players. The coupling between the players mixed strategies, arising as the system evolves from one instant to the next, is determined by the system designer. Information theory tells us that the most likely joint strategy of the players, given a value of the expectation of the overall control objective function, is the minimizer of a function o the joint strategy. So the goal of the system designer is to speed evolution of the joint strategy to that Lagrangian mhimbhgpoint,lowerthe expectated value of the control objective function, and repeat Here we elaborate the theory of algorithms that do this using local descent procedures, and that thereby achieve efficient, adaptive, distributed control.

  13. Planetary entry, descent, and landing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichkhadze, K.; Vorontsov, V.; Polyakov, A.; Ivankov, A.; Taalas, P.; Pellinen, R.; Harri, A.-M.; Linkin, V.

    2003-04-01

    Martian meteorological lander (MML) is intended for landing on the Martian surface in order to monitor the atmosphere at landing point for one Martian year. MMLs shall become the basic elements of a global network of meteorological mini-landers, observing the dynamics of changes of the atmospheric parameters on the Red Planet. The MML main scientific tasks are as follows: (1) Study of vertical structure of the Martian atmosphere throughout the MML descent; (2) On-surface meteorological observations for one Martian year. One of the essential factors influencing the lander's design is its entry, descent, and landing (EDL) sequence. During Phase A of the MML development, five different options for the lander's design were carefully analyzed. All of these options ensure the accomplishment of the above-mentioned scientific tasks with high effectiveness. CONCEPT A (conventional approach): Two lander options (with a parachute system + airbag and an inflatable airbrake + airbag) were analyzed. They are similar in terms of fulfilling braking phases and completely analogous in landing by means of airbags. CONCEPT B (innovative approach): Three lander options were analyzed. The distinguishing feature is the presence of inflatable braking units (IBU) in their configurations. SELECTED OPTION (innovative approach): Incorporating a unique design approach and modern technologies, the selected option of the lander represents a combination of the options analyzed in the framework of Concept B study. Currently, the selected lander option undergoes systems testing (Phase D1). Several MMLs can be delivered to Mars in frameworks of various missions as primary or piggybacking payload: (1) USA-led "Mars Scout" (2007); (2) France-led "NetLander" (2007/2009); (3) Russia-led "Mars-Deimos-Phobos sample return" (2007); (4) Independent mission (currently under preliminary study); etc.

  14. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mendenhall WM, Mancuso AA, Amdur RJ, et al. Squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the neck from an unknown head ... V, et al. Oral health and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and esophagus: results ...

  15. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... increases your risk. In fact, 85 percent of head and neck cancers are linked to tobacco use, including smoking ...

  16. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  17. Biomarkers in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Richard T; Zeegers, Maurice P; James, Nicholas D; Wallace, D Michael A; Cheng, Kar Keung

    2010-03-01

    Detailed molecular insights into bladder cancer biology might allow more detailed prognostication and optimization of treatment with the objective of improving patient outcome and quality of life. However, in bladder cancer research the search for biomarkers has been called into question and has even obtained notoriety. It is unlikely that any single marker will be able to improve prognostication for patients with bladder cancer above and beyond grade and stage, but a combination of multiple independent markers might more precisely predict the outcome. From a previous review, we identified seven biomarkers to study within the setting of the Bladder Cancer Prognosis Programme (BCPP), a 5-year multicentre programme of research based at the University of Birmingham and funded by Cancer Research UK, investigating their effectiveness in predicting recurrence and progression. As part of the ongoing quality-assurance process for BCPP we present an updated review of our selected biomarkers, as well as highlighting other recent important developments in bladder cancer research. PMID:19793380

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Bladder cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with bladder cancer each year. What are the genetic changes related to bladder cancer? As with most ... Center . Where can I find general information about genetic conditions? The Handbook provides basic information about genetics ...

  19. Bridle Device in Mars Science Laboratory Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view of a portion of the descent stage of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory shows two of the stage's three spherical fuel tanks flanking the bridle device assembly. The photograph was taken in early October 2008 from the center of the descent stage looking outward. The top of the descent stage is toward the top of the image.

    The bridle device assembly is about two-thirds of a meter, or 2 feet, from top to bottom, and has two main parts. The cylinder on the top is the descent brake. The conical-shaped mechanism below that is the bridle assembly, including a spool of nylon and Vectran cords that will be attached to the rover.

    When pyrotechnic bolts fire to sever the rigid connection between the rover and the descent stage, gravity will pull the tethered rover away from the descent stage. The bridle or tether, attached to three points on the rover, will unspool from the bridle assembly, beginning from the larger-diameter portion. The rotation rate of the assembly, hence the descent rate of the rover, will be governed by the descent brake. Inside the housing of that brake are gear boxes and banks of mechanical resistors engineered to prevent the bridle from spooling out too quickly or too slowly. The length of the bridle will allow the rover to be lowered about 7.5 meters (25 feet) while still tethered to the descent stage.

    The Starsys division of SpaceDev Inc., Poway, Calif., provided the descent brake. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., built the bridle assembly. Vectran is a product of Kuraray Co. Ltd., Tokyo. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  20. Superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    Bladder cancer is almost certainly a product of the industrial revolution and the cigarette smoking that has accompanied it. Exposure to a chemical bladder carcinogen such as beta naphthylamine, benzidine, or 4-diphenylaniline can be proved in only a small proportion of patients and only a handful obtain industrial diseases benefit after developing "Prescribed Industrial Disease C23." None the less, the continued use of known carcinogenic substances in British industry for many years after their identification, the wide range of industries with a known or suspected increased risk of bladder cancer, and our ignorance of the carcinogenic potential of many materials used in current manufacturing should be a cause for continuing concern. Images p912-a PMID:8173377

  1. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  2. Simulator Evaluation of a New Cockpit Descent Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Barry; Palmer, Everett; Smith, Nancy; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate flight crew performance of the "Precision Descent," a new cockpit procedure designed to support the Descent Advisor (DA), one of the components in a new air traffic control advisory system called the "Center-TRACON Automation System" (CTAS). The DA predicts when aircraft will reach a specific waypoint on the arrival route, and presents controllers with clearance advisories designed to improve the sequencing of arriving aircraft. The effectiveness of the DA depends on the aircraft's descent trajectory: where it begins descent, what speed it maintains, how fast and at what altitude it crosses the bottom-of-descent waypoint. The Precision Descent allows controllers to assign these descent parameters to the flight crew. A Field Evaluation of the DA was conducted in Denver in 1995. Three separate clearances using standard ATC phraseology were used to support the cockpit descent procedure during this evaluation. The number and length of these clearances caused problems for both controllers and flight crews, causing readback errors, repeat requests and procedure misunderstandings. These observations led to a focus group meeting in which controller and pilot participants in the 1995 FE assisted in the redesign of the procedure. The Precision Descent eliminates one clearance used in the earlier study, and greatly reduces the length of the remaining clearances. This was accomplished by using non-standard clearance phraseology that relies on a published procedure chart for correct interpretation. Eight type-rated flight crews flew eight Precision Descents in a Boeing 747-400 simulator. No training was provided: crews received either a procedure chart or a procedure chart with a flight manual bulletin describing procedure techniques. Video and digital data were recorded for each descent. Preliminary results indicate that moving information from the verbal clearance to the chart was successful: the shorter clearances and the procedure's default crossing restriction were understood, and procedure compliance of 81% was observed across all descents on six independent compliance measures. Some readback errors and procedure misunderstandings were still observed, however; particularly when descent clearances deviated from the normative procedure.

  3. Long-term complications following bladder augmentations in patients with spina bifida: bladder calculi, perforation of the augmented bladder and upper tract deterioration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background We desire to review our experience with bladder augmentation in spina bifida patients followed in a transitional and adult urologic practice. This paper will specifically focus on three major complications: bladder calculi, the most frequent complication found following bladder augmentation, perforation of the augmentation, its most lethal complication and finally we will address loss of renal function as a direct result of our surgical reconstructive procedures. Methods We reviewed a prospective data base maintained on patients with spina bifida followed in our transitional and adult urology clinic from 1986 to date. Specific attention was given to patients who had developed bladder calculi, sustained a spontaneous perforation of the augmented bladder or had developed new onset of renal scarring or renal insufficiency (≥ stage 3 renal failure) during prolonged follow-up. Results The development of renal stones (P<0.05) and symptomatic urinary tract infections (P<0.0001) were found to be significantly reduced by the use of high volume (≥240 mL) daily bladder wash outs. Individuals who still developed bladder calculi recalcitrant to high volume wash outs were not benefited by the correction of underlying metabolic abnormalities or mucolytic agents. Spontaneous bladder perforations in the adult patient population with spina bifida were found to be directly correlated to substance abuse and noncompliance with intermittent catheterization, P<0.005. Deterioration of the upper tracts as defined by the new onset of renal scars occurred in 40% (32/80) of the patients managed by a ileocystoplasty and simultaneous bladder neck outlet procedure during a median follow-up interval 14 years (range, 8–45 years). Development of ≥ stage 3 chronic renal failure occurred within 38% (12/32) of the patients with scarring i.e., 15% (12/80) of the total patient population. Prior to the development of the renal scarring, 69% (22/32) of the patients had been noncompliant with intermittent catheterization. The onset of upper tract deterioration (i.e., new scar formation, hydronephrosis, calculus development, decrease in renal function) was silent, that is, clinically asymptomatic in one third (10/32 pts). Conclusions This paper documents the need for high volume bladder irrigations to both prevent the most common complication following bladder augmentation, which is the development of bladder calculi and to reduce the incidence of symptomatic urinary tract infections. It provides a unique perspective regarding the impact of substance abuse and patient non-compliance with medical directives as being both the most common cause for both spontaneous bladder rupture following augmentation cystoplasty and for deterioration of the upper tracts. These findings should cause the surgeon to reflect on his/her assessment of a patient prior to performing a bladder augmentation procedure and stress the need for close follow-up. PMID:26904407

  4. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  5. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, R. E.; Moore, H. J.; Scott, R. F.; Shorthill, R. W.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1980-11-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift materials, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock.

  6. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutton, R.E.; Moore, H.J.; Scott, R.F.; Shorthill, R.W.; Spitzer, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift material, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  7. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future. PMID:26327873

  8. Bladder Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Bladder C670–C679 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor destruction, NOS 11 Photodynamic therapy (PDT) 12

  9. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing simulation was created over the past two years to serve as the primary Crew Exploration Vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis tool at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) simulation is a six degree-of-freedom tool with a unique design architecture which has a high level of flexibility. This paper describes the decision history and motivations that guided the creation of this simulation tool. The capabilities of the models within ANTARES are presented in detail. Special attention is given to features of the highly flexible GN&C architecture and the details of the implemented GN&C algorithms. ANTARES provides a foundation simulation for the Orion Project that has already been successfully used for requirements analysis, system definition analysis, and preliminary GN&C design analysis. ANTARES will find useful application in engineering analysis, mission operations, crew training, avionics-in-the-loop testing, etc. This paper focuses on the entry simulation aspect of ANTARES, which is part of a bigger simulation package supporting the entire mission profile of the Orion vehicle. The unique aspects of entry GN&C design are covered, including how the simulation is being used for Monte Carlo dispersion analysis and for support of linear stability analysis. Sample simulation output from ANTARES is presented in an appendix.

  10. Distributed Method to Optimal Profile Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geun I.

    Current ground automation tools for Optimal Profile Descent (OPD) procedures utilize path stretching and speed profile change to maintain proper merging and spacing requirements at high traffic terminal area. However, low predictability of aircraft's vertical profile and path deviation during decent add uncertainty to computing estimated time of arrival, a key information that enables the ground control center to manage airspace traffic effectively. This paper uses an OPD procedure that is based on a constant flight path angle to increase the predictability of the vertical profile and defines an OPD optimization problem that uses both path stretching and speed profile change while largely maintaining the original OPD procedure. This problem minimizes the cumulative cost of performing OPD procedures for a group of aircraft by assigning a time cost function to each aircraft and a separation cost function to a pair of aircraft. The OPD optimization problem is then solved in a decentralized manner using dual decomposition techniques under inter-aircraft ADS-B mechanism. This method divides the optimization problem into more manageable sub-problems which are then distributed to the group of aircraft. Each aircraft solves its assigned sub-problem and communicate the solutions to other aircraft in an iterative process until an optimal solution is achieved thus decentralizing the computation of the optimization problem.

  11. Non-functioning paraganglioma of the urinary bladder: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yongqing; Chen, Duqun; Yu, Zuhu; Ni, Liangchao; Yang, Shangqi

    2014-03-01

    Paragangliomas are extra-adrenal tumors of the autonomic nervous system and may be found within the skull base, neck, mediastinum and periaortic region. Paragangliomas of the urinary bladder are rare, and non-functioning bladder paraganglioma is even rarer and not easily recognized. Histological examination is often key in leading to a definitive diagnosis. The current report presents a case of a 28-year-old female with urinary bladder paraganglioma. The patient presented with no classical signs and symptoms, and these were only appreciated following histological examination of a transurethral resection specimen that elucidated the correct diagnosis. In the present report, the clinical features, diagnosis, management and pathological observations of paraganglioma of the urinary bladder are discussed. PMID:24520306

  12. Design and Development of the MSL Descent Stage Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Guernsey, Carl S.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, The Mars Science Laboratory mission successfully landed the largest interplanetary rover ever built, Curiosity, on the surface of Mars. The Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of this mission was by far the most complex landing ever attempted on a planetary body. The Descent Stage Propulsion System played an integral and critical role during Curiosity's EDL. The Descent Stage Propulsion System was a one of a kind hydrazine propulsion system designed specifically for the EDL phase of the MSL mission. It was designed, built, and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the design and development of the MSL Descent Stage Propulsion System. Driving requirements, system design, component selection, operational sequence of the system at Mars, new developments, and key challenges will be discussed.

  13. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  14. Automation for Accommodating Fuel-Efficient Descents in Constrained Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coopenbarger, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous descents at low engine power are desired to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and noise during arrival operations. The challenge is to allow airplanes to fly these types of efficient descents without interruption during busy traffic conditions. During busy conditions today, airplanes are commonly forced to fly inefficient, step-down descents as airtraffic controllers work to ensure separation and maximize throughput. NASA in collaboration with government and industry partners is developing new automation to help controllers accommodate continuous descents in the presence of complex traffic and airspace constraints. This automation relies on accurate trajectory predictions to compute strategic maneuver advisories. The talk will describe the concept behind this new automation and provide an overview of the simulations and flight testing used to develop and refine its underlying technology.

  15. Ascent/descent ancillary data production user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brans, H. R.; Seacord, A. W., II; Ulmer, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Product, also called the A/D BET because it contains a Best Estimate of the Trajectory (BET), is a collection of trajectory, attitude, and atmospheric related parameters computed for the ascent and descent phases of each Shuttle Mission. These computations are executed shortly after the event in a post-flight environment. A collection of several routines including some stand-alone routines constitute what is called the Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Production Program. A User's Guide for that program is given. It is intended to provide the reader with all the information necessary to generate an Ascent or a Descent Ancillary Data Product. It includes descriptions of the input data and output data for each routine, and contains explicit instructions on how to run each routine. A description of the final output product is given.

  16. Vesicoureteral reflux and bladder dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Lee, Yong Seung; Im, Young Jae

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between vesicoureteral reflux and bladder dysfunction is inseparable and has long been emphasized. However, the primary concern of all physicians treating patients with vesicoureteral reflux is the prevention of renal scarring and eventual deterioration of renal function. Bladder dysfunction, urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux are the three important factors which are closely related to each other and contribute to the formation of renal scar. Especially, there is ongoing discussion regarding the role of bladder dysfunction in the prognosis of both medically and surgically treated vesicoureteral reflux. The effect of bladder dysfunction on VUR is mostly via inadequate sphincter relaxation during infancy which is closer to immature bladder dyscoordination rather than true dysfunction. But after toilet training, functional obstruction caused by voluntary sphincter constriction during voiding is responsible through elevation in bladder pressure, thus distorting the architecture of bladder and ureterovesical junction. Reports suggest that voiding phase abnormalities in lower urinary tract dysfunction contributes to lower spontaneous resolution rate of VUR. However, filling phase abnormalities such as involuntary detrusor contraction can also cause VUR even in the absence of dysfunctional voiding. With regards to the effect of bladder dysfunction on treatment, meta-analysis reveals that the cure rate of VUR following endoscopic treatment is less in children with bladder bowel dysfunction but there is no difference for open surgery. The pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction associated with UTI can be explained by the ‘milk-back’ of contaminated urine back into the bladder and significant residual urine resulting from functional outlet obstruction. In addition, involuntary detrusor contraction can decrease perfusion of the bladder mucosa thus decreasing mucosal immunity and creating a condition prone to UTI. In terms of renal scarring, dysfunctional voiding seems to be more closely related to renal damage in association with VUR than overactive bladder. However, studies show that UTI can induce renal scarring even without VUR present and urodynamic abnormalities are quite often detected in these cases. Whether reflux of sterile urine in bladder dysfunction can cause significant renal scarring, especially when intrarenal reflux is present remains controversial. Another issue that warrants further research is the direct relationship between bladder dysfunction and renal scarring, since some reports suggest that these two conditions share a common genotype. Recently some studies have suggest VUR as a causal factor of bladder dysfunction, supported by the fact that bladder dysfunction resolves after injection therapy of VUR. Further study with more objective evaluation of bladder dysfunction may be needed. PMID:26816705

  17. Air-Traffic Controllers Evaluate The Descent Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of Descent Advisor algorithm: software automation aid intended to assist air-traffic controllers in spacing traffic and meeting specified times or arrival. Based partly on mathematical models of weather conditions and performances of aircraft, it generates suggested clearances, including top-of-descent points and speed-profile data to attain objectives. Study focused on operational characteristics with specific attention to how it can be used for prediction, spacing, and metering.

  18. Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Adult Urinary Bladder: A Rare Case Report of Misclassification as Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelven Weijing; Wu, Fiona Mei Wen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) of the adult urinary bladder is a rare malignant tumour. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) of the bladder is a benign genitourinary tumour that may appear variable histologically but usually lacks unequivocal malignant traits. Techniques like flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry may be used to differentiate these two tumours. Our patient, a 46-year-old male, had rapidly recurring lower urinary tract symptoms after two transurethral resections of the prostate. He subsequently underwent a transvesical prostatectomy which showed IMT on histology. However, his symptoms did not resolve and an open resection done at our institution revealed a 6?cm tumour arising from the right bladder neck. This time, histology was ERMS with diffuse anaplasia of the bladder. Rapid recurrence of urinary symptoms with prostate regrowth after surgery is unusual. Differential diagnoses of uncommon bladder malignancies should be considered if there is an inconsistent clinical course as treatment approaches are different. PMID:25737794

  19. Entry descent and landing systems for future missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncy, J.; Lebleu, D.; Arfi, P.; Schipper, A. M.

    2010-07-01

    In 2005, the Huygens probe, designed by Thales Alenia Space, France, successfully completed its entry and descent in Titan's atmosphere. In the frame of the Aurora Exploration Program, ESA has initiated industrial studies for the ExoMars mission. The Thales Alenia Space France-led consortium was awarded the contract for the design, development and manufacturing of the Entry and Descent System under Thales Alenia Space—Italy mission prime. Huygens and ExoMars constitute major European milestones in the field of atmospheric entry and descent. Eight out of the ten bodies larger than Mercury in the Solar System have a significant atmosphere to descent in, either to reach a solid surface, or to explore the atmosphere itself. The gained experience in Entry Descent and Landing design will enhance European industry capability to contribute to future planetary exploration missions. This paper assesses the different environments and conditions that Entry Descent and Landing Systems will meet. It discusses how Europe's Huygens and ExoMars experience will apply in such environments and identifies the critical technologies needed to complement it. It concludes on the elements of a roadmap for the related technological development.

  20. A descent of the aurora over Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiter, Daniel; Partamies, Noora

    2014-05-01

    A very large statistical study (? 4 × 105 measurements) into the peak emission height of the aurora has shown that the aurora over Lapland descended significantly between 1996 and 2007. The study was performed using images from a network of ground-based all-sky cameras which form part of the MIRACLE (Magnetometers-Ionospheric Radar-All-sky Cameras Large Experiment) network, and are located at various observation stations across northern Finland and Sweden. The height of the aurora was first measured about a century ago. Since then, it has generally been assumed that the peak emission height of any particular auroral emission is constant for similar geomagnetic conditions. The present work was motivated by the need to improve estimates of the height of the aurora used to calculate other ionospheric and auroral properties, such as optical flow velocities and auroral arc widths. In recent years MIRACLE has produced approximately 105 images of the aurora per station per year. In order to analyse such a large number of images, a novel fast and automatic method was developed for finding the peak emission height of an auroral structure from a pair of all-sky camera images with overlapping fields of view. This method has been applied to all auroral images recorded by the MIRACLE intensified CCD cameras in operation between 1996 and 2007. Such a large data set allows the study of variations in the height of the aurora with time (yearly, monthly, hourly) and with solar and geomagnetic indices such as F10.7 and Kp. Results from the statistical study show that the peak emission height of green (557.7 nm, O1S - O1D transition) aurora over Lapland descended by about 10 km between 1996 and 2007. This descent occurred independently of the solar cycle, and is thought to be due to a cooling and contraction of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  1. Female Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Daniel S; Nitti, Victor W

    2016-04-01

    The non-specific symptoms the patients express upon the presentation of female bladder outlet obstruction make it a challenge to diagnose. There are subtle differences between the obstructed patient and those whose bladders are underactive and/or fail to mount a detrusor contraction. These disparities can be extracted through a thorough history and examination. At times, the clinician may utilize nomograms, non-invasive uroflow, and urodynamics with the addition of fluoroscopy to establish the diagnosis of obstruction. Management of the obstruction depends on the nature of the condition, whether functional or anatomical. The increase in the number of sling procedures performed to treat stress urinary incontinence has resulted in a rise in the number of iatrogenic obstructions. The temporal relationship between surgery and obstruction is the key to identifying the problem. PMID:26902625

  2. Metabonomic profiling of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Hong, Yanjun; Ho, Paul C; Mahendran, Ratha; Raman Nee Mani, Lata; Chiong, Edmund; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan

    2015-02-01

    Early diagnosis and life-long surveillance are clinically important to improve the long-term survival of bladder cancer patients. Currently, a noninvasive biomarker that is as sensitive and specific as cystoscopy in detecting bladder tumors is lacking. Metabonomics is a complementary approach for identifying perturbed metabolic pathways in bladder cancer. Significant progress has been made using modern metabonomic techniques to characterize and distinguish bladder cancer patients from control subjects, identify marker metabolites, and shed insights on the disease biology and potential therapeutic targets. With its rapid development, metabonomics has the potential to impact the clinical management of bladder cancer patients in the future by revolutionizing the diagnosis and life-long surveillance strategies and stratifying patients for diagnostic, surgical, and therapeutic clinical trials. An introduction to metabonomics, typical metabonomic workflow, and critical evaluation of metabonomic investigations in identifying biomarkers for the diagnosis of bladder cancer are presented. PMID:25388527

  3. Bladder outlet obstruction treated with transurethral ultrasonic aspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Terrence R.

    1991-07-01

    Fifty-nine males with bladder outlet obstruction were treated with transurethral ultrasonic aspiration of the prostate. Utilizing a 26.5 French urethral sheath, surgery was accomplished with a 10 French, 0-700 micron vibration level ultrasonic tip with an excursion rate of 39 kHz. Complete removal of the adenoma was accomplished, followed by transurethral electrocautery biopsies of both lateral lobes to compare pathologic specimens. One-year follow-up revealed satisfactory voiding patterns in 57 of 59 men (96%). Two men developed bladder neck contractures. Pathologic comparisons showed 100% correlation between aspirated and TUR specimens (56 BPH, 3 adeno-carcinoma). Forty-sevel men were active sexually preoperatively (6 with inflatable penile prostheses). Post ultrasonic aspiration, 46 men had erectile function similar to preoperative levels with one patient suffering erectile dysfunction. Forty men (85%) had antegrade ejaculation while 7 (15%) experienced retrograde or retarded ejaculation. No patients were incontinent.

  4. Pharmacogenomics in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide. For patients presenting with muscle-invasive disease, the five year survival rate is approximately 50%. Cisplatinum-based combination chemotherapy is recommended in the neoadjuvant setting prior to cystectomy and is also the first line in the metastatic setting. However, the survival benefit of such therapy is modest. The identification of pharmacogenomic biomarkers would enable the rational and personalized treatment of patients by selecting those patients that would benefit most from such therapies sparing others the unnecessary toxicity. Conventional therapies would be recommended for an expected responder while a non-responder would be considered for alternative therapies selected on the basis of the individual’s molecular profile. Although few effective bladder cancer therapies have been introduced in the past 30 years, several targeted therapies against the molecular drivers of bladder cancer appear promising. This review summarizes pharmacogenomic biomarkers that require further investigation and/or prospective evaluation, publicly available tools for drug discovery and biomarker identification from in vitro data, and targeted agents that have been evaluated in preclinical models. PMID:24360659

  5. Human Scleral Structural Stiffness Increases More Rapidly With Age in Donors of African Descent Compared to Donors of European Descent

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Massimo A.; Grytz, Rafael; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Bruno, Luigi; Girkin, Christopher A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We tested the hypothesis that the variation of peripapillary scleral structural stiffness with age is different in donors of European (ED) and African (AD) descent. Methods. Posterior scleral shells from normal eyes from donors of European (n = 20 pairs; previously reported) and African (n = 9 pairs) descent aged 0 and 90 years old were inflation tested within 48 hours post mortem. Scleral shells were pressurized from 5 to 45 mm Hg and the full-field, 3-dimensional (3D) deformation of the outer surface was recorded at submicrometric accuracy using speckle interferometry (ESPI). Mean maximum principal (tensile) strain of the peripapillary and midperipheral regions surrounding the optic nerve head (ONH) were fit using a functional mixed effects model that accounts for intradonor variability, same-race correlation, and spatial autocorrelation to estimate the effect of race on the age-related changes in mechanical scleral strain. Results. Mechanical tensile strain significantly decreased with age in the peripapillary sclera in the African and European descent groups (P < 0.001), but the age-related stiffening was significantly greater in the African descent group (P < 0.05). Maximum principal strain in the peripapillary sclera was significantly higher than in the midperipheral sclera for both ethnic groups. Conclusions. The sclera surrounding the ONH stiffens more rapidly with age in the African descent group compared to the European group. Stiffening of the peripapillary sclera with age may be related to the higher prevalence of glaucoma in the elderly and persons of African descent. PMID:25237162

  6. Bladder tuberculosis after BCG therapy.

    PubMed

    Bouhabel, A; Takoucht, F; Bousbia, W; Hamada, B; Lemaiaci, N

    2008-01-01

    The initial treatment of bladder cancer is transurethral resection (TUR), but this cancer recurs at an important rate, and has 14% chance of progression after TUR alone. Intravesical chemotherapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is effective against recurrence and progression of bladder cancer. However, this therapeutic expose to many local and systemic side-effects. We report a case of 63-year-old man who presented bladder tuberculosis after a BCG therapy, which required 6 months of antitubercular therapy. PMID:18087129

  7. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  8. Overactive bladder--pharmacological aspects.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K E

    2002-01-01

    The micturition reflex can be initiated by contraction or distension of detrusor smooth muscle cells, or by signals from the urothelium. It has been shown that bladder distension causes release of ATP from the urothelium, and that ATP can activate P2X3 receptors on suburothelial afferent nerve terminals to evoke a neural discharge. However, most probably the activation of afferent fibres during bladder filling involves not only ATP, but a cascade of inhibitory and stimulatory transmitters/mediators. These mechanisms may be targets for future drugs. Both in the normal and functionally disturbed bladder, muscarinic receptor stimulation produces the main part of detrusor contraction, but evidence is accumulating that in disease states, such as neurogenic bladders, outflow obstruction, idiopathic detrusor instability, interstitial cystitis, and also in the ageing bladder, a non-cholinergic activation via purinergic receptors may occur. If this component of activation is responsible not only for part of the bladder contractions, but also for the symptoms of the overactive bladder, it should be considered an important target for therapeutic interventions. Drags blocking different P2X receptor subtypes, or counteracting bladder contraction via other mechanisms, e.g. beta3-adrenoceptor stimulation, may be developed for treatment of the overactive bladder. PMID:12475021

  9. MR imaging of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Gautham K; Siegelman, Evan S

    2004-08-01

    MR imaging is a useful modality for evaluating diseases of the bladder. MR imaging can detect and stage bladder cancer by determining the presence and depth of muscle invasion. Direct multiplanar imaging and superb soft-tissue contrast make MR imaging an ideal modality for evaluating less common neoplastic diseases of the bladder, such as urachal carcinoma, and tumors that develop within bladder diverticula. Dynamic breath-held fast T2-weighted imaging can evaluate for cystocele and other components of pelvic floor relaxation. PMID:15271370

  10. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malin, M.C.; Caplinger, M.A.; Carr, M.H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (???6 ?? 6 ?? 12 cm, including baffle; <500 gm), low power requirements (<2.5 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise). The intent of the investigation is to acquire nested images over a range of resolutions, from 8 m/pixel to better than 1 cm/pixel, during the roughly 2 min it takes the MPL to descend from 8 km to the surface under parachute and rocket-powered deceleration. Observational goals will include studies of (1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); (2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief); and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 x 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 X 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a "best final nonpowered descent image" will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 x 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Design of automation tools for management of descent traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Nedell, William

    1988-01-01

    The design of an automated air traffic control system based on a hierarchy of advisory tools for controllers is described. Compatibility of the tools with the human controller, a key objective of the design, is achieved by a judicious selection of tasks to be automated and careful attention to the design of the controller system interface. The design comprises three interconnected subsystems referred to as the Traffic Management Advisor, the Descent Advisor, and the Final Approach Spacing Tool. Each of these subsystems provides a collection of tools for specific controller positions and tasks. This paper focuses primarily on the Descent Advisor which provides automation tools for managing descent traffic. The algorithms, automation modes, and graphical interfaces incorporated in the design are described. Information generated by the Descent Advisor tools is integrated into a plan view traffic display consisting of a high-resolution color monitor. Estimated arrival times of aircraft are presented graphically on a time line, which is also used interactively in combination with a mouse input device to select and schedule arrival times. Other graphical markers indicate the location of the fuel-optimum top-of-descent point and the predicted separation distances of aircraft at a designated time-control point. Computer generated advisories provide speed and descent clearances which the controller can issue to aircraft to help them arrive at the feeder gate at the scheduled times or with specified separation distances. Two types of horizontal guidance modes, selectable by the controller, provide markers for managing the horizontal flightpaths of aircraft under various conditions. The entire system consisting of descent advisor algorithm, a library of aircraft performance models, national airspace system data bases, and interactive display software has been implemented on a workstation made by Sun Microsystems, Inc. It is planned to use this configuration in operational evaluations at an en route center.

  12. A case of severe bladder wall hypertrophy: bladder cancer or sequela of bladder outlet obstruction?

    PubMed

    Tyson, Mark; French, Margaret; McNulty, Nancy; Lerner, Lori

    2009-02-01

    Angiosarcomas are soft tissue malignancies of connective tissue origin with rapid hematogenous spread, but are extremely uncommon primary tumors of the bladder with approximately ten reported cases in the 20th century. We report a 59-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and gross hematuria who underwent a bladder biopsy for a markedly thickened bladder wall on CT scan. Biopsy specimens demonstrated deep vascular malformations that were concerning for a malignancy. Intense pathological review was initially not definitive and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed for his symptoms. Interestingly, surgery reversed the bladder process. This case serves as a unique example of how the sequelae of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) can resemble a malignant process on presentation but represent no more than hypertrophic adaptations in the bladder wall musculature of a patient with BPH and significant outlet obstruction. PMID:19222895

  13. Neck Swelling (Symptom Checker)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... t serious. Follow this chart if you have any swelling or lumps on your neck. SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE Begin Here 1. Do you have lumps or swelling on both sides of your neck? No Go to Question 4.* Yes 2. Do you have a fever, sore throat, ...

  14. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a person’s risk of head and neck cancer. Marijuana use. Research suggests that people who have used marijuana may be at higher risk for head and ... head and neck cancer include: Avoiding alcohol Discussing marijuana as a risk factor with your doctor and ...

  15. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePLUS

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS History AHNS Leadership Past Presidents In Memory Professionalism & Ethics Find A Specialist Humanitarian Efforts AHNS ...

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Ye, Yuanqing; Siddiq, Afshan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Kooperberg, Charles; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Prescott, Jennifer; Porru, Stefano; Dinney, Colin P.; Malats, Núria; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark; Jacobs, Eric J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Tang, Wei; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth; Tjønneland, Anne; Brenan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Conti, David; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Kamat, Ashish M.; Lerner, Seth P.; Barton Grossman, H.; Lin, Jie; Gu, Jian; Pu, Xia; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Johnson, Alison; Schned, Alan; Armenti, Karla R.; Hosain, G.M.; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Ryan Diver, W.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Haiman, Chris A.; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Vineis, Paolo; Wu, Xifeng; Silverman, Debra T.; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 11 independent susceptibility loci associated with bladder cancer risk. To discover additional risk variants, we conducted a new GWAS of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls, followed by a meta-analysis with two independently published bladder cancer GWAS, resulting in a combined analysis of 6911 cases and 11 814 controls of European descent. TaqMan genotyping of 13 promising single nucleotide polymorphisms with P < 1 × 10?5 was pursued in a follow-up set of 801 cases and 1307 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs10936599 on 3q26.2 (P = 4.53 × 10?9) and rs907611 on 11p15.5 (P = 4.11 × 10?8). Two notable loci were also identified that approached genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 on 20p12.2 (P = 7.13 × 10?7) and rs4510656 on 6p22.3 (P = 6.98 × 10?7); these require further studies for confirmation. In conclusion, our study has identified new susceptibility alleles for bladder cancer risk that require fine-mapping and laboratory investigation, which could further understanding into the biological underpinnings of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24163127

  17. Bladder conservation for muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Peter; Dubash, Suraiya

    2012-08-01

    In the UK alone, approximately 10,000 patients are diagnosed with bladder cancer each year. Of these, muscle-invasive bladder cancer stage T2 or T3 accounts for 10-15%, with the remainder being non-muscle-invasive tumors, dealt with by local intravesical treatment. This group of patients are often older, the median age at presentation being 65-70 years and since this is a smoking-associated cancer there are often significant comorbidities. Transitional cell carcinoma is the most common histological type and comprises >90% of bladder cancers. Other cell types include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, sarcoma, carcinosarcoma, lymphoma and melanoma. In bladder cancer, the most important prognostic factors are stage and grade. Cystectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy all have a role in the management of bladder cancer. In many centers across the world, the standard management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer, stage T2 and T3, is radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. There is now increasing evidence that modern nonsurgical approaches using chemoradiation achieve results at least as good as those with surgery and enable bladder preservation in the majority of patients. Optimal chemoradiation schedules and the role of radiosensitizers remain important areas of research to optimize the bladder-preserving approach. Ultimately, a prospective randomized trial is needed to compare modern state-of-the-art surgery with chemoradiation to provide high-level evidence on which informed patient choices can be made. PMID:23030221

  18. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Keay, Susan K.; Birder, Lori A.; Chai, Toby C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology. PMID:24900993

  19. Promotion in urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S M

    1983-01-01

    Aromatic amines, including 2-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl and benzidine, are known urinary bladder carcinogens in man and other species, but in rodents, aromatic amines and amides have usually induced liver tumors, occasionally also with tumors of the bladder and other tissues. Variations in organ specificity are related to differences in metabolism; for the production of bladder tumors, the rates of acetylation and deacetylation appear to be critical. Bladder specific carcinogens in rodents and other species have subsequently been identified, including N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) administered in the drinking water, N-[(4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl]formamide (FANFT) in the diet and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) instilled intravesically. When low doses of several bladder carcinogens (BBN, FANFT, 2-acetylaminofluorene, and 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine) are administered to rats, either simultaneously or sequentially, a synergistic effect is observed with respect to bladder carcinogenesis. In addition, a multistage carcinogenesis process has been demonstrated for the rat bladder using MNU or FANFT as initiators, and dietary sodium saccharin, sodium cyclamate, or tryptophan as promoters. Calculi (or pellets) appear to enhance the promotion process but are not necessary for it to occur. Recent studies also indicate that urine has a role in the promoting process. The urothelium normally has a very low mitotic rate. If mucosal proliferation is increased, such as during fetal development or during regeneration and repair of an ulcer, the bladder appears to be considerably more sensitive to the effects of promoting substances. For example, if sodium saccharin is administered to rats after ulceration of the bladder, even without prior administration of an initiator, bladder carcinoma develops. Under these conditions, the substance appears as a carcinogen. Human populations with increased bladder epithelial proliferation, such as fetus, infants, patients with bacterial cystitis or men with partially obstructive prostatism, may have increased susceptibility to the action of carcinogenic or promoting stimuli. PMID:6873031

  20. Bladder repair following iatrogenic cystotomy in irradiated small capacity bladders

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Jia Yi; Durai, Pradeep; Wu, Mei Wen Fiona; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-01-01

    During laparotomy in a previously irradiated and operated pelvis, incidental cystotomies can occur and a tension-free, watertight, two- or three-layer closure of the bladder may be impossible. We herein report two cases of iatrogenic defects of the bladders in post-irradiated pelvises and compare the two different methods of bladder repair employed – an ileal augmentation segment used in the first case and bovine pericardial graft used in the second. Successful closures of the bladder defects were achieved in both cases. Native irradiated bowel and bovine pericardium can be useful substitutes in situations involving bladder defects in a previously irradiated pelvis. The advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches are also herein discussed. PMID:25820861

  1. Vulvar Metastasis from Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; El Rassy, Elie; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Hawaux, Eric; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is a very rare entity; few cases are reported in the English literature. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological characteristics, evolution, and treatment of a patient with vulvar metastasis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder followed by a brief review of the reported cases in the literature. PMID:26000184

  2. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James Sa

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  3. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  4. Medical management of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ubee, Sarvpreet S.; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Singh, Gurpreet

    2010-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB), as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat. PMID:20877608

  5. Crew Procedures for Continuous Descent Arrivals Using Conventional Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Williams, David H.; Lewis, Elliot T,

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study which investigated the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures for conducting a descent through a busy terminal area, using conventional transport-category automation. This research was part of the Low Noise Flight Procedures (LNFP) element within the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project, that addressed development of flight guidance, and supporting pilot and Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures for low noise operations. The procedures and chart were designed to be easy to understand, and to make it easy for the crew to make changes via the Flight Management Computer Control-Display Unit (FMC-CDU) to accommodate changes from ATC. The test runs were intended to represent situations typical of what exists in many of today's terminal areas, including interruptions to the descent in the form of clearances issued by ATC.

  6. Mars Smart Lander Simulations for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, S. A.; Way, D. W.; Balaram, J.

    2002-01-01

    Two primary simulations have been developed and are being updated for the Mars Smart Lander Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). The high fidelity engineering end-to-end EDL simulation that is based on NASA Langley's Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) and the end-to-end real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation testbed, which is based on NASA JPL's (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS). This paper presents the status of these Mars Smart Lander EDL end-to-end simulations at this time. Various models, capabilities, as well as validation and verification for these simulations are discussed.

  7. Rosetta Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and Philae's Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-09-01

    In November 2014 the Rosetta mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its Philae lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more challenging. Philae fell almost radially towards 67P, as shown in an animation produced by the European Space Agency (ESA) prior to the event. Below, we investigate whether it is possible to model the spacecraft's descent time and impact speed using concepts taught in an introductory physics course.

  8. Flight Data Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Elmain M.; Winterhalter, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Winterhalter, NASA Engineering and Safety Center Chief Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsor a 3-year effort to collect entry, descent, and landing material and to establish a NASA-wide archive to serve the material. The principle focus of this task was to identify entry, descent, and landing repository material that was at risk of being permanently lost due to damage, decay, and undocumented storage. To provide NASA-wide access to this material, a web-based digital archive was created. This document contains the outcome of the effort.

  9. Space shuttle descent design: From development to operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crull, T. J.; Hite, R. E., III

    1985-01-01

    The descent guidance system, the descent trajectories design, and generating of the associated flight products are discussed. The programs which allow the successful transitions from development to STS operations, resulting in reduced manpower requirements and compressed schedules for flight design cycles are addressed. The topics include: (1) continually upgraded tools for the job, i.e., consolidating tools via electronic data transfers, tailoring general purpose software for needs, easy access to tools through an interactive approach, and appropriate flexibility to allow design changes and provide growth capability; (2) stabilizing the flight profile designs (I-loads) in an uncertain environment; and (3) standardizing external interfaces within performance and subsystems constraints of the Orbiter.

  10. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study: Phase 1 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Komar, David R.; Munk, Michelle M.; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Powell, Richard W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wilhite, Alan W.; Kinney, David J.; McGuire, M. Kathleen; Arnold, James O.; Howard, Austin R.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Studak, Joseph W.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.; Llama, Eduardo G.; Casoliva, Jordi; Ivanov, Mark C.; Clark, Ian; Sengupta, Anita

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the motivation, approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission

  11. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a possibility with long-term administration, the dose should be decreased to 16,000 IU after 3 years. High doses of beta-carotene should be avoided based on a large clinical trial reporting a 25% increase in the number of cases of prostate cancer and a statistically significant increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Vitamin B6 has been studied in several clinical trials in bladder cancer. The US-based Veterans Administration cooperative study found benefit for vitamin B6 when given as a single agent. Data for vitamins C and E are insufficient to recommend either agent as stand-alone treatment. Nonetheless, each of these vitamins is known to have beneficial effects, including improved function of the immune system. It is possible that only a small percentage of patients with bladder cancer respond to vitamins B6, C, or E, yet each is safe, nontoxic, and inexpensive. In an effort to pool the efficacy of individual agents and to increase the power of study, the authors evaluated the combination of vitamins A, B6, C, and E in a double-blind trial. The observed 50% 5-year reduction in tumor recurrence was highly significant and greater than would be expected for any of the individual ingredients and suggests that combinations of nutritional agents may be most appropriate. A large-volume study along similar lines is being conducted. Among the numerous other compounds and dietary substances purported to have chemopreventive effect, soybeans, garlic, and green tea stand out as having the greatest promise and can freely be recommended to patients. For synthetically synthesized agents such as celecoxib, piroxicam, or DFMO, recommendations must be deferred until the results of clinical trials are conclusively in favor of their use. Many of the dietary factors found to be protective against bladder cancer are being investigated in other cancers and are beneficial to general health. Although naturally occurring nutrients are ideal, especially because the delicate balance of various micronutrients might be impossible to synthesize in the laboratory, the general population finds it easier to take vitamin supplements. Unfortunately, dietary changes such as decreasing fat and increasing fruit and vegetable intake are more difficult to initiate. There is a mistaken notion that simply because an agent is naturally occurring, it cannot be as beneficial as taking a substance synthesized in the laboratory. Even in a high-risk group such as nuclear-bomb survivors in Japan, high consumption of vegetables and fruit is protective against bladder cancer [44]. Encouraging patients to follow an essentially healthy food habit lifestyle will be a significant contribution in the fight against cancer. PMID:12109342

  12. Primary multiple clear cell variant urothelial carcinomas of urinary bladder: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yutao; Huang, Jun; Feng, Hao; Tang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell variant urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder was very rare. There were only 6 report articles included by Pubmed and total 8 cases had been described till now. All of the past reports described single tumor of urinary bladder, but multiple carcinomas had not been reported. Here we reported a 65-years-old Chinese man who complained of intermittent gross hematuria and odynuria for more than 2 months in January 2013. Only one cauliflower-like tumor was detected approximately in the left wall of the urinary bladder with cystoscopy and the biopsy specimen was diagnosed as "urothelial carcinoma, high grade". However, three tumors were found in anterior wall (×2) near neck of urinary bladder and posterior wall (×1) of the urinary bladder during transurethral resection of the bladder tumor. Typical urothelial carcinoma with partial clear cell appearance made it difficult to make a precise pathological diagnosis and immunohistochemical stain helped to diagnose the case as clear cell variant urothelial carcinoma, but not metastasis of the renal cell carcinoma. Finally, computerized tomographic scanning confirmed that there was no primary tumor in the kidney. The clinical and pathological characteristic had not been identified for the limited reports. More work should be done to know this kind of tumor well for guiding clinical therapy. PMID:25031765

  13. Melanoma - neck (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  14. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  15. Isolation of urothelial cells from bladder tissue.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Namrata

    2013-01-01

    Presented below is a methodology for the isolation, expansion, and maintenance of urothelial cells derived from human bladder. Such bladder-derived urothelial cells, taken together with bladder or alternately sourced smooth muscle cells, may be complexed with an appropriately shaped biodegradable scaffold to create regenerative constructs capable of seeding formation of new bladder or bladder-like neo-organs upon implantation in human cystectomy patients. PMID:23494417

  16. [Transurethral resection of bladder neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Tóth, J; Pósta, B; Schmautzer, J; Kisbenedek, L; Balogh, F

    1976-01-01

    The technique of removal of bladder tumours is discussed on the basis of experience with transurethral resection performed on 200 patients suffering from bladder tumour (113 benign and 87 malignant tumours). The indications for the intervention are as follows. With benign tumours, resection has to be given preference over exposure. When malignant tumours are operable and situated on the mobile part of the bladder, radical surgery is recommended. When the tumour is in some other position, transurethral resection is the procedure of choice. PMID:1020578

  17. Müllerianosis of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Olivia Vella, Josefa Elizabeth; Nair, Nithin; Ferryman, Stephen Robert; Athavale, Ramanand; Latthe, Pallavi; Hirschowitz, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Müllerianosis of the urinary bladder is a rare condition that encompasses 3 histological entities (endometriosis, endocervicosis, and endosalpingiosis). The authors report 2 patients with bladder müllerianosis, one of whom had endometriosis and the other a history of past pelvic surgery, describe the histological and cystoscopic features, and review the literature on this condition. Mucosal hyperemia and submucosal nodules or cysts with associated fibrosis and distortion of the bladder wall may mimic malignancy on cystoscopy, as may the infiltrative growth pattern sometimes evident histologically. Recognition of this complex diagnostic entity is important to avoid misdiagnosis and inappropriate investigation. There is a clinical association with endometriosis and past pelvic surgery. PMID:21632636

  18. Outcome Measurement of Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Lien, Chi-Shun; Chieh-Lung Chou, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common disease. The diagnosis of OAB is based on its symptoms without physiological markers of disease activity. Frequently used assessment methods for OAB include frequency volume chart; urodynamic studies; patient-reported outcomes questionnaires, such as the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, King's Health Questionnaire, patient perception of bladder conditions; and OAB symptom score. The severity of OAB and degree of improvement after treatment can be obtained by comprehensive evaluation. However, a consensus of which evaluations should be used to define the severity of OAB is still lacking. We expect a proper OAB assessment with universal acceptance in the future. PMID:26676702

  19. Simulation Results for Airborne Precision Spacing along Continuous Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a fast-time simulation experiment and a high-fidelity simulator validation with merging streams of aircraft flying Continuous Descent Arrivals through generic airspace to a runway at Dallas-Ft Worth. Aircraft made small speed adjustments based on an airborne-based spacing algorithm, so as to arrive at the threshold exactly at the assigned time interval behind their Traffic-To-Follow. The 40 aircraft were initialized at different altitudes and speeds on one of four different routes, and then merged at different points and altitudes while flying Continuous Descent Arrivals. This merging and spacing using flight deck equipment and procedures to augment or implement Air Traffic Management directives is called Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing, an important subset of a larger Airborne Precision Spacing functionality. This research indicates that Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing initiated while at cruise altitude and well prior to the Terminal Radar Approach Control entry can significantly contribute to the delivery of aircraft at a specified interval to the runway threshold with a high degree of accuracy and at a reduced pilot workload. Furthermore, previously documented work has shown that using a Continuous Descent Arrival instead of a traditional step-down descent can save fuel, reduce noise, and reduce emissions. Research into Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing is a cooperative effort between government and industry partners.

  20. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more…

  1. Stress within a Bicultural Context for Adolescents of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Andrea J.; Roberts, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Folkman and Lazarus's theory of stress and coping was used to develop a measure assessing the perceived stress within a bicultural context. Middle school students of Mexican descent (N=881) reported their perceived stress from intergenerational acculturation gaps, within-group discrimination, out-group discrimination, and monolingual stress.…

  2. A Portfolio of Outstanding Americans of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelevier, Benjamin, Jr.

    A cross section of Mexican American achievement is presented in a portfolio of 37 portraits of outstanding Americans of Mexican descent. Drawn in black and white on heavy paper stock by Mr. David L. Rodriguez, the sketches are suitable for display purposes. With the likenesses are biographical sketches in both English and Spanish which were…

  3. Elderhostels: Teaching and Learning with Americans of German Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichmann, Eberhard; Reichmann, Ruth M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes three workshops designed for an Elderhostel program whose audience is largely Americans of German descent and the grandparents of today's students. The workshop topics include an introduction to the German-American experience and German-American studies; German American customs, beliefs, and traditions; and German-American genealogy,…

  4. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance: Uncontrolled descent. 31.19 Section 31.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... single failure of the heater assembly, fuel cell system, gas value system, or maneuvering vent system,...

  5. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance: Uncontrolled descent. 31.19 Section 31.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... single failure of the heater assembly, fuel cell system, gas value system, or maneuvering vent system,...

  6. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent. PMID:24636222

  7. Women of African Descent: Persistence in Completing Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddrisu, Vannetta Bailey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the educational persistence of women of African descent (WOAD) in pursuit of a doctorate degree at universities in the southeastern United States. WOAD are women of African ancestry born outside the African continent. These women are heirs to an inner dogged determination and spirit to survive despite all odds (Pulliam, 2003,…

  8. Origin of INSL3-mediated testicular descent in therian mammals

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Il; Semyonov, Jenia; Chang, Chia Lin; Yi, Wei; Warren, Wesley; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2008-01-01

    Testicular descent is a unique physiological adaptation found in therian mammals allowing optimal spermatogenesis below core body temperature. Recent studies show that INSL3, produced by Leydig cells, and its receptor LGR8 (RXFP2) are essential for mediating the transabdominal phase of testicular descent during early development. However, the origin and genetic basis for this physiological adaptation is not clear. Using syntenic mapping and the functional characterization of contemporary and resurrected relaxin family hormones, we show that derivation of INSL3-mediated testicular descent involved the duplication of an ancestral RLN3-like gene that encodes an indiscriminate ligand for LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8. This event was followed by acquisition of the LGR7-selective characteristics by a daughter gene (RLN3) prior to the evolution of the common ancestor of monotremes, marsupials, and placentals. A subsequent mutation of the other daughter gene (INSL3) occurred before the emergence of therian mammals, which then led to the derivation of the reciprocal LGR8-specific characteristics of INSL3. The stepwise evolution of these independent signaling pathways through gene duplication and subsequent divergence is consistent with Darwinian theory of selection and adaptation, and the temporal proximity suggests an association between these genetic events and the concurrent evolution of testicular descent in ancestral therian mammals. PMID:18463305

  9. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more…

  10. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a... from any single tear in the balloon envelope between tear stoppers: (1) The maximum vertical velocity..., with the balloon descending at the maximum vertical velocity determined in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  11. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a... from any single tear in the balloon envelope between tear stoppers: (1) The maximum vertical velocity..., with the balloon descending at the maximum vertical velocity determined in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  12. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a... from any single tear in the balloon envelope between tear stoppers: (1) The maximum vertical velocity..., with the balloon descending at the maximum vertical velocity determined in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  13. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group and the Reconstruction of the Huygens Probe Entry and Descent Trajectory at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton*, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of NASA, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997 and arrived at Saturn in 2004. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. It was recognized early in the Huygens program that to correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for ground truth calibration of the Cassini orbiter remote sensing observations, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location would be necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG) was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team. With membership comprising representatives from all the probe engineering and instrument teams as well as representatives of industry and the Cassini and Huygens Project Scientists, the DTWG presented an organizational framework within which instrument data was shared, the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction implemented, and the trajectory reconstruction efficiently disseminated. The primary goal of the Descent Trajectory Working Group was to develop retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry interface altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe, and to provide a reconstruction of the Huygens probe trajectory from entry to the surface of Titan that is maximally consistent with all available engineering and science data sets. The official project entry and descent trajectory reconstruction effort was published by the DTWG in 2007. A revised descent trajectory was released in 2010 that accounts for updated measurements of Titan's pole coordinates derived from radar images of Titan taken during Cassini flybys after 2007. The effect of the updated pole positions on Huygens is a southward shift of the trajectory by about 0.3 degrees with a much smaller effect of less than 0.01 degree in the zonal (west to east) direction. The revised Huygens landing coordinates of 192.335 degrees West and 10.573 degrees South with longitude and latitude residuals of respectively 0.035 degrees and 0.007 degrees, respectively, are in excellent agreement with results of recent landing site investigations using visual and radar images from the Cassini VIMS instrument. Acknowledgements *J.-P.L's work was performed while at ESA/ESTEC. DA and BK would like to express appreciation to the European Space Agency's Research and Scientific Support Department for funding the Descent Trajectory Working Group. The work of the Descent Trajectory Working Group would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of all the Huygens principal investigators and their teams, and the science and engineering data provided from each experiment team, including M. Fulchignoni and the HASI Team, H. Niemann and the GCMS Team, J. Zarnecki and the SSP Team, M. Tomasko and the DISR Team, M. Bird and the DWE Team, and G. Israel and the ACP Team. Additionally, special thanks for many years of support to D.L. Matson, R.T. Mitchell, M. Pérez-Ayúcar, O. Witasse; J. Jones, D. Roth, N. Strange on the Cassini Navigation Team at JPL; A.-M. Schipper and P. Couzin at Thales Alenia; C. Sollazzo, D. Salt, J. Wheadon and S. Standley from the Huygens Ops Team; and R. Trautner and H. Svedhem on the Radar Team at ESTEC.

  14. Huygens probe entry and descent trajectory analysis and reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Kazeminejad, B.; Gaborit, V.; Ferri, F.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2005-04-01

    Cassini/Huygens is a joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/European Space Agency (ESA)/Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) mission on its way to explore the Saturnian system. The ESA Huygens Probe is scheduled to be released from the Orbiter on 25 December 2004 and enter the atmosphere of Titan on 14 January 2005. Probe delivery to Titan, arbitrarily defined to occur at a reference altitude of 1270 km above the surface of Titan, is the responsibility of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). ESA is then responsible for safely delivering the probe from the reference altitude to the surface. The task of reconstructing the probe trajectory and attitude from the entry point to the surface has been assigned to the Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG), a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team. The DTWG will use data provided by the Huygens Probe engineering subsystems and selected data sets acquired by the scientific payload. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for possible "ground-truthing" Orbiter remote sensing measurements, it is essential that the trajectory reconstruction be performed as early as possible in the post-flight data analysis phase. The reconstruction of the Huygens entry and descent trajectory will be based primarily on the probe entry state vector provided by the Cassini Navigation Team, and measurements of acceleration, pressure, and temperature made by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI). Other data sets contributing to the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction include the mean molecular weight of the atmosphere measured by the probe Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) in the upper atmosphere and the Surface Science Package (SSP) speed of sound measurement in the lower atmosphere, accelerations measured by the Central and Radial Accelerometer Sensor Units (CASU/RASU), and the probe altitude by the two probe radar altimeters during the latter stages of the descent. In the last several hundred meters, the altitude determination will be constrained by measurements from the SSP acoustic sounder. Other instruments contributing data to the entry and descent trajectory and attitude determination include measurements of the zonal wind drift by the Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE), and probe zonal and meridional drift and probe attitude by the Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer (DISR). In this paper, the need for and the methods by which the Huygens Probe entry and descent trajectory will be reconstructed are reviewed.

  15. Measurement of CPAS Main Parachute Rate of Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is being designed to land the Orion Crew Module (CM) at a safe rate of descent at splashdown. Flight test performance must be measured to a high degree of accuracy to ensure this requirement is met with the most efficient design possible. Although the design includes three CPAS Main parachutes, the requirement is that the system must not exceed 33 ft/s under two Main parachutes, should one of the Main parachutes fail. Therefore, several tests were conducted with clusters of two Mains. All of the steady-state rate of descent data are normalized to standard sea level conditions and checked against the limit. As the Orion design gains weight, the system is approaching this limit to within measurement precision. Parachute "breathing," cluster interactions, and atmospheric anomalies can cause the rate of descent to vary widely and lead to challenges in characterizing parachute terminal performance. An early test had contradictory rate of descent results from optical trajectory and Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS). A thorough analysis of the data sources and error propagation was conducted to determine the uncertainty in the trajectory. It was discovered that the Time Space Position Information (TSPI) from the optical tracking provided accurate position data. However, the velocity from TPSI must be computed via numerical differentiation, which is prone to large error. DGPS obtains position through pseudo-range calculations from multiple satellites and velocity through Doppler shift of the carrier frequency. Because the velocity from DGPS is a direct measurement, it is more accurate than TSPI velocity. To remedy the situation, a commercial off-the-shelf product that combines GPS and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was purchased to significantly improve rate of descent measurements. This had the added benefit of solving GPS dropouts during aircraft extraction. Statistical probability distributions for CPAS Main parachute rate of descent and drag coefficient were computed and plotted. Using test data, a terminal rate of descent at splashdown can be estimated as a function of canopy loading.

  16. Inflammatory myofibroblastic bladder tumor in a patient with wolf-hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marte, Antonio; Indolfi, Paolo; Ficociello, Carmine; Russo, Daniela; Oreste, Matilde; Bottigliero, Gaetano; Gualdiero, Giovanna; Barone, Ciro; Vigliar, Elena; Indolfi, Cristiana; Casale, Fiorina

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare neoplasm described in several tissues and organs including genitourinary system, lung, head, and neck. The etiology of IMT is contentious, and whether it is a postinflammatory process or a true neoplasm remains controversial. To our knowledge, we report the first reported case of IMT of urinary bladder in a pediatric patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn (WHS). We also review the literature about patients with associated neoplasia. PMID:24024066

  17. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Martin, Susana

    2015-04-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface. Our development and assessments show clearly that this kind of inflatable technology originally developed for the Martian atmosphere, is feasible for use by Earth entry and descent applications. The preliminary results are highly promising indicating that the current Mars probe design could be used as it is for the Earth. According tp our analyses, the higher atmospheric pressure at an altitude of 12 km and less requires an additional pressurizing device for the in atable system increasing the entry mass by approximately 2 kg. These analyses involved the calculation of 120 different atmospheric entry and descent trajectories. The analysis of the existing technologies and current trends have indicated that the kind of inflatable technology pursued by RITD has high potential to enhance the European space technology expertise. This kind of technology is clearly feasible for utilization by Earth entry and descent applications.

  18. Spontaneous bladder rupture of a urinary bladder with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipavlou, Marios; Tharakan, Tharu; Khan, Shahid A A; Swinn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 65-year-old man who developed spontaneous bladder rupture after picking up his suitcase from a squatting position. He was known to have non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), managed previously with transurethral resections and intravesical chemotherapy. CT scan showed a large amount of free intraperitoneal fluid anterior to the bladder, suggestive of a urinoma. Management was initially conservative, with insertion of urethral catheter, intravenous antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Follow-up CT scan showed resolution of the urinoma with the patient making a full recovery after 3 weeks. PMID:24618866

  19. [Evolution of urinary bladder substitution].

    PubMed

    Kock, N G

    1992-11-01

    The historical background to the currently used methods for continent bladder substitution is shortly outlined. The significance for the patient's quality of life of various methods for bladder reconstruction or urinary diversion is briefly discussed. The importance of reservoir configuration for achieving a high compliant urinary receptacle is pointed out. Factors affecting reabsorption of urinary constituents are stressed and the significance of an antireflux mechanism is discussed. Currently the majority of patients undergoing cystectomy for cancer or for other reasons can be offered bladder substitutes providing continence and easy emptying; that is, complete control over voiding. This can be achieved by orthotopic bladder reconstruction or by diverting the urine to the augmented and valved rectum or to the skin via a continent intestinal reservoir. PMID:1492767

  20. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  1. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the bladder under anesthesia. Urinalysis and Urine Culture Examining urine with a microscope and culturing the ... doctor may consider a diagnosis of IC/PBS. Culture of Prostate Secretions Although not commonly done, in ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Bladder cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cells during a person's lifetime. These noninherited genetic changes are called somatic mutations. Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of bladder cancer? These resources address the diagnosis ...

  3. [Melanosis of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Wöllner, J; Janzen, J; Pannek, J

    2016-01-01

    Melanosis of the bladder is rare. Only 10 cases have been described in the literature. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal paralysis. During the diagnostic work-up which included cystoscopy, black spots in the bladder wall were observed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a benign suburothelial melanosis. Thus, with cystoscopic suspicion of a malignancy (melanoma), a biopsy is mandatory and regular cystoscopic follow-up is recommended. PMID:26358438

  4. The neurogenic bladder: medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Buyse, Gunnar M.

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder sphincter dysfunction (NBSD) can cause severe and irreversible renal damage and bladder-wall destruction years before incontinence becomes an issue. Therefore, the first step in adequate management is to recognize early the bladder at risk for upper- and lower-tract deterioration and to start adequate medical treatment proactively. Clean intermittent catheterization combined with anticholinergics (oral or intravesical) is the standard therapy for NBSD. Early institution of such treatment can prevent both renal damage and secondary bladder-wall changes, thereby potentially improving long-term outcomes. In children with severe side effects or with insufficient suppression of detrusor overactivity despite maximal dosage of oral oxybutynin, intravesical instillation is an effective alternative. Intravesical instillation eliminates systemic side effects by reducing the first-pass metabolism and, compared with oral oxybutynin, intravesical oxybutynin is a more potent and long-acting detrusor suppressor. There is growing evidence that with early adequate treatment, kidneys are saved and normal bladder growth can be achieved in children so they will no longer need surgical bladder augmentation to achieve safe urinary continence in adolescence and adulthood. PMID:18095004

  5. Crile's neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Silver, Carl E; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2007-11-01

    George Crile, after a long experience with treatment of head and neck cancer and study of a large number of cases, appreciated that these tumors almost always drained through the lymphatic pathways of the neck, rarely metastasized distantly, and were thus theoretically curable by resection of the primary tumor and its lymphatic draining shed. After evaluation of his early failures, he found that a block resection of all of the lymph node-bearing tissue of the neck in addition to resection of the primary tumor was the most effective means of obtaining a cure, particularly in patients with clinical evidence of spread of disease to the neck. Such radical surgery, at the time, was fraught with difficulty because of the lack of blood transfusion, antibiotics, and endotracheal anesthesia, but Crile devised several strategies for combating these obstacles. Crile performed 36 such block resections with a determinate 3-year survival of 75% compared with 19% 3-year survival in patients who had not undergone block resection. The surgical precepts developed by Crile laid the foundation for the effective modern surgical treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:17828045

  6. Head and Neck Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rotenberg, Dov

    1987-01-01

    Tumours of the head and neck show a wide spectrum of natural behaviour ranging from the most benign to the extremely lethal. Investigative techniques are of limited usefulness. History and physical examination are the foundations for diagnosis, though ultimate proof rests on surgical biopsy. The author of this article discusses the more common head and neck neoplasms. He gives brief descriptions of some tumours, highlighting their specific characteristics and their natural behaviour. He also suggests methods of investigation and gives brief overviews of modes of therapy. He discusses advances in management of head and neck neoplasms within the past decade and describes the technique of fine-needle cytologic aspirate. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:21263883

  7. Triple cancer: chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bladder and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Sharma, Rashi; Sahoo, Manas Kumar

    2015-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) is a common lymphoproliferative disorder with an increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The decreased immunity and B-cell dysfunction in CLL probably accounts for this emergence of second malignancies. We report a case of synchronous bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma with CLL. A 74-year-old male who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia 2 years before, presented with recurrent urinary tract infection. Peripheral blood smear revealed leukocytosis with absolute lymphocytosis (absolute lymphocyte count: 37870 cells/mm³). Flow cytometric immunophenotyping revealed 75% abnormal lymphoid cells which were positive for CD 19, CD5, CD23, CD22, CD200, CD20 (moderate) with lambda light chain restriction and negative for CD3, CD10, FMC7, CD38, CD138, IgM, CD103, CD123. F Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed increased metabolic activity of the left lateral wall of the urinary bladder extending to the left UV junction, adjacent part of trigone and bladder neck region along with multiple heterogeneous enhancing areas with increased FDG avidity within the prostate. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumour by cystoscopy was performed. Histopathology showed high grade, muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. Due to presence of uptake in the prostate, transurethral resection of the prostate was done and histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma of prostate (prostate specific antigen- positive), Gleason grade III+III and Gleason score 6. A high index of suspicion is required to detect synchronous and metachronous malignancies. Ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and PET/CT are often essential for detection and an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26277675

  8. Neck masses in children.

    PubMed

    Turkington, J R A; Paterson, A; Sweeney, L E; Thornbury, G D

    2005-01-01

    Infants and children with neck masses frequently present to the radiologist for further evaluation. The role of the radiologist is to differentiate between conditions using imaging modalities such as ultrasound with colour Doppler, CT and MRI. Where appropriate, the radiologist will also stage lesions for management purposes and aid in guiding aspiration or biopsy. This paper presents a pictorial review of paediatric neck masses and their imaging features. Particular emphasis is applied to the anatomical site of the mass to aid in differential diagnosis. It must be emphasised that the radiological findings should always be interpreted in conjunction with the patient's age, the clinical history and the findings on physical examination. PMID:15673538

  9. Head and neck melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shashanka, R; Smitha, B R

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma appears to be increasing at an alarming rate throughout the world over the past 30-40 years and continues to increase in the United States, Canada, Australia, Asia, and Europe. The behavior of head and neck melanoma is aggressive, and it has an overall poorer prognosis than that of other skin sites. The authors review the published literature and text books, intending to give an overall picture of malignant melanomas of the head and neck and a special emphasis on treatment considerations with controversies in treatment including biopsy, radiation therapy, sentinel node biopsy, and nodal dissection. PMID:22570796

  10. Bilateral neck paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Mumoli, N; Cei, M; Pauletti, M; Ferrito, G; Scazzeri, F

    2009-10-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare neoplasms presented as cervical mass, generally bilateral, that arise from chemoreceptors located at the carotid bifurcation (carotid body tumors), along the vagus nerve (vagal paragangliomas), and in the jugular fossa and tympanic cavity (jugulotympanic paragangliomas). They are typically asymptomatic at the beginning, highly vascular, slow-growing and compressing the surrounding anatomic structures. Only radical surgery is the curative treatment for paragangliomas. We present a case of a 62- year-old woman with a diagnosis of bilateral neck paragangliomas where surgical removal was judged burdened by excessive risk because of the size of the tumor. PMID:19622673

  11. Analysis of various descent trajectories for a hypersonic-cruise, cold-wall research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    The probable descent operating conditions for a hypersonic air-breathing research airplane were examined. Descents selected were cruise angle of attack, high dynamic pressure, high lift coefficient, turns, and descents with drag brakes. The descents were parametrically exercised and compared from the standpoint of cold-wall (367 K) aircraft heat load. The descent parameters compared were total heat load, peak heating rate, time to landing, time to end of heat pulse, and range. Trends in total heat load as a function of cruise Mach number, cruise dynamic pressure, angle-of-attack limitation, pull-up g-load, heading angle, and drag-brake size are presented.

  12. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, H.; Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface.

  13. Efficient Sensor Placement Optimization Using Gradient Descent and Probabilistic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Vahab; Lévesque, Julien-Charles; Gagné, Christian; Parizeau, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing an adaptation of the gradient descent method to optimize the position and orientation of sensors for the sensor placement problem. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the combination of gradient descent optimization with a realistic model, which considers both the topography of the environment and a set of sensors with directional probabilistic sensing. The performance of this approach is compared with two other black box optimization methods over area coverage and processing time. Results show that our proposed method produces competitive results on smaller maps and superior results on larger maps, while requiring much less computation than the other optimization methods to which it has been compared. PMID:25196164

  14. Helicopter optimal descent and landing after power loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    An optimal control solution is obtained for the descent and landing of a helicopter after the loss of power in level flight. The model considers the helicopter vertical velocity, horizontal velocity, and rotor speed; and it includes representations of ground effect, rotor inflow time lag, pilot reaction time, rotor stall, and the induced velocity curve in the vortex ring state. The control (rotor thrust magnitude and direction) required to minimize the vertical and horizontal velocity at contact with the ground is obtained using nonlinear optimal control theory. It is found that the optimal descent after power loss in hover is a purely vertical flight path. Good correlation, even quantitatively, is found between the calculations and (non-optimal) flight test results.

  15. A Symmetric Time-Varying Cluster Rate of Descent Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    A model of the time-varying rate of descent of the Orion vehicle was developed based on the observed correlation between canopy projected area and drag coefficient. This initial version of the model assumes cluster symmetry and only varies the vertical component of velocity. The cluster fly-out angle is modeled as a series of sine waves based on flight test data. The projected area of each canopy is synchronized with the primary fly-out angle mode. The sudden loss of projected area during canopy collisions is modeled at minimum fly-out angles, leading to brief increases in rate of descent. The cluster geometry is converted to drag coefficient using empirically derived constants. A more complete model is under development, which computes the aerodynamic response of each canopy to its local incidence angle.

  16. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; MacDiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-01-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, ‘healthy’ bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the recommendations for improving and maintaining bladder health presented herein. PMID:21923844

  17. Two descent hybrid conjugate gradient methods for optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Weijun

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we propose two new hybrid nonlinear conjugate gradient methods, which produce sufficient descent search direction at every iteration. This property depends neither on the line search used nor on the convexity of the objective function. Under suitable conditions, we prove that the proposed methods converge globally for general nonconvex functions. The numerical results show that both hybrid methods are efficient for the given test problems from the CUTE library.

  18. Flight Management System Execution of Idle-Thrust Descents in Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2011-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its error models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents, and the recorded data includes the target speed profile and FMS intent trajectories. The FMS computes the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and any intervention by the controllers that alters the FMS execution of the descent is recorded so that such flights are discarded from the analysis. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location are extracted from the radar data. Using more than 60 descents in Boeing 777 aircraft, the actual speeds are compared to the intended descent speed profile. In addition, three aspects of the accuracy of the FMS intent trajectory are analyzed: the meter fix crossing time, the TOD location, and the altitude at the meter fix. The actual TOD location is within 5 nmi of the intent location for over 95% of the descents. Roughly 90% of the time, the airspeed is within 0.01 of the target Mach number and within 10 KCAS of the target descent CAS, but the meter fix crossing time is only within 50 sec of the time computed by the FMS. Overall, the aircraft seem to be executing the descents as intended by the designers of the onboard automation.

  19. Robotic approaches to the neck.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yoon Woo; Choi, Eun Chang

    2014-06-01

    This article introduces and evaluates the feasibility of robot-assisted neck dissection as well as robot-assisted neck surgery via a modified facelift or retroauricular approach. Robot-assisted neck surgery is feasible compared with conventional techniques and shows a clear cosmetic benefit. PMID:24882801

  20. Airborne Management of Traffic Conflicts in Descent With Arrival Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    NASA is studying far-term air traffic management concepts that may increase operational efficiency through a redistribution of decisionmaking authority among airborne and ground-based elements of the air transportation system. One component of this research, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows trained pilots of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for traffic separation. Ground-based air traffic controllers would continue to separate traffic unequipped for autonomous operations and would issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To evaluate En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a human-in-the-loop experiment was jointly conducted by the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. In this experiment, test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve conflicts in cruise and descent, and to adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by test subject controllers. Simulators at NASA Langley were equipped with a prototype Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) flight deck toolset to assist pilots with conflict management and constraint compliance tasks. Results from the experiment are presented, focusing specifically on operations during the initial descent into the terminal area. Airborne conflict resolution performance in descent, conformance to traffic flow management constraints, and the effects of conflicting traffic on constraint conformance are all presented. Subjective data from subject pilots are also presented, showing perceived levels of workload, safety, and acceptability of autonomous arrival operations. Finally, potential AOP functionality enhancements are discussed along with suggestions to improve arrival procedures.

  1. Titan Explorer Entry, Descent and Landing Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Jody L.; Lindberg, Robert E.; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    2006-01-01

    The Titan Explorer mission concept includes an orbiter, entry probe and inflatable airship designed to take remote and in-situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere. A modified entry, descent and landing trajectory at Titan that incorporates mid-air airship inflation (under a parachute) and separation is developed and examined for Titan Explorer. The feasibility of mid-air inflation and deployment of an airship under a parachute is determined by implementing and validating an airship buoyancy and inflation model in the trajectory simulation program, Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2). A nominal POST2 trajectory simulation case study is generated which examines different descent scenarios by varying airship inflation duration, orientation, and separation. The buoyancy model incorporation into POST2 is new to the software and may be used in future trajectory simulations. Each case from the nominal POST2 trajectory case study simulates a successful separation between the parachute and airship systems with sufficient velocity change as to alter their paths to avoid collision throughout their descent. The airship and heatshield also separate acceptably with a minimum distance of separation from the parachute system of 1.5 km. This analysis shows the feasibility of airship inflation on a parachute for different orientations, airship separation at various inflation times, and preparation for level-flight at Titan.

  2. Free-falls and parachute descents in the standard atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, A P

    1947-01-01

    A detailed table of the standard equilibrium velocity and standard equilibrium time is presented for bodies falling in the standard atmosphere. This table gives the velocity at various altitudes and the time of fall from sea level to -4000 feet and from 80,000 feet to sea level. In addition to this standard table, there are given short tables and charts of an open-parachute descent and free-falls; the terminal velocity at sea level, and the variation of the weight-to-drag ratio (2w/cds)1/2 for various weight jumpers from 90 to 30 feet in open-parachute descent; and estimations of drag coefficients of silk and nylon parachutes. The table of standard equilibrium velocities and standard equilibrium times may be used directly for open-parachute descents, given the weight of the jumper, the diameter of the parachute, and the drag coefficient. For free-falls starting from horizontal flight, approximately 14 seconds must be added to the equilibrium time given in the table to obtain the total time to sea level. (author)

  3. Factors Associated with Sleep Disturbance in Women of Mexican Descent

    PubMed Central

    Heilemann, MarySue V.; Choudhury, Shonali M.; Kury, Felix Salvador; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aims were to identify the most useful parameters of acculturation in relation to self reported sleep disturbance and describe risk factors for sleep disturbance in women of Mexican descent. Background Little is known about acculturation as a factor for poor sleep in the context of other personal factors such as income or sense of resilience or mastery for Latinas in the United States. Methods These personal factors were incorporated into a modification of the Conceptual Framework of Impaired Sleep to guide our secondary analysis of self-reported sleep disturbance. Cross sectional data from a convenience sample of 312 women of Mexican descent of childbearing age (21-40 years) located in an urban California community were collected and previously analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms and post traumatic stress disorder. The General Sleep Disturbance Scale (in English and Spanish) was used to assess sleep disturbance. Results Early socialization to the United States during childhood was the most useful acculturation parameter for understanding self reported sleep disturbance in this sample. In a multivariate regression analysis, three factors (higher acculturation, lower income, and higher depressive symptoms) were significant in accounting for 40% of the variance in sleep disturbance. Conclusion When low income Latinas of Mexican descent report sleep problems, clinicians should probe for environmental sleep factors associated with low income, such as noise, over-crowding, and exposure to trauma and violence, and refer the woman to psychotherapy and counselling rather than merely prescribe a sleep medication. PMID:22221152

  4. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Erika; Forbes, John C.; Thornton, Randall J.

    2010-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform multiple burns including the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine technology testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  5. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alarez, Erika; Thornton, Randall J.; Forbes, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform minor mid-course corrections, a Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI) burn, a de-orbit burn, and the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  6. A new method for forecasting the solar cycle descent time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, Bharati; Kakad, Amar; Sai Ramesh, Durbha

    2015-08-01

    The prediction of an extended solar minimum is extremely important because of the severity of its impact on the near-earth space. Here, we present a new method for predicting the descent time of the forthcoming solar cycle (SC); the method is based on the estimation of the Shannon entropy. We use the daily and monthly smoothed international sunspot number. For each nth SC, we compute the parameter [Tpre]n by using information on the descent and ascent times of the n - 3th and nth SCs, respectively. We find that [Tpre] of nth SC and entropy can be effectively used to predict the descent time of the n + 2th SC. The correlation coefficient between [Td]n+2 - [Tpre]n and [E]n is found to be 0.95. Using these parameters the prediction model is developed. Solar magnetic field and F10.7 flux data are available for SCs 21-22 and 19-23, respectively, and they are also utilized to get estimates of the Shannon entropy. It is found that the Shannon entropy, a measure of randomness inherent in the SC, is reflected well in the various proxies of the solar activity (viz sunspot, magnetic field, F10.7 flux). The applicability and accuracy of the prediction model equation is verified by way of association of least entropy values with the Dalton minimum. The prediction model equation also provides possible criteria for the occurrence of unusually longer solar minima.

  7. Learning curves for stochastic gradient descent in linear feedforward networks.

    PubMed

    Werfel, Justin; Xie, Xiaohui; Seung, H Sebastian

    2005-12-01

    Gradient-following learning methods can encounter problems of implementation in many applications, and stochastic variants are sometimes used to overcome these difficulties. We analyze three online training methods used with a linear perceptron: direct gradient descent, node perturbation, and weight perturbation. Learning speed is defined as the rate of exponential decay in the learning curves. When the scalar parameter that controls the size of weight updates is chosen to maximize learning speed, node perturbation is slower than direct gradient descent by a factor equal to the number of output units; weight perturbation is slower still by an additional factor equal to the number of input units. Parallel perturbation allows faster learning than sequential perturbation, by a factor that does not depend on network size. We also characterize how uncertainty in quantities used in the stochastic updates affects the learning curves. This study suggests that in practice, weight perturbation may be slow for large networks, and node perturbation can have performance comparable to that of direct gradient descent when there are few output units. However, these statements depend on the specifics of the learning problem, such as the input distribution and the target function, and are not universally applicable. PMID:16212768

  8. Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance of the Mars Phoenix Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Prince, Jill L.; Wueen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.; Grover, Myron R.

    2008-01-01

    On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander successfully landed on the northern arctic plains of Mars. An overview of a preliminary reconstruction analysis performed on each entry, descent, and landing phase to assess the performance of Phoenix as it descended is presented and a comparison to pre-entry predictions is provided. The landing occurred 21 km further downrange than the predicted landing location. Analysis of the flight data revealed that the primary cause of Phoenix s downrange landing was a higher trim total angle of attack during the hypersonic phase of the entry, which resulted in Phoenix flying a slightly lifting trajectory. The cause of this higher trim attitude is not known at this time. Parachute deployment was 6.4 s later than prediction. This later deployment time was within the variations expected and is consistent with a lifting trajectory. The parachute deployment and inflation process occurred as expected with no anomalies identified. The subsequent parachute descent and powered terminal landing also behaved as expected. A preliminary reconstruction of the landing day atmospheric density profile was found to be lower than the best apriori prediction, ranging from a few percent less to a maximum of 8%. A comparison of the flight reconstructed trajectory parameters shows that the actual Phoenix entry, descent, and landing was close to pre-entry predictions. This reconstruction investigation is currently ongoing and the results to date are in the process of being refined.

  9. Extraperitoneally Ruptured, Everted, and Prolapsed Bladder: A Very Rare Complication of Pelvic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ojewola, Rufus Wale; Tijani, Kehinde Habeeb; Badmus, Olakunle Olaleke; Oliyide, Abisola Ekundayo; Osegbe, Chukwudi Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic rupture of the bladder with eversion and protrusion via the perineum is a rare complication of pelvic injury. We present a 36-year-old lady who sustained severe pelvic injury with a bleeding right-sided deep perineal laceration. She had closed reduction of pelvic fracture with pelvic banding and primary closure of perineal laceration at a private hospital. She subsequently had dehiscence of repaired perineal laceration with protrusion of fleshy mass from vulva and leakage of urine per perineum five weeks later. Examination revealed a fleshy mucosa-like mass protruding anteriorly with a bridge of tissue between it and right anterolateral vaginal wall. Upward pressure on this mass revealed the bladder neck and ureteric orifices. She had perineal and pelvic exploration with findings of prolapsed, completely everted bladder wall through a transverse anterior bladder wall rent via the perineum, and an unstable B1 pelvic disruption. She had repair of the ruptured, everted, and prolapsed bladder, double-plate and screw fixation of disrupted pelvis and repair of the pelvic/perineal defect. She commenced physiotherapy and ambulation a week after surgery. Patient now walks normally and is continent of urine. We conclude that the intrinsic urethral continent mechanism plays a significant role in maintaining continence in females. PMID:26417472

  10. [A case of plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: rapid progression after transurethral resection].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ayako; Ohori, Makoto; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Hamada, Riu; Nomura, Masaharu; Kusama, Hiroshi; Nagao, Toshitaka; Tachibana, Masaaki

    2012-02-01

    An 85-year-old man complained of macroscopic hematuria and painful urination. Cytoscopy revealed a non-papillary tumor at the bladder neck extending to the trigone. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the bladder wall in the same area but did not reveal lymph node swelling. Urinary cytology was class IIIb. We conducted a transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) after which a histopathological examination showed urothelial carcinoma, G3, INF?, pT2. From 6 days after TURBT, severe fever persisted despite the administration of various antibiotics and his general condition deteriorated. He died of acute myocardial infarction at 37 days after TURBT. Histopathological examination at autopsy revealed extensive urothelial carcinoma, a plasmacytoid variant, of the bladder which had invaded into the entire body including the lungs, liver, kidneys, adrenal glands, and veins, although tumor cells were not identified in lymph nodes. We review the literature and report this rare case of urothelial carcinoma, a plasmacytoid variant, of the bladder. PMID:22450838

  11. Familial factors in bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Walzak, M P; Fried, R; Domina, A H; Lynch, J F

    1979-10-01

    Surprisingly, little is known about host factors in cases of bladder carcinoma. We investigated 2 families prone to transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A high degree of pathology verification of cancer of all anatomic sites and a meticulous recording of genealogy, associated diseases and environmental exposures, when known, have allowed a more cogent appraisal of cancer etiology. It is reasonable to assume that members of the subject families may be more susceptible to variable carcinogenic exposures, a concept that is in accord with a genetic-environmental interaction hypothesis for cancer etiology. In addition to increased surveillance of high risk patients for earlier detection of bladder cancer, cancer control measures also should take into consideration preventive programs directed toward the avoidance of known carcinogenic exposures, such as cigarette smoking in high risk relatives of cancer-affected probands. We propose that the etiology of familial bladder cancer may be complex, involving possible other associated malignant neoplasms and/or certain non-neoplastic disorders, in addition to specific carcinogenic exposures. There is a serious need for the detailed reporting of families prone to bladder cancer wherein all of these potentially important associated factors are considered, so that a fuller appraisal of etiology might be achieved. PMID:480484

  12. Treatment of bladder cancer. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Surgical treatment of common bladder cancers; Radiation therapy of common bladder cancers; Chemotherapy of common bladder cancers; Immunotherapy of common bladder cancers; Multimodal treatment of common bladder cancers; Other treatment modalities of common bladder cancers; Treatment of less common bladder cancers; Reviews of treatment of bladder cancers.

  13. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, Alejandro M.; Burkhart, Paul D.; mendeck, Gavin F.

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of Mars. This paper describes the current MSL EDL system performance as predicted by end-to-end EDL simulations, highlights the sensitivity of this baseline performance to several key environmental assumptions, and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering such an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  14. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; SanMartin, A. Miguel; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2007-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of Mars. This paper describes the current MSL EDL system performance as predicted by end-to-end EDL simulations, highlights the sensitivity of this baseline performance to several key environmental assumptions, and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering such an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  15. Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Bresser, P; Monasch, E

    1990-12-01

    A patient is described with isolated idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRPF) of the bladder causing overhydration due to postrenal oliguria. IRPF is known to spread to the bladder; restriction of the bladder, however, is extremely rare. The patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids. The potential role of corticosteroids in the management of IRPF is discussed. PMID:2074918

  16. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  17. Bladder Hamartoma in a Fetus: Case Report☆

    PubMed Central

    Pieretti, Alberto; Wu, Chin-Lee; Pieretti, Rafael V.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of the youngest reported patient with a bladder hamartoma detected prenatally by ultrasonography. Bladder tumors in newborns are rare, but a hamartoma should not be discarded among the diagnostic possibilities when evaluating a fetus or a newborn with a polypoid bladder lesion.

  18. Ultrasonic Device Monitors Fullness Of The Bladder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Blalock, Travis; Companion, John A.; Cavalier, AL; Mineo, Beth A.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic device monitors fullness of bladder is self-contained, lightweight, portable, powered by battery, and tailored for specific patient through software modified as patient's behavior changes. Essentially quantifies amount of urine in bladder by measuring relative distension of bladder and gives suitable alarm telling patient to eliminate. Intended for use in training people who are incontinent and cannot identify when elimination necessary.

  19. Dose Distribution in Bladder and Surrounding Normal Tissues in Relation to Bladder Volume in Conformal Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Wojciech; Wesolowska, Iwona; Urbanczyk, Hubert; Hawrylewicz, Leszek; Schwierczok, Barbara; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate bladder movements and changes in dose distribution in the bladder and surrounding tissues associated with changes in bladder filling and to estimate the internal treatment margins. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with bladder cancer underwent planning computed tomography scans with 80- and 150-mL bladder volumes. The bladder displacements associated with the change in volume were measured. Each patient had treatment plans constructed for a 'partially empty' (80 mL) and a 'partially full' (150 mL) bladder. An additional plan was constructed for tumor irradiation alone. A subsequent 9 patients underwent sequential weekly computed tomography scanning during radiotherapy to verify the bladder movements and estimate the internal margins. Results: Bladder movements were mainly observed cranially, and the estimated internal margins were nonuniform and largest (>2 cm) anteriorly and cranially. The dose distribution in the bladder worsened if the bladder increased in volume: 70% of patients (11 of 16) would have had bladder underdosed to <95% of the prescribed dose. The dose distribution in the rectum and intestines was better with a 'partially empty' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 23%, 20%, and 15% for the rectum and 162, 144, 123 cm{sup 3} for the intestines, respectively) than with a 'partially full' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 28%, 24%, and 18% for the rectum and 180, 158, 136 cm{sup 3} for the intestines, respectively). The change in bladder filling during RT was significant for the dose distribution in the intestines. Tumor irradiation alone was significantly better than whole bladder irradiation in terms of organ sparing. Conclusion: The displacements of the bladder due to volume changes were mainly related to the upper wall. The internal margins should be nonuniform, with the largest margins cranially and anteriorly. The changes in bladder filling during RT could influence the dose distribution in the bladder and intestines. The dose distribution in the rectum and bowel was slightly better with a 'partially empty' than with a 'full' bladder.

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-30

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  1. Bladder Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic cystopathy is a well-recognized complication of diabetes mellitus, which usually develops in middle-aged or elderly patients with long-standing and poorly controlled disease. It may have broad spectrum clinical presentations. Patients may be asymptomatic, or have a wide variety of voiding complaints from overactive bladder and urge incontinence to decreased bladder sensation and overflow incontinence. This review focuses on pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for urologic complications of diabetes and emphasizing on recent developments in our understanding of this condition. We also tried to shed some light on therapeutic modalities like behavioral, pharmacological, and surgical approaches. PMID:21833175

  2. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  3. [Bladder replacement with sigmoid colon for bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Suzu, H; Yushita, Y; Yamashita, S; Kanetake, H; Saito, Y; Sakuragi, T

    1991-01-01

    From 1972 to 1989, 21 patients underwent bladder replacement with sigmoid colon after cystectomy for bladder cancer. A portion of sigmoid colon (about 15 to 20 cm) was isolated and anastomosed to the urethral stump. Then the ureters were implanted in the sigmoid colon via submucosal tunnels. There were 20 men and 1 woman, ranging in age from 24 to 71 years (average 51 years). Preoperative investigations showed that all the cases were free of metastasis. Five years survival rate was 60.7% and there was no operative mortality. There was urethral recurrence in one case and in that case postoperative histopathology revealed carcinoma in situ with tumor. All patients were able to void by themselves without any difficulty. Five patients complained mild incontinence at daytime and all patients had mild incontinence during deep sleep at night, but all of them could maintain their normal daily life like before. The major postoperative complications were: leak at the site of anastomosis (between sigmoid colon and urethra) in 6 cases, hydronephrosis in 2 cases, VUR in 2 cases and bladder stone in 1 case. The patients who underwent bladder replacement with sigmoid colon were well satisfied, because there were no external stoma and the patients could void by themselves. From now, we want to improve our operative method in order to avoid postoperative incontinence. PMID:2046199

  4. Social stress induces changes in urinary bladder function, bladder NGF content, and generalized bladder inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Peterson, Abbey; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Nelson, Mark T; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2014-10-01

    Social stress may play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we explored changes in bladder function caused by social stress using mouse models of stress and increasing stress. In the stress paradigm, individual submissive FVB mice were exposed to C57BL/6 aggressor mice directly/indirectly for 1 h/day for 2 or 4 wk. Increased stress was induced by continuous, direct/indirect exposure of FVB mice to aggressor mice for 2 wk. Stressed FVB mice exhibited nonvoiding bladder contractions and a decrease in both micturition interval (increased voiding frequency) and bladder capacity compared with control animals. ELISAs demonstrated a significant increase in histamine protein expression with no change in nerve growth factor protein expression in the urinary bladder compared with controls. Unlike stressed mice, mice exposed to an increased stress paradigm exhibited increased bladder capacities and intermicturition intervals (decreased voiding frequency). Both histamine and nerve growth factor protein expression were significantly increased with increased stress compared with control bladders. The change in bladder function from increased voiding frequency to decreased voiding frequency with increased stress intensity suggests that changes in social stress-induced urinary bladder dysfunction are context and duration dependent. In addition, changes in the bladder inflammatory milieu with social stress may be important contributors to changes in urinary bladder function. PMID:25100077

  5. Social stress induces changes in urinary bladder function, bladder NGF content, and generalized bladder inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Abbey; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Nelson, Mark T.; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Social stress may play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we explored changes in bladder function caused by social stress using mouse models of stress and increasing stress. In the stress paradigm, individual submissive FVB mice were exposed to C57BL/6 aggressor mice directly/indirectly for 1 h/day for 2 or 4 wk. Increased stress was induced by continuous, direct/indirect exposure of FVB mice to aggressor mice for 2 wk. Stressed FVB mice exhibited nonvoiding bladder contractions and a decrease in both micturition interval (increased voiding frequency) and bladder capacity compared with control animals. ELISAs demonstrated a significant increase in histamine protein expression with no change in nerve growth factor protein expression in the urinary bladder compared with controls. Unlike stressed mice, mice exposed to an increased stress paradigm exhibited increased bladder capacities and intermicturition intervals (decreased voiding frequency). Both histamine and nerve growth factor protein expression were significantly increased with increased stress compared with control bladders. The change in bladder function from increased voiding frequency to decreased voiding frequency with increased stress intensity suggests that changes in social stress-induced urinary bladder dysfunction are context and duration dependent. In addition, changes in the bladder inflammatory milieu with social stress may be important contributors to changes in urinary bladder function. PMID:25100077

  6. WNT3 involvement in human bladder exstrophy and cloaca development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Baranowska Körberg, Izabella; Hofmeister, Wolfgang; Markljung, Ellen; Cao, Jia; Nilsson, Daniel; Ludwig, Michael; Draaken, Markus; Holmdahl, Gundela; Barker, Gillian; Reutter, Heiko; Vukojevi?, Vladana; Clementson Kockum, Christina; Lundin, Johanna; Lindstrand, Anna; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2015-09-15

    Bladder exstrophy, a severe congenital urological malformation when a child is born with an open urinary bladder, is the most common form of bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) with an incidence of 1:30,000 children of Caucasian descent. Recent studies suggest that WNT genes may contribute to the etiology of bladder exstrophy. Here, we evaluated WNT-pathway genes in 20 bladder exstrophy patients using massively parallel sequencing. In total 13 variants were identified in WNT3, WNT6, WNT7A, WNT8B, WNT10A, WNT11, WNT16, FZD5, LRP1 and LRP10 genes and predicted as potentially disease causing, of which seven variants were novel. One variant, identified in a patient with a de novo nonsynonymous substitution in WNT3 (p.Cys91Arg), was further evaluated in zebrafish. Knock down of wnt3 in zebrafish showed cloaca malformations, including disorganization of the cloaca epithelium and expansion of the cloaca lumen. Our study suggests that the function of the WNT3 p.Cys91Arg variant was altered, since RNA overexpression of mutant Wnt3 RNA does not result in embryonic lethality as seen with wild-type WNT3 mRNA. Finally, we also mutation screened the WNT3 gene further in 410 DNA samples from BEEC cases and identified one additional mutation c.638G>A (p.Gly213Asp), which was paternally inherited. In aggregate our data support the involvement of WNT-pathway genes in BEEC and suggest that WNT3 in itself is a rare cause of BEEC. PMID:26105184

  7. Gun shot wound neck.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, L K; Shukul, V K; Sharma, Rahul

    2004-01-01

    All penetrating neck wounds are potentially very dangerous and require emergency treatment. The choice of treatment for the stable patient remains controversial, a number of studies encouraging mandatory surgical exploration and a similar number encourage selective surgical exploration. Knowledge of the physical properties of the penetrating object or weapon can help to determine a treatment plan and predict the risk of injury- All tracheal and esophageal injuries with structural damage should be repaired primarily. A case of Gun Shot Wound Neck was air evacuated to Army Hospital R & R Delhi Cantt in a tracheostomised state. Patient was evaluated in detail, he had trachea esophageal fistula. The management of this case is discussed along with principles of management of war injuries. PMID:23120029

  8. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  9. Entry, Descent, and Landing for Human Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Michelle M.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of a human mission to Mars is landing safely on the Martian surface. Mars has such low atmospheric density that decelerating large masses (tens of metric tons) requires methods that have not yet been demonstrated, and are not yet planned in future Mars missions. To identify the most promising options for Mars entry, descent, and landing, and to plan development of the needed technologies, NASA's Human Architecture Team (HAT) has refined candidate methods for emplacing needed elements of the human Mars exploration architecture (such as ascent vehicles and habitats) on the Mars surface. This paper explains the detailed, optimized simulations that have been developed to define the mass needed at Mars arrival to accomplish the entry, descent, and landing functions. Based on previous work, technology options for hypersonic deceleration include rigid, mid-L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) aeroshells, and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (IADs). The hypersonic IADs, or HIADs, are about 20% less massive than the rigid vehicles, but both have their technology development challenges. For the supersonic regime, supersonic retropropulsion (SRP) is an attractive option, since a propulsive stage must be carried for terminal descent and can be ignited at higher speeds. The use of SRP eliminates the need for an additional deceleration system, but SRP is at a low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) in that the interacting plumes are not well-characterized, and their effect on vehicle stability has not been studied, to date. These architecture-level assessments have been used to define the key performance parameters and a technology development strategy for achieving the challenging mission of landing large payloads on Mars.

  10. Chenopod salt bladders deter insect herbivores.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, E F

    2014-03-01

    Trichomes on leaves and stems of certain chenopods (Chenopodiaceae) are modified with a greatly enlarged apical cell (a salt bladder), containing a huge central vacuole. These structures may aid in the extreme salt tolerance of many species by concentrating salts in the vacuole. Bladders eventually burst, covering the leaf in residue of bladder membranes and solid precipitates. The presence of this system in non-halophytic species suggests additional functions. I tested the novel hypothesis that these bladders have a defensive function against insect herbivores using choice, no choice, and field tests. Generalist insect herbivores preferred to feed on leaves without salt bladders in choice tests. In no choice tests, herbivores consumed less leaf matter with bladders. In a field test, leaves from which I had removed bladders suffered greater herbivory than adjacent leaves with bladders. Solutions containing bladders added to otherwise preferred leaves deterred herbivores, suggesting a water-soluble chemical component to the defense. This bladder system has a defensive function in at least four genera of chenopods. Salt bladders may be a structural defense, like spines or domatia, but also have a chemical defense component. PMID:24241642

  11. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  12. Mullerianosis of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Kudva, Ranjini; Hegde, Padmaraj

    2012-04-01

    Mullerianosis of the urinary bladder is a rare and morphologically complex tumor-like lesion, composed of several types of mullerian lesions like endometriosis, endocervicosis, and endosalpingiosis. This disease occurs in women of reproductive age group. Implantative and metaplastic origins have been suggested in the pathogenesis. PMID:22919142

  13. Mullerianosis of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Ranjini; Hegde, Padmaraj

    2012-01-01

    Mullerianosis of the urinary bladder is a rare and morphologically complex tumor-like lesion, composed of several types of mullerian lesions like endometriosis, endocervicosis, and endosalpingiosis. This disease occurs in women of reproductive age group. Implantative and metaplastic origins have been suggested in the pathogenesis. PMID:22919142

  14. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  15. Cancer of the Urinary Bladder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2015 74,000 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.5% Estimated Deaths in 2015 16,000 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2012, there were an estimated 577,403 people living with bladder cancer in ...

  16. Apollo 16, LM-11 descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of the LM-11 descent propulsion system during the Apollo 16 missions was evaluated and found satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted one sigma uncertainty of 0.2 seconds. Several flight measurement discrepancies existed during the flight as follows: (1) the chamber pressure transducer had a noticeable drift, exhibiting a maximum error of about 1.5 psi at approximately 130 seconds after engine ignition, (2) the fuel and oxidizer interface pressure measurements appeared to be low during the entire flight, and (3) the fuel propellant quantity gaging system did not perform within expected accuracies.

  17. Shuttle program: OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Knoedler, J.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of the orbital flight test (OFT) flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. The A/D ancillary data support for OFT mission evaluation activities is confined to providing postflight position, velocity, attitude, and associated navigation and attitude derived parameters for the Orbiter over particular flight phases and time intervals.

  18. OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Abramson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of orbital flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. It was intended that this document serve as the sole requirements control instrument between MPB/MPAD and the A/D ancillary data users. The requirements are primarily functional in nature, but some detail level requirements are also included.

  19. [Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in patients of African descent].

    PubMed

    Maia, Morgana Lima e; Trevisam, Paula Grasiele Carvalho; Minicucci, Marcos; Mazeto, Glaucia M F S; Azevedo, Paula S

    2014-10-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) is an endocrine emergency marked by recurrent attacks of muscle weakness associated with hypokalemia and thyrotoxicosis. Asiatic male patients are most often affected. On the other hand, African descents rarely present this disease. The case described shows an afrodescendant patient with hypokalemia and tetraparesis, whose diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was considered during this crisis. The THPP, although rare, is potentially lethal. Therefore, in cases of flaccid paresis crisis this diagnosis should always be considered, especially if associated with hypokalemia. In this situation, if no previous diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, this should also be regarded. PMID:25372590

  20. A piloted simulator evaluation of a ground-based 4D descent advisor algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Davis, Thomas J.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1987-01-01

    A ground-based, four-dimensional (4D) descent-advisor algorithm is under development at NASA Ames Research Center. The algorithm combines detailed aerodynamic, propulsive, and atmospheric models with an efficient numerical integration scheme to generate 4D descent advisories. This paper investigates the ability of the 4D descent advisor algorithm to provide adequate control of arrival time for aircraft not equipped with on-board 4D guidance systems. A piloted simulation was conducted to determine the precision with which the descent advisor could predict the 4D trajectories of typical straight-in descents flown by airline pilots under different wind conditions. The effects of errors in the estimation of wind and initial aircraft weight were also studied. A description of the descent advisor as well as the results of the simulation studies are presented.

  1. A piloted simulator evaluation of a ground-based 4-D descent advisor algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based, four dimensional (4D) descent-advisor algorithm is under development at NASA-Ames. The algorithm combines detailed aerodynamic, propulsive, and atmospheric models with an efficient numerical integration scheme to generate 4D descent advisories. The ability is investigated of the 4D descent advisor algorithm to provide adequate control of arrival time for aircraft not equipped with on-board 4D guidance systems. A piloted simulation was conducted to determine the precision with which the descent advisor could predict the 4D trajectories of typical straight-in descents flown by airline pilots under different wind conditions. The effects of errors in the estimation of wind and initial aircraft weight were also studied. A description of the descent advisor as well as the result of the simulation studies are presented.

  2. STS-1 operational flight profile. Volume 5: Descent, cycle 3. Appendix C: Monte Carlo dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of three nonlinear the Monte Carlo dispersion analyses for the Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) Orbiter Descent Operational Flight Profile, Cycle 3 are presented. Fifty randomly selected simulation for the end of mission (EOM) descent, the abort once around (AOA) descent targeted line are steep target line, and the AOA descent targeted to the shallow target line are analyzed. These analyses compare the flight environment with system and operational constraints on the flight environment and in some cases use simplified system models as an aid in assessing the STS-1 descent flight profile. In addition, descent flight envelops are provided as a data base for use by system specialists to determine the flight readiness for STS-1. The results of these dispersion analyses supersede results of the dispersion analysis previously documented.

  3. Conceptual design of "Exomars-2018" Descent Module developed by federal enterprise "Lavochkin Association"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khartov, V. V.; Martynov, M. B.; Lukiyanchikov, A. V.; Alexashkin, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Goals and tasks for "ExoMars-2018" mission and share of responsibilities between European partners and p]Russia are presented. The main design requirements for a Descent Module (DM) that define its design concept as well as design specific features are given. The structure of the descent module, thermal control, means for securing systems interaction onboard the spacecraft "ExoMars-2018", and radio communication with the descent module are examined.

  4. An evaluation of descent strategies for TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Groce, J. L.; Coote, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated were the effects on system throughput and fleet fuel usage of arrival aircraft utilizing three 4D RNAV descent strategies (cost optimal, clean-idle Mach/CAS and constant descent angle Mach/CAS), both individually and in combination, in an advanced air traffic control metering environment. Results are presented for all mixtures of arrival traffic consisting of three Boeing commercial jet types and for all combinations of the three descent strategies for a typical en route metering airport arrival distribution.

  5. Accelerated Mini-batch Randomized Block Coordinate Descent Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tuo; Yu, Mo; Wang, Yiming; Arora, Raman; Liu, Han

    2014-01-01

    We consider regularized empirical risk minimization problems. In particular, we minimize the sum of a smooth empirical risk function and a nonsmooth regularization function. When the regularization function is block separable, we can solve the minimization problems in a randomized block coordinate descent (RBCD) manner. Existing RBCD methods usually decrease the objective value by exploiting the partial gradient of a randomly selected block of coordinates in each iteration. Thus they need all data to be accessible so that the partial gradient of the block gradient can be exactly obtained. However, such a “batch” setting may be computationally expensive in practice. In this paper, we propose a mini-batch randomized block coordinate descent (MRBCD) method, which estimates the partial gradient of the selected block based on a mini-batch of randomly sampled data in each iteration. We further accelerate the MRBCD method by exploiting the semi-stochastic optimization scheme, which effectively reduces the variance of the partial gradient estimators. Theoretically, we show that for strongly convex functions, the MRBCD method attains lower overall iteration complexity than existing RBCD methods. As an application, we further trim the MRBCD method to solve the regularized sparse learning problems. Our numerical experiments shows that the MRBCD method naturally exploits the sparsity structure and achieves better computational performance than existing methods. PMID:25620860

  6. Stereotypes of women of Asian descent in midwifery: some evidence.

    PubMed

    Bowler, I M

    1993-03-01

    The subject of this paper is part of a larger study which investigated the delivery of maternity care to women of South Asian descent in Britain (Bowler, 1990). An ethnographic approach was used and the main method of data collection was non-participant observation in antenatal clinics, labour and postnatal wards in a teaching hospital maternity unit. These observations were supported by data from interviews with midwives. It was found that the midwives commonly use stereotypes of women in order to help them to provide care. These stereotypes are particularly likely to be used in situations where the midwife has difficulty (through pressure of time or other circumstances) in getting to know an individual woman. The stereotype of women of Asian descent contained four main themes: communication problems; failure to comply with care and service abuse; making a fuss about nothing; a lack of normal maternal instinct. Reasons for stereotyping are explored. Effects on service provision in the areas of family planning and breast feeding are highlighted. PMID:8492731

  7. Arachnid aloft: directed aerial descent in neotropical canopy spiders.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Munk, Yonatan; Dudley, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The behaviour of directed aerial descent has been described for numerous taxa of wingless hexapods as they fall from the tropical rainforest canopy, but is not known in other terrestrial arthropods. Here, we describe similar controlled aerial behaviours for large arboreal spiders in the genus Selenops (Selenopidae). We dropped 59 such spiders from either canopy platforms or tree crowns in Panama and Peru; the majority (93%) directed their aerial trajectories towards and then landed upon nearby tree trunks. Following initial dorsoventral righting when necessary, falling spiders oriented themselves and then translated head-first towards targets; directional changes were correlated with bilaterally asymmetric motions of the anterolaterally extended forelegs. Aerial performance (i.e. the glide index) decreased with increasing body mass and wing loading, but not with projected surface area of the spider. Along with the occurrence of directed aerial descent in ants, jumping bristletails, and other wingless hexapods, this discovery of targeted gliding in selenopid spiders further indicates strong selective pressures against uncontrolled falls into the understory for arboreal taxa. PMID:26289654

  8. Controller evaluations of the descent advisor automation aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1989-01-01

    An automation aid to assist air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting arrival times at a fix has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The automation aid, referred to as the descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent point and speed profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is interfaced with a mouse-based, menu-driven controller display that allows the air traffic controller to interactively use its accurate predictive capability to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. This paper focuses on operational issues concerning the utilization of the DA, specifically, how the DA can be used for prediction, intrail spacing, and metering. In order to evaluate the DA, a real time simulation was conducted using both current and retired controller subjects. Controllers operated in teams of two, as they do in the present environment; issues of training and team interaction will be discussed. Evaluations by controllers indicated considerable enthusiasm for the DA aid, and provided specific recommendations for using the tool effectively.

  9. Efficient Love wave modeling via Sobolev gradient steepest descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Matt; Ferguson, John; McMechan, George

    2016-02-01

    A new method for finding solutions to ordinary differential equation boundary value problems is introduced, in which Sobolev gradient steepest descent is used to determine eigenfunctions and eigenvalues simultaneously in an iterative scheme. The technique is then applied to the 1-D Love wave problem. The algorithm has several advantages when computing dispersion curves. It avoids the problem of mode skipping, and can handle arbitrary Earth structure profiles in depth. For a given frequency range, computation times scale approximately as the square root of the number of frequencies, and the computation of dispersion curves can be implemented in a fully parallel manner over the modes involved. The steepest descent solutions are within a fraction of a percent of the analytic solutions for the first 25 modes for a two-layer model. Since all corresponding eigenfunctions are computed along with the dispersion curves, the impact on group and phase velocity of the displacement behavior with depth is thoroughly examined. The dispersion curves are used to compute synthetic Love wave seismograms that include many higher order modes. An example includes addition of attenuation to a model with a low velocity zone, with values as low as Q = 20. Finally, a confirming comparison is made with a layer matrix method on the upper 700 km of a whole Earth model.

  10. High mammographic density in women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and is known to be approximately 60% heritable. Here we report a finding of an association between genetic ancestry and adjusted PMD. Methods We selected self-identified Caucasian women in the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute Cohort whose screening mammograms placed them in the top or bottom quintiles of age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Our final dataset included 474 women with the highest adjusted PMD and 469 with the lowest genotyped on the Illumina 1 M platform. Principal component analysis (PCA) and identity-by-descent analyses allowed us to infer the women's genetic ancestry and correlate it with adjusted PMD. Results Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, as defined by the first principal component of PCA and identity-by-descent analyses, represented approximately 15% of the sample. Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, defined by the first principal component of PCA, was associated with higher adjusted PMD (P = 0.004). Using multivariate regression to adjust for epidemiologic factors associated with PMD, including age at parity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, did not attenuate the association. Conclusions Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, based on genetic analysis, are more likely to have high age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Ashkenazi Jews may have a unique set of genetic variants or environmental risk factors that increase mammographic density. PMID:23668689

  11. Pediatric Head and Neck Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Qaisi, Mohammed; Eid, Issam

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck malignancies are rare in pediatric patients, and represent 12% of all pediatric malignancies. The incidence for these head and neck tumors is 1.49 cases per 1,000,000 person-years. Among the most common pediatric head and neck malignancies are lymphomas (27%), neural tumors including primitive neurectodermal tumors (23%), thyroid malignancies (21%), soft tissue sarcomas including rhabdomyosarcoma (12%), nasopharyngeal carcinoma, skeletal and odontogenic malignancies including osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and ameloblastic carcinoma. This article presents an overview of pediatric head and neck malignancies with emphasis on diagnosis and management. PMID:26614697

  12. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  13. Isothiocyanates in the chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li; Zhang, Yuesheng

    2004-04-01

    Development of effective preventive strategies for bladder cancer is of critical importance. Bladder cancer is among the most common human malignancies and typically recurs after treatment. Many plant-derived isothiocyanates (ITCs) have shown cancer-preventive activity in a variety of rodent organs. They are known to inhibit carcinogen-activating enzymes, and to induce carcinogen-detoxifying enzymes, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation of cancer cells. More importantly, orally ingested ITCs are efficiently absorbed, rapidly and almost exclusively excreted and concentrated in the urine as N-acetylcysteine conjugates (NAC-ITC). NAC-ITCs also possess anticarcinogenic activity, perhaps due largely to their facile dissociation to free ITCs. Storage of urine in the bladder makes the bladder epithelium, which lines the inner surface of the bladder and gives rise to the majority of bladder cancers, the most exposed tissue to ITCs/NAC-ITCs upon their ingestion. Storage of urine in the bladder also will increase the release of ITCs from NAC-ITCs. Consequently, the amount of ITCs needed orally to achieve cancer prevention in the bladder may be much lower than that required for other organs. As a result, potential systemic adverse effects of ITCs may be minimized when using ITCs for chemoprevention of bladder carcinogenesis. Taken together, ITCs may be especially useful for the prevention of bladder cancer. PMID:15078196

  14. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Clark, Roderick; Welk, Blayne

    2016-02-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can't be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  15. Design of a randomised acupuncture trial on functional neck/shoulder stiffness with two placebo controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional neck/shoulder stiffness is one of the most well-known indications for acupuncture treatment in Japan. There is little evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for functional neck/shoulder stiffness. Research using two different placebos may allow an efficient method to tease apart the components of real acupuncture from various kinds of ‘non-specific’ effects such as ritual with touch or ritual alone. Herein, we describe a protocol of an ongoing, single-centre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial which aims to assess whether, in functional neck/shoulder stiffness, acupuncture treatment with skin piercing has a specific effect over two types of placebo: skin-touching plus ritual or ritual alone. Methods Six acupuncturists and 400 patients with functional neck/shoulder stiffness are randomly assigned to four treatment groups: genuine acupuncture penetrating the skin, skin-touch placebo or no-touch placebo needles in a double-blind manner (practitioner-patient blinding) or no-treatment control group. Each acupuncturist applies a needle to each of four acupoints (Bladder10, Small Intestine14, Gallbladder21 and Bladder42) in the neck/shoulder to 50 patients. Before, immediately after and 24 hours after the treatment, patients are asked about the intensity of their neck/shoulder stiffness. After the treatment, practitioners and patients are asked to guess whether the treatment is “penetrating”, “skin-touch” or “no-touch” or to record “cannot identify the treatment”. Discussion In addition to intention-to-treat analysis, we will conduct subgroup analysis based on practitioners’ or patients’ guesses to discuss the efficacy and effectiveness of treatments with skin piercing and various placebo controls. The results of practitioner and patient blinding will be discussed. We believe this study will further distinguish the role of different components of acupuncture. Trial registration Current Controlled Trial ISRCTN76896018 PMID:25027157

  16. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  17. Pharmacologic management of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Sum; Hilas, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a prevalent and costly condition that can affect any age group. Typical symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence and nocturia. OAB occurs as a result of abnormal contractions of the bladder detrusor muscle caused by the stimulation of certain muscarinic receptors. Therefore, antimuscarinic agents have long been considered the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for OAB. Currently, there are five such agents approved for the management of OAB in the United States: oxybutynin, tolterodine, trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin. This article summarizes the efficacy, contraindications, precautions, dosing and common side effects of these agents. All available clinical trials on trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin were reviewed to determine its place in therapy. PMID:18044184

  18. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  19. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Patra, Phani B; Patra, Sayani

    2015-05-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  20. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sonpavde, Guru; Lerner, Seth P

    2007-12-01

    Occult distant micrometastasis at the time of radical cystectomy leads predominantly to distant failures in patients with locally advanced muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy enhances survival in patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. Studies evaluating adjuvant chemotherapy have been limited by inadequate statistical power. However, randomized clinical trials have demonstrated a survival benefit for neoadjvuant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy, which should be considered a standard of care. In addition, neoadjuvant therapy may assist in the rapid development of novel systemic therapy regimens, since pathologic complete remission appears to be a powerful prognostic factor for long-term outcomes. Patients who are either unfit for or refuse radical cystectomy may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation to enable bladder preservation. PMID:18247016

  1. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of uncertainties in external factors. Analysis from operational feasibility perspective suggests that two key features of the performance based Flight Management System (FMS) i.e. required time of arrival (RTA) and geometric descent path would help in reduction of unpredictability associated with arrival time and vertical profile of aircraft guided by the FMS coupled with auto-pilot (AP) and auto-throttle (AT). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA also suggests that for procedure design window type, 'AT or above' and 'AT or below' altitude and FPA constraints are more realistic and useful compared to obsolete 'AT' type altitude constraint.

  2. Development of an analytical guidance algorithm for lunar descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomel, Christina Tvrdik

    In recent years, NASA has indicated a desire to return humans to the moon. With NASA planning manned missions within the next couple of decades, the concept development for these lunar vehicles has begun. The guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) computer programs that will perform the function of safely landing a spacecraft on the moon are part of that development. The lunar descent guidance algorithm takes the horizontally oriented spacecraft from orbital speeds hundreds of kilometers from the desired landing point to the landing point at an almost vertical orientation and very low speed. Existing lunar descent GN&C algorithms date back to the Apollo era with little work available for implementation since then. Though these algorithms met the criteria of the 1960's, they are cumbersome today. At the basis of the lunar descent phase are two elements: the targeting, which generates a reference trajectory, and the real-time guidance, which forces the spacecraft to fly that trajectory. The Apollo algorithm utilizes a complex, iterative, numerical optimization scheme for developing the reference trajectory. The real-time guidance utilizes this reference trajectory in the form of a quartic rather than a more general format to force the real-time trajectory errors to converge to zero; however, there exist no guarantees under any conditions for this convergence. The proposed algorithm implements a purely analytical targeting algorithm used to generate two-dimensional trajectories "on-the-fly"' or to retarget the spacecraft to another landing site altogether. It is based on the analytical solutions to the equations for speed, downrange, and altitude as a function of flight path angle and assumes two constant thrust acceleration curves. The proposed real-time guidance algorithm has at its basis the three-dimensional non-linear equations of motion and a control law that is proven to converge under certain conditions through Lyapunov analysis to a reference trajectory formatted as a function of downrange, altitude, speed, and flight path angle. The two elements of the guidance algorithm are joined in Monte Carlo analysis to prove their robustness to initial state dispersions and mass and thrust errors. The robustness of the retargeting algorithm is also demonstrated.

  3. UTIs in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Mona S; Mure, Amanda; Gomez, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) remain one of the most prevalent and frustrating morbidities for neurogenic bladder patients, and death attributed to urosepsis in the spinal cord injury (SCI) patient is higher when compared to the general population. Risk factors include urinary stasis, high bladder pressures, bladder stones, and catheter use. While classic symptoms of UTI include dysuria, increased frequency and urgency, neurogenic bladder patients present differently with increased spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary incontinence, and vague pains. Multiple modalities have been assessed for prevention including catheter type, oral supplements, bladder irrigation, detrusor injections and prophylactic antimicrobials. Of these, bladder inoculation with E. coli HU2117, irrigation with iAluRil(®), detrusor injections, and weekly prophylaxis with alternating antibiotics appear to have a positive reduction in UTI but require further study. Ultimately, treatment for symptomatic UTI should account for the varied flora and possible antibiotic resistances including relying on urine cultures to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:25113150

  4. [Plastic repair of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Bondar', G V; Bulava, V V; Panova, L A

    1976-01-01

    Clinical observations of 76 patients in whom an artifical urinary bladder was constructed from the rectum are presented. 52 patients were operated upon for cancer of the urinary bladder, total papillomatosis, a metastasis of uterine cancer in the bladder, cancer of the sigmoid with the urinary bladder involvement, sarcoma and cancer of the prostate with the bladder involvement. 17 patients were operated upon for extrophy, 7 -- for cancer of the urethra. An isolation of the rectum is followed by ligation of the upper rectal and vein. Fifteen patients died postoperatively due to peritonitis (6), ascending infection of the urinary tract (4), postoperative shock (I), phlegmon of the minor pelvis (I). In late postoperative period an artificial urinary bladder provides for reservoir and excretory functions. PMID:997414

  5. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-07

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  6. [Occupational exposure and bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Conso, Françoise

    2004-10-15

    There is an important gap between the number of bladder cancer cases--over a 1000 per year--that are imputable, by epidemiologists'estimations, to occupational factors and the small number--fewer than 20--compensated as occupational diseases. This can be explained by the latency of the disease and by the fact that the chemicals mainly responsible for bladder cancer--aromatic amines compounds and, to a lesser extent, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons--are very complex and disseminated in a large variety of industrial settings. Besides the sectors historically known as involving this occupational risk--the dye and the rubber industries--new branches have been identified as hazardous: some sectors of plastic materials or aluminium industries, of laboratory research, the industrial gas production from coke ovens, foundries... The European policy for the prevention of occupational cancers has applied for over 10 years to carcinogenic aromatic amines. Screening for the early detection of vesical lesions is legally prescribed in France for workers that are or have been exposed to chemicals or processes potentially carcinogenic for the bladder. PMID:15605580

  7. [Tumor marker tests in bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Feil, G; Stenzl, A

    2006-01-01

    The gold standard for detecting bladder cancer is cystoscopy which identifies nearly all papillary and sessile lesions. However, it is an invasive procedure causing some discomfort for patients. Urine cytology is the standard non-invasive marker with very high specificity, but unfavourable poor sensitivity for Ta, G1, and T1 bladder tumors. To improve early detection of bladder cancer as well as to monitor treatment response and tumor recurrence, bladder tumor markers are eligible. An ideal bladder cancer test would have the potential to replace or delay cystoscopy in the follow-up of bladder cancer patients. In recent years, the FDA approved non-invasive tumor marker tests ImmunoCyt / uCyt+, BTA TRAK, BTA stat, NMP22, NMP22 BladderChek, and UroVysion have been investigated. The tests demonstrated higher sensitivity for diagnosis of bladder cancer compared to urine cytology. Overall, the mean sensitivity and mean specificity was 64-80% and 71-95% and the mean positive and negative predictive values to detect malignancy were 49-84% and 79-95%, respectively. BTA TRAK, BTA stat, NMP22, and NMP22 BladderChek assays are limited by false-positive results in patients with benign urological diseases such as hematuria, urocystitis, renal calculi or urinary tract infections. Due to low specificity BTA TRAK, BTA stat, NMP22, and NMP22 BladderChek should not be used without first ruling out benign or malignant genitourinary disease other than bladder cancer. With the exception of UroVysion achieving 80% sensitivity and 94% specificity, none of these non-invasive tests revealed a high sensitivity and specificity at the same time, which is a main demand to be made on an ideal tumor marker. Insufficient sensitivity along with limited specificity does not allow replacing cystoscopy in diagnosis of bladder cancer or treatment decisions based on a positive test result. PMID:16703728

  8. The Role of la Familia for Women of Mexican Descent Who Are Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo, Sandra Gray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe the role of "la familia" for women of Mexican descent as it relates to their development as leaders and their leadership in academia. Purposeful sampling was utilized to reach the goal of 18 participants who were female academic leaders of Mexican descent teaching full time in…

  9. Ethnic Identity and Acculturative Stress as Mediators of Depression in Students of Asian Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantrip, Crystal; Mazzetti, Francesco; Grasso, Joseph; Gill, Sara; Miller, Janna; Haner, Morgynn; Rude, Stephanie; Awad, Germine

    2015-01-01

    This study underscored the importance of addressing the well-being of college students of Asian descent, because these students had higher rates of depression and lower positive feelings about their ethnic group compared with students of European descent, as measured by the Affirmation subscale of the Ethnic Identity Scale. Affirmation mediated…

  10. Ethnic Identity and Acculturative Stress as Mediators of Depression in Students of Asian Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantrip, Crystal; Mazzetti, Francesco; Grasso, Joseph; Gill, Sara; Miller, Janna; Haner, Morgynn; Rude, Stephanie; Awad, Germine

    2015-01-01

    This study underscored the importance of addressing the well-being of college students of Asian descent, because these students had higher rates of depression and lower positive feelings about their ethnic group compared with students of European descent, as measured by the Affirmation subscale of the Ethnic Identity Scale. Affirmation mediated…

  11. The Role of la Familia for Women of Mexican Descent Who Are Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo, Sandra Gray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe the role of "la familia" for women of Mexican descent as it relates to their development as leaders and their leadership in academia. Purposeful sampling was utilized to reach the goal of 18 participants who were female academic leaders of Mexican descent teaching full time in…

  12. Prostate Cancer in Men of African Descent: Opportunities for Global Research Collaborations

    Cancer.gov

    Prostate cancer disproportionately affects men of African descent in terms of incidence, morbidity, and mortality worldwide. Significant knowledge gaps exist about the factors that predict disparities in prostate cancer incidence and outcomes between men of African descent and other ethnic or racial groups.

  13. The Yearly Variation in Fall-Winter Arctic Winter Vortex Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Newman, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Using the change in HALOE methane profiles from early September to late March, we have estimated the minimum amount of diabatic descent within the polar which takes place during Arctic winter. The year to year variations are a result in the year to year variations in stratospheric wave activity which (1) modify the temperature of the vortex and thus the cooling rate; (2) reduce the apparent descent by mixing high amounts of methane into the vortex. The peak descent amounts from HALOE methane vary from l0km -14km near the arrival altitude of 25 km. Using a diabatic trajectory calculation, we compare forward and backward trajectories over the course of the winter using UKMO assimilated stratospheric data. The forward calculation agrees fairly well with the observed descent. The backward calculation appears to be unable to produce the observed amount of descent, but this is only an apparent effect due to the density decrease in parcels with altitude. Finally we show the results for unmixed descent experiments - where the parcels are fixed in latitude and longitude and allowed to descend based on the local cooling rate. Unmixed descent is found to always exceed mixed descent, because when normal parcel motion is included, the path average cooling is always less than the cooling at a fixed polar point.

  14. Mars Exploration Rover: Launch, Cruise, Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, James K.; Manning, Robert M.; Adler, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Project was an ambitious effort to land two highly capable rovers on Mars and concurrently explore the Martian surface for three months each. Launched in June and July of 2003, cruise operations were conducted through January 4, 2004 with the first landing, followed by the second landing on January 25. The prime mission for the second rover ended on April 27, 2004. This paper will provide an overview of the launch, cruise, and landing phases of the mission, including the engineering and science objectives and challenges involved in the selection and targeting of the landing sites, as well as the excitement and challenges of atmospheric entry, descent and landing execution.

  15. Apollo 16 LM-11 descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of the LM-11 Descent Propulsion System during the Apollo 16 Mission was evaluated and found to be satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted 1 sigma uncertainty of 0.2 seconds. The engine performance corrected to standard inlet conditions for the FTP portion of the burn at 50 seconds after ignition was as follows: thrust, 9839 lbf; specific impulse, 306.9 sec; and propellant mixture ratio, 1.592. These values are +0.34, +0.03 and +0.0 percent different, respectively, from the values reported from engine acceptance tests and were within specification limits. Several flight measurement discrepancies that existed during the flight are discussed.

  16. En route Descent Advisor Concept for Efficient Arrival Metering Conformance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven; Vivona, Robert; Coppenbarger, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The En-route Descent Advisor (EDA) is a suite of decision support tool (DST) capabilities for en route sector subject to metering restrictions such as those generated by the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) Traffic Management Advisor. EDA assists controllers with high-density arrival metering by providing fuel-efficient metering-conformance advisories, integrated with conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capabilities, to minimize deviations from the user s preferred trajectory. These DST capabilities will enable controllers to change their procedures from ones that are oriented towards sector management to procedures oriented towards trajectory management. Although adaptable to current procedures and airspace structure, EDA is intended as a tool for transitioning traffic from a Free Flight environment to an efficiently organized flow into terminal airspace. This paper describes the transition airspace problem and EDA concept, defines the key benefit mechanisms that will be enabled by EDA capabilities, and presents a traffic scenario to illustrate the use of the tool.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, Ravi; Burkhart, P. Dan; Chen, Allen; Comeaux, Keith A.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Devin, M. Kipp; Mendeck, Gavin F.; Powell, Richard W.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Sell, Steven W.; Steltzner, Adam D.; Way, David W.

    2008-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than prior missions to Mars, MSL will offer access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. The MSL EDL sequence is a result of a more stringent requirement set than any of its predecessors. Notable among these requirements is landing a 900 kg rover in a landing ellipse much smaller than that of any previous Mars lander. In meeting these requirements, MSL is extending the limits of the EDL technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions.

  18. CryoScout: A Descent Through the Mars Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Saunders, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    CryoScout was proposed as a subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars North Polar cap. After landing on a gentle landscape in the midst of the mild summer season, CryoScout was to use the continuous polar sunlight to power the descent of a cryobot, a thermal probe, into the ice at a rate of about 1 m per day. CryoScout would probe deep enough into this time capsule to see the effects of planetary obliquity variations and discrete events such as dust storms or volcanic eruptions. By penetrating tens of meters of ice, the mission would explore at least one of the dominant "MOC layers" observed in exposed layered terrain.

  19. Mars exploration rovers entry, descent, and landing trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Knocke, Philip C.

    2007-09-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover mission successfully landed two rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" on Mars on January 4th and 25th of 2004, respectively. In this paper, the trajectory analysis performed to define the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) scenario is described. The entry requirements and constraints are presented, as well as uncertainties used in a Monte Carlo dispersion analysis to statistically assess the robustness of the entry design to off-nominal conditions. In the analysis, six-degree-of-freedom and three-degree-offreedom trajectory results are compared to assess the entry characteristics of the capsule. Comparison of the pre-entry results to preliminary post-landing reconstruction data shows all EDL parameters were within the requirements. In addition, the final landing locations for both Spirit and Opportunity were within 15 km from the target.

  20. Steepest descent ballistic deposition of complex shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topic, Nikola; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    We present an efficient event-driven algorithm for sequential ballistic deposition of complex-shaped rigid particles. Each of the particles is constructed from hard spheres (typically 5 … 1000) of variable radii. The sizes and relative positions of the spheres may mutually overlap and can be chosen such that the surface of the resulting particle appears relatively smooth. In the sequential deposition process, by performing steps of rolling and linear motion, the particles move along the steepest descent in a landscape formed by the boundaries and previously deposited particles. The computer time for the simulation of a deposition process depends on the total number of spheres but only weakly on the sizes and shapes of the particles. The proposed algorithm generalizes the Visscher-Bolsterli algorithm [1] which is frequently used for packing of spheres, to non-spherical particles. The proposed event-driven algorithm allows simulations of multi-million particle systems using desktop computers.

  1. Overview of the Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, Myron R., III; Cichy, Benjamin D.; Desai, Prasun N.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Phoenix Mars Lander began its journey to Mars from Cape Canaveral, Florida in August 2007, but its journey to the launch pad began many years earlier in 1997 as NASA s Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. In the intervening years, the entry, descent and landing (EDL) system architecture went through a series of changes, resulting in the system flown to the surface of Mars on May 25th, 2008. Some changes, such as entry velocity and landing site elevation, were the result of differences in mission design. Other changes, including the removal of hypersonic guidance, the reformulation of the parachute deployment algorithm, and the addition of the backshell avoidance maneuver, were driven by constant efforts to augment system robustness. An overview of the Phoenix EDL system architecture is presented along with rationales driving these architectural changes.

  2. Analysis of Atmospheric Mesoscale Models for Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.; Michaels, T. I.; Rafkin, S. C. R.; Richardson, M. I.; Toigo, A. D.

    2003-01-01

    Each Mars Exploration Rover (MER) is sensitive to the martian winds encountered near the surface during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) process. These winds are strongly influenced by local (mesoscale) conditions. In the absence of suitable wind observations, wind fields predicted by martian mesoscale atmospheric models have been analyzed to guide landing site selection. Two different models were used, the MRAMS model and the Mars MM5 model. In order to encompass both models and render their results useful to the EDL engineering team, a series of statistical techniques were applied to the model results. These analyses cover the high priority landing sites during the expected landing times (1200 to 1500 local time). The number of sites studied is limited by the computational and analysis cost of the mesoscale models.

  3. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Koryanov, Vsevolod; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valery; Martynov, Maxim; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Viktor; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    2014-05-01

    A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry. 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth's atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. 'Mini-1' category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, V (m/s): re-entry velocity and ? (deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet ('Mini-1' category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being VSOL = 5268 m/s. Using the basic pre-defined parameters for MetNet-type of lander in Earth atmosphere, we get the optimal angle of ? = -3.06 degrees for Earth re-entry. 3. Payload Mass for Earth Entry DV One of the key elements in Earth entry lander is the amount of available payload mass. The payload mass depends on, e.g., the lander size, landing type (soil or water), heat shield durability and additional landing gear. The payload mass will have an impact to the center of gravity of the lander. The payload with a 'low' CoG (compared the the lander structure) has a larger tolerance than the payload with 'high' CoG. In cases where payload CoG causes instability, the extra balance mass can be used to adjust CoG. This balance mass will reduce the available payload mass. A major limitation for payload mass is the heat shielding. Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 263255. References [1] http://ritd.fmi.fi

  4. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Martynov, Maxim; Schmidt, Walter; Harri, Ari-Matti; Vsevolod Koryanov, D.; Kazakovtcev, Victor; Haukka, Harri; Arruego, Ignacio; Finchenko, Valery; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrei; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    Abstract A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) or Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth’s atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth’s atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. “Mini-1” category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: - qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, - Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, - m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, - V (m/s): re-entry velocity and - theta(deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet (“Mini-1” category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being VSOL = 5268 m/s. Using the basic pre-defined parameters for MetNet-type of lander in Earth atmosphere, we get the optimal angle of = -3.06 degrees for Earth re-entry. 3. Payload Mass for Earth Entry DV One of the key elements in Earth entry lander is the amount of available payload mass. The payload mass depends on, e.g., the lander size, landing type (soil or water), heat shield durability and additional landing gear. The payload mass will have an impact to the center of gravity of the lander. The payload with a “low” CoG (compared the the lander structure) has a larger tolerance than the payload with “high” CoG. In cases where payload CoG causes instability, the extra balance mass can be used to adjust CoG. This balance mass will reduce the available payload mass. A major limitation for payload mass is the heat shielding. Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 263255. References [1] http://ritd.fmi.fi

  5. Mars Exploration Rovers Entry, Descent, and Landing Trajectory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Knocke, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover mission successfully landed two rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" on Mars on January 4th and 25th of 2004, respectively. The trajectory analysis performed to define the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) scenario is described. The entry requirements and constraints are presented, as well as uncertainties used in a Monte Carlo dispersion analysis to statistically assess the robustness of the entry design to off-nominal conditions. In the analysis, six-degree-of-freedom and three-degree-of-freedom trajectory results are compared to assess the entry characteristics of the capsule. Comparison of the preentry results to preliminary post-landing reconstruction data shows that all EDL parameters were within the requirements. In addition, the final landing position for both "Spirit" and "Opportunity" were within 15 km of the predicted landing location.

  6. Is Bladder Tumor Location Associated with Prostate Cancer Detection after Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Instillation?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Seong-Cheol; Kwon, Taekmin; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong; Hong, Jun Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bladder tumor (BT) location on prostate cancer (PCa) detection in patients with elevated PSA levels after intravesical BCG instillation. Methods Between February 2004 and January 2013 prostate biopsies were performed in 59 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) patients whose PSA level were elevated (?3 ng/ml) after a 6 week course of intravesical BCG (Oncotice, 12.5 mg in 50 ml normal saline). Differences in PCa detection according to the BT location [bladder neck and/or trigone (Group 1, n?=?22) vs. other locations (Group 2, n?=?37)] were evaluated. The Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney U test were used to evaluate the association between categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Results A total of 14 patients (23.7%) were diagnosed with PCa. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) PSA before intravesical BCG instillation and prostate biopsy were 1.36±1.04 ng/ml in Group 1 and 1.09±1.12 ng/ml in Group 2 (P?=?0.633), and 6.05±3.57 ng/ml in Group 1 and 5.13±3.88 ng/ml in Group 2 (P?=?0.378), respectively. Interestingly, whereas PCa was detected upon biopsy in only one patient in Group 1 (4.5%), 13 cases were detected in Group 2 (35.1%) (P?=?0.009). Conclusions PCa detection after intravesical BCG was highly associated with BT location. Prostate biopsy should therefore be considered when PSA level is elevated after BCG instillation and his BT is located far from the bladder neck. PMID:25072158

  7. Comparison of a new venous control device with a bladder box system for use in ECMO.

    PubMed

    Setz, K; Kesser, K; Kopotic, R J; Cornish, J D

    1992-01-01

    During extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), forward pump flow must not be allowed to exceed the rate of blood drainage from the patient so that excessive negative pressure does not develop within the ECMO circuit or in the patient's right atrium. A distensible reservoir ("bladder") and mechanically actuated electronic switch ("bladder box"), has typically been used for this purpose. If the rate of blood flow from the patient to the pump is insufficient to support the perfusion rate desired and adjustments in volume status and catheter position do not increase blood drainage, the only recourse is to increase the siphon pressure by elevating the patient. At the author's institution, a novel venous control module (VCM), without a reservoir, that can provide increased venous drainage without elevating the patient is used. Using an in vitro model of neonatal ECMO, the authors' compared their VCM to a commercially available "bladder box" system. Pressures were monitored in a collapsible chamber inside a water bath (simulating the right atrium), at the gravitational high point of the ECMO circuit ("neck site") and at the low point of the circuit ("venous site") at flow rates of 100, 450, 900, and 1,300 cc/min. Pump shut-off characteristics for both systems were also measured with either sudden interruption of venous drainage ("cross-clamping") or restriction of venous inflow ("hypovolemia"). Under continuous flow conditions, higher flows could be achieved with the VCM. With acute venous catheter occlusion, instantaneous ("trough") pressures at the neck site were lower, and venous monitoring site pressures were higher with the bladder box system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1450482

  8. Assessment on EXPERT Descent and Landing System Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, H.; Muylaert, J.; Northey, D.; Riley, D.

    2009-01-01

    EXPERT is a re-entry vehicle designed for validation of aero-thermodynamic models, numerical schemes in Computational Fluid Dynamics codes and test facilities for measuring flight data under an Earth re-entry environment. This paper addresses the design for the descent and landing sequence for EXPERT. It includes the descent sequence, the choice of drogue and main parachutes, and the parachute deployment condition, which can be supersonic or subsonic. The analysis is based mainly on an engineering tool, PASDA, together with some hand calculations for parachute sizing and design. The tool consists of a detailed 6-DoF simulation performed with the aerodynamics database of the vehicle, an empirical wakes model and the International Standard Atmosphere database. The aerodynamics database for the vehicle is generated by DNW experimental data and CFD codes within the framework of an ESA contract to CIRA. The analysis will be presented in terms of altitude, velocity, accelerations, angle-of- attack, pitch angle and angle of rigging line. Discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of each parachute deployment condition is included in addition to some comparison with the available data based on a Monte-Carlo method from a Russian company, FSUE NIIPS. Sensitivity on wind speed to the performance of EXPERT is shown to be strong. Supersonic deployment of drogue shows a better performance in stability at the expense of a larger G-load than those from the subsonic deployment of drogue. Further optimization on the parachute design is necessary in order to fulfill all the EXPERT specifications.

  9. Y Chromosome Lineages in Men of West African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Shomarka O. Y.; Kittles, Rick A.

    2012-01-01

    The early African experience in the Americas is marked by the transatlantic slave trade from ?1619 to 1850 and the rise of the plantation system. The origins of enslaved Africans were largely dependent on European preferences as well as the availability of potential laborers within Africa. Rice production was a key industry of many colonial South Carolina low country plantations. Accordingly, rice plantations owners within South Carolina often requested enslaved Africans from the so-called “Grain Coast” of western Africa (Senegal to Sierra Leone). Studies on the African origins of the enslaved within other regions of the Americas have been limited. To address the issue of origins of people of African descent within the Americas and understand more about the genetic heterogeneity present within Africa and the African Diaspora, we typed Y chromosome specific markers in 1,319 men consisting of 508 west and central Africans (from 12 populations), 188 Caribbeans (from 2 islands), 532 African Americans (AAs from Washington, DC and Columbia, SC), and 91 European Americans. Principal component and admixture analyses provide support for significant Grain Coast ancestry among African American men in South Carolina. AA men from DC and the Caribbean showed a closer affinity to populations from the Bight of Biafra. Furthermore, 30–40% of the paternal lineages in African descent populations in the Americas are of European ancestry. Diverse west African ancestries and sex-biased gene flow from EAs has contributed greatly to the genetic heterogeneity of African populations throughout the Americas and has significant implications for gene mapping efforts in these populations. PMID:22295064

  10. Ground reaction forces and frictional demands during stair descent: effects of age and illumination.

    PubMed

    Christina, Kathryn A; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2002-04-01

    Stair descent is an inherently risky and demanding task that older adults often encounter in everyday life. It is believed that slip between the foot or shoe sole and the stair surface may play a role in stair related falls, however, there are no reports on slip resistance requirements for stair descent. The aim of this study was to determine the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) necessary for safe stair descent in 12 young and 12 older adults, under varied illuminance conditions. The RCOF during stair descent was found to be comparable in magnitude and time to that for overground walking, and thus, with adequate footwear and dry stair surfaces, friction does not appear to be a major determinant of stair safety. Illuminance level had little effect on the dependent variables quantified in this study. However, the older participants demonstrated safer strategies than the young during stair descent, as reflected by differences in the ground reaction forces and lower RCOF. PMID:11869909

  11. Analysis of foot clearance in firefighters during ascent and descent of stairs.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Richard M; Horn, Gavin P; Rosengren, Karl S; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    Slips, trips, and falls are a leading cause of injury to firefighters with many injuries occurring while traversing stairs, possibly exaggerated by acute fatigue from firefighting activities and/or asymmetric load carriage. This study examined the effects that fatigue, induced by simulated firefighting activities, and hose load carriage have on foot clearance while traversing stairs. Landing and passing foot clearances for each stair during ascent and descent of a short staircase were investigated. Clearances decreased significantly (p < 0.05) post-exercise for nine of 12 ascent parameters and increased for two of eight descent parameters. Load carriage resulted in significantly decreased (p < 0.05) clearance over three ascent parameters, and one increase during descent. Decreased clearances during ascent caused by fatigue or load carriage may result in an increased trip risk. Increased clearances during descent may suggest use of a compensation strategy to ensure stair clearance or an increased risk of over-stepping during descent. PMID:26360190

  12. Cancer in the neck: Evaluation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.L.; Ballantyne, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of melanoma; Basic principles of radiobiology in head and neck oncology; Head and neck cancer: Radiotherapeutic precepts in the management of the neck; and Morbidity of modified neck dissection.

  13. Incidental Diagnosis of Nonfunctional Bladder Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Spessoto, Luís Cesar Fava; Vasilceac, Fábio Augusto; Padilha, Thiago Litaiff; de Arruda, Pedro Francisco Ferraz; Gatti, Marcio; de Arruda, José Germano Ferraz; Pessutti, Daniel; Antoniassi, Thiago da Silveira; Costa Neto, José de Mendonça; Facio, Fernando Nestor

    2015-01-01

    Nonfunctional bladder paragangliomas may present clinical, radiology and pathological features similar to bladder cancer, so knowledge of this generally benign neuroendocrine neoplasm is of great importance to avoid misdiagnosis. We present the case of a patient with no clinical symptoms of paraganglioma and with radiological and cystoscopy examination results suggestive of urothelial carcinoma but with pathological diagnosis of paraganglioma.

  14. Incidental Diagnosis of Nonfunctional Bladder Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Spessoto, Luís Cesar Fava; Vasilceac, Fábio Augusto; Padilha, Thiago Litaiff; de Arruda, Pedro Francisco Ferraz; Gatti, Marcio; de Arruda, José Germano Ferraz; Pessutti, Daniel; Antoniassi, Thiago da Silveira; Costa Neto, José de Mendonça; Facio, Fernando Nestor

    2016-01-01

    Nonfunctional bladder paragangliomas may present clinical, radiology and pathological features similar to bladder cancer, so knowledge of this generally benign neuroendocrine neoplasm is of great importance to avoid misdiagnosis. We present the case of a patient with no clinical symptoms of paraganglioma and with radiological and cystoscopy examination results suggestive of urothelial carcinoma but with pathological diagnosis of paraganglioma. PMID:26793581

  15. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  16. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  17. Bladder cancer documentation of causes: multilingual questionnaire, 'bladder cancer doc'.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Abreu-Villaca, Yael; Anbari Attar, Rowshanak; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Aslam, Muhammad; Basaran, Nursen; Belik, Rouslana; Butryee, Chaniphun; Dalpiaz, Orietta; Dzhusupov, Keneshbek; Ecke, Thorsten H; Galambos, Henrieta; Galambos, Henrieta; Gerilovica, Helena; Gerullis, Holger; Gonzalez, Patricia Casares; Goossens, Maria E; Gorgishvili-Hermes, Lela; Heyns, Chris F; Hodzic, Jasmin; Ikoma, Fumihiko; Jichlinski, Patrice; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Martinova, Irina; Mittal, Rama Devi; Ravichandran, Beerappa; Romics, Imre; Roy, Bidyut; Rungkat-Zakaria, Fransiska; Rydzynski, Konrad; Scutaru, Cristian; Shen, Jianhua; Soufi, Maria; Toguzbaeva, Karlygash; Vu Duc, Trinh; Widera, Agata; Wishahi, Mohamed; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-01-01

    There is a considerable discrepancy between the number of identified occupational-related bladder cancer cases and the estimated numbers particularly in emerging nations or less developed countries where suitable approaches are less or even not known. Thus, within a project of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health, a questionnaire of the Dortmund group, applied in different studies, was translated into more than 30 languages (Afrikaans, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Korean, Latvian, Malay, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese/Brazilian, Romanian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, Spanish, Spanish/Mexican, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Vietnamese). The bipartite questionnaire asks for relevant medical information in the physician's part and for the occupational history since leaving school in the patient's part. Furthermore, this questionnaire is asking for intensity and frequency of certain occupational and non-occupational risk factors. The literature regarding occupations like painter, hairdresser or miner and exposures like carcinogenic aromatic amines, azo dyes, or combustion products is highlighted. The questionnaire is available on www.ifado.de/BladderCancerDoc. PMID:22652680

  18. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation CBCT sampled on the segmentation contour candidate. The cost function measured the goodness of fit of the segmentation on the validation image and was minimized using a simplex optimizer. For each validation CBCT image, the segmentations were done five times using a different reference CBCT. The one with the lowest cost function was selected as the final bladder segmentation. Volume- and distance-based metrics and the accuracy of plan selection were evaluated to quantify the performance. Two to four PCA modes were needed to represent the bladder shape variation with less than 0.1 cm average residual error for the training data of each patient. The automatically segmented bladders had a 78.5% mean conformity index with the manual delineations. The mean SD of the local residual error over all patients was 0.24 cm. The agreement of plan selection between automatic and manual bladder segmentations was 77.5%. PCA is an efficient method to describe patient-specific bladder deformation. The statistical-shape-based segmentation approach is robust to handle the relatively poor CBCT image quality and allows for fast and reliable automatic segmentation of the bladder on CBCT for selecting the appropriate plan from a library of plans.

  19. Neuropathic bladder in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Carr, Michael C

    2014-09-01

    The management of infants born with myelomeningocele depends on understanding how their bladder stores and empties urine. Storage at low pressure with effective emptying periodically throughout the day is the goal. Intervention is designed to impact on one or both of these processes so that infants can remain infection-free and at the same time allow for appropriate renal growth over time. Urodynamic evaluation plays an important role, so that neonates can be stratified according to their risk. Most patients require intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy to achieve these goals at some point in their lives. PMID:25155738

  20. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  1. Pathogenesis of human urinary bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, George T.

    1983-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bladder cancer is being analyzed at several levels of biological organization, i.e., population groups, individual whole animal, tissue, cell, molecule, etc. Each of these levels provides opportunities for mechanistic studies. Yet the integration of these several levels into a cohesive fabric is incomplete. From a clinical point of view, the following seem of importance to human bladder cancer pathogenesis. The initiation, promotion, and progression of bladder cancer involves several factors acting concurrently or sequentially. These factors appear to be naturally occurring or synthetically created chemicals present in the external environment. Human exposures to these agents may begin in utero, and varying, dynamic qualitative and quantitative exposure patterns continue through developmental and adult life. Apparent latent periods of development of clinical bladder cancer may be as short as one, or as long as 50 years or more. Individuals may exhibit differential susceptibility to vesical carcinogens, perhaps through phenotypic differences in quantitative biotransformation routes. Differences in bladder epithelial cell susceptibilities probably also occur, as well as varying local tissue and generalized resistance to neoplasia formation. Older individuals do not appear to be more resistant to bladder carcinogenesis. A number of animal model systems have been developed for the study of the in vivo, cellular, and molecular pathogenesis of bladder cancer. These models replicate many of the known salient features of human bladder cancer. Through use of appropriate whole animal models in conjunction with investigations of human and animal bladder cells and tissues in culture, controlled mechanistic and quantitative studies of bladder cancer pathogenesis should rapidly develop. PMID:6832092

  2. The role of free radicals and nitric oxide in the ischemia-reperfusion injury mediated by acute bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Asif; Onol, Fikret Fatih; Haklar, Goncagül; Tarcan, Tufan

    2008-01-01

    Free-radical generation and nitric oxide (NO) generation were detected in the rat bladder following acute bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), and the results were compared with those for vascular ischemia and reperfusion (I-R). Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were used. In the acute BOO plus I-R group (group 1), rats were catheterized with a 3-Fr catheter and an inflated balloon was positioned at the bladder neck. The bladder was overdistended after administration of Ringer solution and furosemide (12 mg/kg, each) for 60 min, and was then drained to allow reperfusion for 30 min. In the acute BOO plus nerve stimulation group (group 2), the pelvic nerve was stimulated in the distended bladder for 60 min (5 s every 5 min, 10 V/0.1 ms, 20 Hz). Pelvic nerve stimulation was performed in nonobstructed animals in group 3. In the I-R group (group 4), the distal aorta was occluded for 60 min followed by reperfusion for 30 min. Sham-operated animals served as the control group (group 5). At the end of the protocols, the levels of hydroxyl and superoxide radicals and NO levels were measured in the bladder tissues with luminol- and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence methods. The results were compared by a one-way analysis of variance test. The levels of hydroxyl radicals were not significantly different between the study groups. In contrast, superoxide radicals and NO levels were significantly increased in both group 1 and group 4 compared with those in control animals (P<0.05 for all comparisons). Superoxide radical generation in group 2 was comparable to the levels in group 1 (P>0.05), whereas NO levels were substantially lower than in group 1 (P=0.06). In summary, vascular I-R causes significant oxidative damage to the bladder. Acute BOO with overdistension of the bladder mimics the effects of true vascular I-R injury. The NO pathway has possibly a major role in I-R-induced bladder damage. Prolonged BOO may therefore significantly enhance the oxidative damage to the bladder and further accentuate the effects of generalized atherosclerotic processes in the elderly adult. PMID:17602306

  3. Descent strategy comparisons for TNAV-equipped aircraft under airplane-preferred operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.

    1989-01-01

    Three 4-D descent strategies were evaluated which were employed by TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering air traffic control environment. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to assess performance using three criteria when traffic enters the simulation under preferred cruise operating conditions (altitude and speed): throughput, fuel usage, and conflict probability. In comparison to an evaluation previously performed under NASA contract, the current analysis indicates that the optimal descent strategy is preferred over the clean-idle and constant descent angle (CFPA) strategies when all three criteria are considered.

  4. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a convex optimization based method that can rapidly generate the fuel optimal asteroid powered descent trajectory. The ultimate goal is to autonomously design the optimal powered descent trajectory on-board the spacecraft immediately prior to the descent burn. Compared to a planetary powered landing problem, the major difficulty is the complex gravity field near the surface of an asteroid that cannot be approximated by a constant gravity field. This paper uses relaxation techniques and a successive solution process that seeks the solution to the original nonlinear, nonconvex problem through the solutions to a sequence of convex optimal control problems.

  5. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter C; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, H Barton; Dinney, Colin P

    2006-11-01

    The 30-45% failure rate after radical cystoprostatectomy mandates that we explore and optimize multimodal therapy to achieve better disease control in these patients. Cisplatin-based multi-agent combination chemotherapy has been used with success in metastatic disease and has therefore also been introduced in patients with high-risk but non-metastatic bladder cancer. There is now convincing evidence that chemotherapy given pre-operatively can improve survival in these patients. In this review we establish the need for peri-operative chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients and summarize the evidence for the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The advantages and disadvantages of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy are discussed, and the main shortcomings of both--treatment-related toxicity and the inability to prospectively identify likely responders--are presented. Finally, a risk-adapted approach to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is presented, whereby the highest risk patients are offered treatment while those unlikely to benefit are spared the treatment-related toxicity. PMID:17115230

  6. Description of the computations and pilot procedures for planning fuel-conservative descents with a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.; Knox, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm and the vertical performance modeling required for the DC-10 airplane is described.

  7. Description of the computations and pilot procedures for planning fuel-conservative descents with a small programmable calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Vicroy, D.D.; Knox, C.E.

    1983-05-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm and the vertical performance modeling required for the DC-10 airplane is described.

  8. Development of a Mars Airplane Entry, Descent, and Flight Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    2001-01-01

    An entry, descent, and flight (EDF) trajectory profile for a Mars airplane mission is defined as consisting of the following elements: ballistic entry of an aeroshell; supersonic deployment of a decelerator parachute; subsonic release of a heat shield; release, unfolding, and orientation of an airplane to flight attitude; and execution of a pull up maneuver to achieve trimmed, horizontal flight. Using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) a trajectory optimization problem was formulated. Model data representative of a specific Mars airplane configuration, current models of the Mars surface topography and atmosphere, and current estimates of the interplanetary trajectory, were incorporated into the analysis. The goal is to develop an EDF trajectory to maximize the surface-relative altitude of the airplane at the end of a pull up maneuver, while subject to the mission design constraints. The trajectory performance was evaluated for three potential mission sites and was found to be site-sensitive. The trajectory performance, examined for sensitivity to a number of design and constraint variables, was found to be most sensitive to airplane mass, aerodynamic performance characteristics, and the pull up Mach constraint. Based on the results of this sensitivity study, an airplane-drag optimized trajectory was developed that showed a significant performance improvement.

  9. Race, language, and mental evolution in Darwin's descent of man.

    PubMed

    Alter, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Charles Darwin was notoriously ambiguous in his remarks about the relationship between human evolution and biological race. He stressed the original unity of the races, yet he also helped to popularize the notion of a racial hierarchy filling the gaps between the highest anthropoids and civilized Europeans. A focus on Darwin's explanation of how humans initially evolved, however, shows that he mainly stressed not hierarchy but a version of humanity's original mental unity. In his book The Descent of Man, Darwin emphasized a substantial degree of mental development (including the incipient use of language) in the early, monogenetic phase of human evolution. This development, he argued, necessarily came before primeval man's numerical increase, geographic dispersion, and racial diversification, because only thus could one explain how that group was able to spread at the expense of rival ape-like populations. This scenario stood opposed to a new evolutionary polygenism formulated in the wake of Darwin's Origin of Species by his ostensible supporters Alfred Russel Wallace and Ernst Haeckel. Darwin judged this outlook inadequate to the task of explaining humanity's emergence. PMID:17623873

  10. Minimum Landing Error Powered-Descent Guidance for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Acikmese, Behcet

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm improves the accuracy with which a lander can be delivered to the surface of Mars. The main idea behind this innovation is the use of a lossless convexification, which converts an otherwise non-convex constraint related to thruster throttling to a convex constraint, enabling convex optimization to be used. The convexification leads directly to an algorithm that guarantees finding the global optimum of the original nonconvex optimization problem with a deterministic upper bound on the number of iterations required for convergence. In this innovation, previous work in powered-descent guidance using convex optimization is extended to handle the case where the lander must get as close as possible to the target given the available fuel, but is not required to arrive exactly at the target. The new algorithm calculates the minimum-fuel trajectory to the target, if one exists, and calculates the trajectory that minimizes the distance to the target if no solution to the target exists. This approach poses the problem as two Second-Order Cone Programs, which can be solved to global optimality with deterministic bounds on the number of iterations required.

  11. STS-40 descent BET products: Development and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.; Wood, James S.; Findlay, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Descent Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) Data were generated for the final Orbiter Experiments Flight, STS-40. This report discusses the actual development of these post-flight products: the inertial BET, the Extended BET, and the Aerodynamic BET. Summary results are also included. The inertial BET was determined based on processing Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRSS) coherent Doppler data in conjunction with observations from eleven C-band stations, to include data from the Kwajalein Atoll and the usual California coastal radars, as well as data from five cinetheodolite cameras in the vicinity of the runways at EAFB. The anchor epoch utilized for the trajectory reconstruction was 53,904 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) seconds which corresponds to an altitude at epoch of approximately 708 kft. Atmospheric data to enable development of an Extended BET for this mission were upsurped from the JSC operational post-flight BET. These data were evaluated based on Space Shuttle-derived considerations as well as model comparisons. The Aerodynamic BET includes configuration information, final mass properties, and both flight-determined and predicted aerodynamic performance estimates. The predicted data were based on the final pre-operational databook, updated to include flight determined incrementals based on an earlier ensemble of flights. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are presented and correlated versus statistical results based on twenty-two previous missions.

  12. Preliminary Study of a Model Rotor in Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, K. W.; Tung, C.; Sharpe, D. L.; Huang, S.; Hendley, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    Within a program designed to develop experimental techniques for measuring the trajectory and structure of vortices trailing from the tips of rotor blades, the present preliminary study focuses on a method for quantifying the trajectory of the trailing vortex during descent flight conditions. This study also presents rotor loads and blade surface pressures for a range of tip-path plane angles and Mach numbers. Blade pressures near the leading edge and along the outer radius are compared with data obtained on the same model rotor, but in open jet facilities. A triangulation procedure based on two directable laser-light sheets, each containing an embedded reference, proved effective in defining the spatial coordinates of the trailing vortex. When interrogating a cross section of the flow that contains several trailing vortices, the greatest clarity was found to result when the flow is uniformly seeded. Surface pressure responses during blade-vortex interactions appeared equally sensitive near the leading edge and along the outer portion of the blade, but diminished rapidly as the distance along the blade chord increased. The pressure response was virtually independent of whether the tip-path plane angle was obtained through shaft tilt or cyclic pitch. Although the shape and frequency of the pressure perturbations on the advancing blade during blade-vortex interaction are similar to those obtained in open-jet facilities, the angle of the tip-path plane may need to be lower than the range covered in this study.

  13. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; Burkhart, P. Dan; Chen, Allen; Comeaux, Keith A.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Kipp, Devin M.; Lorenzoni, Leila V.; Mendeck, Gavin F.; Powell, Richard W.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Sell, Steven W.; Prakash, Ravi; Way, David W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than prior missions to Mars, MSL will offer access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. The MSL EDL sequence is a result of a more stringent requirement set than any of its predecessors. Notable among these requirements is landing a 900 kg rover in a landing ellipse much smaller than that of any previous Mars lander. In meeting these requirements, MSL is extending the limits of the EDL technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions. Thus, there are many design challenges that must be solved for the mission to be successful. Several pieces of the EDL design are technological firsts, such as guided entry and precision landing on another planet, as well as the entire Sky Crane maneuver. This paper discusses the MSL EDL architecture and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  14. Beaconless stochastic parallel gradient descent laser beam control: numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Piatrou, Piotr; Roggemann, Michael

    2007-09-20

    We apply a target-in-the-loop strategy to the case of adaptive optics beam control in the presence of strong atmospheric turbulence for air-to-ground directed energy laser applications. Using numerical simulations we show that in the absence of a cooperative beacon to probe the atmosphere it is possible to extract information suitable for effective beam control from images of the speckled and strongly turbulence degraded intensity distribution of the laser energy at the target. We use a closed-loop, single-deformable-mirror adaptive optics system driven by a target-in-the-loop stochastic parallel gradient descent optimization algorithm minimizing a mean-radius performance metric defined on the image of the laser beam intensity distribution formed at the receiver. We show that a relatively low order 25-channel zonal adaptive optical beam control system controlled in this way is capable of achieving a high degree of turbulence compensation with respect to energy concentration if the tilt can be corrected separately. PMID:17882306

  15. Physics-based Entry, Descent and Landing Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Huynh, Loc C.; Manning, Ted

    2014-01-01

    A physics-based risk model was developed to assess the risk associated with thermal protection system failures during the entry, descent and landing phase of a manned spacecraft mission. In the model, entry trajectories were computed using a three-degree-of-freedom trajectory tool, the aerothermodynamic heating environment was computed using an engineering-level computational tool and the thermal response of the TPS material was modeled using a one-dimensional thermal response tool. The model was capable of modeling the effect of micrometeoroid and orbital debris impact damage on the TPS thermal response. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the effects of uncertainties in the vehicle state at Entry Interface, aerothermodynamic heating and material properties on the performance of the TPS design. The failure criterion was set as a temperature limit at the bondline between the TPS and the underlying structure. Both direct computation and response surface approaches were used to compute the risk. The model was applied to a generic manned space capsule design. The effect of material property uncertainty and MMOD damage on risk of failure were analyzed. A comparison of the direct computation and response surface approach was undertaken.

  16. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance and Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, Joel M.; Johnson, Wyatt

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Vehicle is the next spacecraft to take humans into space and will include missions to ISS as well as missions to the Moon. As part of that challenge, the vehicle will have to accommodate multiple mission design concepts, since return from Low Earth Orbit and return from the Moon can be quite different. Commonality between the different missions as it relates to vehicle systems, guidance capability, and operations concepts is the goal. Several unique mission design concepts include the specification of multiple land-based landing sites for a vehicle with closed-loop direct and skip entry guidance, followed by a parachute descent and landing attenuation system. This includes the ability of the vehicle to accurately target and land at a designated landing site, including site location aspects, landing site size, and landing opportunities assessments. Analyses associated with these mission design and flight performance challenges and constraints will be discussed as well as potential operational concepts to provide feasibility and/or mission commonality.

  17. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  18. Estimating Controller Intervention Probabilities for Optimized Profile Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Erzberger, Heinz; Huynh, Phu V.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of arrival traffic at Dallas/Fort-Worth and Denver airports were conducted to evaluate incorporating scheduling and separation constraints into advisories that define continuous descent approaches. The goal was to reduce the number of controller interventions required to ensure flights maintain minimum separation distances of 5 nmi horizontally and 1000 ft vertically. It was shown that simply incorporating arrival meter fix crossing-time constraints into the advisory generation could eliminate over half of the all predicted separation violations and more than 80% of the predicted violations between two arrival flights. Predicted separation violations between arrivals and non-arrivals were 32% of all predicted separation violations at Denver and 41% at Dallas/Fort-Worth. A probabilistic analysis of meter fix crossing-time errors is included which shows that some controller interventions will still be required even when the predicted crossing-times of the advisories are set to add a 1 or 2 nmi buffer above the minimum in-trail separation of 5 nmi. The 2 nmi buffer was shown to increase average flight delays by up to 30 sec when compared to the 1 nmi buffer, but it only resulted in a maximum decrease in average arrival throughput of one flight per hour.

  19. Engineering description of the ascent/descent bet product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, A. W., II

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent output product is produced in the OPIP routine from three files which constitute its input. One of these, OPIP.IN, contains mission specific parameters. Meteorological data, such as atmospheric wind velocities, temperatures, and density, are obtained from the second file, the Corrected Meteorological Data File (METDATA). The third file is the TRJATTDATA file which contains the time-tagged state vectors that combine trajectory information from the Best Estimate of Trajectory (BET) filter, LBRET5, and Best Estimate of Attitude (BEA) derived from IMU telemetry. Each term in the two output data files (BETDATA and the Navigation Block, or NAVBLK) are defined. The description of the BETDATA file includes an outline of the algorithm used to calculate each term. To facilitate describing the algorithms, a nomenclature is defined. The description of the nomenclature includes a definition of the coordinate systems used. The NAVBLK file contains navigation input parameters. Each term in NAVBLK is defined and its source is listed. The production of NAVBLK requires only two computational algorithms. These two algorithms, which compute the terms DELTA and RSUBO, are described. Finally, the distribution of data in the NAVBLK records is listed.

  20. Eigenanalysis of SNP data with an identity by descent interpretation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuwen; Weir, Bruce S

    2016-02-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and the principal component axes often represent perpendicular gradients in geographic space. The explanation of PCA results is of major interest for geneticists to understand fundamental demographic parameters. Here, we provide an interpretation of PCA based on relatedness measures, which are described by the probability that sets of genes are identical-by-descent (IBD). An approximately linear transformation between ancestral proportions (AP) of individuals with multiple ancestries and their projections onto the principal components is found. In addition, a new method of eigenanalysis "EIGMIX" is proposed to estimate individual ancestries. EIGMIX is a method of moments with computational efficiency suitable for millions of SNP data, and it is not subject to the assumption of linkage equilibrium. With the assumptions of multiple ancestries and their surrogate ancestral samples, EIGMIX is able to infer ancestral proportions (APs) of individuals. The methods were applied to the SNP data from the HapMap Phase 3 project and the Human Genome Diversity Panel. The APs of individuals inferred by EIGMIX are consistent with the findings of the program ADMIXTURE. In conclusion, EIGMIX can be used to detect population structure and estimate genome-wide ancestral proportions with a relatively high accuracy. PMID:26482676

  1. A Non-Invasive Bladder Sensory Test Supports a Role for Dysmenorrhea Increasing Bladder Noxious Mechanosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    TU, Frank F.; EPSTEIN, Aliza E.; POZOLO, Kristen E.; SEXTON, Debra L.; MELNYK, Alexandra I.; HELLMAN, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Catheterization to measure bladder sensitivity is aversive and hinders human participation in visceral sensory research. Therefore, we sought to characterize the reliability of sonographically-estimated female bladder sensory thresholds. To demonstrate this technique’s usefulness, we examined the effects of self-reported dysmenorrhea on bladder pain thresholds. Methods Bladder sensory threshold volumes were determined during provoked natural diuresis in 49 healthy women (mean age 24 ± 8) using three-dimensional ultrasound. Cystometric thresholds (Vfs – first sensation, Vfu – first urge, Vmt – maximum tolerance) were quantified and related to bladder urgency and pain. We estimated reliability (one-week retest and interrater). Self-reported menstrual pain was examined in relationship to bladder pain, urgency and volume thresholds. Results Average bladder sensory thresholds (mLs) were Vfs (160±100), Vfu (310±130), and Vmt (500±180). Interrater reliability ranged from 0.97–0.99. One-week retest reliability was Vmt = 0.76 (95% CI 0.64–0.88), Vfs = 0.62 (95% CI 0.44–0.80), and Vfu = 0.63, (95% CI 0.47–0.80). Bladder filling rate correlated with all thresholds (r = 0.53–0.64, p < 0.0001). Women with moderate to severe dysmenorrhea pain had increased bladder pain and urgency at Vfs and increased pain at Vfu (p’s < 0.05). In contrast, dysmenorrhea pain was unrelated to bladder capacity. Discussion Sonographic estimates of bladder sensory thresholds were reproducible and reliable. In these healthy volunteers, dysmenorrhea was associated with increased bladder pain and urgency during filling but unrelated to capacity. Plausibly, dysmenorrhea sufferers may exhibit enhanced visceral mechanosensitivity, increasing their risk to develop chronic bladder pain syndromes. PMID:23370073

  2. SERS measurement of the bladder cancer cells with the nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di; Chen, Haige; Cao, Ming; Yang, Guoliang; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran

    2015-09-01

    The surfaced enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of bladder cancer cells and tissues were measured in this paper. Both depth SERS and map SERS of SCABER bladder cancer cells were measured with confocal Raman microscope using gold nanoparticles as the enhance substrate. We also measured SERS of normal bladder tissue and bladder cancer tissue, and analyzed the difference of two different tissues. The SERS spectra of more samples need to be measured and analyzed for bladder cancer tissue and the normal bladder tissue in the future and the spectra will be helpful for bladder cancer diagnosis. PMID:26525026

  3. Urinary bladder cancer: role of MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sadhna; Rajesh, Arumugam; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Gaitonde, Krishnanath; Lall, Chandana G; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Aeron, Gunjan; Bracken, Robert B; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2012-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variety of pathologic features, cytogenetic characteristics, and natural histories. It is the fourth most common cancer in males and the tenth most common cancer in females. Urinary bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate, necessitating long-term surveillance after initial therapy. Early detection is important, since up to 47% of bladder cancer-related deaths may have been avoided. Conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are only moderately accurate in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer, with cystoscopy and pathologic staging remaining the standards of reference. However, the role of newer MR imaging sequences (eg, diffusion-weighted imaging) in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer is still evolving. Substantial advances in MR imaging technology have made multiparametric MR imaging a feasible and reasonably accurate technique for the local staging of bladder cancer to optimize treatment. In addition, whole-body CT is the primary imaging technique for the detection of metastases in bladder cancer patients, especially those with disease that invades muscle. PMID:22411938

  4. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  5. Challenges of Dealing With Atmospheres: Entry, Descent and Landing - Duration: 31 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Whether landing on Mars or returning to Earth, one of the most challenging parts of any mission is the entry, descent and landing. Just think -- a spacecraft hurtling through space at thousands of ...

  6. Descent graphs in pedigree analysis: applications to haplotyping, location scores, and marker-sharing statistics.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, E.; Lange, K.

    1996-01-01

    The introduction of stochastic methods in pedigree analysis has enabled geneticists to tackle computations intractable by standard deterministic methods. Until now these stochastic techniques have worked by running a Markov chain on the set of genetic descent states of a pedigree. Each descent state specifies the paths of gene flow in the pedigree and the founder alleles dropped down each path. The current paper follows up on a suggestion by Elizabeth Thompson that genetic descent graphs offer a more appropriate space for executing a Markov chain. A descent graph specifies the paths of gene flow but not the particular founder alleles traveling down the paths. This paper explores algorithms for implementing Thompson's suggestion for codominant markers in the context of automatic haplotyping, estimating location scores, and computing gene-clustering statistics for robust linkage analysis. Realistic numerical examples demonstrate the feasibility of the algorithms. PMID:8651310

  7. A conflict analysis of 4D descent strategies in a metered, multiple-arrival route environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Harris, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    A conflict analysis was performed on multiple arrival traffic at a typical metered airport. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to simulate arrival operations using Denver Stapleton's arrival route structure. Sensitivities of conflict performance to three different 4-D descent strategies (clear-idle Mach/Constant AirSpeed (CAS), constant descent angle Mach/CAS and energy optimal) were examined for three traffic mixes represented by those found at Denver Stapleton, John F. Kennedy and typical en route metering (ERM) airports. The Monte Carlo technique was used to generate simulation entry point times. Analysis results indicate that the clean-idle descent strategy offers the best compromise in overall performance. Performance measures primarily include susceptibility to conflict and conflict severity. Fuel usage performance is extrapolated from previous descent strategy studies.

  8. Antarctic Polar Descent and Planetary Wave Activity Observed in ISAMS CO from April to July 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Nakamura, N.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Taylor, F. W.; Remedios, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Antarctic polar descent and planetary wave activity in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are observed in ISAMS CO data from April to July 1992. CO-derived mean April-to-May upper stratosphere descent rates of 15 K/day (0.25 km/day) at 60 S and 20 K/day (0.33 km/day) at 80 S are compared with descent rates from diabatic trajectory analyses. At 60 S there is excellent agreement, while at 80 S the trajectory-derived descent is significantly larger in early April. Zonal wavenumber 1 enhancement of CO is observed on 9 and 28 May, coincident with enhanced wave 1 in UKMO geopotential height. The 9 May event extends from 40 to 70 km and shows westward phase tilt with height, while the 28 May event extends from 40 to 50 km and shows virtually no phase tilt with height.

  9. Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Technology Investments Within NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, M. M.

    2014-06-01

    NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate has several investments in entry, descent and landing technologies, across its nine programs. This presentation will give a top-level view of the various investments.

  10. User's manual for a fuel-conservative descent planning algorithm implemented on a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. An explanation and examples of how the algorithm is used, as well as a detailed flow chart and listing of the algorithm are contained.

  11. The vertebrate urinary bladder: osmoregulatory and other uses.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    The bladder may serve more biological uses than simple storage. The importance of bladder functions can be inferred from its presence among vertebrates, its anatomy and histology. From an evolutionary perspective, bladders have evolved at least twice in the vertebrates. The variability of permeability of the urinary bladder to water and solutes among species is discussed. Finally, the urinary bladder may play an osmoregulatory role. PMID:538956

  12. Rare entities in urinary bladder pathology.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Marques, Rita C; Montironi, Rodolfo; Reymundo, Carlos; Fonseca, Jorge; Cheng, Liang

    2015-02-01

    Bladder carcinoma with variant histology is a subject of recent interest, with data suggesting more aggressive behavior when compared with conventional urothelial carcinoma. The timely identification and recognition of these histological variants should avoid their misinterpretation as benign lesions. We emphasize the need to recognize these peculiar morphologic features since some of them may require a different/specific therapeutic approach. Other rare entities such as bladder polyps and myofibroblastic proliferations tend to occur at a younger age and represent specific problems in the differential diagnosis. We describe the salient clinicopathologic features of representative rare entities arising in the urinary bladder. PMID:26072630

  13. [Overactive bladder syndrome: etiology, pathogenesis, treatment].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, V H

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the causes of hyperactive detrusory contractions, considered etiopathogenesis and treatment of patients with overactive bladder syndrome (OBS). Two groups of patients with overactive bladder syndrome were examined, analyzed etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. A new method for increasing the threshold sensitivity of spinal centers under the OBS by using the local lesions of the mucous membrane of the bladder by electrical coagulation or local microwave hyperthermia of the prostate are proposed. The high efficiency of these methods in dealing with OBS is shown. PMID:23713359

  14. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis. PMID:25926919

  15. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis. PMID:25926919

  16. Urinary Bladder Leiomyosarcoma: Primary Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Slaoui, Hakim; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Validire, Pierre; Barret, Eric; Rozet, François; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Cases of bladder leiomyosarcoma represent 0.1% of all nonurothelial tumors. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy for a high-grade bladder leiomyosarcoma with an ileal diversion. The patient recovered uneventfully and no surgical margins were verified in final pathology. Early follow-up at 3 months shows no signs of computed tomography recurrence and adequate adaptation to ileal diversion. Although bladder sarcomas were once thought to have a grim prognosis, recent studies suggest that adequate surgical treatment is able to achieve optimal cancer control outcomes. PMID:26839792

  17. Urinary Bladder Leiomyosarcoma: Primary Surgical Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Slaoui, Hakim; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Validire, Pierre; Barret, Eric; Rozet, François; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Cases of bladder leiomyosarcoma represent 0.1% of all nonurothelial tumors. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy for a high-grade bladder leiomyosarcoma with an ileal diversion. The patient recovered uneventfully and no surgical margins were verified in final pathology. Early follow-up at 3 months shows no signs of computed tomography recurrence and adequate adaptation to ileal diversion. Although bladder sarcomas were once thought to have a grim prognosis, recent studies suggest that adequate surgical treatment is able to achieve optimal cancer control outcomes. PMID:26839792

  18. [Placenta percreta with bladder invasion. Case report].

    PubMed

    Torres Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Torres Farías, Emigdio; Rodríguez Sandoval, Rosa María

    2007-09-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old woman, who had two previous caesarean sections, attended for the first time at 18 weeks of gestation. Pelvic ultrasonography and color Doppler imaging showed a placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder. A caesarean section was carried out at 27th week of gestation for preterm premature rupture of membranes. Placental tissue was firmly attached to the anterior surface of the bladder. A cesarean hysterectomy was performed with bilateral anterior internal iliac artery ligation before hysterectomy was finished. The bladder was repaired, leaving a suprapubic catheter. PMID:18293630

  19. [Classification and natural history of bladder tumors].

    PubMed

    Allory, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Urinary bladder tumors are mainly of urothelial type. Classifications include stage and grade to provide with the required prognostic factors and help to select the most adequate treatment. Though somatic mutations in bladder tumors are known, their used for targeted therapy are restricted to clinical trials. Upper urinary tract tumors are classified as urinary bladder tumor at histological level, but tumor staging is specified according to calyx, renal pelvis or ureter location; in young patients with upper urinary tract tumor, a Lynch syndrome should be eliminated. PMID:25668829

  20. Current state of immunotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kassouf, Wassim; Kamat, Ashish M

    2004-12-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to be the most effective agent for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer since its approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of carcinoma in situ of the bladder in 1990. Recently, augmentation of BCG immunotherapy with interferon-alpha2b and other agents is emerging as salvage therapy for those patients who fail initial treatment. This review summarizes the role of various immunotherapeutic agents in the treatment of bladder cancer, with special emphasis on the appropriate administration and schedule of BCG therapy as well as salvage with the combination of BCG with interferon-alpha2b. PMID:15606331

  1. Bladder reconstruction: The past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    EL-TAJI, OMAR M.S.; KHATTAK, ALTAF Q.; HUSSAIN, SYED A.

    2015-01-01

    Ileal conduit urinary diversion is the gold standard treatment for urinary tract reconstruction following cystectomy. This procedure uses gastrointestinal segments for bladder augmentation, a technique that is often associated with significant complications. The substantial progression in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine over the previous two decades has resulted in the development of techniques that may lead to the construction of functional de novo urinary bladder substitutes. The present review identifies and discusses the complications associated with current treatment options post-cystectomy. The current techniques, achievements and perspectives of the use of biomaterials and stem cells in the field of urinary bladder reconstruction are also reviewed. PMID:26170968

  2. Apollo 15 mission report, supplement 4: Descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.; Wood, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of a postflight analysis of the LM-10 Descent Propulsion System (DPS) during the Apollo 15 Mission are reported. The analysis determined the steady state performance of the DPS during the descent phase of the manned lunar landing. Flight measurement discrepancies are discussed. Simulated throttle performance results are cited along with overall performance results. Evaluations of the propellant quantity gaging system, propellant loading, pressurization system, and engine are reported. Graphic illustrations of the evaluations are included.

  3. Analysis of Flight Management System Predictions of Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the predictor and its uncertainty models, descents from cruise to the meter fix were executed using vertical navigation in a B737-700 simulator and a B777-200 simulator, both with commercial FMSs. For both aircraft types, the FMS computed the intended descent path for a specified speed profile assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and then it controlled the avionics without human intervention. The test matrix varied aircraft weight, descent speed, and wind conditions. The first analysis in this paper determined the effect of the test matrix parameters on the FMS computation of TOD location, and it compared the results to those for the current ground predictor in the Efficient Descent Advisor (EDA). The second analysis was similar but considered the time to fly a specified distance to the meter fix. The effects of the test matrix variables together with the accuracy requirements for the predictor will determine the allowable error for the predictor inputs. For the B737, the EDA prediction of meter fix crossing time agreed well with the FMS; but its prediction of TOD location probably was not sufficiently accurate to enable idle-thrust descents in congested airspace, even though the FMS and EDA gave similar shapes for TOD location as a function of the test matrix variables. For the B777, the FMS and EDA gave different shapes for the TOD location function, and the EDA prediction of the TOD location is not accurate enough to fully enable the concept. Furthermore, the differences between the FMS and EDA predictions of meter fix crossing time for the B777 indicated that at least one of them was not sufficiently accurate.

  4. Bladder Stromal Loss of Transforming Growth Factor Receptor II Decreases Fibrosis After Bladder Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Anumanthan, Govindaraj; Tanaka, Stacy T.; Adams, Cyrus M.; Thomas, John C.; Wills, Marcia L.; Adams, Mark C.; Hayward, Simon W.; Matusik, Robert J.; Bhowmick, Neil A.; Brock, John W.; Pope, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor-β is a potent stimulator of extracellular matrix production. Several studies show that loss of transforming growth factor-β signaling decreases kidney, liver and lung fibrosis. However, the role of transforming growth factor-β signaling in bladder fibrosis is not entirely understood. We investigated the effect of stromal loss of such signaling in mice after partial bladder outlet obstruction. Materials and Methods We performed partial bladder outlet obstruction by urethral ligation in 5-week-old female Tgfbr2colTKO mice. These mice were compared to WT mice with partial bladder outlet obstruction and to WT nonobstructed controls. After 4 weeks and before sacrifice urodynamics were performed. Bladder tissue was harvested, and p-Smad2 and collagen (Masson’s trichrome) staining were performed. Results Bladder compliance was increased in partially obstructed Tgfbr2colTKO mice and decreased in partially obstructed WT mice. The latter had increased smooth muscle hypertrophy and increased collagen deposition between smooth muscle bundles compared to those in Tgfbr2colTKO mice and nonobstructed controls. Transforming growth factor-β responsive collagen promoter activity was significantly decreased in Tgfbr2 knockout bladder stromal cells vs WT stromal cells. Conclusions Stromal loss of transforming growth factor-β signaling decreased collagen deposition after partial bladder outlet obstruction. In contrast to collagen production by recruited macrophages, stromal transforming growth factor-β signaling appears to be the primary source of fibrosis after partial bladder outlet obstruction. These findings further support the hypothesis that manipulating transforming growth factor-β signaling in bladder stromal cells would provide a future avenue for neuropathic bladder and bladder fibrosis treatment. PMID:19692014

  5. Concanavalin A agglutination of bladder cells of rats treated with bladder carcinogens; a rapid new test to detect bladder carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Kakizoe, T; Kawachi, T; Okada, M

    1978-11-01

    N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN), which is a potent, specific bladder carcinogen in rats, and its related compounds were orally administered to rats for 1 week. The bladder cells were isolated by the treatment with EDTA and sonication and they were subjected to agglutination assay by concanavalin A (Con A). Bladder cells obtained from rats treated with BBN, N-butyl-N-(3-carboxypropyl)nitrosamine (BCPN), N-ethyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (EHBN) and N-butyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)nitrosamine (BHEN) were agglutination-positive, while those cells treated with N-tert-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (t-BBH) and N-butyl-N-(3-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine (BHPN) were negative. Results obtained by this method were highly correlated with the known carcinogenicity of BBN and its analogues. Therefore, this method could be used for rapid screening of bladder carcinogens. PMID:728886

  6. Lack of association between MTHFR Ala222Val and Glu429Ala polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk: A meta-analysis of case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    SHI, RONG; ZHAO, ZHEN; ZHOU, HUI; ZHOU, JUEYU; TAN, WANLONG

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a commom malignancy in the urinary tract that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The role of functional polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with bladder cancer risk remains to be determined. This meta-analysis was performed to derive a more precise estimation of MTHFR Ala222Val and Glu429Ala polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk. Data were collected with the last report up to September 2013. A total of 3,463 cases and 3,927 controls for Ala222Val, and 3,177 cases and 3,502 controls for Glu429Ala were analyzed. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated for the association with bladder cancer risk. Overall, no significant associations of Ala222Val and Glu429Ala polymorphisms with bladder cancer risk were found (for Ala222Val: Val/Val vs. Ala/Ala: OR, 1.02; 95% CI: 0.80–1.29; Val/Ala vs. Ala/Ala: OR, 1.02; 95% CI: 0.92–1.12; dominant model: OR, 1.01; 95% CI: 0.87–1.17; recessive model: OR, 1.00; 95% CI: 0.87–1.15; and for Glu429Ala: Ala/Ala vs. Glu/Glu: OR, 1.11; 95% CI: 0.78–1.58; Ala/Glu vs. Glu/Glu: OR, 1.16; 95% CI: 0.95–1.40; dominant model: OR, 1.15; 95% CI: 0.94–1.41; recessive model: OR, 0.96; 95% CI: 0.79–1.15). In stratified analyses by ethnicity, significant associations were observed for Glu429Ala polymorphism in individuals of Middle Eastern descent (Ala/Glu vs. Glu/Glu: OR, 2.11; 95% CI: 1.26–3.53; dominant model: OR, 2.16; 95% CI: 1.16–4.01; recessive model: OR, 1.82; 95% CI: 1.11–3.01). This meta-analysis demonstrated that overall there was no association of MTHFR Ala222Val and Glu429Ala polymorphisms with bladder cancer risk. However, in the stratified analysis by ethnicity the MTHFR Glu429Ala polymorphism was significantly associated with increased bladder cancer risk in individuals of Middle Eastern descent. PMID:24748982

  7. The Huygens Probe Descent Trajectory Working Group: Organizational framework, goals, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Witasse, Olivier; Pérez-Ayúcar, Miguel; Matson, Dennis L.

    2007-11-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided in situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments, and to provide a reference set of data for ground-truth calibration of orbiter remote sensing measurements, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location is necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team to develop and implement an organizational framework and retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe. This paper presents an overview of the Descent Trajectory Working Group, including the history, rationale, goals and objectives, organizational framework, rules and procedures, and implementation.

  8. Supervised descent method with low rank and sparsity constraints for robust face alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yubao; Hu, Bin; Deng, Jiankang; Li, Xing

    2015-03-01

    Supervised Descent Method (SDM) learns the descent directions of nonlinear least square objective in a supervised manner, which has been efficiently used for face alignment. However, SDM still may fail in the cases of partial occlusions and serious pose variations. To deal with this issue, we present a new method for robust face alignment by utilizing the low rank prior of human face and enforcing sparse structure of the descent directions. Our approach consists of low rank face frontalization and sparse descent steps. Firstly, in terms of the low rank prior of face image, we recover such a low-rank face from its deformed image and the associated deformation despite significant distortion and corruption. Alignment of the recovered frontal face image is more simple and effective. Then, we propose a sparsity regularized supervised descent model by enforcing the sparse structure of the descent directions under the l1constraint, which makes the model more effective in computation and robust to partial occlusion. Extensive results on several benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to facial occlusions and pose variations

  9. [The anterolateral structures of the neck and trunk].

    PubMed

    Mihalache, G; Indrei, A; T?ranu, T

    1996-01-01

    This work has in view the arrangement of the elements that form the anterolateral wall of the neck, thorax and abdomen. We insist on the behavior of the fasciae and the situation of the connective spaces related at the muscular layers that enter the structure of this segments. We have found the continuity of the deep cervical fascia (the superficial fascia, after the French anatomy), like a muff that surrounds the neck and the trunk; in the places where this deep cervical fascia is related to the bones (for example, the clavicle), it is continued by the periosteum. On the ventral midline, the deep cervical fascia is very dense and resistant and it is continued from the hyoid bone to the pubis. It is adherent on the connective deep elements, taking part at the formation of the "linea alba". On the posterior midline it is adherent at the fibrous elements that fix the fascia on the spinous process of the vertebrae. At the level of the neck, this fascia is very obvious and resistant; it becomes thinner according as it descent to the abdomen. At the cervical level it surrounds the sternocleidomastoid and the trapezius, at the level of the thorax it surrounds the pectoralis major and the latissimus dorsi, at the level of the abdomen it becomes very fine and it covers the rectus sheath in the anterior part; at the level of the obliquus externus abdominis is very difficult to demonstrate its existence. We followed then the behavior of the anterolateral muscles from the cervical and the abdominal segments. We have found the continuity of the anterior paramedian muscles: the first plane--the sternocleidomastoid, pectoralis major (its sternal fibres form the right sternal) and the rectus abdominis and pyramidalis. For the first and second planes we make an analogy between the muscles of the neck, the subclavius, pectoralis minor, serratus anterior. The second plane--the infrahyoid muscles, the subclavius, pectoralis minor, serratus anterior. The third plane--the scaleni, anterior, medius and posterior, intercostales, transversus thoracis, obliquus externus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis and transversus abdominis. This work excludes the suprahyoid muscles--their origin, function, innervation and vascularization are debated in another study. PMID:9455400

  10. Atmospheric Environments for Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, Carl G.; Braun, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Scientific measurements of atmospheric properties have been made by a wide variety of planetary flyby missions, orbiters, and landers. Although landers can make in-situ observations of near-surface atmospheric conditions (and can collect atmospheric data during their entry phase), the vast majority of data on planetary atmospheres has been collected by remote sensing techniques from flyby and orbiter spacecraft (and to some extent by Earth-based remote sensing). Many of these remote sensing observations (made over a variety of spectral ranges), consist of vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature as a function of atmospheric pressure level. While these measurements are of great interest to atmospheric scientists and modelers of planetary atmospheres, the primary interest for engineers designing entry descent and landing (EDL) systems is information about atmospheric density as a function of geometric altitude. Fortunately, as described in in this paper, it is possible to use a combination of the gas-law relation and the hydrostatic balance relation to convert temperature-versus-pressure, scientific observations into density-versus-altitude data for use in engineering applications. The following section provides a brief introduction to atmospheric thermodynamics, as well as constituents, and winds for EDL. It also gives methodology for using atmospheric information to do "back-of-the-envelope" calculations of various EDL aeroheating parameters, including peak deceleration rate ("g-load"), peak convective heat rate. and total heat load on EDL spacecraft thermal protection systems. Brief information is also provided about atmospheric variations and perturbations for EDL guidance and control issues, and atmospheric issues for EDL parachute systems. Subsequent sections give details of the atmospheric environments for five destinations for possible EDL missions: Venus. Earth. Mars, Saturn, and Titan. Specific atmospheric information is provided for these destinations, and example results are presented for the "back-of-the-envelope" calculations mentioned above.

  11. Analysis of atmospheric mesoscale models for entry, descent, and landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.; Michaels, T. I.; Rafkin, S. C. R.; Richardson, M. I.; Toigo, A. D.

    2003-11-01

    Each Mars Exploration Rover (MER) is sensitive to the Martian winds encountered near the surface during the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) process. These winds are strongly influenced by local (mesoscale) conditions. In the absence of suitable wind observations, wind fields predicted by Martian mesoscale atmospheric models have been analyzed to guide landing site selection. In order to encompass the available models and render them useful to the EDL engineering team, a series of statistical techniques was applied to the model results. These analyses cover the high-priority landing sites during the expected landing times (1200-1500 LT). The number of sites studied is limited by the computational and analysis cost of the mesoscale models. The statistical measures concentrate on the effective mean wind (the wind as seen by the landing system) and on the vertical structure of the horizontal winds. Both aspects are potentially hazardous to the MER landing system. In addition, a number of individual wind profiles from the mesoscale model were processed into a form that can be used directly by the EDL Monte Carlo simulations. The statistical analysis indicates that the Meridiani Planum and Elysium landing sites are probably safe. The Gusev Crater and Isidis Basin sites may be safe, but further analysis by the EDL engineers will be necessary to quantify the actual risk. Finally, the winds at the Melas Chasma landing site (and presumably other Valles Marineris landing sites) are dangerous. While the statistical parameters selected for these studies were primarily of engineering and safety interest, the techniques are potentially useful for more general scientific analyses. One interesting result of the current analysis is that the depth of the convective boundary layer (and thus the resulting energy density) appears to be primarily driven by the existence of a well-organized mesoscale (or regional) circulation, primarily driven by large-scale topographic features at Mars.

  12. Optimal sliding guidance algorithm for Mars powered descent phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibben, Daniel R.; Furfaro, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Landing on large planetary bodies (e.g. Mars) with pinpoint accuracy presents a set of new challenges that must be addressed. One such challenge is the development of new guidance algorithms that exhibit a higher degree of robustness and flexibility. In this paper, the Zero-Effort-Miss/Zero-Effort-Velocity (ZEM/ZEV) optimal sliding guidance (OSG) scheme is applied to the Mars powered descent phase. This guidance algorithm has been specifically designed to combine techniques from both optimal and sliding control theories to generate an acceleration command based purely on the current estimated spacecraft state and desired final target state. Consequently, OSG yields closed-loop trajectories that do not need a reference trajectory. The guidance algorithm has its roots in the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance and its mathematical equations are naturally derived by defining a non-linear sliding surface as a function of the terms Zero-Effort-Miss and Zero-Effort-Velocity. With the addition of the sliding mode and using Lyapunov theory for non-autonomous systems, one can formally prove that the developed OSG law is globally finite-time stable to unknown but bounded perturbations. Here, the focus is on comparing the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance with the OSG law to explicitly demonstrate the benefits of the sliding mode augmentation. Results show that the sliding guidance provides a more robust solution in off-nominal scenarios while providing similar fuel consumption when compared to the non-sliding guidance command. Further, a Monte Carlo analysis is performed to examine the performance of the OSG law under perturbed conditions.

  13. Mars 2020 Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Wright, Henry; White, Todd; Schoenenberger, Mark; Santos, Jose; Karlgaard, Chris; Kuhl, Chris; Oishi, TOmo; Trombetta, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    This paper will introduce Mars Entry Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2) on NASA's Mars2020 mission. Mars2020 is a flagship NASA mission with science and technology objectives to help answer questions about possibility of life on Mars as well as to demonstrate technologies for future human expedition. Mars2020 is scheduled for launch in 2020. MEDLI2 is a suite of instruments embedded in the heatshield and backshell thermal protection systems of Mars2020 entry vehicle. The objectives of MEDLI2 are to gather critical aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and TPS performance data during EDL phase of the mission. MEDLI2 builds up the success of MEDLI flight instrumentation on Mars Science Laboratory mission in 2012. MEDLI instrumentation suite measured surface pressure and TPS temperature on the heatshield during MSL entry into Mars. MEDLI data has since been used for unprecedented reconstruction of aerodynamic drag, vehicle attitude, in-situ atmospheric density, aerothermal heating, transition to turbulence, in-depth TPS performance and TPS ablation. [1,2] In addition to validating predictive models, MEDLI data has highlighted extra margin available in the MSL forebody TPS, which can potentially be used to reduce vehicle parasitic mass. MEDLI2 expands the scope of instrumentation by focusing on quantities of interest not addressed in MEDLI suite. The type the sensors are expanded and their layout on the TPS modified to meet these new objectives. The paper will provide key motivation and governing requirements that drive the choice and the implementation of the new sensor suite. The implementation considerations of sensor selection, qualification, and demonstration of minimal risk to the host mission will be described. The additional challenges associated with mechanical accommodation, electrical impact, data storage and retrieval for MEDLI2 system, which extends sensors to backshell will also be described.

  14. Mars Exploration Rover Entry, Descent, and Landing: A Thermal Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Sunada, Eric T.; Novak, Keith S.; Kinsella, Gary M.; Phillip, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    Perhaps the most challenging mission phase for the Mars Exploration Rovers was the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). During this phase, the entry vehicle attached to its cruise stage was transformed into a stowed tetrahedral Lander that was surrounded by inflated airbags through a series of complex events. There was only one opportunity to successfully execute an automated command sequence without any possible ground intervention. The success of EDL was reliant upon the system thermal design: 1) to thermally condition EDL hardware from cruise storage temperatures to operating temperature ranges; 2) to maintain the Rover electronics within operating temperature ranges without the benefit of the cruise single phase cooling loop, which had been evacuated in preparation for EDL; and 3) to maintain the cruise stage propulsion components for the critical turn to entry attitude. Since the EDL architecture was inherited from Mars Pathfinder (MPF), the initial EDL thermal design would be inherited from MPF. However, hardware and implementation differences from MPF ultimately changed the MPF inheritance approach for the EDL thermal design. With the lack of full inheritance, the verification and validation of the EDL thermal design took on increased significance. This paper will summarize the verification and validation approach for the EDL thermal design along with applicable system level thermal testing results as well as appropriate thermal analyses. In addition, the lessons learned during the system-level testing will be discussed. Finally, the in-flight EDL experiences of both MER-A and -B missions (Spirit and Opportunity, respectively) will be presented, demonstrated how lessons learned from Spirit were applied to Opportunity.

  15. Detection of Subpubic Tumor Causing Bladder Outlet Obstruction by 3D?Perineal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, S.; Steetskamp, J.; Rommens, K.; Porta, S.; Battista, M.; Hoffmann, G.; Skala, C.

    2015-01-01

    This case report shows that 3D?perineal ultrasound can be superior to clinical examination and routine 2D?perineal ultrasound in the detection of an unusual subpubic tumor. A 73-year-old female patient was referred to our urogynecological outpatient unit complaining of over-active bladder symptoms and voiding dysfunction for 3 years. Gynecological examination found no signs of pelvic organ prolapse or abnormality in the vaginal cavity. Routine 2D?perineal ultrasound showed substantial residual urine (ca. 300?ml on catheter) and limited bladder neck mobility, but no signs of pelvic organ prolapse. Use of standardized 3D?perineal ultrasound revealed a 24?×?26?×?32?mm spherical, hypoechoic tumor below the pubic symphysis between the distal urethra and the pubic bones. This structure was mistaken for the pubic symphysis in the midline on 2D?ultrasound performed earlier. At surgery, the tumor was completely excised through a vaginal incision between the urethra and the pubic symphysis. After an uneventful postoperative recovery the patient developed de-novo stress urinary incontinence, which was corrected successfully by the insertion of a retropubic tension-free suburethral sling after an interval of 8 weeks. After a further follow-up of 8 weeks the patient reported well-being, urinary continence and no voiding dysfunction; no abnormalities were found on examination. In conclusion, 3D?perineal ultrasound is a useful additional tool for the diagnostic workup of bladder outlet obstruction. PMID:26257409

  16. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: Can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    SciTech Connect

    Stam, Marcel R. . E-mail: m.stam@rther.umcn.nl; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. Results: A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 Sd = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. Conclusions: This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  17. [Management of metastatic bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Hélène; Serrate, Camille; Pouessel, Damien; Le Maignan, Christine; Teixeira, Luis; Culine, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The management of patients with metastatic bladder cancer is mainly based on cytotoxic chemotherapy. The reference molecule is cisplatin. In 2014, first-line regimens include gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC protocol) or methotrexate, vinblastine, and cisplatin doxorubicin (MVAC protocol). When cisplatin is contra-indicated, another platinum Salt, carboplatin, is used in combination with gemcitabine. Vinflunine is the only molecule to have obtained a marketing approval for patients who failed first-line chemotherapy including a platinum salt. The overall prognosis of patients remains dismal, since the median overall survival is 12 to 14 months for patients being treated with cisplatin, whereas it is less than 1 year for patients receiving carboplatin. The identification of new effective drugs is a major challenge for the coming years. PMID:25668832

  18. Neurogenic Inflammation of Guinea-Pig Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Saban, M. R.; Saban, R.

    1994-01-01

    Capsaicin, substance P, and ovalbumin, instilled into the bladders of naive and ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized guineapigs caused inflammation, as indicated by increased vascular permeability. Histological changes after exposure to these compounds progressed with time from intense vasodilatation to marginalization of granulocytes followed by interstitial migration of leukocytes. In vitro incubation of guinea-pig bladder tissue with substance P and ovalbumin stimulated release of prostaglandin D2 and leukotrienes. In vitro incubation of bladder tissue with capsaicin, OVA, prostaglandin D2, leukotriene C4, histamine, or calcium ionophore A-23587 all stimulated substance P release. These data suggest that bladder inflammation initiated by a variety of stimuli could lead to a cyclic pattern of release of inflammatory mediators and neuropeptides, which could result in amplification and persistence of cystitis after the inciting cause has subsided. PMID:18472941

  19. Bladder cancer in the aluminium industry.

    PubMed

    Thériault, G; Tremblay, C; Cordier, S; Gingras, S

    1984-04-28

    The incidence of bladder cancer is unusually high in aluminium smelter workers. An epidemiological study showed that workers in Soderberg potrooms are at highest risk for bladder cancer, the adjusted overall relative risk being 2.39 (1.34-4.28). Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, of which benz(a)pyrene (BaP) served as an indicator, seems to be the causative factor. The relative risk was evaluated at 12.38 for workers with 20 or more equivalent years of BaP exposure. Cigarette smoking contributed significantly to the appearance of bladder cancer in the population studied. There is a synergistic effect when cigarette smoking and BaP exposure are combined; the numbers in our population are too small to determine whether this interaction effect is multiplicative or additive. It is concluded that bladder cancer is associated with aluminium smelting (primarily with the Soderberg process). PMID:6143877

  20. Future Perspectives in Bladder Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Bradley C; Damaser, Margot S; Chermansky, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Substantial clinical need persists for improved autologous tissues to augment or replace the urinary bladder and research has begun to address this using tissue engineering techniques. The implantation of both tissue scaffolds which allow for native bladder tissue ingrowth and autologous bladder grafts created from in vitro cellularization of such scaffolds have been tested clinically; however, successful outcomes in both scenarios have been challenged by insufficient vascularity resulting from large graft sizes, which subsequently limits tissue ingrowth and leads to central graft ischemia. Consequently, recent research has focused on developing better methods to produce scaffolds with increased tissue ingrowth and vascularity. This review provides an update on bladder tissue engineering and outlines the challenges that remain to clinical implementation. PMID:26709356

  1. New methods for detection of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Grossman, H B

    1998-02-01

    Superficial bladder cancer is characterized by a high incidence of recurrence and a low risk of progression. Cystoscopy has been the mainstay for bladder cancer detection with additional information provided by urine cytology. Several new markers, including the BTA series of markers, NMP22 and FDP, have been approved for clinical use; numerous others continue to be evaluated. Markers help to detect clinically occult bladder cancer and to increase the interval of cystoscopic evaluation. The former indication emphasizes specificity (if a marker has high specificity, the marker-directed biopsies are frequently positive) and the latter, sensitivity (if a marker has high sensitivity, there is a low risk of deferring cystoscopy when bladder cancer is present). Because no marker or combination of markers has 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, the selection of markers for clinical use rests on the desired objective and the performance characteristics of the available assays. PMID:9508078

  2. Genetic Marker Identified for Aggressive Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers led by Ludmila Prokunina-Olsson, Ph.D., in DCEG's Laboratory of Translational Genomics, have identified the first genetic variant associated with risk of aggressive bladder cancer. The variant, rs7257330, is in the promoter region of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes for cyclin E protein, a cell cycle regulator. This result comes from a fine-mapping analysis of data from two bladder cancer genome-wide association studies and functional studies.

  3. Urinary Bladder Mucosal Responses to Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sunagawa, Masataka; Wolf-Johnston, Amanda; Nomiya, Masanori; Sawada, Norifumi; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Hisamitsu, Tadashi; Birder, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study were to examine the expression of various cellular proteins within the urothelium (UT) and lamina propria (LP) following chronic bladder ischemia in the rat urinary bladder. Materials and Methods Urinary bladders were removed from adult Sprague-Dawley rats 8 weeks after creation of bladder ischemia, and from sham controls. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine distribution of LP-vimentin-immunoreactive (IR) cells and connexins (Cx26; Cx43); and Western immunoblotting or ELISA for proteins involved in UT barrier and sensory functions. Results Ischemia was associated with a significant increase in LP-vimentin-IR cells and increased expression of the gap-junction proteins Cx26 and Cx43 within the bladder urothelium as compared to sham control. Ischemia also resulted in an increased (p<0.05) expression level of the junctional marker (ZO-1), and non-significantly increased expressions of the trophic factor nerve growth factor (NGF) as well as norepinephrine (NE). Conclusions Our findings reveal that chronic ischemia alters a number of proteins within the urothelium and underlying lamina propria. These proteins are involved in barrier function, remodeling, repair as well as intercellular communication. The increased expression of LP-vimentin-IR cells suggests that changes in cell-cell interactions could play a role in ischemia-induced changes in bladder activity. PMID:24728265

  4. Evaluation of bladder microvasculature with high resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhixing; Roberts, William; Carson, Paul; Liu, Xiaojun; Tao, Chao; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    We explored the potential of an emerging laser-based technology, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), for bladder cancer diagnosis through high resolution imaging of microvasculature in the bladder tissues. Imaging results from ex vivo canine bladders demonstrated the excellent ability of PAI in mapping three-dimensional microvasculature in optically scattering bladder tissues. By comparing the results from human bladder specimens affected by cancer to those from the normal control, the feasibility of PAI in differentiate malignant from benign bladder tissues was also explored. The distinctive morphometric characteristics of tumor microvasculature can be seen in the images from cancer samples, suggesting that PAI may allow in vivo assessment of neoangiogenesis that is closely associated with bladder cancer generation and progression. By presenting subsurface morphological and physiological information in bladder tissues, PAI, when performed in a similar way as in conventional endoscopy, provides an opportunity for improved diagnosis, staging and treatment guidance of bladder cancer. PMID:22179893

  5. Head and Neck International Group (HNIG)

    Cancer.gov

    The Head and Neck International Group was established in 2014 with the mission to promote and conduct high quality head and neck cancer clinical trials worldwide to improve outcomes in patients diagnosed with these diseases.

  6. Aerodynamics of Reentry Vehicle Clipper at Descent Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Yu. P.; Reshetin, A. G.; Dyadkin, A. A.; Petrov, N. K.; Simakova, T. V.; Tokarev, V. A.

    2005-02-01

    From Gagarin spacecraft to reusable orbiter Buran, RSC Energia has traveled a long way in the search for the most optimal and, which is no less important, the most reliable spacecraft for manned space flight. During the forty years of space exploration, in cooperation with a broad base of subcontractors, a number of problems have been solved which assure a safe long stay in space. Vostok and Voskhod spacecraft were replaced with Soyuz supporting a crew of three. During missions to a space station, it provides crew rescue capability in case of a space station emergency at all times (the spacecraft life is 200 days).The latest modification of Soyuz spacecraft -Soyuz TMA -in contrast to its predecessors, allows to become a space flight participant to a person of virtually any anthropometric parameters with a mass of 50 to 95 kg capable of withstanding up to 6 g load during descent. At present, Soyuz TMA spacecraft are the state-of-the-art, reliable and only means of the ISS crew delivery, in-flight support and return. Introduced on the basis of many years of experience in operation of manned spacecraft were not only the principles of deep redundancy of on-board systems and equipment, but, to assure the main task of the spacecraft -the crew return to Earth -the principles of functional redundancy. That is, vital operations can be performed by different systems based on different physical principles. The emergency escape system that was developed is the only one in the world that provides crew rescue in case of LV failure at any phase in its flight. Several generations of space stations that have been developed have broadened, virtually beyond all limits, capabilities of man in space. The docking system developed at RSC Energia allowed not only to dock spacecraft in space, but also to construct in orbit various complex space systems. These include large space stations, and may include in the future the in-orbit construction of systems for the exploration of the Moon and Mars.. Logistics spacecraft Progress have been flying regularly since 1978. The tasks of these unmanned spacecraft include supplying the space station with all the necessities for long-duration missions, such as propellant for the space station propulsion system, crew life support consumables, scientific equipment for conducting experiments. Various modifications of the spacecraft have expanded the space station capabilities. 1988 saw the first, and, much to our regret, the last flight of the reusable orbiter Buran.. Buran could deliver to orbit up to 30 tons of cargo, return 20 tons to Earth and have a crew of up to 10. However, due to our country's economic situation the project was suspended.

  7. Shake rattle and roll: the bony labyrinth and aerial descent in squamates.

    PubMed

    Boistel, Renaud; Herrel, Anthony; Lebrun, Renaud; Daghfous, Gheylen; Tafforeau, Paul; Losos, Jonathan B; Vanhooydonck, Bieke

    2011-12-01

    Controlled aerial descent has evolved many times independently in vertebrates. Squamates (lizards and snakes) are unusual in that respect due to the large number of independent origins of the evolution of this behavior. Although some squamates such as flying geckos of the genus Ptychozoon and the flying dragons of the genus Draco show obvious adaptations including skin flaps or enlarged ribs allowing them to increase their surface area and slow down their descent, many others appear unspecialized. Yet, specializations can be expected at the level of the sensory and neural systems allowing animals to maintain stability during controlled aerial descent. The vestibular system is a likely candidate given that it is an acceleration detector and is well-suited to detect changes in pitch, roll and yaw. Here we use conventional and synchrotron μCT scans to quantify the morphology of the vestibular system in squamates able to perform controlled aerial descent compared to species characterized by a terrestrial or climbing life style. Our results show the presence of a strong phylogenetic signal in the data with the vestibular system in species from the same family being morphologically similar. However, both our shape analysis and an analysis of the dimensions of the vestibular system showed clear differences among animals with different life-styles. Species able to perform a controlled aerial descent differed in the position and shape of the inner ear, especially of the posterior ampulla. Given the limited stability of squamates against roll and the fact that the posterior ampulla is tuned to changes in roll this suggests an adaptive evolution of the vestibular system in squamates using controlled aerial descent. Future studies testing for similar differences in other groups of vertebrates known to use controlled aerial descent are needed to test the generality of this observation. PMID:21700578

  8. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-14

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  9. Laparoscopic urinary bladder diverticulectomy combined with photoselective vaporisation of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Eret, Viktor; Stránský, Petr; Trávní?ek, Ivan; Dolejšová, Olga; Chudá?ek, Zden?k; Petersson, Fredrik; Hes, Ond?ej; Ch?osta, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pseudodiverticulum of the urinary bladder is mostly a complication of subvesical obstruction (SO). The gold standard of treatment was open diverticulectomy with adenectomy. A more contemporary resolution is endoscopic, in two steps: the first transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), the second laparoscopic diverticulectomy (LD). Aim To present a one-session procedure – photoselective vaporisation of the prostate (PVP) with LD. Material and methods From 1/2011 to 6/2014, 14 LDs were performed: 1 LD only, 1 with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, 12 combined with treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 4 cases of TURP and LD in the second period. In 8 cases, PVP and LD in one session were combined. These 8 cases are presented. 3D CT cystography was used as a gold standard for assessment of diverticulum. Results The mean age was 66.5 ±5.5 (57.3–75.1) years, the mean size of the diverticulum 61.8 ±22.1 (26–90) mm. The procedure starts in the lithotomy position. It includes PVP and stenting of the ureter(s). Changing of position and laparoscopy follows: four ports, transperitoneal extravesical approach. Photoselective vaporisation of the prostate was performed using the Green Light Laser HPS (1x) or XPS with cooled fibre MoXy (7x). The mean delivered energy in PVP was 205.1 ±106.4 (120–458) kJ. The mean time of operation was 165.0 ±48.5 (90–255) min. No postoperative complications were observed. One patient underwent TUR incision after 1 year for sclerosis of the bladder neck. Conclusions Pseudodiverticulum of the urinary bladder (with or without SO) is a relatively rare disease. One session of PVP (Green Light Laser XPS, MoXy fibre) and laparoscopic (transperitoneal extravesical) diverticulectomy is the preferred method for treatment of subvesical obstruction due to BPH and bladder diverticulum at our institution. PMID:25960795

  10. The response of smooth muscle cells in the rabbit urinary bladder to outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Brent, L; Stephens, F D

    1975-05-01

    The morphologic response of smooth muscle cells in the urinary bladder to a standardized bladder neck obstruction and the cell changes subsequent to release of that obstruction were studied in both growing and adult rabbits. The bladder reacted first by gross dilation and then by concentric thickening of the wall at the expense of the lumen. Microscopically, thickening of the bladder wall was due to temporary submucosal edema, then to the increased fibrocollagenous connective tissue, and finally to the increased muscle mass which in part replaced the connective tissue. Hypertrophy of the smooth muscle cells and their nuclei was apparent and this preceded cellular hyperplasia, which did not occur until 30 days after the obstruction was induced in the adult rabbits. In contrast, there was early hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells in the growing rabbits, followed by hypertrophy of the cells and their nuclei. In no instance could mitosis of smooth muscle cells be found in either young or adult rabbits. Quantitation showed that the degree of cellular hypertrophy was proportional to the duration of the obstruction. In the adult animal, the muscular thickening was mainly due to an initial 5 fold increase of the muscle cell volume together with a later 3 fold increase of muscle cell number. In the growing rabbits, the muscle cells first doubled in number and then after 8 weeks a 6 fold enlargement of cell volume contributed to the total muscular thickening. Upon release of obstruction in the adult rabbits, both enlarged cell and nuclear sizes regressed to normal values and the cell numbers gradually decreased to near normal values over periods up to 4 months after release. PMID:1120643

  11. Planning fuel-conservative descents in an airline environmental using a small programmable calculator: Algorithm development and flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Vicroy, D. D.; Simmon, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A simple, airborne, flight-management descent algorithm was developed and programmed into a small programmable calculator. The algorithm may be operated in either a time mode or speed mode. The time mode was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel-conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The speed model was designed for planning fuel-conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path for both modes was calculated for a constant with considerations given for the descent Mach/airspeed schedule, gross weight, wind, wind gradient, and nonstandard temperature effects. Flight tests, using the algorithm on the programmable calculator, showed that the open-loop guidance could be useful to airline flight crews for planning and executing fuel-conservative descents.

  12. Reproducibility of the bladder shape and bladder shape changes during filling

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, Heidi T.; Herk, Marcel van; Betgen, Anja; Pos, Floris; Lebesque, Joos V.; Remeijer, Peter

    2005-08-15

    The feasibility of high precision radiotherapy to the bladder region is limited by bladder motion and volume changes. In the near future, we plan to begin treatment delivery of bladder cancer patients with the acquisition of a cone beam CT image on which the complete bladder will be semi-automatically localized. Subsequently, a bladder shape model that was developed in a previous study will be used for bladder localization and for the prediction of shape changes in the time interval between acquisition and beam delivery. For such predictions, knowledge about urinary inflow rate is required. Therefore, a series of MR images was acquired over 1 h with time intervals of 10 min for 18 healthy volunteers. To gain insight in the reproducibility of the bladder shape over longer periods of time, two additional MRI series were recorded for 10 of the volunteers. To a good approximation, the bladder volume increased linearly in time for all individuals. Despite receiving drinking instructions, we found a large variation in the inflow rate between individuals, ranging from 2.1 to 15 cc/min (mean value: 9{+-}3 cc/min). In contrast, the intravolunteer variation was much smaller, with a mean standard deviation (SD) of 0.4 cc/min. The inflow rate was linearly correlated with age (negative slope). To study the reproducibility of the bladder shape, we compared bladder shapes of equal volume. For all individuals, the caudal part of the bladder was the most reproducible (variations<0.3 cm in all cases). The cranial and posterior parts of the bladder was much less reproducible, with local SD values up to {approx}1.2 cm for bladders with a volume of 200 cc. These large long-term variations were primarily caused by changes in position and filling of the small bowel and rectum. However, for short time intervals, the rectal filling was (nearly) constant. Therefore, the reproducibility of urinary inflow, combined with the previously developed shape model gives us an excellent tool to predict short-term shape changes. We intend to use this tool for further improvement of image-guided radiotherapy for bladder cancer patients.

  13. Cone Beam CT Imaging Analysis of Interfractional Variations in Bladder Volume and Position During Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Rathee, Satyapal; Ghosh, Sunita; Ko, Lawrence; Murray, Brad

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm). The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (+- standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm{sup 3} (SD, 29.71 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm{sup 3} (SD, 21.64 cm{sup 3}). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm{sup 3} (SD, 36.51 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm{sup 3} (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm{sup 3} (SD, 3.97 cm{sup 3}). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.

  14. Multiple venous aneurysms of neck

    PubMed Central

    Swaika, Sweta; Basu, Sudipta; Bhadra, Ram C.; Maitra, Sujay

    2013-01-01

    Venous aneurysm of neck is a rare anomaly, usually presenting as a painless mass which increases in size on valsalva maneuver. A child with multiple aneurysms of the right common facial and external jugular veins diagnosed on Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance venography is reported. PMID:23599580

  15. Electrodeposited Nickel Reinforces Outlet Neck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Theodore C.; Larosa, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Selective plating with nickel used to reinforce outlet-neck assembly of combustion chamber of rocket engine. Plating cell built around part to be plated to enforce correct flow of plating solution. Provides relatively cheap way of thickening metal in affected regions to reduce stresses to acceptable levels.

  16. Treatment of advanced neck metastases

    PubMed Central

    Spriano, G; Pellini, R; Manciocco, V; Ruscito, P

    2006-01-01

    Summary Despite the use of aggressive single or multimodality treatment protocols, patients with advanced cervical metastases, N2 and N3, have a poor prognosis because of their high risk of regional and distal failure. Moreover, N3 class does not allow resectability and curability to be defined. Numerous trials have been carried out in order to improve the oncological outcomes of patients with advanced metastases to the neck using a variety of multimodality therapy. At present, there is a trend toward the use of a definitive radiochemotherapy followed, or not, by neck dissection. In order to offer a panoramic view of the treatment protocols in use, data available in the literature, regarding the management of advanced neck disease using surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, in different associations, have been reviewed and our experience reported. The presence of advanced cervical metastases is a very poor prognostic factor. The combined treatment modality offers better chances of cure than single modality treatment. Surgery followed by radiotherapy or chemo-radiation therapy is an effective and well standardized approach. The use of planned neck dissection following chemoradiation is still debated. PMID:17633156

  17. Tracer-Based Determination of Vortex Descent in the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Hurst, Dale F.; Elkins, James W.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Herman, Robert L.; Webster, Christopher R.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed analysis of available in situ and remotely sensed N2O and CH4 data measured in the 1999-2000 winter Arctic vortex has been performed in order to quantify the temporal evolution of vortex descent. Differences in potential temperature (theta) among balloon and aircraft vertical profiles (an average of 19-23 K on a given N2O or CH4 isopleth) indicated significant vortex inhomogeneity in late fall as compared with late winter profiles. A composite fall vortex profile was constructed for November 26, 1999, whose error bars encompassed the observed variability. High-latitude, extravortex profiles measured in different years and seasons revealed substantial variability in N2O and CH4 on theta surfaces, but all were clearly distinguishable from the first vortex profiles measured in late fall 1999. From these extravortex-vortex differences, we inferred descent prior to November 26: 397+/-15 K (1sigma) at 30 ppbv N2O and 640 ppbv CH4, and 28+/-13 K above 200 ppbv N2O and 1280 ppbv CH4. Changes in theta were determined on five N2O and CH4 isopleths from November 26 through March 12, and descent rates were calculated on each N2O isopleth for several time intervals. The maximum descent rates were seen between November 26 and January 27: 0.82+/-0.20 K/day averaged over 50-250 ppbv N2O. By late winter (February 26-March 12), the average rate had decreased to 0.10+/-0.25 K/day. Descent rates also decreased with increasing N2O; the winter average (November 26-March 5) descent rate varied from 0.75+/-0.10 K/day at 50 ppbv to 0.40+/-0.11 K/day at 250 ppbv. Comparison of these results with observations and models of descent in prior years showed very good overall agreement. Two models of the 1999-2000 vortex descent, SLIMCAT and REPROBUS, despite theta offsets with respect to observed profiles of up to 20 K on most tracer isopleths, produced descent rates that agreed very favorably with the inferred rates from observation.

  18. A case–control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. Methods This case–control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Results Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. Conclusions These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening. PMID:23497224

  19. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with ?-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  20. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J.; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with ?-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1–2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5–5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10–20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5–40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  1. Global patterns of prostate cancer incidence, aggressiveness, and mortality in men of african descent.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Devesa, Susan S; Chang, Bao-Li; Bunker, Clareann H; Cheng, Iona; Cooney, Kathleen; Eeles, Rosalind; Fernandez, Pedro; Giri, Veda N; Gueye, Serigne M; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Heyns, Chris F; Hu, Jennifer J; Ingles, Sue Ann; Isaacs, William; Jalloh, Mohamed; John, Esther M; Kibel, Adam S; Kidd, Lacreis R; Layne, Penelope; Leach, Robin J; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Okobia, Michael N; Ostrander, Elaine A; Park, Jong Y; Patrick, Alan L; Phelan, Catherine M; Ragin, Camille; Roberts, Robin A; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Stanford, Janet L; Strom, Sara; Thompson, Ian M; Witte, John; Xu, Jianfeng; Yeboah, Edward; Hsing, Ann W; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the leading cancer among men of African descent in the USA, Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The estimated number of CaP deaths in SSA during 2008 was more than five times that among African Americans and is expected to double in Africa by 2030. We summarize publicly available CaP data and collected data from the men of African descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate (MADCaP) Consortium and the African Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) to evaluate CaP incidence and mortality in men of African descent worldwide. CaP incidence and mortality are highest in men of African descent in the USA and the Caribbean. Tumor stage and grade were highest in SSA. We report a higher proportion of T1 stage prostate tumors in countries with greater percent gross domestic product spent on health care and physicians per 100,000 persons. We also observed that regions with a higher proportion of advanced tumors reported lower mortality rates. This finding suggests that CaP is underdiagnosed and/or underreported in SSA men. Nonetheless, CaP incidence and mortality represent a significant public health problem in men of African descent around the world. PMID:23476788

  2. Quadratic steepest descent on potential energy surfaces. I. Basic formalism and quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun-Qiang; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    1993-10-01

    A novel second-order algorithm is formulated for determining steepest-descent lines on potential energy surfaces. The reaction path is deduced from successive exact steepest-descent lines of local quadratic approximations to the surface. At each step, a distinction is made between three points: the center for the local quadratic Taylor expansion of the surface, the junction of the two adjacent local steepest-descent line approximations, and the predicted approximation to the true steepest-descent line. This flexibility returns a more efficient yield from the calculated information and increases the accuracy of the local quadratic approximations by almost an order of magnitude. In addition, the step size is varied with the curvature and, if desired, can be readjusted by a trust region assessment. Applications to the Gonzalez-Schlegel and the Müller-Brown surfaces show the method to compare favorably with existing methods. Several measures are given for assessing the accuracy achieved without knowledge of the exact steepest-descent line. The optimal evaluation of the predicted gradient and curvature for dynamical applications is discussed.

  3. Global Patterns of Prostate Cancer Incidence, Aggressiveness, and Mortality in Men of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Devesa, Susan S.; Chang, Bao-Li; Bunker, Clareann H.; Cheng, Iona; Cooney, Kathleen; Eeles, Rosalind; Fernandez, Pedro; Giri, Veda N.; Gueye, Serigne M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Heyns, Chris F.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue Ann; Isaacs, William; Jalloh, Mohamed; John, Esther M.; Kibel, Adam S.; Kidd, LaCreis R.; Layne, Penelope; Leach, Robin J.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Okobia, Michael N.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Park, Jong Y.; Patrick, Alan L.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Ragin, Camille; Roberts, Robin A.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Stanford, Janet L.; Strom, Sara; Thompson, Ian M.; Witte, John; Xu, Jianfeng; Yeboah, Edward; Hsing, Ann W.; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the leading cancer among men of African descent in the USA, Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The estimated number of CaP deaths in SSA during 2008 was more than five times that among African Americans and is expected to double in Africa by 2030. We summarize publicly available CaP data and collected data from the men of African descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate (MADCaP) Consortium and the African Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3) to evaluate CaP incidence and mortality in men of African descent worldwide. CaP incidence and mortality are highest in men of African descent in the USA and the Caribbean. Tumor stage and grade were highest in SSA. We report a higher proportion of T1 stage prostate tumors in countries with greater percent gross domestic product spent on health care and physicians per 100,000 persons. We also observed that regions with a higher proportion of advanced tumors reported lower mortality rates. This finding suggests that CaP is underdiagnosed and/or underreported in SSA men. Nonetheless, CaP incidence and mortality represent a significant public health problem in men of African descent around the world. PMID:23476788

  4. Comparison of minimum-action and steepest-descent paths in gradient systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Leines, Grisell; Rogal, Jutta

    2016-02-01

    On high-dimensional and complex potential energy surfaces, the identification of the most likely mechanism for the transition between local minima is a challenging task. Usually the steepest-descent path is used interchangeably with the minimum-energy path and is associated with the most likely path. Here we compare the meaning of the steepest-descent path in complex energy landscapes to the path integral formulation of a trajectory that minimizes the action functional for Brownian dynamics. In particular, for energy landscapes with bifurcation points and multiple minima and saddle points, there can be several steepest-descent paths associated with specific saddles that connect two predetermined states but largely differ from the path of maximum likelihood. The minimum-action path, however, additionally takes into account the scalar work along the trajectory. Minimizing the scalar work can be less ambiguous in the identification of the most likely path in different gradient systems. It can also be used to distinguish between multiple steepest-descent paths that connect reactant and product states. We illustrate that in systems with complex energy landscapes a careful assessment of the steepest-descent path is thus advisable. Here the evaluation of the action can provide valuable information on the analysis and description of the most likely path.

  5. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  6. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  7. Material aspects of dynamic neck retardation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Z.; Vaziri, A.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    Neck retardation in stretching of ductile materials is promoted by strain hardening, strain-rate hardening and inertia. Retardation is usually beneficial because necking is often the precursor to ductile failure. The interaction of material behavior and inertia in necking retardation is complicated, in part, because necking is highly nonlinear but also because the mathematical character of the response changes in a fundamental way from rate-independent necking to rate-dependent necking, whether due to material constitutive behavior or to inertia. For rate-dependent behavior, neck development requires the introduction of an imperfection, and the rate of neck growth in the early stages is closely tied to the imperfection amplitude. When inertia is important, multiple necks form. In contrast, for rate-independent materials deformed quasi-statically, single necks are preferred and they can emerge in an imperfection-free specimen as a bifurcation at a critical strain. In this paper, the interaction of material properties and inertia in determining neck retardation is unraveled using a variety of analysis methods for thin sheets and plates undergoing plane strain extension. Dimensionless parameters are identified, as are the regimes in which they play an important role.

  8. Nutrition, total fluid and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2008-09-01

    Bladder cancer is a major health concern for older males in Western populations. About 30 years ago there was a suggestion that nutrition may have a role in the aetiology of the disease. Although the literature has been accumulating since then, owing to heterogeneity between studies results have often been inconsistent and unclear. The aim of this paper was to present an updated summary of the scientific evidence on the association between nutrition, total fluid intake and bladder cancer. A search of computerized databases, PubMed, ISI, Embase and Cochrane Library, was conducted to identify all epidemiological studies published between 1966 and October 2007. The level of scientific evidence for the various nutritional factors and total fluid intake was ranked according to the number of studies reporting a statistically significant association and the existence of mechanistic evidence. The levels of association were based on a ranking of statistically significant relative risks. Fruit and yellow-orange vegetables, particularly carrots and selenium, are probably associated with a moderately reduced risk of bladder cancer. Citrus fruits and cruciferous vegetables were also identified as having a possible protective effect. Possible risk factors are salted and barbecued meat, pork, total fat, pickled vegetables, salt, soy products, spices and artificial sweeteners. No clear association could be determined for beef, eggs, processed meats and total fluid intake. In conclusion, specific fruit and vegetables may act to reduce the risk of bladder cancer. Future studies on bladder cancer should investigate the effect of food categorization, amount and gender. PMID:18815914

  9. Glucocorticoid therapy and risk of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, K; Schned, A; Fortuny, J; Heaney, J; Marsit, C; Kelsey, K T; Karagas, M R

    2009-01-01

    Background: Use of immunosuppressive drugs post organ transplantation, and prolonged use of glucorticoids for other conditions have been associated with subsequent risk of certain malignancies, that is, skin cancers and lymphoma. There is evidence that the incidence of bladder cancer is also elevated among organ transplant recipients, however, it is unknown whether other groups of patients, that is, those taking oral glucocorticoids, likewise are at an increased risk. Methods: In a population-based case–control study in New Hampshire, USA, we compared the use of glucocorticoids in 786 bladder cancer cases and in 1083 controls. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis to compute adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associated with oral glucocorticoid use. Results: In our analysis, the risk of bladder cancer was related to a history of prolonged oral glucocorticoid use (OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.24–2.76, adjusted for age, gender and smoking). Associations with oral glucocorticoid use were stronger for invasive tumours (OR=2.12, 95% CI=1.17–3.85) and tumours with high (3+) p53 staining intensity (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.26–4.36). Conclusion: Our results raise the possibility of an increased risk of bladder cancer from systemic use of glucocorticoids, and a potential role of immune surveillance in bladder cancer aetiology. PMID:19773763

  10. Erosion of repaired exstrophy bladder by a large vesical calculus

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Abdul; Sinha, Arvind; Bisht, Mayank; Gola, Neelkamal

    2011-01-01

    Formation of stones in repaired exstrophy bladder is common; however, erosion of stone through the repaired bladder and anterior abdominal wall has never been reported. We report one such case of erosion after three years of repair. PMID:21897570

  11. Shaping Bladder and Bowel Continence in Developmentally Retarded Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Glenn

    1983-01-01

    A program to improve bowel and bladder continence with four developmentally retarded preschoolers used a regular schedule and social and liquid reinforcement, verbal reprimand, and correction for accidents. Ss showed improvement in bowel and bladder continence. (Author/CL)

  12. [Aponeurotic suspension of the bladder neck as elective treatment of minimal stress urinary incontinence in women].

    PubMed

    Serrate, R; Gutiérrez, R; Rius, G; Prats, J; Wahab, A; Regué, R

    1995-01-01

    To correct urine incontinence at minimal exertion in woman, most especially in those who have undergone unsuccessful vaginal techniques, we advice the aponeurotic suspension of the vesical cervix, with anchorage, in fixed tissue (Cooper's ligament or ischiopubic branch) in order to avoid displacement of the supporting band and new drops of the vesical cervix, with incontinence relapse in the long run. Since 1983 this procedure has been performed in 400 women, with various degrees of urinary incontinence on exertion, 140 of whom had previously undergone other procedures. Our results have been completely successful in 383 patient who at year from surgery no longer presented urinary incontinence of any degree. These good results lead us to recommend this procedure as the most suitable to solve urinary incontinence at minimal exertion, relapses and that associated to feeling of urgency in many occasions. PMID:7717155

  13. Huygens’ entry and descent through Titan's atmosphere—Methodology and results of the trajectory reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeminejad, Bobby; Atkinson, David H.; Pérez-Ayúcar, Miguel; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Sollazzo, Claudio

    2007-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Huygens probe separated from the NASA Cassini spacecraft on 25 December 2004, after having been attached for a 7-year interplanetary journey and three orbits around Saturn. The probe reached the predefined NASA/ESA interface point on 14 January 2005 at 09:05:52.523 (UTC) and performed a successful entry and descent sequence. The probe softly impacted on Titan's surface on the same day at 11:38:10.77 (UTC) with a speed of about 4.54 m/s. The probe entry and descent trajectory was reconstructed from the estimated initial state vector provided by the Cassini Navigation team, the probe housekeeping data, and measurements from the scientific payload. This paper presents the methodology and discuss the results of the reconstruction effort. Furthermore the probe roll rate was reconstructed prior to the main entry phase deceleration pulse and throughout the entire descent phase under the main and drogue parachute.

  14. Recovering the attitude of the Huygens descent module using DISR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, B.; Tomasko, M. G.; Bushroe, M. W.; McFarlane, E. A.; See, C.

    2004-02-01

    Data from a combination of DISR instruments will allow probe attitude reconstruction during the descent phase. The radiances measured by the DISR Sun Sensor (SS), Side-Looking Imager (SLI) and Solar Aureole (SA 1, 2, 3 and 4) cameras as they are exposed to different sections of Titan sky and surface while the descent module spins, will be compared to a model of the satellite's absolute sky brightness in order to discern deviations from a baseline simulations with no tips or tilts. Thus the attitude of the probe can be deduced. Deriving the attitude allows High-Resolution Imager (HRI) and Medium-Resolution Imager (MRI) ground tracks to be assembled by correlating ground features from image to image and altitudes determined from SLI measurements of the level of the horizon. Hence the descent trajectory can be determined.

  15. Preliminary assessment of the Mars Science Laboratory entry, descent, and landing simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, David W.

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, successfully landed inside Gale Crater. This landing was the seventh successful landing and fourth rover to be delivered to Mars. Weighing nearly one metric ton, Curiosity is the largest and most complex rover ever sent to investigate another planet. Safely landing such a large payload required an innovative Entry, Descent, and Landing system, which included the first guided entry at Mars, the largest supersonic parachute ever flown at Mars, and the novel Sky Crane landing system. A complete, end-to-end, six degree-of-freedom, multi-body computer simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing sequence was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. In-flight data gathered during the successful landing is compared to pre-flight statistical distributions, predicted by the simulation. These comparisons provide insight into both the accuracy of the simulation and the overall performance of the Entry, Descent, and Landing system.

  16. Control of stair ascent and descent with a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Brian Edward; Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Huff, Amanda; Erdemir, Erdem; Goldfarb, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a finite state-based control system for a powered transfemoral prosthesis that provides stair ascent and descent capability. The control system was implemented on a powered prosthesis and evaluated by a unilateral, transfemoral amputee subject. The ability of the powered prosthesis to provide stair ascent and descent capability was assessed by comparing the gait kinematics, as recorded by a motion capture system, with the kinematics provided by a passive prosthesis, in addition to those recorded from a set of healthy subjects. The results indicate that the powered prosthesis provides gait kinematics that are considerably more representative of healthy gait, relative to the passive prosthesis, for both stair ascent and descent. PMID:23096120

  17. Descent and Landing Triggers for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Exploration Flight Test-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Brian D.; Semrau, Jeffrey D.; Duke, Charity J.

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will perform a flight test known as Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) currently scheduled for 2014. One of the primary functions of this test is to exercise all of the important Guidance, Navigation, Control (GN&C), and Propulsion systems, along with the flight software for future flights. The Descent and Landing segment of the flight is governed by the requirements levied on the GN&C system by the Landing and Recovery System (LRS). The LRS is a complex system of parachutes and flight control modes that ensure that the Orion MPCV safely lands at its designated target in the Pacific Ocean. The Descent and Landing segment begins with the jettisoning of the Forward Bay Cover and concludes with sensing touchdown. This paper discusses the requirements, design, testing, analysis and performance of the current EFT-1 Descent and Landing Triggers flight software.

  18. Experimental liquid line of descent and liquid immiscibility for basalt 70017. [lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Hess, P. C.; Daniel, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    The paper describes one possible liquid line of descent produced for a high-titanium mare basalt composition through an arbitrarily chosen series of partial equilibrium and fractional crystallization experiments on basalt 70017. The liquid line of descent leading to immiscibility at 994 C is characterized by enrichment of FeO, K2O, SiO2, and MnO and depletion of MgO and TiO2 in the residual liquids. The composition of the residual liquid at the onset of immiscibility is ferrobasaltic, and the initial appearance of immiscible liquids in the form of silica-rich spherules is in the vicinity of plagioclase-liquid contacts. The integrated bulk composition of the areas of finely exsolved liquids indicates that the trend of the liquid line of descent is at a small angle to the tie lines joining the two liquids.

  19. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  20. Evolutionary analyses of non-genealogical bonds produced by introgressive descent

    PubMed Central

    Bapteste, Eric; Lopez, Philippe; Bouchard, Frédéric; Baquero, Fernando; McInerney, James O.; Burian, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    All evolutionary biologists are familiar with evolutionary units that evolve by vertical descent in a tree-like fashion in single lineages. However, many other kinds of processes contribute to evolutionary diversity. In vertical descent, the genetic material of a particular evolutionary unit is propagated by replication inside its own lineage. In what we call introgressive descent, the genetic material of a particular evolutionary unit propagates into different host structures and is replicated within these host structures. Thus, introgressive descent generates a variety of evolutionary units and leaves recognizable patterns in resemblance networks. We characterize six kinds of evolutionary units, of which five involve mosaic lineages generated by introgressive descent. To facilitate detection of these units in resemblance networks, we introduce terminology based on two notions, P3s (subgraphs of three nodes: A, B, and C) and mosaic P3s, and suggest an apparatus for systematic detection of introgressive descent. Mosaic P3s correspond to a distinct type of evolutionary bond that is orthogonal to the bonds of kinship and genealogy usually examined by evolutionary biologists. We argue that recognition of these evolutionary bonds stimulates radical rethinking of key questions in evolutionary biology (e.g., the relations among evolutionary players in very early phases of evolutionary history, the origin and emergence of novelties, and the production of new lineages). This line of research will expand the study of biological complexity beyond the usual genealogical bonds, revealing additional sources of biodiversity. It provides an important step to a more realistic pluralist treatment of evolutionary complexity. PMID:23090996

  1. Overview of the NASA Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Dwyer-Cianciolo, Alicia M.; Kinney, David J.; Howard, Austin R.; Chen, George T.; Ivanov, Mark C.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Westhelle, Carlos H.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the Study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission.

  2. Steepest Descent Trajectories on Isosurfaces of the Scalar Field and of Fluctuations of the Scalar Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasukov, V. V.; Moldovanova, E. A.; Il'kin, E. E.; Novoselov, V. V.; Rozhkova, S. V.; Rozhkova, O. V.

    2015-05-01

    It has been shown that steepest descent trajectories on an isosurface of the scalar field or of fluctuations of the scalar curvature can serve as the geometric skeleton of galaxies, these trajectories simultaneously being isolines of the isosurface. Isolines and isosurfaces can generate matter via the mechanism of spontaneous emission of the Lemaître-Friedmann primordial atom. Steepest descent trajectories on an isosurface of fluctuations of the scalar curvature can also serve as the skeleton of quantum inhomogeneities of the density in GTR.

  3. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Class Simulation Overview and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and exploration or human-scale missions. The year one exploration class mission activity considered technologies capable of delivering a 40-mt payload. This paper provides an overview of the exploration class mission study, including technologies considered, models developed and initial simulation results from the EDL-SA year one effort.

  4. Initial Field Evaluation of Pilot Procedures for Flying CTAS Descent Clearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett; Goka, Tsuyoshi; Cashion, Patricia; Feary, Michael; Graham, Holly; Smith, Nancy; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) is a new support system that is designed to assist air traffic controllers in the management of arrival traffic. CTAS will provide controllers with more information about current air traffic, enabling them to provide clearances for efficient, conflict-free descents that help achieve an orderly stream of aircraft at the final approach fix. CTAS is a computer-based system that functions as a "ground-based FMS" that can predict flight trajectories and arrival times for all incoming aircraft. CTAS uses an aircraft's cruise airspeed; current air traffic, winds and temperature; performance characteristics of the aircraft type; and individual airline preferences to create a flight profile from cruise altitude to the final approach fix. Controllers can use this flight profile to provide a descent clearance that will allow an aircraft to fly an efficient descent and merge more smoothly with other arriving aircraft. A field test of the CTAS Descent Advisor software was conducted at the Denver Center for aircraft arriving at the Stapleton International Airport from September 12-29. CTAS Descent clearances were given to a NASA flight test aircraft and to 77 airline flights that arrived during low traffic periods. For the airline portion of the field test, cockpit procedures and pilot briefing packages for both FMS equipped and unequipped aircraft were developed in cooperation with an airline. The procedures developed for the FMS equipped aircraft were to fly a VNAV descent at a controller specified speed to cross a metering fix at a specified altitude and speed. For nonFMS aircraft, the clearance also specified a CTAS calculated top-of-descent point. Some CTAS related flight deck issues included how much time was available to the pilots' for compliance, the amount of information that needed to be interpreted in the clearance and possible repercussions of misunderstandings. Data collected during the study ranged from subjective data (including the airline pilots' opinions and comments about the new descent clearances and procedures) to objective data (including observations of aircraft performance from the flight deck). This paper will present data and the resulting changes in the design of the procedures and clearance phraseology.

  5. Minimum-Cost Aircraft Descent Trajectories with a Constrained Altitude Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G.; Sadovsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical formula for solving the speed profile that accrues minimum cost during an aircraft descent with a constrained altitude profile is derived. The optimal speed profile first reaches a certain speed, called the minimum-cost speed, as quickly as possible using an appropriate extreme value of thrust. The speed profile then stays on the minimum-cost speed as long as possible, before switching to an extreme value of thrust for the rest of the descent. The formula is applied to an actual arrival route and its sensitivity to winds and airlines' business objectives is analyzed.

  6. Progress in personalizing chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, James S; Lara, Primo N; Pan, Chong-Xian

    2012-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer. However, there are currently no methods to predict chemotherapy response in this disease setting. A better understanding of the biology of bladder cancer has led to developments of molecular biomarkers that may help guide clinical decision making. These biomarkers, while promising, have not yet been validated in prospective trials and are not ready for clinical applications. As alkylating agents, platinum drugs kill cancer cells mainly through induction of DNA damage. A microdosing approach is currently being tested to determine if chemoresistance can be identified by measuring platinum-induced DNA damage using highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry technology. The hope is that these emerging strategies will help pave the road towards personalized therapy in advanced bladder cancer. PMID:22400017

  7. Bladder volume estimation from electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Schlebusch, T; Nienke, S; Leonhardt, S; Walter, M

    2014-09-01

    Non-invasive estimation of bladder volume is required to progress from scheduled voiding to a demand-driven emptying scheme for patients with impaired bladder volume sensation. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a promising candidate for the non-invasive monitoring of bladder volume. This article focuses on four estimation algorithms used to map recorded EIT data to a volume estimate. Two different approaches are presented: the tomographic algorithms (one based on global impedance, the other on equivalent circular diameter) rely on the reconstruction of a tomographic image and then extract a volume estimate, whereas the parametric algorithms (one based on neural networks, the other on the singular value difference method) directly map the raw data to a volume estimate. The four algorithms presented here are evaluated for volume estimation error, noise tolerance and suppression of varying urine conductivity based on finite element simulation data. PMID:25139037

  8. Current Staging Procedures in Urinary Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Tobias; Horn, Thomas; Heck, Matthias; Gschwend, Jürgen E.; Eiber, Matthias; Beer, Ambros J.

    2013-01-01

    Currently computed tomography (CT) represents the most widely used standard imaging modality in muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer. Visualization of local tumor or depth of invasion as well as lymph node staging, however, is often impaired. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted sequences, determination of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values or utilization of superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles potentially exhibits advantages in the assessment of local tumor or lymph node involvement and therefore might play a role in routine staging of urinary bladder cancer in the future. Likewise, positron emission tomography (PET) with the currently utilized tracers 18F-FDG, 11C-choline and 11C-acetate is investigated in bladder cancer patients—mostly in combination with diagnostic CT. Although promising results could be obtained for these PET/CT examinations in smaller series, their true value cannot be determined at present.

  9. Botulinum Toxin to Treat Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher P; Chancellor, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    Alteration in neural control from suprapontine areas to the nerves innervating the bladder can lead to bladder dysfunction and the development of a neurogenic bladder (NGB). Patients with NGB often suffer from urinary incontinence, which can lead to adverse events such as urinary tract infections and decubiti, in addition to creating a large care burden for family members or healthcare providers and significantly impairing patient quality of life. The common failure of anticholinergic medications has spurned the development of second-line treatments, including the use of botulinum toxin. OnabotulinumtoxinA (onaBoNT-A; BOTOX, Allergan, Inc.) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with urinary incontinence resulting from a NGB. In this review the authors summarize pertinent results from key trials leading to FDA approval of onaBoNT-A as well as more recent long-term data. PMID:26866490

  10. Bladder cancer: smoking, beverages and artificial sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Jain, Meera G.

    1974-01-01

    A matched patient-control study of bladder cancer examined the relationship of the disease to occupation, smoking and intake of tea, coffee, cola, alcohol and artificial sweeteners. There was no association of disease with occupation for these patients. Heavy smoking gave relative risks of 6.37 and 4.36 for men and women respectively; there was evidence of a dose-response relationship. Tea and coffee intake did not increase the risk of disease nor did prolonged use of artificial sweeteners. Alcohol and cola intake increased the relative risk of bladder cancer among male smokers. There is some suggestion that smoking interacts with both alcohol and cola intake in the production of bladder cancer. PMID:4429932

  11. Neural reconstruction methods of restoring bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, Sandra M.; Barbe, Mary F.; de Groat, William C.; Brown, Justin M.; Tuite, Gerald F.; Corcos, Jacques; Fecho, Susan B.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, diverse studies have focused on the development of surgical strategies to restore function of a decentralized bladder after spinal cord or spinal root injury via repair of the original roots or by transferring new axonal sources. The techniques included end-to-end sacral root repairs, transfer of roots from other spinal segments to sacral roots, transfer of intercostal nerves to sacral roots, transfer of various somatic nerves to the pelvic or pudendal nerve, direct reinnervation of the detrusor muscle, or creation of an artificial reflex pathway between the skin and the bladder via the central nervous system. All of these surgical techniques have demonstrated specific strengths and limitations. The findings made to date already indicate appropriate patient populations for each procedure, but a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of each technique to restore urinary function after bladder decentralization is required to guide future research and potential clinical application. PMID:25666987

  12. 9 CFR 96.7 - Dried bladders, weasands, and casings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dried bladders, weasands, and casings... RESTRICTION OF IMPORTATIONS OF FOREIGN ANIMAL CASINGS OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.7 Dried bladders, weasands, and casings. Dried animal bladders, dried weasands, and all other dried animal...

  13. 9 CFR 96.7 - Dried bladders, weasands, and casings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dried bladders, weasands, and casings... RESTRICTION OF IMPORTATIONS OF FOREIGN ANIMAL CASINGS OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.7 Dried bladders, weasands, and casings. Dried animal bladders, dried weasands, and all other dried animal...

  14. 9 CFR 96.7 - Dried bladders, weasands, and casings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dried bladders, weasands, and casings... RESTRICTION OF IMPORTATIONS OF FOREIGN ANIMAL CASINGS OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.7 Dried bladders, weasands, and casings. Dried animal bladders, dried weasands, and all other dried animal...

  15. 9 CFR 96.7 - Dried bladders, weasands, and casings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dried bladders, weasands, and casings... RESTRICTION OF IMPORTATIONS OF FOREIGN ANIMAL CASINGS OFFERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.7 Dried bladders, weasands, and casings. Dried animal bladders, dried weasands, and all other dried animal...

  16. [Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Irani, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancers (NMIBC) represent a heterogeneous group as regards their biology and their seriousness. NMIBC management should be adapted to the acknowledged prognostic factors. First line treatment of NMIBC includes a transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB). Recurrence and progression risks following TURB are significantly high. Acknowledged factors are T stage, grade, number and size of tumors, recurrence modalities and associated carcinoma in situ. The benefit of adjuvant therapy using chemotherapy or BCG intravesical instillations has been demonstrated particularly on recurrence risk. Progression is very likely reduced by maintenance BCG. However, when high grade tumours do not respond to BCG, radical cystectomy is the mainstay treatment. PMID:25665317

  17. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 with Bladder Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Üre, Iyimser; Gürocak, Serhat; Gönül, Ipek Isik; Sözen, Sinan; Deniz, Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is an autosomal dominant transmitted disease with various clinical manifestations. The bladder is the most commonly affected organ in the genitourinary system. The malignant transformation of the disease is rare, and unlike malign tumors, the treatment option for benign disease is usually conservative. The size and localization of the mass determine the symptoms, most of which are usually not specific. In this paper, we aim to present a 15-year-old patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 with bladder involvement. The clinical presentation and treatment options of this disease are discussed in the light of the literature. PMID:23984171

  18. Perioperative management of classic bladder exstrophy

    PubMed Central

    Massanyi, Eric Z; Gearhart, John P; Kost-Byerly, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The exstrophy-epispadias complex is a rare congenital malformation of the genitourinary system, abdominal wall muscles, and pelvic structures. Modern surgical repairs focus on reconstruction of the bladder and its adjacent structures, with the goal of achieving urinary continence, a satisfactory cosmetic result, and a high quality of life. Complex surgery in neonates and young children, as well as a prolonged postoperative course require close collaboration between surgeons, anesthesiologists, intensivists, pediatricians, and an experienced nursing staff. This article will review the spectrum of bladder exstrophy anomalies, the surgical repair, and the perioperative interdisciplinary management. PMID:24400236

  19. MULTIPLEX URINARY TESTS FOR BLADDER CANCER DIAGNOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Urquidi, Virginia; Rosser, Charles J.; Goodison, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The development of accurate and reliable molecular assays that could diagnose bladder cancer would be of significant benefit to both patients and the healthcare system. Non-invasive assays that have utility not only for diagnosis, but also for monitoring disease recurrence and response to treatment, are needed. Current urinary tests lack sufficient sensitivity or specificity, often because of a reliance on single biomarkers, but high-throughput technologies are enabling the derivation of more accurate panels of biomarkers. In this article, we review some of the promising investigational studies that are revealing multiplex biomarker signatures that may augment current bladder cancer detection strategies. PMID:24533178

  20. Calcifying nanoparticles associated encrusted urinary bladder cystitis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Roque, Rod; Yasar, Uzay; Tomchin, Shayna B; Serrato, Jose M; Deem, Samuel G; Tierney, James P; Chang, Ho-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Encrusted cystitis is a subtype of chronic cystitis characterized by multiple calcifications in the form of plaques located in the interstitium of the urinary bladder mucosa and frequently associated with mucosal ulcers. It is a very rare disease of controversial etiology. Our transmission electron microscopy of the calcified plaques of encrusted cystitis has revealed that the smallest formed particles (elementary units) of these calcifications are electron-dense shells surrounding an electron lucent core, diagnostic of calcifying nanoparticles (previously called nanobacteria). We pioneer the notion that calcifying nanoparticles are the causative agents of encrusted urinary bladder cystitis. PMID:18990947

  1. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:26475949

  2. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function.

    PubMed

    Walker, K A; Ikeda, Y; Zabbarova, I; Schaefer, C M; Bushnell, D; De Groat, W C; Kanai, A; Bates, C M

    2015-04-15

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2(BM-/-)). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders had thin muscle layers with less ?-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2(BM-/-) versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2(BM-/-) versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  3. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-09-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence. PMID:26793538

  4. Novel therapeutic approaches for recurrent nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Brock E; Svatek, Robert S

    2015-05-01

    This article summarizes strategies being investigated in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Progress has been made toward improving the delivery method of intravesical agents. Intravesical therapy is limited by the amount of time that the agent remains in contact with the bladder. Bladder cancer is considered to be responsive to immune therapy. Thus, many novel approaches are immune-based therapies and include cancer vaccines, use of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) subcomponents, and checkpoint inhibitors. Finally, access to bladder mucosa via direct catheterization into the bladder via the urethra has enabled unique strategies for delivery of cancer therapy including viral- or plasmid-based gene therapy. PMID:25882558

  5. Modeling bladder cancer in mice: opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Owczarek, Tomasz B.; McKiernan, James M.; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment of bladder cancer have hardly improved in the last 20 years. Bladder cancer remains a debilitating and often fatal disease, and among the most costly cancers to treat. The generation of informative mouse models has the potential to improve our understanding of bladder cancer progression, as well as impact its diagnosis and treatment. However, relatively few mouse models of bladder cancer have been described and particularly few that develop invasive cancer phenotypes. This review focuses on opportunities for improving the landscape of mouse models of bladder cancer. PMID:25533675

  6. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-01-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence. PMID:26793538

  7. Detection of bladder tumors using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yingtian; Xie, Tuqiang; Wang, Zhenguo

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes the engineering development of our lab for endoscopic optical coherence tomography toward the ultimate goal to image bladder micro architecture and to diagnose bladder cancers. To test the utility and potential limitations of OCT setups for bladder tumor diagnosis, we used a rat bladder cancer model to track the morphological changes following tumor growth. Image results are presented, suggesting that OCT is able to differentiate cancerous lesions from inflammatory lesions based on OCT characterizations of epithelial thickness and backscattering changes of bladder tissue.

  8. Head and neck position sense.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or fails to be appropriately integrated in the CNS, errors in head position may occur, resulting in an inaccurate reference for HNPS, and conversely if neck proprioceptive information is inaccurate, then control of head position may be affected. The cerebellum and cortex also play a role in control of head position, providing feed-forward and modulatory influences depending on the task requirements. Position-matching tasks have been the most popular means of testing position sense in the cervical spine. These allow the appreciation of absolute, constant and variable errors in positioning and have been shown to be reliable. The results of such tests indicate that errors are relatively low (2-5 degrees). It is apparent that error is not consistently affected by age, a finding similar to studies undertaken in peripheral joints. Furthermore, the range of motion in which subjects are tested does not consistently affect accuracy in a predictable manner. However, it is evident that impairments in position sense are observed in individuals who have experienced whiplash-type injuries and individuals with chronic head and neck pain of non-traumatic origin (e.g. cervical spondylosis). While researchers advocate comprehensive retraining protocols, which include eye and neck motion targeting tasks and coordination exercises, as well as co-contraction exercises to reduce such impairments, some studies show that more general exercises and manipulation may be of benefit. Overall, there is limited information concerning the efficacy of treatment programmes. PMID:18201114

  9. Effects of aircraft and flight parameters on energy-efficient profile descents in time-based metered traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of several parameters on the time required to fly a nominal profile descent of a B-737 from an entry fix to a metering fix 75 n.mi. away was studied. The ground distance for the constant speed segment was adjusted in each case so that the aircraft would always arrive at the metering fix position at the completion of the five segments of the profile descent. The influence of eight parameters on the same nominal profile descent is outlined, but the method used for the off nominal cases was changed. The time calculated for the constant speed segment in the nominal case is used for all off nominal cases. This method allows the aircraft to arrive at the metering fix before or after the profile descent is complete. It is shown that descent Mach number and wind speed have a large effect on the time error, whereas weight was a much smaller effect.

  10. Use of steepest descent and various approximations for efficient computation of minimum noise aircraft landing trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, G.; Witt, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The following areas related to landing trajectory optimization research were discussed: (1) programming and modifying the steepest descent optimization procedure, (2) successfully iterating toward the optimum for a four-mile trajectory, (3) beginning optimization runs for a twenty-mile trajectory, and (4) adapt wind tunnel data for computer usage. Other related areas were discussed in detail in the two previous annual reports.

  11. A Wind Tunnel Study on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Lander Descent Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, J. Francisco; Coquilla, Rachael V.; Wilson, Gregory R.; Seiff, Alvin; Rivell, Tomas

    2001-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Mars Pathfinder lander local pressure readings in accordance with the actual ambient atmospheric pressures of Mars during parachute descent. In order to obtain good measurements, the plane of the lander pressure sensor opening should ideally be situated so that it is parallel to the freestream. However, due to two unfavorable conditions, the sensor was positioned in locations where correction factors are required. One of these disadvantages is due to the fact that the parachute attachment point rotated the lander's center of gravity forcing the location of the pressure sensor opening to be off tangent to the freestream. The second and most troublesome factor was that the lander descends with slight oscillations that could vary the amplitude of the sensor readings. In order to accurately map the correction factors required at each sensor position, an experiment simulating the lander descent was conducted in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Using a 115 scale model at Earth ambient pressures, the test settings provided the necessary Reynolds number conditions in which the actual lander was possibly subjected to during the descent. In the analysis and results of this experiment, the readings from the lander sensor were converted to the form of pressure coefficients. With a contour map of pressure coefficients at each lander oscillatory position, this report will provide a guideline to determine the correction factors required for the Mars Pathfinder lander descent pressure sensor readings.

  12. Showing up, Remaining Engaged, and Partaking as Students: Resilience among Students of Mexican Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which 12 high school students of Mexican descent remain resilient amid difficult and stressful realities. Through an examination of students' interview responses, a case is made that students' ability to engage in school and figure out everyday ways to partake as students are signs of resilience. This work suggests…

  13. A Critical Analysis of Western Perspectives on Families of Arab Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitin, Ben K.; Allen, Katherine R.; Bekheet, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Western research on families of Arab descent has increased in the current decade, compared to the previous 30 years. In this review of 256 empirical articles, through a critical postcolonial lens, domestic violence and family planning were the two most established areas of study. Generally, samples have come from a small group of countries such as…

  14. Forward stair descent with hybrid neuroprosthesis after paralysis: Single case study demonstrating feasibility.

    PubMed

    Bulea, Thomas C; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L; Schnellenberger, John R; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to negotiate stairs is important for community access and independent mobility but requires more effort and strength than level walking. For this reason, previous attempts to utilize functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore stair navigation after spinal cord injury (SCI) have had limited success and are not readily generalizable. Stair descent is particularly challenging because it requires energy absorption via eccentric muscle contractions, a task not easily accomplished with FNS. This article presents the design and initial testing of a hybrid neuroprosthesis with a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM-HNP) for stair descent. Using a 16-channel percutaneous FNS system, a muscle activation pattern was synthesized to descend stairs with the VIKM-HNP in a step-by-step fashion. A finite state control system was implemented to deactivate knee extensor stimulation and utilize the VIKM-HNP to absorb energy and regulate descent speed. Feasibility testing was performed on one individual with complete thoracic-level SCI. Stair descent was achieved with maximum upper-limb forces of less than 45% body weight compared with previously reported value of 70% with FNS only. The experiments also provided insight into design requirements for future hybrid systems for stair navigation, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:25437932

  15. Access to Health Care Among Latinos of Mexican Descent in "Colonias" in Two Texas Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Larry; Arizmendi, Lydia; Cornelius, Llewellyn J.

    2004-01-01

    Critical to resolving the problem of health disparities among Latinos is examining the needs within ethnic subpopulations. This paper focused on the unique challenges encountered by one ethnic subpopulation -- Latinos of Mexican descent living in colonias. Findings reaffirm the importance of looking within ethnic subpopulations to understand the…

  16. Smart-Divert Powered Descent Guidance to Avoid the Backshell Landing Dispersion Ellipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M.; Acikmese, Behcet

    2013-01-01

    A smart-divert capability has been added into the Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) software originally developed for Mars pinpoint and precision landing. The smart-divert algorithm accounts for the landing dispersions of the entry backshell, which separates from the lander vehicle at the end of the parachute descent phase and prior to powered descent. The smart-divert PDG algorithm utilizes the onboard fuel and vehicle thrust vectoring to mitigate landing error in an intelligent way: ensuring that the lander touches down with minimum- fuel usage at the minimum distance from the desired landing location that also avoids impact by the descending backshell. The smart-divert PDG software implements a computationally efficient, convex formulation of the powered-descent guidance problem to provide pinpoint or precision-landing guidance solutions that are fuel-optimal and satisfy physical thrust bound and pointing constraints, as well as position and speed constraints. The initial smart-divert implementation enforced a lateral-divert corridor parallel to the ground velocity vector; this was based on guidance requirements for MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) landings. This initial method was overly conservative since the divert corridor was infinite in the down-range direction despite the backshell landing inside a calculable dispersion ellipse. Basing the divert constraint instead on a local tangent to the backshell dispersion ellipse in the direction of the desired landing site provides a far less conservative constraint. The resulting enhanced smart-divert PDG algorithm avoids impact with the descending backshell and has reduced conservatism.

  17. Showing up, Remaining Engaged, and Partaking as Students: Resilience among Students of Mexican Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which 12 high school students of Mexican descent remain resilient amid difficult and stressful realities. Through an examination of students' interview responses, a case is made that students' ability to engage in school and figure out everyday ways to partake as students are signs of resilience. This work suggests…

  18. Spread of cattle led to the loss of matrilineal descent in Africa: a coevolutionary analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Clare Janaki; Mace, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    Matrilineal descent is rare in human societies that keep large livestock. However, this negative correlation does not provide reliable evidence that livestock and descent rules are functionally related, because human cultures are not statistically independent owing to their historical relationships (Galton's problem). We tested the hypothesis that when matrilineal cultures acquire cattle they become patrilineal using a sample of 68 Bantu- and Bantoid-speaking populations from sub-Saharan Africa. We used a phylogenetic comparative method to control for Galton's problem, and a maximum-parsimony Bantu language tree as a model of population history. We tested for coevolution between cattle and descent. We also tested the direction of cultural evolution--were cattle acquired before matriliny was lost? The results support the hypothesis that acquiring cattle led formerly matrilineal Bantu-speaking cultures to change to patrilineal or mixed descent. We discuss possible reasons for matriliny's association with horticulture and its rarity in pastoralist societies. We outline the daughter-biased parental investment hypothesis for matriliny, which is supported by data on sex, wealth and reproductive success from two African societies, the matrilineal Chewa in Malawi and the patrilineal Gabbra in Kenya. PMID:14667331

  19. Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.…

  20. A Terminal Descent Sensor Trade Study Overview for the Orion Landing and Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Catherine; Prakash, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    This trade study was conducted as a part of the Orion Landing System Advanced Development Project to determine possible Terminal Descent Sensor (TDS) architectures that could be used for a rocket assisted landing system. Several technologies were considered for the Orion TDS including radar, lidar, GPS applications, mechanical sensors, and gamma ray altimetry.

  1. Forward stair descent with hybrid neuroprosthesis after paralysis: Single case study demonstrating feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L.; Schnellenberger, John R.; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to negotiate stairs is important for community access and independent mobility but requires more effort and strength than level walking. For this reason, previous attempts to utilize functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore stair navigation after spinal cord injury (SCI) have had limited success and are not readily generalizable. Stair descent is particularly challenging because it requires energy absorption via eccentric muscle contractions, a task not easily accomplished with FNS. This article presents the design and initial testing of a hybrid neuroprosthesis with a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM-HNP) for stair descent. Using a 16-channel percutaneous FNS system, a muscle activation pattern was synthesized to descend stairs with the VIKM-HNP in a step-by-step fashion. A finite state control system was implemented to deactivate knee extensor stimulation and utilize the VIKM-HNP to absorb energy and regulate descent speed. Feasibility testing was performed on one individual with complete thoracic-level SCI. Stair descent was achieved with maximum upper-limb forces of less than 45% body weight compared with previously reported value of 70% with FNS only. The experiments also provided insight into design requirements for future hybrid systems for stair navigation, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:25437932

  2. A molecular signature of an arrest of descent in human parturition

    PubMed Central

    MITTAL, Pooja; ROMERO, Roberto; TARCA, Adi L.; DRAGHICI, Sorin; NHAN-CHANG, Chia-Ling; CHAIWORAPONGSA, Tinnakorn; HOTRA, John; GOMEZ, Ricardo; KUSANOVIC, Juan Pedro; LEE, Deug-Chan; KIM, Chong Jai; HASSAN, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to identify the molecular basis of an arrest of descent. Study Design Human myometrium was obtained from women in term labor (TL; n=29) and arrest of descent (AODes, n=21). Gene expression was characterized using Illumina® HumanHT-12 microarrays. A moderated t-test and false discovery rate adjustment were applied for analysis. Confirmatory qRT-PCR and immunoblot was performed in an independent sample set. Results 400 genes were differentially expressed between women with an AODes compared to those with TL. Gene Ontology analysis indicated enrichment of biological processes and molecular functions related to inflammation and muscle function. Impacted pathways included inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of HIF1A, IL-6, and PTGS2 in AODES was confirmed. Conclusion We have identified a stereotypic pattern of gene expression in the myometrium of women with an arrest of descent. This represents the first study examining the molecular basis of an arrest of descent using a genome-wide approach. PMID:21284969

  3. Feeling Frugal: Socioeconomic Status, Acculturation, and Cultural Health Beliefs among Women of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrayo, Evelinn A.; Jenkins, Sharon Rae

    2003-01-01

    Investigates influences of acculturation, socioeconomic status (SES), and cultural health beliefs on Mexican-descent women's preventive health behaviors. In 5 focus group interviews sampling across levels of acculturation and SES, women expressing more traditional Mexican health beliefs about breast cancer screening were of lower SES and were less…

  4. Access to Health Care Among Latinos of Mexican Descent in "Colonias" in Two Texas Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Larry; Arizmendi, Lydia; Cornelius, Llewellyn J.

    2004-01-01

    Critical to resolving the problem of health disparities among Latinos is examining the needs within ethnic subpopulations. This paper focused on the unique challenges encountered by one ethnic subpopulation -- Latinos of Mexican descent living in colonias. Findings reaffirm the importance of looking within ethnic subpopulations to understand the…

  5. Predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Polese, Janaine Cunha; Scianni, Aline Alvim; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine which clinical measures of walking performance and lower limb muscle strength would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent in community-dwelling individuals with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Regression analysis of cross-sectional data from 55 individuals between one and five years post-stroke was used to investigate the measures of walking (speed and distance covered during the 6-minute walk test [6MWT]), and strength of the paretic knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent. [Results] Three predictors (habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles) were kept in the model. Habitual walking speed alone explained 47% of the variance in energy cost during stair ascent and descent. When the strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles was included in the model, the explained variance increased to 53%. By adding the distance covered during the 6MWT, the variance increased to 58%. [Conclusion] Habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles were significant predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with mild walking limitations. PMID:26834342

  6. Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.…

  7. High expression of Wnt7b in human superficial bladder cancer vs invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bui, T. D.; O'Brien, T.; Crew, J.; Cranston, D.; Harris, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt gene expression is involved in the development of breast cancer, but its role in other tumours is unknown. Wnts regulate cadherin function, previously shown to be more commonly deregulated in invasive bladder cancer. This study investigated whether factors upstream of cadherins were aberrantly expressed in superficial bladder cancer. The expression of one transforming (Wnt7b) and one non-transforming (Wnt5a) Wnt gene in four human bladder carcinoma cell lines, and in normal human bladder tissues (n = 8) and bladder cancers (n = 48) were analysed by ribonuclease protection analysis. All cell lines expressed an approximately equal level of Wnt7b mRNA. Wnt5a and Wnt7b mRNAs were both expressed in normal bladder tissues and bladder tumours. The median expression of Wnt7b was fourfold higher in superficial tumours (n = 29) than in normal tissues (n = 8, P = 0.002) and five fold higher than in invasive tumours (n = 17, P = 0.003). There was no significant difference between normal tissues and invasive tumours (P = 0.3). The expression of Wnt5a did not vary significantly between normal tissues and superficial tumours (P = 0.4), normal tissues and invasive tumours (P = 0.3) or superficial tumours and invasive tumours (P = 0.2). The differential expression of Wnt7b suggests a role in the early events of superficial bladder tumorigenesis involving cell adhesion and provides further evidence of different pathways of evolution of superficial and invasive cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9461004

  8. Protamine Sulfate-induced Bladder Injury is Protective from Distention-induced Bladder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Stemler, Kristina M.; Crock, Lara W.; Lai, H. Henry; Mills, Jason C.; Gereau, Robert W.; Mysorekar, Indira U.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bladder pain is a debilitating symptom of many urologic conditions, and there is no generally effective treatment. Abnormal urothelial turnover is common to multiple disease states, but the specific components of urothelial injury and the resulting molecular signals that lead to bladder pain are unknown. We examined mouse models of bladder injury induced by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), protamine sulfate (PS), and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to identify cellular and molecular correlates underlying pain sensitization in response to the stimuli. Materials and Methods C57BL/6 female mice were given intravesicular PS, LPS or UPEC, and the impact of each on nociception was determined by measuring the evoked visceromotor response to bladder distention at 24 hours post inoculation. Levels of pyuria and tissue inflammation were examined by urinary cytology and tissue histology. Quantitative PCR and gene expression analysis were used to identify injury profiles associated with nociception. Results PS treatment was significantly analgesic upon bladder distention. PS-treated bladders did not exhibit pyuria or extensive tissue damage. PS injury was associated with a global decrease in expression of inflammation-associated genes. In contrast, UPEC injury significantly increased the nociceptive response to bladder distention. LPS treatment did not affect nociception. Finally, injury-induced expression of inflammation-associated genes correlated with nociceptive responses. Conclusion PS treatment of the bladder is analgesic, tissue protective, and suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression normally associated with nociception. Additionally, the injury modalities that result in differential tissue response patterns provide an innovative method for identification of mediators of visceral pain. PMID:23174261

  9. Neck pain: manipulating the upper back helps lessen pain and improve neck motion.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Neck pain is very common. In the United States, between 30% and 50% of people suffer from an aching neck each year. Although neck pain can be caused by injury, most of this pain results from more gradual stresses, such as particular sitting, standing, or work postures, lifting patterns, or sleeping positions. Typical neck pain can also cause headaches, pain between your shoulders, or a feeling of knots in your neck and upper back muscles. Although manual therapy, sometimes called "manipulation," is a common treatment for many types of spine pain, some people are uncomfortable having their necks manipulated. Recently, though, researchers have tested the benefits of a thrust manipulation of the upper back to treat neck pain. A study published in the September 2011 issue of JOSPT provides new insight and an evidence-based summary of the benefits of manipulating the upper back to ease and eliminate neck pain. PMID:21885905

  10. Fast descent routes from within or near the stratosphere to Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, H.; Narazaki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    By using high concentrations of 7Be as an indicator, we clarify fast descent routes from within or near the stratosphere to Earth's surface, with the study site being in Fukuoka, Japan. Most routes arise from high latitudes through the following processes. First, the descent associated with a tropopause fold occurs, followed by southward movement with slow descent at the rear side of a strong trough. Because this motion occurs along an isentropic surface, the descending air parcels nearly conserve the potential temperature. As an extension, a strong descent associated with a sharp drop in the isentropic-surface height occurs at the south edge of the trough; this transports air parcels to low altitudes. This process involves irreversible phenomena such as filamentation and cutoff of potential vorticity. Finally, upon meeting appropriate near-surface disturbances, parcels at low altitudes are transported to Earth's surface. In some cases, parcels descend within mid-latitudes. In such routes, because the potential temperature is much higher at high altitudes than at low altitudes, strong descent with conservation of the potential temperature is impossible, and the potential temperature decreases. In these cases, the entire flow does not move downward; instead, only part of the flow in a diffluent field descends. When parcels descend, they push low isentropic surfaces, and their potential temperature decreases upon mixing with parcels having low potential temperature in the lower layers. The prevalence of the high-latitude route is explained as follows. In the mid-latitude route, because parcels at high and relatively low altitudes mix, the high concentrations of 7Be included in high-altitude parcels are difficult to maintain. Therefore, for parcels to arrive at low altitudes in the mid-latitude while maintaining high concentrations of 7Be, i.e., conserving the potential temperature, their area of origin should be high altitudes in high latitudes where the potential temperature is almost the same as that in the arrival area. Moreover, the initial descent must occur, because parcels cannot descend in the stratosphere when moving from high to mid-latitudes; parcels must already have descended from the stratosphere to the troposphere in high latitudes for effective descent with the movement to mid-latitudes. In spring, tropopause folds are frequent in high latitudes, disturbances in the southward transport of parcels are strong, and disturbances occur by which parcels descend to the surface. Therefore, high concentrations of 7Be occur most frequently in spring.

  11. Anatomic Variations in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Wong, Chin-Ho; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure. Variations encountered in the recipient vessels and commonly used flaps add to the complexity of surgery. This article reviews the commonly encountered variations in the recipient vessels in the neck with emphasis on alternatives and techniques to circumvent these variations. Flaps commonly used in head and neck reconstruction are also reviewed in detail. Furthermore, safety, potential pitfalls, and technical pearls are highlighted. PMID:22550436

  12. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases. However, in stage III with or without AVN, the results of osteosynthesis are poor and the choice of treatment is replacement arthroplasty (hemi or total). PMID:25593354

  13. Vesicoenteric Fistula due to Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yu Jin; Park, Dong Jin; Kim, Soon; Kim, Sung Woo; Lee, Kyung Seop; Choi, Nak Gyeu

    2014-01-01

    Vesicoenteric fistula is a rare complication of bladder squamous cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 70-year-old male who complained of painless, total gross hematuria. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) revealed an approximately 2.7-cm lobulated and contoured enhancing mass in the bladder dome. We performed partial cystectomy of the bladder dome after transurethral resection of the bladder. The biopsy result was bladder squamous cell carcinoma, with infiltrating serosa histopathologically, but the resection margin was free. Postoperatively, follow-up CT was done after 3 months. Follow-up CT revealed an approximately 4.7-cm×4.0-cm lobulated, contoured, and heterogeneous mass in the bladder dome. A vesicoenteric fistula was visible by cystography. Here we report this case of a vesicoenteric fistula due to bladder squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25045451

  14. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    PubMed Central

    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergeno?lu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; A?kar, Niyazi; ?til, ?smail Mete

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Material and Methods Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. Results The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). Conclusion It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms. PMID:24592016

  15. Aggressive bladder carcinoma in an HIV-positive man with tetraplegia and neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Benabdallah, Justin O.; Collins, Clinton W.; Carucci, Laura R.; Moore, Kenneth E.; Gater, David R.; Klausner, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective Patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to spinal cord injury who are managed long term with an indwelling catheter are known to be at increased risk for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Immunosuppression is a known risk factor for malignancies that often are more aggressive than those seen in normal populations. Method Case report and discussion of management recommendations. Results We summarize the case of a 44-year-old HIV-positive C5–C6 incomplete tetraplegic male (date of injury 1980), who was diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and succumbed to disease within 6 months of diagnosis. The patient was a non-smoker who was never managed with an indwelling catheter. There has been no such case reported in the literature. Conclusions HIV infection in the presence of a neurogenic bladder may carry an increased risk of aggressive bladder malignancy. More studies are warranted to determine whether routine annual screening with cystoscopy in all patients with HIV and neurogenic bladder is indicated. PMID:21675364

  16. Safety of sequential whole bladder photodynamic therapy (WBPT) in bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nseyo, Unyime O.; Lamm, Donald L.; Carpenter, Cindy

    2001-05-01

    Bladder cancer remains a serious public health problem in many parts of the world with an estimated 300,000 new cases a year. In the US, there were 53,200 new cases of bladder cancer with 12,200 deaths in 2000. A majority (75%-90%) of these cancers are diagnosed pathologically as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Superficial TCC constitutes 85% of newly diagnosed bladder cancer cases. Superficial bladder cancer includes papillary tumors involving only the mucosa (Ta) or submucosa (T1) and flat carcinoma in suit (CIS). Transurethral resection (TUR) of bladder tumor effectively controls the primary tumors, confirms the superficial or non-muscle invasive nature of the disease, provides cytological and histological tumor characteristics for determining prognostic significance and allows for assessment of the extent of bladder tissue involvement by tumor. Intravesical therapy provides a high concentration of drug in contact with tumor-bearing mucosa for prolonged periods, reduces the likelihood of tumor implantation after resection by destroying viable cancer cells, provides a cytotoxic effect on residual carcinoma, and potentially alters precursor mucosal lesions.

  17. Protein Interactome of Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Akshay; Heinzel, Andreas; Mayer, Bernd; Perco, Paul; Mühlberger, Irmgard; Husi, Holger; Merseburger, Axel S.; Zoidakis, Jerome; Vlahou, Antonia; Schanstra, Joost P.; Mischak, Harald; Jankowski, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Muscle invasive bladder carcinoma is a complex, multifactorial disease caused by disruptions and alterations of several molecular pathways that result in heterogeneous phenotypes and variable disease outcome. Combining this disparate knowledge may offer insights for deciphering relevant molecular processes regarding targeted therapeutic approaches guided by molecular signatures allowing improved phenotype profiling. The aim of the study is to characterize muscle invasive bladder carcinoma on a molecular level by incorporating scientific literature screening and signatures from omics profiling. Public domain omics signatures together with molecular features associated with muscle invasive bladder cancer were derived from literature mining to provide 286 unique protein-coding genes. These were integrated in a protein-interaction network to obtain a molecular functional map of the phenotype. This feature map educated on three novel disease-associated pathways with plausible involvement in bladder cancer, namely Regulation of actin cytoskeleton, Neurotrophin signalling pathway and Endocytosis. Systematic integration approaches allow to study the molecular context of individual features reported as associated with a clinical phenotype and could potentially help to improve the molecular mechanistic description of the disorder. PMID:25569276

  18. Novel endoscopic diagnosis for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Seth P; Goh, Alvin

    2015-01-15

    Advances in endoscopic imaging technology may improve sensitivity for the detection of bladder cancer and provide a more complete understanding of the urothelial landscape, and it also may lead to improved short-term and long-term cancer control. Fluorescence cystoscopy requires intravesical administration of a photosensitizing agent (5-aminolevulinic acid or hexaminolevulinate), and imaging with a blue-light endoscopy system demonstrably improves the detection of papillary and flat bladder lesions compared with conventional white-light cystoscopy. Prospective phase 3 clinical trials have demonstrated improved diagnostic ability, enhanced tumor resection, and a small but significant reduction in recurrence-free survival. Optical coherence tomography delineates subsurface microarchitecture information about bladder lesions in real time and has the ability to discriminate between noninvasive and invasive cancers. Narrow-band imaging may augment white-light cystoscopy by providing increased contrast between normal and abnormal tissue on the basis of neovascularity. Confocal laser endoscopy has been applied to the urinary tract using thinner probes adapted from use in gastrointestinal malignancies and provides exquisite images at microscopic resolution. More technology is on the horizon that may further enhance our ability to detect and accurately stage bladder tumors and distinguish benign from malignant or dysplastic lesions. PMID:25132313

  19. Bladder rupture after intentional medication overdose.

    PubMed

    Huston, Butch; Mills, Kelly; Froloff, Victor; McGee, Michael

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of a 51-year-old woman who had a medical history of diabetes, depression with past suicide attempts, and suicidal ideation. She was found unresponsive in a motel with multiple bottles of medicines (melatonin, carisoprodol, ativan, and clonazepam) and an unopened bottle of wine. She was transported to the local hospital and treated for benzodiazepine toxicity and aspiration pneumonitis.The decedent gradually became more alert and was extubated 3 days after hospital admission. The decedent was reportedly getting up to use the restroom when she became tachypneic and diaphoretic and complained of generalized body pain. Her condition quickly declined, and she was pronounced deceased. A postmortem examination revealed an acute bladder rupture and soft tissue hemorrhage.A review of the literature reveals that isolated bladder rupture after minimal or no trauma in association with alcohol or drug ingestion is an infrequently reported, but recognized, injury. The diagnosis of bladder rupture should be considered in a patient with lower abdominal pain, even without a history of trauma. A history of voiding or bladder dysfunction should increase the suspicion for this injury. If suspected, a retrograde cystogram should be obtained promptly. Failure to consider and recognize this injury may lead to significant morbidity. PMID:21897194

  20. Intravesical Treatments of Bladder Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Shen, Tong; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    For bladder cancer, intravesical chemo/immunotherapy is widely used as adjuvant therapies after surgical transurethal resection, while systemic therapy is typically reserved for higher stage, muscle-invading, or metastatic diseases. The goal of intravesical therapy is to eradicate existing or residual tumors through direct cytoablation or immunostimulation. The unique properties of the urinary bladder render it a fertile ground for evaluating additional novel experimental approaches to regional therapy, including iontophoresis/electrophoresis, local hyperthermia, co-administration of permeation enhancers, bioadhesive carriers, magnetic-targeted particles and gene therapy. Furthermore, due to its unique anatomical properties, the drug concentration-time profiles in various layers of bladder tissues during and after intravesical therapy can be described by mathematical models comprised of drug disposition and transport kinetic parameters. The drug delivery data, in turn, can be combined with the effective drug exposure to infer treatment efficacy and thereby assists the selection of optimal regimens. To our knowledge, intravesical therapy of bladder cancer represents the first example where computational pharmacological approach was used to design, and successfully predicted the outcome of, a randomized phase III trial (using mitomycin C). This review summarizes the pharmacological principles and the current status of intravesical therapy, and the application of computation to optimize the drug delivery to target sites and the treatment efficacy. PMID:18369709

  1. Protein interactome of muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Akshay; Heinzel, Andreas; Mayer, Bernd; Perco, Paul; Mühlberger, Irmgard; Husi, Holger; Merseburger, Axel S; Zoidakis, Jerome; Vlahou, Antonia; Schanstra, Joost P; Mischak, Harald; Jankowski, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Muscle invasive bladder carcinoma is a complex, multifactorial disease caused by disruptions and alterations of several molecular pathways that result in heterogeneous phenotypes and variable disease outcome. Combining this disparate knowledge may offer insights for deciphering relevant molecular processes regarding targeted therapeutic approaches guided by molecular signatures allowing improved phenotype profiling. The aim of the study is to characterize muscle invasive bladder carcinoma on a molecular level by incorporating scientific literature screening and signatures from omics profiling. Public domain omics signatures together with molecular features associated with muscle invasive bladder cancer were derived from literature mining to provide 286 unique protein-coding genes. These were integrated in a protein-interaction network to obtain a molecular functional map of the phenotype. This feature map educated on three novel disease-associated pathways with plausible involvement in bladder cancer, namely Regulation of actin cytoskeleton, Neurotrophin signalling pathway and Endocytosis. Systematic integration approaches allow to study the molecular context of individual features reported as associated with a clinical phenotype and could potentially help to improve the molecular mechanistic description of the disorder. PMID:25569276

  2. Embolization of the neck lymphatic varix, causing periodic neck swelling.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Anthony K; Pukenas, Brian A; Yan, Yan; Newman, Jason G; Itkin, Maxim

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 44-year-old female patient, presented to us after years of recurrent intermittent episodes of unilateral left neck swelling. An MR lymphangiogram demonstrated a lymphatic varix at the confluence of the left upper extremity lymphatic ducts, confirmed by intranodal axillary lymphangiography. After successful catheterization of the feeding lymphatic vessels, the varix was successfully embolized with detachable microcoils and an autologous blood patch. The patient has been free from symptoms on subsequent outpatient follow-up. PMID:24352865

  3. An improved delivery system for bladder irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Mohammad K; Rajaei, Mojtaba

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Occasionally, urologists may see patients requiring temporary bladder irrigation at hospitals without stocks of specialist irrigation apparatus. One option is to transfer the patient to a urology ward, but often there are outstanding medical issues that require continued specialist input. Here, we describe an improved system for delivering temporary bladder irrigation by utilizing readily available components and the novel modification of a sphygmomanometer blub. This option is good for bladder irrigation in patients with moderate or severe gross hematuria due to various causes. Materials and methods In this prospective study from March 2007 to April 2009, we used our new system in eligible cases. In this system, an irrigant bag with 1 L of normal saline was suspended 80 cm above the indwelled 3-way Foley catheter, and its drainage tube was inserted into the irrigant port of the catheter. To increase the flow rate of the irrigant system, we inserted a traditional sphygmomanometer bulb at the top of the irrigant bag. This closed system was used for continuous bladder irrigation (CBI) in patients who underwent open prostatectomy, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), or transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB). This high-pressure system is also used for irrigation during cystourethroscopy, internal urethrotomy, and transurethral lithotripsy. Our 831 eligible cases were divided into two groups: group 1 were endourologic cases and group 2 were open prostatectomy, TURP, and TURB cases. The maximum and average flow rates were evaluated. The efficacy of our new system was compared prospectively with the previous traditional system used in 545 cases. Results In group 1, we had clear vision at the time of endourologic procedures. The success rate of this system was 99.5%. In group 2, the incidence of clot retention decreased two fold in comparison to traditional gravity-dependent bladder flow system. These changes were statistically significant (P = 0.001). We did not observe any adverse effects such as bladder perforation due to our high-pressure, high-flow system. Conclusion A pressurized irrigant system has better visualization during endourologic procedures, and prevents clot formation after open prostatectomy, TURP, and TURB without any adverse effects. PMID:20957138

  4. Direct and remote constriction of membrane necks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božič, Bojan; Guven, Jemal; Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo; Svetina, Saša

    2014-05-01

    The physical properties of membrane necks are relevant in vesiculation, a process that plays an essential role in cellular physiology. Because the neck's radius is, in general, finite, membrane scission and the consequent pinching off of the vesicle can only occur if it is narrowed to permit the necessary membrane topological reformation. Here we examine, in a simple single phase lipid vesicle, how external forces can promote neck constriction not only by direct compression at the neck but also, counterintuitively, by dilation at remote locations. These results provide a new perspective on the role played by actin polymerization in the process of endocytosis.

  5. Ethnic differences in bladder cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Yee, David S.; Ishill, Nicole M.; Lowrance, William T.; Herr, Harry W.; Elkin, Elena B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Racial disparities in bladder cancer outcomes have been documented with poorer survival observed among blacks. Bladder cancer outcomes in other ethnic minority groups are less well described. We examined trends in bladder cancer survival among whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Asian/Pacific Islanders in the US over a 30-year period. Methods From the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer registry data, we identified patients diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder between 1975 and 2005. This cohort included 163,973 white, 7,731 black, 7,364 Hispanic and 5,934 Asian/Pacific Islander patients. We assessed the relationship between ethnicity and patient characteristics. Disease-specific 5-year survival was estimated for each ethnic group and for subgroups of stage and grade. Results Blacks presented with higher stage disease than whites, Hispanics and Asian/Pacific Islanders, although a trend toward earlier stage presentation was observed in all groups over time. Five-year disease-specific survival was consistently worse for blacks than for other ethnic groups, even when stratified by stage and grade. Five-year disease-specific survival was 82.8% in whites compared with 70.2% in blacks, 80.7% in Hispanics and 81.9% in Asian/Pacific Islanders. There was a persistent disease-specific survival disadvantage in black patients over time which was not seen in the other ethnic groups. Conclusions Ethnic disparities in bladder cancer survival persist between whites and blacks, while survival in other ethnic minority groups appears similar to that of whites. Further study of access to care, quality of care and treatment decision making among black patients is needed to better understand these disparities. PMID:21782222

  6. Muscles of the Head and Neck

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ureters Urinary Bladder Urethra Review Quiz Reproductive System Male Reproductive System Testes Duct System Accessory Glands Penis Male Sexual Response & Hormone Control Female Reproductive System Ovaries Genital Tract External Genitalia Female Sexual Response & ...

  7. Basic Surgical Techniques in the Göttingen Minipig: Intubation, Bladder Catheterization, Femoral Vessel Catheterization, and Transcardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Kaare S.; Glud, Andreas N.; Orlowski, Dariusz; Fitting, Lise M.; Meier, Kaare; Soerensen, Jens Christian; Bjarkam, Carsten R.; Alstrup, Aage K. Olsen

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of the Göttingen minipig in research of topics such as neuroscience, toxicology, diabetes, obesity, and experimental surgery reflects the close resemblance of these animals to human anatomy and physiology 1-6.The size of the Göttingen minipig permits the use of surgical equipment and advanced imaging modalities similar to those used in humans 6-8. The aim of this instructional video is to increase the awareness on the value of minipigs in biomedical research, by demonstrating how to perform tracheal intubation, transurethral bladder catheterization, femoral artery and vein catheterization, as well as transcardial perfusion. Endotracheal Intubation should be performed whenever a minipig undergoes general anesthesia, because it maintains a patent airway, permits assisted ventilation and protects the airways from aspirates. Transurethral bladder catheterization can provide useful information about about hydration state as well as renal and cardiovascular function during long surgical procedures. Furthermore, urinary catheterization can prevent contamination of delicate medico-technical equipment and painful bladder extension which may harm the animal and unnecessarily influence the experiment due to increased vagal tone and altered physiological parameters. Arterial and venous catheterization is useful for obtaining repeated blood samples and monitoring various physiological parameters. Catheterization of femoral vessels is preferable to catheterization of the neck vessels for ease of access, when performing experiments involving frame-based stereotaxic neurosurgery and brain imaging. When performing vessel catheterization in survival studies, strict aseptic technique must be employed to avoid infections6. Transcardial perfusion is the most effective fixation method, and yields preeminent results when preparing minipig organs for histology and histochemistry2,9. For more information about anesthesia, surgery and experimental techniques in swine in general we refer to Swindle 2007. Supplementary information about premedication and induction of anesthesia, assisted ventilation, analgesia, pre- and postoperative care of Göttingen minipigs are available via the internet at http://www.minipigs.com10. For extensive information about porcine anatomy we refer to Nickel et al. Vol. 1-511. PMID:21730947

  8. Afatinib inhibits proliferation and invasion and promotes apoptosis of the T24 bladder cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    TANG, YUNHUA; ZHANG, XIANGYANG; QI, FAN; CHEN, MINGFENG; LI, YUAN; LIU, LONGFEI; HE, WEI; LI, ZHUO; ZU, XIONGBING

    2015-01-01

    Afatinib is a highly selective, irreversible inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human EGFR 2 (HER-2). Although preclinical and clinical studies have indicated that afatinib has antitumor activity and clinical efficacy in non-small cell lung carcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and breast cancer, there are few studies investigating its inhibitory effect on human bladder carcinoma cells. In this study, the antitumor effect of afatinib was investigated on the T24 bladder cancer cell line. The T24 bladder cancer cell line was treated with afatinib at various concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10 and 20 µmol/l). MTT assay was used to estimate the proliferation of the T24 cells; flow cytometric analysis was used to estimate the effect of afatinib on T24 cell apoptosis; cell invasion ability was assessed by a Transwell invasion assay; and western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, Akt, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. The MTT assay demonstrated that afatinib inhibited the proliferation of T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the cell apoptosis rate increased as the concentration of afatinib increased. The cell invasion assay indicated that afatinib treatment significantly inhibited the invasive behavior of T24 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that with increasing afatinib concentrations, Bcl-2, phosphorylated (p)-ERK1/2, p-Akt, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression levels were significantly decreased, whereas total (t)-ERK1/2 and t-Akt expression levels remained basically unchanged, and Bax expression levels were greatly increased. The results indicate that afatinib inhibits the proliferation and invasion of T24 cells in vitro and induces the apoptosis of these cells by inhibiting the EGFR signaling network. PMID:26136904

  9. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  10. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are ... Being Treated With Radiation for Cancer in Your Head or Neck? If so, this booklet can help you. While ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  12. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  13. Stages of Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  14. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Coskun, H Hakan; Medina, Jesus E; Robbins, K Thomas; Silver, Carl E; Strojan, Primož; Teymoortash, Afshin; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Rodrigo, Juan P; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Shaha, Ashok R; Suárez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P; Hamoir, Marc; Pitman, Karen T; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2015-06-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsurgical modalities have been introduced, and, in many situations, have supplanted neck surgery. The refinements of imaging the neck based on the concept of neck level involvement has encouraged new philosophies to evolve that seem to benefit patient outcomes particularly as this relates to diminished morbidity. The purpose of this review was to highlight the new paradigms for surgical removal of neck metastases using an evidence-based approach. PMID:24623715

  15. Bladder wall thickness and ultrasound estimated bladder weight in healthy adults with portative ultrasound device

    PubMed Central

    Kanyilmaz, Selcen; Calis, Funda Atamaz; Cinar, Yasemin; Akkoc, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate bladder wall thickness (BWT) and ultrasound estimated bladder weight (UEBW) values in healthy population with a portative ultrasound device and their relationship with demographic parameters. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in Neurorehabilitation Clinic of Ege University Hospital. Ninety-five subjects (48 women and 47 men) aged between 18 and 56 were included in the study. BWT and UEBW were determined non-invasively with a portative ultrasound device; Bladder Scan BVM 6500 (Verathon Inc., WA, USA) at a frequency of 3.7 MHz at functional bladder capacity. These values were compared by gender, and their relation was assessed with age, body mass index (BMI) and parity. Results: Mean BWT was 2.0 ± 0.4 mm and UEBW was 44.6 ± 8.3 g at a mean volume of 338.0 ± 82.1 ml. Although higher results were obtained in men at higher bladder volumes, the results did not differ significantly by gender. Correlation analyses revealed statistically significant correlation between UEBW and age (r = 0.32). BWT was negatively correlated with volume (r = –0.50) and bladder surface area (r = –0.57). Also, statistically significant correlations were observed between UEBW and volume (r = 0.36), bladder surface area (r = 0.48) and BWT (r = 0.25). Conclusion: Determined values of BWT and UEBW in healthy population are estimated with portative ultrasound devices, which are future promising, for their convenient, easy, non-invasive, time-efficient hand-held use for screening. PMID:23914210

  16. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  17. Variable Patterned Pudendal Nerve Stimuli Improves Reflex Bladder Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Tim M.; Bhadra, Narendra; Gustafson, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated variable patterns of pudendal nerve (PN) stimuli for reflex bladder excitation. Reflex activation of the bladder has been demonstrated previously with 20–33 Hz continuous stimulation of PN afferents. Neuronal circuits accessed by afferent mediated pathways may respond better to physiological patterned stimuli than continuous stimulation. Unilateral PN nerve cuffs were placed in neurologically intact male cats. PN stimulation (0.5–100 Hz) was performed under isovolumetric conditions at bladder volumes up to the occurrence of distension evoked reflex contractions. Stimulus evoked reflex bladder contractions were elicited in eight cats. Across all experiments, bursting of 2–10 pulses at 100–200 Hz repeated at continuous stimulation frequencies evoked significantly larger bladder responses than continuous (single pulse) stimulation (52.0 ± 44.5%). Bladder excitation was also effective at 1 Hz continuous stimuli, which is lower than typically reported. Variable patterned pulse bursting resulted in greater evoked reflex bladder pressures and increased the potential stimulation parameter space for effective bladder excitation. Improved bladder excitation should increase the efficacy of neuroprostheses for bladder control. PMID:18403282

  18. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport. PMID:15911597

  19. Bladder Cancer: A Simple Model Becomes Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pierro, Giovanni Battista Di; Gulia, Caterina; Cristini, Cristiano; Fraietta, Giorgio; Marini, Lorenzo; Grande, Pietro; Gentile, Vincenzo; Piergentili, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in developed countries and it is also characterized by a high number of recurrences. Despite this, several authors in the past reported that only two altered molecular pathways may genetically explain all cases of bladder cancer: one involving the FGFR3 gene, and the other involving the TP53 gene. Mutations in any of these two genes are usually predictive of the malignancy final outcome. This cancer may also be further classified as low-grade tumors, which is always papillary and in most cases superficial, and high-grade tumors, not necessarily papillary and often invasive. This simple way of considering this pathology has strongly changed in the last few years, with the development of genome-wide studies on expression profiling and the discovery of small non-coding RNA affecting gene expression. An easy search in the OMIM (On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database using “bladder cancer” as a query reveals that genes in some way connected to this pathology are approximately 150, and some authors report that altered gene expression (up- or down-regulation) in this disease may involve up to 500 coding sequences for low-grade tumors and up to 2300 for high-grade tumors. In many clinical cases, mutations inside the coding sequences of the above mentioned two genes were not found, but their expression changed; this indicates that also epigenetic modifications may play an important role in its development. Indeed, several reports were published about genome-wide methylation in these neoplastic tissues, and an increasing number of small non-coding RNA are either up- or down-regulated in bladder cancer, indicating that impaired gene expression may also pass through these metabolic pathways. Taken together, these data reveal that bladder cancer is far to be considered a simple model of malignancy. In the present review, we summarize recent progress in the genome-wide analysis of bladder cancer, and analyse non-genetic, genetic and epigenetic factors causing extensive gene mis-regulation in malignant cells. PMID:23372425

  20. Preventable Sternocleidomastoid Muscular Atrophy after Neck Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nao; Sawai, Natsuko Yoshimura; Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ogura, Hide; Aikawa, Tomonao; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modified radical neck dissection (mRND) [preserving the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and the spinal accessory nerve] and supraomohyoid neck dissection have become common surgical procedures for treating head and neck cancer. Postoperative severe asymmetry of the neck and severe atrophy of the SCM, however, have been demonstrated. Methods: Using computed tomographic images, cross-sectional areas of the SCMs were measured in 99 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent unilateral mRND or supraomohyoid neck dissection. An asymmetry index was used. Results: Innervation to the SCM was preserved in 91 patients. The spinal accessory nerve and the innervation were sacrificed in 3 patients; the innervation was repaired in 5 patients. Sacrifice of innervation to the SCM resulted in extremely severe asymmetry. Repair of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 40%. Preservation of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 75% at the middle portion of the neck and in 56% at the lower portion after mRND. Conclusion: Preserving innervation to the SCM and gentle handling of the nerve during neck dissection could prevent severe asymmetry after neck dissection. PMID:26495217