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Sample records for blade fatigue life

  1. Uncertainty Analysis in Fatigue Life Prediction of Gas Turbine Blades Using Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Li, Jing; Peng, Weiwen; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates Bayesian model selection for fatigue life estimation of gas turbine blades considering model uncertainty and parameter uncertainty. Fatigue life estimation of gas turbine blades is a critical issue for the operation and health management of modern aircraft engines. Since lots of life prediction models have been presented to predict the fatigue life of gas turbine blades, model uncertainty and model selection among these models have consequently become an important issue in the lifecycle management of turbine blades. In this paper, fatigue life estimation is carried out by considering model uncertainty and parameter uncertainty simultaneously. It is formulated as the joint posterior distribution of a fatigue life prediction model and its model parameters using Bayesian inference method. Bayes factor is incorporated to implement the model selection with the quantified model uncertainty. Markov Chain Monte Carlo method is used to facilitate the calculation. A pictorial framework and a step-by-step procedure of the Bayesian inference method for fatigue life estimation considering model uncertainty are presented. Fatigue life estimation of a gas turbine blade is implemented to demonstrate the proposed method.

  2. Loading Analysis of Composite Wind Turbine Blade for Fatigue Life Prediction of Adhesively Bonded Root Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi-Majd, Davood; Azimzadeh, Vahid; Mohammadi, Bijan

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays wind energy is widely used as a non-polluting cost-effective renewable energy resource. During the lifetime of a composite wind turbine which is about 20 years, the rotor blades are subjected to different cyclic loads such as aerodynamics, centrifugal and gravitational forces. These loading conditions, cause to fatigue failure of the blade at the adhesively bonded root joint, where the highest bending moments will occur and consequently, is the most critical zone of the blade. So it is important to estimate the fatigue life of the root joint. The cohesive zone model is one of the best methods for prediction of initiation and propagation of debonding at the root joint. The advantage of this method is the possibility of modeling the debonding without any requirement to the remeshing. However in order to use this approach, it is necessary to analyze the cyclic loading condition at the root joint. For this purpose after implementing a cohesive interface element in the Ansys finite element software, one blade of a horizontal axis wind turbine with 46 m rotor diameter was modelled in full scale. Then after applying loads on the blade under different condition of the blade in a full rotation, the critical condition of the blade is obtained based on the delamination index and also the load ratio on the root joint in fatigue cycles is calculated. These data are the inputs for fatigue damage growth analysis of the root joint by using CZM approach that will be investigated in future work.

  3. Vortex-induced vibration effect on fatigue life estimate of turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. L.; Leung, R. C. K.; So, R. M. C.

    2007-11-01

    An analysis of a turbine blade fatigue life that includes the physics of fluid-structure interaction on the high cycle fatigue (HCF) life estimate of turbine blades is carried out. The rotor wake excitation is modeled by rows of Karman vortices superimposed on an inviscid uniform flow. The vortex-induced vibration problem is modeled by a linear cascade composed of five turbine blades and the coupled Euler and structural dynamics equations are numerically solved using a time-marching boundary element technique. The analysis can be applied to any blade geometries; it is not limited to the blade geometry considered here. Two major design parameters have been identified; the ratio of blade spacing to blade chord length s/ c of the stator, and the normalized frequency parameter c/ d which is related to the wake passing frequency of the rotor. For a rigid cascade, it is found that aerodynamic resonance prevails at the resonant c/ d values corresponding to an isolated blade while s/ c is responsible for the level of the aerodynamic response. If the central blades were elastic, the parameter s/ c plays a different role in the fluid-structure interaction problem. With a c/ d that could lead to structural resonance for an isolated blade, changing s/ c would stabilize the aerodynamic and structural response of the elastic blade in a cascade. On the contrary, an improper choice of s/ c might turn the elastic blade response into structural resonance even though the oncoming c/ d is non-resonant. The results of the nonlinear effects of c/ d and s/ c could be used together with the Campbell diagram to obtain an improved HCF design of rotor-stator pair.

  4. Turbine blade thermal fatigue testing Pratt and Whitney aircraft hollow core blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, J.; Gross, L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of low cycle fatigue testing on turbine blades for use in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engines is presented. Cored blade and cored blades with circulation were tested in the MSFC thermal fatigue tester. Both blade configurations showed significant low cycle fatigue life improvements when compared to baseline solid blades.

  5. Structural fatigue test results for large wind turbine blade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to provide quantitative information on the operating life capabilities of wind turbine rotor blade concepts for root-end load transfer, a series of cantilever beam fatigue tests was conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted on a laminated wood blade with bonded steel studs, a low cost steel spar (utility pole) with a welded flange, a utility pole with additional root-end thickness provided by a swaged collar, fiberglass spars with both bonded and nonbonded fittings, and, finally, an aluminum blade with a bolted steel fitting (Lockheed Mod-0 blade). Photographs, data, and conclusions for each of these tests are presented. In addition, the aluminum blade test results are compared to field failure information; these results provide evidence that the cantilever beam type of fatigue test is a satisfactory method for obtaining qualitative data on blade life expectancy and for identifying structurally underdesigned areas (hot spots).

  6. Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric Structure

    E-print Network

    Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric University MCARE 2012 #12;Outline · Overview of MSU Fatigue Program on Wind Blade MaterialsWind Blade Wind Blade Component Materials Acknowledgements: Sandia National Laboratories/DOE (Joshua Paquette

  7. Determination of Turbine Blade Life from Engine Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2012-01-01

    It is probable that no two engine companies determine the life of their engines or their components in the same way or apply the same experience and safety factors to their designs. Knowing the failure mode that is most likely to occur minimizes the amount of uncertainty and simplifies failure and life analysis. Available data regarding failure mode for aircraft engine blades, while favoring low-cycle, thermal mechanical fatigue as the controlling mode of failure, are not definitive. Sixteen high-pressure turbine (HPT) T-1 blade sets were removed from commercial aircraft engines that had been commercially flown by a single airline and inspected for damage. Each set contained 82 blades. The damage was cataloged into three categories related to their mode of failure: (1) Thermal-mechanical fatigue, (2) Oxidation/Erosion, and (3) "Other." From these field data, the turbine blade life was determined as well as the lives related to individual blade failure modes using Johnson-Weibull analysis. A simplified formula for calculating turbine blade life and reliability was formulated. The L(sub 10) blade life was calculated to be 2427 cycles (11 077 hr). The resulting blade life attributed to oxidation/erosion equaled that attributed to thermal-mechanical fatigue. The category that contributed most to blade failure was Other. If there were there no blade failures attributed to oxidation/erosion and thermal-mechanical fatigue, the overall blade L(sub 10) life would increase approximately 11 to 17 percent.

  8. Jumplike fatigue crack growth in compressor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limar', L. V.; Demina, Yu. A.; Botvina, L. R.

    2014-04-01

    It is shown that power relations between the two main fractographic characteristics of fracture surfaces forming during jumplike fatigue crack growth, namely, the crack depth and the corresponding crack front length, can be used to estimate the fracture stress during vibration tests of the compressor blades of an aviation gas turbine engine, which are made of VT3-1 titanium alloy.

  9. Determination of Turbine Blade Life from Engine Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2013-01-01

    It is probable that no two engine companies determine the life of their engines or their components in the same way or apply the same experience and safety factors to their designs. Knowing the failure mode that is most likely to occur minimizes the amount of uncertainty and simplifies failure and life analysis. Available data regarding failure mode for aircraft engine blades, while favoring low-cycle, thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) as the controlling mode of failure, are not definitive. Sixteen high-pressure turbine (HPT) T-1 blade sets were removed from commercial aircraft engines that had been commercially flown by a single airline and inspected for damage. Each set contained 82 blades. The damage was cataloged into three categories related to their mode of failure: (1) TMF, (2) Oxidation/erosion (O/E), and (3) Other. From these field data, the turbine blade life was determined as well as the lives related to individual blade failure modes using Johnson-Weibull analysis. A simplified formula for calculating turbine blade life and reliability was formulated. The L10 blade life was calculated to be 2427 cycles (11 077 hr). The resulting blade life attributed to O/E equaled that attributed to TMF. The category that contributed most to blade failure was Other. If there were no blade failures attributed to O/E and TMF, the overall blade L(sub 10) life would increase approximately 11 to 17 percent.

  10. Fatigue Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, J.; van Dam, J.; Hughes, S.; Johnson, J.

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue testing was conducted on Carbon Experimental and Twist-Bend Experimental (CX-100 and TX-100) 9-m wind turbine research blades. The CX-100 blade was designed to investigate the use of a carbon spar cap to reduce weight and increase stiffness while being incorporated using conventional manufacturing techniques. The TX-100 blade used carbon in the outboard portion of the skin to produce twist-bend coupling to passively alleviate aerodynamic loads. In the fatigue tests, the CX-100 blade was loaded by a single hydraulic cylinder while the TX-100 blade was loaded via a hydraulically-actuated resonant loading system called the Universal Resonant Exciter. The blades were outfitted with approximately 30 strain gages as well as displacement and load sensors. Both blades survived to cycle counts sufficient to demonstrate a 20-year operational life. The CX-100 blade failed at approximately 1.6 million cycles because of a buckle and crack that formed and grew just outboard of max-chord. The TX-100 blade failed because of a crack that grew from the termination point of the spar cap at the midspan of the blade. This paper covers the results of the fatigue tests.

  11. Approach to the fatigue analysis of vertical-axis wind-turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.S.

    1981-09-01

    A cursory analysis of the stress history of wind turbine blades indicates that a single stress level at each wind speed does not adequately describe the blade stress history. A statistical description is required. Blade stress data collected from the DOE/ALCOA Low Cost experimental turbines indicate that the Rayleigh probability density function adequately describes the distribution of vibratory stresses at each wind speed. The Rayleigh probability density function allows the distribution of vibratory stresses to be described by the RMS of the stress vs. time signal. With the RMS stress level described for all wind speeds, the complete stress history of the turbine blades is known. Miner's linear cumulative damage rule is used as a basis for summing the fatigue damage over all operating conditions. An analytical expression is derived to predict blade fatigue life.

  12. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Fatigue Failure of Single Crystal Nickel Base Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2000-01-01

    High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas-turbine engines is a pervasive problem affecting a wide range of components and materials. HCF is currently the primary cause of component failures in gas turbine aircraft engines. Turbine blades in high performance aircraft and rocket engines are increasingly being made of single crystal nickel superalloys. Single-crystal Nickel-base superalloys were developed to provide superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys previously used in the production of turbine blades and vanes. Currently the most widely used single crystal turbine blade superalloys are PWA 1480/1493 and PWA 1484. These alloys play an important role in commercial, military and space propulsion systems. PWA1493, identical to PWA1480, but with tighter chemical constituent control, is used in the NASA SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) alternate turbopump, a liquid hydrogen fueled rocket engine. Objectives for this paper are motivated by the need for developing failure criteria and fatigue life evaluation procedures for high temperature single crystal components, using available fatigue data and finite element modeling of turbine blades. Using the FE (finite element) stress analysis results and the fatigue life relations developed, the effect of variation of primary and secondary crystal orientations on life is determined, at critical blade locations. The most advantageous crystal orientation for a given blade design is determined. Results presented demonstrates that control of secondary and primary crystallographic orientation has the potential to optimize blade design by increasing its resistance to fatigue crack growth without adding additional weight or cost.

  13. Implementation of a Biaxial Resonant Fatigue Test Method on a Large Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Snowberg, D.; Dana, S.; Hughes, S.; Berling, P.

    2014-09-01

    A biaxial resonant test method was utilized to simultaneously fatigue test a wind turbine blade in the flap and edge (lead-lag) direction. Biaxial resonant blade fatigue testing is an accelerated life test method utilizing oscillating masses on the blade; each mass is independently oscillated at the respective flap and edge blade resonant frequency. The flap and edge resonant frequency were not controlled, nor were they constant for this demonstrated test method. This biaxial resonant test method presented surmountable challenges in test setup simulation, control and data processing. Biaxial resonant testing has the potential to complete test projects faster than single-axis testing. The load modulation during a biaxial resonant test may necessitate periodic load application above targets or higher applied test cycles.

  14. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Fatigue Failure of Single Crystal Nickel Base Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, N. K.; Swanson, G.

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades is a pervasive problem. Single crystal nickel turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines throughout industry because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. Currently the most widely used single crystal turbine blade superalloys are PWA 1480/1493, PWA 1484, RENE' N-5 and CMSX-4. These alloys play an important role in commercial, military and space propulsion systems. Single crystal materials have highly orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. The failure modes of single crystal turbine blades are complicated to predict due to the material orthotropy and variations in crystal orientations. Fatigue life estimation of single crystal turbine blades represents an important aspect of durability assessment. It is therefore of practical interest to develop effective fatigue failure criteria for single crystal nickel alloys and to investigate the effects of variation of primary and secondary crystal orientation on fatigue life. A fatigue failure criterion based on the maximum shear stress amplitude /Delta(sub tau)(sub max))] on the 24 octahedral and 6 cube slip systems, is presented for single crystal nickel superalloys (FCC crystal). This criterion reduces the scatter in uniaxial LCF test data considerably for PWA 1493 at 1200 F in air. Additionally, single crystal turbine blades used in the alternate advanced high-pressure fuel turbopump (AHPFTP/AT) are modeled using a large-scale three-dimensional finite element model. This finite element model is capable of accounting for material orthotrophy and variation in primary and secondary crystal orientation. Effects of variation in crystal orientation on blade stress response are studied based on 297 finite element model runs. Fatigue lives at critical points in the blade are computed using finite element stress results and the failure criterion developed. Stress analysis results in the blade attachment region are also presented. Results presented demonstrates that control of secondary and primary crystallographic orientation has the potential to significantly increase a component S resistance to fatigue crack growth with- out adding additional weight or cost. [DOI: 10.1115/1.1413767

  15. Space Shuttle main engine powerhead structural modeling, stress and fatigue life analysis. Volume 2: Dynamics of blades and nozzles SSME HPFTP and HPOTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammett, J. C.; Hayes, C. H.; Price, J. M.; Robinson, J. K.; Teal, G. A.; Thomson, J. M.; Tilley, D. M.; Welch, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Normal modes of the blades and nozzles of the HPFTP and HPOTP are defined and potential driving forces for the blades are identified. The computer models used in blade analyses are described, with results. Similar information is given for the nozzles.

  16. Space Shuttle main engine powerhead structural modeling, stress and fatigue life analysis. Volume 3: Stress summay of blades and nozzles at FPL and 115 percent RPL loads. SSME HPFTP and HPOTP blades and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammett, J. C.; Hayes, C. H.; Price, J. M.; Robinson, J. K.; Teal, G. A.; Thomson, J. M.; Tilley, D. M.; Welch, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Gasdynamic environments applied to the turbine blades and nozzles of the HPFTP and HPOTP were analyzed. Centrifugal loads were applied to blades to account for the pump rotation of FPL and 115 percent RPL. The computer models used in the blade analysis with results presented in the form of temperature and stress contour plots are described. Similar information is given for the nozzles.

  17. High-cycle fatigue design evolution and experience of free-standing combustion turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Scalzo, A.J. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents the evolution of the combustion turbine blade high cycle fatigue design criteria for free-standing blades. It also presents the analysis and corrective actions taken to resolve several unique combustion turbine blade fatigue problems, all encountered over a 35-year period. Included are high-cycle fatigue problems due to cooling air leakage, seal pin friction, and combustion temperature maldistribution, as well as flow-induced nonsynchronous vibration.

  18. Fatigue life of laser cut metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted to determine the actual reduction in fatigue life due to weight removal for balancing by: hand grinding, low power (20 watt) Nd:glass laser, and high power (400 watt) Nd:YAG laser.

  19. Structural changes and damage of single-crystal turbine blades during life tests of an aviation gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospennikova, O. G.; Orlov, M. R.; Kolodochkina, V. G.; Nazarkin, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    The irreversible structural changes of the single-crystal ZhS32-VI nickel superalloy blades of a high-pressure turbine that occur during life tests of a gas turbine engine are studied. The main operation damages in the hottest section of the blade airfoil are found to be the fracture of the heat-resistant coating in the leading edge and the formation of thermomechanical fatigue cracks. The possibility of reconditioning repair of the blades is considered.

  20. A real time neural net estimator of fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, T.; Merrill, W.

    1990-01-01

    A neural net architecture is proposed to estimate, in real-time, the fatigue life of mechanical components, as part of the Intelligent Control System for Reusable Rocket Engines. Arbitrary component loading values were used as input to train a two hidden-layer feedforward neural net to estimate component fatigue damage. The ability of the net to learn, based on a local strain approach, the mapping between load sequence and fatigue damage has been demonstrated for a uniaxial specimen. Because of its demonstrated performance, the neural computation may be extended to complex cases where the loads are biaxial or triaxial, and the geometry of the component is complex (e.g., turbopump blades). The generality of the approach is such that load/damage mappings can be directly extracted from experimental data without requiring any knowledge of the stress/strain profile of the component. In addition, the parallel network architecture allows real-time life calculations even for high frequency vibrations. Owing to its distributed nature, the neural implementation will be robust and reliable, enabling its use in hostile environments such as rocket engines. This neural net estimator of fatigue life is seen as the enabling technology to achieve component life prognosis, and therefore would be an important part of life extending control for reusable rocket engines.

  1. Mixed Mode Static and Fatigue Crack Growth in Wind Blade Paste Adhesives

    E-print Network

    1 Mixed Mode Static and Fatigue Crack Growth in Wind Blade Paste Adhesives Daniel D. Samborsky and fatigue crack growth in thick adhesive joints with fiberglass laminate adherends, for three adhesive-tension and reversed loading. Comparisons of the three adhesives are given in terms of crack growth characteristics

  2. Effects of Glass Fabric and Laminate Construction on the Fatigue of Resin Infused Blade Materials

    E-print Network

    Effects of Glass Fabric and Laminate Construction on the Fatigue of Resin Infused Blade Materials fabrics with epoxy resins over a range of fiber contents. Significant improvements in tensile fatigue on fabric architecture and stitching details. All stitched fabric laminates show a transition to lower

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF A MOBILE OSCILLATORY FATIGUE OPERATOR FOR WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoo, P.E.; Cotrell, J.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory testing of wind turbine blades is required to meet wind turbine design standards, reduce machine cost, and reduce the technical and fi nancial risks of deploying mass-produced wind turbine models. Fatigue testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is currently conducted using Universal Resonance Excitation (UREX) technology. In a UREX test, the blade is mounted to a rigid stand and hydraulic exciters mounted to the blade are used to excite the blade to its resonant frequency. A drawback to UREX technology is that mounting hydraulic systems to the blade is diffi cult and requires a relatively long set-up period. An alternative testing technology called the Mobile Oscillatory Fatigue Operator (MOFO) has been analyzed. The MOFO uses an oscillating blade test-stand rather than a rigid stand, avoiding the need to place hydraulic systems on the blade. The MOFO will be demonstrated by converting an existing test-stand at the NWTC to an oscillating stand that can test blades up to 25 m in length. To obtain the loads necessary to design the MOFO, the system motion is modeled using rigid body and lumped mass dynamics models. Preliminary modeling indicates the existing stand can be converted to a MOFO relatively easily. However, the blade dynamic models suggest that blade bending moment distributions are signifi cantly different for UREX and MOFO testing; more sophisticated models are required to assess the implication of this difference on the accuracy of the test.

  4. High Sensitive Methods for Health Monitoring of Compressor Blades and Fatigue Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wito?, Miros?aw

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostic and research aspects of compressor blade fatigue detection have been elaborated in the paper. The real maintenance and overhaul problems and characteristic of different modes of metal blade fatigue (LCF, HCF, and VHCF) have been presented. The polycrystalline defects and impurities influencing the fatigue, along with their related surface finish techniques, are taken into account. The three experimental methods of structural health assessment are considered. The metal magnetic memory (MMM), experimental modal analysis (EMA) and tip timing (TTM) methods provide information on the damage of diagnosed objects, for example, compressor blades. Early damage symptoms, that is, magnetic and modal properties of material strengthening and weakening phases (change of local dislocation density and grain diameter, increase of structural and magnetic anisotropy), have been described. It has been proven that the shape of resonance characteristic gives abilities to determine if fatigue or a blade crack is concerned. The capabilities of the methods for steel and titanium alloy blades have been illustrated in examples from active and passive experiments. In the conclusion, the MMM, EMA, and TTM have been verified, and the potential for reliable diagnosis of the compressor blades using this method has been confirmed. PMID:24191135

  5. Multiscale Fatigue Life Prediction for Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life prediction capabilities have been incorporated into the HyperSizer Composite Analysis and Structural Sizing Software. The fatigue damage model is introduced at the fiber/matrix constituent scale through HyperSizer s coupling with NASA s MAC/GMC micromechanics software. This enables prediction of the micro scale damage progression throughout stiffened and sandwich panels as a function of cycles leading ultimately to simulated panel failure. The fatigue model implementation uses a cycle jumping technique such that, rather than applying a specified number of additional cycles, a specified local damage increment is specified and the number of additional cycles to reach this damage increment is calculated. In this way, the effect of stress redistribution due to damage-induced stiffness change is captured, but the fatigue simulations remain computationally efficient. The model is compared to experimental fatigue life data for two composite facesheet/foam core sandwich panels, demonstrating very good agreement.

  6. Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue of in-service air-engine blades, compressor and turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanyavskiy, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    In-service Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue (VHCF) regime of compressor vane and turbine rotor blades of the Al-based alloy VD-17 and superalloy GS6K, respectively, was considered. Surface crack origination occurred at the lifetime more than 1500 hours for vanes and after 550 hours for turbine blades. Performed fractographic investigations have shown that subsurface crack origination in vanes took place inspite of corrosion pittings on the blade surface. This material behavior reflected lifetime limit that was reached by the criterion VHCF. In superalloy GS6K subsurface fatigue cracking took place with the appearance of flat facet. This phenomenon was discussed and compared with specimens cracking of the same superalloy but prepared by the powder technology. In turbine blades VHCF regime appeared because of resonance of blades under the influenced gas stream. Both cases of compressor-vanes and turbine blades in-service cracking were discussed with crack growth period and stress equivalent estimations. Recommendations to continue aircrafts airworthiness were made for in-service blades.

  7. Constitutive and life modeling of single crystal blade alloys for root attachment analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, T. G.; Mccarthy, G. J.; Favrow, L. H.; Anton, D. L.; Bak, Joe

    1988-01-01

    Work to develop fatigue life prediction and constitutive models for uncoated attachment regions of single crystal gas turbine blades is described. At temperatures relevant to attachment regions, deformation is dominated by slip on crystallographic planes. However, fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth are not always observed to be crystallographic. The influence of natural occurring microporosity will be investigated by testing both hot isostatically pressed and conventionally cast PWA 1480 single crystal specimens. Several differnt specimen configurations and orientations relative to the natural crystal axes are being tested to investigate the influence of notch acuity and the material's anisotropy. Global and slip system stresses in the notched regions were determined from three dimensional stress analyses and will be used to develop fatigue life prediction models consistent with the observed lives and crack characteristics.

  8. Analysis of SNL/MSU/DOE fatigue database trends for wind turbine blade materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, John F.; Ashwill, Thomas D.; Wilson, Timothy J.; Sears, Aaron T.; Agastra, Pancasatya; Laird, Daniel L.; Samborsky, Daniel D.

    2010-12-01

    This report presents an analysis of trends in fatigue results from the Montana State University program on the fatigue of composite materials for wind turbine blades for the period 2005-2009. Test data can be found in the SNL/MSU/DOE Fatigue of Composite Materials Database which is updated annually. This is the fifth report in this series, which summarizes progress of the overall program since its inception in 1989. The primary thrust of this program has been research and testing of a broad range of structural laminate materials of interest to blade structures. The report is focused on current types of infused and prepreg blade materials, either processed in-house or by industry partners. Trends in static and fatigue performance are analyzed for a range of materials, geometries and loading conditions. Materials include: sixteen resins of three general types, five epoxy based paste adhesives, fifteen reinforcing fabrics including three fiber types, three prepregs, many laminate lay-ups and process variations. Significant differences in static and fatigue performance and delamination resistance are quantified for particular materials and process conditions. When blades do fail, the likely cause is fatigue in the structural detail areas or at major flaws. The program is focused strongly on these issues in addition to standard laminates. Structural detail tests allow evaluation of various blade materials options in the context of more realistic representations of blade structure than do the standard test methods. Types of structural details addressed in this report include ply drops used in thickness tapering, and adhesive joints, each tested over a range of fatigue loading conditions. Ply drop studies were in two areas: (1) a combined experimental and finite element study of basic ply drop delamination parameters for glass and carbon prepreg laminates, and (2) the development of a complex structured resin-infused coupon including ply drops, for comparison studies of various resins, fabrics and pry drop thicknesses. Adhesive joint tests using typical blade adhesives included both generic testing of materials parameters using a notched-lap-shear test geometry developed in this study, and also a series of simulated blade web joint geometries fabricated by an industry partner.

  9. Full-scale fatigue tests of CX-100 wind turbine blades. Part II: analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Jeong, Hyomi; Jang, Jae Kyeong; Park, Gyuhae; Farinholt, Kevin M.; Todd, Michael D.; Ammerman, Curtt M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the initial analysis results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to two 9- meter CX-100 wind turbine blades subjected to fatigue loading at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The first blade was a pristine blade, manufactured to standard CX-100 design specifications. The second blade was manufactured for the University of Massachusetts, Lowell (UMass), with intentional simulated defects within the fabric layup. Each blade was instrumented with a variety of sensors on its surface. The blades were subject to harmonic excitation at their first natural frequency with steadily increasing loading until ultimately reaching failure. Data from the sensors were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured at multi-scale frequency ranges using a variety of data acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and prototype data acquisition hardware. The data were analyzed to identify fatigue damage initiation and to assess damage progression. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions in time and frequency domains, and wave propagation methods were applied to assess the condition of the turbine blade. The analysis methods implemented were evaluated in conjunction with hardware-specific performance for their efficacy in enabling the assessment of damage progression in the blade. The results of this assessment will inform the selection of specific data to be collected and analysis methods to be implemented for a CX-100 flight test to be conducted in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) in Bushland, Texas.

  10. Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Farinholt, Kevin M.; Jeong, Hyomi; Jang, JaeKyung; Park, Gyu Hae; Todd, Michael D.; Farrar, Charles R.; Ammerman, Curtt N.

    2012-06-28

    This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

  11. Fatigue testing of low-cost fiberglass composite wind turbine blade materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, K. E.; Bennett, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The static and fatigue behavior of transverse filament tape (TFT) fiberglass/epoxy and TFT/polyester composites was established by the testing of specimens cut from panels fabricated by a filament winding process used for the construction of large experimental wind turbine blades.

  12. AIAA-2003-0692 NEW FATIGUE DATA FOR W IND TURBINE BLADE M ATERIALS

    E-print Network

    1 AIAA-2003-0692 NEW FATIGUE DATA FOR W IND TURBINE BLADE M ATERIALS John F. Mandell, Daniel D to the wind turbine industry in several areas: (a) very high cycle S-N data; (b) refined Goodman Diagram; (c the expected cycle range for turbines. While the data cannot be used directly in design due to the specialized

  13. Considerations concerning fatigue life of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, V. M.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1993-01-01

    Since metal matrix composites (MMC) are composed from two very distinct materials each having their own physical and mechanical properties, it is feasible that the fatigue resistance depends on the strength of the weaker constituent. Based on this assumption, isothermal fatigue lives of several MMC's were analyzed utilizing a fatigue life diagram approach. For each MMC, the fatigue life diagram was quantified using the mechanical properties of its constituents. The fatigue life regions controlled by fiber fracture and matrix were also quantitatively defined.

  14. A real time neural net estimator of fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, T.; Merrill, W.

    1990-01-01

    A neural network architecture is proposed to estimate, in real-time, the fatigue life of mechanical components, as part of the intelligent Control System for Reusable Rocket Engines. Arbitrary component loading values were used as input to train a two hidden-layer feedforward neural net to estimate component fatigue damage. The ability of the net to learn, based on a local strain approach, the mapping between load sequence and fatigue damage has been demonstrated for a uniaxial specimen. Because of its demonstrated performance, the neural computation may be extended to complex cases where the loads are biaxial or triaxial, and the geometry of the component is complex (e.g., turbopumps blades). The generality of the approach is such that load/damage mappings can be directly extracted from experimental data without requiring any knowledge of the stress/strain profile of the component. In addition, the parallel network architecture allows real-time life calculations even for high-frequency vibrations. Owing to its distributed nature, the neural implementation will be robust and reliable, enabling its use in hostile environments such as rocket engines.

  15. Conductor fatigue life research. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, G.E.

    1983-11-01

    Objective of this Phase II work was to experimentally evaluate the long-term effectiveness of amplitude reductions in arresting the aeolian fatigue deterioration of minimally damaged ACSR conductors supported in standard short-radius suspension clamps. The aeolian vibration was simulated by mechanical means in a controlled laboratory situation and the reduction in vibration amplitudes was a simulation of the addition of amplitude limiting devices (dampers). Conductors were vibrated at high amplitudes until a predetermined number of strand breaks occurred, after which the vibration was continued at reduced amplitudes. The Phase II research expanded the number of cycles of vibration and amplitude reduction values for the conductors used in the Phase I effort. The results indicated that the amplitude reductions arrested long-term fatigue strand breaks in every case tested. Additionally, the maximum fatigue damage arrestment amplitude was expanded and evaluated to be 20 mils at the 3-1/2 inch location for Drake ACSR conductor. Electric utilities can utilize the results of this EPRI project in assessing the fatigue life of minimally damaged transmission lines and in evaluating techniques for mitigating fatigue damage. A secondary objective of the Phase II effort was to develop aeolian vibration Load-N curves (dynamic bending stress versus number of cycles of vibration curves) for some ACSR conductors based on Ontario-Hydro recorder and wind data. The wind data generated Load-N curves developed appear to be too conservative. The modified worst-case Ontario-Hydro recorder Load-N curve developed is recommended as a design guideline curve for aeolian fatigue troubled lines in Georgia. The development and use of Load-N curves in conjunction with S-N curves are required for rational aeolian fatigue design of overhead conductors, and for estimating line fatigue lives.

  16. Fatigue, Creep-Fatigue, and Thermomechanical Fatigue Life Testing of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; McGaw, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack initiation resistance of an alloy is determined by conducting a series of tests over a range of values of stress amplitude or strain range. The observed number of cycles to failure is plotted against the stress amplitude or strain range to obtain a fatigue curve. The fatigue properties quoted for an alloy are typically the constants used in the equation(s) that describe the fatigue curve. Fatigue lives of interest may be as low as 10(exp 2) or higher than 10(exp 9) cycles. Because of the enormous scatter associated with fatigue, dozens of tests may be needed to confidently establish a fatigue curve, and the cost may run into several thousands of dollars. To further establish the effects on fatigue life of the test temperature, environment, alloy condition, mean stress effects, creep-fatigue effects, thermomechanical cycling, etc. requires an extraordinarily large and usually very costly test matrix. The total effort required to establish the fatigue resistance of an alloy should not be taken lightly. Fatigue crack initiation tests are conducted on relatively small and presumed to be initially crack-free, samples of an alloy that are intended to be representative of the alloy's metallurgical and physical condition. Generally, samples are smooth and have uniformly polished surfaces within the test section. Some may have intentionally machined notches of well-controlled geometry, but the surface at the root of the notch is usually not polished. The purpose of polishing is to attain a reproducible surface finish. This is to eliminate surface finish as an uncontrolled variable. Representative test specimen geometries will be discussed later. Test specimens are cyclically loaded until macroscopically observable cracks initiate and eventually grow to failure. Normally, the fatigue failure life of a specimen is defined as the number of cycles to separation of the specimen into two pieces. Alternative definitions are becoming more common, particularly for low-cycle fatigue testing, wherein some prescribed indication of impending failure due to cracking is adopted. Specific criteria will be described later. As a rule, cracks that develop during testing are not measured nor are the test parameters intentionally altered owing to the presence of cracking.

  17. The relationship between observed fatigue damage and life estimation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurath, Peter; Socie, Darrell F.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the surface of laboratory specimens subjected to axial and torsional fatigue loadings has resulted in the identification of three damage fatigue phenomena: crack nucleation, shear crack growth, and tensile crack growth. Material, microstructure, state of stress/strain, and loading amplitude all influence which of the three types of fatigue damage occurs during a dominant fatigue life fraction. Fatigue damage maps are employed to summarize the experimental observations. Appropriate bulk stress/strain damage parameters are suggested to model fatigue damage for the dominant fatigue life fraction. Extension of the damage map concept to more complex loadings is presented.

  18. Selection of Wind Turbine Blade Materials for Fatigue Resistance

    E-print Network

    -ParameterPower Law and Three-Parameter #12;ISSUE: Fiber ChoiceISSUE: Fiber Choice · E-glass and similar compositions Represent Test Data #12;S-N Fatigue, Constant Amplitude, Load Control, Showing Three Curve Fit Equations (Power Law Most Common)q ( ) #12;Statistical Confidence Limit Representation, Power Law and Three

  19. On the impact of variability and assembly on turbine blade cooling flow and oxidation life

    E-print Network

    Sidwell, Carroll Vincent, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    The life of a turbine blade is dependent on the quantity and temperature of the cooling flow sup- plied to the blade. The focus of this thesis is the impact of variability on blade cooling flow and, subsequently, its impact ...

  20. Fatigue life prediction of bonded primary joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The validation of a proposed fatigue life prediction methodology was sought through the use of aluminum butt and scarf joint and graphite/epoxy butt joint specimens in a constant amplitude fatigue environment. The structural properties of the HYSOL 9313 adhesive system were obtained by mechanical test of molded heat adhesive specimens. Aluminum contoured double cantilever beam specimens were used to generate crack velocity versus stress intensity factor data. The specific objectives were: (1) to ascertain the feasibility of predicting fatigue failure of an adhesive in a primary bonded composite structure by incorporating linear elastic crack growth behavior; and (2) to ascertain if acoustic emission and/or compliance measurement techniques can be used to detect flaws.

  1. Fatigue Life of Superalloy Haynes 188 in Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Webster, H.; Ribeiro, G.; Gorman, T.; Gayda, J.

    2012-08-01

    The effects of hydrogen and surface finish on the mean low cycle fatigue life of Haynes 188 were studied. Specimens were prepared and fatigue tested with gage sections having low stress ground (LSG) and electro-discharge machined (EDM) surfaces. Fatigue tests were performed at temperatures of 25 to 650 °C with varied strain conditions, in hydrogen and helium environments. Fatigue life decreased with increasing strain range, strain ratio, temperature, and with hydrogen atmosphere. A Smith-Watson-Topper stress parameter could be used to account for variations in strain range and strain ratio, and most strongly influenced life. Hydrogen reduced fatigue life by about 5× (80%) at 25 °C, but was much less harmful at 650 °C. Standard EDM finish did not consistently reduce mean fatigue life from that of LSG finish specimens. Additional tests indicated fatigue life in hydrogen was maintained for varied EDM conditions, provided specimen roughness and maximum recast layer thickness were not excessive.

  2. Static and Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbine Blades Subject to Cold Weather Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo Gallardo, Patricio Andres

    Canada has aggressive targets for introducing wind energy across the country, but also faces challenges in achieving these goals due to the harsh Canadian climate. One issue which has received little attention in other countries not experiencing these extremes is the behaviour of composite blades in winter conditions. The scope of the work presented is to analyze the static stresses and fatigue response in cold climates using finite element models of the blade. The work opens with a quantification of the extremes of cold experienced in candidate Canadian wind turbine deployment locations. The thesis then narrows its focus to a consideration of the stresses in the root of the composite blades, specifically two common blade-hub connection methods: embedded root carrots and T-bolts. Finite element models of the root are proposed to properly simulate boundary conditions, applied loading and thermal stresses for a 1.5 MW wind turbine. It is shown that the blade root is strongly affected by the thermal stresses caused by the mismatch and orthotrophy of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the blade root constituents. Fatigue analysis of a blade is then presented using temperature dependent material properties including estimated fatigue coefficients.It was found that the natural frequencies of a 1.5 MW wind turbine blade are not significantly altered at cold temperatures. Additionally, cold temperatures slightly increase stresses in the composite blade skin when the blade is loaded, due to an increase in stiffness. Cold temperatures also lead to higher cyclic flapwise bending moments acting on the blade. However, this increase was found not to affect the lifetime fatigue damage. Finally, it was found that the cold climate as seen in Canada improves the fatigue strength of the saturated composite materials used in the blade. The predicted fatigue damage of the triaxial fabric and the spar cap layers in cold climates was therefore predicted to be half that of the fatigue damage at room temperature. This is caused solely by the temperature dependence of the fatigue coefficient b which requires further experimental verification to validate the numerical results of the current study.

  3. Fatigue life and crack growth prediction methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model and life-prediction code to predict fatigue crack growth and fatigue lives of metallic materials are reviewed. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta(K(sub eff))) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta(K(sub eff))-rate relations were needed in the near threshold regime to fit small-crack growth rate behavior and endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and in some cases total fatigue lives, for several aluminum and titanium alloys under constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude, and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  4. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2001-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of composite structures based on fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element (FE) analyses. To demonstrate the approach, predicted results were compared to fatigue tests performed on specimens which represented a tapered composite flange bonded onto a composite skin. In a first step, tension tests were performed to evaluate the debonding mechanisms between the flange and the skin. In a second step, a 2D FE model was developed to analyze the tests. To predict matrix cracking onset, the relationship between the tension load and the maximum principal stresses transverse to the fiber direction was determined through FE analysis. Transverse tension fatigue life data were used to -enerate an onset fatigue life P-N curve for matrix cracking. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. In a third step, a fracture mechanics approach based on FE analysis was used to determine the relationship between the tension load and the critical energy release rate. Mixed mode energy release rate fatigue life data were used to create a fatigue life onset G-N curve for delamination. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. Further, the prediction curve for cumulative life to failure was generated from the previous onset fatigue life curves. The results showed that the methodology offers a significant potential to Predict cumulative fatigue life of composite structures.

  5. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of bonded composite skin/stringer structures based on delamination fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses. Results were compared to fatigue tests on stringer flange/skin specimens to verify the approach.

  6. High-Strength Bolt Corrosion Fatigue Life Model and Application

    PubMed Central

    Hui-li, Wang; Si-feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue performance of high-strength bolt was studied. Based on the fracture mechanics theory and the Gerberich-Chen formula, the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture crack model and the fatigue life model were established. The high-strength bolt crack depth and the fatigue life under corrosion environment were quantitatively analyzed. The factors affecting high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life were discussed. The result showed that the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture biggest crack depth reduces along with the material yield strength and the applied stress increases. The material yield strength was the major factor. And the high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life reduced along with the increase of material strength, the applied stress or stress amplitude. The stress amplitude influenced the most, and the material yield strength influenced the least. Low bolt strength and a low stress amplitude level could extend high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life. PMID:25152916

  7. H. J. Sutherland, "Frequency Domain Analysis of the Fatigue Loads on Typical Wind Turbine Blades," J. of Solar Energy Engineering, Transactions of ASME, Vol. 118, November, 1996,

    E-print Network

    ," J. of Solar Energy Engineering, Transactions of ASME, Vol. 118, November, 1996, pp. 204H. J. Sutherland, "Frequency Domain Analysis of the Fatigue Loads on Typical Wind Turbine Blades-211. FREQUENCY DOMAIN ANALYSIS OF THE FATIGUE LOADS ON TYPICAL WIND TURBINE BLADES Herbert J. Sutherland Wind

  8. Aluminized alloy boosts turbine blade life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    Description of an aluminized alloy coating technique that involves first the application of a ductile, oxidation-resistant overlay, such as NiCrAl, which is then partially aluminized. The duplex protective system has performance advantages over conventional aluminide coatings in that it provides higher-temperature hot corrosion resistance over a longer service life.

  9. Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, J.F.; Samborsky, D.D.; Sutherland, H.J.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of nine years of fatigue testing represented in the USDOE/Montana State University (DOE/MSU) Composite Materials Fatigue Database. The focus of the program has been to explore a broad range of glass-fiber-based materials parameters encompassing over 4500 data points for 130 materials systems. Significant trends and transitions in fatigue resistance are shown as the fiber content and fabric architecture are varied. The effects of structural details including ply drops, bonded stiffeners, and other geometries that produce local variations in fiber packing and geometry are also described. Fatigue tests on composite beam structures are then discussed; these show generally good correlation with coupon fatigue data in the database. Goodman diagrams for fatigue design are presented, and their application to predicting the service lifetime of blades is described.

  10. Impact of aerothermal modeling on the estimation of turbine blade life

    E-print Network

    Collin, Jean E., 1978-

    2004-01-01

    The impact of aerothermal modeling on estimates of turbine blade heat transfer and life was assessed for three high pressure turbine blades. The work was conducted as part of a project aimed at the evaluation of the effect ...

  11. Case Studies of Fatigue Life Improvement Using Low Plasticity Burnishing in Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevey, Paul S.; Shepard, Michael; Ravindranath, Ravi A.; Gabb, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Surface enhancement technologies such as shot peening, laser shock peening (LSP), and low plasticity burnishing (LPB) can provide substantial fatigue life improvement. However, to be effective, the compressive residual stresses that increase fatigue strength must be retained in service. For successful integration into turbine design, the process must be affordable and compatible with the manufacturing environment. LPB provides thermally stable compression of comparable magnitude and even greater depth than other methods, and can be performed in conventional machine shop environments on CNC machine tools. LPB provides a means to extend the fatigue lives of both new and legacy aircraft engines and ground-based turbines. Improving fatigue performance by introducing deep stable layers of compressive residual stress avoids the generally cost prohibitive alternative of modifying either material or design. The X-ray diffraction based background studies of thermal and mechanical stability of surface enhancement techniques are briefly reviewed, demonstrating the importance of minimizing cold work. The LPB process, tooling, and control systems are described. An overview of current research programs conducted for engine OEMs and the military to apply LPB to a variety of engine and aging aircraft components are presented. Fatigue performance and residual stress data developed to date for several case studies are presented including: * The effect of LPB on the fatigue performance of the nickel based super alloy IN718, showing fatigue benefit of thermal stability at engine temperatures. * An order of magnitude improvement in damage tolerance of LPB processed Ti-6-4 fan blade leading edges. * Elimination of the fretting fatigue debit for Ti-6-4 with prior LPB. * Corrosion fatigue mitigation with LPB in Carpenter 450 steel. *Damage tolerance improvement in 17-4PH steel. Where appropriate, the performance of LPB is compared to conventional shot peening after exposure to engine operating temperatures.

  12. Fatigue and quality of life in pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, William S; Christodoulou, Christopher; Troxell, Regina; Milazzo, Maria; Block, Pamela; Preston, Thomas E; Bender, Heidi A; Belman, Anita; Krupp, Lauren B

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue and quality of life are significant concerns in adult multiple sclerosis (MS) but little is known about these factors in pediatric MS. The present investigation evaluates fatigue and quality of life in 51 pediatric MS patients to determine the rate of fatigue and reduced quality of life and assesses the relations between these variables and clinical factors. Fatigue and quality of life were assessed by self- and parent-report via the PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale and the PedsQL Quality of Life Scale. One-sample t-tests determined if scores were below published data for healthy individuals. Moreover, scores falling one standard deviation from norms were considered mildly affected, with severe difficulties being defined as scores falling two or more standard deviations from norms. Associations between self- and parent-reported difficulties and clinical factors were examined via Pearson correlation analyses. In comparison with healthy samples, pediatric MS patients reported greater difficulties with respect to fatigue, sleep, cognition, physical limitations, and academics. In addition to significant difficulties on these factors, parents reported problems with respect to emotional functioning, and tended to report greater fatigue, sleep, and cognitive difficulties than were self-reported. Expanded Disability Status Scale score was the only neurologic variable significantly related to fatigue or quality of life scores. Fatigue was significantly correlated with reports of sleep difficulties, cognitive problems, and quality of life variables. These findings suggest that fatigue and poorer quality of life is a clear concern in pediatric MS, and is related to overall physical disability. PMID:19965517

  13. FATIGUE RESISTANT FIBERGLASS LAMINATES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES (published for Wind Energy 1996, ASME, pp. 46-51)

    E-print Network

    FATIGUE RESISTANT FIBERGLASS LAMINATES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES (published for Wind Energy 1996 State University Bozeman, MT 59717 ABSTRACT Recent test results show that fiberglass laminates composed/MSU database to lifetime prediction as described in Ref. [1]. INTRODUCTION Most U.S. fiberglass wind turbine

  14. Development of an improved method of consolidating fatigue life data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Sampath, S. G.

    1978-01-01

    A fatigue data consolidation model that incorporates recent advances in life prediction methodology was developed. A combined analytic and experimental study of fatigue of notched 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under constant amplitude loading was carried out. Because few systematic and complete data sets for 2024-T3 were available in the program generated data for fatigue crack initiation and separation failure for both zero and nonzero mean stresses. Consolidations of these data are presented.

  15. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-11-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  16. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  17. Carbide factor predicts rolling-element bearing fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis was made to determine correlation between number and size of carbide particles and rolling-element fatigue. Correlation was established, and carbide factor was derived that can be used to predict fatigue life more effectively than such variables as heat treatment, chemical composition, and hardening mechanism.

  18. Life Extending Control. [mechanical fatigue in reusable rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of Life Extending Control is defined. Life is defined in terms of mechanical fatigue life. A brief description is given of the current approach to life prediction using a local, cyclic, stress-strain approach for a critical system component. An alternative approach to life prediction based on a continuous functional relationship to component performance is proposed. Based on cyclic life prediction, an approach to life extending control, called the Life Management Approach, is proposed. A second approach, also based on cyclic life prediction, called the implicit approach, is presented. Assuming the existence of the alternative functional life prediction approach, two additional concepts for Life Extending Control are presented.

  19. Prestraining and Its Influence on Subsequent Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Mcgaw, Michael A.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1995-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the damaging effects of tensile and compressive prestrains on the fatigue life of nickel-base, Inconel 718 superalloy at room temperature. To establish baseline fatigue behavior, virgin specimens with a solid uniform gage section were fatigued to failure under fully-reversed strain-control. Additional specimens were prestrained to 2 percent, 5 percent, and 10 percent (engineering strains) in the tensile direction and to 2 percent (engineering strain) in the compressive direction under stroke-control, and were subsequently fatigued to failure under fully-reversed strain-control. Experimental results are compared with estimates of remaining fatigue lives (after prestraining) using three life prediction approaches: (1) the Linear Damage Rule; (2) the Linear Strain and Life Fraction Rule; and (3) the nonlinear Damage Curve Approach. The Smith-Watson-Topper parameter was used to estimate fatigue lives in the presence of mean stresses. Among the cumulative damage rules investigated, best remaining fatigue life predictions were obtained with the nonlinear Damage Curve Approach.

  20. Contact fatigue : life prediction and palliatives

    E-print Network

    Conner, Brett P. (Brett Page), 1975-

    2002-01-01

    Fretting fatigue is defined as damage resulting from small magnitude (0.5-50 microns) displacement between contacting bodies where at least one of the bodies has an applied bulk stress. The applicability and limits of a ...

  1. Surface Fatigue Life of High Temperature Gear Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1994-01-01

    Three high temperature gear materials were evaluated using spur gear surface fatigue tests. These materials were, VASCO max 350, VASCO matrix 2, and nitralloy N and were evaluated for possible use in high temperature gear applications. The fatigue life of the three high temperature gear materials were compared with the life of the standard AISI 9310 aircraft gear material. Surface fatigue tests were conducted at a lubricant inlet temperature of 321 K (120 F), a lubricant outlet temperature of 350 K (170 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi), a speed of 10,000 rpm, and with a synthetic paraffinic lubricant. The life of the nitralloy N was approximately the same as the AISI 9310, the life of the VASCO max 350 was much less than the AISI 9310 while the life of the VASCO matrix 2 was several times the life of the AISI 9310. The VASCO max 350 also showed very low fracture toughness with approximately half of the gears failed by tooth fracture through the fatigue spall. The VASCO matrix 2 had approximately 10-percent fracture failure through the fatigue spalls indicating moderate to good fracture toughness.

  2. Thermomechanical fatigue, oxidation, and Creep: Part II. Life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, R. W.; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    1989-09-01

    A life prediction model is developed for crack nucleation and early crack growth based on fatigue, environment (oxidation), and creep damage. The model handles different strain-temperature phasings (i.e., in-phase and out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue, isothermal fatigue, and others, including nonproportional phasings). Fatigue life predictions compare favorably with experiments in 1070 steel for a wide range of test conditions and strain-temperature phasings. An oxide growth (oxide damage) model is based on the repeated microrupture process of oxide observed from microscopic measurements. A creep damage expression, which is stress-based, is coupled with a unified constitutive equation. A set of interrupted tests was performed to provide valuable damage progression information. Tests were performed in air and in helium atmospheres to isolate creep damage from oxidation damage.

  3. X-43A Rudder Spindle Fatigue Life Estimate and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Dawicke, David S.; Johnston, William M.; James, Mark A.; Simonsen, Micah; Mason, Brian H.

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue life analyses were performed using a standard strain-life approach and a linear cumulative damage parameter to assess the effect of a single accidental overload on the fatigue life of the Haynes 230 nickel-base superalloy X-43A rudder spindle. Because of a limited amount of information available about the Haynes 230 material, a series of tests were conducted to replicate the overload and in-service conditions for the spindle and corroborate the analysis. Both the analytical and experimental results suggest that the spindle will survive the anticipated flight loads.

  4. Fatigue life prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Meyer, T. G.; Nelson, R. S.; Nissley, D. M.; Swanson, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    A major objective of the fatigue and fracture efforts under the NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) program was to significantly improve the analytic life prediction tools used by the aeronautical gas turbine engine industry. This was achieved in the areas of high-temperature thermal and mechanical fatigue of bare and coated high-temperature superalloys. The cyclic crack initiation and propagation resistance of nominally isotropic polycrystalline and highly anisotropic single crystal alloys were addressed. Life prediction modeling efforts were devoted to creep-fatigue interaction, oxidation, coatings interactions, multiaxiality of stress-strain states, mean stress effects, cumulative damage, and thermomechanical fatigue. The fatigue crack initiation life models developed to date include the Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) and the Total Strain Version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP) for nominally isotropic materials, and the Tensile Hysteretic Energy Model for anisotropic superalloys. A fatigue model is being developed based upon the concepts of Path-Independent Integrals (PII) for describing cyclic crack growth under complex nonlinear response at the crack tip due to thermomechanical loading conditions. A micromechanistic oxidation crack extension model was derived. The models are described and discussed.

  5. Fatigue life prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Meyer, T. G.; Nelson, R. S.; Nissley, D. M.; Swanson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the fatigue and fracture efforts under the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program was to significantly improve the analytic life prediction tools used by the aeronautical gas turbine engine industry. This was achieved in the areas of high-temperature thermal and mechanical fatigue of bare and coated high-temperature superalloys. The cyclic crack initiation and propagation resistance of nominally isotropic polycrystalline and highly anisotropic single crystal alloys were addressed. Life prediction modeling efforts were devoted to creep-fatigue interaction, oxidation, coatings interactions, multiaxiality of stress-strain states, mean stress effects, cumulative damage, and thermomechanical fatigue. The fatigue crack initiation life models developed to date include the Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) and the Total Strain Version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP) for nominally isotropic materials, and the Tensile Hysteretic Energy Model for anisotropic superalloys. A fatigue model is being developed based upon the concepts of Path-Independent Integrals (PII) for describing cyclic crack growth under complex nonlinear response at the crack tip due to thermomechanical loading conditions. A micromechanistic oxidation crack extension model was derived. The models are described and discussed.

  6. NASA GRC Fatigue Crack Initiation Life Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Metal fatigue has plagued structural components for centuries, and it remains a critical durability issue in today's aerospace hardware. This is true despite vastly improved and advanced materials, increased mechanistic understanding, and development of accurate structural analysis and advanced fatigue life prediction tools. Each advance is quickly taken advantage of to produce safer, more reliable, more cost effective, and better performing products. In other words, as the envelope is expanded, components are then designed to operate just as close to the newly expanded envelope as they were to the initial one. The problem is perennial. The economic importance of addressing structural durability issues early in the design process is emphasized. Tradeoffs with performance, cost, and legislated restrictions are pointed out. Several aspects of structural durability of advanced systems, advanced materials and advanced fatigue life prediction methods are presented. Specific items include the basic elements of durability analysis, conventional designs, barriers to be overcome for advanced systems, high-temperature life prediction for both creep-fatigue and thermomechanical fatigue, mean stress effects, multiaxial stress-strain states, and cumulative fatigue damage accumulation assessment.

  7. Non-destructive measurement and role of surface residual stress monitoring in residual life assessment of a steam turbine blading material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu-Gaunkar, Gajanana; Rawat, M. S.; Prasad, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Steam turbine blades in power generation equipment are made from martensitic stainless steels having high strength, good toughness and corrosion resistance. However, these steels are susceptible to pitting which can promote early failures of blades in the turbines, particularly in the low pressure dry/wet areas by stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue. Presence of tensile residual stresses is known to accelerate failures whereas compressive stresses can help in delaying failures. Shot peening has been employed as an effective tool to induce compressive residual stresses which offset a part of local surface tensile stresses in the surface layers of components. Maintaining local stresses at stress raisers, such as pits formed during service, below a threshold level can help in preventing the initiation microcracks and failures. The thickness of the layer in compression will, however, depend of the shot peening parameters and should extend below the bottom of corrosion pits. The magnitude of surface compressive drops progressively during service exposure and over time the effectiveness of shot peening is lost making the material susceptible to micro-crack initiation once again. Measurement and monitoring of surface residual stress therefore becomes important for assessing residual life of components in service. This paper shows the applicability of surface stress monitoring to life assessment of steam turbine blade material based on data generated in laboratory on residual surface stress measurements in relation to fatigue exposure. An empirical model is proposed to calculate the remaining life of shot peened steam turbine blades in service.

  8. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Vito; Nissley, David; Lin, Li-Sen Jim

    1985-01-01

    The first two years of a two-phase program aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation life prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components are discussed. In Phase 1 (baseline) effort, low cycle fatigue (LCF) models, using a data base generated for a cast nickel base gas turbine hot section alloy (B1900+Hf), were evaluated for their ability to predict the crack initiation life for relevant creep-fatigue loading conditions and to define data required for determination of model constants. The variables included strain range and rate, mean strain, strain hold times and temperature. None of the models predicted all of the life trends within reasonable data requirements. A Cycle Damage Accumulation (CDA) was therefore developed which follows an exhaustion of material ductility approach. Material ductility is estimated based on observed similarities of deformation structure between fatigue, tensile and creep tests. The cycle damage function is based on total strain range, maximum stress and stress amplitude and includes both time independent and time dependent components. The CDA model accurately predicts all of the trends in creep-fatigue life with loading conditions. In addition, all of the CDA model constants are determinable from rapid cycle, fully reversed fatigue tests and monotonic tensile and/or creep data.

  9. Fatigue life analysis of a turboprop reduction gearbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, D. G.; Black, J. D.; Savage, M.; Coy, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    A fatigue life analysis of the Allison T56/501 turboprop reduction gearbox was developed. The life and reliability of the gearbox was based on the lives and reliabilities of the main power train bearings and gears. The bearing and gear lives were determined using the Lundberg-Palmgren theory and a mission profile. The five planet bearing set had the shortest calculated life among the various gearbox components, which agreed with field experience where the planet bearing had the greatest incidences of failure. The analytical predictions of relative lives among the various bearings were in reasonable agreement with field experience. The predicted gearbox life was in excellent agreement with field data when the material life adjustment factors alone were used. The gearbox had a lower predicted life in comparison with field data when no life adjustment factors were used or when lubrication life adjustment factors were used either alone or in combination with the material factors.

  10. Life prediction for bridged fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.N.

    1994-08-01

    One of the more promising classes of composites touted for high temperature applications, and certainly the most available, is that of relatively brittle matrices, either ceramic or intermetallic, reinforced by strong, aligned, continuous fibers. Under cyclic loading in the fiber direction, these materials develop matrix cracks that often run perpendicular to the fibers, while the fibers remain intact in the crack wake, supplying bridging tractions across the fracture surfaces. The bridging tractions shield the crack tip from the applied load, dramatically reducing the crack velocity from that expected in an unreinforced material subjected to the same value, {Delta}K{sub a}, of the cyclic applied stress intensity factor. An important issue in reliability is the prediction of the growth rates of the bridged cracks. The growth rates of matrix fatigue cracks bridged by sliding fibers are now commonly predicted by models based on the micromechanics of frictional interfaces. However, there exist many reasons, both theoretical and experimental, for suspecting that the most popular micromechanical models are probably wrong in detail in the context of fatigue cracks. Furthermore, a review of crack growth data reveals that the validity of the micromechanics-based predictive model has never been tested and may never be tested. In this paper, two alternative approaches are suggested to the engineering problem of predicting the growth rates of bridged cracks without explicit recourse to micromechanics. Instead, it is shown that the material properties required to analyze bridging effects can be deduced directly from crack growth data. Some experiments are proposed to test the validity of the proposals.

  11. Developments in blade shape design for a Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, T.D.; Leonard, T.M.

    1986-09-01

    A new computer program package has been developed that determines the troposkein shape for a Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade with any geometrical configuration or rotation rate. This package allows users to interact and develop a ''buildable'' blade whose shape closely approximates the troposkein. Use of this package can significantly reduce flatwise mean bending stresses in the blade and increase fatigue life.

  12. Simplified fatigue life analysis for traction drive contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Coy, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A simplified fatigue life analysis for traction drive contacts of arbitrary geometry is presented. The analysis is based on the Lundberg-Palmgren theory used for rolling-element bearings. The effects of torque, element size, speed, contact ellipse ratio, and the influence of traction coefficient are shown. The analysis shows that within the limits of the available traction coefficient, traction contacts exhibit longest life at high speeds. Multiple, load-sharing roller arrangements have an advantageous effect on system life, torque capacity, power-to-weight ratio and size.

  13. Thermomechanical Fatigue of Ductile Cast Iron and Its Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Sloss, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behaviors of ductile cast iron (DCI) were investigated under out-of-phase (OP), in-phase (IP), and constrained strain-control conditions with temperature hold in various temperature ranges: 573 K to 1073 K, 723 K to 1073 K, and 433 K to 873 K (300 °C to 800 °C, 450 °C to 800 °C, and 160 °C to 600 °C). The integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) model was incorporated into the finite element method to simulate the hysteresis behavior and predict the TMF life of DCI under those test conditions. With the consideration of four deformation/damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement, (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation, as revealed from the previous study on low cycle fatigue of the material, the model delineates the contributions of these physical mechanisms in the asymmetrical hysteresis behavior and the damage accumulation process leading to final TMF failure. This study shows that the ICFT model can simulate the stress-strain response and life of DCI under complex TMF loading profiles (OP and IP, and constrained with temperature hold).

  14. Recovery of Fatigue Damage and Life Prediction by Laser Irradiation Healing Treatment for Copper Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu-Bo; Shang, De-Guang; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Ren, Chong-Gang; Liu, Feng-Zhu; Zhang, Li-Hong; Sun, Yu-Juan

    2015-01-01

    A fatigue life prediction method was investigated after healing fatigue damage by excimer laser irradiation treatment for the damaged copper film. First, the variations of residual fatigue life and strain range for the damaged specimens after laser irradiation healing treatment were analyzed. The results showed that the fatigue damage can be effectively healed by laser irradiation for copper film. The presented healing phenomenon during laser irradiation process showed that the recovery of fatigue damage can result in the improvement in fatigue life for the damaged copper film. Then, based on the fact that the strain concentration factor of copper film had not been changed before and after laser irradiation treatment, a residual fatigue life prediction method was proposed by the local stress transformation. The predicted residual fatigue lives by the proposed method agreed well with the experimental results for copper film after laser irradiation treatment.

  15. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1983-01-01

    The Hot Section Technology (HOST) program, creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic), is reviewed. The program is aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation life prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components. Significant results include: (1) cast B1900 and wrought IN 718 selected as the base and alternative materials respectively; (2) fatigue test specimens indicated that measurable surface cracks appear early in the specimen lives, i.e., 15% of total life at 871 C and 50% of life at 538 c; (3) observed crack initiation sites are all surface initiated and are associated with either grain boundary carbides or local porosity, transgrannular cracking is observed at the initiation site for all conditions tested; and (4) an initial evaluation of two life prediction models, representative of macroscopic (Coffin-Mason) and more microscopic (damage rate) approaches, was conducted using limited data generated at 871 C and 538 C. It is found that the microscopic approach provides a more accurate regression of the data used to determine crack initiation model constants, but overpredicts the effect of strain rate on crack initiation life for the conditions tested.

  16. Fatigue properties of MA 6000E, a gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ni-base alloy for gas turbine blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Merrick, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    MA 6000E is a corrosion resistant, gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy under development for advanced turbine blade applications. The high temperature, 1093 C, rupture strength is superior to conventional nickel-base alloys. This paper addresses the fatigue behavior of the alloy. Excellent properties are exhibited in low and high cycle fatigue and also thermal fatigue. This is attributed to a unique combination of microstructural features, i.e., a fine distribution of dispersed oxides and other nonmetallics, and the highly elongated grain structure which advantageously modify the deformation characteristics and crack initiation and propagation modes from that characteristic of conventional gamma-prime hardened superalloys.

  17. Constrained fatigue life optimization of a NASVYTIS multiroller traction drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Rohn, D. A.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    A contact fatigue life analysis method for multiroller traction drives is presented. The method is based on the Lundberg-Palmgren analysis method for rolling element bearing life prediction, and also uses life adjustment factors for materials, processing, lubrication, and effect of traction. The analysis method is applied in an optimization study to the multiroller traction drive, consisting of a single-stage planetary configuration with two rows of stepped planet rollers of five rollers per row. The drive was approximately 25 centimeters in diameter by 11 centimeters long, having a nominal ratio of 15:1. The theoretically predicted drive life was 2510 hours at a nominal continuous power and speed of 74.6 kW (100 hp) and 75,000 rpm.

  18. Effect on interference fits on roller bearing fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the effects of inner-ring speed and press fits on roller bearing fatigue life. The effects of the resultant hoop and radial stresses on the principal stresses were considered. The maximum shear stresses below the Hertzian contact were determined for different conditions of inner-ring speed and load, and were applied to a conventional roller bearing life analysis. The effect of mean stress was determined using Goodman diagram approach. Hoop stresses caused by press fits and centrifugal force can reduce bearing life by as much as 90 percent. Use of a Goodman diagram predicts life reductions of 20 to 30 percent. The depth of the maximum shear stress remains virtually unchanged.

  19. Fatigue-life behavior and matrix fatigue crack spacing in unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, G. T.; Herrmann, D. J.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Fatigue tests of the SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite system were performed to characterize the fatigue behavior for unnotched conditions. The stress-life behavior of the unnotched (9/90)2s laminates was investigated for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3. The occurrence of matrix cracking was also examined in these specimens. This revealed multiple matrix crack initiation sites throughout the composite, as well as evenly spaced surface cracks along the length of the specimens. No difference in fatigue lives were observed for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3 when compared on a stress range basis. The unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S composites had shorter fatigue lives than the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites, however the neat Timetal 21S matrix material had a longer fatigue life than the neat Ti-15-3.

  20. Test evaluation of a laminated wood wind turbine blade concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests conducted on a root end section of a laminated wood wind turbine blade are reported. The blade to hub transition of the wood blade uses steel studs cast into the wood D spar with a filled epoxy. Both individual studs and a full scale, short length, root section were tested. Results indicate that the bonded stud concept is more than adequate for both the 30 year life fatigue loads and for the high wind or hurricane gust loads.

  1. Lubricant and additive effects on spur gear fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Spur gear endurance tests were conducted with six lubricants using a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 spur gears. The sixth lubricant was divided into four batches each of which had a different additive content. Lubricants tested with a phosphorus-type load carrying additive showed a statistically significant improvement in life over lubricants without this type of additive. The presence of sulfur type antiwear additives in the lubricant did not appear to affect the surface fatigue life of the gears. No statistical difference in life was produced with those lubricants of different base stocks but with similar viscosity, pressure-viscosity coefficients and antiwear additives. Gears tested with a 0.1 wt % sulfur and 0.1 wt % phosphorus EP additives in the lubricant had reactive films that were 200 to 400 (0.8 to 1.6 microns) thick.

  2. Fatigue

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sense, fatigue is defined as a lack of energy, a subjective feeling of being tired. Fatigue also ... muscular dystrophies as muscles weaken and require greater energy to perform the same activities. Types of fatigue ...

  3. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; O''Brien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to nonlinear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending loads. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse flexbeam tip-displacement and flapping angle. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  4. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to non-linear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse displacement. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  5. An Energy Based Fatigue Life Prediction Framework for In-Service Structural Components

    SciTech Connect

    H. Ozaltun; M. H.H. Shen; T. George; C. Cross

    2011-06-01

    An energy based fatigue life prediction framework has been developed for calculation of remaining fatigue life of in service gas turbine materials. The purpose of the life prediction framework is to account aging effect caused by cyclic loadings on fatigue strength of gas turbine engines structural components which are usually designed for very long life. Previous studies indicate the total strain energy dissipated during a monotonic fracture process and a cyclic process is a material property that can be determined by measuring the area underneath the monotonic true stress-strain curve and the sum of the area within each hysteresis loop in the cyclic process, respectively. The energy-based fatigue life prediction framework consists of the following entities: (1) development of a testing procedure to achieve plastic energy dissipation per life cycle and (2) incorporation of an energy-based fatigue life calculation scheme to determine the remaining fatigue life of in-service gas turbine materials. The accuracy of the remaining fatigue life prediction method was verified by comparison between model approximation and experimental results of Aluminum 6061-T6. The comparison shows promising agreement, thus validating the capability of the framework to produce accurate fatigue life prediction.

  6. Determination of Turboprop Reduction Gearbox System Fatigue Life and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Lewicki, David G.; Savage, Michael; Vlcek, Brian L.

    2007-01-01

    Two computational models to determine the fatigue life and reliability of a commercial turboprop gearbox are compared with each other and with field data. These models are (1) Monte Carlo simulation of randomly selected lives of individual bearings and gears comprising the system and (2) two-parameter Weibull distribution function for bearings and gears comprising the system using strict-series system reliability to combine the calculated individual component lives in the gearbox. The Monte Carlo simulation included the virtual testing of 744,450 gearboxes. Two sets of field data were obtained from 64 gearboxes that were first-run to removal for cause, were refurbished and placed back in service, and then were second-run until removal for cause. A series of equations were empirically developed from the Monte Carlo simulation to determine the statistical variation in predicted life and Weibull slope as a function of the number of gearboxes failed. The resultant L(sub 10) life from the field data was 5,627 hr. From strict-series system reliability, the predicted L(sub 10) life was 774 hr. From the Monte Carlo simulation, the median value for the L(sub 10) gearbox lives equaled 757 hr. Half of the gearbox L(sub 10) lives will be less than this value and the other half more. The resultant L(sub 10) life of the second-run (refurbished) gearboxes was 1,334 hr. The apparent load-life exponent p for the roller bearings is 5.2. Were the bearing lives to be recalculated with a load-life exponent p equal to 5.2, the predicted L(sub 10) life of the gearbox would be equal to the actual life obtained in the field. The component failure distribution of the gearbox from the Monte Carlo simulation was nearly identical to that using the strict-series system reliability analysis, proving the compatibility of these methods.

  7. NASALIFE - Component Fatigue and Creep Life Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2014-01-01

    NASALIFE is a life prediction program for propulsion system components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and creep rupture conditions. Although the primary focus was for CMC components, the underlying methodologies are equally applicable to other material systems as well. The program references empirical data for low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep rupture, and static material properties as part of the life prediction process. Multiaxial stresses are accommodated by Von Mises based methods and a Walker model is used to address mean stress effects. Varying loads are reduced by the Rainflow counting method or a peak counting type method. Lastly, damage due to cyclic loading and creep is combined with Minor's Rule to determine damage due to cyclic loading, damage due to creep, and the total damage per mission and the number of potential missions the component can provide before failure.

  8. Estimation of fatigue strain-life curves for austenitic stainless steels in light water reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1998-02-12

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code design fatigue curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Unlike those of carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects on fatigue lives of SSs are more pronounced in low-dissolved-oxygen (low-DO) water than in high-DO water, This paper summarizes available fatigue strain vs. life data on the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, DO level, strain range, and strain rate on the fatigue lives of wrought and cast austenitic SSs. Statistical models for estimating the fatigue lives of these steels in LWR environments have been updated with a larger data base. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve has been evaluated.

  9. Interfacial delamination and fatigue life estimation of 3D solder bumps in flip-chip packages

    E-print Network

    Nakamura, Toshio

    Interfacial delamination and fatigue life estimation of 3D solder bumps in flip-chip packages Yu Gu-dimensional finite element analysis was carried out for area-array solder-bumped flip-chip packages. The analysis fracture behaviors under thermal load. The 3D analysis also estimated thermal fatigue life of solder bumps

  10. FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE FATIGUE LIFE OF RUBBER: A LITERATURE SURVEY

    E-print Network

    Fatemi, Ali

    FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE FATIGUE LIFE OF RUBBER: A LITERATURE SURVEY W. V. MARS* ADVANCED RESEARCH ENGINEER COOPER TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY, 701 LIMA AVE., FINDLAY, OHIO, 45840 A. FATEMI UNIVERSITY OF TOLEDO, TOLEDO, OHIO, 43606 ABSTRACT Many factors are known to influence the mechanical fatigue life of rubber

  11. In vitro fatigue behavior of human dentin with implications for life prediction

    E-print Network

    Ritchie, Robert

    In vitro fatigue behavior of human dentin with implications for life prediction R. K. Nalla,1 V the paucity of fatigue data through a systematic investigation of the effects of prolonged cyclical loading frequencies of 2 and 20 Hz. The "stress- life" (S/N) data thus obtained are discussed in the context

  12. Probabilistic fatigue life prediction model for alloys with defects: applied to A206

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Rajeev; Sree Hari Rao, V.; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Baumann, John A.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2011-05-31

    Presented here is a model for the prediction of fatigue life based on the statistical distribution of pores, intermetallic particles and grains. This has been applied to a cast Al alloy A206, before and after friction stir processing (FSP). The model computes the probability to initiate a small crack based on the probability of finding combinations of defects and grains on the surface. The crack initiation and propagation life of small cracks due to these defect and grain combinations are computed and summed to obtain the total fatigue life. The defect and grain combinations are ranked according to total fatigue life and the failure probability computed. Bending fatigue experiments were carried out on A206 before and after FSP. FSP eliminated the porosity, broke down the particles and refined the microstructure. The model predicted the fatigue life of A206 before and after FSP well. The cumulative probability distribution vs. fatigue life was fitted to a three parameter Weibull distribution function. The scatter reduced after FSP and the threshold of fatigue life increased. The potential improvement in the fatigue life of A206 for a microstructure consisting of a finer distribution of particle sizes after FSP was predicted using the model.

  13. Fatigue Life Estimation of an Aircaft Engine Under Different Load Spectrums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong-Zhong; Gong, Jie; Zuo, Ming J.; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Liao, Qiang

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft engine components are subjected to variable amplitude load conditions usually they tend to experience fatigue damage. Many fatigue damage accumulation theories have been put forward to predict the fatigue lives of structure components. Under different load spectra, the aircraft engine has different working life. In this paper, based on the linear damage rule, the fatigue life of an aircraft engine was estimated by considering the load spectrum difference factor. According to one aircraft engine used for different load spectrums, the relationship between the load spectrum and the life is discussed. Moreover, the fatigue life of this engine used in A-type bomber is estimated based on the different load spectrum of the B-type bomber. A good agreement is found between the estimated results and real life data.

  14. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. S.; Levan, G. W.; Harvey, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    This Final Report covers the activities completed under the optional program of the NASA HOST Contract, NAS3-23288. The initial effort of the optional program was report-in NASA CR189221, which consisted of high temperature strain controlled fatigue tests to study the effects of thermomechanical fatigue, multiaxial loading, reactive environments, and imposed stresses. The baseline alloy used in the tests included B1900+Hf (with or without coating) and wrought INCO 718. Tests conducted on B1900+Hf included environmental tests using various atmospheres (75 psig oxygen, purified argon, or block exposures) and specimen tests of wrought INCO 718 included tensile, creep, stress rupture, TMF, multiaxial, and mean stress tests. Results of these testings were used to calibrate a CDA model for INCO 718 alloy and to develop modifications or corrections to the CDA model to handle additional failure mechanisms. The Socie parameter was found to provide the best correlation for INCO multiaxial loading. Microstructural evaluations consisting of optical, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques, and surface replication techniques to determine crack initiation lives provided data which were used to develop life prediction models.

  15. H. J. Sutherland and John F. Mandell, "Application of the U.S. High Cycle Fatigue Data Base to Wind Turbine Blade Lifetime Predictions," Energy Week 1996, Book VIII: Wind

    E-print Network

    to Wind Turbine Blade Lifetime Predictions," Energy Week 1996, Book VIII: Wind Energy, ASME, January-February, 1996, pp. 85-92. APPLICATION OF THE U.S. HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE DATA BASE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LIFETIME PREDICTIONS Herbert J. Sutherland Wind Energy Technology Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185

  16. The application of strain field intensity method in the steel bridge fatigue life evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Wang, Yanhong; Cui, Yanjun; Cao, Kaisheng

    2012-04-01

    Asce's survey shows that 80%--90% bridge damage were associated with fatigue and fracture problems. With the operation of vehicle weight and traffic volume increases constantly, the fatigue of welded steel bridge is becoming more and more serious in recent years. A large number of studies show that most prone to fatigue damage of steel bridge is part of the welding position. Thus, it's important to find a more precise method to assess the fatigue life of steel bridge. Three kinds of fatigue analysis method is commonly used in engineering practice, such as nominal stress method, the local stress strain method and field intensity method. The first two methods frequently used for fatigue life assessment of steel bridge, but field intensity method uses less ,and it widely used in fatigue life assessment of aerospace and mechanical. Nominal stress method and the local stress strain method in engineering has been widely applied, but not considering stress gradient and multiaxial stress effects, the accuracy of calculation stability is relatively poor, so it's difficult to fully explain the fatigue damage mechanism. Therefore, it used strain field intensity method to evaluate the fatigue life of steel bridge. The fatigue life research of the steel bridge based on the strain field method and the fatigue life of the I-section plate girder was analyzed. Using Ansys on the elastoplastic finite element analysis determined the dangerous part of the structure and got the stress-strain history of the dangerous point. At the same time, in order to divide the unit more elaborate introduced the sub-structure technology. Finally, it applies K.N. Smith damage equation to calculate the fatigue life of the dangerous point. In order to better simulating the actual welding defects, it dug a small hole in the welding parts. It dug different holds from different view in the welding parts and plused the same load to calculate its fatigue life. Comparing the results found that the welding defect in different parts had different influence on the fatigue life. Simultaneously, it based on S-N curve the I-shaped beam and combined with Palmgren - Miner linear cumulative damage theory to calculate the fatigue life of the dangerous part. The corresponding calculation results proved the superiority of the strain field intensity method.

  17. Experimental fatigue life investigation of cylindrical thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The thrust chambers studied in the investigation have been designed for a possible use in the Space Shuttle main engine. An annular combustion chamber configuration was used, consisting of an annular injector, a liquid hydrogen cooled outer cylinder, which served as the test section, and a contoured water cooled centerbody which formed the throat. Twenty-two cylinders were fabricated by milling cooling channels into liners fabricated from the material to be evaluated. The three materials chosen for the liners include OFHC copper, Amzirc, and NARloy-Z. The cylinders were cyclically tested until failure occurred due to fatigue cracks in the hot-gas-side wall. It was found that cylinders with liners fabricated from NARloy-Z and aged Amzirc had the best cyclic life characteristics.

  18. Effect of lubricant extreme pressure additives on rolling element fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of surface active additives on rolling-element fatigue life were investigated with the five-ball fatigue tester at conditions where classical subsurface initiated rolling-element fatigue is the sole mode of failure. Test balls of AISI 52100, AISI M-50, and AISI 1018 were run with an acid-treated white oil containing either 2.5 percent sulfurized terpene, 1 percent didodecyl phosphite, or 5 percent chlorinated wax. In general, it was found that the influence of surface active additives was detrimental to rolling-element fatigue life. The chlorinated-wax additive significantly reduced fatigue life by a factor of 7. The base oil with the 2.5 percent sulfurized-terpene additive can reduce fatigue life by as much as 50 percent. No statistical change in fatigue life occurred with the base oil having the 1 percent didodecyl-phosphite additive. The additives used with the base oil did not change the ranking of the bearing steels where rolling-element fatigue life was of subsurface origin.

  19. Evaluation of Creep-Fatigue Life by Fraction of Cavity Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bumjoon; Lim, Byeongsoo

    The components of power plant such as main steam pipe and gas turbines are operated under static and cyclic load conditions. As the period of static load increases, the service life of these components decreases. Generally, the increase of cyclic load results in fatigue damage and the increase of static load period results in the metallurgical degradation by the effect of creep. Under the creep-fatigue interaction, cavities cause rapid degradation of material and decreases the creep-fatigue life of high temperature components. In this paper, creep-fatigue tests were performed to investigate the relationship between the cavity and creep-fatigue life under various tensile hold times. Test materials were HAZ and base metal of P122 (12Cr-2W) alloy weldment. The effect of hold times on the cavity damage was examined and the fraction of cavity area was analyzed. From the linear relationship of Fca (fraction of cavity area) and experimental life, a new parameter for life evaluation, Fca, was introduced and the creep-fatigue life was predicted by Fca. Good agreement was found between experimental and predicted life. Under the same hold time condition, the Fca of HAZ was greater than that of base metal while the creep-fatigue life of HAZ was shorter than that of base metal.

  20. [The relationship among subjective symptoms of fatigue, subjective fatigue feeling, and life habits of high school and college students].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Demura, S; Goshi, F; Minami, M; Nagasawa, Y; Sato, S; Noda, M

    1999-10-01

    The relationship among subjective symptoms of fatigue, subjective fatigue feeling, and life habits of high school and college students. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among subjective symptoms of fatigue (SSF), subjective fatigue feeling (SFF), life habits (behavioral patterns (BP) and life-style consciousness (LC)) in male students. A questionnaire on SSF, SFF, fatigue content, BP and LC was administered to 1802 male students aged 15-20 yr, and data from 1792 properly completed questionnaires was analyzed. The results were: 1) Students experience high SFF from daily activity. Students with a higher SFF tend to have more complaints of SSF, especially symptoms of languor, but the relationship between SFF and symptoms of irritation and physical disintegration are low. 2) Relationships between SFF and BP and LC are relatively low, except for physical condition. Even if the BP is successful, student's SFF is relatively high. 3) Subjective degree of health and physical condition relate highly to SSF. Exercise habits relate to loss of vigor, dietary habits to languor, loss of vigor, drowsiness and a decrease in concentration, and LC to SSF except for languor. It was inferred that SSF is influenced by BP and LC. PMID:10555445

  1. Test Population Selection from Weibull-Based, Monte Carlo Simulations of Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue life is probabilistic and not deterministic. Experimentally establishing the fatigue life of materials, components, and systems is both time consuming and costly. As a result, conclusions regarding fatigue life are often inferred from a statistically insufficient number of physical tests. A proposed methodology for comparing life results as a function of variability due to Weibull parameters, variability between successive trials, and variability due to size of the experimental population is presented. Using Monte Carlo simulation of randomly selected lives from a large Weibull distribution, the variation in the L10 fatigue life of aluminum alloy AL6061 rotating rod fatigue tests was determined as a function of population size. These results were compared to the L10 fatigue lives of small (10 each) populations from AL2024, AL7075 and AL6061. For aluminum alloy AL6061, a simple algebraic relationship was established for the upper and lower L10 fatigue life limits as a function of the number of specimens failed. For most engineering applications where less than 30 percent variability can be tolerated in the maximum and minimum values, at least 30 to 35 test samples are necessary. The variability of test results based on small sample sizes can be greater than actual differences, if any, that exists between materials and can result in erroneous conclusions. The fatigue life of AL2024 is statistically longer than AL6061 and AL7075. However, there is no statistical difference between the fatigue lives of AL6061 and AL7075 even though AL7075 had a fatigue life 30 percent greater than AL6061.

  2. Test Population Selection from Weibull-Based, Monte Carlo Simulations of Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life is probabilistic and not deterministic. Experimentally establishing the fatigue life of materials, components, and systems is both time consuming and costly. As a result, conclusions regarding fatigue life are often inferred from a statistically insufficient number of physical tests. A proposed methodology for comparing life results as a function of variability due to Weibull parameters, variability between successive trials, and variability due to size of the experimental population is presented. Using Monte Carlo simulation of randomly selected lives from a large Weibull distribution, the variation in the L10 fatigue life of aluminum alloy AL6061 rotating rod fatigue tests was determined as a function of population size. These results were compared to the L10 fatigue lives of small (10 each) populations from AL2024, AL7075 and AL6061. For aluminum alloy AL6061, a simple algebraic relationship was established for the upper and lower L10 fatigue life limits as a function of the number of specimens failed. For most engineering applications where less than 30 percent variability can be tolerated in the maximum and minimum values, at least 30 to 35 test samples are necessary. The variability of test results based on small sample sizes can be greater than actual differences, if any, that exists between materials and can result in erroneous conclusions. The fatigue life of AL2024 is statistically longer than AL6061 and AL7075. However, there is no statistical difference between the fatigue lives of AL6061 and AL7075 even though AL7075 had a fatigue life 30 percent greater than AL6061.

  3. Grain boundary oxidation and its effects on high temperature fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Yoshiki

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue lives at elevated temperatures are often shortened by creep and/or oxidation. Creep causes grain boundary void nucleation and grain boundary cavitation. Grain boundary voids and cavities will accelerate fatigue crack nucleation and propagation, and thereby shorten fatigue life. The functional relationships between the damage rate of fatigue crack nucleation and propagation and the kinetic process of oxygen diffusion depend on the detailed physical processes. The kinetics of grain boundary oxidation penetration was investigated. The statistical distribution of grain boundary penetration depth was analyzed. Its effect on high temperature fatigue life are discussed. A model of intermittent micro-ruptures of grain boundary oxide was proposed for high temperature fatigue crack growth. The details of these studies are reported.

  4. Effect of carbide distribution on rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1983-01-01

    Endurance tests with ball bearings made of corrosion resistant bearing steel which resulted in fatigue lives much lower than were predicted are discussed. Metallurgical analysis revealed an undesirable carbide distribution in the races. It was shown in accelerated fatigue tests in the RC rig that large, banded carbides can reduce rolling element fatigue life by a factor of approximately four. The early spalling failures on the bearing raceways are attributed to the large carbide size and banded distribution.

  5. Fatigue Life of Titanium Alloys Fabricated by Additive Layer Manufacturing Techniques for Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Mason, Robert L.; Okabe, Toru

    2013-02-01

    Additive layer deposition techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM) have been utilized to fabricate rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) contents. The layer-by-layer deposition techniques resulted in plates that have different surface finishes which can impact significantly on the fatigue life by providing potential sites for fatigue cracks to initiate. The fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys fabricated by EBM and LBM deposition techniques was investigated by three-point testing of rectangular beams of as-fabricated and electro-discharge machined surfaces under stress-controlled conditions at 10 Hz until complete fracture. Fatigue life tests were also performed on rolled plates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI, regular Ti-6Al-4V, and CP Ti as controls. Fatigue surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy to identify the crack initiation site in the various types of specimen surfaces. The fatigue life data were analyzed statistically using both analysis of variance techniques and the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis method with the Gehan-Breslow test. The results indicate that the LBM Ti-6Al-4V ELI material exhibits a longer fatigue life than the EBM counterpart and CP Ti, but a shorter fatigue life compared to rolled Ti-6Al-4V ELI. The difference in the fatigue life behavior may be largely attributed to the presence of rough surface features that act as fatigue crack initiation sites in the EBM material.

  6. Subjective quality of life in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rakib, A; White, P D; Pinching, A J; Hedge, B; Newbery, N; Fakhoury, W K; Priebe, S

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to (1) assess Subjective Quality of Life (SQOL) of patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) using a generic concept and to compare the findings with those in groups with mental disorders and healthy subjects, and (2) investigate whether and, if so, to what extent socio-demographic and clinical variables predict SQOL in CFS patients. Seventy-three patients diagnosed with CFS were randomly selected and interviewed from two specialised clinics. CFS was diagnosed using the Oxford Criteria. SQOL was assessed on the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA) and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) on the Medical Outcome Study Short-Form 36 (MOS) SF-36. A battery of mood and symptom questionnaires, including the Symptom Checklist Questionnaire (SCL-90-R), was administered to assess various aspects of symptomatology as potential predictor variables. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of SQOL. Overall, SQOL was low in CFS patients and less favourable than in groups with mental disorders and healthy subjects. Satisfaction was particularly low with life as a whole, leisure activities and financial situation. Whilst SQOL was only moderately correlated with HRQOL, the SCL-90-R score, especially SCL-90-R Depression scale score, was the best predictor of SQOL explaining 35% of the variance. HRQOL and generic SQOL appear distinct despite some overlap. The findings underline that SQOL is significantly disrupted in CFS patients. Depressive symptoms are statistically the strongest 'predictor' of SQOL, although the direction of the relationship is not established. These data suggest that treatment of depression associated with CFS, regardless of causation, could help to improve SQOL in CFS patients. PMID:15789937

  7. Evaluation of fatigue life of CRM-reinforced SMA and its relationship to dynamic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati; Koting, Suhana

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

  8. Evaluation of Fatigue Life of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Relationship to Dynamic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400?kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

  9. Ultrasonic attenuation as an indicator of fatigue life of graphite/epoxy fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Doll, B.

    1979-01-01

    The narrow band ultrasonic longitudinal wave velocity and attenuation were measured as a function of the transfiber compression-compression fatigue of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites. No change in velocity was detected at any point in fatigue life. For specimens fatigued at 80% of static strength, there was generally a 5% to 10% increase in attenuation, however, this increase does not appear to be a satisfactory indicator of fatigue life. On the other hand, there appears to be a correlation between initial attenuation (measured prior to cycling) and cycles to fracture. Initial attenuation as measured at 1.5 MHz and 2.0 MHz appears to be a good indicator of relative fatigue life.

  10. Notch sensitivity of fatigue life in a Sylramic TM composite at elevated temperature

    E-print Network

    Zok, Frank

    sensitivity; Fatigue; SiC composite; Embrittlement 1. Introduction Continuous-fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs are expelled during unloading and the oxidizing atmosphere drawn into the composite through matrix cracksNotch sensitivity of fatigue life in a Sylramic TM /SiC composite at elevated temperature J.C. Mc

  11. Acoustic fatigue life prediction for nonlinear structures with multiple resonant modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents an effort to develop practical and accurate methods for estimating the fatigue lives of complex aerospace structures subjected to intense random excitations. The emphasis of the current program is to construct analytical schemes for performing fatigue life estimates for structures that exhibit nonlinear vibration behavior and that have numerous resonant modes contributing to the response.

  12. 2004-01-1529 A Comparative Study of Fatigue Behavior and Life Predictions

    E-print Network

    Fatemi, Ali

    ABSTRACT This study investigates and compares fatigue behavior of forged steel and powder metal connecting1 2004-01-1529 A Comparative Study of Fatigue Behavior and Life Predictions of Forged Steel and PM comparison and recent developments in "crackable" forged steel connecting rods are also included

  13. Feasibility study of pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Cheney, M.C.

    2000-02-28

    In work performed under subcontract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a preliminary design study and proof-of-concept field test were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors. A 400 kW turbine was selected for the design study, and a scaled 80 kW rotor was fabricated and tested as a demonstration of the concept. To examine the feasibility of pultruded blades, several issues were addressed, including power performance, tower strikes, yaw stability, stall flutter, fatigue, and rotor cost. Results showed that with proper design, rotors using pultruded blades demonstrate acceptable fatigue life and stable yaw behavior without tower strikes. Furthermore, blades using this technology may be manufactured for approximately half the cost of conventional blades. Field tests of the scaled rotor provided experimental data on power performance and loads while verifying stable yaw operation.

  14. Effects of LWR environments on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    SME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides construction of nuclear power plant components. Figure I-90 Appendix I to Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data suggest that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This paper reports the results of recent fatigue tests that examine the effects of steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, loading waveform, and surface morphology on the fatigue life of A 106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel in water.

  15. Description of a computerized method for predicting thermal fatigue life of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Cox, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program is described which can be used to predict the thermal fatigue life of metals and structural components from conventional metal properties. A unique feature of TFLIFE is that it calculates lives according to several different failure criteria for the same input data. These criteria are surface crack initiation, interior crack initiation, and complete fracture of both unnotched and notched fatigue specimens. Sample output tables are shown, together with results for two typical problems: (1) Thermal-mechanical fatigue of bar specimens of the tantalum alloy T-111, and (2) thermal-stress fatigue of wedge specimens of the nickel alloy B-1900.

  16. Tensile, Fracture, Fatigue Life, and Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Behavior of Structural Materials for the ITER Magnets: The European Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyilas, A.; Nikbin, K.; Portone, A.; Sborchia, C.

    2004-06-01

    Fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) are determined for R ratios between 0.1 - 0.7 at 7 K for three full-size Mock-up Models of the ITER Toroidal Field coil case produced by modified Type 316LN alloys. A representative forged block of Model 3 is additionally manufactured to determine its improved spatial tensile properties and compare it to former Model 3 data. From the new candidate jacket materials, developed for the ITER Central Solenoid coil, a batch is investigated to assess the fatigue life behavior at 7 K. Furthermore, the 4 K test facility, a 630 kN load capacity hydraulic machine has been used to allow fatigue life investigations under four point bending of the full-size jackets with artificial surface flaws. Cyclic life results have been assessed for the heat affected zone, weld, and base metal. The results are used in the fatigue analysis of the coil. Residual stresses resulting from jacket welding have been determined using two different techniques. First by distortion measurements of sliced pieces of the weld section and secondly by neutron diffraction measurements. In addition, tensile and fracture tests have been performed at 7 K with Al 7075, a candidate alloy for the pre-compression system of the CS coil.

  17. Rolling-element fatigue life with two synthetic cycloaliphatic traction fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Parker, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The life potential of two synthetic cycloaliphatic hydrocarbon traction fluids in rolling element fatigue was evaluated in a five ball fatigue tester. Life comparisons with a MIL-L-23699 qualified tetraester oil showed that the traction test oils had good fatigue life performance, comparable to that of the tetraester oil. No statistically significant life differences between the traction fluids and the tetraester oil were exhibited under the accelerated fatigue test conditions. Erratic operating behavior was occasionally encountered during tests with the antiwear additive containing traction fluid for reasons thought to be related to excessive chemical activity under high contact pressure. This behavior occasionally resulted in premature test termination due to excessive surface distress and overheating.

  18. Residual stress evaluation and fatigue life prediction in the welded joint by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Keun Bong; Hwang, Kwon Tae; Chang, Jung Chel; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2009-07-01

    In the fossil power plant, the reliability of the components which consist of the many welded parts depends on the quality of welding. The residual stress is occurred by the heat flux of high temperature during weld process. This decreases the mechanical properties as the strength of fatigue and fracture. The residual stress of the welded part in the recently constructed power plants has been the cause of a variety of accidents. The objective of this study is measurement of the residual stress and the full width at half maximum intensity (FWHM) by X-ray diffraction method and to estimate the feasibility of this application for fatigue life assessment of the high-temperature pipeline. The materials used for the study is P92 steel for the use of high temperature pipe on super critical condition. The test results were analyzed by the distributed characteristics of residual stresses and FWHM in x-ray diffraction intensity curve. Also, X-ray diffraction tests using specimens simulated low cycle fatigue damage were performed in order to analyze fatigue properties when fatigue damage conditions become various stages. As a result of X-ray diffraction tests for specimens simulated fatigue damages, we conformed that the ratio of the FWHM due to fatigue damage has linear relationship with fatigue life ratio algebraically. From this relationship, it was suggested that direct expectation of the life consumption rate was feasible.

  19. Blade vibration information system BeSSI for power plant operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gloger, M.; Jung, M.; Termuehlen, H.

    1995-12-31

    By the use of two electric sensors mounted in the casing at the circumference of the rotating blade tips the vibrational deflection of all blades of a blade row can be measured. The system, well established for measurements in model turbines and for testing in steam and gas turbines, is now developed for the continuous observation of the vibrational behavior of all last stage rotating blades of large steam turbines. Operational conditions leading to life-reducing dynamic stresses will thus be identified and can then be avoided. If such operating conditions are unavoidable the remaining service life of each blade is determined continuously and a warning is given before consumption of a blade`s fatigue life, i.e. before crack initiation has been reached.

  20. What roles do team climate, roster control, and work life conflict play in shiftworkers' fatigue longitudinally?

    PubMed

    Pisarski, Anne; Barbour, Jennifer P

    2014-05-01

    The study aimed to examine shiftworkers fatigue and the longitudinal relationships that impact on fatigue such as team climate, work life conflict, control of shifts and shift type in shift working nurses. We used a quantitative survey methodology and analysed data with a moderated hierarchical multiple regression. After matching across two time periods 18 months apart, the sample consisted of 166 nurses from one Australian hospital. Of these nurses, 61 worked two rotating day shifts (morning & afternoon/evening) and 105 were rotating shiftworkers who worked three shifts (morning afternoon/evening and nights). The findings suggest that control over shift scheduling can have significant effects on fatigue for both two-shift and three-shift workers. A significant negative relationship between positive team climate and fatigue was moderated by shift type. At both Time 1 and Time 2, work life conflict was the strongest predictor of concurrent fatigue, but over time it was not. PMID:24210672

  1. Joint design for improved fatigue life of diffusion-bonded box-stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Moses, P. L.; Kanenko, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Simple photoelastic models were used to identify a cross-section geometry that would eliminate the severe stress concentrations at the bond line between box stiffeners diffusion bonded to a panel skin. Experimental fatigue-test data from titanium test specimens quantified the allowable stress in terms of cycle life for various joint geometries. It is shown that the effect of stress concentration is reduced and an acceptable fatigue life is achieved.

  2. Assessment of Solder Joint Fatigue Life Under Realistic Service Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasha, Sa'd.; Jaradat, Younis; Qasaimeh, Awni; Obaidat, Mazin; Borgesen, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of lead-free solder alloys under complex loading scenarios is still not well understood. Common damage accumulation rules fail to account for strong effects of variations in cycling amplitude, and random vibration test results cannot be interpreted in terms of performance under realistic service conditions. This is a result of the effects of cycling parameters on materials properties. These effects are not yet fully understood or quantitatively predictable, preventing modeling based on parameters such as strain, work, or entropy. Depending on the actual spectrum of amplitudes, Miner's rule of linear damage accumulation has been shown to overestimate life by more than an order of magnitude, and greater errors are predicted for other combinations. Consequences may be particularly critical for so-called environmental stress screening. Damage accumulation has, however, been shown to scale with the inelastic work done, even if amplitudes vary. This and the observation of effects of loading history on subsequent work per cycle provide for a modified damage accumulation rule which allows for the prediction of life. Individual joints of four different Sn-Ag-Cu-based solder alloys (SAC305, SAC105, SAC-Ni, and SACXplus) were cycled in shear at room temperature, alternating between two different amplitudes while monitoring the evolution of the effective stiffness and work per cycle. This helped elucidate general trends and behaviors that are expected to occur in vibrations of microelectronics assemblies. Deviations from Miner's rule varied systematically with the combination of amplitudes, the sequences of cycles, and the strain rates in each. The severity of deviations also varied systematically with Ag content in the solder, but major effects were observed for all the alloys. A systematic analysis was conducted to assess whether scenarios might exist in which the more fatigue-resistant high-Ag alloys would fail sooner than the lower-Ag ones.

  3. Structural qualification testing and operational loading on a fiberglass rotor blade for the Mod-OA wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue tests were performed on full- and half-scale root end sections, first to qualify the root retention design, and second to induce failure. Test methodology and results are presented. Two operational blades were proof tested to design limit load to ascertain buckling resistance. Measurements of natural frequency, damping ratio, and deflection under load made on the operational blades are documented. The tests showed that all structural design requirements were met or exceeded. Blade loads measured during 3000 hr of field operation were close to those expected. The measured loads validated the loads used in the fatigue tests and gave high confidence in the ability of the blades to achieve design life.

  4. The Effect of Hole Quality on the Fatigue Life of 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Richard A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study whose main objective was to determine which type of fabrication process would least affect the fatigue life of an open-hole structural detail. Since the open-hole detail is often the fundamental building block for determining the stress concentration of built-up structural parts, it is important to understand any factor that can affect the fatigue life of an open hole. A test program of constant-amplitude fatigue tests was conducted on five different sets of test specimens each made using a different hole fabrication process. Three of the sets used different mechanical drilling procedures while a fourth and fifth set were mechanically drilled and then chemically polished. Two sets of specimens were also tested under spectrum loading to aid in understanding the effects of residual compressive stresses on fatigue life. Three conclusions were made from this study. One, the residual compressive stresses caused by the hole-drilling process increased the fatigue life by two to three times over specimens that were chemically polished after the holes were drilled. Second, the chemical polishing process does not appear to adversely affect the fatigue life. Third, the chemical polishing process will produce a stress-state adjacent to the hole that has insignificant machining residual stresses.

  5. Effects of microstructural inclusions on fatigue life of polyether ether ketone (PEEK).

    PubMed

    Simsiriwong, Jutima; Shrestha, Rakish; Shamsaei, Nima; Lugo, Marcos; Moser, Robert D

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effects of microstructural inclusions on fatigue life of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) was investigated. Due to the versatility of its material properties, the semi-crystralline PEEK polymer has been increasingly adopted in a wide range of applications particularly as a biomaterial for orthopedic, trauma, and spinal implants. To obtain the cyclic behavior of PEEK, uniaxial fully-reversed strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted at ambient temperature and at 0.02 mm/mm to 0.04 mm/mm strain amplitudes. The microstructure of PEEK was obtained using the optical and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the microstructural inclusion properties in PEEK specimen such as inclusion size, type, and nearest neighbor distance. SEM analysis was also conducted on the fracture surface of fatigue specimens to observe microstructural inclusions that served as the crack incubation sites. Based on the experimental strain-life results and the observed microstructure of fatigue specimens, a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model was used to predict the fatigue life of PEEK that includes both crack incubation and small crack growth regimes. Results show that the employed model is applicable to capture microstructural effects on fatigue behavior of PEEK. PMID:26301567

  6. Fatigue

    MedlinePLUS

    ... doctor determine its cause. For example, if you wake up in the morning rested but quickly develop fatigue ... underactive thyroid. On the other hand, if you wake up with a low level of energy and have ...

  7. Thermal-barrier-coated turbine blade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. A.; Hillig, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of coating TBC on a CF6-50 stage 2 high-pressure turbine blade were analyzed with respect to changes in the mean bulk temperature, cooling air requirements, and high-cycle fatigue. Localized spallation was found to have a possible deleterious effect on low-cycle fatigue life. New blade design concepts were developed to take optimum advantage of TBCs. Process and material development work and rig evaluations were undertaken which identified the most promising combination as ZrO2 containing 8 w/o Y2O3 applied by air plasma spray onto a Ni22Cr-10Al-1Y bond layer. The bond layer was applied by a low-pressure, high-velocity plasma spray process onto the base alloy. During the initial startup cycles the blades experienced localized leading edge spallation caused by foreign objects.

  8. Predicting random high-cycle fatigue life with finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Preumont, A.; Piefort, V. )

    1994-04-01

    This paper extends the classical theory of random fatigue to multiaxial stress fields, using a quadratic criterion. An equivalent uniaxial random process is constructed by combining the power spectral densities of the normal and tangential stresses according to the von Mises criterion. This process, that we call the von Mises stress, is used to evaluate the damage with a uniaxial model of random fatigue. A finite element implementation is proposed. 17 refs.

  9. Empirical modeling of environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys for component life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Edward, III

    1995-01-01

    This research aims to develop the methods and understanding needed to incorporate time and loading variable dependent environmental effects on fatigue crack propagation (FCP) into computerized fatigue life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO (NASGRO). In particular, the effect of loading frequency on FCP rates in alpha + beta titanium alloys exposed to an aqueous chloride solution is investigated. The approach couples empirical modeling of environmental FCP with corrosion fatigue experiments. Three different computer models have been developed and incorporated in the DOS executable program. UVAFAS. A multiple power law model is available, and can fit a set of fatigue data to a multiple power law equation. A model has also been developed which implements the Wei and Landes linear superposition model, as well as an interpolative model which can be utilized to interpolate trends in fatigue behavior based on changes in loading characteristics (stress ratio, frequency, and hold times).

  10. Fatigue life prediction of an intermetallic matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    A strain-based fatigue life prediction method is proposed for an intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures. Styled after the 'Universal Slopes' method, the model utilizes the composite's tensile properties to estimate fatigue life. Factors such as fiber volume ratio (Vf), number of plys and temperature dependence are implicitly incorporated into the model through these properties. The model constants are determined by using unidirectional fatigue data at temperatures of 425 and 815 C. Fatigue lives from two independent sources are used to verify the model at temperatures of 650 and 760 C. Cross-ply lives at 760 C are also predicted. It is demonstrated that the correlation between experimental and predicted lives is within a factor of two.

  11. Fatigue life prediction of an intermetallic matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    A strain-based fatigue life prediction method is proposed for an intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures. Styled after the Universal Slopes method, the model utilizes the composite's tensile properties to estimate fatigue life. Factors such as fiber volume ratio, number of plys and temperature dependence are implicitly incorporated into the model through these properties. The model constants are determined by using unidirectional fatigue data at temperatures of 425 and 815 C. Fatigue lives from two independent sources are used to verify the model at temperatures of 650 and 760 C. Cross-ply lives at 760 C are also predicted. It is demonstrated that the correlation between experimental and predicted lives is within a factor of two.

  12. Evaluation of the EHL Film Thickness and Extreme Pressure Additives on Gear Surface Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Shimski, John

    1994-01-01

    Surface pitting fatigue life tests were conducted with seven lubricants, using AISI 9310 spur gears. The test lubricants can be classified as synthetic polyol-esters with various viscosities and additive packages. The lubricant with a viscosity that provided a specific film thickness greater than one and with an additive package produced gear surface fatigue lives that were 8.6 times that for lubricants with a viscosity that provided specific film thickness less than one. Lubricants with the same viscosity and similar additive packages gave equivalent gear surface fatigue lives.

  13. High compressive pre-strains reduce the bending fatigue life of nitinol wire.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikha; Pelton, Alan R; Weaver, Jason D; Gong, Xiao-Yan; Nagaraja, Srinidhi

    2015-04-01

    Prior to implantation, Nitinol-based transcatheter endovascular devices are subject to a complex thermo-mechanical pre-strain associated with constraint onto a delivery catheter, device sterilization, and final deployment. Though such large thermo-mechanical excursions are known to impact the microstructural and mechanical properties of Nitinol, their effect on fatigue properties is still not well understood. The present study investigated the effects of large thermo-mechanical pre-strains on the fatigue of pseudoelastic Nitinol wire using fully reversed rotary bend fatigue (RBF) experiments. Electropolished Nitinol wires were subjected to a 0%, 8% or 10% bending pre-strain and RBF testing at 0.3-1.5% strain amplitudes for up to 10(8) cycles. The imposition of 8% or 10% bending pre-strain resulted in residual set in the wire. Large pre-strains also significantly reduced the fatigue life of Nitinol wires below 0.8% strain amplitude. While 0% and 8% pre-strain wires exhibited distinct low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue regions, reaching run out at 10(8) cycles at 0.6% and 0.4% strain amplitude, respectively, 10% pre-strain wires continued to fracture at less than 10(5) cycles, even at 0.3% strain amplitude. Furthermore, over 70% fatigue cracks were found to initiate on the compressive pre-strain surface in pre-strained wires. In light of the texture-dependent tension-compression asymmetry in Nitinol, this reduction in fatigue life and preferential crack initiation in pre-strained wires is thought to be attributed to compressive pre-strain-induced plasticity and tensile residual stresses as well as the formation of martensite variants. Despite differences in fatigue life, SEM revealed that the size, shape and morphology of the fatigue fracture surfaces were comparable across the pre-strain levels. Further, the mechanisms underlying fatigue were found to be similar; despite large differences in cycles to failure across strain amplitudes and pre-strain levels, cracks initiated from surface inclusions in nearly all wires. Compressive pre-strain-induced damage may accelerate such crack initiation, thereby reducing fatigue life. The results of the present study indicate that large compressive pre-strains are detrimental to the fatigue properties of Nitinol, and, taken together, the findings underscore the importance of accounting for thermo-mechanical history in the design and testing of wire-based percutaneous implants. PMID:25625888

  14. Fatigue-Life Prediction Methodology Using Small-Crack Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newmann, James C., Jr.; Phillips, Edward P.; Swain, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model to predict fatigue lives of metallic materials using 'small-crack theory' for various materials and loading conditions. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional state-of-stress effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta K(eff)) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta k(eff)-rate relations were needed in the near-threshold regime to fit measured small-crack growth rate behavior and fatigue endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and to predict total fatigue lives, for notched and un-notched specimens made of two aluminum alloys and a steel under constant-amplitude and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack-growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks for the aluminum alloys and steel for edge-notched specimens. An equivalent-initial-flaw-size concept was used to calculate fatigue lives in other cases. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  15. A Fatigue Life Prediction Model of Welded Joints under Combined Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, Keurrie C.; Camarao, Arnaldo F.; Pereira, Marcos Venicius S.; Ferreira Batalha, Gilmar

    2011-01-01

    A practical and robust methodology is developed to evaluate the fatigue life in seam welded joints when subjected to combined cyclic loading. The fatigue analysis was conducted in virtual environment. The FE stress results from each loading were imported to fatigue code FE-Fatigue and combined to perform the fatigue life prediction using the S x N (stress x life) method. The measurement or modelling of the residual stresses resulting from the welded process is not part of this work. However, the thermal and metallurgical effects, such as distortions and residual stresses, were considered indirectly through fatigue curves corrections in the samples investigated. A tube-plate specimen was submitted to combined cyclic loading (bending and torsion) with constant amplitude. The virtual durability analysis result was calibrated based on these laboratory tests and design codes such as BS7608 and Eurocode 3. The feasibility and application of the proposed numerical-experimental methodology and contributions for the technical development are discussed. Major challenges associated with this modelling and improvement proposals are finally presented.

  16. Fatigue life estimation for different notched specimens based on the volumetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehsaz, M.; Hassanifard, S.; Esmaeili, F.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, the effects of notch radius for different notched specimens has been studied on the values of stress concentration factor, notch strength reduction factor, and fatigue life duration of the specimens. The material which has been selected for this investigation is Al 2024T3 . Volumetric approach has been applied to obtain the values of notch strength reduction factor and results have been compared with those obtained from the Neuber and Peterson methods. Load controlled fatigue tests of mentioned specimens have been conducted on the 250kN servo-hydraulic Zwick/Amsler fatigue testing machine with the frequency of 10Hz. The fatigue lives of the specimens have also been predicted based on the available smooth S-N curve of Al2024-T3 and also the amounts of notch strength reduction factor which have been obtained from volumetric, Neuber and Peterson methods. The values of stress and strain around the notch roots are required to predict the fatigue life of notched specimens, so Ansys finite element code has been used and non-linear analyses have been performed to obtain the stress and strain distributions around the notches. The plastic deformations of the material have been simulated using multi-linear kinematic hardening and cyclic stress-strain relation. The work here shows that the volumetric approach does a very good job for predicting the fatigue life of the notched specimens.

  17. Smart structure for small wind turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supeni, E. E.; Epaarachchi, J. A.; Islam, M. M.; Lau, K. T.

    2013-08-01

    Wind energy is seen as a viable alternative energy option for future energy demand. The blades of wind turbines are generally regarded as the most critical component of the wind turbine system. Ultimately, the blades act as the prime mover of the whole system which interacts with the wind flow during the production of energy. During wind turbine operation the wind loading cause the deflection of the wind turbine blade which can be significant and affect the turbine efficiency. Such a deflection in wind blade not only will result in lower performance in electrical power generation but also increase of material degradation due high fatigue life and can significantly shorten the longevity for the wind turbine material. In harnessing stiffness of the blade will contribute massive weight factor and consequently excessive bending moment. To overcome this excessive deflection due to wind loading on the blade, it is feasible to use shape memory alloy (SMA) wires which has ability take the blade back to its optimal operational shape. This paper details analytical and experimental work being carried out to minimize blade flapping deflection using SMA.

  18. Failure analysis and reliability improvement of small turbine engine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shee, H. K.; Chen, H. Y.; Yang, T. W.

    1992-07-01

    Analysis and testing procedures for small turbine engines are presented which are aimed at verifying the critical failure modes and improving the performance, reliability, and safety of operating engine blades. These procedures include metallographic examination; chemical ingredient, vibration, modal, and stress analyses; fatigue life prediction; and modal testing with and without coating. It is demonstrated that, for small turbine engine under consideration, the most probable failure mode is the fatigue fracture rather than the creep fracture. An approach based on the reduction of the number of stators from 17 to 14 is found to be the most beneficial for improving the fatigue performance and reliability of engine blades as compared to the surface coating and high strength material approaches. This approach removes vibrational frequencies of the turbine engine from the operating frequencies, thus significantly reducing the vibrational level of engine blades.

  19. An Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Vacuum Environment on the Fatigue Life, Fatigue-Crack-Growth Behavior, and Fracture Toughness of 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    Axial load fatigue life, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture toughness tests were conducted on 0.090-inch thick specimens made of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy. The fatigue life and fatigue-crack propagation experiments were conducted at a stress ratio of 0.02. Maximum stresses ranged from 33 to 60 ksi in the fatigue life experiments, and from 10 to 40 ksi in the fatigue-crack propagation experiments, and fatigue life experiments were conducted at gas pressures of 760, 0.5, 0.05, and 0.00000005 torr. Fatigue-crack-growth and fracture toughness experiments were conducted at gas pressures of 760 and 5 x 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Residual stress measurements were made on selected fatigue life specimens to determine the effect of such stresses on fatigue life. Analysis of the results from the fatigue life experiments indicated that fatigue life progressively increased as the gas pressure decreased. Analysis of the results from the fatigue-crack-growth experiments indicates that at low values of stress-intensity range, the fatigue crack growth rates were approximately twice as high in air as in vacuum. Fracture toughness data showed there was essentially no difference in the fracture toughness of 7075-T6 in vacuum and in air.

  20. Prevalence of fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis and its effect on the quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Karthik; Taly, Arun B.; Gupta, Anupam; Prasad, Chandrajit; Christopher, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This prospective study was carried out to observe the prevalence of fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and its effect on quality-of-life (QoL). Study Design and Setting: Prospective observational study in a University Tertiary Research Hospital in India. Patients and Methods: A total of 31 patients (25 females) with definite MS according to McDonald's criteria presented in out-patient/admitted in the Department of Neurology (between February 2010 and December 2011) were included in the study. Disease severity was evaluated using the Kurtzke's expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Fatigue was assessed using Krupp's fatigue severity scale (FSS). QoL was assessed by the World Health Organization QoL-BREF questionnaire. Results: The mean age of patients was 30.1 ± 9.1 years. The mean age at first symptom was 25.23 ± 6.4 years. The mean number of relapses was 4.7 ± 3.6 in the patients. The mean duration of illness was 4.9 ± 4.4 years. The mean EDSS score was 3.5 ± 2.2. Mean fatigue score was 38.7 ± 18.5 (cut-off value 36 in FSS). The prevalence of fatigue in patients with MS was 58.1% (18/31). MS patients with fatigue were significantly more impaired (P < 0.05) on all QoL domains (i.e., physical, psychosocial, social, and environment) than MS patients without fatigue. Conclusion: Prevalence of fatigue was found to be high in the MS patients in the study. All four domains of QoL were significantly more impaired in the group with fatigue than in those without fatigue. PMID:24250159

  1. Probabilistic Fatigue Life Analysis of High Density Electronics Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Kolawa, E. A.; Sutharshana, S.; Newlin, L. E.; Creager, M.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of thin film metal interconnections in high density electronics packaging subjected to thermal cycling has been evaluated using a probabilistic fracture mechanics methodology. This probabilistic methodology includes characterization of thin film stress using an experimentally calibrated finite element model and simulation of flaw growth in the thin films using a stochastic crack growth model.

  2. A study of stiffness, residual strength and fatigue life relationships for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, J. T.; Crossman, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative exploration of the relationship between stiffness, strength, fatigue life, residual strength, and damage of unnotched, graphite/epoxy laminates subjected to tension loading. Clarification of the mechanics of the tension loading is intended to explain previous contradictory observations and hypotheses; to develop a simple procedure to anticipate strength, fatigue life, and stiffness changes; and to provide reasons for the study of more complex cases of compression, notches, and spectrum fatigue loading. Mathematical models are developed based upon analysis of the damage states. Mathematical models were based on laminate analysis, free body type modeling or a strain energy release rate. Enough understanding of the tension loaded case is developed to allow development of a proposed, simple procedure for calculating strain to failure, stiffness, strength, data scatter, and shape of the stress-life curve for unnotched laminates subjected to tension load.

  3. Effects of High Temperature Exposures on Fatigue Life of Disk Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Tim P.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Pete T.; Smith, James W.; Browning, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    The effects on fatigue life of high temperature exposures simulating service conditions were considered for two disk superalloys. Powder metallurgy processed, supersolvus heat treated Udimet (trademark) 720 and ME3 fatigue specimens were exposed in air at temperatures of 650 to 704 C, for times of 100 h to over 1000 h. They were then tested using conventional fatigue tests at 650 and 704 C, to determine the effects of exposure on fatigue resistance. Cyclic dwell verification tests were also performed to contrast the effects of intermixed exposures and fatigue cycles. The prior exposures reduced life by up to 70% and increased the scatter in life, compared to unexposed levels. Cyclic dwell tests reduced lives even more. Fractographic evaluations indicated the failure mode was shifted by the exposures and cyclic dwells from predominantly internal to often surface crack initiations. The increased scatter in life was related to the competition between internal crack initiations at inclusions or large grains producing longer lives, and surface crack initiations at an environmentally affected surface layer producing shorter lives.

  4. Predicted effect of dynamic load on pitting fatigue life for low-contact-ratio spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    1986-01-01

    How dynamic load affects the surface pitting fatigue life of external spur gears was predicted by using the NASA computer program TELSGE. Parametric studies were performed over a range of various gear parameters modeling low-contact-ratio involute spur gears. In general, gear life predictions based on dynamic loads differed significantly from those based on static loads, with the predictions being strongly influenced by the maximum dynamic load during contact. Gear mesh operating speed strongly affected predicted dynamic load and life. Meshes operating at a resonant speed or one-half the resonant speed had significantly shorter lives. Dynamic life factors for gear surface pitting fatigue were developed on the basis of the parametric studies. In general, meshes with higher contact ratios had higher dynamic life factors than meshes with lower contact ratios. A design chart was developed for hand calculations of dynamic life factors.

  5. Experimental and modeling results of creep fatigue life of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 at 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Sham, Sam; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Busby, Jeremy T; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James

    2013-01-01

    Creep fatigue testing of Ni-based superalloy Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 were conducted in the air at 850 C. Tests were performed with fully reversed axial strain control at a total strain range of 0.5%, 1.0% or 1.5% and hold time at maximum tensile strain for 3, 10 or 30 min. In addition, two creep fatigue life prediction methods, i.e. linear damage summation and frequency-modified tensile hysteresis energy modeling, were evaluated and compared with experimental results. Under all creep fatigue tests, Haynes 230 performed better than Inconel 617. Compared to the low cycle fatigue life, the cycles to failure for both materials decreased under creep fatigue test conditions. Longer hold time at maximum tensile strain would cause a further reduction in both material creep fatigue life. The linear damage summation could predict the creep fatigue life of Inconel 617 for limited test conditions, but considerably underestimated the creep fatigue life of Haynes 230. In contrast, frequency-modified tensile hysteresis energy modeling showed promising creep fatigue life prediction results for both materials.

  6. A numerical method for predicting the bending fatigue life of NiTi and stainless steel root canal

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    ) and are subjected to harsh working (corrosive) condi- tions under a combination of torsional and bending momentsA numerical method for predicting the bending fatigue life of NiTi and stainless steel root canal. A numerical method for predicting the bending fatigue life of NiTi and stainless steel root canal instruments

  7. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. S.; Levan, G. W.; Schoendorf, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    A series of high temperature strain controlled fatigue tests have been completed to study the effects of thermomechanical fatigue, multiaxial loading, reactive environments, and imposed mean stresses. The baseline alloy used in these tests was cast B1900+Hf (with and without coatings); a small number of tests of wrought INCO 718 are also included. A strong path dependence was demonstrated during the thermomechanical fatigue testing, using in-phase, out-phase, and non-proportional (elliptical and 'dogleg') strain-temperature cycles. The multiaxial tests also demonstrated cycle path to be a significant variable, using both proportional and non-proportional tension-torsion loading. Environmental screening tests were conducted in moderate pressure oxygen and purified argon; the oxygen reduced the specimen lives by two, while the argon testing produced ambiguous data. Both NiCoCrAlY overlay and diffusion aluminide coatings were evaluated under isothermal and TMF conditions; in general, the lives of the coated specimens were higher that those of uncoated specimens. Controlled mean stress TMF tests showed that small mean stress changes could change initiation lives by orders of magnitude; these results are not conservatively predicted using traditional linear damage summation rules. Microstructures were evaluated using optical, SEM and TEM methods.

  8. Fatigue life improvement of an autofrettage thick-walled pressure vessel with an external groove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Seung K.; Stephens, Ralph I.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an investigation into a fatigue life improvement of an autofrettaged thick-walled pressure vessel with an external groove subjected to pulsating internal pressure, along with mean strain and mean stress effects on strain-controlled low cycle fatigue behavior. Linear elastic stress analysis of an autofrettaged thick-walled pressure vessel with an external groove is done using a finite element method. Autofrettage loading is performed using a thermal loading analogy. Change of external groove geometry is made using a quasi-optimization technique and finite element method to achieve longer fatigue life by relieving the stress concentration at the groove root. Surface treatment using shot peening is employed to produce compressive residual stresses at the vulnerable surface of the groove root to counteract the high tensile stresses. An evaluation of the fatigue life of an autofrettaged thick-walled pressure vessel with an external groove is done through a series of simulation fatigue tests using C-shaped specimens taken from the thick-walled pressure vessel.

  9. Enhancing fatigue life of cylinder-crown integrated structure by optimizing dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Xiaosong; Wang, Zhongren; Yuan, Shijian

    2015-03-01

    Cylinder-crown integrated hydraulic press (CCIHP) is a new press structure. The hemispherical hydraulic cylinder also functions as a main portion of crown, which has lower weight and higher section modulus compared with the conventional hydraulic cylinder and press crown. As a result, the material strength capacity is better utilized. During the engineering design of cylinder-crown integrated structure, in order to increase the fatigue life, structural optimization on the basis of the adaptive macro genetic algorithms (AMGA) is first conducted to both reduce weight and decrease peak stress. It is shown that the magnitude of the maximum principal stress is decreased by 28.6%, and simultaneously the total weight is reduced by 4.4%. Subsequently, strain-controlled fatigue test is carried out, and the stress-strain hysteresis loops and cyclic hardening curve are obtained. Based on linear fit, the fatigue properties are calculated and used for the fatigue life prediction. It is shown that the predicted fatigue life is significantly increased from 157000 to 1070000 cycles after structural optimization. Finally, according to the optimization design, a 6300 kN CCIHP has been manufactured, and priority application has been also suggested.

  10. Low Cycle Fatigue Life Prediction of Notched Specimens Under Proportional and Non-proportional Multiaxial Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takamoto; Ozaki, Tomohiko

    This study discusses multiaxial low cycle fatigue life of notched specimens under proportional and non-proportional loadings at room temperature. Strain controlled multiaxial low cycle fatigue tests were carried out using smooth and circumferentially notched round-bar specimens of two types of steels, SUS316 and SGV410. Two kinds of shallow notched specimens were employed of which elastic stress concentration factors, Kt, are 1.5 and 2.5. The strain paths include proportional and non-proportional loadings. The former employed a push-pull straining or a reversed torsion straining. The latter was achieved by strain path where axial and shear strains had 90 degree phase difference but their amplitudes were the same based on von Mises' criterion. The notch dependency of multiaxial low cycle fatigue life and the life predictability were discussed. The lives for both steels depend on both Kt and strain path. The data correlations also showed the different trend between the steels. The strain parameter for the life prediction was discussed with the non-proportional strain parameter proposed by one of the authors with introducing Kt. The proposed parameter gave a satisfactory correlation with multiaxial low cycle fatigue life of notched specimens for two steels under proportional and non-proportional loadings.

  11. Fatigue Life of Cast Titanium Alloys Under Simulated Denture Framework Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Mari; Chan, Kwai S.; Hummel, Susan K.; Mason, Robert L.; Okabe, Toru

    2013-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the hypothesis that the mechanical properties and fatigue behavior of removable partial dentures (RPD) made from cast titanium alloys can be improved by alloying with low-cost, low-melting elements such as Cu, Al, and Fe using commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V as controls. RPD specimens in the form of rest-shaped, clasp, rectangular-shaped specimens and round-bar tensile specimens were cast using an experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy, Ti-5Al-1Fe, and Ti-1Fe in an Al2O3-based investment with a centrifugal-casting machine. The mechanical properties of the alloys were determined by performing tensile tests under a controlled displacement rate. The fatigue life of the RPD specimens was tested by the three-point bending in an MTS testing machine under a cyclic displacement of 0.5 mm. Fatigue tests were performed at 10 Hz at ambient temperature until the specimens failed into two pieces. The tensile data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA (? = 0.05) and the fatigue life data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (? = 0.05). The experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy showed a significantly higher average fatigue life than that of either CP-Ti or Ti-5Al-1Fe alloy ( p < 0.05). SEM fractography showed that the fatigue cracks initiated from surface grains, surface pores, or hard particles in surface grains instead of the internal casting pores. Among the alloys tested, the Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy exhibited favorable results in fabricating dental appliances with an excellent fatigue behavior compared with other commercial alloys.

  12. The fatigue life of a cobalt-chromium alloy after laser welding.

    PubMed

    Al-Bayaa, Nabil Jalal Ahmad; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fatigue life of laser welded joints in a commercially available cast cobalt-chromium alloy. Twenty rod shaped specimens (40 mm x 1.5 mm) were cast and sand blasted. Ten specimens were used as controls and the remaining ten were sectioned and repaired using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser welder. All specimens were subjected to fatigue testing (30N - 2Hz) in a controlled environment. A statistically significant difference in median fatigue life was found between as-cast and laser welded specimens (p < 0.001). Consequently, the technique may not be appropriate for repairing cobalt chromium clasps on removable partial dentures. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the presence of cracks, pores and constriction of the outer surface in the welded specimens despite 70% penetration of the weld. PMID:21528682

  13. A Study on the Effects of Ball Defects on the Fatigue Life in Hybrid Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Ching-Yao; Foerster, Chad E.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Hardy, Brian S.; Goyal, Vinay K.; Nelson, Benjamin A.; Robinson, Ernest Y.; Ward, Peter C.; Hilton, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid ball bearings using silicon nitride ceramic balls with steel rings are increasingly being used in space mechanism applications due to their high wear resistance and long rolling contact fatigue life. However, qualitative and quantitative reports of the effects of ball defects that cause early fatigue failure are rare. We report on our approach to study these effects. Our strategy includes characterization of defects encountered in use, generation of similar defects in a laboratory setting, execution of full-scale bearing tests to obtain lifetimes, post-test characterization, and related finite-element modeling to understand the stress concentration of these defects. We have confirmed that at least one type of defect of appropriate size can significantly reduce fatigue life. Our method can be used to evaluate other defects as they occur or are encountered.

  14. Effect of Creep and Oxidation on Reduced Creep-Fatigue life of Ni-based Alloy 617 at 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Yang, Zhiqing; Sokolov, Mikhail A; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James

    2014-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep fatigue testing of Ni-based alloy 617 was carried out at 850 C. Compared with its LCF life, the material s creep fatigue life decreases to different extents depending on test conditions. To elucidate the microstructure-fatigue property relationship for alloy 617 and the effect of creep and oxidation on its fatigue life, systematic microstructural investigations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). In LCF tests, as the total strain range increased, deformations concentrated near high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs). The strain hold period in the creep fatigue tests introduced additional creep damage to the material, which revealed the detrimental effect of the strain hold time on the material fatigue life in two ways. First, the strain hold time enhanced the localized deformation near HAGBs, resulting in the promotion of intergranular cracking of alloy 617. Second, the strain hold time encouraged grain boundary sliding, which resulted in interior intergranular cracking of the material. Oxidation accelerated the initiation of intergranular cracking in alloy 617. In the crack propagation stage, if oxidation was promoted and the cyclic oxidation damage was greater than the fatigue damage, oxidation-assisted intergranular crack growth resulted in a significant reduction in the material s fatigue life.

  15. Fatigue, fracture, and life prediction criteria for composite materials in magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, F.M.G.

    1990-06-01

    An explosively-bonded copper/Inconel 718/copper laminate conductor was proposed to withstand the severe face compression stresses in the central core of the Alcator C-MOD tokamak toroidal field (TF) magnet. Due to the severe duty of the TF magnet, it is critical that an accurate estimate of useful life be determined. As part of the effort to formulate an appropriate life prediction, fatigue crack growth experiments were performed on the laminate as well as its components. Metallographic evaluation of the laminate interface revealed many shear bands in the Inconel 718. Shear bands and shear band cracks were produced in the Inconel 718 as a result of the explosion bonding process. These shear bands were shown to have a detrimental effect on the crack growth behavior of the laminate, by significantly reducing the load carrying capability of the reinforcement layer and providing for easy crack propagation paths. Fatigue crack growth rate was found not only to be dependent on temperature but also on orientation. Fatigue cracks grew faster in directions which contained shear bands in the plane of the propagating crack. Fractography showed crack advancement by fatigue cracking in the Inconel 718 and ductile tearing of the copper at the interface. However, further away from the interfaces, the copper exhibited fatigue striations indicating that cracks were now propagating by fatigue. Laminate life prediction results showed a strong dependence on shear band orientation, and exhibited little variation between room temperature and 77{degree}K. Predicted life of this laminate was lower when the crack propagation was along a shear band than when crack propagation was across the shear bands. Shear bands appear to have a dominating effect on crack growth behavior.

  16. A Statistical Simulation Approach to Safe Life Fatigue Analysis of Redundant Metallic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, William T.; Neal, Donald M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper introduces a dual active load path fail-safe fatigue design concept analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation. The concept utilizes the inherent fatigue life differences between selected pairs of components for an active dual path system, enhanced by a stress level bias in one component. The design is applied to a baseline design; a safe life fatigue problem studied in an American Helicopter Society (AHS) round robin. The dual active path design is compared with a two-element standby fail-safe system and the baseline design for life at specified reliability levels and weight. The sensitivity of life estimates for both the baseline and fail-safe designs was examined by considering normal and Weibull distribution laws and coefficient of variation levels. Results showed that the biased dual path system lifetimes, for both the first element failure and residual life, were much greater than for standby systems. The sensitivity of the residual life-weight relationship was not excessive at reliability levels up to R = 0.9999 and the weight penalty was small. The sensitivity of life estimates increases dramatically at higher reliability levels.

  17. Surface pitting fatigue life of noninvolute, low-contact-ratio gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1990-01-01

    Spur gear endurance tests were conducted to investigate the surface pitting fatigue life of noninvolute gears with low numbers of teeth and low contact ratios for use in advanced applications. The results were compared with those for a standard involute design with a low number of teeth. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm (3.50 in.) with 12 teeth on both gear designs. Test conditions were an oil inlet temperature of 320 K (116 F), an oil outlet temperature of 350 K (170 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.49 GPa (216 ksi), and a speed of 10 000 rpm. The following results were obtained: the noninvolute gear had a surface pitting fatigue life approximately 1.6 times that of the standard involute gear of a similar design; and the surface pitting fatigue life of the 3.43-pitch AISI 8620 noninvolute gear was approximately equal to the surface pitting fatigue life of an 8-pitch, 28-tooth AISI 9310 gear at the same load but at a considerably higher maximum Hertz stress.

  18. Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, and Burnout: Factors Impacting a Professional's Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprang, Ginny; Whitt-Woosley, Adrienne; Clark, James J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between three variables, compassion fatigue (CF), compassion satisfaction (CS), and burnout, and provider and setting characteristics in a sample of 1,121 mental health providers in a rural southern state. Respondents completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale as part of a larger survey of provider…

  19. Effect of lubricant extreme-pressure additives on surface fatigue life of AISI 9310 spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Townsend, D. P.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Surface fatigue tests were conducted with AISI 9310 spur gears using a formulated synthetic tetraester oil (conforming to MIL-L-23699 specifications) as the lubricant containing either sulfur or phosphorus as the EP additive. Four groups of gears were tested. One group of gears tested without an additive in the lubricant acted as the reference oil. In the other three groups either a 0.1 wt % sulfur or phosphorus additive was added to the tetraester oil to enhance gear surface fatigue life. Test conditions included a gear temperature of 334 K (160 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 000 psi), and a speed of 10,000 rpm. The gears tested with a 0.1 wt % phosphorus additive showed pitting fatigue life 2.6 times the life of gears tested with the reference tetraester based oil. Although fatigue lives of two groups of gears tested with the sulfur additive in the oil showed improvement over the control group gear life, the results, unlike those obtained with the phosphorus oil, were not considered to be statistically significant.

  20. Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: The Impact of Depression, Fatigue, and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goksel Karatepe, Altlnay; Kaya, Taciser; Gunaydn, Rezzan; Demirhan, Aylin; Ce, Plnar; Gedizlioglu, Muhtesem

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to evaluate its association with disability and psychosocial factors especially depression and fatigue. Methods: Demographic characteristics, education level, disease severity, and disease duration were documented for each patient. QoL,…

  1. Effects of High-Temperature Exposures on the Fatigue Life of Disk Superalloys Examined

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Pete T.; Smith, James W.

    2005-01-01

    Tests used to characterize the low-cycle-fatigue resistance of disk superalloys are usually performed at cyclic frequencies of 0.33 Hz or faster. However, service conditions for disks in some aerospace and land-based gas turbine engines can produce major cycle periods extending from minutes to hours and days. Over a service life, this can produce total service times near the maximum temperature that exceed 100 hr for aerospace applications and 100,000 hr for land-based applications. Such time-dependent effects of realistic mission cycles on fatigue resistance can be significant in superalloy disks, and need to be considered for accurate disk life prediction. The purpose of this study at the NASA Glenn Research Center was to examine the effects of extended exposures and extended cycle periods on the fatigue resistance of two disk superalloys. Current alloy Udimet 720 (Special Metals Corporation, Huntington, WV) disk material was provided by Solar Turbines/Caterpillar Co., and advanced alloy ME3 was provided by the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technologies (UEET) Project, in powder-metallurgy-processed, supersolvus heat-treated form. Fatigue specimens were fully machined and exposed in air at temperatures of 650 to 704 C for extended times. Then, they were tested using conventional fatigue tests with a total strain range of 0.70 percent and a minimum-to-maximum strain ratio of zero to determine the effects of prior exposure on fatigue resistance. Subsequent tests with extended dwells at minimum strain in each fatigue cycle were performed to determine cyclic exposure effects.

  2. Cyclic fatigue damage characteristics observed for simple loadings extended to multiaxial life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David J.; Kurath, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Fully reversed uniaxial strain controlled fatigue tests were performed on smooth cylindrical specimens made of 304 stainless steel. Fatigue life data and cracking observations for uniaxial tests were compared with life data and cracking behavior observed in fully reversed torsional tests. It was determined that the product of maximum principle strain amplitude and maximum principle stress provided the best correlation of fatigue lives for these two loading conditions. Implementation of this parameter is in agreement with observed physical damage and it accounts for the variation of stress-strain response, which is unique to specific loading conditions. Biaxial fatigue tests were conducted on tubular specimens employing both in-phase and out-of-phase tension torsion cyclic strain paths. Cracking observations indicated that the physical damage which occurred in the biaxial tests was similar to the damage observed in uniaxial and torsional tests. The Smith, Watson, and Topper parameter was then extended to predict the fatigue lives resulting from the more complex loading conditions.

  3. Analysis and Tests of Pultruded Blades for Wind Turbine Rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, M. C.; Olsen, T.; Quandt, G.; Archidiacono, P.

    1999-07-19

    PS Enterprises, Inc. investigated a flexible, downwind, free-yaw, five-blade rotor system employing pultruded blades. A rotor was designed, manufactured and tested in the field. A preliminary design study and proof of concept test were conducted to assess the feasibility of using pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors. A 400 kW turbine was selected for the design study and a scaled 80 kW rotor was fabricated and field tested as a demonstration of the concept. The design studies continued to support the premise that pultruded blades offer the potential for significant reductions in rotor weight and cost. The field test provided experimental performance and loads data that compared well with predictions using the FLEXDYNE aeroelastic analysis. The field test also demonstrated stable yaw behavior and the absence of stall flutter over the wind conditions tested. During the final year of the contract, several studies were conducted by a number of independent consultants to address specific technical issues related to pultruded blades that could impact the commercial viability of turbines using this technology. The issues included performance, tower strikes, yaw stability, stall flutter, fatigue, and costs. While the performance of straight pultruded blades was projected to suffer a penalty of about 13% over fully twisted and tapered blades, the study showed that an aerodynamic fairing over the inner 40% could recover 85% of that loss while still keeping the blade cost well below that of conventional blades. Other results of the study showed that with proper design, rotors using pultruded blades could operate without aeroelastic problems, have acceptable fatigue life, and cost less than half that of rotors employing conventionally manufactured blades.

  4. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Analysis of Single-Crystal, Nickel-Based Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. R.; Arakere, N. K.

    2000-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue-induced failures in turbine and turbopump blades is a pervasive problem. Single-crystal nickel turbine blades are used because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities. Single-crystal materials have highly orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant and complicating factor. A fatigue failure criterion based on the maximum shear stress amplitude on the 24 octahedral and 6 cube slip systems is presented for single-crystal nickel superalloys (FCC crystal). This criterion greatly reduces the scatter in uniaxial fatigue data for PWA 1493 at 1,200 F in air. Additionally, single-crystal turbine blades used in the Space Shuttle main engine high pressure fuel turbopump/alternate turbopump are modeled using a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model. This model accounts for material orthotrophy and crystal orientation. Fatigue life of the blade tip is computed using FE stress results and the failure criterion that was developed. Stress analysis results in the blade attachment region are also presented. Results demonstrate that control of crystallographic orientation has the potential to significantly increase a component's resistance to fatigue crack growth without adding additional weight or cost.

  5. Split mandrel versus split sleeve coldworking: Dual methods for extending the fatigue life of metal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodman, Geoffrey A.; Creager, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    It is common practice to use split sleeve coldworking of fastener holes as a means of extending the fatigue life of metal structures. In search of lower manufacturing costs, the aerospace industry is examining the split mandrel (sleeveless) coldworking process as an alternative method of coldworking fastener holes in metal structures. The split mandrel process (SpM) significantly extends the fatigue life of metal structures through the introduction of a residual compressive stress in a manner that is very similar to the split sleeve system (SpSl). Since the split mandrel process is significantly less expensive than the split sleeve process and more adaptable to robotic automation, it will have a notable influence upon other new manufacture of metal structures which require coldworking a significant number of holes, provided the aerospace community recognizes that the resulting residual stress distributions and fatigue life improvement are the same for both processes. Considerable testing has validated the correctness of that conclusion. The findings presented in this paper represent the results of an extensive research and development program, comprising data collected from over 400 specimens fabricated from 2024-T3 and 7075-T651 aluminum alloys in varied configurations, which quantify the benefits (fatigue enhancement and cost savings) of automating a sleeveless coldworking system.

  6. Smoother Turbine Blades Resist Thermal Shock Better

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerniak, Paul; Longenecker, Kent; Paulus, Don; Ullman, Zane

    1991-01-01

    Surface treatment increases resistance of turbine blades to low-cycle fatigue. Smoothing removes small flaws where cracks start. Intended for blades in turbines subject to thermal shock of rapid starting. No recrystallization occurs at rocket-turbine operating temperatures.

  7. Profiled Roller Stress/Fatigue Life Analysis Methodology and Establishment of an Appropriate Stress/Life Exponent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the three dimensional volumetric stress field, surface pressure distribution and actual contact area between a 0.50" square roller with different crown profiles and a flat raceway surface using Finite Element Analysis. The 3-dimensional stress field data was used in conjunction with several bearing fatigue life theories to extract appropriate values for stress-life exponents. Also, results of the FEA runs were used to evaluate the laminated roller model presently used for stress and life prediction.

  8. Isothermal Fatigue, Damage Accumulation, and Life Prediction of a Woven PMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of the fully reversed fatigue behavior exhibited by a carbon fiber/polyimide resin, woven laminate at room and elevated temperatures. Nondestructive video edge view microscopy and destructive sectioning techniques were used to study the microscopic damage mechanisms that evolved. The residual elastic stiffness was monitored and recorded throughout the fatigue life of the coupon. In addition, residual compressive strength tests were conducted on fatigue coupons with various degrees of damage as quantified by stiffness reduction. Experimental results indicated that the monotonic tensile properties were only minimally influenced by temperature, while the monotonic compressive and fully reversed fatigue properties displayed noticeable reductions due to the elevated temperature. The stiffness degradation, as a function of cycles, consisted of three stages; a short-lived high degradation period, a constant degradation rate segment composing the majority of the life, and a final stage demonstrating an increasing rate of degradation up to failure. Concerning the residual compressive strength tests at room and elevated temperatures, the elevated temperature coupons appeared much more sensitive to damage. At elevated temperatures, coupons experienced a much larger loss in compressive strength when compared to room temperature coupons with equivalent damage. The fatigue damage accumulation law proposed for the model incorporates a scalar representation for damage, but admits a multiaxial, anisotropic evolutionary law. The model predicts the current damage (as quantified by residual stiffness) and remnant life of a composite that has undergone a known load at temperature. The damage/life model is dependent on the applied multiaxial stress state as well as temperature. Comparisons between the model and data showed good predictive capabilities concerning stiffness degradation and cycles to failure.

  9. Fatigue in Children With Sickle Cell Disease: Association With Neurocognitive and Social-Emotional Functioning and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lindsay M; Allen, Taryn M; Thornburg, Courtney D; Bonner, Melanie J

    2015-11-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) report fatigue in addition to acute and chronic pain, which can decrease overall health-related quality of life (HRQL). The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and HRQL. Given limited prior research, secondary objectives included investigation of associations between fatigue and functional outcomes, including child neurocognitive and social-emotional functioning. Children aged 8 to 16 years (N=32) and a caregiver completed measures of fatigue, HRQL, pain, and neurocognitive and social-emotional functioning. Controlling for pain and number of SCD-related hospitalizations, hierarchical linear regression models were used to determine the impact of child-reported and parent-reported fatigue on child HRQL. Correlational analyses were used to explore the relationship between fatigue and additional child outcomes. Data indicated that children with SCD experience clinically relevant levels of fatigue, which independently predicts lower HRQL. Fatigue was also associated with lower working memory, executive functioning, and higher levels of internalizing symptoms. Given its observed impact on HRQL and relationship to functional outcomes, fatigue may be an important target of clinical, home, or school interventions. This practice may attenuate the burden of fatigue in these patients, and in turn, help improve the quality of life of children living with SCD. PMID:26479993

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigation of fatigue life in reusable rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Kasper, H. J.; Pavli, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    During a test program to investigate low-cycle thermal fatigue, 13 rocket combustion chambers were fabricated and cyclically test fired to failure. Six oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper and seven Amzirc chambers were tested. The failures in the OFHC copper chambers were not typical fatigue failures but are described as creep rupture enhanced by ratcheting. The coolant channels bulged toward the chamber centerline, resulting in progressive thinning of the wall during each cycle. The failures in the Amzirc alloy chambers were caused by low-cycle thermal fatigue. The zirconium in this alloy was not evenly distributed in the chamber materials. The life that was achieved was nominally the same as would have been predicted from OFHC copper isothermal test data.

  11. Rolling-element fatigue life of silicon nitride balls: Preliminary test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Hot pressed silicon nitride was evaluated as a rolling element bearing material. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to test 12.7 mm (0.500 in.) diameter balls at a maximum Hertz stress of 800,000 psi at a race temperature of 130 F. The fatigue spalls in the silicon nitride resembled those in typical bearing steels. The ten-percent fatigue life of the silicon nitride balls was approximately one-eighth to one-fifth that of typical bearing steels (52100 and M-50). The load capacity of the silicon nitride was approximately one-third that of typical bearing steels. The load capacity of the silicon nitride was significantly higher than previously tested ceramic materials for rolling element bearings.

  12. Excitation, response, and fatigue life estimation methods for the structural design of externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, E. E.; Chandiramani, K. L.; Barger, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Means for predicting the fluctuating pressures acting on externally blown flap surfaces are developed on the basis of generalizations derived from non-dimensionalized empirical data. Approaches for estimation of the fatigue lives of skin-stringer and honeycomb-core sandwich flap structures are derived from vibration response analyses and panel fatigue data. Approximate expressions for fluctuating pressures, structural response, and fatigue life are combined to reveal the important parametric dependences. The two-dimensional equations of motion of multi-element flap systems are derived in general form, so that they can be specialized readily for any particular system. An introduction is presented of an approach to characterizing the excitation pressures and structural responses which makes use of space-time spectral concepts and promises to provide useful insights, as well as experimental and analytical savings.

  13. Fatigue, Sleep Quality, and Disability in Relation to Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Radfar, Moloud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QOL) is impaired in multiple sclerosis (MS) in part due to physical disability. MS-associated fatigue and poor sleep are common and treatable features of MS that affect QOL. We assessed the association between fatigue, sleep quality, and QOL in people with MS. Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected from 217 patients with MS. Health-related QOL (MS Quality of Life-54), fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale [FSS]), and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory [PSQI]) were assessed. Expanded Disability Status Scale scores were also provided by a qualified neurologist. Results: The mean ± SD age of the 217 patients was 32.6 ± 8.6 years, and 79% were female. One hundred fifty-two patients (70.0%) were classified as poor sleepers based on PSQI scores; 122 (56.2%) had significant fatigue based on FSS results. The mean ± SE physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) health composite scores of the MSQOL-54 were 40.12 ± 1.27 and 43.81 ± 1.61, respectively. There was a strong statistically significant positive correlation between PCS scores and MCS (r = 0.58), FSS (r = 0.49), and PSQI (r = 0.52) scores. MCS scores were strongly correlated with FSS (r = 0.53) and PSQI (r = 0.35) scores. Age exhibited statistically significant negative correlations with PCS (r = ?0.21) and MCS (r = ?0.58) scores, and was statistically significantly correlated with FSS (r = 0.23) and PSQI (r = 0.21) scores. Expanded Disability Status Scale scores were strongly correlated with FSS scores. Conclusions: These findings support screening of fatigue severity and sleep quality and their effects on QOL. PMID:26664332

  14. Inclusions Size-based Fatigue Life Prediction Model of NiTi Alloy for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Cadelli, Andrea; Sczerzenie, Frank; Luccarelli, Pietro; Beretta, Stefano; Coda, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Current standards consider the size and distribution of inclusions in semi-finished material, but do not place requirements on final biomedical devices made of NiTi shape memory alloys. In this paper, we analyze this by comparing the fatigue performances of NiTi superelastic wires obtained by different processes through a simple bilinear model of fatigue response in terms of strain life. The fracture surfaces of failed wires are analyzed through SEM microscopy and data regarding the presence of particles, and their morphology is recorded and analyzed using Type-I extreme value distribution. The results show a strong correlation between the fatigue limit of wires (in terms of strain) and the predicted extreme values of inclusions at fracture origin. Then, following the concept of treating the inclusions as `small cracks,' a simple relationship between fatigue limit strain range and inclusion size is proposed based on ?Kth data from the literature. The model is compared with the fatigue data obtained from the tested wires.

  15. Fatigue Life of Damaged Bridge Deck Panels Strengthened With Carbon Fiber Hongseob Oh, Jongsung Sim, and Christian Meyer

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Christian

    1 Fatigue Life of Damaged Bridge Deck Panels Strengthened With Carbon Fiber Sheets Hongseob Oh was applied to test panels, which were then reinforced with carbon fiber sheets (CFS) using two different for bridge decks, based on cumulative damage theory. Keywords: bridge deck slab, carbon fiber sheets, fatigue

  16. Fatigue and quality of life in women treated for various types of gynaecological cancers: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Sekse, Ragnhild Johanne Tveit; Hufthammer, Karl Ove; Vika, Margrethe Elin

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives To examine the prevalence of cancer-related fatigue in women treated for various types of gynaecological cancers and, for these cancers, to assess fatigue in relation to distress, health-related quality of life, demography and treatment characteristics. Background Advances in treatment of cancer have improved the likelihood of survival. Consequently, there are a growing number of patients who become survivors after cancer and who face side effects even years after treatment. One of the most frequently reported side effects across all types and stages of the disease is cancer-related fatigue. Design A descriptive cross-sectional study. Methods One hundred and twenty women treated for gynaecological cancers who were participants in an intervention study were included. Fatigue, psychological distress, health-related QoL and demographics were assessed by questionnaires. Disease and treatment characteristics were extracted from medical records. Results Cancer-related fatigue was reported in 53% of the women treated for gynaecological cancers, with a higher proportion in the group of cervical cancer, followed by ovarian cancer. Younger participants reported fatigue more frequently than older participants. When adjusting for age, the type of cancer a woman experiences was shown to have little impact on her risk of experiencing fatigue. The participants with fatigue reported higher levels of anxiety and depression than participants without fatigue. There was a relationship between fatigue and quality of life as measured by SF-36 domains. Conclusion The findings underscore the importance of screening for fatigue, patient education and symptom management. This should be included in a standard procedure during treatment and follow-up. Both somatic and psychological aspects of fatigue should be emphasised. Relevance to clinical practice The findings imply the need for health personnel to have focus on fatigue during the entire cancer trajectory of women after gynaecological cancers, as well as the need for screening, information, guidance and symptom management. PMID:25040957

  17. Fretting Stresses in Single Crystal Superalloy Turbine Blade Attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Swanson, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    Single crystal nickel base superalloy turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and turbine engines because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. Currently the most widely used single crystal nickel base turbine blade superalloys are PWA 1480/1493 and PWA 1484. These alloys play an important role in commercial, military and space propulsion systems. High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades is a pervasive problem. Blade attachment regions are prone to fretting fatigue failures. Single crystal nickel base superalloy turbine blades are especially prone to fretting damage because the subsurface shear stresses induced by fretting action at the attachment regions can result in crystallographic initiation and crack growth along octahedral planes. Furthermore, crystallographic crack growth on octahedral planes under fretting induced mixed mode loading can be an order of magnitude faster than under pure mode I loading. This paper presents contact stress evaluation in the attachment region for single crystal turbine blades used in the NASA alternate Advanced High Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (HPFTP/AT) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Single crystal materials have highly orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. Blades and the attachment region are modeled using a large-scale 3D finite element (FE) model capable of accounting for contact friction, material orthotrophy, and variation in primary and secondary crystal orientation. Contact stress analysis in the blade attachment regions is presented as a function of coefficient of friction and primary and secondary crystal orientation, Stress results are used to discuss fretting fatigue failure analysis of SSME blades. Attachment stresses are seen to reach peak values at locations where fretting cracks have been observed. Fretting stresses at the attachment region are seen to vary significantly as a function of crystal orientation. Attempts to adapt techniques used for estimating fatigue life in the airfoil region, for life calculations in the attachment region, are presented. An effective model for predicting crystallographic crack initiation under mixed mode loading is required for life prediction under fretting action.

  18. Adaptive active vibration control to improve the fatigue life of a carbon-epoxy smart structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Cazzulani, Gabriele; Cinquemani, Simone; Resta, Ferruccio; Torti, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Active vibration controls are helpful in improving fatigue life of structures through limitation of absolute displacements. However, control algorithms are usually designed without explicitly taking into account the fatigue phenomenon. In this paper, an adaptive vibration controller is proposed to increase the fatigue life of a smart structure made of composite material and actuated with piezoelectric patches. The main innovation with respect to the most common solutions is that the control laws are directly linked to a damage driving force, which is correlated to a fatigue damage model for the specific material. The control logic is different depending on the damage state of the structure. If no significant damage affects the structure, the controller decreases the crack nucleation probability by limiting the driving forces in the overall structure. On the contrary, if initiated cracks are present, their further propagation is prevented by controlling the damage driving forces in the already damaged areas. The structural diagnostics is performed through a vibration-based health monitoring technique, while periodical adaptation of the controller is adopted to consider damage-induced changes on the structure state-space model and to give emphasis to the most excited modes. The control algorithm has been numerically validated on the finite element model of a cantilever plate.

  19. Substrate Creep on The Fatigue Life of A Model Dental Multilayer Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J; Huang, M; Niu, X; soboyejo, W

    2006-10-09

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of substrate creep on the fatigue behavior of a model dental multilayer structure, in which a top glass layer was bonded to a polycarbonate substrate through a dental adhesive. The top glass layers were ground using 120 grit or 600 grit sand papers before bonding to create different sub-surface crack sizes and morphologies. The multilayer structures were tested under cyclic Hertzian contact loading to study crack growth and obtain fatigue life curves. The experiment results showed that the fatigue lives of the multilayer structures were impaired by increasing crack sizes in the sub-surfaces. They were also significantly reduced by the substrate creep when tested at relatively low load levels i.e. P{sub m} < 60 N (Pm is the maximum magnitude of cyclic load). But at relatively high load levels i.e. P{sub m} > 65 N, slow crack growth (SCG) was the major failure mechanisms. A modeling study was then carried out to explore the possible failure mechanisms over a range of load levels. It is found that fatigue life at relatively low load levels can be better estimated by considering the substrate creep effect (SCE).

  20. Optimal Shot Peening Treatments to Maximize the Fatigue Life of Quenched and Tempered Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llaneza, V.; Belzunce, F. J.

    2015-07-01

    The search for the optimal Almen intensity to use in shot peening treatments to maximize the fatigue life of industrial steel components involves many different variables and physical phenomena. In this paper, the optimal peening intensity of different steel grades obtained from an AISI 4340 steel through heat treatments has been determined. Six different steel grades were subjected to shot peening treatments, which were performed under full coverage, but employing diverse Almen intensities, shot sizes and air pressures. The role of the mechanical properties of the treated steel and the applied Almen intensity on the shot peening effects were studied to understand the results obtained by means of rotating bending fatigue tests. Each steel has a specific Almen intensity value able to optimize its fatigue life, thereby allowing an optimal balance between the positive and negative effects induced by shot peening. This value, or range of values, is dependent on the mechanical properties of the treated steel, increasing with increasing steel properties up to a certain point and then decreasing for stronger steels. In these cases, over peening treatments produce sufficiently large surface defects to induce relaxation of the surface residual stress and facilitate the initiation of surface fatigue cracks.

  1. A Modified Nonlinear Damage Accumulation Model for Fatigue Life Prediction Considering Load Interaction Effects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Zhong; Yuan, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Many structures are subjected to variable amplitude loading in engineering practice. The foundation of fatigue life prediction under variable amplitude loading is how to deal with the fatigue damage accumulation. A nonlinear fatigue damage accumulation model to consider the effects of load sequences was proposed in earlier literature, but the model cannot consider the load interaction effects, and sometimes it makes a major error. A modified nonlinear damage accumulation model is proposed in this paper to account for the load interaction effects. Experimental data of two metallic materials are used to validate the proposed model. The agreement between the model prediction and experimental data is observed, and the predictions by proposed model are more possibly in accordance with experimental data than that by primary model and Miner's rule. Comparison between the predicted cumulative damage by the proposed model and an existing model shows that the proposed model predictions can meet the accuracy requirement of the engineering project and it can be used to predict the fatigue life of welded aluminum alloy joint of Electric Multiple Units (EMU); meanwhile, the accuracy of approximation can be obtained from the proposed model though more simple computing process and less material parameters calling for extensive testing than the existing model. PMID:24574866

  2. Effects of material and loading variables on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data suggest that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This paper reports the results of recent fatigue tests that examine the effects of steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, loading waveform, and surface morphology on the fatigue life of A106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel in water.

  3. Comparison of Fatigue Life Estimation Using Equivalent Linearization and Time Domain Simulation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Dhainaut, Jean-Michel

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation method in conjunction with the finite element large deflection modal formulation are used to estimate fatigue life of aircraft panels subjected to stationary Gaussian band-limited white-noise excitations. Ten loading cases varying from 106 dB to 160 dB OASPL with bandwidth 1024 Hz are considered. For each load case, response statistics are obtained from an ensemble of 10 response time histories. The finite element nonlinear modal procedure yields time histories, probability density functions (PDF), power spectral densities and higher statistical moments of the maximum deflection and stress/strain. The method of moments of PSD with Dirlik's approach is employed to estimate the panel fatigue life.

  4. The Effect of Drive Signal Limiting on High Cycle Fatigue Life Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kihm, Frederic; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    It is common practice to assume a Gaussian distribution of both the input acceleration and the response when modeling random vibration tests. In the laboratory, however, shaker controllers often limit the drive signal to prevent high amplitude peaks. The high amplitudes may either be truncated at a given level (socalled brick wall limiting or abrupt clipping), or compressed (soft limiting), resulting in drive signals which are no longer Gaussian. The paper first introduces several methods for limiting a drive signal, including brick wall limiting and compression. The limited signal is then passed through a linear time-invariant system representing a device under test. High cycle fatigue life predictions are subsequently made using spectral fatigue and rainflow cycle counting schemes. The life predictions are compared with those obtained from unclipped input signals. Some guidelines are provided to help the test engineer decide how clipping should be applied under different test scenarios.

  5. On the fatigue life of M50 NiL rolling bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, T. A.; Skiller, John; Spitzer, Ronald F.

    1992-10-01

    The fatigue life of rolling bearings made of M50 NiL (a nickel-low carbon variant of M50 tool steel) was investigated using data from a battery of 15 R2 endurance test rigs specially modified to accommodate the aircraft application test conditions. Results indicate that bearings manufactured from case-hardened M50 NiL steel can provide significantly greater rolling contact fatigue life than bearings made from through-hardened M50 steel. In addition, it was found that M50 NiL bearings endurance-tested under conditions of heavy tensile hoop stresses showed no tendency toward raceway spalling or cracking through, unlike M50 bearings, which exhibited both tendencies.

  6. Space Shuttle Rudder Speed Brake Actuator-A Case Study Probabilistic Fatigue Life and Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Savage, Michael; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Space Shuttle fleet was originally intended to have a life of 100 flights for each vehicle, lasting over a 10-year period, with minimal scheduled maintenance or inspection. The first space shuttle flight was that of the Space Shuttle Columbia (OV-102), launched April 12, 1981. The disaster that destroyed Columbia occurred on its 28th flight, February 1, 2003, nearly 22 years after its first launch. In order to minimize risk of losing another Space Shuttle, a probabilistic life and reliability analysis was conducted for the Space Shuttle rudder/speed brake actuators to determine the number of flights the actuators could sustain. A life and reliability assessment of the actuator gears was performed in two stages: a contact stress fatigue model and a gear tooth bending fatigue model. For the contact stress analysis, the Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory was expanded to include gear-surface pitting for the actuator as a system. The mission spectrum of the Space Shuttle rudder/speed brake actuator was combined into equivalent effective hinge moment loads including an actuator input preload for the contact stress fatigue and tooth bending fatigue models. Gear system reliabilities are reported for both models and their combination. Reliability of the actuator bearings was analyzed separately, based on data provided by the actuator manufacturer. As a result of the analysis, the reliability of one half of a single actuator was calculated to be 98.6 percent for 12 flights. Accordingly, each actuator was subsequently limited to 12 flights before removal from service in the Space Shuttle.

  7. Strainrange partitioning life predictions of the long time metal properties council creep-fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    The method of strainrange partitioning is used to predict the cyclic lives of the Metal Properties Council's long time creep-fatigue interspersion tests of several steel alloys. Comparisons are made with predictions based upon the time- and cycle-fraction approach. The method of strainrange partitioning is shown to give consistently more accurate predictions of cyclic life than is given by the time- and cycle-fraction approach.

  8. Short-Time Procedure for the Determination of Woehler and Fatigue Life Curves Using Mechanical, Thermal and Electrical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar

    Mechanical stress-strain hysteresis, temperature and electrical resistance measurements were performed to characterize the fatigue behavior and to calculate the lifetime of metals under constant amplitude loading and random loading. Constant amplitude sequences were periodically inserted in random load tests to measure the plastic strain amplitude as well as the deformation-induced changes in specimen temperature and electrical resistance. These data are plotted versus the number of cycles for the fatigue assessment under random loading, similar as commonly practiced under constant amplitude loading. On the basis of Morrow and Basquin equations in generalized formulations, to be applicable for mechanical, thermal and electrical measurement techniques, a physically based fatigue life calculation method “PHYBAL” was developed. This new short-time procedure requires data of only three fatigue tests for a rapid and nevertheless precise determination of Woehler curves for constant amplitude loading or fatigue life curves for random loading.

  9. The impact of disability, fatigue and sleep quality on the quality of life in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghaem, Haleh; Haghighi, Afshin Borhani

    2008-01-01

    Background: Only few papers have investigated the impact of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially MS-related fatigue and the impact of the quality of sleep on the quality of life (QoL) in MS patients. Objective: The objective of this study was to measure the quality of life in MS patients and the impact of disability, fatigue and sleep quality, using statistical modeling. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted and data was collected from 141 MS patients, who were referred to the Mottahari Clinic, Shiraz, Iran, in 2005. Data on health-related quality of life (MSQoL-54), fatigue severity scale (FSS), and Pittsburgh sleep quality Index (PSQI) were obtained in the case of all the patients. Epidemiology data concerning MS type, MS functional system score, expanded disability status scale (EDSS) etc. were also provided by a qualified neurologist. Spearman ? coefficient, Mann-Whitney U test, and linear regression model were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean ±SD age of 141 MS patients was 32.6±9.6 year. Thirty five (24.8%) of them were male and the others were female. Eighty two (58.1%) of the patients had EDSS score of ? 2, 36 (25.5%) between 2.5 and 4.5, and 23 (16.3%) ? 5. As per PSQI scores, two (1.4%) of the patients had good sleep, 16 (11.3%) had moderate sleep and 123 (87.2%) had poor sleep. There was a significant high positive correlation between the quality of mental and physical health composite scores (r = 0.791, P<0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between the quality of physical score and age (r = -0.88, P<0.001), fatigue score (r = -0.640, P<0.001), EDSS score (r = -0.476, P<0.001) and PSQI (sleep quality r = -0.514, P<0.000). Linear regression analysis showed that PSQI score, EDSS, and fatigue score were predictors in the model between the quality of physical score and covariates (P<0.001). Linear regression model showed that fatigue score and PSQI were predictors in the model between the quality of mental score and covariates (P<0.001). Discussion and Conclusion: In conclusion, it may be said that MS patients had poor and moderate quality of mental and physical health. The quality of life was impaired as seen by PSQI, EDSS, and FSS. It is our suggestion that these patients require the attention of health care professionals, to be observed for the need of possible psychological support. PMID:19893680

  10. A Probabilistic Approach to Predict Thermal Fatigue Life for Ball Grid Array Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Helin; Wang, Kuisheng

    2011-11-01

    Numerous studies of the reliability of solder joints have been performed. Most life prediction models are limited to a deterministic approach. However, manufacturing induces uncertainty in the geometry parameters of solder joints, and the environmental temperature varies widely due to end-user diversity, creating uncertainties in the reliability of solder joints. In this study, a methodology for accounting for variation in the lifetime prediction for lead-free solder joints of ball grid array packages (PBGA) is demonstrated. The key aspects of the solder joint parameters and the cyclic temperature range related to reliability are involved. Probabilistic solutions of the inelastic strain range and thermal fatigue life based on the Engelmaier model are developed to determine the probability of solder joint failure. The results indicate that the standard deviation increases significantly when more random variations are involved. Using the probabilistic method, the influence of each variable on the thermal fatigue life is quantified. This information can be used to optimize product design and process validation acceptance criteria. The probabilistic approach creates the opportunity to identify the root causes of failed samples from product fatigue tests and field returns. The method can be applied to better understand how variation affects parameters of interest in an electronic package design with area array interconnections.

  11. Fatigue life analysis for traction drives with application to a toroidal type geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1976-01-01

    A contact fatigue life analysis for traction drives was developed which was based on a modified Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The analysis was used to predict life for a cone-roller toroidal traction drive. A 90-percent probability of survival was assumed for the calculated life. Parametric results were presented for life and Hertz contact stress as a function of load, drive ratio, and size. A design study was also performed. The results were compared to previously published work for the dual cavity toroidal drive as applied to a typical compact passenger vehicle drive train. For a representative duty cycle condition wherein the engine delivers 29 horsepower at 2000 rpm with the vehicle moving at 48.3 km/hr (30 mph) the drive life was calculated to be 19,200 km (11 900 miles).

  12. Laser Peening and Shot Peening Effects on Fatigue Life and Surface Roughness of Friction Stir Welded 7075-T7351 Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Lyons, Jed; Forman, Royce

    2006-01-01

    The effects of laser peening, shot peening, and a combination of both on the fatigue life of Friction Stir Welds (FSW) was investigated. The fatigue samples consisted of dog bone specimens and the loading was applied in a direction perpendicular to the weld direction. Several laser peening conditions with different intensities, durations, and peening order were tested to obtain the optimum peening parameters. The surface roughness resulting from various peening techniques was assessed and characterized. The results indicate a significant increase in fatigue life using laser peening compared to shot peened versus their native welded specimens.

  13. The impact of regular physical activity on fatigue, depression and quality of life in persons with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Nicole M; Minahan, Clare L

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare fatigue, depression and quality of life scores in persons with multiple sclerosis who do (Exercisers) and do not (Non-exercisers) regularly participate in physical activity. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study of 121 patients with MS (age 25–65 yr) living in Queensland, Australia was conducted. Physical activity level, depression, fatigue and quality of life were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Health Status Questionnaire Short Form 36, Becks Depression Inventory and Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. Results 52 participants performed at least two 30-min exercise sessions·wk-1 (Exercisers) and 69 did not participate in regular physical activity (Non-exercisers). Exercisers reported favourable fatigue, depression and quality of life scores when compared to Non-exercisers. Significant weak correlations were found between both leisure-time and overall reported physical activity levels and some subscales of the quality of life and fatigue questionnaires. Additionally, some quality of life subscale scores indicated that regular physical activity had a greater benefit in subjects with moderate MS. Conclusion Favourable fatigue, depression and quality of life scores were reported by persons with MS who regularly participated in physical activity, when compared to persons with MS who were classified as Non-exercisers. PMID:19619337

  14. A work-life perspective on sleep and fatigue—looking beyond shift workers

    PubMed Central

    SKINNER, Natalie; DORRIAN, Jill

    2015-01-01

    This study examines sleep and fatigue through a work-life lens. Whilst most often thought of as an issue for shift workers, this study observed that self-reported insufficient sleep and fatigue were prevalent for workers on standard daytime schedules. Using a representative sample of 573 daytime workers (51.3% men; 70.7% aged 25?54?yr) from one Australian state, it was observed that 26.4% of daytime workers never or rarely get the seven hours of sleep a night that is recommended for good health. Those with parenting responsibilites (29.4%) or working long (45+) hours (37.4%) were most likely to report insufficient sleep. Whereas mothers in full-time work were most likely to report frequent fatigue (42.5%). This study highlights the common experience of insufficient sleep and fatigue in a daytime workforce, with significant implications for health and safety at work and outside of work. Stronger and more effective legislation addressing safe and ‘decent’ working time is clearly needed, along with greater awareness and acceptance within workplace cultures of the need to support reasonable workloads and working hours. PMID:26027709

  15. A work-life perspective on sleep and fatigue-looking beyond shift workers.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Natalie; Dorrian, Jill

    2015-10-01

    This study examines sleep and fatigue through a work-life lens. Whilst most often thought of as an issue for shift workers, this study observed that self-reported insufficient sleep and fatigue were prevalent for workers on standard daytime schedules. Using a representative sample of 573 daytime workers (51.3% men; 70.7% aged 25-54?yr) from one Australian state, it was observed that 26.4% of daytime workers never or rarely get the seven hours of sleep a night that is recommended for good health. Those with parenting responsibilites (29.4%) or working long (45+) hours (37.4%) were most likely to report insufficient sleep. Whereas mothers in full-time work were most likely to report frequent fatigue (42.5%). This study highlights the common experience of insufficient sleep and fatigue in a daytime workforce, with significant implications for health and safety at work and outside of work. Stronger and more effective legislation addressing safe and 'decent' working time is clearly needed, along with greater awareness and acceptance within workplace cultures of the need to support reasonable workloads and working hours. PMID:26027709

  16. Fatigue criterion to system design, life and reliability: A primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1992-01-01

    A method for estimating a component's design survivability by incorporating finite element analysis and probabilistic material properties was developed. The method evaluates design parameters through direct comparisons of component survivability expressed in terms of Weibull parameters. The analysis was applied to a rotating disk with mounting bolt holes. The highest probability of failure occurred at, or near, the maximum shear stress region of the bolt holes. Distribution of material failure as a function of Weibull slope affects the probability of survival. Where Weibull parameters are unknown for a rotating disk, it may be permissible to assume Weibull parameters, as well as the stress-life exponent, in order to determine the qualitative effect of disk speed on the probability of survival.

  17. Helicopter rotor blade design for minimum vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of blade design parameters in rotor vibratory response and the design of a minimum vibration blade based upon this understanding are examined. Various design approaches are examined for a 4 bladed articulated rotor operating at a high speed flight condition. Blade modal shaping, frequency placement, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and intermodal cancellation are investigated to systematically identify and evaluate blade design parameters that influence blade airloads, blade modal response, hub loads, and fuselage vibration. The relative contributions of the various components of blade force excitation and response to the vibratory hub loads transmitted to the fuselage are determined in order to isolate primary candidates for vibration alleviation. A blade design is achieved which reduces the predicted fuselage vibration from the baseline blade by approximately one half. Blade designs are developed that offer significant reductions in vibration (and fatigue stresses) without resorting to special vibration alleviation devices, radical blade geometries, or weight penalties.

  18. Effects of High-Temperature Exposures on the Fatigue Life of Superalloy Udimet(Registered Trademark) 720

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter T.; Sweeney, Joseph W.; Browning, Paul F.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of extended exposures on the near-surface fatigue resistance of a disk superalloy. Powder metallurgy processed, supersolvus heat-treated Udimet 720 (U720) fatigue specimens were exposed in air at temperatures from 650 to 705 C for 100 hr to over 1000 hr. They were then tested using conventional fatigue tests at 650 C to determine the effects of exposure on fatigue resistance. The exposures reduced life by up to 70% and increased the scatter in life, compared to unexposed levels. Fractographic evaluations indicated the failure mode was shifted by the exposures from internal to surface crack initiations. The increased scatter in life was related to the competition between internal crack initiations at inclusions or large grains producing longer lives, and surface crack initiations at an environmentally affected surface layer producing shorter lives.

  19. A two-parameter model to predict fatigue life of high-strength steels in a very high cycle fatigue regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengqi; Liu, Xiaolong; Hong, Youshi

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic (20 kHz) fatigue tests were performed on specimens of a high-strength steel in very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) regime. Experimental results showed that for most tested specimens failed in a VHCF regime, a fatigue crack originated from the interior of specimen with a fish-eye pattern, which contained a fine granular area (FGA) centered by an inclusion as the crack origin. Then, a two-parameter model is proposed to predict the fatigue life of high-strength steels with fish-eye mode failure in a VHCF regime, which takes into account the inclusion size and the FGA size. The model was verified by the data of present experiments and those in the literature. Furthermore, an analytic formula was obtained for estimating the equivalent crack growth rate within the FGA. The results also indicated that the stress intensity factor range at the front of the FGA varies within a small range, which is irrespective of stress amplitude and fatigue life.

  20. One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Noal, Sabine; Levy, Christelle; Hardouin, Agnes; Rieux, Chantal; Heutte, Natacha; Segura, Carine; Collet, Fabienne; Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry; Henry-Amar, Michel; Joly, Florence

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

  1. Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.

  2. Deep surface rolling for fatigue life enhancement of laser clad aircraft aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, W.; Liu, Q.; Djugum, R.; Sharp, P. K.; Paradowska, A.

    2014-11-01

    Deep surface rolling can introduce deep compressive residual stresses into the surface of aircraft metallic structure to extend its fatigue life. To develop cost-effective aircraft structural repair technologies such as laser cladding, deep surface rolling was considered as an advanced post-repair surface enhancement technology. In this study, aluminium alloy 7075-T651 specimens with a blend-out region were first repaired using laser cladding technology. The surface of the laser cladding region was then treated by deep surface rolling. Fatigue testing was subsequently conducted for the laser clad, deep surface rolled and post-heat treated laser clad specimens. It was found that deep surface rolling can significantly improve the fatigue life in comparison with the laser clad baseline repair. In addition, three dimensional residual stresses were measured using neutron diffraction techniques. The results demonstrate that beneficial compressive residual stresses induced by deep surface rolling can reach considerable depths (more than 1.0 mm) below the laser clad surface.

  3. Factors affecting quality of life and fatigue in patients with leukemia under chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Musarezaie, Amir; Khaledi, Firuz; Esfahani, Homayoon Naji; Ghaleghasemi, Tahere Momeni

    2014-01-01

    Background: The goal of treating chronic diseases, including hematologic malignancies, is to increase patients’ life span and to improve their capabilities as much as possible; so that patients could maintain an appropriate level of quality of life (QoL) and continue their lives. Most studies performed to evaluate the treatment of various diseases were mostly focused on the increase of life expectancy regardless of the QoL and treatment issues. Furthermore, fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and treatments related to it, which can affect a patient's QoL, and be followed by many problems. This study was designed and implemented with the aim to determine the factors affecting the QoL and fatigue in patients with leukemia undergoing chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional correlation descriptive-analytical study. One hundred and fifteen patients with leukemia referred to Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital were enrolled in the study through convenient sampling method. To collect data, a three-part questionnaire was used: The first part was related to demographic characteristics and disease-related data and the second part was the fatigue check list and the third part was the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) related to QoL. The data were analyzed after collection and coding through Software SPSS version 18 and descriptive and analytical statistics (analysis of variance test, independent t test, Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficient) with 95% confidence interval. Results: The results showed that there was a significant correlation between QoL in Physical Component Summary with gender (P = 0.03), educational level (P = 0.09), and marital status (P = 0.004), Also there was a significant correlation between QoL in Mental Component Summary with educational level (P = 0.01) and economic status (P = 0.02). Findings showed that there was a significant correlation between fatigue and marital status (P = 0.005). But statistically there was no significant correlation between demographic variables such as age, educational level, and employment status with patients’ fatigue. Spearman correlation coefficient showed that there was a significant correlation between fatigues with pain (P = 0.005). Also findings revealed the statistically significant correlation between fatigues with economic status (P = 0.003). Conclusion: According to the present results, it seems that some demographic factors affect QoL and significant relationship exists between them. Fatigue in patients with leukemia dramatically affects their QoL. Therefore, it is important for medical staff to pay attention to demographics and fatigue in leukemic patients in order to improve their QoL and help them to organize their activities to promote health and QoL. PMID:25077157

  4. Effect of residual stresses induced by prestressing on rolling element fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    A mechanical prestress cycle suitable to induce compressive stress beneath the surface of the inner race of radially loaded 207-size bearings was determined. Compressive residual stress in excess 0.69 x 10 to the 9th power N/sq m (100,000 psi), as measured by X-ray diffraction, were induced at the depth of maximum shearing stress. The prestress cycle consisted of running the bearings for 25 hours at 2750 rpm at a radial load which produced a maximum Hertz stress of 3.3 x 10 to the 9th power N/sq m (480,000 psi) at the contact of the inner race and the heaviest loaded ball. Bearings subjected to this prestress cycle and subsequently fatigue tested gave a 10 percent fatigue life greater than twice that of a group of baseline bearings.

  5. Effect of Buckling Modes on the Fatigue Life and Damage Tolerance of Stiffened Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Bisagni, Chiara; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    The postbuckling response and the collapse of composite specimens with a co-cured hat stringer are investigated experimentally and numerically. These specimens are designed to evaluate the postbuckling response and the effect of an embedded defect on the collapse load and the mode of failure. Tests performed using controlled conditions and detailed instrumentation demonstrate that the damage tolerance, fatigue life, and collapse loads are closely tied with the mode of the postbuckling deformation, which can be different between two nominally identical specimens. Modes that tend to open skin/stringer defects are the most damaging to the structure. However, skin/stringer bond defects can also propagate under shearing modes. In the proposed paper, the effects of initial shape imperfections on the postbuckling modes and the interaction between different postbuckling deformations and the propagation of skin/stringer bond defects under quasi-static or fatigue loads will be examined.

  6. A combined approach to buffet response analyses and fatigue life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J. H.; Perez, R.

    1994-03-01

    Experimental measurement and neural network based prediction of wind tunnel model empennage random pressures are discussed. Artificially generated neural network power spectral densities of surface pressures are used to augment existing data and then load an elastic finite element model to obtain response spectra. Details on the use of actual response spectra from flight test data are also discussed. A random spectra fatigue method is described which effectively combines buffet and maneuver loads into a time series based on aircraft usage data. A peak-valley damage analysis procedure is employed to compute the aggregate fatigue life of the structure based on five combined load time series information. Applications of the method as a continual learning tool for buffet response spectra is elaborated.

  7. Fatigue life of silumin irradiated by high intensity pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, S. V.; Alsaraeva, K. V.; Gromov, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.

    2015-09-01

    The electron-beam processing of silumin, leading to the evolution of structure-phase state of its surface is carried out. It has been shown that this alloy is a multiphase material and contains, except an aluminum-based phase, the particles of intermetallic compounds of Al-Si- Fe-Mn. It is shown that electron beam treatment of the eutectic silumin surface increases the fatigue service life more than in 3.5 times. The analysis of structure-phase states modification of silumin subjected to electron beam treatment with the following fatigue loading up to the failure is carried out by methods of optical and scanning electron diffraction microscopy. Analysis of the surface layer structure revealed the sources of nucleation of submicrocracks. It is revealed that the large silicon plates located on the surface and in the subsurface layer are the most dangerous stress concentrators.

  8. The effect of residual stress in HVOF tungsten carbide coatings on the fatigue life in bending of thermal spray coated aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrann, R. T. R.; Greving, D. J.; Shadley, J. R.; Rybicki, E. F.; Bodger, B. E.; Somerville, D. A.

    1998-12-01

    One factor that affects the suitability of tungsten carbide (WC) coatings for wear and corrosion control applications is the fatigue life of the coated part. Coatings, whether anodized or thermal spray coated, can reduce the fatigue life of a part compared to an uncoated part. This study compares the fatigue life of uncoated and thermal spray coated 6061 Al specimens. The relation between the residual stress level in the coating and the fatigue life of the specimen is investigated. Cyclic bending tests were performed on flat, cantilever beam specimens. Applied loads placed the coating in tension. Residual stress levels for each of the coating types were determined experimentally using the modified layer removal method. Test results show that the fatigue life of WC coated specimens is directly related to the level of compressive residual stress in the coating. In some cases, the fatigue life can be increased by a factor of 35 by increasing the compressive residual stress in the coating.

  9. Slow Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Prediction of Ceramic Components Subjected to Variable Load History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama

    2001-01-01

    Present capabilities of the NASA CARES/Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code include probabilistic life prediction of ceramic components subjected to fast fracture, slow crack growth (stress corrosion), and cyclic fatigue failure modes. Currently, this code has the capability to compute the time-dependent reliability of ceramic structures subjected to simple time-dependent loading. For example, in slow crack growth (SCG) type failure conditions CARES/Life can handle the cases of sustained and linearly increasing time-dependent loads, while for cyclic fatigue applications various types of repetitive constant amplitude loads can be accounted for. In real applications applied loads are rarely that simple, but rather vary with time in more complex ways such as, for example, engine start up, shut down, and dynamic and vibrational loads. In addition, when a given component is subjected to transient environmental and or thermal conditions, the material properties also vary with time. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a methodology capable of predicting the time-dependent reliability of components subjected to transient thermomechanical loads that takes into account the change in material response with time. In this paper, the dominant delayed failure mechanism is assumed to be SCG. This capability has been added to the NASA CARES/Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code, which has also been modified to have the ability of interfacing with commercially available FEA codes executed for transient load histories. An example involving a ceramic exhaust valve subjected to combustion cycle loads is presented to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and the CARES/Life program.

  10. A model for life predictions of nickel-base superalloys in high-temperature low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanoski, Glenn R.; Pelloux, Regis M.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    Extensive characterization of low-cycle fatigue damage mechanisms was performed on polycrystalline Rene 80 and IN100 tested in the temperature range from 871 to 1000 C. Low-cycle fatigue life was found to be dominated by propagation of microcracks to a critical size governed by the maximum tensile stress. A model was developed which incorporates a threshold stress for crack extension, a stress-based crack growth expression, and a failure criterion. The mathematical equivalence between this mechanistically based model and the strain-life low-cycle fatigue law was demonstrated using cyclic stress-strain relationships. The model was shown to correlate the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue data of the different nickel-base superalloys considered in this study.

  11. Dynamic Capacity and Surface Fatigue Life for Spur and Helical Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model for surface fatigue life of gear, pinion, or entire meshing gear train is given. The theory is based on a previous statistical approach for rolling-element bearings. Equations are presented which give the dynamic capacity of the gear set. The dynamic capacity is the transmitted tangential load which gives a 90 percent probability of survival of the gear set for one million pinion revolutions. The analytical results are compared with test data for a set of AISI 9310 spur gears operating at a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 billion N/sq m and 10,000 rpm. The theoretical life predictions are shown to be good when material constants obtained from rolling-element bearing tests were used in the gear life model.

  12. Effect of speed and press fit on fatigue life of roller-bearing inner-race contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the effects of inner ring speed and press fit on the rolling element fatigue life of a roller bearing inner race contact. The effects of the resultant hoop and radial stresses on the principal stresses were considered. The maximum shear stresses below the Hertzian contact were determined for different conditions of inner ring speed, load, and geometry and were applied to a conventional ring life analysis. The race contact fatigue life was reduced by more than 90 percent for some conditions when speed and press fit were considered. The depth of the maximum shear stress remained virtually unchanged.

  13. The application of probabilistic design theory to high temperature low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirsching, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Metal fatigue under stress and thermal cycling is a principal mode of failure in gas turbine engine hot section components such as turbine blades and disks and combustor liners. Designing for fatigue is subject to considerable uncertainty, e.g., scatter in cycles to failure, available fatigue test data and operating environment data, uncertainties in the models used to predict stresses, etc. Methods of analyzing fatigue test data for probabilistic design purposes are summarized. The general strain life as well as homo- and hetero-scedastic models are considered. Modern probabilistic design theory is reviewed and examples are presented which illustrate application to reliability analysis of gas turbine engine components.

  14. CARES/Life Ceramics Durability Evaluation Software Enhanced for Cyclic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.

    1999-01-01

    The CARES/Life computer program predicts the probability of a monolithic ceramic component's failure as a function of time in service. The program has many features and options for materials evaluation and component design. It couples commercial finite element programs--which resolve a component's temperature and stress distribution--to reliability evaluation and fracture mechanics routines for modeling strength-limiting defects. The capability, flexibility, and uniqueness of CARES/Life have attracted many users representing a broad range of interests and has resulted in numerous awards for technological achievements and technology transfer. Recent work with CARES/Life was directed at enhancing the program s capabilities with regards to cyclic fatigue. Only in the last few years have ceramics been recognized to be susceptible to enhanced degradation from cyclic loading. To account for cyclic loads, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a crack growth model that combines the Power Law (time-dependent) and the Walker Law (cycle-dependent) crack growth models. This combined model has the characteristics of Power Law behavior (decreased damage) at high R ratios (minimum load/maximum load) and of Walker law behavior (increased damage) at low R ratios. In addition, a parameter estimation methodology for constant-amplitude, steady-state cyclic fatigue experiments was developed using nonlinear least squares and a modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. This methodology is used to give best estimates of parameter values from cyclic fatigue specimen rupture data (usually tensile or flexure bar specimens) for a relatively small number of specimens. Methodology to account for runout data (unfailed specimens over the duration of the experiment) was also included.

  15. Fatiguing exercise initiated later in life reduces incidence of fibrillation and improves sleep quality in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan; Feng, Yue; Wen, Deng Tai; Wang, Hui; Wu, Xiu Shan

    2015-08-01

    As the human body ages, the risk of heart disease and stroke greatly increases. While there is evidence that lifelong exercise is beneficial to the heart's health, the effects of beginning exercise later in life remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether exercise training started later in life is beneficial to cardiac aging in Drosophila. We examined 4-week-old wild-type virgin female flies that were exposed to exercise periods of either 1.5, 2.0, or 2.5 h per day, 5 days a week for 2 weeks. Using M-mode traces to analyze cardiac function by looking at parameters including heart rate, rhythmicity, systolic and diastolic diameter, and interval and fractional shortening, we found that cardiac function declined with age, shown by an increase in the number of fibrillation events and a decrease in fractional shortening. About 2.0 and 2.5 h of exercise per day displayed a reduced incidence of fibrillation events, and only physical exercise lasting 2.5-h period increased fractional shortening and total sleep time in Drosophila. These data suggested that training exercise needs to be performed for longer duration to exert physiological benefits for the aging heart. Additionally, climbing ability to assess the exercise-induced muscle fatigue was also measured. We found that 2.0 and 2.5 h of exercise caused exercise-induced fatigue, and fatiguing exercise is beneficial for cardiac and healthy aging overall. This study provides a basis for further study in humans on the impact of beginning an exercise regimen later in life on cardiac health. PMID:26206392

  16. Effect of Environmental Exposures on Fatigue Life of P/M Disk Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan

    2011-01-01

    As the temperature capability of Ni-base superalloy powder metallurgy disks is steadily increased, environmental resistance and protection of advanced nickel-based turbine disk components are becoming increasingly important. Localized surface hot corrosion attack and damage from oxidation have been shown to impair disk fatigue life and may eventually limit disk operating temperatures. NASA Research Announcement (NRA) contracts have been awarded to GE Aviation and Honeywell Aerospace to separately develop fatigue resistant metallic and ceramic coatings for corrosion resistance and the corrosion/fatigue results of selected coatings will be presented. The microstructural response of a bare ME3 disk superalloy has been evaluated for moderate (704 C) and aggressive (760-816 C) oxidizing exposures up to 2,020 hours. Cross section analysis reveals sub-surface damage (significant for aggressive exposures) that consists of Al2O3 "fingers", interfacial voids, a recrystallized precipitate-free layer and GB carbide dissolution. The effects of a Nichrome corrosion coating on this microstructural response will also be presented.

  17. Fatigue life prediction of liquid rocket engine combustor with subscale test verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, In-Kyung

    Reusable rocket systems such as the Space Shuttle introduced a new era in propulsion system design for economic feasibility. Practical reusable systems require an order of magnitude increase in life. To achieve this improved methods are needed to assess failure mechanisms and to predict life cycles of rocket combustor. A general goal of the research was to demonstrate the use of subscale rocket combustor prototype in a cost-effective test program. Life limiting factors and metal behaviors under repeated loads were surveyed and reviewed. The life prediction theories are presented, with an emphasis on studies that used subscale test hardware for model validation. From this review, low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep-fatigue interaction (ratcheting) were identified as the main life limiting factors of the combustor. Several life prediction methods such as conventional and advanced viscoplastic models were used to predict life cycle due to low cycle thermal stress, transient effects, and creep rupture damage. Creep-fatigue interaction and cyclic hardening were also investigated. A prediction method based on 2D beam theory was modified using 3D plate deformation theory to provide an extended prediction method. For experimental validation two small scale annular plug nozzle thrusters were designed, built and tested. The test article was composed of a water-cooled liner, plug annular nozzle and 200 psia precombustor that used decomposed hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer and JP-8 as the fuel. The first combustor was tested cyclically at the Advanced Propellants and Combustion Laboratory at Purdue University. Testing was stopped after 140 cycles due to an unpredicted failure mechanism due to an increasing hot spot in the location where failure was predicted. A second combustor was designed to avoid the previous failure, however, it was over pressurized and deformed beyond repair during cold-flow test. The test results are discussed and compared to the analytical and numerical predictions. A detailed comparison was not performed, however, due to the lack of test data resulting from a failure of the test article. Some theoretical and experimental aspects such as fin effect and round corner were found to reduce the discrepancy between prediction and test results.

  18. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic): Fourth year progress review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Richard S.; Schoendorf, John F.

    1986-01-01

    As gas turbine technology continues to advance, the need for advanced life prediction methods for hot section components is becoming more and more evident. The complex local strain and temperature histories at critical locations must be accurately interpreted to account for the effects of various damage mechanisms (such as fatigue, creep, and oxidation) and their possible interactions. As part of the overall NASA HOST effort, this program is designed to investigate these fundamental damage processes, identify modeling strategies, and develop practical models which can be used to guide the early design and development of new engines and to increase the durability of existing engines.

  19. Advanced Failure Determination Measurement Techniques Used in Thermal Fatigue Life Testing of Electronic Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, A. P.; Cornford, S. L.; Gross, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal fatigue life testing of various electronic packaging technologies is being performed by the Reliability Technology Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These testing efforts are in progress to improve uderstanding of the reliability issues associated with low volume packaging technologies for space applications and to develop qualification and acceptance approaches for these technologies. The work described here outlines the electrical failure detection techniques used during testing by documenting the circuits and components used to make these measurements, the sensitivity of the measurements, and the applicability of each specific measurement.

  20. Surface fatigue life and failure characteristics of EX-53, CBS 1000M, and AISI 9310 gear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    Spur gear endurance tests and rolling-element surface fatigue tests are conducted to investigate EX-53 and CBS 1000M steels for use as advanced application gear materials, to determine their endurance characteristics, and to compare the results with the standard AISI 9310 gear material. The gear pitch diameter is 8.89 cm (3.50 in). Gear test conditions are an oil inlet temperature of 320 K (116 F), an oil outlet temperature of 350 K (170 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi), and a speed of 10,000 rpm. Bench-type rolling-element fatigue tests are conducted at ambient temperature with a bar specimen speed of 12,500 rpm and a maximum Hertz stress of 4.83 GPa (700 ksi). The EX-53 test gears have a surface fatigue life of twice that of the AISI 9310 spur gears. The CBS 1000M test gears have a surface fatigue life of more than twice that of the AISI 9310 spur gears. However, the CBS 1000M gears experience a 30-percent tooth fracture failure which limits its use as a gear material. The rolling-contact fatigue lines of RC bar specimens of EX-53 and ASISI 9310 are approximately equal. However, the CBS 1000M RC specimens have a surface fatigue life of about 50 percent that of the AISI 9310.

  1. Prediction of fatigue life of high-heat-load components made of oxygen-free copper by comparing with Glidcop

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Sunao; Sano, Mutsumi; Watanabe, Atsuo; Kitamura, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Following a successful study on the prediction of fatigue life of high-heat-load components made of Glidcop, the thermal limitation of oxygen-free copper (OFC), which is used more commonly than Glidcop, has been studied. In addition to its general mechanical properties, the low-cycle-fatigue (LCF) and creep properties of OFC were investigated in detail and compared with those of Glidcop. The breaking mode of OFC, which was observed to be completely different from that of Glidcop in a fatigue fracture experiment, clarified the importance of considering the creep–fatigue interaction. An additional LCF test with compressive strain holding was conducted so that the creep–fatigue life diagram for out-of-phase thermal fatigue could be obtained on the basis of the strain-range partitioning method. The life predicted from elasto-plastic creep analysis agreed well with that determined from the void ratio estimated in the fatigue fracture experiment. PMID:23254657

  2. Evaluation of flawed composite structural components under static and cyclic loading. [fatigue life of graphite-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of initial defects on the fatigue and fracture response of graphite-epoxy composite laminates are presented. The structural laminates investigated were a typical angle ply laminate, a polar/hoop wound pressure vessel laminate, and a typical engine fan blade laminate. Defects investigated were full and half penetration circular holes, full and half penetration slits, and countersink holes. The effects of the defect size and type on the static fracture strength, fatigue performance, and residual static strength are shown as well as the results of loadings on damage propagation in composite laminates. The data obtained were used to define proof test levels as a qualification procedure in composite structure subjected to cyclic loading.

  3. Oxidation and the Effects of High Temperature Exposures on Notched Fatigue Life of an Advanced Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Draper, Susan L.; Gorman, Timothy T.; Telesman, Jack; Gab, Timothy P.; Hull, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation and the effects of high temperature exposures on notched fatigue life were considered for a powder metallurgy processed supersolvus heat-treated ME3 disk superalloy. The isothermal static oxidation response at 704 C, 760 C, and 815 C was consistent with other chromia forming nickel-based superalloys: a TiO2-Cr2O3 external oxide formed with a branched Al2O3 internal subscale that extended into a recrystallized - dissolution layer. These surface changes can potentially impact disk durability, making layer growth rates important. Growth of the external scales and dissolution layers followed a cubic rate law, while Al2O3 subscales followed a parabolic rate law. Cr- rich M23C6 carbides at the grain boundaries dissolved to help sustain Cr2O3 growth to depths about 12 times thicker than the scale. The effect of prior exposures was examined through notched low cycle fatigue tests performed to failure in air at 704 C. Prior exposures led to pronounced debits of up to 99 % in fatigue life, where fatigue life decreased inversely with exposure time. Exposures that produced roughly equivalent 1 m thick external scales at the various isotherms showed statistically equivalent fatigue lives, establishing that surface damage drives fatigue debit, not exposure temperature. Fractographic evaluation indicated the failure mode for the pre-exposed specimens involved surface crack initiations that shifted with exposure from predominately single intergranular initiations with transgranular propagation to multi-initiations from the cracked external oxide with intergranular propagation. Weakened grain boundaries at the surface resulting from the M23C6 carbide dissolution are partially responsible for the intergranular cracking. Removing the scale and subscale while leaving a layer where M23C6 carbides were dissolved did not lead to a significant fatigue life improvement, however, also removing the M23C6 carbide dissolution layer led to nearly full recovery of life, with a transgranular initiation typical to that observed in unexposed specimens.

  4. Overview of the fatigue/fracture/life working group program at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Constitutive and life prediction models are developed and verified for materials typically used in hot gas path components of reusable space propulsion systems over the range of relevant operating environments. The efforts were centered on the development of crack initiation life prediction methods, while the efforts of a counterpart group were centered on the development of cyclic crack propagation life prediction methods. The complexion of the active tasks are presented. A significant new task started this year will incorporate the various material constitutive and life prediction models developed in this program into a comprehensive creep-fatigue damage analysis and life assessment computer code. The program will function as a postprocessor to general structural analysis programs (such as finite element or boundary element codes) using the output of such analyses (stress, strain, and temperature fields as functions of time) as the input to the damage analysis and life assessment code. The code will be designed to execute on engineering/scientific workstations and will feature a windowing, mouse-driven user interface. Current plans call for the code to be finished and made available for use in mid 1991.

  5. Cable connected active tuned mass dampers for control of in-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, B.; Basu, B.

    2014-11-01

    In-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades are of concern in modern multi-megawatt wind turbines. Today's turbines with capacities of up to 7.5 MW have very large, flexible blades. As blades have grown longer the increasing flexibility has led to vibration problems. Vibration of blades can reduce the power produced by the turbine and decrease the fatigue life of the turbine. In this paper a new active control strategy is designed and implemented to control the in-plane vibration of large wind turbine blades which in general is not aerodynamically damped. A cable connected active tuned mass damper (CCATMD) system is proposed for the mitigation of in-plane blade vibration. An Euler-Lagrangian wind turbine model based on energy formulation has been developed for this purpose which considers the structural dynamics of the system and the interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations and also the interaction between the blades and the tower including the CCATMDs. The CCATMDs are located inside the blades and are controlled by an LQR controller. The turbine is subject to turbulent aerodynamic loading simulated using a modification to the classic Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory with turbulence generated from rotationally sampled spectra. The turbine is also subject to gravity loading. The effect of centrifugal stiffening of the rotating blades has also been considered. Results show that the use of the proposed new active control scheme significantly reduces the in-plane vibration of large, flexible wind turbine blades.

  6. Fatigue Life of Lead Free Solder BGA Joints Against Vibration Stress under High Temperature Circumstance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Michiya; Furusawa, Takeshi; Fukuda, Kyohei; Egusa, Minoru; Yasuda, Kiyokazu; Fujimoto, Kozo

    Recently, the wave of car computerizing is surging such as electronic control unit, car navigation system, electronic toll collection system, car to car communication system, etc. The use environment of in-car devices is under combined environmental stresses such as thermal stress, vibration, and humidity. In general, the reliability of the joints of the devices is individually tested by the evaluation methods for each stress. Our main purpose of this study is to construct the evaluation method for the damages of solder joints under multiple environmental stresses. We investigated the relationship between the plastic strain caused by one cycle vibration stress calculated with FEM analysis considering the temperature dependency of the elasto-plasticity and the fatigue life obtained by the vibration experiment. We indicated the adequacy of the analysis by the correspondence of the resonance frequency of the BGA package mounting board with the experimental result. We also showed that the plastic strain concentrating position corresponded to the crack position. We clarified that the creep strain rate in the total strain was less than 1 percent. We demonstrated that we could apply the power-law equation to predict the fatigue life of the vibration stress from plastic strain rate under 80°C and 125°C as well as the room temperature.

  7. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle method to the prediction of fatigue life of B-52 aircraft pylon components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Carter, A. L.; Totton, W. W.; Ficke, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Stress intensity levels at various parts of the NASA B-52 carrier aircraft pylon were examined for the case when the pylon store was the space shuttle solid rocket booster drop test vehicle. Eight critical stress points were selected for the pylon fatigue analysis. Using fracture mechanics and the half-cycle theory (directly or indirectly) for the calculations of fatigue-crack growth ,the remaining fatigue life (number of flights left) was estimated for each critical part. It was found that the two rear hooks had relatively short fatigue life and that the front hook had the shortest fatigue life of all the parts analyzed. The rest of the pylon parts were found to be noncritical because of their extremely long fatigue life associated with the low operational stress levels.

  8. Investigation of Bearing Fatigue Damage Life Prediction Using Oil Debris Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Bolander, Nathan; Haynes, Chris; Toms, Allison M.

    2011-01-01

    Research was performed to determine if a diagnostic tool for detecting fatigue damage of helicopter tapered roller bearings can be used to determine remaining useful life (RUL). The taper roller bearings under study were installed on the tail gearbox (TGB) output shaft of UH- 60M helicopters, removed from the helicopters and subsequently installed in a bearing spall propagation test rig. The diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting oil debris data during spall progression tests on four bearings. During each test, data from an on-line, in-line, inductance type oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. Results from the four bearings tested indicate that measuring the debris generated when a bearing outer race begins to spall can be used to indicate bearing damage progression and remaining bearing life.

  9. A high temperature fatigue life prediction computer code based on the total strain version of StrainRange Partitioning (SRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    A recently developed high-temperature fatigue life prediction computer code is presented and an example of its usage given. The code discussed is based on the Total Strain version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP). Included in this code are procedures for characterizing the creep-fatigue durability behavior of an alloy according to TS-SRP guidelines and predicting cyclic life for complex cycle types for both isothermal and thermomechanical conditions. A reasonably extensive materials properties database is included with the code.

  10. Low strain, long life creep fatigue of AF2-1DA and INCO 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakker, A. B.; Cowles, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Two aircraft turbine disk alloys, GATORIZED AF2-DA and INCO 718 were evaluated for their low strain long life creep-fatigue behavior. Static (tensile and creep rupture) and cyclic properties of both alloys were characterized. The cntrolled strain LCF tests were conducted at 760 C (1400 F) and 649 C (1200 F) for AF2-1DA and INCO 718, respectively. Hold times were varied for tensile, compressive and tensile/compressive strain dwell (relaxation) tests. Stress (creep) hold behavior of AF2-1DA was also evaluated. Generally, INCO 718 exhibited more pronounced reduction in cyclic life due to hold than AF2-1DA. The percent reduction in life for both alloys for strain dwell tests was greater at low strain ranges (longer life regime). Changing hold time from 0 to 0.5, 2.0 and 15.0 min. resulted in corresponding reductions in life. The continuous cycle and cyclic/dwell initiation failure mechanism was predominantly transgranular for AF2-1DA and intergranular for INCO 718.

  11. Analysis of aeroelastic loads and their contributions to fatigue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergami, L.; Gaunaa, M.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the aeroelastic loads on a wind turbine in normal operation. The characteristic of the loads causing the highest fatigue damage are identified, so to provide indications to the development of active load alleviation systems for smart- rotor applications. Fatigue analysis is performed using rain-flow counting and Palmgren-Miner linear damage assumption; the contribution to life-time fatigue damage from deterministic load variations is quantified, as well as the contributions from operation at different mean wind speeds. A method is proposed to retrieve an estimation of the load frequencies yielding the highest fatigue contributions from the bending moment spectra. The results are in good agreement with rain-flow counting analysis on filtered time series, and, for the blade loads, show dominant contributions from frequencies close to the rotational one; negligible fatigue contributions are reported for loads with frequencies above 2 Hz.

  12. Fatigue Life Prediction of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures. Part I: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on the fatigue behavior in C/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) with different fiber preforms, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D woven, at room and elevated temperatures in air atmosphere. The experimental fatigue life S - N curves of C/SiC composites corresponding to different stress levels and test conditions have been obtained. The damage evolution processes under fatigue loading have been analyzed using fatigue hysteresis modulus and fatigue hysteresis loss energy. By comparing the experimental fatigue hysteresis loss energy with theoretical computational values, the interface shear stress corresponding to different peak stress, fiber preforms and test conditions have been estimated. It was found that the degradation of interface shear stress and fibres strength caused by oxidation markedly decreases the fatigue life of C/SiC composites at elevated temperature.

  13. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  14. Pre-crack fatigue life assessment of relevant aircraft materials using fractal analysis of eddy current test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Jürgen; Cikalova, Ulana; Hillmann, Susanne; Meyendorf, Norbert; Hoffmann, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Successful determination of residual fatigue life requires a comprehensive understanding of the fatigue related material deformation mechanism. Neither macroscopic continuum mechanics nor micromechanic observations provide sufficient data to explain subsequent deformation structures occurring during the fatigue life of a metallic structure. Instead mesomechanic deformation on different scaling levels can be studied by applying fractal analysis of various means of nondestructive inspection measurements. The resulting fractal dimension data can be correlated to the actual material damage states, providing an estimation of the remaining residual fatigue life before macroscopic fracture develops. Recent efforts were aimed to apply the fractal concept to aerospace relevant materials AA7075-T6 and Ti-6Al-4V. Proven and newly developed fractal analysis methods were applied to eddy current (EC) measurements of fatigued specimens, with the potential to transition this approach to an aircraft for an in-situ nondestructive inspection. The occurrence of mesomechanic deformation at the material surface of both AA7075-T6 and Ti-6Al-4V specimens could be established via topography images using confocal microscopy (CM). Furthermore, a pulsed eddy current (PEC) approach was developed, combined with a sophisticated new fractal analysis algorithm based on short pulse excitation and evaluation of EC relaxation behavior. This paper presents concept, experimental realization, fractal analysis procedures, and results of this effort.

  15. Evaluation of effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figure I-90 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments when five conditions are satisfied simultaneously, viz., applied strain range, temperature, dissolved oxygen in the water, and sulfur content of the steel are above a minimum threshold level, and the loading strain rate is below a threshold value. Only a moderate decrease in fatigue life is observed when any one of these conditions is not satisfied. This paper summarizes available data on the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels. The data have been analyzed to define the threshold values of the five critical parameters. Methods for estimating fatigue lives under actual loading histories are discussed.

  16. Independent effect of fatigue on health-related quality of life in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Vasfiye Burcu; Koksal, Ayhan; Dirican, Ayten; Baybas, Sevim; Dirican, Ahmet; Dogan, Gulsum Buse

    2015-12-01

    Nonmotor symptoms (NMS) of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), specifically fatigue, depression and sleep disturbances, are important contributors for worse quality of life and poor patient outcomes. The aim of this research is to determine the relationship between fatigue and other NMS and the independent effect of fatigue on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with IPD. 86 IPD patients and 85 healthy individuals were included in our study. Participants were evaluated by their answers to the Beck Depression Inventory, Fatigue Severity Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39. Hoehn-Yahr stage, disease duration, medications and demographical characteristics were also noted. ROC analysis was used to determine the cutoff point for HRQoL. Nonparametric Spearman correlation analysis was used for determining the relationship between variables. Independent factors which affect HRQoL were detected by multiple forward stepwise logistic regression analysis. NMS were associated with each other and with HRQoL when they act concomitantly (p < 0.001). Of these three frequent NMS, depression (p < 0.05) and fatigue (p < 0.001) had independent worsening effect on HRQoL, whereas sleep disturbances did not (p > 0.05). The stage of IPD and levodopa-entacapone treatment had independent effects on HRQoL too (p < 0.05). Fatigue was found as the most important factor which affects HRQoL among all investigated NMS. So, it is important to ask about fatigue in routine controls of IPD patients and try to treat it for improving life quality. PMID:26198763

  17. Microstructural Influence on Deformation and Fatigue Life of Composites Using the Generalized Method of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Murthy, P.; Bednarcyk, B. A.; Pineda, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    A fully coupled deformation and damage approach to modeling the response of composite materials and composite laminates is presented. It is based on the semi-­-analytical generalized method of cells (GMC) micromechanics model as well as its higher fidelity counterpart, HFGMC, both of which provide closed-form constitutive equations for composite materials as well as the micro scale stress and strain fields in the composite phases. The provided constitutive equations allow GMC and HFGMC to function within a higher scale structural analysis (e.g., finite element analysis or lamination theory) to represent a composite material point, while the availability of the micro fields allow the incorporation of lower scale sub­-models to represent local phenomena in the fiber and matrix. Further, GMC's formulation performs averaging when applying certain governing equations such that some degree of microscale field accuracy is surrendered in favor of extreme computational efficiency, rendering the method quite attractive as the centerpiece in a integrated computational material engineering (ICME) structural analysis; whereas HFGMC retains this microscale field accuracy, but at the price of significantly slower computational speed. Herein, the sensitivity of deformation and the fatigue life of graphite/epoxy PMC composites, with both ordered and disordered microstructures, has been investigated using this coupled deformation and damage micromechanics based approach. The local effects of fiber breakage and fatigue damage are included as sub-models that operate on the microscale for the individual composite phases. For analysis of laminates, classical lamination theory is employed as the global or structural scale model, while GMC/HFGMC is embedded to operate on the microscale to simulate the behavior of the composite material within each laminate layer. A key outcome of this study is the statistical influence of microstructure and micromechanics idealization (GMC or HFGMC) on the overall accuracy of unidirectional and laminated composite deformation and fatigue response.

  18. The Effect of Weld Profile and Geometries of Butt Weld Joints on Fatigue Life Under Cyclic Tensile Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mukhtar, A. M.; Biermann, H.; Hübner, P.; Henkel, S.

    2011-11-01

    The fatigue life of welded joint was calculated based on numerical integration of simple Paris' law and a reliable solution of the stress intensity factor (SIF). The initial crack length ( a i) was assumed to be equal to 0.1 mm in case of weld toe. This length was satisfactory for different butt joints geometries. The comparisons with the available data from standards and literature were demonstrated. It was shown numerically that the machining of weld reinforcements will increase the fatigue life. The increase of plate thickness decreases the fatigue strength (FAT) and the number of cycles to failure when using the proportional scaling of crack length. The validation processes of the current calculations have been shown. Therefore, it can be concluded that it will prevent the unnecessary waste of time consumed to carry out the experiments.

  19. The Effects of Shot and Laser Peening on Fatigue Life and Crack Growth in 2024 Aluminum Alloy and 4340 Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Matthews, W. T.; Prabhakaran, R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dubberly, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue and crack growth tests have been conducted on 4340 steel and 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, respectively, to assess the effects of shot peening on fatigue life and the effects of shot and laser peening on crack growth. Two current programs involving fixed and rotary-wing aircraft will not be using shot peened structures. Since the shot peening compressive residual stress depth is usually less than the 0.05-inch initial damage tolerance crack size, it is believed by some that shot peening should have no beneficial effects toward retarding crack growth. In this study cracks were initiated from an electronic-discharged machining flaw which was cycled to produce a fatigue crack of approximately 0.05-inches in length and then the specimens were peened. Test results showed that after peening the crack growth rates were noticeably slower when the cracks were fairly short for both the shot and laser peened specimens resulting in a crack growth life that was a factor of 2 to 4 times greater than the results of the average unpeened test. Once the cracks reached a length of approximately 0.1-inches the growth rates were about the same for the peened and unpeened specimens. Fatigue tests on 4340 steel showed that the endurance limit of a test specimen with a 0.002-inch-deep machining-like scratch was reduced by approximately 40 percent. However, if the "scratched" specimen was shot peened after inserting the scratch, the fatigue life returned to almost 100 percent of the unflawed specimens original fatigue life.

  20. Initial Assessment of the Effects of Nonmetallic Inclusions on Fatigue Life of Powder-Metallurgy-Processed Udimet(TM) 720

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Telesman, J.; Kantzos, P. T.; Bonacuse, P. J.; Barrie, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue lives of modern powder metallurgy (PM) disk alloys are influenced by variabilities in alloy microstructure and mechanical properties. These properties can vary due to the different steps of materials/component processing and machining. One of these variables, the presence of nonmetallic inclusions, has been shown to significantly degrade low-cycle fatigue (LCF) life. Nonmetallic inclusions are inherent defects in powder alloys that are a by-product of powder-processing techniques. Contamination of the powder can occur in the melt, during powder atomization, or during any of the various handling processes through consolidation. In modern nickel disk powder processing facilities, the levels of inclusion contamination have been reduced to less than 1 part per million by weight. Despite the efforts of manufacturers to ensure the cleanliness of their powder production processes, the presence of inclusions remains a source of great concern for the designer. the objective of this study was to investigate the effects on fatigue life of these inclusions. Since natural inclusions occur so infrequently, elevated levels of inclusions were carefully introduced in a nickel-based disk superalloy, Udimet 720 (registered trademark of Special Metals Corporation), produced using PM processing. Multiple strain-controlled fatigue tests were then performed on this material at 650 C. Analyses were performed to compare the LCF lives and failure initiation sites as functions of inclusion content and fatigue conditions. A large majority of the failures in specimens with introduced inclusions occurred at cracks initiating from inclusions at the specimen surface. The inclusions could reduce fatigue life by up to 100 times. These effects were found to be dependent on strain range and strain ratio. Tests at lower strain ranges and higher strain ratios produced larger effects of inclusions on life.

  1. A creep cavity growth model for creep-fatigue life prediction of a unidirectional W/Cu composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Verrilli, Michael J.; Halford, Gary R.

    1992-01-01

    A microstructural model was developed to predict creep-fatigue life in a (0)(sub 4), 9 volume percent tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite at the temperature of 833 K. The mechanism of failure of the composite is assumed to be governed by the growth of quasi-equilibrium cavities in the copper matrix of the composite, based on the microscopically observed failure mechanisms. The methodology uses a cavity growth model developed for prediction of creep fracture. Instantaneous values of strain rate and stress in the copper matrix during fatigue cycles were calculated and incorporated in the model to predict cyclic life. The stress in the copper matrix was determined by use of a simple two-bar model for the fiber and matrix during cyclic loading. The model successfully predicted the composite creep-fatigue life under tension-tension cyclic loading through the use of this instantaneous matrix stress level. Inclusion of additional mechanisms such as cavity nucleation, grain boundary sliding, and the effect of fibers on matrix-stress level would result in more generalized predictions of creep-fatigue life.

  2. Fatigue modeling for small wind systems: basic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Waldon, C.A.; Hansen, A.C.

    1983-06-01

    This report discusses the theory of fatigue as applied to horizontal-axis wind systems and reviews current techniques for predicting fatigue loads and fatigue life. Wind systems are subjected to a complex and diverse variety of loads, ranging from simple gravity and centrifugal loads to complex and random wind loads. The categories of loads described here include transient, periodic, and control-induced loads, as well as loads induced by severe aeroelastic instabilities. Within these categories, load types include centrifugal, aerodynamic thrust and torque, parked rotor survival loads, gravity loads, gyroscopic loads, and aerodynamic loads induced by crossflow or yaw motion. Control systems can impose loads whenever they are activated. Catastrophic failure can result from severe aeroelastically-induced loads caused by flutter. Techniques available for predicting fatigue loads include various aerodynamic performance codes (such as PROP) and simplified methods for calculating the convection of the vortex wake. MOSTAB, an aeroelasticity computer code, treats all major load sources. Results using this code are shown to be fairly comparable to experimental data in the case of a rigid-bladed wind system. Fatigue life of a machine component can be predicted during design by several techniques, including the strength-of-materials method, the fatigue curve method, and the fatigue event method. The theories of Miner, Manson, and Corten-Dolan can be used to predict fatigue life based on test data and operational experience. A fatigue research project to be performed at Rocky Flats will attempt to resolve whether any of these theories or a combination of theories can be used with an acceptable degree of accuracy in predicting fatigue loads and life for wind systems. An appendix to the report provides sample calculations of fatigue load magnitudes made using available methods.

  3. Development of a device to study fatigue life of fixed partial dentures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, S. C.; Meseguer, M. D.; Estal, R.; Folguera, F.; Vidal, V.

    2012-04-01

    Fixed partial dentures can be fabricated by means of different materials and with different manufacturing processes. In order to establish possible differences among them, their behaviour, as fatigue life or cement shear bond strength, have to be evaluated. This article presents a modular, economic and robust device to evaluate fixed partial dentures and dental crowns. A base to support the fixed partial dentures and a device to simulate masticatory loads have been developed. The device has got a simple design. It is based on a pneumatic piston, with a pressure regulator to control masticatory loads. On a first stage, only vertical forces have been taking into account. However, the device will allow simulating tangential masticatory loads on the other axis, studying the behaviour of the fixed partial dentures submerged in a solution similar to saliva, changing masticatory load application, etc. with little modifications.

  4. Reliability approach to rotating-component design. [fatigue life and stress concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D. B.; Lalli, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    A probabilistic methodology for designing rotating mechanical components using reliability to relate stress to strength is explained. The experimental test machines and data obtained for steel to verify this methodology are described. A sample mechanical rotating component design problem is solved by comparing a deterministic design method with the new design-by reliability approach. The new method shows that a smaller size and weight can be obtained for specified rotating shaft life and reliability, and uses the statistical distortion-energy theory with statistical fatigue diagrams for optimum shaft design. Statistical methods are presented for (1) determining strength distributions for steel experimentally, (2) determining a failure theory for stress variations in a rotating shaft subjected to reversed bending and steady torque, and (3) relating strength to stress by reliability.

  5. User`s guide for the frequency domain algorithms in the LIFE2 fatigue analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.; Linker, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The LIFE2 computer code is a fatigue/fracture analysis code that is specialized to the analysis of wind turbine components. The numerical formulation of the code uses a series of cycle count matrices to describe the cyclic stress states imposed upon the turbine. However, many structural analysis techniques yield frequency-domain stress spectra and a large body of experimental loads (stress) data is reported in the frequency domain. To permit the analysis of this class of data, a Fourier analysis is used to transform a frequency-domain spectrum to an equivalent time series suitable for rainflow counting by other modules in the code. This paper describes the algorithms incorporated into the code and their numerical implementation. Example problems are used to illustrate typical inputs and outputs.

  6. Effects of blade bending on aerodynamic control of fluctuating loads on teetered HAWT rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, A.J. Jr.; Ashley, H.; Rock, S.M.; Chaney, K.; Digumarthi, R.

    1996-11-01

    Active aerodynamic control, in the form of closed-loop actuation of blade-tip ailerons or all-movable blades, is investigated as a means of increasing the structural fatigue life of HAWT rotors. The rotor considered is upwind and teetered, with two blades of diameter 29.2 m., fiberglass construction and other properties representative of modern light-weight construction. The paper begins with a review of prior work which studied the problem for an essentially rigid structure. For that and the present research, two loading conditions were invoked: exposure to a Rayleigh distribution of operating winds with vertical shear and a 15 percent superimposed spectrum of turbulence; and occasional exposure to 62 m/s hurricanes. Accounted for herein is the effect of flatwise bending flexibility on the loads spectra of root flatwise bending moment, thrust, and torque (both open loop and closed loop). Using Miner`s rule, the moments are converted to fatigue lives. With aerodynamic control, RMS flatwise moments for the flexible blade in turbulence are found to be less than {1/2} of those without control. At a fixed blade weight of 540 kg when hurricane loads are added, the aileron-controlled blade is designed by that limit-load condition. In contrast, the all-movable blade can be feather controlled in the high wind so that its life is dominated by turbulent loads. Simplified fatigue analysis permits weight reductions to be estimated which yield controlled blades capable of 30 years` operation with a safety factor of 11. The resulting weights are about 400 kg for the aileron-controlled blade, and 230 kg for the all-movable blade. However, such light-weight rotors require attention to other design considerations, such as start-stop cycles. Apart from limit loads, the methods of analysis are linearized (locally for aerodynamic loads). It follows that the results are likely to be meaningful in terms of comparative, rather than absolute, values of fatigue life and weight.

  7. Experimental observations on uniaxial whole-life transformation ratchetting and low-cycle stress fatigue of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Di; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the low-cycle fatigue failure of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy micro-tubes with a wall thickness of 150 ?m is investigated by uniaxial stress-controlled cyclic tests at human body temperature 310 K. The effects of mean stress, peak stress, and stress amplitude on the uniaxial whole-life transformation ratchetting and fatigue failure of the NiTi alloy are observed. It is concluded that the fatigue life depends significantly on the stress levels, and the extent of martensite transformation and its reverse play an important role in determining the fatigue life. High peak stress or complete martensite transformation shortens the fatigue life.

  8. The relationship between cough-specific quality of life and abdominal muscle endurance, fatigue, and depression in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Arikan, Hulya; Savci, Sema; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Saglam, Melda; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Coplu, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cough is a prevalent symptom that impacts quality of life in COPD. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between cough-specific quality of life, abdominal muscle endurance, fatigue, and depression in stable patients with COPD. Methods Twenty-eight patients with COPD (mean age 60.6±8.7 years) referred for pulmonary rehabilitation participated in this cross-sectional study. Sit-ups test was used for assessing abdominal muscle endurance. Leicester Cough Questionnare (LCQ) was used to evaluate symptom-specific quality of life. Fatigue perception was evaluated with Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used for assessing depression level. Results The LCQ total score was significantly associated with number of sit-ups; BDI score; FIS total; physical, cognitive, and psychosocial scores (P<0.05). Scores of the LCQ physical, social, and psychological domains were also significantly related with number of sit-ups, FIS total score, and BDI score (P<0.05). FIS total score and number of sit-ups explained 58% of the variance in LCQ total score (r=0.76, r2=0.577, F(2–20)=12.296, P<0.001). Conclusion Chronic cough may adversely affect performance in daily life due to its negative effect on fatigue and decrease abdominal muscle endurance in patients with COPD. Decreased cough-related quality of life is related with increased level of depression in COPD patients. Effects of increased abdominal muscle endurance and decreased fatigue in COPD patients with chronic cough need further investigation. PMID:26379433

  9. Successful Solutions to SSME/AT Development Turbine Blade Distress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Stuart K.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump/Alternate Turbopump (HPFTP/AT) turbine blade development program, unique turbine blade design features were implemented to address 2nd stage turbine blade high cycle fatigue distress and improve turbine robustness. Features included the addition of platform featherseal dampers, asymmetric blade tip seal segments, gold plating of the blade attachments, and airfoil tip trailing edge modifications. Development testing shows these features have eliminated turbine blade high cycle fatigue distress and consequently these features are currently planned for incorporation to the flight configuration. Certification testing will begin in 1999. This presentation summarizes these features.

  10. Influence of Solid-State Diffusion during Equilibration on Microstructure and Fatigue Life of Superalloy Wide-Gap Brazements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osoba, L. O.; Ojo, O. A.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of solid-state diffusion-controlled solute-loss into additive powder particles (APPs), as determined by particles size, during the equilibration stage of wide-gap brazing, on microstructure and fatigue behavior of a brazed aerospace superalloy was studied. The results, which experimentally confirm previously reported numerical model simulation results, show that, in order to avoid degradation of fatigue life of wide-gap brazement, adequate solute-loss into the APPs, which is necessary to prevent their complete melting, but has not been generally considered, is imperative.

  11. Grain boundary oxidation and an analysis of the effects of pre-oxidation on subsequent fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oshida, Y.; Liu, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of preoxidation on subsequent fatigue life were studied. Surface oxidation and grain boundary oxidation of a nickel-base superalloy (TAZ-8A) were studied at 600 to 1000 C for 10 to 1000 hours in air. Surface oxides were identified and the kinetics of surface oxidation was discussed. Grain boundary oxide penetration and morphology were studied. Pancake type grain boundary oxide penetrates deeper and its size is larger, therefore, it is more detrimental to fatigue life than cone-type grain boundary oxide. Oxide penetration depth, a (sub m), is related to oxidation temperature, T, and exposure time, t, by an empirical relation of the Arrhenius type. Effects of T and t on statistical variation of a (sub m) were analyzed according to the Weibull distribution function. Once the oxide is cracked, it serves as a fatigue crack nucleus. Statistical variation of the remaining fatigue life, after the formation of an oxide crack of a critical length, is related directly to the statistical variation of grain boundary oxide penetration depth.

  12. Rolling-element fatigue life of silicon nitride balls. [as compared to that of steel, ceramic, and cermet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    The five-ball fatigue tester was used to evaluate silicon nitride as a rolling-element bearing material. Results indicate that hot-pressed silicon nitride running against steel may be expected to yield fatigue lives comparable to or greater than those of bearing quality steel running against steel at stress levels typical rolling-element bearing application. The fatigue life of hot-pressed silicon nitride is considerably greater than that of any ceramic or cermet tested. Computer analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of 120-mm-bore angular--contact ball bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where hot-pressed silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  13. J. F. Mandell, D. D. Samborsky, and H. J. Sutherland, "Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades", 1999

    E-print Network

    J. F. Mandell, D. D. Samborsky, and H. J. Sutherland, "Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Turbine Blades John F. Mandell Daniel D. Samborsky Dept. of Chemical Engineering Montana State University

  14. The Relationship between Qi Deficiency, Cancer-related Fatigue and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chung-Hua; Lee, Chia-Jung; Chien, Tsai-Ju; Lin, Che-Pin; Chen, Chien-Hung; Yuen, Mei-Jen; Lai, Yuen-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Qi (? qì) refers to the vital energy of the body in Traditional Chinese medicines (TCM). Qi deficiency (?? qì x?) is the most common symptom in cancer patients according to the concept of TCM. We hypothesized that cancer patients with Qi deficiency suffer from poor quality of life (QOL) and fatigue. Method: Among the 256 registered cancer patients screened at our outpatient clinic, a total of 198 were enrolled. The inclusion criteria were (1) age between 18 and 70 years, (2) cancer diagnosis confirmed by the professional physician, (3) being Chinese, and (4) Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status rating (PSR) ? 3. The major outcome is the difference in QOL score in cancer patients with and without Qi deficiency. Results: The initial results showed statistically significant differences in WHO-QOL scores in physical, psychological, and social domains between the groups with and without Qi deficiency as well as the groups with and without cancerrelated fatigue (CRF). All patients with CRF present were also diagnosed as Qi deficient. In addition, among the patients with no CRF, 39.9% (69/173) were diagnosed as suffering from Qi deficiency, which led to poor QOL. Conclusions: The present study showed statistically significant difference in WHO-QOL scores in physical, psychological, and social domains between the groups with and without Qi deficiency as well as the groups with and without CRF. Cancer patients diagnosed with Qi deficiency or CRF have poor QOL. The concept of Qi deficiency in TCM might be applied to cancer health care. PMID:24716125

  15. Finite element analysis of sucker rod couplings with guidelines for improving fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.

    1997-09-01

    The response of a variety of sucker rod couplings to an applied axial load was simulated using axisymmetric finite element models. The calculations investigated three sucker rod sizes and various combinations of the slimhole, Spiralock, and Flexbar modifications to the coupling. In addition, the effect of various make-ups (assembly tightness) on the performance of coupling was investigated. An axial load was applied to the sucker rod ranging from {minus}5 ksi to 40 ksi, encompassing three load cycles identified on a modified Goodman diagram as acceptable for indefinite service life of the sucker rods. The simulations of the various coupling geometries and make-ups were evaluated with respect to how well they accomplish the two primary objectives of preloading threaded couplings: (1) to lock the threaded coupling together so that it will not loosen and eventually uncouple, and (2) to improve the fatigue resistance of the threaded connection by reducing the stress amplitude in the coupling when subjected to cyclic loading. Perhaps the most significant finding in this study was the characterization of the coupling parameters which affect two stress measures. The mean hydrostatic stress, which determines the permissible effective alternating stress, is a function of the coupling make-up. Whereas, the alternating effective stress is a function of the relative stiffnesses of the pin and box sections of the coupling and, as long as the coupling does not separate, is unaffected by the amount of circumferential displacement applied during make-up. The results of this study suggest approaches for improving the fatigue resistance of sucker rod couplings.

  16. Neural network fatigue life prediction in steel i-beams using mathematically modeled acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadorai, Prathikshen N.

    The purpose of this research is to predict fatigue cracking in metal beams using mathematically modeled acoustic emission (AE) data. The AE data was collected from nine samples of steel Ibeam that were subjected to three-point bending caused by cyclic loading. The data gathered during these tests were filtered in order to remove long duration hits, multiple hit data, and obvious outliers. Based on the duration, energy, amplitude, and average frequency of the AE hits, the filtered data were classified into the various failure mechanisms of metals using NeuralWorksRTM Professional II/Plus software based self-organizing map (SOM) neural network. The parameters from mathematically modeled AE failure mechanism data were used to predict plastic deformation data. Amplitude data from classified plastic deformation data is mathematically modeled herein using bounded Johnson distributions and Weibull distribution. A backpropagation neural network (BPNN) is generated using MATLABRTM. This BPNN is able to predict the number of cycles that ultimately cause the steel I-beams to fail via five different models of plastic deformation data. These five models are data without any mathematical modeling and four which are mathematically modeled using three methods of bounded Johnson distribution (Slifker and Shapiro, Mage and Linearization) and Weibull distribution. Currently, the best method is the Linearization method that has prediction error not more than 17%. Multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is also performed on the four sets of mathematically modeled plastic deformation data as named above using the bounded Johnson and Weibull shape parameters. The MLR gives the best prediction for the Linearized method which has a prediction error not more than 2%. The final conclusion made is that both BPNN and MLR are excellent tools for accurate fatigue life cycle prediction.

  17. NASALife-Component Fatigue and Creep Life Prediction Program and Illustrative Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.

    2005-01-01

    NASALife is a life prediction program for propulsion system components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and creep rupture conditions. Although, the primary focus was for CMC components the underlying methodologies are equally applicable to other material systems as well. The program references data for low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep rupture, and static material properties as part of the life prediction process. Multiaxial stresses are accommodated by Von Mises based methods and a Walker model is used to address mean stress effects. Varying loads are reduced by the Rainflow counting method. Lastly, damage due to cyclic loading (Miner s rule) and creep are combined to determine the total damage per mission and the number of missions the component can survive before failure are calculated. Illustration of code usage is provided through example problem of a CMC turbine stator vane made of melt-infiltrated, silicon carbide fiber-reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC)

  18. Fatigue Life Prediction in Rapid Die Casting - Preliminary Work in View of Current Research

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan Huat Ng; Grote, Karl-Heinrich; Baehr, Ruediger

    2007-05-17

    Numerical simulation technique as a prediction tool is slowly adopted in metal casting industry for predicting design modelling solidification analysis. The reasons for this activity is found in the need to further enhance the geometrical design and mechanical properties of the tool design and the correct prediction methodology to fulfil industrial needs. The present state of numerical simulation capabilities in rapid die casting technologies is reviewed and the failure mode mechanisms of thermal fatigue, aimed at developing a numerical simulation with a systematic design guidance for predicting the thermal cyclic loading analysis and improvement is presented along with several other methods. The economic benefits of a numerical simulation technique in die casting are limited to tool life time, mechanical properties and design guidance. The extensive computer capabilities of a numerical simulation with a systematic design guidance methodology are exploited to provide a solution for flexible design, mechanical properties and mould life time. Related research carried out worldwide by different organisations and academic institutions are discussed.

  19. Displacement measurement on specimens subjected to non-Gaussian random vibrations in fatigue life tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncossi, M.; Di Sante, R.; Rivola, A.

    2014-05-01

    High-cycle fatigue life tests conducted using controlled random vibrations are commonly used to evaluate failure in components and structures. In most cases, a Gaussian distribution of both the input vibration and the stress response is assumed, while real-life loads may be non-Gaussian causing the response to be non-Gaussian as well. Generating non-Gaussian drive signals with high kurtosis and a given power spectral density, however, does not always guarantee that the stress response will actually be non-Gaussian, because this depends on the adherence of the tested system to the Central Limit Theorem. On the other side, suitable measurement methods need to be developed in order to estimate the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations, and therefore to evaluate and select input loads. In this paper, a simple test rig with a notched cantilevered specimen was developed to measure the response and examine the kurtosis values in the case of stationary Gaussian, stationary non-Gaussian, and non-stationary non-Gaussian excitation signals. The Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) technique was used for the first time in this type of test, to estimate the specimen stress amplitude response in terms of differential displacement at the notch section ends. A method based on the use of accelerometers to correct for the occasional signal drops occurring during the experiment is described and the results are discussed with respect to the ability of the test procedure to evaluate the output signal.

  20. Characterisation of the fatigue life, dynamic creep and modes of damage accumulation within mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Gillian M; Murphy, Bruce P

    2015-09-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is often caused by either elongated or ruptured chordae tendineae (CT). In many cases, rupture is spontaneous, meaning there is no underlying cause. We hypothesised that spontaneous rupture may be due to mechanical fatigue. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested porcine marginal CT: in uniaxial tension, and in fatigue at a range of peak stresses (n=12 at 15, 10 and 7.5MPa respectively, n=6 at 5MPa). The rupture surfaces of failed CT were observed histologically, under polarised light microscopy, and SEM. The cycles to failure for 15, 10, 7.5 and 5 MPa peak stresses were: (average±SD): 5077±4366, 49513±56414, 99927±108908, 197099±69103. A Weibull plot was constructed and from this, the number of cycles at 50% probability of failure was established in order to approximate the fatigue life, which was found to be 2.43MPa at 10 million cycles. The rate of creep increases exponentially with increasing peak stress. Under histological examination it was observed that CT which have been fatigued at low stress partially lose their organised collagen structure and can sustain micro-cracks that can be linked to increases in the creep rate. Furthermore our SEM images closely matched descriptions from the literature of spontaneous in vivo rupture. In conclusion, we believe that the mechanical test results we present strongly suggest that spontaneous chordal rupture and chordal elongation in vivo can be caused by mechanical fatigue. PMID:26087111

  1. Effects of exercise on angiogenesis and apoptosis-related molecules, quality of life, fatigue and depression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ergun, M; Eyigor, S; Karaca, B; Kisim, A; Uslu, R

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of exercise on angiogenesis and apoptosis-related molecules, quality of life, fatigue and depression in patients who completed breast cancer treatment. Sixty breast cancer patients were randomised into three groups, as supervised exercise group, home exercise group and education group. Angiogenesis and apoptosis-related cytokine levels and quality of life (EORTC QOL-C30: European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life C30), fatigue (Brief Fatigue Inventory) and depression (BDI: Beck Depression Inventory) scores were compared before and after a 12-week exercise programme. After the exercise programme, statistically significant decreases were found in interleukin-8 and neutrophil activating protein-78 levels in the home exercise group (P < 0.05). The education group showed a statistically significant increase in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 level (P < 0.05). Functional score and global health score of EORTC QOL-C30 in the supervised exercise group and functional score of EORTC QOL-C30 in the home exercise group increased significantly after exercise programme (P < 0.05). BDI score was significantly lower in the supervised exercise group after the exercise programme (P < 0.05). Changes in angiogenesis and apoptosis-related molecules in the study groups suggest a possible effect of exercise on these parameters. Exercise programmes are safe and effective on quality of life and depression in breast cancer patients whose treatments are complete. PMID:23731173

  2. Fatigue handbook: Offshore steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Almarnaess, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of Offshore Steel Structures; Loads on Ocean Structures; Fracture Mechanics As a Tool in Fatigue Analysis; Basic Fatigue Properties of Welded Joints; Significance of Defects; Improving the Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints; Effects of Marine Environment and Cathodic Protection on Fatigue of Structural Steels Fatigue of Tubular Joints; Unstable Fracture; Fatigue Life Calculations; and Fatigue in Building Codes Background and Applications.

  3. FLAPS (Fatigue Life Analysis Programs): Computer Programs to Predict Cyclic Life Using the Total Strain Version of Strainrange Partitioning and Other Life Prediction Methods. Users' Manual and Example Problems, Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This manual presents computer programs FLAPS for characterizing and predicting fatigue and creep-fatigue resistance of metallic materials in the high-temperature, long-life regime for isothermal and nonisothermal fatigue. The programs use the Total Strain version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP), and several other life prediction methods described in this manual. The user should be thoroughly familiar with the TS-SRP and these life prediction methods before attempting to use any of these programs. Improper understanding can lead to incorrect use of the method and erroneous life predictions. An extensive database has also been developed in a parallel effort. The database is probably the largest source of high-temperature, creep-fatigue test data available in the public domain and can be used with other life-prediction methods as well. This users' manual, software, and database are all in the public domain and can be obtained by contacting the author. The Compact Disk (CD) accompanying this manual contains an executable file for the FLAPS program, two datasets required for the example problems in the manual, and the creep-fatigue data in a format compatible with these programs.

  4. Health-related quality of life, fatigue, and depression under low-dose IFN-? therapy in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Katrin; Albrecht, Karoline; Seelig, Harald; Meiss, Frank; Mauch, Cornelia; Kreuzberg, Nicole; Nashan, Dorothée

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvant melanoma treatment with interferon-? (IFN-?) has proven to be accompanied by several side effects and to decrease patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL), fatigue and depression being essential factors at that. Although a large body of evidence exists for HRQOL under IFN-? therapy, we now specifically address this topic combining the HRQOL survey in the first months of IFN-? low-dose treatment with a structured assessment of relevant neuropsychiatric side effects, fatigue and depression, with specific validated assessment tools. The present study is a longitudinal observational study assessing fatigue, depression, and HRQOL with specific assessment tools at 3 assessment points over 6 months. The IFN-? treatment group consisted of 48 patients with current IFN-? therapy (3 MU 3 times weekly) from a consecutively recruited melanoma collective and compared with a parallelized nontreatment group (n=48) in routine clinical practice. A descriptive analysis and generalized linear models were applied to compare the groups. Physical fatigue increased significantly within the first months of IFN-? treatment, whereas cognitive and emotional fatigue and depression symptoms did not show this increase. The hypothesis of a significant deterioration of HRQOL after IFN-? initiation was not confirmed. The treatment group did, however, show a different course of global HRQOL than the comparison group, with a significant improvement in the nontreatment group. Patients under low-dose IFN-? therapy primarily suffer from physical side effects, mainly physical fatigue, in the early phases of treatment. The HRQOL improvement evident in the nontreatment group was not observed in the IFN-? group. PMID:25304729

  5. Demonstrating the Effect of Particle Impact Dampers on the Random Vibration Response and Fatigue Life of Printed Wiring Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Montgomery, Randall; Geist, David; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In a recent experimental study, small Particle Impact Dampers (PID) were bonded directly to the surface of printed circuit board (PCB) or printed wiring assemblies (PWA), reducing the random vibration response and increasing the fatigue life. This study provides data verifying practicality of this approach. The measured peak strain and acceleration response of the fundamental out of plane bending mode was significantly attenuated by adding a PID device. Attenuation of this mode is most relevant to the fatigue life of a PWA because the local relative displacements between the board and the supported components, which ultimately cause fatigue failures of the electrical leads of the board-mounted components are dominated by this mode. Applying PID damping at the board-level of assembly provides mitigation with a very small mass impact, especially as compared to isolation at an avionics box or shelf level of assembly. When compared with other mitigation techniques at the PWA level (board thickness, stiffeners, constrained layer damping), a compact PID device has the additional advantage of not needing to be an integral part of the design. A PID can simply be bonded to heritage or commercial off the shelf (COTS) hardware to facilitate its use in environments beyond which it was originally qualified. Finite element analysis and test results show that the beneficial effect is not localized and that the attenuation is not due to the simple addition of mass. No significant, detrimental reduction in frequency was observed. Side-by-side life testing of damped and un-damped boards at two different thicknesses (0.070" and 0.090") has shown that the addition of a PID was much more significant to the fatigue life than increasing the thickness. High speed video, accelerometer, and strain measurements have been collected to correlate with analytical results.

  6. Assessment technology for turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, T.H.; Rieger, N.F.

    1995-08-01

    Blade failures are the leading cause of steam turbine unavailability for large fossil fuel power plants in the US, costing utilities over $200 million per year in maintenance and lost revenue. In low-pressure (LP) turbines, the major concern is failure of blades by corrosion fatigue in the last or next-to-last stage. To reduce the incidence of these failures, industry efforts have included development and testing of blade evaluation tools, new blading materials, and blade coatings. In intermediate-pressure (IP) and high-pressure (HP) turbines, solid particle erosion is a major concern. To address this problem, industry work has included reducing the source of the solid particles, removing the particles upstream of the turbine, protecting the turbine from the effects of the particular matter, and adjusting operation.

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation of Metal Fatigue Using Nonlinear Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Safe-life and damage-tolerant design philosophies of high performance structures have driven the development of various methods to evaluate nondestructively the accumulation of damage in such structures resulting from cyclic loading. Although many techniques have proven useful, none has been able to provide an unambiguous, quantitative assessment of damage accumulation at each stage of fatigue from the virgin state to fracture. A method based on nonlinear acoustics is shown to provide such a means to assess the state of metal fatigue. The salient features of an analytical model are presented of the microelastic-plastic nonlinearities resulting from the interaction of an acoustic wave with fatigue-generated dislocation substructures and cracks that predictably evolve during the metal fatigue process. The interaction is quantified by the material (acoustic) nonlinearity parameter extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The parameters typically increase monotonically by several hundred percent over the fatigue life of the metal, thus providing a unique measure of the state of fatigue. Application of the model to aluminum alloy 2024-T4, 410Cb stainless steel, and IN100 nickel-base superalloy specimens fatigued using different loading conditions yields good agreement between theory and experiment. Application of the model and measurement technique to the on-site inspection of steam turbine blades is discussed.

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation of Metal Fatigue Using Nonlinear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-01

    Safe-life and damage-tolerant design philosophies of high performance structures have driven the development of various methods to evaluate nondestructively the accumulation of damage in such structures resulting from cyclic loading. Although many techniques have proven useful, none has been able to provide an unambiguous, quantitative assessment of damage accumulation at each stage of fatigue from the virgin state to fracture. A method based on nonlinear acoustics is shown to provide such a means to assess the state of metal fatigue. The salient features of an analytical model are presented of the microelastic-plastic nonlinearities resulting from the interaction of an acoustic wave with fatigue-generated dislocation substructures and cracks that predictably evolve during the metal fatigue process. The interaction is quantified by the material (acoustic) nonlinearity parameter ? extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The ? parameters typically increase monotonically by several hundred percent over the fatigue life of the metal, thus providing a unique measure of the state of fatigue. Application of the model to aluminum alloy 2024-T4 and 410 Cb stainless steel specimens fatigued using different loading conditions yields good agreement between theory and experiment. Application of the model and measurement technique to the on-site inspection of steam turbine blades is discussed.

  9. A review of damage detection methods for wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Ho, Siu-Chun M.; Song, Gangbing; Ren, Liang; Li, Hongnan

    2015-03-01

    Wind energy is one of the most important renewable energy sources and many countries are predicted to increase wind energy portion of their whole national energy supply to about twenty percent in the next decade. One potential obstacle in the use of wind turbines to harvest wind energy is the maintenance of the wind turbine blades. The blades are a crucial and costly part of a wind turbine and over their service life can suffer from factors such as material degradation and fatigue, which can limit their effectiveness and safety. Thus, the ability to detect damage in wind turbine blades is of great significance for planning maintenance and continued operation of the wind turbine. This paper presents a review of recent research and development in the field of damage detection for wind turbine blades. Specifically, this paper reviews frequently employed sensors including fiber optic and piezoelectric sensors, and four promising damage detection methods, namely, transmittance function, wave propagation, impedance and vibration based methods. As a note towards the future development trend for wind turbine sensing systems, the necessity for wireless sensing and energy harvesting is briefly presented. Finally, existing problems and promising research efforts for online damage detection of turbine blades are discussed.

  10. Combining Turbine Blade-Strike and Life Cycle Models to Assess Mitigation Strategies for Fish Passing Dams

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, John W.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Leonardsson, Kjell; Zabel, Richard W.; Lundqvist, Hans

    2008-08-01

    Combining the two models produced a rapid, cost effective tool for assessing dam passage impacts to fish populations and prioritizing among mitigation strategies for conserving fish stocks in regulated rivers. Estimated mortality of juvenile and adult Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and sea trout (S. trutta) passing turbines at two dams in northern Sweden was significantly higher for Kaplan turbines compared to Francis turbines, and for adult fish compared to juveniles based on blade strike models. Mean probability of mortality ranged from 6.7% for salmon smolts passing Francis turbines to >100% for adult salmon passing Kaplan turbines. Life cycle modeling allowed benefits to be assessed for three alternatives that mitigated this mortality. Salmon population responses varied considerably among alternatives and rivers: growth rates improved as much as 17.9%, female escapements increased up to 669%, and more than 1,300 additional female salmon were produced in one case. Protecting both smolts and adults provided benefits, and in one river, mitigating turbine mortality alone was estimated to have met the production capacity of the available habitat.

  11. J. GUIDANCE, VOL. 23, NO. 4: ENGINEERING NOTES 759 Nonlinear Life-Extending Control

    E-print Network

    Ray, Asok

    J. GUIDANCE, VOL. 23, NO. 4: ENGINEERING NOTES 759 Nonlinear Life-Extending Control of a Rocket-extending control system for rocket engines via damage mitigation in both the fuel (H2 ) and oxidizer (O2) turbine service life of a reusable rocket engine. Fatigue damage in the turbine blades is one of the most serious

  12. Effects of a 4-Week Multimodal Rehabilitation Program on Quality of Life, Cardiopulmonary Function, and Fatigue in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Do, Junghwa; Cho, Youngki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study examines the effects of a rehabilitation program on quality of life (QoL), cardiopulmonary function, and fatigue in breast cancer patients. The program included aerobic exercises as well as stretching and strengthening exercises. Methods Breast cancer patients (n=62) who had completed chemotherapy were randomly assigned to an early exercise group (EEG; n=32) or a delayed exercise group (DEG; n=30). The EEG underwent 4 weeks of a multimodal rehabilitation program for 80 min/day, 5 times/wk for 4 weeks. The DEG completed the same program during the next 4 weeks. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), EORTC Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-BR23), predicted maximal volume of oxygen consumption (VO2max), and fatigue severity scale (FSS) were used for assessment at baseline, and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Results After 8 weeks, statistically significant differences were apparent in global health, physical, role, and emotional functions, and cancer-related symptoms such as fatigue and pain, nausea, and dyspnea on the EORTC QLQ-C30; cancer-related symptoms involving the arm and breast on the EORTC QLQ-BR23; the predicted VO2max; muscular strength; and FSS (p<0.050), according to time, between the two groups. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that a supervised multimodal rehabilitation program may improve the physical symptoms, QoL, and fatigue in patients with breast cancer. PMID:25834616

  13. Brief summary of the evolution of high-temperature creep-fatigue life prediction models for crack initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1993-10-01

    The evolution of high-temperature, creep-fatigue, life-prediction methods used for cyclic crack initiation is traced from inception in the late 1940's. The methods reviewed are material models as opposed to structural life prediction models. Material life models are used by both structural durability analysts and by material scientists. The latter use micromechanistic models as guidance to improve a material's crack initiation resistance. Nearly one hundred approaches and their variations have been proposed to date. This proliferation poses a problem in deciding which method is most appropriate for a given application. Approaches were identified as being combinations of thirteen different classifications. This review is intended to aid both developers and users of high-temperature fatigue life prediction methods by providing a background from which choices can be made. The need for high-temperature, fatigue-life prediction methods followed immediately on the heels of the development of large, costly, high-technology industrial and aerospace equipment immediately following the second world war. Major advances were made in the design and manufacture of high-temperature, high-pressure boilers and steam turbines, nuclear reactors, high-temperature forming dies, high-performance poppet valves, aeronautical gas turbine engines, reusable rocket engines, etc. These advances could no longer be accomplished simply by trial and error using the 'build-em and bust-em' approach. Development lead times were too great and costs too prohibitive to retain such an approach. Analytic assessments of anticipated performance, cost, and durability were introduced to cut costs and shorten lead times. The analytic tools were quite primitive at first and out of necessity evolved in parallel with hardware development. After forty years more descriptive, more accurate, and more efficient analytic tools are being developed. These include thermal-structural finite element and boundary element analyses, advanced constitutive stress-strain-temperature-time relations, and creep-fatigue-environmental models for crack initiation and propagation. The high-temperature durability methods that have evolved for calculating high-temperature fatigue crack initiation lives of structural engineering materials are addressed. Only a few of the methods were refined to the point of being directly useable in design.

  14. Brief summary of the evolution of high-temperature creep-fatigue life prediction models for crack initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of high-temperature, creep-fatigue, life-prediction methods used for cyclic crack initiation is traced from inception in the late 1940's. The methods reviewed are material models as opposed to structural life prediction models. Material life models are used by both structural durability analysts and by material scientists. The latter use micromechanistic models as guidance to improve a material's crack initiation resistance. Nearly one hundred approaches and their variations have been proposed to date. This proliferation poses a problem in deciding which method is most appropriate for a given application. Approaches were identified as being combinations of thirteen different classifications. This review is intended to aid both developers and users of high-temperature fatigue life prediction methods by providing a background from which choices can be made. The need for high-temperature, fatigue-life prediction methods followed immediately on the heels of the development of large, costly, high-technology industrial and aerospace equipment immediately following the second world war. Major advances were made in the design and manufacture of high-temperature, high-pressure boilers and steam turbines, nuclear reactors, high-temperature forming dies, high-performance poppet valves, aeronautical gas turbine engines, reusable rocket engines, etc. These advances could no longer be accomplished simply by trial and error using the 'build-em and bust-em' approach. Development lead times were too great and costs too prohibitive to retain such an approach. Analytic assessments of anticipated performance, cost, and durability were introduced to cut costs and shorten lead times. The analytic tools were quite primitive at first and out of necessity evolved in parallel with hardware development. After forty years more descriptive, more accurate, and more efficient analytic tools are being developed. These include thermal-structural finite element and boundary element analyses, advanced constitutive stress-strain-temperature-time relations, and creep-fatigue-environmental models for crack initiation and propagation. The high-temperature durability methods that have evolved for calculating high-temperature fatigue crack initiation lives of structural engineering materials are addressed. Only a few of the methods were refined to the point of being directly useable in design. Recently, two of the methods were transcribed into computer software for use with personal computers.

  15. Low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. D. (editor); Kaisand, L. R. (editor); Halford, G. R. (editor); Leis, B. N. (editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on various aspects of low cycle fatigue, including cyclic deformation, crack propagation, high-temperature low cycle fatigue, microstructural defects, multiaxial and variable amplitude loading, and life prediction. Papers are presented on the low cycle fatigue of some aluminum alloys, prediction of crack growth under creep-fatigue loading conditions, high-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior and lifetime prediction of a nickel-base ODS alloy, and an integrated approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. Other topics discussed include thermal fatigue testing of coated monocrystalline superalloys, low cycle fatigue of Al-Mg-Si alloys, and the effect of superimposed stresses at high frequency on low cycle fatigue.

  16. Fatigue Life Prediction of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures. Part II: Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-05-01

    This paper follows on from the earlier study (Part I) which investigated the fatigue behavior of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D C/SiC composites at room and elevated temperatures. In this paper, a micromechanics approach to predict the fatigue life S-N curves of fiber-reinforced CMCs has been developed considering the fatigue damage mechanism of interface wear or interface oxidation. Upon first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. The two-parameter Weibull model is used to describe fibers strength distribution. The stress carried by broken and intact fibres on the matrix crack plane under fatigue loading is determined based on the Global Load Sharing (GLS) criterion. The fibres failure probabilities under fatigue loading considering the degradation of interface shear stress and fibres strength have been obtained. When the broken fibres fraction approaches critical value, the composite would fatigue fail. The fatigue life S-N curves of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D C/SiC composites at room and elevated temperatures have been predicted. The predicted results agreed with experimental data.

  17. The Relationships Between Microstructure, Tensile Properties and Fatigue Life in Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr-0.4Fe (Ti-5553)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, John W., IV

    beta-titanium alloys are being increasingly used in airframes as a way to decrease the weight of the aircraft. As a result of this movement, Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr-0.4Fe (Timetal 555), a high-strength beta titanium alloy, is being used on the current generation of landing gear. This alloy features good combinations of strength, ductility, toughness and fatigue life in alpha+beta processed conditions, but little is known about beta-processed conditions. Recent work by the Center for the Accelerated Maturation of Materials (CAMM) research group at The Ohio State University has improved the tensile property knowledge base for beta-processed conditions in this alloy, and this thesis augments the aforementioned development with description of how microstructure affects fatigue life. In this work, beta-processed microstructures have been produced in a Gleeble(TM) thermomechanical simulator and subsequently characterized with a combination of electron and optical microscopy techniques. Four-point bending fatigue tests have been carried out on the material to characterize fatigue life. All the microstructural conditions have been fatigue tested with the maximum test stress equal to 90% of the measured yield strength. The subsequent results from tensile tests, fatigue tests, and microstructural quantification have been analyzed using Bayesian neural networks in an attempt to predict fatigue life using microstructural and tensile inputs. Good correlation has been developed between lifetime predictions and experimental results using microstructure and tensile inputs. Trained Bayesian neural networks have also been used in a predictive fashion to explore functional dependencies between these inputs and fatigue life. In this work, one section discusses the thermal treatments that led to the observed microstructures, and the possible sequence of precipitation that led to these microstructures. The thesis then describes the implications of microstructure on fatigue life and implications of tensile properties on fatigue life. Several additional experiments are then described that highlight possible causes for the observed dependence of microstructure on fatigue life, including fractographic evidence to provide support of microstructural dependencies.

  18. Inversion of the strain-life and strain-stress relationships for use in metal fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents closed-form solutions (collocation method and spline-function method) for the constants of the cyclic fatigue life equation so that they can be easily incorporated into cumulative damage analysis. The collocation method involves conformity with the experimental curve at specific life values. The spline-function method is such that the basic life relation is expressed as a two-part function, one applicable at strains above the transition strain (strain at intersection of elastic and plastic lines), the other below. An illustrative example is treated by both methods. It is shown that while the collocation representation has the advantage of simplicity of form, the spline-function representation can be made more accurate over a wider life range, and is simpler to use.

  19. Influence of test specimen fabrication method and cross-section configuration on tension-tension fatigue life of PMMA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Sheafi, E M; Tanner, K E

    2015-11-01

    Different cyclic loading modes have been used in in vitro fatigue studies of PMMA bone cement. It is unclear which loading mode is most appropriate from the perspective of the in vivo loading experienced by the cement in a cemented arthroplasty. Also, in different in vitro fatigue studies, different test specimen configurations have been used. The present work considers the influence of test specimen fabrication method (direct moulding vs moulding followed by machining) and cross-section shape (rectangular vs circular) on the tension-tension fatigue performance of two bone cement brands (SmartSet GHV and CMW1), under force control conditions. Two trends were consistent: 1) for each of the cements, for moulded specimens, a longer fatigue life was obtained with circular cross-sectioned specimens and, 2) for either rectangular or circular CMW1 specimens, a longer fatigue life was obtained using machined specimens. A comparison of the present results to those reported in our previous work on fully-reversed tension-compression loading under force control showed that, regardless of the test specimen fabrication method or cross-section configuration used, the fatigue life was considerably shorter under tension-compression than tension-tension loading. This finding highlights the fact that the presence of the compression portion in the loading cycle accelerates fatigue failure. PMID:26295451

  20. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle theory to the prediction of fatigue life of aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1989-01-01

    The service life of aircraft structural components undergoing random stress cycling was analyzed by the application of fracture mechanics. The initial crack sizes at the critical stress points for the fatigue crack growth analysis were established through proof load tests. The fatigue crack growth rates for random stress cycles were calculated using the half-cycle method. A new equation was developed for calculating the number of remaining flights for the structural components. The number of remaining flights predicted by the new equation is much lower than that predicted by the conventional equation. This report describes the application of fracture mechanics and the half-cycle method to calculate the number of remaining flights for aircraft structural components.

  1. FATIGUE PERFORMANCE COMPARISON AND LIFE PREDICTION OF FORGED STEEL AND DUCTILE CAST IRON CRANKSHAFTS

    E-print Network

    Fatemi, Ali

    A crankshaft is a highly stressed component in an engine that is subjected to bending and torsional loads machined from the crankshafts. Load-controlled component bending fatigue tests were also carried out

  2. Cement fatigue and HPHT well integrity with application to life of well prediction 

    E-print Network

    Ugwu, Ignatius Obinna

    2009-05-15

    isolation can be compromised due to factors that come into play when oil well cement experiences cyclic loading conditions which can lead to fatigue failure as a consequence of extensive degradation of the microstructure of the cement material depending...

  3. ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi

    2012-02-16

    The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

  4. Remanent Creep Life Prediction in Low-Alloy Ferritic Steel Power Plant Components

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Peter

    1991-03-19

    concentration where cavitation in the initial stage of creep can occur. Nevertheless, although such regions are critical for creep damage, they are not necessarily so in terms of life exhaustion; in many cases, non-destructive dam- age monitoring and repair... , austenitic fatigue, weld and stainless steels HAZ cracking Turbines All rotors Cr-Mo-V (-Nb-W) Creep and steels thermal fatigue Low pressure Ni-Cr-Mo-V Fretting fatigue, rotors and steels corrosion fatigue, turbine blades stress corrosion & pitting etc...

  5. Effect of machining damage on low cycle fatigue crack initiation life in drilled holes in UdimetRTM 720

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magadanz, Christine M.

    White layer is a generic term for a light etching surface layer on metal alloys that can result under extreme deformation conditions in wear, sliding or machining. While there has been some characterization of white layer due to abusive machining, the specific effect on fatigue crack initiation life has not been well documented. This study aimed to establish a relationship between the presence of white layer due to abusive machining and fatigue crack initiation life in a wrought nickel based superalloy (Udimet ® 720). Low cycle fatigue testing was conducted on large specimens containing through holes drilled with parameters aimed at creating holes with and without white layer. Initially, Acoustic Emission monitoring technologies were used to monitor for acoustic events associated with crack initiation, however, this technology was deemed unreliable for this testing. Instead, cycles to crack initiation was determined using striation density measurements on each fracture surface to estimate the number of cycles of crack propagation, which was subtracted from the total number of cycles for the specimen. A total of sixteen specimens were tested in this manner. The results suggested that the crack initiation lives of holes machined with good machining parameters were statistically longer than crack initiation lives of holes machined with poor machining parameters. The mean initiation life of the poorly machined specimens was a factor of approximately 2 times shorter than the mean initiation life of the well machined specimens. The holes machined with good machining parameters exhibited subsurface initiations which suggested that no anomalies affected crack initiation for these specimens. It was also shown that some of the poorly machined holes exhibited subsurface initiations rather than initiations at white layer damage. These holes had better surface finish than the poorly machined specimens that did fail at white layer. The mean initiation life of the poorly machined holes with subsurface initiation was 7 times longer than the mean initiation life of the holes that exhibited white layer at the crack origins. Lastly, no apparent correlation between white layer thickness and initiation life was demonstrated in this study.

  6. Fatigue strain-life behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 in LWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Keisler, J.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    The existing fatigue strain vs. life (S-N) data, foreign and domestic, for carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 used in the construction of nuclear power plant components have been compiled and categorized according to material, loading, and environmental conditions. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the effects of the various service conditions on the fatigue life of these materials. The results of a rigorous statistical analysis have been used to estimate the probability of initiating a fatigue crack. Data in the literature were reviewed to evaluate the effects of size, geometry, and surface finish of a component on its fatigue life. The fatigue S-N curves for components have been determined by adjusting the probability distribution curves for smooth test specimens for the effect of mean stress and applying design margins to account for the uncertainties due to component size/geometry and surface finish. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve and on the proposed interim design curves published in NUREG/CR-5999 is discussed. Estimations of the probability of fatigue cracking in sample components from BWRs and PWRs are presented.

  7. Adhesive and Protective Characteristics of Ceramic Coating A-417 and Its Effect on Engine Life of Forged Refractaloy-26 (AMS 5760) and Cast Stellite 21 (AMS 5385) Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Floyd B; Gyorgak, Charles A

    1953-01-01

    The adhesive and protective characteristics of National Bureau of Standards Coating A-417 were investigated, as well as the effect of the coating on the life of forged Refractaloy 26 and cast Stellite 21 turbine blades. Coated and uncoated blades were run in a full-scale J33-9 engine and were subjected to simulated service operations consisting of consecutive 20-minute cycles (15 min at rated speed and approximately 5 min at idle). The ceramic coating adhered well to Refractaloy 26 and Stellite 21 turbine blades operated at 1500 degrees F. The coating also prevented corrosion of the Refractaloy 26, a corrosion-sensitive nickel-base alloy, and of the Stellite 21, a relatively corrosion-resistant cobalt-base alloy. Although the coating prevented corrosion of both alloys, it had no apparent effect on blade life.

  8. Structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades : SE 265 Final Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, W. C.; Jacobs, Laura D.; Rutherford, A. C.; Puckett, Anthony

    2006-03-23

    ACME Wind Turbine Corporation has contacted our dynamic analysis firm regarding structural health monitoring of their wind turbine blades. ACME has had several failures in previous years. Examples are shown in Figure 1. These failures have resulted in economic loss for the company due to down time of the turbines (lost revenue) and repair costs. Blade failures can occur in several modes, which may depend on the type of construction and load history. Cracking and delamination are some typical modes of blade failure. ACME warranties its turbines and wishes to decrease the number of blade failures they have to repair and replace. The company wishes to implement a real time structural health monitoring system in order to better understand when blade replacement is necessary. Because of warranty costs incurred to date, ACME is interested in either changing the warranty period for the blades in question or predicting imminent failure before it occurs. ACME's current practice is to increase the number of physical inspections when blades are approaching the end of their fatigue lives. Implementation of an in situ monitoring system would eliminate or greatly reduce the need for such physical inspections. Another benefit of such a monitoring system is that the life of any given component could be extended since real conditions would be monitored. The SHM system designed for ACME must be able to operate while the wind turbine is in service. This means that wireless communication options will likely be implemented. Because blade failures occur due to cyclic stresses in the blade material, the sensing system will focus on monitoring strain at various points.

  9. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Kim, Sang-Shik

    1993-01-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on 'stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  10. Effects on fatigue life of gate valves due to higher torque switch settings during operability testing

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.; Snow, S.D.; Miller, G.K.; Russell, M.J.; Ware, A.G.

    1995-12-01

    Some motor operated valves now have higher torque switch settings due to regulatory requirements to ensure valve operability with appropriate margins at design basis conditions. Verifying operability with these settings imposes higher stem loads during periodic inservice testing. These higher test loads increase stresses in the various valve internal parts which may in turn increase the fatigue usage factors. This increased fatigue is judged to be a concern primarily in the valve disks, seats, yokes, stems, and stem nuts. Although the motor operators may also have significantly increased loading, they are being evaluated by the manufacturers and are beyond the scope of this study. Two gate valves representative of both relatively weak and strong valves commonly used in commercial nuclear applications were selected for fatigue analyses. Detailed dimensional and test data were available for both valves from previous studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Finite element models were developed to estimate maximum stresses in the internal parts of the valves and to identity the critical areas within the valves where fatigue may be a concern. Loads were estimated using industry standard equations for calculating torque switch settings prior and subsequent to the testing requirements of USNRC Generic Letter 89--10. Test data were used to determine both; (1) the overshoot load between torque switch trip and final seating of the disk during valve closing and (2) the stem thrust required to open the valves. The ranges of peak stresses thus determined were then used to estimate the increase in the fatigue usage factors due to the higher stem thrust loads. The usages that would be accumulated by 100 base cycles plus one or eight test cycles per year over 40 and 60 years of operation were calculated.

  11. Notched fatigue of single crystal PWA 1480 at turbine attachment temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, T. G.; Nissley, D. M.; Swanson, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The focus is on the lower temperature, uncoated and notched features of gas turbine blades. Constitutive and fatigue life prediction models applicable to these regions are being developed. Fatigue results are presented which were obtained thus far. Fatigue tests are being conducted on PWA 1480 single crystal material using smooth strain controlled specimens and three different notched specimens. Isothermal fatigue tests were conducted at 1200, 1400, and 1600 F. The bulk of the tests were conducted at 1200 F. The strain controlled tests were conducted at 0.4 percent per second strain rate and the notched tests were cycled at 1.0 cycle per second. A clear orientation dependence is observed in the smooth strain controlled fatigue results. The fatigue lifes of the thin, mild notched specimens agree fairly well with this smooth data when elastic stress range is used as a correlating parameter. Finite element analyses were used to calculate notch stresses. Fatigue testing will continue to further explore the trends observed thus far. Constitutive and life prediction models are being developed.

  12. Cyclic Structural Analyses of SSME Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Manderscheid, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The problems of calculating the structural response of high-temperature space propulsion components such as turbine blades for the fuel turbopump are addressed. The first high-pressure-stage fuel turbine blade (HPFTB) in the liquid-hydrogen turbopump of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) was selected for this study. In the past these blades have cracked in the blade shank region and at the airfoil leading edge adjacent to the platform. To achieve the necessary durability, these blades are currently being cast by using directional solidification. Single-crystal alloys are also being investigated for future SSME applications. The study evaluated the utility of advanced structural analysis methods in assessing the low-cycle fatigue lives of these anisotropic components. The turbine blade airfoil of the high-pressure stage of the SSME fuel turbopump was analyzed because it has a history of rapid crack initiation.

  13. Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Study for Rotating Composite Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrations of aircraft engine blades cause blade fatigue problems in engines, which can lead to thicker and aerodynamically lower performing blade designs, increasing engine weight, fuel burn, and maintenance costs. In order to mitigate undesirable blade vibration levels, active piezoelectric vibration control has been investigated, potentially enabling thinner blade designs for higher performing blades and minimizing blade fatigue problems. While the piezoelectric damping idea has been investigated by other researchers over the years, very little study has been done including rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. The particular objectives of this study were: (a) to develop and analyze a multiphysics piezoelectric finite element composite blade model for harmonic forced vibration response analysis coupled with a tuned RLC circuit for rotating engine blade conditions, (b) to validate a numerical model with experimental test data, and (c) to achieve a cost-effective numerical modeling capability which enables simulation of rotating blades within the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. A numerical and experimental study for rotating piezoelectric composite subscale fan blades was performed. It was also proved that the proposed numerical method is feasible and effective when applied to the rotating blade base excitation model. The experimental test and multiphysics finite element modeling technique described in this paper show that piezoelectric vibration damping can significantly reduce vibrations of aircraft engine composite fan blades.

  14. Fatigue crack initiation life prediction in high strength structural steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricoteaux, A.; Fardoun, F.; Degallaix, S.; Sauvage, F.

    1995-02-01

    The local approach method is used to calculate the fatigue crack initiation/early crack growth lives (N(i)) in high strength structural steel weldments. Weld-toe geometries, welding residual stresses and HAZ (heat affected zone) cyclic mechanical properties are taken into account in the N(i) estimation procedure. Fatigue crack initiation lives are calculated from either a Basquin type or a Manson-Coffin type equation. The local (HAZ) stress and strain amplitudes and the local mean stress are determined from an analysis based on the Neuber rule and the Molski-Glinka energy approach. The accuracy of the different methods is evaluated and discussed. Finally the previous methods are used with HAZ cyclic mechanical properties estimated from hardness measurements.

  15. Structural Testing of the Blade Reliability Collaborative Effect of Defect Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, M.; Hughes, S.; Paquette, J.

    2015-06-08

    Two 8.3-meter (m) wind turbine blades intentionally constructed with manufacturing flaws were tested to failure at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) south of Boulder, Colorado. Two blades were tested; one blade was manufactured with a fiberglass spar cap and the second blade was manufactured with a carbon fiber spar cap. Test loading primarily consisted of flap fatigue loading of the blades, with one quasi-static ultimate load case applied to the carbon fiber spar cap blade. Results of the test program were intended to provide the full-scale test data needed for validation of model and coupon test results of the effect of defects in wind turbine blade composite materials. Testing was part of the Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) led by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The BRC seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the causes of unexpected blade failures (Paquette 2012), and to develop methods to enable blades to survive to their expected operational lifetime. Recent work in the BRC includes examining and characterizing flaws and defects known to exist in wind turbine blades from manufacturing processes (Riddle et al. 2011). Recent results from reliability databases show that wind turbine rotor blades continue to be a leading contributor to turbine downtime (Paquette 2012).

  16. Effect of grinding on the fatigue life of titanium alloy (5 Al-2.5 Sn) under dry and wet conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangaswamy, Partha; Terutung, Hendra; Jeelani, Shaik

    1989-01-01

    The principal factors in the performance of aerospace materials are strength-to-weight ratio, fatigue life, fracture toughness, survivability and, of course, reliability. Machining processes and, in particular, grinding under adverse conditions have been found to cause damage to surface integrity and affect the residual stress distribution in the surface and subsurface region. These effects have a direct bearing on the fatigue life. In this investigation the effects of grinding conditions on the fatigue life of Titanium 5 Al-2.5Sn were studied. This alloy is used in ground form in the manufacturing of some critical components in the space shuttle's main engine. It is essential that materials for such applications be properly characterized for use in severe service conditions. Flat sub-size specimens 0.1 inch thick were ground on a surface grinding machine equipped with a variable speed motor at speeds of 2000 to 6000 rpm using SiC wheels of grit sizes 60 and 120. The grinding parameters used in this investigation were chosen from a separate study. The ground specimens were then fatigued at a selected stress and the resulting lives were compared with that of the virgin material. The surfaces of the specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope, and the roughness and hardness were measured using a standard profilometer and microhardness tester, respectively. The fatigue life of the ground specimens was found to decrease with the increase in speed for both dry and wet conditions. The fatigue life of specimens ground under wet conditions showed a significant increase at the wheel speed of 2000 rpm for both the grit sizes and thereafter decreased with increase profilometry, microhardness measurements and scanning electron microscopic examination.

  17. Case histories involving fatigue and fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Charleston, SC, Mar. 21, 22, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. Michael (editor); Rich, Thomas P. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on cracking at nozzle corners in the nuclear pressure vessel industry, applied fracture mechanics for assessing defect significance in a crude oil pipeline, failure analysis of a large wind-tunnel compressor blade, analysis of a compressor-wheel failure, and preventing fracture by inspection and analysis. Consideration is also given to the fatigue crack growth predictions of welded aircraft structures containing flaws in the residual stress field, the fatigue and fracture mechanics analysis of a compression loaded aircraft structure, fracture of an aircraft horizontal stabilizer, fatigue life analysis of fuel tank skins under combined loads, and aircraft structural maintenance recommendations based on fracture mechanics analysis. Additional papers discuss an analysis of two metal-forming die failures, an analysis of a failed saw arbor, and the role of fracture mechanics in assessing the effect on fatigue life of design changes in welded fabrications.

  18. The effect of group mindfulness - based stress reduction program and conscious yoga on the fatigue severity and global and specific life quality in women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Soheila; Talepasand, Siavash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer is not merely an event with a certain end, but it is a permanent and vague situation that is determined by delayed effects due to the disease, its treatment and its related psychological issues. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the mindfulness-based stress reduction program and conscious yoga on the mental fatigue severity and life quality of women with breast cancer. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study with a pre-test, post-test and control group. In this study, 24 patients with the diagnosis of breast cancer were selected among the patients who referred to the Division of Oncology and Radiotherapy of Imam Hossein hospital in Tehran using available sampling method, and were randomly assigned into the experimental and control groups. All the participants completed the Fatigue Severity Scale, Global Life Quality of Cancer Patient and Specific Life Quality of Cancer Patient questionnaires. Data were analyzed by multivariate repeated measurement variance analysis model. Results: Findings revealed that the mindfulness-based stress reduction treatment significantly improved the overall quality of life, role, cognitive, emotion, social functions and pain and fatigue symptoms in global life quality in the experimental group. It also significantly improved the body image, future functions and therapy side effects in specific life quality of the experimental group compared to the control group. In addition, fatigue severity caused by cancer was reduced significantly. Conclusion: The results showed that the mindfulness - based stress reduction treatment can be effective in improving global and specific life quality and fatigue severity in women with breast cancer. PMID:26034728

  19. Microstructural aspects of fatigue in Ni-base superalloys.

    PubMed

    Antolovich, Stephen D

    2015-03-28

    Nickel-base superalloys are primarily used as components in jet engines and land-based turbines. While compositionally complex, they are microstructurally simple, consisting of small (50-1000?nm diameter), ordered, coherent Ni(3)(Al,Ti)-type L1(2) or Ni(3)Nb-type DO(22) precipitates (called ?(') and ?(''), respectively) embedded in an FCC substitutional solid solution consisting primarily of Ni and other elements which confer desired properties depending upon the application. The grain size may vary from as small as 2??m for powder metallurgy alloys used in discs to single crystals the actual size of the component for turbine blades. The fatigue behaviour depends upon the microstructure, deformation mode, environment and cycle time. In many cases, it can be controlled or modified through small changes in composition which may dramatically change the mechanism of damage accumulation and the fatigue life. In this paper, the fundamental microstructural, compositional, environmental and deformation mode factors which affect fatigue behaviour are critically reviewed. Connections are made across a range of studies to provide more insight. Modern approaches are pointed out in which the wealth of available microstructural, deformation and damage information is used for computerized life prediction. The paper ends with a discussion of the very important and highly practical subject of thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). It is shown that physics-based modelling leads to significantly improved life prediction. Suggestions are made for moving forward on the critical subject of TMF life prediction in notched components. PMID:25713453

  20. Risk assessment of Cumberland unit 2 L-O blades

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, T.C.T.; Puri, A.

    1996-12-31

    Concern about the reliability of the 1,300 mw Cumberland steam turbine units after an unexpected blade tip failure in the fall of 1995 caused TVA to conduct an investigation into the current reliability of the L-O blades. A probabilistic model based on the measured frequencies, damping and material fatigue data was generated. The influence of significant erosion damage on the blade natural frequencies and on the local stresses was estimated. A probabilistic model of the local fatigue limit was generated based on test data. Monte Carlo simulation was employed to estimate the probability of blade failure by comparing the dynamic stress with the fatigue limit. Risk assessment of the blade failure is presented.

  1. An experimental study of heat transfer in the rectangular coolant passages of a gas turbine rotor blade 

    E-print Network

    Uddin, Mohammed Jalal

    2000-01-01

    Modern gas turbines have high inlet temperatures to harness maximum power output, which causes different components to experience severe thermal stresses and fatigue. To achieve turbine blade durability goals, the blades ...

  2. Influence of process parameters on rolling-contact-fatigue life of ion plated nickel-copper-silver lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a connection between argon ion flux, element-mixing, and rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of a thin film nickel-copper-silver lubricant on ball bearings. The film is deposited on the balls using an ion plating process and tested for RCF in high vacuum. The ion flux is measured using a Langmuir probe and the plane stress within the film during deposition is calculated using a thin film model. Experiments reveal that there is an inverse relationship between ion flux and RCF life for most deposition voltage and pressure combinations tested, specifically, 15.5-18.5 mTorr and 1.5-3.5 kV. For voltages up to 2.5 kV, RCF life decreases as ion flux increases due to increased compressive stress within the film, reaching as high as 2.6 GPa. For voltages between 2.5 and 3.5 kV, interlayer mixing of nickel and copper with the silver layer reduces RCF life due to contamination, even as ion flux and corresponding film compressive stress are reduced. A Monte Carlo-based simulation tool, SRIM is used to track collision cascades of the argon ions and metal atoms within the coating layers. At process voltages above 2.5 kV we observe elemental mixing of copper and nickel with the silver layer using Auger electron spectroscopy of coated steel and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls. The authors conclude that an ion flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} leads to reduced RCF life due to high film stress. In addition, process voltages greater than 2.5 kV also reduce RCF life due to contamination and interlayer mixing of nickel and copper within the silver layer.

  3. Panel resonant behavior of wind turbine blades.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2010-03-01

    The principal design drivers in the certification of wind turbine blades are ultimate strength, fatigue resistance, adequate tip-tower clearance, and buckling resistance. Buckling resistance is typically strongly correlated to both ultimate strength and fatigue resistance. A composite shell with spar caps forms the airfoil shape of a blade and reinforcing shear webs are placed inside the blade to stiffen the blade in the flap-wise direction. The spar caps are dimensioned and the shear webs are placed so as to add stiffness to unsupported panel regions and reduce their length. The panels are not the major flap-wise load carrying element of a blade; however, they must be designed carefully to avoid buckling while minimizing blade weight. Typically, buckling resistance is evaluated by consideration of the load-deflection behavior of a blade using finite element analysis (FEA) or full-scale static testing of blades under a simulated extreme loading condition. The focus of this paper is on the use of experimental modal analysis to measure localized resonances of the blade panels. It can be shown that the resonant behavior of these panels can also provide a means to evaluate buckling resistance by means of analytical or experimental modal analysis. Further, panel resonances have use in structural health monitoring by observing changes in modal parameters associated with panel resonances, and use in improving panel laminate model parameters by correlation with test data. In recent modal testing of wind turbine blades, a set of panel modes were measured. This paper will report on the findings of these tests and accompanying numerical and analytical modeling efforts aimed at investigating the potential uses of panel resonances for blade evaluation, health monitoring, and design.

  4. Mitigation of edgewise vibrations in wind turbine blades by means of roller dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zili; Li, Jie; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2014-10-01

    Edgewise vibrations in wind turbine blades are lightly damped, and large amplitude vibrations induced by the turbulence may significantly shorten the fatigue life of the blade. This paper investigates the performance of roller dampers for mitigation of edgewise vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades. Normally, the centrifugal acceleration of the rotating blade can reach to a magnitude of 7-8g, which makes it possible to use this kind of damper with a relatively small mass ratio for suppressing edgewise vibrations effectively. The parameters of the damper to be optimized are the mass ratio, the frequency ratio, the coefficient of rolling friction and the position of the damper in the blade. The optimization of these parameters has been carried out on a reduced 2-DOF nonlinear model of the rotating wind turbine blade equipped with a roller damper in terms of a ball or a cylinder, ignoring the coupling with other degrees of freedom of the wind turbine. The edgewise modal loading on the blade has been calculated from a more sophisticated 13-DOF aeroelastic wind turbine model with due consideration to the indicated couplings, the turbulence and the aerodynamic damping. Various turbulence intensities and mean wind speeds have been considered to evaluate the effectiveness of the roller damper in reducing edgewise vibrations when the working conditions of the wind turbine are changed. Further, the optimized roller damper is incorporated into the 13-DOF wind turbine model to verify the application of the decoupled optimization. The results indicate that the proposed damper can effectively improve the structural response of wind turbine blades.

  5. Effects of voids on delamination behavior under static and fatigue mode I and mode II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelal, Nisrin Rizek

    Composite materials have become materials of choice for wind turbine blade manufacturing due to their high specific stiffness, strength and fatigue life. Glass fiber composites are used extensively in light-weight structural components for wind turbines, aircrafts, marine craft and high performance automobile because glass fiber is inexpensive and usually provides high strength to weight ratio and good in-plane mechanical properties. The high cycle fatigue resistance of composite materials used in wind turbine blades has been recognized as a major uncertainty in predicting the reliability of wind turbines over their design lifetime. Blades are expected to experience 108 to 109 fatigue cycles over a 20 to 30 year lifetime. Delamination or interlaminar failure is a serious failure mode observed in composite structures. Even partial delamination will lead to a loss of local stiffness, which can preclude buckling failure. Manufacturing process defects such as voids and fiber waviness degrade the fatigue life and delamination resistance of the blade's composite. This research describes the effect of voids on static and fatigue interlaminar fracture behavior under mode I and mode II loading of wind turbine glass fiber composites. Samples with different void volume fractions in the 0.5%-7% range were successfully obtained by varying the vacuum in the hand layup vacuum bagging manufacturing process. Void content was characterized using four different methods; ultrasonic scanning, epoxy burn off, serial sectioning and X-Ray computed tomography. The effect of voids on both mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness under static and fatigue loading was investigated. Finally, fractographic analysis (using optical and scanning electron microscopy) was conducted. The results showed that voids leads to slight reduction in static modes I and II interlaminar fracture toughness. In addition, voids lead to a decrease in modes I and II maximum cyclic strain energy release rates and fatigue life. Fractographic features allowed relations to be drawn between fracture surfaces and mechanical properties of the composite, and to investigate the differences in the fractographic features between panels fabricated at different vacuum levels, and between static and fatigue modes I and II.

  6. Comparison of pitting fatigue life of ausforged and standard forged AISI M-50 and AISI 9310 spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Standard forged and ausforged spur gears made of vacuum-induction-melted, consumable-electrode, vacuum-arc-remelted AISI M-50 steel were tested under conditions that produced fatigue pitting. The gears were 8.89 cm (3.5 in.) in pitch diameter and had tip relief. The M-50 standard forged and ausforged test results were compared with each other. They were then compared with results for machined vacuum-arc-remelted AISI 9310 gears tested under identical conditions. Both types of M-50 gears had lives approximately five times that of the 9310 gears. The life at which 10 percent of the M-50 ausforged gears failed was slightly less than that at which the M-50 standard forged gears failed. The ausforged gears had a slightly greater tendency to fail by tooth fracture than did the standard forged gears, most likely because of the better forging and grain flow pattern of standard forged gears.

  7. Improved stud configurations for attaching laminated wood wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Faddoul, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    In order to improve joint strength for bonded studs in laminated wood structures (wind turbine blades) a series of designs was developed and tested. Each design systematically varied a parameter which was expected to have a significant effect on performance. The structural capability of each design was established based on tension-tension fatigue tests, and it was found that a stud with a concave tapered carrot design, bonded in place with an epoxy thickened with chopped carbon fiber, was the most effective design. Further improvements in joint performance could be made by augmenting the laminated wood with thin plies of carbon cloth (10 percent thickness buildup) in the area of the stud. Two designs were selected for further testing, which demonstrated that joint strengths approaching the membrane wood strength could be achieved. For a 3- by 3-inch wood block, an ultimate load exceeding 100,000 lbs could be introduced through a single bonded stud. For the same type of specimen in cyclic tension at an R-ratio of 0.1, the bonded studs were projected to have a fatigue life of 4 x 10/sup 8/ cycles at maximum loads of 30,000 lbs. For reversed axial fatigue, a reduction of 25 percent from these numbers was shown to be appropriate. These values represent an improvement of 100 percent over the stud designs used previously for laminated wood wind turbine blades. However, temperatures of 100/sup 0/F with humidity at 100 percent in certain cases caused a loss of ultimate load capability approaching 35 percent and a loss of fatigue capacity approaching 50 percent. While this result may have been specimen-related, additional testing or a change in the epoxy resin system should be considered before using the bonded stud designs in hot, humid environments.

  8. Mechanical design of steam turbine moving blades with snubber type blade connection structure

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Kaneko, J.; Aoyama, M.

    1995-12-31

    Different kinds of blades have been developed to improve the reliability of stages near the region of transition from dry steam to wet steam in turbines. For example, the next to last (L-1) stage of a fossil turbine is at or just downstream of the Wilson line, and has been especially susceptible to corrosion-induced failures (Warner, 1985). The new blades were designed with snubber type blade connection structures and outside dovetail root attachment. A snubber type blade connection structure is effective in reducing dynamic stresses on the blades (Neumann,1989). Dynamic stress on the blade-wheel dovetail attachment is also reduced. Consequently it is advantageous in avoiding failures such as corrosion fatigue or stress-corrosion cracking, especially in corrosive environments. This paper describes the design procedure of a snubber configuration favorable from the points of view of machining and assembly. The results of some verification tests are also included.

  9. Influence of electroless nickel-phosphorus deposits on the corrosion-fatigue life of notched and unnotched samples of an AISI 1045 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chitty, J.A.; Pertuz, A.; Puchi, E.S.; Hintermann, H.

    1999-02-01

    Electroless nickel-phosphorus deposits of approximately 10% phosphorus and about 20 {micro}m thickness are shown either to have no effect or sometimes to increase the corrosion-fatigue properties of a quenched and tempered AISI 1045 steel in the stress amplitude range of 481 to 687 MPa, in the presence of an aqueous solution of 3% sodium chloride. Such an increase is produced when the stress amplitude is below 516 MPa. For the notched specimens, no substantial differences are found between the fatigue life of the coated and uncoated specimens.

  10. AIAA980057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS

    E-print Network

    Sweetman, Bert

    AIAA­98­0057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS: PARAMETRIC STUDY WITH MULTIPLE that is most useful in estimating fatigue loads on wind turbine blades. The histograms of rainflow counted for flapwise loads on three horizontal axis wind tur­ bines(HAWTs). In the case of two of these turbines

  11. Low-cycle thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented of the field of thermal fatigue. Following a brief historical review, the concept is developed that thermal fatigue can be viewed as processes of unbalanced deformation and cracking. The unbalances refer to dissimilar mechanisms occurring in opposing halves of thermal fatigue loading and unloading cycles. Extensive data summaries are presented and results are interpreted in terms of the unbalanced processes involved. Both crack initiation and crack propagation results are summarized. Testing techniques are reviewed, and considerable discussion is given to a technique for thermal fatigue simulation, known as the bithermal fatigue test. Attention is given to the use of isothermal life prediction methods for the prediction of thermal fatigue lives. Shortcomings of isothermally-based life prediction methods are pointed out. Several examples of analyses and thermal fatigue life predictions of high technology structural components are presented. Finally, numerous dos and don'ts relative to design against thermal fatigue are presented.

  12. Developments in new aircraft tire tread materials. [fatigue life of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, T. J.; Mccarty, J. L.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Golub, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    Comparative laboratory and field tests were conducted on experimental and state-of-the-art aircraft tire tread materials in a program aimed at seeking new elastomeric materials which would provide improved aircraft tire tread wear, traction, and blowout resistance in the interests of operational safety and economy. The experimental stock was formulated of natural rubber and amorphous vinyl polybutadiene to provide high thermal-oxidative resistance, a characteristic pursued on the premise that thermal oxidation is involved both in the normal abrasion or wear of tire treads and probably in the chain of events leading to blowout failures. Results from the tests demonstrate that the experimental stock provided better heat buildup (hysteresis) and fatigue properties, at least equal wet and dry traction, and greater wear resistance than the state-of-the-art stock.

  13. Determination of Rolling-Element Fatigue Life From Computer Generated Bearing Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2003-01-01

    Two types of rolling-element bearings representing radial loaded and thrust loaded bearings were used for this study. Three hundred forty (340) virtual bearing sets totaling 31400 bearings were randomly assembled and tested by Monte Carlo (random) number generation. The Monte Carlo results were compared with endurance data from 51 bearing sets comprising 5321 bearings. A simple algebraic relation was established for the upper and lower L(sub 10) life limits as function of number of bearings failed for any bearing geometry. There is a fifty percent (50 percent) probability that the resultant bearing life will be less than that calculated. The maximum and minimum variation between the bearing resultant life and the calculated life correlate with the 90-percent confidence limits for a Weibull slope of 1.5. The calculated lives for bearings using a load-life exponent p of 4 for ball bearings and 5 for roller bearings correlated with the Monte Carlo generated bearing lives and the bearing data. STLE life factors for bearing steel and processing provide a reasonable accounting for differences between bearing life data and calculated life. Variations in Weibull slope from the Monte Carlo testing and bearing data correlated. There was excellent agreement between percent of individual components failed from Monte Carlo simulation and that predicted.

  14. Enhancing the damping of wind turbine rotor blades, the DAMPBLADE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaviaropoulos, P. K.; Politis, E. S.; Lekou, D. J.; Sørensen, N. N.; Hansen, M. H.; Bulder, B. H.; Winkelaar, D.; Lindenburg, C.; Saravanos, D. A.; Philippidis, T. P.; Galiotis, C.; Hansen, M. O. L.; Kossivas, T.

    2006-01-01

    A research programme enabling the development of damped wind turbine blades, having the acronym DAMPBLADE, has been supported by the EC under its 5th Framework Programme. In DAMPBLADE the following unique composite damping mechanisms were exploited aiming to increase the structural damping: tailoring of laminate damping anisotropy, damping layers and damped polymer matrices. Additional objectives of the project were the development of the missing critical analytical technologies enabling the explicit modelling of composite structural damping and a novel composite blade design capacity enabling the direct prediction of aeroelastic stability and fatigue life; the development and characterization of damped composite materials; and the evaluation of new technology via the design and fabrication of damped prototype blades and their full-scale laboratory testing. After 4 years of work a 19 m glass/polyester damped blade was designed, manufactured and tested using the know-how acquired. Modal analysis of this blade at the testing facility of CRES showed a nearly 80% increase in the damping ratio of both the first flap and lag modes compared with the earlier, standard, design practice. Copyright

  15. PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S. Cairns

    E-print Network

    1 PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S materials structures such as wind turbine blades. Design methodologies to prevent such failures have static and fatigue loading. INTRODUCTION Composite material structures such as wind turbine blades

  16. Quality of life in multiple sclerosis (MS) and role of fatigue, depression, anxiety, and stress: A bicenter study from north of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salehpoor, Ghasem; Rezaei, Sajjad; Hosseininezhad, Mozaffar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although studies have demonstrated significant negative relationships between quality of life (QOL), fatigue, and the most common psychological symptoms (depression, anxiety, stress), the main ambiguity of previous studies on QOL is in the relative importance of these predictors. Also, there is lack of adequate knowledge about the actual contribution of each of them in the prediction of QOL dimensions. Thus, the main objective of this study is to assess the role of fatigue, depression, anxiety, and stress in relation to QOL of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-two MS patients completed the questionnaire on demographic variables, and then they were evaluated by the Persian versions of Short-Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36), Fatigue Survey Scale (FSS), and Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21). Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient and hierarchical regression. Results: Correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between QOL elements in SF-36 (physical component summary and mental component summary) and depression, fatigue, stress, and anxiety (P < 0.01). Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that among the predictor variables in the final step, fatigue, depression, and anxiety were identified as the physical component summary predictor variables. Anxiety was found to be the most powerful predictor variable amongst all (? = ?0.46, P < 0.001). Furthermore, results have shown depression as the only significant mental component summary predictor variable (? = ?0.39, P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study has highlighted the role of anxiety, fatigue, and depression in physical dimensions and the role of depression in psychological dimensions of the lives of MS patients. In addition, the findings of this study indirectly suggest that psychological interventions for reducing fatigue, depression, and anxiety can lead to improved QOL of MS patients. PMID:25558256

  17. Counterrotating aircraft propulsor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Joey L. (Inventor); Elston, III, Sidney B. (Inventor); Tseng, Wu-Yang (Inventor); Hemsworth, Martin C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A propulsor blade for an aircraft engine includes an airfoil section formed in the shape of a scimitar. A metallic blade spar is interposed between opposed surfaces of the blade and is bonded to the surfaces to establish structural integrity of the blade. The metallic blade spar includes a root end allowing attachment of the blade to the engine.

  18. Counterrotating aircraft propulsor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Joey L. (Inventor); Elston, III, Sidney B. (Inventor); Tseng, Wu-Yang (Inventor); Hemsworth, Martin C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A propulsor blade for an aircraft engine includes an airfoil section formed in the shape of a scimitar. A metallic blade spar is interposed between opposed surfaces of the blade and is bonded to the surfaces to establish structural integrity of the blade. The metallic blade spar includes a root end allowing attachment of the blade to the engine.

  19. Work capacity and health-related quality of life among individuals with multiple sclerosis reduced by fatigue: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among individuals diagnosed with the chronic neurologic disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a majority suffers from fatigue, which strongly influences their every-day-life. The aim of this study was to investigate work capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a group of MS patients and also to investigate if work capacity and HRQoL could be predicted by background factors, fatigue, heat sensitivity, cognitive dysfunction, emotional distress or degree of disability. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional, designed survey was undertaken A questionnaire was sent to 323 individuals diagnosed with MS, aged between 20 and 65 years, with physical disability on the expanded disability status score (EDSS) in the interval 0???EDSS???6.5, living in Östergötland county in eastern Sweden. Questions on background factors, occupation and work, together with the health-related quality of life short form instrument (SF-36), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the perceived deficit questionnaire (PDQ) and the hospital anxiety depression scale (HAD) were posed. Associations between variables were analyzed using Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlations. Differences between groups were tested using the Chi-square test, the Mann Whitney U-test, and the Student’s t-test. Predictive factors were analyzed using multiple linear and multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Of those who completed the questionnaire (n?=?257, 79.6%), 59.8% were working. Work capacity was found significantly more among men (p?fatigue (p?fatigue, higher level of education, male sex and lower age. Those with work capacity showed significantly higher HRQoL than those who had no work capacity (p?fatigue, cognition and emotional distress were found to be major contributing factors for HRQoL. Conclusions Work capacity and HRQoL among individuals diagnosed with MS are highly influenced by fatigue which can be considered as a key symptom. Work capacity was influenced by heat-sensitivity, cognitive difficulties and emotional distress and significant predictive factors besides fatigue, were physical disability (EDSS), age, sex, and level of education. Remaining at work also gives a better HRQoL. PMID:23497281

  20. Delayed-release prednisone improves fatigue and health-related quality of life: findings from the CAPRA-2 double-blind randomised study in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alten, Rieke; Grahn, Amy; Holt, Robert J; Rice, Patricia; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Like morning stiffness, fatigue is a common, debilitating symptom of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Delayed-release (DR) prednisone is designed for evening administration (approximately 22:00) and releases 4?h later to coincide with the rise of nocturnal inflammatory cytokines associated with development of morning stiffness. The impact of DR prednisone on fatigue and other related patient-reported outcomes was analysed with data obtained from the Circadian Administration of Prednisone in Rheumatoid Arthritis (CAPRA) 2 study. Methods Patients with symptomatic RA (n=350) despite treatment with a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) were randomised 2:1 to receive additional therapy with DR prednisone 5?mg or placebo once daily for 12?weeks. Fatigue was assessed using validated instruments: the fatigue scale of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) and the vitality domain of the Short Form-36 (SF-36). General quality of life was assessed using the general score and individual domains of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) and SF-36. Results The change from baseline to week 12 in FACIT-F score was statistically significantly different with DR prednisone/DMARD (3.8) versus placebo/DMARD (1.6; difference 2.2, p=0.0032). Improvement in FACIT-F score correlated positively with clinical response. Compared with placebo/DMARD, DR prednisone/DMARD showed a significantly greater improvement in SF-36 vitality score (5.6, p=0.001), physical component of SF-36 (2.3, p=0.0003) and general score with FACT-G (2.6, p=0.0233). Conclusions DR prednisone in addition to a DMARD significantly improves fatigue and other aspects of health-related quality of life in patients with symptomatic RA compared with DMARD treatment alone. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00650078. PMID:26535146

  1. Chronic fatigue is the most important factor limiting health-related quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib.

    PubMed

    Efficace, F; Baccarani, M; Breccia, M; Cottone, F; Alimena, G; Deliliers, G L; Baratè, C; Specchia, G; Di Lorenzo, R; Luciano, L; Turri, D; Martino, B; Stagno, F; Dabusti, M; Bergamaschi, M; Leoni, P; Simula, M P; Levato, L; Fava, C; Veneri, D; Sica, S; Rambaldi, A; Rosti, G; Vignetti, M; Mandelli, F

    2013-07-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important goal of therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients treated with current molecular-targeted therapies. The main objective of this study was to investigate factors associated with long-term HRQOL outcomes of CML patients receiving imatinib. Analysis was performed on 422 CML patients recruited in an observational multicenter study. HRQOL was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Key socio-demographic and clinical data were investigated for their association with HRQOL outcomes. Chronic fatigue and social support were also investigated. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to identify independent factors associated with HRQOL outcomes. Fatigue was the only variable showing an independent and consistent association across all physical and mental HRQOL outcomes (P<0.01). Differences between patients reporting low versus high fatigue levels were more than eight and seven times the magnitude of a clinically meaningful difference, respectively, for the role physical (?=70 points) and emotional scale (?=63 points) of the SF-36. Fatigue did not occur as an isolated symptom and was most highly correlated with musculoskeletal pain (r=0.511; P?0.001) and muscular cramps (r=0.448; P?0.001). Chronic fatigue is the major factor limiting HRQOL of CML patients receiving imatinib. PMID:23417029

  2. The effects of temperature gradient and growth rate on the morphology and fatigue properties of MAR-M246(Hf)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.D.; Alter, W.S.; Hamilton, W.D.; Parr, R.A.

    1989-08-01

    MAR-M246(Hf) is a nickel based superalloy used in the turbopump blades of the Space Shuttle main engines. The effects are considered of temperature gradient (G) and growth rate (R) on the microstructure and fatigue properties of this superalloy. The primary dendrite arm spacings were found to be inversely proportional to both temperature gradient and growth rate. Carbide and gamma - gamma prime morphology trends were related to G/R ratios. Weibull analysis of fatigue results shows the characteristic life to be larger by a factor of 10 for the low gradient/fast rate pairing of G and R, while the reliability (beta) was lower.

  3. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    SciTech Connect

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T.P.; Miner, R.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C, but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  4. The low cycle fatigue behavior of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C, but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  5. Quality of life, depression and fatigue among persons co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C: outcomes from a population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Braitstein, P; Montessori, V; Chan, K; Montaner, J S G; Schechter, M T; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Hogg, R S

    2005-05-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the additional burden generated by hepatitis C (HCV) infection among HIV-infected individuals as measured by self-reported quality of life, depression and fatigue. The provincial HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program (DTP) distributes all antiretroviral medication in the province of British Columbia. Eligibility for accessing antiretrovirals is based on published guidelines commensurate with the International AIDS Society. Each participant is asked to complete a self-administered mailed questionnaire that includes patient sociodemographic information, quality of life measures (Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form (MOS-SF), mental health issues (Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CESD) and fatigue information. HIV-HCV co-infected individuals were compared to HIV mono-infected individuals using parametric and nonparametric methods. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the impact of hepatitis C on quality of life, depression and fatigue, after controlling for sociodemographics and HIV-specific clinical characteristics. Of the 4,134 individuals who were sent a HIV/AIDS DTP survey in 1999, 2000 or 2001, 484 participants both returned one and had an HCV-antibody test result on file. Of the 484 participants eligible for this analysis, 105 (22%) were HCV-positive. In comparison to the 379 (78%) patients testing negative for HCV, a larger proportion of co-infected patients were female (18% versus 3%, p<0.001), aboriginal (20% versus 3%, p<0.001), had ever injected drugs (79% versus 5%, p<0.001), were unemployed (91% versus 49%, p<0.001) and lived in unstable housing (19% versus 1%, p<0.001) at the time they completed the survey. Co-infected patients reported more symptoms consistent with depression, increased fatigue and poorer quality of life. However, using multivariate modeling, it was determined that the impact of HCV on quality of life, depression and fatigue was better explained by the sociodemographic factors related to poverty and injection drug use, than by HCV itself. In conclusion, individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV represent a patient population with significant physical and mental health challenges. Although these patients experience poorer quality of life, increased depression and fatigue, this experience appears to be primarily related to socio-economic issues rather than HCV infection. PMID:16036236

  6. Diagnostic methods of a bladed disc mode shape evaluation used for shrouded blades in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strnad, Jaromir; Liska, Jindrich

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with advanced methods for the evaluation of a bladed disc behavior in terms of the wheel vibration and blade service time consumption. These methods are developed as parts of the noncontact vibration monitoring system of the steam turbine shrouded blades. The proposed methods utilize the time-frequency processing (cross spectra) and the method using least squares to analyse the data from the optical and magnetoresistive sensors, which are mounted in the stator radially above the rotor blades. Fundamentally, the blade vibrations are detected during the blade passages under the sensors and the following signal processing, which covers also the proposed methods, leads to the estimation of the blade residual service life. The prototype system implementing above mentioned techniques was installed into the last stage of the new steam turbine (LP part). The methods for bladed disc mode shape evaluation were successfully verified on the signals, which were obtained during the commission operation of the turbine.

  7. The calculation of fluid-structure interaction and fatigue analysis for Francis turbine runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. F.; Li, H. L.; Zhu, F. W.

    2012-11-01

    Francis turbine, as a widely used hydro turbine, is especially suited for the hydropower station with high hydraulic head and higher hydraulic head. For such turbine generator units all around the world, the crack streaks usually come out after a long time use and the resulted accidents may cause huge losses. Hence, it is meaningful to refine the design assuring the stability and safety of the Francis turbine. In this paper, the stiffness and strength as well as the fatigue life of the Francis turbine are studied. Concerning on the turbine of one certain hydropower station, the flow field inside the turbine are first simulated and the pressure distribution around the blades are derived. Meanwhile, the stress distributions of the blades are also obtained. Based on these, the fatigue analyses are applied on the turbine. According to the results of fatigue analyses, some optimal designs on the turbine are verified. The results show that with the optimal designs, the hydraulic performances of the turbine do not change too much while the maximum stress on the turbine decrease and the fatigue life increase as well.

  8. Multi-stage fatigue life monitoring on quasi-isotropic carbon fibre reinforced polymers enhanced with multi-wall carbon nanotubes: parallel use of electrical resistance, acoustic emission, and acousto-ultrasonic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, V.; Vavouliotis, A.; Loutas, T.; Karapappas, P.

    2009-03-01

    In this study, CNTs were used as modifiers of the epoxy matrix of quasi-isotropic carbon fibre reinforced laminates. The prepared laminates were subjected to tensile loading and tension-tension fatigue and, the changes in the longitudinal resistance were monitored via a digital multimeter. In addition, Acoustic Emission and Acousto-Ultrasonic techniques were used for monitoring the fatigue process of the laminates. The nano-enhanced laminates on the one hand exhibited superior fatigue properties and on the other hand they demonstrated the full-potential of the material to be used as an integrated sensor to monitor the fatigue life.

  9. Design and evaluation of low-cost stainless steel fiberglass foam blades for large wind driven generating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggert, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    A low cost wind turbine blade based on a stainless steel fiberglass foam Budd blade design concept, was evaluated for its principle characteristics, low cost features, and its advantages and disadvantages. A blade structure was designed and construction methods and materials were selected. A complete blade tooling concepts, various technical and economic analysis, and evaluations of the blade design were performed. A comprehensive fatigue test program is conducted to provide data to verify the design stress allowables.

  10. Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    with average porosities ranging from 8 to 21 pct. The porosity field is imported into finite element analysis to the finite element node spacing. A probabilistic pore size distribution model is used to estimate the radius life of steel castings containing porosity. For ease of use in standard design practice, commonly used

  11. Development of composite blades for large wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gewehr, H. W.

    The design, analysis, and tests of a 150 ft length fiberglass wind turbine blade and the development of a similar set of blades for the NASA Mod-1 WECS are described. Transverse filament tape was employed in order to lower costs on the composite blades. The woven roving E-glass tape featured fibers uniformly oriented across the tape width. Components of the blade included a wound glass/epoxy spar, an E-glass/polyester trailing edge spline made from pultrusions, sandwich panels made of resin impregnated kraft paper honeycomb faced with E-glass cloth epoxy skins, and a steel hub adaptor. The blade weighed 16,300 kg. Ultimate strength properties are given, as well as costs at $22/kg. The blades for the Mod-1 are intended to last through 400 million fatigue cycles over 30 years of operation. Details of lightning tests which proved the blade suffered minimal damage in a strike are presented.

  12. Endurance training in MS: short-term immune responses and their relation to cardiorespiratory fitness, health-related quality of life, and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Bansi, J; Bloch, W; Gamper, U; Riedel, S; Kesselring, J

    2013-12-01

    The influences of exercise on cytokine response, health-related quality of life (HR-QoL), and fatigue are important aspects of MS rehabilitation. Physical exercises performed within these programs are often practiced in water, but the effects of immersion have not been investigated. To investigate the influences of short-term immune responses and cardiorespiratory fitness on HR-QoL and fatigue during 3 weeks endurance training conducted on a cycle-ergometer or an aquatic-bike. Randomized controlled clinical trial in 60 MS patients. HR-QoL, fatigue, cardiorespiratory fitness, and short-term immune changes (serum concentrations in response to cardiopulmonary exercise test) of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), interleukin-6, and the soluble receptor of IL-6 (sIL-6R) were determined at the beginning and end of 3 weeks of training intervention. Subjects performed daily 30 min training at 60 % of their VO2peak. SF-36 total (p = 0.031), physical (p = 0.004), and mental health (p = 0.057) scores show time effects within both groups. Between-group effects were shown for FSMC total (p = 0.040) and motor function score (p = 0.041). MFIS physical fatigue showed time effects (p = 0.008) for both groups. Linear regression models showed relationships between short-term immune responses and cardiorespiratory fitness with HR-QoL and fatigue after the intervention. This study indicates beneficial effects of endurance training independent of the training setting. Short-term immune adaptations and cardiorespiratory fitness have the potential to influence HR-QoL and fatigue in persons with MS. The specific immune responses of immersion to exercise need further clarification. PMID:24036849

  13. Fatigue behavior and life prediction of a SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite under isothermal conditions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) and Intermetallic Matrix Composites (IMC) were identified as potential material candidates for advanced aerospace applications. They are especially attractive for high temperature applications which require a low density material that maintains its structural integrity at elevated temperatures. High temperature fatigue resistance plays an important role in determining the structural integrity of the material. This study attempts to examine the relevance of test techniques, failure criterion, and life prediction as they pertain to an IMC material, specifically, unidirectional SiC fiber reinforced titanium aluminide. A series of strain and load controlled fatigue tests were conducted on unidirectional SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite at 425 and 815 C. Several damage mechanism regimes were identified by using a strain-based representation of the data, Talreja's fatigue life diagram concept. Results of these tests were then used to address issues of test control modes, definition of failure, and testing techniques. Finally, a strain-based life prediction method was proposed for an IMC under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures.

  14. Mechanical and microstructural/chemical degradation of coating and substrate in gas turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Sugita, Y.; Ito, M.; Sakurai, S.; Gold, C.R.; Bloomer, T.E.; Kameda, J.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanical property degradation (295--1223 K) and microstructural/chemical evolution of CoNiCrAlY coatings and superalloy (Rene 80) substrates in gas turbine blades operated in- service have been studied using a small punch (SP) testing technique and scanning Auger microprobe. In SP tests, coating cracks continuously and discretely propagated at 295 K and higher temperatures, respectively. The ductile-brittle transition temperature of the coatings was increased during long time exposure of gas turbine blades to oxidizing environments while that of the substrate did not change. The low cycle fatigue life of the coatings at 295 K was also reduced in-service. Oxidation and sulfur segregation near the coating surface were found to be major causes of the mechanical degradation of the coatings.

  15. An analysis of the deformation approach to calculation of the life of hydrogen impregnated 1Kh16N4B steel in low-cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Litvin, V.V.; Anan'evskii, V.A.; Mints, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental investigations and an analysis of the applicability of the deformation approach for calculation of the life of 1Kh16N4B steel in low-cycle fatigue. Hydrogen impregnation was done with use of cathodic polarization in a special cell with a polarization current density of 35 mA/cm/sup 2/ for 60 min. The test results are presented, and it can be seen that the influence of hydrogen absorption significantly changes the life of 1Kh16N4B steel, but the Coffin-Kavomoto criterion does not give satisfactory results.

  16. Exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy to improve fatigue, daily activity performance and quality of life in Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome: the protocol of the FACTS-2-PPS trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome (PPS) is a complex of late onset neuromuscular symptoms with new or increased muscle weakness and muscle fatigability as key symptoms. Main clinical complaints are severe fatigue, deterioration in functional abilities and health related quality of life. Rehabilitation management is the mainstay of treatment. Two different therapeutic interventions may be prescribed (1) exercise therapy or (2) cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). However, the evidence on the effectiveness of both interventions is limited. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-PPS trial is to study the efficacy of exercise therapy and CBT for reducing fatigue and improving activities and quality of life in patients with PPS. Additionally, the working mechanisms, patients' and therapists' expectations of and experiences with both interventions and cost-effectiveness will be evaluated. Methods/Design A multi-centre, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A sample of 81 severely fatigued patients with PPS will be recruited from 3 different university hospitals and their affiliate rehabilitation centres. Patients will be randomized to one of three groups i.e. (1) exercise therapy + usual care, (2) CBT + usual care, (3) usual care. At baseline, immediately post-intervention and at 3- and 6-months follow-up, fatigue, activities, quality of life and secondary outcomes will be assessed. Costs will be based on a cost questionnaire, and statistical analyses on GEE (generalized estimated equations). Analysis will also consider mechanisms of change during therapy. A responsive evaluation will be conducted to monitor the implementation process and to investigate the perspectives of patients and therapists on both interventions. Discussion A major strength of the FACTS-2-PPS study is the use of a mixed methods design in which a responsive and economic evaluation runs parallel to the trial. The results of this study will generate new evidence for the rehabilitation treatment of persons with PPS. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR1371. PMID:20082714

  17. On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, Herbert J.

    1999-06-01

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. Operational experiences with these large rotating machines indicated that their components (primarily blades and blade joints) were failing at unexpectedly high rates, which led the wind turbine community to develop fatigue analysis capabilities for wind turbines. Our ability to analyze the fatigue behavior of wind turbine components has matured to the point that the prediction of service lifetime is becoming an essential part of the design process. In this review paper, I summarize the technology and describe the ''best practices'' for the fatigue analysis of a wind turbine component. The paper focuses on U.S. technology, but cites European references that provide important insights into the fatigue analysis of wind turbines.

  18. The Nature of Fatigue in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olson, Karin; Zimka, Oksana; Stein, Eleanor

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we report the findings of our study on the nature of fatigue in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome. Using ethnoscience as a design, we conducted a series of unstructured interviews and card sorts to learn more about how people with chronic fatigue syndrome describe fatigue. Participants (N = 14) described three distinct domains: tiredness, fatigue, and exhaustion. Most participants experienced tiredness prior to diagnosis, fatigue during daily life, and exhaustion after overexertion. We also discuss participants' ability to adapt to a variety of stressors and prevent shifts to exhaustion, and relate our findings to stress theory and other current research. Primary strategies that promoted adaptation to stressors included pacing and extended rest periods. These findings can aid health care professionals in detecting impending shifts between tiredness, fatigue, and exhaustion and in improving adaptive strategies, thereby improving quality of life. PMID:25721719

  19. Viscoelastic Vibration Dampers for Turbomachine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2003-01-01

    Simple viscoelastic dampers have been invented for use on the root attachments of turbomachine blades. These dampers suppress bending- and torsion-mode blade vibrations, which are excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces during operation. In suppressing vibrations, these dampers reduce fatigue (thereby prolonging blade lifetimes) while reducing noise. These dampers can be installed in new turbomachines or in previously constructed turbomachines, without need for structural modifications. Moreover, because these dampers are not exposed to flows, they do not affect the aerodynamic performances of turbomachines. Figure 1 depicts a basic turbomachine rotor, which includes multiple blades affixed to a hub by means of dovetail root attachments. Prior to mounting of the blades, thin layers of a viscoelastic material are applied to selected areas of the blade roots. Once the blades have been installed in the hub and the rotor is set into rotation, centrifugal force compresses these layers between the mating load-bearing surfaces of the hub and the blade root. The layers of viscoelastic material provide load paths through which the vibration energy of the blade can be dissipated. The viscoelasticity of the material converts mechanical vibration energy into shear strain energy and then from shear strain energy to heat. Of the viscoelastic materials that have been considered thus far for this application, the one of choice is a commercial polyurethane that is available in tape form, coated on one side with an adhesive that facilitates bonding to blade roots. The thickness of the tape can be chosen to suit the specific application. The typical thickness of 0.012 in. (.0.3 mm) is small enough that the tape can fit in the clearance between the mating blade-root and hub surfaces in a typical turbomachine. In an experiment, a blade was mounted in a test fixture designed to simulate the blade-end conditions that prevail in a turbocompressor. Vibrations were excited in the blade by use of an impact hammer, and damping of the vibrations was measured by use of a dynamic signal analyzer. Tests were performed without and with viscoelastic dampers installed in the dovetail root attachment. The results of the measurements, some of which are presented in Figure 2, show that the viscoelastic dampers greatly increased the rate of damping of vibrations. Accordingly, dynamic stresses on rotor blades were significantly reduced, as shown in Figure 2.

  20. Wind Turbine Blade

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This photo shows one of the three 135-ft blades of a turbine before installation. Although the blades of wind turbines appear to move quite slowly to the human eye, blade tips often move at speeds faster than 100 mph. ...

  1. An evaluation of the effects of stacking sequence and thickness on the fatigue life of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Notched and unnotched geometries at 16, 32, and 64-ply thicknesses of a 90/45/0-45 (ns) laminate and a 45/0/-45/90 (ns) laminate were tested in compression-compression fatigue. The fatigue life and the initiation, type, and progression of damage were determined. Interlaminar stresses generated at straight, free edges of axially loaded laminates were used to interpret the test results. The fatigue lives of the notched specimens did not appear to be a strong function of laminate stacking sequence or specimen thickness. The stress concentration at the hole dominated over the interlaminar stresses at the straight free edge. The unnotched specimens of the 90/45/0/-45 (ns) laminate with tensile interlaminar normal stresses delaminated more readily than did the 45/0/-45/90 (ns) laminate with compressive interlaminar normal stress. The life of the 16-ply unnotched specimens was lower than the 32- and 64-ply specimens. Delaminations were located at the interface where the maximum shear stress occurred regardless of the sense or magnitude of the interlaminar normal stress. An antibuckling fixture was effective in preventing out-of-plane motion without overconstraining the specimen.

  2. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.

    1995-04-11

    A retainer ring is arranged to mount turbine blades to a turbine disk so that aerodynamic forces produced by a gas turbine engine are transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk to cause the turbine blades and turbine disk to rotate, but so that centrifugal forces of the turbine blades resulting from the rotation of the turbine blades and turbine disk are not transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk. 6 figures.

  3. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A retainer ring is arranged to mount turbine blades to a turbine disk so that aerodynamic forces produced by a gas turbine engine are transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk to cause the turbine blades and turbine disk to rotate, but so that centrifugal forces of the turbine blades resulting from the rotation of the turbine blades and turbine disk are not transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk.

  4. Fatigue life enhancement of high reliability metallic components by laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, J. L.; Porro, J. A.; Díaz, M.; Ruiz de Lara, L.; Correa, C.; Peral, D.

    2015-03-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) is increasingly applied as an effective technology for the improvement of metallic materials mechanical properties in different types of components as a means of enhancement of their mechanical behavior. As reported in the literature, a main effect resulting from the application of the LSP technique consists on the generation of relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Additional results accomplished by the authors in the line of practical development of the LSP technique at an experimental level (aiming its integral assessment from an interrelated theoretical and experimental point of view) are presented in this paper. Concretely, experimental results on the residual stress profiles and associated mechanical properties modification successfully reached in typical materials under different LSP irradiation conditions are presented along with a practical correlated analysis on the protective character of the residual stress profiles obtained under different irradiation strategies. In this case, the specific behavior of a widely used material in high reliability components (especially in nuclear and biomedical applications) as AISI 316L is analyzed, the effect of possible "in-service" thermal conditions on the relaxation of the LSP effects being specifically characterized.

  5. Physical activity and quality of life in multiple sclerosis: Intermediary roles of disability, fatigue, mood, pain, self-efficacy and social support

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Snook, Erin M.; Gliottoni, Rachael C.

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity has been associated with a small improvement in quality of life (QOL) among those with multiple sclerosis (MS). This relationship may be indirect and operate through factors such as disability, fatigue, mood, pain, self-efficacy and social support. The present study examined variables that might account for the relationship between physical activity and QOL in a sample (N = 292) of individuals with a definite diagnosis of MS. The participants wore an accelerometer for 7 days and then completed self-report measures of physical activity, QOL, disability, fatigue, mood, pain, self-efficacy and social support. The data were analysed using covariance modelling in Mplus 3.0. The model provided an excellent fit for the data (?2 = 51.33, df = 18, p < 0.001, standardised root mean squared residual = 0.03, comparative fit index = 0.98). Those who were more physically active reported lower levels of disability (? = -0.50), depression (? = -0.31), fatigue (? = -0.46) and pain (? = -0.19) and higher levels of social support (? = 0.20), self-efficacy for managing MS (? = 0.41), and self-efficacy for regular physical activity (? = 0.49). In turn, those who reported lower levels of depression (? = -0.37), anxiety (? = -0.15), fatigue (? = -0.16) and pain (? = -0.08) and higher levels of social support (? = 0.26) and self-efficacy for controlling MS (? = 0.17) reported higher levels of QOL. The observed pattern of relationships supports the possibility that physical activity is indirectly associated with improved QOL in individuals with MS via depression, fatigue, pain, social support and self-efficacy for managing MS. PMID:19085318

  6. The Correlation of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deficiency Syndromes, Cancer Related Fatigue, and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Tsai-Ju; Song, You-Lung; Lin, Che-Pin; Hsu, Chung-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the correlation between the different traditional chinese medicine (TCM) deficiency syndromes, cancer related fatigue (CRF), and quality of life (QoL) in breast cancer patients. Patients and methods: Ninety-five breast cancer patients were categorized into different qi (? qì), blood (? xuè), yin (? yin), and yang (? yáng) TCM deficiency syndrome groups (DSGs). We used the ICD-10 for diagnosing CRF. The QoL was assessed by the WHO-BREF and Short Form Health Survey (SF12) questionnaires. The major outcome was to compare the QoL scores between the different TCM DSGs. The second outcome was the intergroup analysis between the CRF and different TCM DSGs in breast cancer patients. Results: The patients with qi deficiency (?? qì xu) had a higher correlation with CRF (p=0.001) and poorer QoL both in the WHO-BREF and SF12 survey (p<0.001), whereas the patients with yin deficiency (?? yin xu) had poorer QoL in the psychological (p=0.02) and social aspects (p=0.04). The qi deficiency (?? qì xu) syndrome was closely associated with yin deficiency syndrome (?? yin xu). (p=0.03). Conclusion: Our study confirmed the concept of Qi-deficiency (?? qì xu) in TCM was associated with CRF as identified in cancer care in western medicine. The breast cancer patients with qi deficiency (?? qì xu) have poorer QoL. Treatment of CRF and improving QoL by supplying qi (? qì) may warrant further investigation. PMID:24716134

  7. The influence of high harmonic force on fatigue life and its prediction via coupled inline-crossflow VIV modeling

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) of a flexibly mounted rigid cylinder placed in a flow is a canonical problem of fluid-structure interactions and the study of VIV and the resulting material fatigue is particularly important ...

  8. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  9. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Childhood Adversity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Early Life Stress and Adult ... reported in studies of survivors of childhood abuse. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating illness that can sometimes ...

  10. 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for

    E-print Network

    1 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for Wind as wind blade size has increased. Typical blade joints use paste adhesives several millimeters thick aircraft, which are also of relevance to wind blades in many instances. The strengths of lap-shear and many

  11. A preliminary path analysis: Effect of psychopathological symptoms, mental and physical dysfunctions related to quality of life and body mass index on fatigue severity of Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hosseininezhad, Mozaffar; Rezaei, Sajjad

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease with fatigue as most prevalent symptom. Psychopathological symptoms, physical and mental dysfunctions and body mass abnormalities potentially could deteriorate fatigue. Thus, in this study, we aimed at evaluating the effect of these factors on fatigue severity of MS patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 162 patients with mean age of 34.1 ± 9.4 (16-58 years) were recruited by consecutive sampling. All the patients, after completing demographic information were evaluated using Persian versions of Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21), and short form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36). Results Correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between fatigue severity and depression, anxiety, stress, physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) (P < 0.01). Findings of path analysis demonstrated that PCS is the only variable which has a direct effect on fatigue severity (? = -0.278, P < 0.05). Moreover, the strongest standard coefficient (?) belonged to cause and effect relationship between MCS and depression (? = -0.691, P < 0.0001). Conclusion Present study made the role of psychopathological symptoms and physical and mental dysfunctions prominent in exacerbation of fatigue severity. Moreover, we can refer to more sensible effect of physical dysfunction related to life on fatigue. PMID:24250873

  12. Multiscale/Multifunctional Probabilistic Composite Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A multilevel (multiscale/multifunctional) evaluation is demonstrated by applying it to three different sample problems. These problems include the probabilistic evaluation of a space shuttle main engine blade, an engine rotor and an aircraft wing. The results demonstrate that the blade will fail at the highest probability path, the engine two-stage rotor will fail by fracture at the rim and the aircraft wing will fail at 109 fatigue cycles with a probability of 0.9967.

  13. Prevention of quality of life deterioration with light therapy is associated with changes in fatigue in women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Neelum; Liu, Lianqi; Rissling, Michelle; Trofimenko, Vera; Natarajan, Loki; Parker, Barbara A.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose During chemotherapy, women with breast cancer not only experience poor quality of life (QOL), they also have little exposure to bright light, which has been shown to be associated with depression, fatigue and poor sleep in other chronic illnesses. This study examined whether increased light exposure would have a positive effect on QOL. Methods 39 women with Stage I–III breast cancer scheduled to receive ?4 cycles of chemotherapy were randomized to a bright white light (BWL, n=23) or dim red light (DRL, n=16) treatment group. Data were collected before (baseline) and during cycles 1 and 4 of chemotherapy. Light was administered via a light box (Litebook®, Ltd.). QOL was assessed with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ). Results Compared to baseline, the DRL group demonstrated significant decline in QOL during the treatment weeks of both cycles (all p’s<0.02), whereas the BWL group had no significant decline (all p’s>0.05). Mixed model analyses revealed that there was a group-by-time interaction for FOSQ at the treatment week of cycle 4 and this interaction was mediated by fatigue. Conclusion The data suggest that increased exposure to bright light during chemotherapy may prevent the decline in QOL via preventing the increase of fatigue. PMID:22865153

  14. Low cycle fatigue life of two nickel-base casting alloys in a hydrogen environment. [for high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of two nickel-base casting alloys, Mar-M-246 (a Martin Company alloy) and 713LC (a low-carbon modification of the alloy 713C developed by International Nickel Company) were tested as candidate materials for the high-pressure fuel and high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles. The samples were subjected to tensile tests and to low cycle fatigue tests in high-pressure hydrogen to study the influence of the hydrogen environment. The Mar-M-246 material was found to have a three times higher cyclic life in hydrogen than the 713LC alloy, and was selected as the nozzle material.

  15. Recent results from data analysis of dynamic stall on wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P; Simms, D; Huyer, S

    1992-01-01

    Wind turbines are subjected to dynamic loading from a variety of different sources. Wind shear and turbulence cause time-varying inflow that results in unsteady airloads. Tower shadow, upwind turbine wakes, and yaw angles also introduce unsteady inflow to wind turbine rotors. Wind turbine designers must predict these loads accurately in order to adequately design blades, hubs, and the remaining support structure to achieve a 30-year life. Structural analysts have not been able to predict mean or dynamic loads accurately enough to predict the fatigue life of major wind turbine components with confidence. Part of the problem is due to uncertainty in the stochastic wind environments as mentioned earlier. Another important part of the problem is the lack of basic knowledge of rotary wing airfoil stall performance. There is mounting evidence that dynamic stall may be related to dynamic loads that are greater than predictions. This paper describes some results of investigations of unsteady aerodynamic loads measured on a wind turbine blade. The objective of the investigation is to understand the steady and unsteady stall behavior of wind turbine blades. 13 refs.

  16. The Health-Related Quality of Life for Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

    PubMed Central

    Falk Hvidberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME)/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a common, severe condition affecting 0.2 to 0.4 per cent of the population. Even so, no recent international EQ-5D based health-related quality of life (HRQoL) estimates exist for ME/CFS patients. The main purpose of this study was to estimate HRQoL scores using the EQ-5D-3L with Danish time trade-off tariffs. Secondary, the aims were to explore whether the results are not influenced by other conditions using regression, to compare the estimates to 20 other conditions and finally to present ME/CFS patient characteristics for use in clinical practice. Material and methods All members of the Danish ME/CFS Patient Association in 2013 (n=319) were asked to fill out a questionnaire including the EQ-5D-3L. From these, 105 ME/CFS patients were identified and gave valid responses. Unadjusted EQ-5D-3L means were calculated and compared to the population mean as well as to the mean of 20 other conditions. Furthermore, adjusted estimates were calculated using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, adjusting for gender, age, education, and co-morbidity of 18 self-reported conditions. Data from the North Denmark Health Profile 2010 was used as population reference in the regression analysis (n=23,392). Results The unadjusted EQ-5D-3L mean of ME/CFS was 0.47 [0.41–0.53] compared to a population mean of 0.85 [0.84–0.86]. The OLS regression estimated a disutility of -0.29 [-0.21;-0.34] for ME/CFS patients in this study. The characteristics of ME/CFS patients are different from the population with respect to gender, relationship, employment etc. Conclusion The EQ-5D-3L-based HRQoL of ME/CFS is significantly lower than the population mean and the lowest of all the compared conditions. The adjusted analysis confirms that poor HRQoL of ME/CFS is distinctly different from and not a proxy of the other included conditions. However, further studies are needed to exclude the possible selection bias of the current study. PMID:26147503

  17. Investigation of Advanced Processed Single-Crystal Turbine Blade Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. J.; Biondo, C. M.; DeLuca, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation studied the influence of thermal processing and microstructure on the mechanical properties of the single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys PWA 1482 and PWA 1484. The objective of the program was to develop an improved single-crystal turbine blade alloy that is specifically tailored for use in hydrogen fueled rocket engine turbopumps. High-gradient casting, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and alternate heat treatment (HT) processing parameters were developed to produce pore-free, eutectic-free microstructures with different (gamma)' precipitate morphologies. Test materials were cast in high thermal gradient solidification (greater than 30 C/cm (137 F/in.)) casting furnaces for reduced dendrite arm spacing, improved chemical homogeneity, and reduced interdendritic pore size. The HIP processing was conducted in 40 cm (15.7 in.) diameter production furnaces using a set of parameters selected from a trial matrix study. Metallography was conducted on test samples taken from each respective trial run to characterize the as-HIP microstructure. Post-HIP alternate HT processes were developed for each of the two alloys. The goal of the alternate HT processing was to fully solution the eutectic gamma/(gamma)' phase islands and to develop a series of modified (gamma)' morphologies for subsequent characterization testing. This was accomplished by slow cooling through the (gamma)' solvus at controlled rates to precipitate volume fractions of large (gamma)'. Post-solution alternate HT parameters were established for each alloy providing additional volume fractions of finer precipitates. Screening tests included tensile, high-cycle fatigue (HCF), smooth and notched low-cycle fatigue (LCF), creep, and fatigue crack growth evaluations performed in air and high pressure (34.5 MPa (5 ksi)) hydrogen at room and elevated temperature. Under the most severe embrittling conditions (HCF and smooth and notched LCF in 34.5 MPa (5 ksi) hydrogen at 20 C (68 F), screening test results showed increases in fatigue life typically on the order of 1OX, when compared to the current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Alternate Turbopump (AT) blade alloy (PWA 1480).

  18. Fatigue and thermal fatigue of Pb-Sn solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Frear, D.; Grivas, D.; McCormack, M.; Tribula, D.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a fundamental investigation of the fatigue and thermal fatigue characteristics, with an emphasis on the microstructural development during fatigue, of Sn-Pb solder joints. Fatigue tests were performed in simple shear on both 60Sn-40Pb and 5Sn-95Pb solder joints. Isothermal fatigue tests show increasing fatigue life of 60Sn-40Pb solder joints with decreasing strain and temperature. In contrast, such behavior was not observed in the isothermal fatigue of 5Sn-95Pb solder joints. Thermal fatigue results on 60Sn-40Pb solder cycled between -55/sup 0/C and 125/sup 0/C show that a coarsened region develops in the center of the joint. Both Pb-rich and Sn-rich phases coarsen, and cracks form within these coarsened regions. The failure mode 60Sn-40Pb solder joints in thermal and isothermal fatigue is similar: cracks form intergranularly through the Sn-rich phase or along Sn/Pb interphase boundaries. Extensive cracking is found throughout the 5Sn-95Pb joint for both thermal and isothermal fatigue. In thermal fatigue the 5Sn-95Pb solder joints failed after fewer cycles than 60Sn-40Pb.

  19. Quality of life and fatigue of patients with spinal bone metastases under combined treatment with resistance training and radiation therapy- a randomized pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this trial was to compare the effects of resistance training versus passive physical therapy on quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and emotional distress outcomes during radiation therapy in patients with spinal bone metastases under radiotherapy (RT). Methods In this randomized trial, 60 patients were treated from September 2011 until March 2013 into one of the two groups: isometric resistance training or physical therapy with thirty patients in each group during RT. EORTC QLQ-BM22, EORTC QLQ-FA13, and FBK-R10 were assessed at baseline, three months, and six months after RT. Results Psychosocial aspects in resistance training group (Arm A) were significantly improved after three (p?=?0.001) and six months (p?=?0.010). Other rated items of the QLQ-BM22 painful site, and pain characteristics were without significant differences. Functional interference showed a positive trend after six months (p?=?0.081). After six months, physical fatigue (p?=?0.013), and interference with daily life (p?=?0.006) according to the QLQ-FA13 assessment improved in Arm A significantly. Emotional distress was in Arm A lower after six months (p?=?0.016). The Cohen’s effect size confirmed the clinically significant improvement of these findings. Conclusions In this group of patients we were able to show that guided isometric resistance training of the paravertebral muscles can improve functional capacity, reduce fatigue and thereby enhance QoL over a 6-months period in patients with stable spinal metastases. The results offer a rationale for future large controlled investigations to confirm these findings. Trial registration Clinical trial identifier NCT01409720 PMID:24998293

  20. Fretting Fatigue of Gamma TiAl Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Lerch, Bradley A.; Draper, Susan L.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma titanium-aluminum alloy (g-TiAl) is an attractive new material for aerospace applications because of its low density and high specific strength in comparison to currently used titanium and nickel-base alloys. Potential applications for this material are compressor and low-pressure turbine blades. These blades are fitted into either the compressor or turbine disks via a dovetail connection. The dovetail region experiences a complex stress state due to the alternating centrifugal force and the natural high-frequency vibration of the blade. Because of the dovetail configuration and the complex stress state, fretting is often a problem in this area. Furthermore, the local stress state becomes more complex when the influence of the metal-metal contact and the edge of the contact is evaluated. Titanium and titanium-based alloys in the clean state exhibit strong adhesive bonds when in contact with themselves and other materials (refs. 1 and 2). This adhesion causes heavy surface damage and high friction in practical cases. Although the wear produced by fretting may be mild, the reduction in fatigue life can be substantial. Thus, there is the potential for fretting problems with these TiAl applications. Since TiAl is an emerging material, there has been limited information about its fretting behavior.

  1. Casting dimensional control and fatigue life prediction for permanent mold casting dies. Technical progress report, September 29, 1993-- September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    First year efforts as part of a three year program to address metal casting dimensional control and fatigue life prediction for permanent mold casting dies are described. Procedures have been developed and implemented to collect dimensional variability data from production steel castings. The influence of process variation and casting geometry variables on dimensional tolerances have been investigated. Preliminary results have shown that these factors have a significant influence on dimensional variability, although this variability is considerably less than the variability indicated in current tolerance standards. Gage repeatability and reproducibility testing must precede dimensional studies to insure that measurement system errors are acceptably small. Also initial efforts leading to the development and validation of a CAD/CAE model to predict the thermal fatigue life of permanent molds for aluminum castings are described. An appropriate thermomechanical property database for metal, mold and coating materials has been constructed. A finite element model has been developed to simulate the mold temperature distribution during repeated casting cycles. Initial validation trials have indicated the validity of the temperature distribution model developed.

  2. A literature review on fatigue and creep interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Life-time prediction methods, which are based on a number of empirical and phenomenological relationships, are presented. Three aspects are reviewed: effects of testing parameters on high temperature fatigue, life-time prediction, and high temperature fatigue crack growth.

  3. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  4. Monitoring microstructural evolution of alloy 617 with non-linear acoustics for remaining useful life prediction; multiaxial creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting

    SciTech Connect

    Lissenden, Cliff; Hassan, Tasnin; Rangari, Vijaya

    2014-10-30

    The research built upon a prior investigation to develop a unified constitutive model for design-­by-­analysis of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs). Model development requires a set of failure data from complex mechanical experiments to characterize the material behavior. Therefore uniaxial and multiaxial creep-­fatigue and creep-­ratcheting tests were conducted on the nickel-­base Alloy 617 at 850 and 950°C. The time dependence of material behavior, and the interaction of time dependent behavior (e.g., creep) with ratcheting, which is an increase in the cyclic mean strain under load-­controlled cycling, are major concerns for NGNP design. This research project aimed at characterizing the microstructure evolution mechanisms activated in Alloy 617 by mechanical loading and dwell times at elevated temperature. The acoustic harmonic generation method was researched for microstructural characterization. It is a nonlinear acoustics method with excellent potential for nondestructive evaluation, and even online continuous monitoring once high temperature sensors become available. It is unique because it has the ability to quantitatively characterize microstructural features well before macroscale defects (e.g., cracks) form. The nonlinear acoustics beta parameter was shown to correlate with microstructural evolution using a systematic approach to handle the complexity of multiaxial creep-­fatigue and creep-­ratcheting deformation. Mechanical testing was conducted to provide a full spectrum of data for: thermal aging, tensile creep, uniaxial fatigue, uniaxial creep-­fatigue, uniaxial creep-ratcheting, multiaxial creep-fatigue, and multiaxial creep-­ratcheting. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Optical Microscopy were conducted to correlate the beta parameter with individual microstructure mechanisms. We researched application of the harmonic generation method to tubular mechanical test specimens and pipes for nondestructive evaluation. Tubular specimens and pipes act as waveguides, thus we applied the acoustic harmonic generation method to guided waves in both plates and shells. Magnetostrictive transducers were used to generate and receive guided wave modes in the shell sample and the received signals were processed to show the sensitivity of higher harmonic generation to microstructure evolution. Modeling was initiated to correlate higher harmonic generation with the microstructure that will lead to development of a life prediction model that is informed by the nonlinear acoustics measurements.

  5. Turbine blade structural dynamic analysis. [for space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents structural dynamic analysis and test results for the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine blades. Athough these blades are designed to avoid coincidence of natural frequencies with harmonic excitation forces, the complexity of the turbine hardware, its nonlinearities and lack of information regarding the forcing function have led to fatigue failures. A comparison of single-blade analysis and test modal frequencies, shapes, and stresses is given; analysis techniques to describe the forcing function, compute dynamic responses, and incorporate the nonlinearities of Coulomb-friction dampers are presented. Recommendations are made for new research to improve forcing function computations and structural damping estimates used in the analysis.

  6. The influence of dynamic strain ageing on stress response and strain-life relationship in low cycle fatigue of 316L(N) stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, V.S.; Sandhya, R.; Valsan, M.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S.L.; Sastry, D.H.

    1997-11-15

    It has been recognized that the essential prerequisite for accurate prediction of low cycle fatigue life (LCF) at elevated temperatures is the determination of rate controlling time dependent damage process that influences the cyclic deformation and fracture behavior of alloys. At intermediate temperatures (0.25 < T/T{sub m} < 0.55, where T{sub m} is melting point in Kelvin), where the effects of time dependent processes such as creep and oxidation are found to be minimal, the drastic reduction in low cycle fatigue life observed with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate in alloys such as type 04 stainless steel, Nimonic PE 16 superalloy and Haynes 188 superalloy has been ascribed primarily to the deleterious effects of dynamic strain ageing (DSA). These alloys displayed anomalous cyclic hardening and an increase of maximum cyclic stress with increasing temperature or decreasing strain rate due to DSA. The nitrogen alloyed 316L stainless steel is currently used for a variety of components in the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Although the temperature range of application of 316L(N) in LMFBRs encompass the domain in which DSA is active, to-date there has been little information available on the effects of DSA on cyclic behavior of 316L(N) stainless steel (SS). The present investigation is therefore focused on assessing the effects of DSA on LCF life and cyclic stress response of 316L(N) SS. The influence of DSA on cyclic strain-life relationship has also been examined in the regime where other time dependent mechanisms such as creep and oxidation are virtually absent.

  7. Effect of tensile mean stress on fatigue behavior of single-crystal and directionally solidified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Two nickel base superalloys, single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf, were studied in view of the potential usage of the former and usage of the latter as blade materials for the turbomachinery of the space shuttle main engine. The baseline zero mean stress (ZMS) fatigue life (FL) behavior of these superalloys was established, and then the effect of tensile mean stress (TMS) on their FL behavior was characterized. At room temperature these superalloys have lower ductilities and higher strengths than most polycrystalline engineering alloys. The cycle stress-strain response was thus nominally elastic in most of the fatigue tests. Therefore, a stress range based FL prediction approach was used to characterize both the ZMS and TMS fatigue data. In the past, several researchers have developed methods to account for the detrimental effect of tensile mean stress on the FL for polycrystalline engineering alloys. However, the applicability of these methods to single crystal and directionally solidified superalloys has not been established. In this study, these methods were applied to characterize the TMS fatigue data of single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf and were found to be unsatisfactory. Therefore, a method of accounting for the TMS effect on FL, that is based on a technique proposed by Heidmann and Manson was developed to characterize the TMS fatigue data of these superalloys. Details of this method and its relationship to the conventionally used mean stress methods in FL prediction are discussed.

  8. Solder fatigue reduction in point focus photovoltaic concentrator modules

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, T.D.; Burchett, S.N.

    1991-01-01

    Solder fatigue tests have been conducted on point focus photovoltaic concentration cell assemblies to identify a baseline fatigue life and to quantify the fatigue life improvements that result using a copper-molybdenum-copper low-expansion insert between the solar cell and copper heat spreader. Solder microstructural changes and fatigue crack growth were identified using cross sections and ultrasonic scans of the fatigue solder joints. The Coffin-Manson and Total Strain fatigue models for low-cycle fatigue were evaluated for use in fatigue life predictions. Since both of these models require strain calculations, two strain calculation methods were compared: hand-calculated shear strain and a finite element method shear strain. At present, the available theoretical models for low-cycle solder fatigue are limited in their ability to predict failure; consequently, extensive thermal cycling is continuing to define the fatigue life for point focus photovoltaic cell assemblies. 9 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Swept Blade Aero-Elastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-07-01

    A preprocessor for analyzing preswept wind turbines using the in-house aero-elastic tool coupled with a multibody dynamic simulator was developed. A baseline 10-kW small wind turbine with straight blades and various configurations that featured bend-torsion coupling via blade-tip sweep were investigated to study their impact on ultimate loads and fatigue damage equivalent loads.

  10. AIAA-98-0057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS

    E-print Network

    Sweetman, Bert

    AIAA-98-0057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS: PARAMETRIC STUDY WITH MULTIPLE that is most useful in estimating fatigue loads on wind turbine blades. The histograms of rain ow counted for apwise loads on three horizontal axis wind tur- binesHAWTs. In the case of two of these turbines

  11. Wind turbine blade testing system using base excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrell, Jason; Thresher, Robert; Lambert, Scott; Hughes, Scott; Johnson, Jay

    2014-03-25

    An apparatus (500) for fatigue testing elongate test articles (404) including wind turbine blades through forced or resonant excitation of the base (406) of the test articles (404). The apparatus (500) includes a testing platform or foundation (402). A blade support (410) is provided for retaining or supporting a base (406) of an elongate test article (404), and the blade support (410) is pivotally mounted on the testing platform (402) with at least two degrees of freedom of motion relative to the testing platform (402). An excitation input assembly (540) is interconnected with the blade support (410) and includes first and second actuators (444, 446, 541) that act to concurrently apply forces or loads to the blade support (410). The actuator forces are cyclically applied in first and second transverse directions. The test article (404) responds to shaking of its base (406) by oscillating in two, transverse directions (505, 507).

  12. White noise response of turbine blades subjected to heat flux and thermal gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, V.; Aba, E.; Morguel, O.K.

    1997-07-01

    Design and production of the complex mechanical structures rarely result in an optimal solution. A typical example for this is a turbine blade design. Fatigue failures of the turbine blades is one of the most vexing problems of turbo-machine manufacturers, ever since the steam turbine became the main stay for power generating equipment and the gas turbines are increasingly used in air transport. Turbine blade failures due to fatigue are predominantly vibration related. The dynamic loads on the blading can arise from many different sources such as the high rotational speed, the high operating temperatures, the asymmetric aerofil tapered form of the turbine blade etc. Therefore, vibratory analysis is one of the most important stage in the designing of the turbine blades. In this study, the random response of the turbine blade to white noise excitation has been consistently calculated, including the internal damping mechanisms of the blade. Beside the damping effects, the rotational speed and the linear thermal gradient along the turbine blade are incorporated into the analysis. Pressure difference between the two surfaces of the turbine blades are modelled as white noise excitation along all over the turbine blade. The system dynamic equation of motion are derived and solved by using the combined Finite Element-Modal Analysis Method.

  13. Extended fatigue life of a catalyst free self-healing acrylic bone cement using microencapsulated 2-octyl cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Brochu, Alice B W; Matthys, Oriane B; Craig, Stephen L; Reichert, William M

    2015-02-01

    The tissue adhesive 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (OCA) was encapsulated in polyurethane microshells and incorporated into bone cement to form a catalyst free, self-healing bone cement comprised of all clinically approved components. The bending strength, modulus, and fatigue lifetime were investigated in accordance with ASTM and ISO standards for the testing of PMMA bone cement. The bending strength of bone cement specimens decreased with increasing wt % capsules content for capsules without or with OCA, with specimens of <5 wt % capsule content showing minimal effect. In contrast, bone cement bending modulus was insensitive to capsule content. Load controlled fatigue testing was performed in air at room temperature on capsule free bone cement (0 wt %), bone cement with 5 wt % OCA-free capsules (5 wt % No OCA), and 5 wt % OCA-containing capsules (5 wt % OCA). Specimens were tested at a frequency of 5 Hz at maximum stresses of 90%, 80%, 70%, and 50% of each specimen's bending strength until failure. The 5 wt % OCA exhibited significant self-healing at 70% and 50% of its reference strength (p?Fatigue testing of all three specimen types in air at 22 MPa (50% of reference strength of the 5 wt % OCA specimens) showed that the cycles to failure of OCA-containing specimens was increased by two-fold compared with the OCA-free and capsule-free specimens. This study represents the first demonstration of dynamic, catalyst free self-healing in a biomaterial formulation. PMID:24825796

  14. Probabilistic Mesomechanical Fatigue Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    A probabilistic mesomechanical fatigue life model is proposed to link the microstructural material heterogeneities to the statistical scatter in the macrostructural response. The macrostructure is modeled as an ensemble of microelements. Cracks nucleation within the microelements and grow from the microelements to final fracture. Variations of the microelement properties are defined using statistical parameters. A micromechanical slip band decohesion model is used to determine the crack nucleation life and size. A crack tip opening displacement model is used to determine the small crack growth life and size. Paris law is used to determine the long crack growth life. The models are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the statistical distribution of total fatigue life for the macrostructure. The modeled response is compared to trends in experimental observations from the literature.

  15. Turbine blade testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Testing procedures which could be used to model test turbine blades are developed. The methods studied were methods which used and extended current modal testing procedures. An acoustical impacting testing method was perfected for testing small turbine blades.

  16. A comparison of muscle strength and endurance, exercise capacity, fatigue perception and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and healthy subjects: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has significant systemic effects that substantially impact quality of life and survival. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare peripheral muscle strength and endurance, exercise capacity, fatigue perception and quality of life between patients with COPD and healthy subjects. Methods Twenty COPD patients (mean FEV1 49.3?±?19.2%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in the study. Pulmonary function testing and six-minute walk test (6MWT) were performed. Peripheral muscle strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer, peripheral muscle endurance was evaluated with sit-ups, squats and modified push-ups tests. Fatigue perception was assessed using the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). General quality of life was determined with the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and cough-specific quality of life was evaluated with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ). Results Pulmonary functions, strength of shoulder abductor and flexor muscles, numbers of sit-ups and squats, 6MWT distance and 6MWT% were significantly lower in COPD patients than in healthy subjects (p?life were adversely affected in patients with COPD. There are greater effect of fatigue on psychosocial functioning and general daily life activities and effect of cough on the quality of life in patients with COPD. This study supports the idea that COPD patients must be evaluated in a comprehensive manner for planning pulmonary rehabilitation programs. PMID:24468029

  17. Fatigue in Parkinson disease: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Amy E; Sethares, Kristen A

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue, one of the most prevalent and underassessed nonmotor symptoms in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), is reported to be a major cause of disability and reduced quality of life. The purpose of this review was to systematically examine the scientific literature and report how fatigue is defined and measured and what interventions are used to treat it. A synthesis of the current literature will expose the current state of the science of fatigue in PD, propose areas for future research, and offer practice implications. An integrative review of the literature was conducted. The electronic databases CINAHL, Psychinfo, and PUBMED were searched using the keywords "Parkinson's disease," "fatigue," "definition," "mental fatigue," "physical fatigue," "measurement," "interventions," "treatment," and "methylphenidate." One hundred fourteen articles were found. Nineteen studies met review criteria. No universal definition of fatigue in PD was found, making it difficult to measure. However, central, physical, mental, and peripheral fatigues were described. Six scales were found that measure fatigue in PD; only one specific to PD, the Parkinson Fatigue Scale, measured physical fatigue. Seven studies reported interventions to treat fatigue and were categorized as medication, exercise, and alternative interventions. None of these interventions had a significant effect on fatigue. Findings showed that (a) there is a lack of a universally accepted definition of fatigue because of its subjective nature, (b) existing fatigue measurement tools do not measure all types of fatigue in PD, and (c) no intervention had a significant effect on fatigue. There is a need to define and explore fatigue further using qualitative methods. Further development of instruments to measure fatigue in women, younger onset, and older adults with PD is needed. A focus on person-centered interventions to reduce fatigue in patients with PD is a research priority. PMID:25943995

  18. Effects of a high mean stress on the high cycle fatigue life of PWA 1480 and correlation of data by linear elastic fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, S.; Kwasny, R.

    1985-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue tests using 5-mm-diameter smooth specimens were performed on the single crystal alloy PWA 1480 (001 axis) at 70F (room temperature) in air and at 100F (538C) in vacuum (10 to the -6 power torr). Tests were conducted at zero mean stress as well as at high tensile mean stress. The results indicate that, although a tensile mean stress, in general, reduces life, the reduction in fatigue strength, for a given mean stress at a life of one million cycles, is much less than what is predicted by the usual linear Goodman plot. Further, the material appears to be significantly more resistant to mean stress effects at 1000F than at 70F. Metallographic examinations of failed specimens indicate that failures in all cases are initiated from micropores of sizes of the order of 30 to 40 microns. Since the macroscopic stress-strain response in all cases was observed to be linear elastic, linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analyses were carried out to determine the crack growth curves of the material assuming that crack initiation from a micropore (a sub o = 40 microns) occurs very early in life. The results indicate that the calculated crack growth rates at an R (defined as the ratio between minimum stress to maximum stress) value of zero are approximately the same at 70F as at 1000F. However, the calculated crack growth rates at other R ratios, both positive and negative, tend to be higher at 70F than at 1000F. Calculated threshold effects at large R values tend to be independent of temperature in the temperature regime studied. They are relatively constant with increasing R ratio up to a value of about 0.6, beyond which the calculated threshold stress intensity factor range decreases rapidly with increasing R ratios.

  19. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  20. Turbine blade damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research results and progress on the performance of bladed systems is reported the different topics discussed include: the study of turbine blade damping; forced vibrations of friction damped beam moistures in two dimensions; and a users manual for a computer program for dynamic analysis of bladed systems.

  1. Turbine blade processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Space processing of directionally solidified eutectic-alloy type turbine blades is envisioned as a simple remelt operations in which precast blades are remelted in a preformed mold. Process systems based on induction melting, continuous resistance furnaces, and batch resistance furnaces were evaluated. The batch resistance furnace type process using a multiblade mold is considered to offer the best possibility for turbine blade processing.

  2. Hydrodynamic blade guide

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, Kenneth L. (Dublin, CA); Davis, Pete J. (Pleasanton, CA); Landram, Charles S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A saw having a self-pumped hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing for retaining the saw blade in a centered position in the saw kerf (width of cut made by the saw). The hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing utilizes pockets or grooves incorporated into the sides of the blade. The saw kerf in the workpiece provides the guide or bearing stator surface. Both sides of the blade entrain cutting fluid as the blade enters the kerf in the workpiece, and the trapped fluid provides pressure between the blade and the workpiece as an inverse function of the gap between the blade surface and the workpiece surface. If the blade wanders from the center of the kerf, then one gap will increase and one gap will decrease and the consequent pressure difference between the two sides of the blade will cause the blade to re-center itself in the kerf. Saws using the hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing have particular application in slicing slabs from boules of single crystal materials, for example, as well as for cutting other difficult to saw materials such as ceramics, glass, and brittle composite materials.

  3. Fatigue Experiences Among OCD Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Massimo; Piacentino, Daria; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Maraone, Annalisa; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Patients with OCD are impaired in multiple domains of functioning and quality of life. While associated psychopathology complaints and neuropsychological deficits were reported, the subjective experience of general fatigue and mental fatigue was scarcely investigated. In this single-center case-control study we compared 50 non-depressed OCD outpatients consecutively recruited and 50 panic disorder (PD) outpatients, to determine whether they experienced fatigue differently. Assessment consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, severity and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. Fatigue was assessed by using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI). Regarding MFI physical fatigue, an OR of 0.196 (95 % CI 0.080-0.478) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD compared to PD. The same can be said for MFI mental fatigue, as an OR of 0.138 (95 % CI 0.049-0.326) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD. Notably, OCD patients with OCDP co-morbidity reported higher scores of mental fatigue. In this study fatigue, including mental fatigue, seems not to be a prominent experience among adult non-depressed OCD patients. PMID:25814268

  4. Welding for life

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebler, T.J.; Nugent, R.M.; Wilson, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    State of the Art Welding Techniques are being utilized to extend the life of major steam turbine components, as well as other traditional types of repairs. The development of a temper bead welding technique has allowed Houston Lighting and Power (HL and P) to perform innovative weld repairs. Nozzle vanes are weld repaired without removing the nozzle blocks from the case; repair life has also been doubled. A new two wire Gas Tungsten ARC Welding (GTAW) machine has produced high deposition rates while maintaining excellent mechanical properties. This results in faster turn-around time and with an improved weld repair. Development of a weld wire specification has also been instrumental in achieving additional component life by increasing the resistance to fatigue, especially in the heat affected zone. All these factors work together to enhance the weld repairs. Tensile strengths of 140,000 PSI with good ductility have been achieved. This paper will discuss their experiences with several repairs and recap the results of some studies and tests performed during the technique development stages. Major repairs include; weld repair of cases, nozzle blocks, nozzle boxes, stationary blade repair, forced draft fan shaft buildup, weld repair of turbine shrouds, blades, tennons and journals.

  5. An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2010-09-01

    Wind turbine blades are subjected to complex multiaxial stress states during operation. A review of the literature suggests that mixed mode fracture toughness can be significantly less than that of the tensile opening mode (Mode I), implying that fracture failure can occur at a much lower load capacity if the structure is subject to mixed-mode loading. Thus, it will be necessary to identify the mechanisms that might lead to failure in blade materials under mixed-mode loading conditions. Meanwhile, wind turbine blades are typically fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric materials, e.g. fiber glass composites. Due to the large degree of anisotropy in mechanical properties that is usually associated with laminates, the fracture behavior of these composite materials is likely to be strongly dependent on the loading conditions. This may further strengthen the need to study the effect of mixed-mode loading on the integrity and durability of the wind turbine blade composites. To quantify the fracture behavior of composite structures under mixed mode loading conditions, particularly under combined Mode I (flexural or normal tensile stress) and Mode III (torsional shear stress) loading, a new testing technique is proposed based on the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT). As a 2002 R&D 100 Award winner, SNTT is a novel fracture testing technology. SNTT has many advantages over conventional fracture toughness methods and has been used to determine fracture toughness values on a wide spectrum of materials. The current project is the first attempt to utilize SNTT on polymeric and polymer-based composite materials. It is expected that mixed-mode failure mechanisms of wind turbine blades induced by typical in-service loading conditions, such as delamination, matrix cracking, fiber pull-out and fracture, can be effectively and economically investigated by using this methodology. This project consists of two phases. The Phase I (FY2010) effort includes (1) preparation of testing material and testing equipment set-up, including calibration of associated instruments/sensors, (2) development of design protocols for the proposed SNTT samples for both polymer and composite materials, such as sample geometries and fabrication techniques, (3) manufacture of SNTT samples, and (4) fracture toughness testing using the SNTT method. The major milestone achieved in Phase I is the understanding of fracture behaviors of polymeric matrix materials from testing numerous epoxy SNTT samples. Totals of 30 epoxy SNTT samples were fabricated from two types of epoxy materials provided by our industrial partners Gougeon Brothers, Inc. and Molded Fiber Glass Companies. These samples were tested with SNTT in three groups: (1) fracture due to monotonic loading, (2) fracture due to fatigue cyclic loading, and (3) monotonic loading applied to fatigue-precracked samples. Brittle fractures were observed on all tested samples, implying linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis can be effectively used to estimate the fracture toughness of these materials with confidence. Appropriate fatigue precracking protocols were established to achieve controllable crack growth using the SNTT approach under pure torsion loading. These fatigue protocols provide the significant insights of the mechanical behavior of epoxy polymeric materials and their associated rate-dependent characteristics. Effects of mixed-mode loading on the fracture behavior of epoxy materials was studied. It was found that all epoxy samples failed in brittle tensile failure mode; the fracture surfaces always follow a 45o spiral plane that corresponded to Mode I tensile failure, even when the initial pitch angle of the machined spiral grooves was not at 45o. In addition, general observation from the fatigue experiments implied that loading rate played an important role determining the fracture behavior of epoxy materials, such that a higher loading rate resulted in a shorter fatigue life. A detailed study of loading rate effect will be continued in the Phase II. On the other hand, analytical finite element ana

  6. Blades and Towers Modal Analysis Code (BModes): Verification of Blade Modal Analysis Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Bir, G.

    2009-01-01

    BModes is a finite-element code we developed to provide coupled modes for flexible blades, rotating or non-rotating, and for towers, onshore or offshore (supported either on floating platforms or on monopile foundations). Both the blade and the tower allow a tip attachment, which is modeled as a rigid body with mass, six moments of inertia, and a mass centroid that may be offset from the blade or tower axis. Examples of tip attachments are aerodynamic brakes for blades and nacelle-rotor subassemblies for towers. Allowable supports for the tower include tension wires, floating platforms, and shallow-water monopiles with elastic foundation. Coupled modes (implying coupling of flap, lag, axial, and torsion motions) have several applications. Examples are: modeling of major flexible components for modal-based aeroelastic codes such as FAST, validation of turbine models using experimental data, modal-based fatigue analysis, and understanding of aeroelastic-stability behavior of turbines. This paper presents verification of the blade modal analysis capability of BModes. Verification begins with simple uniform beams, rotating and non-rotating, and progresses to realistic blades. BModes-computed modes for all models are compared with analytical modes, if possible to obtain, and with modes generated by RCAS. All results, presented in terms of frequencies and mode shapes, show excellent agreement.

  7. A Review of Evidence for High Life Coefficients on Propeller and Rotor Blades Under Static Thrust Conditions with Some New Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Peter D.; Meyer, Mark; Branum, Lonnie; Burks, John S. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Interest has increased recently in the thrust-producing capability of rotors at very high collective pitch angles. An early reference noted this behaviour in rotors and offered alternative models for section lift characteristics to explain it. The same phenomenon was coincidentally noted and used in a propeller code, resulting in very good correlation with static thrust data. The proposed paper will present experimental data demonstrating the pronounced persistence of thrust for propellers at increasing collective pitch angles. Comparisons with blade element/momentum theory will be made. These results are expected to point to the need to define (ultimately to explain) aerodynamic lift and drag behaviour in a rotating environment. Experimental measurements made by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate at the Ames Research Center have shown that locally measured normal force coefficients along the span of a highly twisted rotor blade continue to increase at high values of collective pitch. In some cases these coefficients exceed expected values for the same type of airfoil tested under two dimensional conditions. To date no one to the authors' knowledge has defined the variation of C(n) with pitch for very high angles (to 45 deg) in a rotating environment and for a blade of reasonably high aspect ratio; however, total propeller thrust measurements support the idea that stalling does not occur in the same way as on a wing. This paper will present experimental data in the form of surface pressure distributions as well as flow visualization (microtufts) to explore the aerodynamic behavior of the rotating airfoil at high values of blade incidence. This paper also reviews experimental evidence and infers some high lift coefficient behavior from it. Comparisons between predicted thrust, utilizing modified airfoil characteristics and a blade element model, and measured thrust for both rotors and propellers that cover the extremes of collective pitch are shown and discussed.

  8. Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Thomas R.; Hayes, Lauren J.; Applin, Rebecca C.; Weatherly, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward prediction from attention restoration theory is that the level of incompatibility in a person's life should be positively correlated with that person's level of mental (or directed attention) fatigue. The authors tested this prediction by developing a new self-report measure of incompatibility in which they attempted to isolate…

  9. Wireless Inductive Power Device Suppresses Blade Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Min, James B.; Stefko, George L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Fougers, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration in turbomachinery can cause blade failures and leads to the use of heavier, thicker blades that result in lower aerodynamic efficiency and increased noise. Metal and/or composite fatigue in the blades of jet engines has resulted in blade destruction and loss of lives. Techniques for suppressing low-frequency blade vibration, such as gtuned circuit resistive dissipation of vibratory energy, h or simply "passive damping," can require electronics incorporating coils of unwieldy dimensions and adding unwanted weight to the rotor. Other approaches, using vibration-dampening devices or damping material, could add undesirable weight to the blades or hub, making them less efficient. A wireless inductive power device (WIPD) was designed, fabricated, and developed for use in the NASA Glenn's "Dynamic Spin Rig" (DSR) facility. The DSR is used to simulate the functionality of turbomachinery. The relatively small and lightweight device [10 lb (approx.=4.5 kg)] replaces the existing venerable and bulky slip-ring. The goal is the eventual integration of this technology into actual turbomachinery such as jet engines or electric power generators, wherein the device will facilitate the suppression of potentially destructive vibrations in fan blades. This technology obviates slip rings, which require cooling and can prove unreliable or be problematic over time. The WIPD consists of two parts: a remote element, which is positioned on the rotor and provides up to 100 W of electrical power to thin, lightweight piezoelectric patches strategically placed on/in fan blades; and a stationary base unit that wirelessly communicates with the remote unit. The base unit supplies inductive power, and also acts as an input and output corridor for wireless measurement, and active control command to the remote unit. Efficient engine operation necessitates minimal disturbance to the gas flow across the turbine blades in any effort to moderate blade vibration. This innovation makes it possible to moderate vibration on or in turbomachinery blades by providing 100 W of wireless electrical power and actuation control to thin, lightweight vibration-suppressing piezoelectric patches (eight actuation and eight sensor patches in this prototype, for a total of 16 channels) positioned strategically on the surface of, or within, titanium fan blades, or embedded in composite fan blades. This approach moves significantly closer to the ultimate integration of "active" vibration suppression technology into jet engines and other turbomachinery devices such as turbine electrical generators used in the power industry. The novel feature of this device is in its utilization of wireless technology to simultaneously sense and actively control vibration in rotating or stationary turbomachinery blades using piezoelectric patches. In the past, wireless technology was used solely for sensing and diagnostics. This technology, however, will accomplish much more, in terms of simultaneously sensing, suppressing blade vibration, and making it possible for detailed study of vibration impact in turbomachinery blades.

  10. Composite fan blade

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J.D.

    1993-08-31

    A composite fan blade is described for a prop fan engine comprising: a support disk having a plurality of hinge lugs formed therein, the disk being connected to an engine drive means; a bushing element; a fan blade formed from a first set of radially oriented unidirectional layers of fibers, the first set of layers of fibers being wrapped around the bushing element to form an elongated front side, an elongated back side, and a portion encompassing the bushing element; a blade platform formed from a second set of unidirectional layers of fibers having a first and a second end which are both wrapped around respective resin filler elements to form resin filled support pockets, the second set of unidirectional layers of fibers being wrapped around the portion of the fan blade encompassing the bushing element to place the resin filled support pockets against the portion of the fan blade encompassing the bushing element, wherein the fan blade and the blade platform form a fan blade assembly, the fan blade assembly having a plurality of hinge slots formed therein; and a pin element extending through the hinge formed by the plurality of hinge lugs in the support disk and the plurality of hinge slots in the fan blade assembly for attaching the fan blade assembly to the support disk.

  11. Intermetallic blades for fabric cutting. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Blue, C.A.; Sklad, S.; Shih, H.R.; Off, J.W.A.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the evaluation of nickel- and iron-aluminide blades for cutting fabric as opposed to conventional steel blades. The aluminides were selected as blade material because of their extremely high work-hardening rate and the possibility of forming aluminum oxide on the surface to further enhance the wear resistance. Unlike steel blades, they do not require heat treating to become strong. A testing facility using an Eastman cutter was designed and built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing of blades. Denim fabric supplied by Levi Strauss was used. For lack of sufficient fabric, heavy paper was also used. Extensive testing revealed that there were several issues in getting the true comparison between various blades. The most important issue was the consistent sharpening of the blade edge. With all of the effort and precautions, identical edges could not be put on the blades of all the different materials. The second issue was the limited availability of fabric to evaluate the end-of-life limit for the blade edges. Two nickel- and three iron-aluminide compositions were evaluated. Under test conditions, the iron-aluminide alloy (PM-60), based on FeAl, was found to outperform other aluminides and the steel blade. Based on the data presented in this report, the authors recommend that additional testing be carried out on both the steel and aluminide blades to determine the number of times each blade can be sharpened prior to its replacement. However, the recommended testing needs to be conducted on blades for which the identical cutting edges and sharpening are incorporated. They further recommend that if the iron-aluminide blade is truly superior, a cost analysis be performed to determine its commercial feasibility. The best aluminide blades should be tested by commercial textile companies.

  12. Dual-axis resonance testing of wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Scott; Musial, Walter; White, Darris

    2014-01-07

    An apparatus (100) for fatigue testing test articles (104) including wind turbine blades. The apparatus (100) includes a test stand (110) that rigidly supports an end (106) of the test article (104). An actuator assembly (120) is attached to the test article (104) and is adapted for substantially concurrently imparting first and second forcing functions in first and second directions on the test article (104), with the first and second directions being perpendicular to a longitudinal axis. A controller (130) transmits first and second sets of displacement signals (160, 164) to the actuator assembly (120) at two resonant frequencies of the test system (104). The displacement signals (160, 164) initiate the actuator assembly (120) to impart the forcing loads to concurrently oscillate the test article (104) in the first and second directions. With turbine blades, the blades (104) are resonant tested concurrently for fatigue in the flapwise and edgewise directions.

  13. Role of plasticity on fretting fatigue behavior of titanium-aluminum-vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kisu

    Fretting fatigue leads to the degradation of the fatigue strength of a material due to cyclic micro-slip between two contacting materials. Since fatigue life reduction caused by fretting fatigue occurs in various mechanical components, such as bolted connections and blade/disk dovetail joints etc., fretting fatigue is regarded as an important issue in the design of aerospace structures. Consequently, a number of studies have been performed to predict the behavior of fretting fatigue. However, while many studies have evaluated fretting fatigue behavior under elastic deformation conditions, few studies have focused on fretting fatigue behavior under elastic-plastic deformation conditions. Due to the fact that plastic deformation is an integral part of crack nucleation, the role of plastic deformation in crack initiation should be considered, especially when a large plastic zone is presented. The primary goal of this study was to characterize the fretting fatigue crack initiation behavior in the presence of plasticity. Experimental tests were performed using pad configurations involving elastic-plastic deformations. A total of eight different configurations of fretting pads were used for this dissertation. Five of the eight geometries were intended to generate the elastic deformation, i.e. 50.8 mm, 101.6 mm and 304.8 mm radius pads with normal contact load of 1.334 N, 2.224, and 4.003 kN respectively and two flat with rounded edge pads with normal contact load of 1.334 and 4.003 kN. In order to replicate the elastic-plastic deformation conditions, the smaller radii of the cylindrical pads, i.e. 5.08 mm radius pads, and flat pad type3 (FP3) with smaller edge radius, were included in this study. Two different contact loads were applied with the 5.08 mm radius cylindrical pad, i.e. 1.334 and 1.779 kN, while one contact load was applied with the flat pad type3, i.e. 4.003 kN. The crack initiation location was found near the trailing edge under both elastic and elastic-plastic fretting fatigue conditions. The crack initiation orientation was also measured and found to have similar angles for all pad configurations involving both elastic and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to calculate stress distributions under elastic-plastic fretting fatigue conditions, finite element analysis (FEA) was also performed. In order to obtain accurate stress and strain results, the mesh size was determined through comparison with FEA and analytical solution, i.e. Ruiz Program. The applied loading conditions obtained during experimental works were utilized in the FEA. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. The effects of fretting on fatigue characteristics of a mechanically fastened aircraft joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Akbar Hussain

    A research study to investigate the effects of fretting on fatigue characteristics of an aircraft joint was carried out. The selected joint for this study simulates the rotor head of an aircraft capable of taking off vertically. The primary function of this hub-spindle joint is to retain the main rotor blade against the centrifugal forces, both in-plane and out-of-plane bending moments and torsion caused due to the lift, drag and other aerodynamic forces imposed on the rotor blades while the aircraft is in forward flight. The primary objectives of this study were twofold; (a) Verify that the average lives of mechanically fastened joints with combined effects of fretting and fatigue will be lower compared to the average lives due to plain fatigue. (b) Discover whether fretting causes cracks to nucleate and fatigue causes those cracks to propagate. In order to verify the validity of the first hypothesis, seven test joints were tested to failure. Several S/N curves were generated against Mil-Handbook 5H data for comparable plain fatigue response of the same material. Out of the seven specimens that were tested, five were machined from Aluminum 7075-T6, and the other two were machined from Aluminum 7050-T7451. An average fretting fatigue life reduction factor Kff, of 21 was found for all these seven joints. In order to validate the second hypothesis, a detailed investigation under a scanning electron microscope of the fretted/failed surfaces was conducted. Severe fretting damage was observed in all test specimens. It was found that fretting-induced damage provided the crack nucleation sites in all test specimens that failed. These nucleation sites were in the form of fretting scars, pits and gouges providing several regions of stress concentration. Under the influence of high tensile stress fields, these sites allowed several small embryonic cracks to form, coalesce and link up to form primary and multiple cracks, which subsequently propagated under the applied cyclic loads leading to final instability, i.e., fracture. Fretting fatigue should be treated as a major threat against structural integrity of joints. Currently, there are no known analytical models available to design against fretting fatigue. It is therefore recommended that in areas of critical applications full scale tests should be conducted prior to actual use.

  15. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  16. The SNL100-03 Blade: Design Studies with Flatback Airfoils for the Sandia 100-meter Blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Daniel; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-09-01

    A series of design studies were performed to inv estigate the effects of flatback airfoils on blade performance and weight for large blades using the Sandi a 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. As part of the study, the effects of varying the blade slenderness on blade structural performance was investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of blad e slenderness with respect to tip deflection, flap- wise & edge-wise fatigue resistance, panel buckling capacity, flutter speed, manufacturing labor content, blade total weight, and aerodynamic design load magn itude are quantified. Following these design studies, a final blade design (SNL100-03) was prod uced, which was based on a highly slender design using flatback airfoils. The SNL100-03 design with flatback airfoils has weight of 49 tons, which is about 16% decrease from its SNL100-02 predecessor that used conventional sharp trailing edge airfoils. Although not systematically optimized, the SNL100 -03 design study provides an assessment of and insight into the benefits of flatback airfoils for la rge blades as well as insights into the limits or negative consequences of high blade slenderness resulting from a highly slender SNL100-03 planform as was chosen in the final design definition. This docum ent also provides a description of the final SNL100-03 design definition and is intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-03, which are made publicly available. A summary of the major findings of the Sandia 100-meter blade development program, from the initial SNL100-00 baseline blade through the fourth SNL100-03 blade study, is provided. This summary includes the major findings and outcomes of blade d esign studies, pathways to mitigate the identified large blade design drivers, and tool development that were produced over the course of this five-year research program. A summary of large blade tec hnology needs and research opportunities is also presented.

  17. OF CARBON FIBERS TURBINE BLADE

    E-print Network

    THE USE IN WIND DESIGN: OF CARBON FIBERS TURBINE BLADE A SERI-8BLADE EXAMPLE Cheng Printed March 2000 The Use of Carbon Fibers in Wind Turbine Blade Design: a SERI-8 Blade Example Cheng-4035 Sandia Contract: BE-6196 Abstract The benefit ofintroducing carbon fibers inawind turbine blade

  18. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1995-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

  19. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-11

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figs.

  20. Probabilistic fatigue methodology for six nines reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Bartlett, F. D., Jr.; Elber, Wolf

    1990-01-01

    Fleet readiness and flight safety strongly depend on the degree of reliability that can be designed into rotorcraft flight critical components. The current U.S. Army fatigue life specification for new rotorcraft is the so-called six nines reliability, or a probability of failure of one in a million. The progress of a round robin which was established by the American Helicopter Society (AHS) Subcommittee for Fatigue and Damage Tolerance is reviewed to investigate reliability-based fatigue methodology. The participants in this cooperative effort are in the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM) and the rotorcraft industry. One phase of the joint activity examined fatigue reliability under uniquely defined conditions for which only one answer was correct. The other phases were set up to learn how the different industry methods in defining fatigue strength affected the mean fatigue life and reliability calculations. Hence, constant amplitude and spectrum fatigue test data were provided so that each participant could perform their standard fatigue life analysis. As a result of this round robin, the probabilistic logic which includes both fatigue strength and spectrum loading variability in developing a consistant reliability analysis was established. In this first study, the reliability analysis was limited to the linear cumulative damage approach. However, it is expected that superior fatigue life prediction methods will ultimately be developed through this open AHS forum. To that end, these preliminary results were useful in identifying some topics for additional study.

  1. SHM of wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Gyuhae; Taylor, Stuart G; Farinholt, Kevin M; Farrar, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations, frequency response functions, and time series based methods are utilized to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Overall, these three methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation into field deployment. A full-scale fatigue test of a CX-100 wind turbine blade is also conducted. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and practical implementation issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  2. Comparison of damping treatments for gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Robert W.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    1996-05-01

    High frequency vibration of gas turbine fan blades is a high cycle fatigue concern. Friction damping devices are ineffective in suppressing high frequency vibration modes and external damping treatments are plagued by creep concerns. An alternative approach is to apply viscoelastic material internally in the blades. In this paper, an analytical comparison of internal damping treatments for fan blades is presented. The fan blade is modeled as a solid, flat, cantilevered titanium plate. Internal portions are removed producing cavities that are filled with viscoelastic material. Configurations with one, two, and three cavities are modeled using the modal strain energy method in conjunction with finite element analysis to estimate damping. Results show that appreciable damping levels for high frequency modes are possible with stiff viscoelastic material. Other design criteria are also considered. Results indicate that the hydrostatic load from the viscoelastic material on the cavity walls may be a concern.

  3. Effect of tensile mean stress on fatigue behavior of single-crystal and directionally solidified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Two nickel base superalloys, single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf, were studied in view of the potential usage of the former and usage of the latter as blade materials for the turbomachinery of the Space Shuttle main engine. The baseline zero mean stress (ZMS) fatigue life (FL) behavior of these superalloys was established, and then the effect of tensile mean stress (TMS) on their FL behavior was characterized. A stress range based FL prediction approach was used to characterize both the ZMS and TMS fatigue data. In the past, several researchers have developed methods to account for the detrimental effect of tensile mean stress on the FL for polycrystalline engineering alloys. These methods were applied to characterize the TMS fatigue data of single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf and were found to be unsatisfactory. Therefore, a method of accounting for the TMS effect on FL, that is based on a technique proposed by Heidmann and Manson was developed to characterize the TMS fatigue data of these superalloys. Details of this method and its relationship to the conventionally used mean stress methods in FL prediction are discussed.

  4. Laser hardening techniques on steam turbine blade and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Zhang, Qunli; Kong, Fanzhi; Ding, Qingming

    Different laser surface hardening techniques, such as laser alloying and laser solution strengthening were adopted to perform modification treatment on the local region of inset edge for 2Cr13 and 17-4PH steam turbine blades to prolong the life of the blades. The microstructures, microhardness and anti-cavitation properties were investigated on the blades after laser treatment. The hardening mechanism and technique adaptability were researched. Large scale installation practices confirmed that the laser surface modification techniques are safe and reliable, which can improve the properties of blades greatly with advantages of high automation, high quality, little distortion and simple procedure.

  5. Development of a numerical procedure for mixed mode K-solutions and fatigue crack growth in FCC single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Srikant

    2005-11-01

    Fatigue-induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades and vanes are a pervasive problem. Turbine blades and vanes represent perhaps the most demanding structural applications due to the combination of high operating temperature, corrosive environment, high monotonic and cyclic stresses, long expected component lifetimes and the enormous consequence of structural failure. Single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. These materials have orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. Computation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the ability to model fatigue crack growth rate at single crystal cracks subject to mixed-mode loading conditions are important parts of developing a mechanistically based life prediction for these complex alloys. A general numerical procedure has been developed to calculate SIFs for a crack in a general anisotropic linear elastic material subject to mixed-mode loading conditions, using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). The procedure does not require an a priori assumption of plane stress or plane strain conditions. The SIFs KI, KII, and KIII are shown to be a complex function of the coupled 3D crack tip displacement field. A comprehensive study of variation of SIFs as a function of crystallographic orientation, crack length, and mode-mixity ratios is presented, based on the 3D elastic orthotropic finite element modeling of tensile and Brazilian Disc (BD) specimens in specific crystal orientations. Variation of SIF through the thickness of the specimens is also analyzed. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient or effective SIF, Krss, can be computed as a function of crack tip SIFs and the resolved shear stress on primary slip planes. The maximum value of Krss and DeltaKrss was found to determine the crack growth direction and the fatigue crack growth rate respectively. The fatigue crack driving force parameter, DeltaK rss, forms an important multiaxial fatigue damage parameter that can be used to predict life in superalloy components.

  6. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful operating range. Operating a blade at or near the resonance frequencies leads to high-cycle fatigue, which ultimately limits the blade's durability and life. So the aim of this study is to determine the variation of the resonance frequencies for an idealized sandwich blade as a function of its face-sheet thickness, core thickness, and foam density. The finite element method is used to determine the natural frequencies for an idealized rectangular sandwich blade. The proven Lanczos method (ref. 7) is used in the study to extract the natural frequency.

  7. Characterization of a nine-meter sensor-equipped wind turbine blade using a laser measuring device

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nine-meter turbine blade was prepared for an experiment to examine the movement and fatigue patterns during operation on a 115 kW turbine. The blade, equipped with surface mounted fiber optic strain gauges, foil strain gauges, single, and triple axis accelerometers was placed on a calibration fixt...

  8. [Management of fatigue in oncology].

    PubMed

    Gledhill, Jane; Boisvert, Cécile; Thinlot, Chantal

    2006-11-30

    Fatigue associated with cancer may be present at any stage of the disease; its characteristics vary depending on the type and the duration of treatment, the presence of side effects and the reactions from patients. Often associated with other symptoms (pain, nausea, vomiting, anxiety, stress etc.), fatigue affects the daily life of patients as much as or even more than pain. This multi-factored and annoying symptom is linked to physical, cognitive and affective functioning, which must be assessed (Piper fatigue scale). Beside the medical management, nursing research found four efficient interventions to reduce fatigue: educating patients and their families, programming physical conditioning and activities to restore the attention, improving diet, hydration and sleep. The pluridisciplinary management of this symptom is a key factor to a better quality of life. PMID:17274508

  9. Microstructure-Sensitive Computational Fatigue Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, D. L.

    Previous sections focused on plasticity and damage formation and evolution under monotomic loading. Under cyclic loading, fatigue failure is a significant consideration. Historically, simple macroscopic fatigue correlations have proven quite useful in estimating fatigue crack initiation life of metallic components, based on measured or calculated stresses and strains at notches in components. The application of stress-based criteria for high cycle fatigue (HCF) or plastic strain-based criteria for low cycle fatigue (LCF) is typically based on transfer of results from tests on relatively small scale notched and unnotched laboratory specimens to larger components (cf. [1]). At the macroscale, fatigue of ductile materials has many common characteristics among alloy systems, leading to the utility of strain-life criteria. At the level of microstructure, fatigue is a complex, cycle-dependent process that differs in detail from one alloy system to the next. Often it is desired to understand mean fatigue resistance and scatter in fatigue as a function of microstructure in order to tailor microstructure to improve component level fatigue resistance. To this end, extension of fatigue analysis methods to microstructures is necessary as a means to augment and reduce the number of required experiments.

  10. Survivorship: Fatigue, Version 1.2014

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom even after treatment ends. Persistent cancer-related fatigue affects quality of life, because individuals become too tired to fully participate in the roles and activities that make life meaningful. Identification and management of fatigue remains an unmet need for many cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and management recommendations for fatigue in survivors. Management includes education and counseling, physical activity, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacologic treatments. PMID:24925198

  11. Survivorship: fatigue, version 1.2014.

    PubMed

    Denlinger, Crystal S; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J; O'Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L; Urba, Susan G; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2014-06-01

    Many cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom even after treatment ends. Persistent cancer-related fatigue affects quality of life, because individuals become too tired to fully participate in the roles and activities that make life meaningful. Identification and management of fatigue remains an unmet need for many cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and management recommendations for fatigue in survivors. Management includes education and counseling, physical activity, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacologic treatments. PMID:24925198

  12. Bunk Fatigue 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    to design mixtures taking this phenomenon into account and achieving maximum durability is an important and complex issue. This study was aimed at characterizing the effects of oxidative aging on durability in terms of mixture fatigue resistance...

  13. Composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Cheng-Huat

    Researchers in wind energy industry are constantly moving forward to develop higher efficiency wind turbine. One major component for wind turbine design is to have cost effective wind turbine blades. In addition to correct aerodynamic shape and blade geometry, blade performance can be enhanced further through aero-elastic tailoring design and material selections. An analytical tool for blade design has been improved and validated. This analytical tool is utilized to resolve issues related to elastic tailoring design. The investigation looks into two major issues related to the design and fabrication of a bend-twist-coupled blade. Various design parameters for a blade such as materials, laminate lay-up, skin thickness, ply orientation, internal spar, etc. have been examined for designing a bend-twist-coupled blade. The parametric study indicates that the critical design parameters are the ply material, the ply orientation, and the volume fraction ratio between the anisotropic layers and orthotropic layers. To produce a blade having the bend-twist coupling characteristics, the fiber lay-ups at the top and bottom skins of the blade must have a "mirror" lay-up in relation to the middle plane of the blade. Such lay-up causes fiber discontinuation at the seam. The joint design at the seam is one major consideration in fabricating a truly anisotropic blade. A new joint design was proposed and tensile failure tests were carried out for both the old and new joint designs. The tests investigated the effects of different types of joint designs, the laminate lay-up at the joints, and the stacking sequence of the joint retention strength. A major component of a wind turbine blade, D-spar, was designed to maximum coupling. Two D-spars were then fabricated using the new joint design; one of them was subjected to both static and modal testings. Traditionally, wind turbine blades are made of low cost glass material; however, carbon fibers are proposed as alternative material. Our study indicates that carbon fibers are more efficient than glass fibers not only in blade structural performance, but also in relative cost comparison.

  14. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1995-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

  15. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-01-10

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figures.

  16. Turbine blade platform seal

    DOEpatents

    Zagar, Thomas W. (Winter Springs, FL); Schiavo, Anthony L. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A rotating blade group 90 for a turbo-machine having an improved device for sealing the gap 110 between the edges 112,114 of adjacent blade platforms 96,104. The gap 110 between adjacent blades 92,100 is sealed by a seal pin 20 its central portion 110 and by a seal plate 58,60 at each of the front 54 and rear 56 portions. The seal plates 58,60 are inserted into corresponding grooves 62,64 formed in the adjacent edges 112,114 of adjoining blades 92,100 and held in place by end plates 40,42. The end of the seal plates 58,60 may be chamfered 78,80 to improve the seal against the end plate 40,42. The seal pin 20 provides the required damping between the blades 92,100 and the seal plates 58,60 provide improved sealing effectiveness.

  17. Fatigue Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Joshua Paquette

    E-print Network

    Fatigue Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Blades* Joshua Paquette Sandia National a research program1 to demonstrate the use of carbon fiber in subscale blades2 . From this effort, SNL was conducted on Carbon Experimental and Twist-Bend Experimental (CX-100 and TX-100) 9-m wind turbine research

  18. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Disordered Bladed-Disk Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Oliver G., III

    1997-01-01

    In a effort to address current needs for efficient, air propulsion systems, we have developed some new analytical predictive tools for understanding and alleviating aircraft engine instabilities which have led to accelerated high cycle fatigue and catastrophic failures of these machines during flight. A frequent cause of failure in Jets engines is excessive resonant vibrations and stall flutter instabilities. The likelihood of these phenomena is reduced when designers employ the analytical models we have developed. These prediction models will ultimately increase the nation's competitiveness in producing high performance Jets engines with enhanced operability, energy economy, and safety. The objectives of our current threads of research in the final year are directed along two lines. First, we want to improve the current state of blade stress and aeromechanical reduced-ordered modeling of high bypass engine fans, Specifically, a new reduced-order iterative redesign tool for passively controlling the mechanical authority of shroudless, wide chord, laminated composite transonic bypass engine fans has been developed. Second, we aim to advance current understanding of aeromechanical feedback control of dynamic flow instabilities in axial flow compressors. A systematic theoretical evaluation of several approaches to aeromechanical feedback control of rotating stall in axial compressors has been conducted. Attached are abstracts of two .papers under preparation for the 1998 ASME Turbo Expo in Stockholm, Sweden sponsored under Grant No. NAG3-1571. Our goals during the final year under Grant No. NAG3-1571 is to enhance NASA's capabilities of forced response of turbomachines (such as NASA FREPS). We with continue our development of the reduced-ordered, three-dimensional component synthesis models for aeromechanical evaluation of integrated bladeddisk assemblies (i.e., the disk, non-identical bladeing etc.). We will complete our development of component systems design optimization strategies for specified vibratory stresses and increased fatigue life prediction of assembly components, and for specified frequency margins on the Campbell diagrams of turbomachines. Finally, we will integrate the developed codes with NASA's turbomachinery aeromechanics prediction capability (such as NASA FREPS).

  19. Detection of fatigue damage by electrochemical scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, W. J.

    1980-06-01

    Electrochemical reoxidation currents are shown to provide a new method of detecting fatigue damage in metals. The basic principle is demonstrated by measurements on anodized fatigue samples of aluminum. The initial anodic oxide film is ruptured at the site of the fatigue damage, and the flow of charge is measured during subsequent reanodization, or healing of the oxide. The localized distribution of the damage is revealed by a simple immersion scanning procedure, and the flow of charge to these localized regions correlates with observations of the severity of the damage by scanning electron microscopy. Fatigue cracks about 50 microns long or longer can be detected. In the specimens, these occurred after 10 percent of the fatigue life. The magnitude of the associated reanodization current transient is an accurate measure of the crack length and can predict the fatigue life within plus or minus 50 percent.

  20. Influence of alternating loads on nonlinear vibration characteristics of cracked blade in rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang; Chu, Fulei

    2015-09-01

    As important causes of fatigue and crack failure, alternating loads also affect vibration characteristics of cracked blades in rotor system and probably influence formulation of diagnostic rule. This work carried out analysis of nonlinear vibration of cracked blade in rotor system with crack breathing effects and alternating loads taken into account. Firstly, equations of motion are formed with Finite Element Method (FEM), and breathing crack is modeled with cracked hexahedral element (CHE) where the breathing behavior is load-dependent. Secondly, displacement responses of cracked blade are obtained, and the results with CHE and contact element are identical. The stiffness of the cracked blade is obtained with CHE and proved to be time-varying and dependent on the alternating loads. Thirdly, natural frequencies of cracked blade in stationary condition are analyzed including normal model, linear model (open crack) and nonlinear model (breathing crack), and the requirement of the inclusion of breathing effects in blades with fatigue crack is proved. Finally, influence of alternating loads on critical frequency of cracked blade in rotating condition is compared. The results show that the critical frequency is significantly affected due to the co-effects of the rotating speed and alternating loads. The proposed method can estimate nonlinear vibration characteristics of crack blade which is beneficial for the formulation of the diagnostic rule.

  1. Cumulative creep fatigue damage in 316 stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    The cumulative creep-fatigue damage behavior of 316 stainless steel at 1500 F was experimentally established for the two-level loading cases of fatigue followed by fatigue, creep fatigue followed by fatigue, and fatigue followed by creep fatigue. The two-level loadings were conducted such that the lower life (high strain) cycling was applied first for a controlled number of cycles and the higher life (low strain) cycling was conducted as the second level to failure. The target life levels in this study were 100 cycles to failure for both the fatigue and creep-fatigue lowlife loading, 5000 cycles to failure for the higher life fatigue loading and 10,000 cycles to failure for the higher life creep-fatigue loading. The failed specimens are being examined both fractographically and metallographically to ascertain the nature of the damaging mechanisms that produced failure. Models of creep-fatigue damage accumulation are being evaluated and knowledge of the various damaging mechanisms is necessary to ensure that predictive capability is instilled in the final failure model.

  2. NREL Wind Turbine Blade Structural Testing of the Modular Wind Energy MW45 Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-354

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01

    This CRADA was a purely funds-in CRADA with Modular Wind Energy (MWE). MWE had a need to perform full-scale testing of a 45-m wind turbine blade. NREL/NWTC provided the capabilities, facilities, and equipment to test this large-scale MWE wind turbine blade. Full-scale testing is required to demonstrate the ability of the wind turbine blade to withstand static design load cases and demonstrate the fatigue durability. Structural testing is also necessary to meet international blade testing certification requirements. Through this CRADA, MWE would obtain test results necessary for product development and certification, and NREL would benefit by working with an industrial partner to better understand the unique test requirements for wind turbine blades with advanced structural designs.

  3. Comparison of Measured Flapwise Structural Bending Moments on a Teetering Rotor Blade With Results Calculated From the Measured Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, Alton P.

    1959-01-01

    Flapwise bending moments were calculated for a teetering rotor blade using a reasonably rapid theoretical method in which airloads obtained from wind-tunnel tests were employed. The calculated moments agreed reasonably well with those measured with strain gages under the same test conditions. The range of the tests included one hovering and two forward-flight conditions. The rotor speed for the test was very near blade resonance, and difficult-to-calculate resonance effects apparently were responsible for the largest differences between the calculated and measured harmonic components of blade bending moments. These differences, moreover, were largely nullified when the harmonic components were combined to give a comparison of the calculated and measured blade total- moment time histories. The degree of agreement shown is therefore considered adequate to warrant the use of the theoretical method in establishing and applying methods of prediction of rotor-blade fatigue loads. At the same time, the validity of the experimental methods of obtaining both airload and blade stress measurement is also indicated to be adequate for use in establishing improved methods for prediction of rotor-blade fatigue loads during the design stage. The blade stiffnesses and natural frequencies were measured and found to be in close agreement with calculated values; however, for a condition of blade resonance the use of the experimental stiffness values resulted in better agreement between calculated and measured blade stresses.

  4. IEA R&D Wind Annex XI Symposium on Wind Turbine Fatigue

    E-print Network

    IEA R&D Wind Annex XI Symposium on Wind Turbine Fatigue DLR, Stuttgart February 1-2, 1996 DAMAGE ESTIMATES FOR EUROPEAN AND U.S. SITES USING THE U.S. HIGH-CYCLE FATIGUE DATA BASE Herbert J. Sutherland Wind for typical U.S. blade materials and one for European materials, to analyze the service lifetime of a wind

  5. 2013 AIAA SDM Wind Energy Session Creep/Fatigue Behavior of Resin Infused Biaxial Glass

    E-print Network

    2013 AIAA SDM Wind Energy Session Creep/Fatigue Behavior of Resin Infused Biaxial Glass Fabric/epoxy biaxial (±45o ) fabric laminates typical of shell/web areas of wind blades. Loading conditions were cyclic fatigue at R-values 0.1, -1 and 10, as well as tensile and compressive creep. Cyclic stress-strain loops

  6. A model to study the reduction of turbine blade vibration using the snubbing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennacchi, Paolo; Chatterton, Steven; Bachschmid, Nicolò; Pesatori, Emanuel; Turozzi, Giorgio

    2011-05-01

    Blade vibration reduction is an important task in high performance turbo machinery for power generation, in order to avoid the risk of blade failure due to the overcoming of fatigue limit. A possible way to obtain this result is a contact related phenomenon, i.e. by physically limiting the vibration amplitude on the blade tip leaving a small gap between the shrouds of adjacent blades. When the relative displacement between adjacent blades exceeds the gap, in a certain vibration mode of the blade row, a contact occurs between the shrouds, the relative motion is restricted and energy is dissipated by friction and impact during the contact. This is called the snubbing mechanism. In this paper, an original simplified model of bladed disks, in which the snubbing mechanism can occur, is presented and numerical integration in time domain furnishes the time histories of the vibrations of the blades. The level of vibration reduction is then evaluated in some different modes that could be excited for instance by the fluid flow. It is also shown that unlucky combinations of system and excitation parameters can effect also a certain magnification instead of a reduction of the vibration amplitudes. Experimental results on single blade and blade groups of a steam turbine are used to tune the parameters of the system.

  7. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The results of comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, and (2) the unambiguous--ie., quantitative--interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field.

  8. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion.

  9. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.

    1994-12-13

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion. 3 figures.

  10. Effect of Combination Exercise Therapy on Walking Distance, Postural Balance, Fatigue and Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis Patients: A Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Sangelaji, Bahram; Nabavi, Seyed Massood; Estebsari, Fatemeh; Banshi, Mohammad Reza; Rashidian, Hamideh; Jamshidi, Ensiyeh; Dastoorpour, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the nervous system which has numerous disabling effects on patients. Objectives: This study aimed at investigating the short- and long-term effects of a period of combination exercise therapy on walking distance, balance, fatigue and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients referred to the physiotherapy clinic of Iran's Multiple Sclerosis Society in 2013. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial on 59 patients divided into the intervention (n = 39) and control groups (n = 20). The intervention group received 10 weeks of combination therapy including aerobic, strengthening, balancing and stretching exercises. A week before, a week later and a year after the beginning of the exercises, both groups of patients received BBSS, six minute walking, Family Support Services (FSS), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and quality of life tests. The scores of two groups were then compared using statistical tests such as repeated measures ANOVA test. Results: The results indicated significant changes in the intervention group in comparison to the control group in the second phase of the study comparing to the first one for all tests except EDSS (Mean difference scores of EDSS: -0.13), P-value = 0.60; FSS: -6.9, P-value = 0.02, Mental Quality of Life (QOL): 16.36, P-value = 0.001; Physical QOL: 12.17, P-value = 0.001, six minute walking: 137.2, P-value < 0.0001; and Berg: 3.34, P-value < 0.0001. These changes were not significant in the second phase of the study comparing to the third one; however, they were again significant in the third phase comparing to the first phase of the study (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Exercise has significant effect on improving symptoms of multiple sclerosis, and cessation of exercise may cause recurrence of symptoms in the intervention group with a slope similar to that of the control group. Therefore, continuous rather than short period exercises have valuable symptomatic and supportive relief effects in patients. PMID:25068045

  11. Blade Testing Trends (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, M.

    2014-08-01

    As an invited guest speaker, Michael Desmond presented on NREL's NWTC structural testing methods and capabilities at the 2014 Sandia Blade Workshop held on August 26-28, 2014 in Albuquerque, NM. Although dynamometer and field testing capabilities were mentioned, the presentation focused primarily on wind turbine blade testing, including descriptions and capabilities for accredited certification testing, historical methodology and technology deployment, and current research and development activities.

  12. On the effect of deep-rolling and laser-peening on the stress-controlled low- and high-cycle fatigue behavior of Ti-6Al-4V at elevated temperatures up to 550?C

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, IAltenberger, RKNalla, YSano LWagner, RO

    2012-04-01

    The effect of surface treatment on the stress/life fatigue behavior of a titanium Ti-6Al-4V turbine fan blade alloy is investigated in the regime of 102 to 106 cycles to failure under fully reversed stress-controlled isothermal push-pull loading between 25? and 550?C at a frequency of 5 Hz. Specifically, the fatigue behavior was examined in specimens in the deep-rolled and laser-shock peened surface conditions, and compared to results on samples in the untreated (machined and stress annealed) condition. Although the fatigue resistance of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy declined with increasing test temperature regardless of surface condition, deep-rolling and laser-shock peening surface treatments were found to extend the fatigue lives by factors of more than 30 and 5-10, respectively, in the high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue regimes at temperatures as high as 550?C. At these temperatures, compressive residual stresses are essentially relaxed; however, it is the presence of near-surface work hardened layers, with a nanocystalline structure in the case of deep-rolling and dense dislocation tangles in the case of laser-shock peening, which remain fairly stable even after cycling at 450?-550?C, that provide the basis for the beneficial role of mechanical surface treatments on the fatigue strength of Ti-6Al-4V at elevated temperatures.

  13. Nonlinear Control of a Reusable Rocket Engine for Life Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Holmes, Michael S.; Ray, Asok

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual development of a life-extending control system where the objective is to achieve high performance and structural durability of the plant. A life-extending controller is designed for a reusable rocket engine via damage mitigation in both the fuel (H2) and oxidizer (O2) turbines while achieving high performance for transient responses of the combustion chamber pressure and the O2/H2 mixture ratio. The design procedure makes use of a combination of linear and nonlinear controller synthesis techniques and also allows adaptation of the life-extending controller module to augment a conventional performance controller of the rocket engine. The nonlinear aspect of the design is achieved using non-linear parameter optimization of a prescribed control structure. Fatigue damage in fuel and oxidizer turbine blades is primarily caused by stress cycling during start-up, shutdown, and transient operations of a rocket engine. Fatigue damage in the turbine blades is one of the most serious causes for engine failure.

  14. Design and Manufacture of Wood Blades for Windtunnel Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, S. E.

    1998-01-01

    Many windtunnels use wooden fan blades, however, because of their usual long life (often in excess of 50 years) wooden blades typically do not have to be replaced very often; therefore, the expertise for designing and building wooden windtunnel fan blades is being lost. The purpose of this report is to document the design and build process so that when replacement blades are eventually required some of the critical information required is available. Information useful to fan-blade designers, fabricators, inspectors, and windtunnel operations personnel is included. Fixed pitch and variable pitch fans as well as fans which range in size from a few feet in diameter to over 40 ft. in diameter are described. Woods, adhesives, and coverings are discussed.

  15. Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis for bladed wheels damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, P.; Peeters, B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bladed wheels and the fluid distributed by the stator vanes results in cyclic loading of the rotating components. Compressors and turbines wheels are subject to vibration and fatigue issues, especially when resonance conditions are excited. Even if resonance conditions can be often predicted and avoided, high cycle fatigue failures can occur, causing safety issues and economic loss. Rigorous maintenance programs are then needed, forcing the system to expensive shut-down. Blade crack detection methods are beneficial for condition-based maintenance. While contact measurement systems are not always usable in exercise conditions (e.g. high temperature), non-contact methods can be more suitable. One (or more) stator-fixed sensor can measure all the blades as they pass by, in order to detect the damaged ones. The main drawback in this situation is the short acquisition time available for each blade, which is shortened by the high rotational speed of the components. A traditional Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) analysis would result in a poor frequency resolution. A Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis (NHFA) can be executed with an arbitrary frequency resolution instead, allowing to obtain frequency information even with short-time data samples. This paper shows an analytical investigation of the NHFA method. A data processing algorithm is then proposed to obtain frequency shift information from short time samples. The performances of this algorithm are then studied by experimental and numerical tests.

  16. Cooling of Gas Turbines. 2; Effectiveness of Rim Cooling of Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenstein, Lincoln; Meyer, Gene L.; McCarthy, John S.

    1945-01-01

    An analysis of rim cooling, which cools the blade by condition alone, was conducted. Gas temperatures ranged from 1300 degrees to 1900 degrees F and rim temperatures from 0 degrees to 1000 degrees F below gas temperatures. Results show that gas temperature increases up to 200 degrees F are permissible provided that the blades are cooled by 400 degrees to 500 degrees F below the gas temperature. Relatively small amounts of blade cooling, at constant gas temperature, give large increases in blade life. Dependence of rim cooling on heat-transfer coefficient, blade dimensions, and thermal conductivity is determined by a single parameter.

  17. Probabilistic fatigue methodology and wind turbine reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, C.H.

    1996-05-01

    Wind turbines subjected to highly irregular loadings due to wind, gravity, and gyroscopic effects are especially vulnerable to fatigue damage. The objective of this study is to develop and illustrate methods for the probabilistic analysis and design of fatigue-sensitive wind turbine components. A computer program (CYCLES) that estimates fatigue reliability of structural and mechanical components has been developed. A FORM/SORM analysis is used to compute failure probabilities and importance factors of the random variables. The limit state equation includes uncertainty in environmental loading, gross structural response, and local fatigue properties. Several techniques are shown to better study fatigue loads data. Common one-parameter models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential models are shown to produce dramatically different estimates of load distributions and fatigue damage. Improved fits may be achieved with the two-parameter Weibull model. High b values require better modeling of relatively large stress ranges; this is effectively done by matching at least two moments (Weibull) and better by matching still higher moments. For this purpose, a new, four-moment {open_quotes}generalized Weibull{close_quotes} model is introduced. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methodology for design against fatigue is proposed and demonstrated using data from two horizontal-axis wind turbines. To estimate fatigue damage, wind turbine blade loads have been represented by their first three statistical moments across a range of wind conditions. Based on the moments {mu}{sub 1}{hor_ellipsis}{mu}{sub 3}, new {open_quotes}quadratic Weibull{close_quotes} load distribution models are introduced. The fatigue reliability is found to be notably affected by the choice of load distribution model.

  18. Testing of a one-bladed 30-meter-diameter rotor on the DOE/NASA Mod-0 wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ensworth, C.B.F. III; Corrigan, R.D.; Berkowitz, B.M.

    1988-03-01

    As part of the Federal Wind Energy Program of the Department of Energy, NASA Lewis Research Center conducted tests on the DOE/NASA Mod-O horizontal-axis wind turbine with a one-bladed rotor configuration. The single blade had an overall length of 15.2 m, and used a pitchable tip that spanned 12 percent of the blade radius. The blade was balanced by a counterweight assembly that consisted of a solid steel ellipsoid supported at an outer radius of 4.6 m by a steel spar. The blade and counterweight assembly were mounted to a teetered hub in a downwind configuration. The objectives of these tests were to obtain data on the performance, loads, and dynamic characteristics of an intermediate-size, one-bladed rotor. These data, measured at a nominal rotor speed of 49 rpm, were compared with corresponding data for a two-bladed rotor at 33 rpm, having the same blade length and airfoil characteristics. The two-bladed rotor was previously operated on the same machine. The one-bladed and two-bladed rotors used common components wherever possible and did not represent optimized rotor designs. The results of the one-bladed rotor tests showed that this configuration can be operated successfully. There were no significant dynamic loads with this configuration, and the fatigue loads were comparable to those of a two-bladed rotor. A decrease in power output equivalent to a reduction in wind-speed by 1 m/sec occurred with the one-bladed rotor when compared with the aerodynamically similar two-bladed rotor operating at two-thirds of the rotor speed. Analytical methods for predicting the performance and dynamic characteristics of a one-bladed rotor were verified. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Effect of blade outlet angle on radial thrust of single-blade centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Y.; Fukutomi, J.; Fujiwara, R.

    2012-11-01

    Single-blade centrifugal pumps are widely used as sewage pumps. However, a large radial thrust acts on a single blade during pump operation because of the geometrical axial asymmetry of the impeller. This radial thrust causes vibrations of the pump shaft, reducing the service life of bearings and shaft seal devices. Therefore, to ensure pump reliability, it is necessary to quantitatively understand the radial thrust and clarify the behavior and generation mechanism. This study investigated the radial thrust acting on two kinds of single-blade centrifugal impellers having different blade outlet angles by experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Furthermore, the radial thrust was modeled by a combination of three components, inertia, momentum, and pressure, by applying an unsteady conservation of momentum to this impeller. As a result, the effects of the blade outlet angle on both the radial thrust and the modeled components were clarified. The total head of the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases more than the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 8 degrees at a large flow rate. In this case, since the static pressure of the circumference of the impeller increases uniformly, the time-averaged value of the radial thrust of both impellers does not change at every flow rate. On the other hand, since the impeller blade loading becomes large, the fluctuation component of the radial thrust of the impeller with the blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases. If the blade outlet angle increases, the fluctuation component of the inertia component will increase, but the time-averaged value of the inertia component is located near the origin despite changes in the flow rate. The fluctuation component of the momentum component becomes large at all flow rates. Furthermore, although the time-averaged value of the pressure component is almost constant, the fluctuation component of the pressure component becomes large at a large flow rate. In addition to the increase of the fluctuation component of this pressure component, because the fluctuation component of the inertia and momentum components becomes large (as mentioned above), the radial thrust increases at a large flow rate, as is the case for the impeller with a large blade outlet angle.

  20. Structural dynamic testing of composite propfan blades for a cruise missile wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elgin, Stephen D.; Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    The Naval Weapons Center at China Lake, California is currently evaluating a counter rotating propfan system as a means of propulsion for the next generation of cruise missiles. The details and results of a structural dynamic test program are presented for scale model graphite-epoxy composite propfan blades. These blades are intended for use on a cruise missile wind tunnel model. Both dynamic characteristics and strain operating limits of the blades are presented. Complications associated with high strain level fatigue testing methods are also discussed.

  1. Structural dynamic testing of composite propfan blades for a cruise missile wind tunnel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgin, Stephen D.; Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1993-02-01

    The Naval Weapons Center at China Lake, California is currently evaluating a counter rotating propfan system as a means of propulsion for the next generation of cruise missiles. The details and results of a structural dynamic test program are presented for scale model graphite-epoxy composite propfan blades. These blades are intended for use on a cruise missile wind tunnel model. Both dynamic characteristics and strain operating limits of the blades are presented. Complications associated with high strain level fatigue testing methods are also discussed.

  2. AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH

    E-print Network

    AIAA-2001-0025 1 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH FOR FIBERGLASS LAMINATES on a typical fiberglass laminate configuration turbine blade fiberglass material has been undertaken under of fiberglass spectrum have been studied. Data have been obtained for materials produce results that may

  3. INFLOW AND THE FATIGUE OF THE LIST WIND TURBINE*

    E-print Network

    1 INFLOW AND THE FATIGUE OF THE LIST WIND TURBINE* Herbert J. Sutherland Wind Energy Technology response data to characterize the spectrum of loads on wind turbines. A heavily instrumented Micon 65/13M turbine with SERI 8m blades is being used as the primary test turbine for this test. This turbine

  4. Characteristics of the fretting fatigue damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibnazari, Saeed; Hoeppner, David W.

    1992-11-01

    It has been found that different variables, such as normal pressure and maximum fatigue stress, affect the fretting fatigue damage threshold, but the degree to which the fretting fatigue damage threshold is influenced by these variables varies from material to material. This is evidenced by the fact that increasing the maximum fatigue stress and keeping the rest of the variables constant through the test caused the damage threshold of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy to disappear, but did not change the damage threshold of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. Increasing the normal pressure from 20.7 to 34.5 MPa and keeping other test variables constant, caused the damage threshold of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy to change from 30 to 20 percent of fretting fatigue life. An explanation is given for this behavior by presenting a model that links the fretting fatigue damage threshold to fretting-induced damage that is capable of nucleating cracks.

  5. Statistical characterization of the fatigue behavior of composite lamina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. N.; Jones, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to predict statistically the effects of constant and variable amplitude fatigue loadings on the residual strength and fatigue life of composite lamina. The parameters in the model were established from the results of a series of static tensile tests and a fatigue scan and a number of verification tests were performed. Abstracts for two other papers on the effect of load sequence on the statistical fatigue of composites are also presented.

  6. Optimal Railroad Rail Grinding for Fatigue Mitigation 

    E-print Network

    Tangtragulwong, Potchara

    2012-02-14

    This dissertation aims to study the benefit of rail grinding on service life of railroad rails, focusing on failures due to rolling contact fatigue (RCF) at the rail head. Assuming a tangent rail with one-point contact at ...

  7. Fatigue Testing of Heat-Exchanger Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, P.

    1984-01-01

    Acclerated fatigue-life testing of heat-exchanger tubes simplified by technique that substitutes mechanical side load for thermally-generated axisymmetric stress. Load amplitudes adjusted to produce strains equivalent to those produced by anticipated thermal stress.

  8. A Non-Uniformly Under-Sampled Blade Tip-Timing Signal Reconstruction Method for Blade Vibration Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Lin, Jun; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Yang, Yong-Min; Li, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    High-speed blades are often prone to fatigue due to severe blade vibrations. In particular, synchronous vibrations can cause irreversible damages to the blade. Blade tip-timing methods (BTT) have become a promising way to monitor blade vibrations. However, synchronous vibrations are unsuitably monitored by uniform BTT sampling. Therefore, non-equally mounted probes have been used, which will result in the non-uniformity of the sampling signal. Since under-sampling is an intrinsic drawback of BTT methods, how to analyze non-uniformly under-sampled BTT signals is a big challenge. In this paper, a novel reconstruction method for non-uniformly under-sampled BTT data is presented. The method is based on the periodically non-uniform sampling theorem. Firstly, a mathematical model of a non-uniform BTT sampling process is built. It can be treated as the sum of certain uniform sample streams. For each stream, an interpolating function is required to prevent aliasing in the reconstructed signal. Secondly, simultaneous equations of all interpolating functions in each sub-band are built and corresponding solutions are ultimately derived to remove unwanted replicas of the original signal caused by the sampling, which may overlay the original signal. In the end, numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the reconstructed signal depends on the sampling frequency, the blade vibration frequency, the blade vibration bandwidth, the probe static offset and the number of samples. In practice, both types of blade vibration signals can be particularly reconstructed by non-uniform BTT data acquired from only two probes. PMID:25621612

  9. A non-uniformly under-sampled blade tip-timing signal reconstruction method for blade vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zheng; Lin, Jun; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Yang, Yong-Min; Li, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    High-speed blades are often prone to fatigue due to severe blade vibrations. In particular, synchronous vibrations can cause irreversible damages to the blade. Blade tip-timing methods (BTT) have become a promising way to monitor blade vibrations. However, synchronous vibrations are unsuitably monitored by uniform BTT sampling. Therefore, non-equally mounted probes have been used, which will result in the non-uniformity of the sampling signal. Since under-sampling is an intrinsic drawback of BTT methods, how to analyze non-uniformly under-sampled BTT signals is a big challenge. In this paper, a novel reconstruction method for non-uniformly under-sampled BTT data is presented. The method is based on the periodically non-uniform sampling theorem. Firstly, a mathematical model of a non-uniform BTT sampling process is built. It can be treated as the sum of certain uniform sample streams. For each stream, an interpolating function is required to prevent aliasing in the reconstructed signal. Secondly, simultaneous equations of all interpolating functions in each sub-band are built and corresponding solutions are ultimately derived to remove unwanted replicas of the original signal caused by the sampling, which may overlay the original signal. In the end, numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the reconstructed signal depends on the sampling frequency, the blade vibration frequency, the blade vibration bandwidth, the probe static offset and the number of samples. In practice, both types of blade vibration signals can be particularly reconstructed by non-uniform BTT data acquired from only two probes. PMID:25621612

  10. Tungsten fiber reinforced FeCralY: A first generation composite turbine blade material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Winsa, E. A.; Westfall, L. J.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Tungsten-fiber/FeCrAlY (W/FeCrAlY) was identified as a promising aircraft engine, first generation, turbine blade composite material. Based on available data, W/FeCrAlY should have the stress-rupture, creep, tensile, fatigue, and impact strengths required for turbine blades operating from 1250 to 1370 K. It should also have adequate oxidation, hot corrosion, and thermal cycling damage resistance as well as high thermal conductivity. Concepts for potentially low cost blade fabrication were developed. These concepts were used to design a first stage JT9D convection cooled turbine blade having a calculated 50 K use-temperature advantage over the directionally solidified superalloy blade.

  11. Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, Thomas N; Ammerman, Curtt N; Park, Gyu Hae; Farinholt, Kevin M; Farrar, Charles R; Atterbury, Marie K

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

  12. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Frey, deceased, Gary A. (late of Poway, CA); Jimenez, Oscar D. (Escondia, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed therebetween. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. And, a pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade.

  13. SSME blade damper technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, Robert E.; Griffin, Jerry H.

    1987-01-01

    Before 1975 turbine blade damper designs were based on experience and very simple mathematical models. Failure of the dampers to perform as expected showed the need to gain a better understanding of the physical mechanism of friction dampers. Over the last 10 years research on friction dampers for aeronautical propulsion systems has resulted in methods to optimize damper designs. The first-stage turbine blades on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high-pressure oxygen pump have experienced cracking problems due to excessive vibration. A solution is to incorporate a well-designed friction dampers to attenuate blade vibration. The subject study, a cooperative effort between NASA Lewis and Carnegie-Mellon University, represents an application of recently developed friction damper technology to the SSME high-pressure oxygen turbopump. The major emphasis was the contractor's design known as the two-piece damper. Damping occurs at the frictional interface between the top half of the damper and the underside of the platforms of the adjacent blades. The lower half of the damper is an air seal to retard airflow in the volume between blade necks.

  14. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Frey, G.A.; Jimenez, O.D.

    1996-12-03

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed between them. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. A pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade. 4 figs.

  15. Numerical study on air-structure coupling dynamic characteristics of the axial fan blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Xie, B.; Li, F.; Gu, W. G.

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the dynamic characteristics of the axial-flow fan blade due to the effect of rotating stress and the action of unsteady aerodynamic forces caused by the airflow, a numerical simulation method for air-structure coupling in an axial-flow fan with fixed rear guide blades was performed. The dynamic characteristics of an axial-flow fan rotating blade were studied by using the two-way air-structure coupling method. Based on the standard k-? turbulence model, and using weak coupling method, the preceding six orders modal parameters of the rotating blade were obtained, and the distributions of stress and strain on the rotating blade were presented. The results show that the modal frequency from the first to the sixth order is 3Hz higher than the modal frequency without considering air-structure coupling interaction; the maximum stress and the maximum strain are all occurred in the vicinity of root area of the blade no matter the air-structure coupling is considered or not, thus, the blade root is the dangerous location subjected to fatigue break; the position of maximum deformation is at the blade tip, so the vibration of the blade tip is significant. This study can provide theoretical references for the further study on the strength analysis and mechanical optimal design.

  16. Understanding and Treating Fatigue in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jopson, Laura; Dyson, Jessica K; Jones, David E J

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and although experienced less by patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, a minority still report significant fatigue. Fatigue is the symptom with the greatest impact on quality of life, particularly when associated with social dysfunction. The pathogenesis of fatigue in cholestatic liver disease is complex, poorly understood, and probably has central and peripheral components. Managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease presents a challenge for clinicians given the complexity and its numerous associations. This article presents a structured approach to managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease to improve fatigue severity and quality of life. PMID:26593295

  17. Cooling of Gas Turbines. 2; Effectiveness of Rim Cooling of Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenstein, Lincoln; Meyer, Gene L.; McCarthy, John S.

    1947-01-01

    An analysis is presented of rim cooling of gas-turbine blades; that is, reducing the temperature at the base of the blade (wheel rim), which cools the blade by conduction alone. Formulas for temperature and stress distributions along the blade are derived and, by the use of experimental stress-rupture data for a typical blade alloy, a relation is established between blade life (time for rupture), operating speed, and amount of rim cooling for several gas temperatures. The effect of blade parameter combining the effects of blade dimensions, blade thermal conductivity, and heat-transfer coefficient is determined. The effect of radiation on the results is approximated. The gas temperatures ranged from 1300F to 1900F and the rim temperature, from 0F to 1000F below the gas temperature. This report is concerned only with blades of uniform cross section, but the conclusions drawn are generally applicable to most modern turbine blades. For a typical rim-cooled blade, gas temperature increases are limited to about 200F for 500F of cooling of the blade base below gas temperature, and additional cooling brings progressively smaller increases. In order to obtain large increases in thermal conductivity or very large decreases in heat-transfer coefficient or blade length or necessary. The increases in gas temperature allowable with rim cooling are particularly small for turbines of large dimensions and high specific mass flows. For a given effective gas temperature, substantial increases in blade life, however, are possible with relatively small amounts of rim cooling.

  18. Retardation and repair of fatigue cracks in a microcapsule toughened epoxy composite--Part II: In situ self-healing

    E-print Network

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    -I fracture toughness value), a carefully timed rest period can be used to prolong fatigue life up to 118 dependence on the applied range of cyclic stress intensity DKI. Significant crack arrest and life%. At moderate DKI, in situ healing extends fatigue life by as much as 213%. Further improvements in fatigue life

  19. Fluid blade disablement tool

    DOEpatents

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos (Albuquerque, NM); Hughs, Chance G. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2012-01-10

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  20. Blade pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivers, J. W. H.

    Three measurement techniques which enable rotating pressures to be measured during the normal operation of a gas turbine or a component test rig are described. The first technique was developed specifically to provide steady and transient blade surface pressure data to aid both fan flutter research and general fan performance development. This technique involves the insertion of miniature high frequency response pressure transducers into the fan blades of a large civil gas turbine. The other two techniques were developed to measure steady rotating pressures inside and on the surface of engine or rig turbine blades and also rotating pressures in cooling feed systems. These two low frequency response systems are known as the "pressure pineapple' (a name which resulted from the shape of the original prototype) and the rotating scanivalve.

  1. Turbojet engine blade damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, A. V.; Cutts, D. G.; Sridhar, S.

    1981-01-01

    The potentials of various sources of nonaerodynamic damping in engine blading are evaluated through a combination of advanced analysis and testing. The sources studied include material hysteresis, dry friction at shroud and root disk interfaces as well as at platform type external dampers. A limited seris of tests was conducted to evaluate damping capacities of composite materials (B/AL, B/AL/Ti) and thermal barrier coatings. Further, basic experiments were performed on titanium specimens to establish the characteristics of sliding friction and to determine material damping constants J and n. All the tests were conducted on single blades. Mathematical models were develthe several mechanisms of damping. Procedures to apply this data to predict damping levels in an assembly of blades are developed and discussed.

  2. Improved stud configurations for attaching laminated wood wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadoul, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A series of bonded stud design configurations was screened on the basis of tension-tension cyclic tests to determine the structural capability of each configuration for joining a laminated wood structure (wind turbine blade) to a steel flange (wind turbine hub). Design parameters which affected the joint strength (ultimate and fatigue) were systematically varied and evaluated through appropriate testing. Two designs showing the most promise were used to fabricate addiate testing. Two designs showing the most promise were used to fabricate additional test specimens to determine ultimate strength and fatigue curves. Test results for the bonded stud designs demonstrated that joint strengths approaching the 10,000 to 12,000 psi ultimate strength and 5000 psi high cycle fatigue strength of the wood epoxy composite could be achieved.

  3. Experiments of thermomechanical fatigue of SMAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Miller, David A.

    1999-07-01

    As SMA wires are gaining in popularity for use as actuators, one constitutive parameter that remain unknown is the thermomechanical fatigue life. Even though the effect of thermal cycles on the transformation characteristics of SMAs has been studied, these teste have not been extended to high number of cycles. In this study, a novel test frame developed to study the thermomechanical fatigue life of SMAs is described. Additionally, a testing protocol is discussed necessary to fully establish the fatigue characteristics of SMAs under various conditions. Initial results of the initial test show a substantial increase in the number of cycles to failure as the applied stress level reduces to approximately 100 MPa.

  4. Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

  5. Blade Testing Equipment Development and Commercialization: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-346

    SciTech Connect

    Snowberg, D.; Hughes, S.

    2013-04-01

    Blade testing is required to meet wind turbine design standards, reduce machine cost, and reduce the technical and financial risk of deploying mass-produced wind turbine models. NREL?s National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Colorado is the only blade test facility in the U.S. capable of performing full-scale static and fatigue testing of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbine blades. Rapid growth in wind turbine size over the past two decades has outstripped the size capacity of the NWTC blade test facility leaving the U.S. wind industry without a suitable means of testing blades for large land-based and offshore turbines. This CRADA will develop and commercialize testing technologies and test equipment, including scaling up, value engineering, and testing of equipment to be used at blade testing facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  6. Resistive band for turbomachine blade

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Herbert Chidsey; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-08-25

    A turbomachine system includes a rotor that defines a longitudinal axis of the turbomachine system. A first blade is coupled to the rotor, and the first blade has first and second laminated plies. A first band is coupled to the first blade and is configured to resist separation of the first and second laminated plies.

  7. Energy efficient engine shroudless, hollow fan blade technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Shroudless, Hollow Fan Blade Technology program was structured to support the design, fabrication, and subsequent evaluation of advanced hollow and shroudless blades for the Energy Efficient Engine fan component. Rockwell International was initially selected to produce hollow airfoil specimens employing the superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) fabrication technique. Rockwell demonstrated that a titanium hollow structure could be fabricated utilizing SPF/DB manufacturing methods. However, some problems such as sharp internal cavity radii and unsatisfactory secondary bonding of the edge and root details prevented production of the required quantity of fatigue test specimens. Subsequently, TRW was selected to (1) produce hollow airfoil test specimens utilizing a laminate-core/hot isostatic press/diffusion bond approach, and (2) manufacture full-size hollow prototype fan blades utilizing the technology that evolved from the specimen fabrication effort. TRW established elements of blade design and defined laminate-core/hot isostatic press/diffusion bonding fabrication techniques to produce test specimens. This fabrication technology was utilized to produce full size hollow fan blades in which the HIP'ed parts were cambered/twisted/isothermally forged, finish machined, and delivered to Pratt & Whitney Aircraft and NASA for further evaluation.

  8. Incipient Crack Detection in Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Choi, Mijin; Jeong, Hyomi; Jang, Jae Kyeong; Park, Gyuhae; Farinholt, Kevin; Farrar, Charles R.; Ammerman, Curtt N.; Todd, Michael D.; Lee, Jung-Ryul

    2012-08-28

    This paper presents some analysis results for incipient crack detection in a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading to failure. The blade was manufactured to standard specifications, and it underwent harmonic excitation at its first resonance using a hydraulically-actuated excitation system until reaching catastrophic failure. This work investigates the ability of an ultrasonic guided wave approach to detect incipient damage prior to the surfacing of a visible, catastrophic crack. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, which were used in an active, pitchcatch mode with guided waves over a range of excitation frequencies. The performance results in detecting incipient crack formation in the fiberglass skin of the blade is assessed over the range of frequencies in order to determine the point at which the incipient crack became detectable. Higher excitation frequencies provide consistent results for paths along the rotor blade's carbon fiber spar cap, but performance falls off with increasing excitation frequencies for paths off of the spar cap. Lower excitation frequencies provide more consistent performance across all sensor paths.

  9. Rotor blade system with reduced blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leishman, John G. (Inventor); Han, Yong Oun (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A rotor blade system with reduced blade-vortex interaction noise includes a plurality of tube members embedded in proximity to a tip of each rotor blade. The inlets of the tube members are arrayed at the leading edge of the blade slightly above the chord plane, while the outlets are arrayed at the blade tip face. Such a design rapidly diffuses the vorticity contained within the concentrated tip vortex because of enhanced flow mixing in the inner core, which prevents the development of a laminar core region.

  10. Cancer related fatigue syndrome in neoplastic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Bogdan; Kuczerawy, Ilona; Szuta, Justyna; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most important factors which has a considerable influence on treatment and the life quality of oncological patients. The fatigue syndrome is often diagnosed during cancer treatment and this syndrome is not related to the physical effort. Cancer related fatigue is a patient's subjective, psychologically, physically and emotionally based feeling. It is disproportionate to patient's daily activity. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains still unknown. However, on the basis of various questionnaires, it is possible to test the disease's complex nature. Cancer related fatigue causes deterioration of patient's life along with lower motivation to struggle with the disease. It is thought that the factor which increases the incidence of cancer related fatigue is a long-term use of drugs such as opioids, benzodiazepine, and medicines containing codeine, tranquilizers, anxiolytics and antidepressants. On the basis of the results, one can choose an appropriate treatment method for cancer related fatigue such as rehabilitation, psychotherapy or public assistance. A great number of patients consider excessive fatigue a typical concomitant symptom in neoplastic disease; therefore, they do not report it. It is of a paramount importance to make patients aware of the fact that cancer related fatigue is a serious disease which can be treated. PMID:26327879

  11. Fatigue Behavior of Inconel 718 TIG Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos D.; Argyriou, Nikolaos; Stergiou, Vasillis; Kourkoulis, Stavros K.

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical behavior of reference and TIG-welded Inconel 718 specimens was examined in the present work. Tensile, constant amplitude fatigue, and fracture toughness tests were performed in ambient temperature for both, reference and welded specimens. Microstructure revealed the presence of coarse and fine-grained heat-affected zones. It has been shown that without any post-weld heat treatment, welded specimens maintained their tensile strength properties while their ductility decreased by more than 40%. It was found that the welded specimens had lower fatigue life and this decrease was a function of the applied fatigue maximum stress. A 30% fatigue life decrease was noticed in the high cycle fatigue regime for the welded specimens while this decrease exceeded 50% in the low cycle fatigue regime. Cyclic stress-strain curves showed that Inconel 718 experiences a short period of hardening followed by softening for all fatigue lives. Cyclic fatigue response of welded specimens' exhibited cyclically stable behavior. Finally, a marginal decrease was noticed in the Mode I fracture toughness of the welded specimens.

  12. Rotating turbine blade pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.; Lesco, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Non-contacting pyrometer system optically measures surface temperature distribution on rotating turbine blade, comprising line-by-line scan via fiber optic probe. Each scan line output is converted to digital signals, temporarily stored in buffer memory, and then processed in minicomputer for display as temperature.

  13. Blade pitch varying mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.

    1988-04-19

    A gas turbine engine is described comprising: (a) a stationary member; (b) first and second rotating structures coaxially disposed about the stationary member; (c) an annular gas flowpath coaxial with the first and second rotating structures; (d) first and second rotor blades attached to the first and second rotating structures; (e) forward and aft rows of variable pitch propulsor blades coupled to and disposed radially outwardly of the first and second rotating structures respectively; (f) a first gear coaxially coupled to one of the propulsor blades whereby angular displacement of the first gear about a radius of the rotating structure varies the pitch of the propulsor blade with respect to the rotating structure; (g) a second gear rotatably coupled to the first gear; (h) a third gear rigidly coupled to the second gear; (i) a fourth gear rigidly coupled to the rotating structure and rotatably coupled to the thrid gear, (j) means for eccentrically revolving the second gear and the third gear with respect to the first gear and the fourth gear, respectively, whereby the first gear is angularly displaced with respect to the fourth gear.

  14. Wind Turbine Blade Test Definition of the DeWind DW90 Rotor Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-326

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01

    This CRADA was developed as a funds-in CRADA with DeWind to assess the suitability of facilities and equipment at the NWTC for performing certification blade testing on wind turbine blades made from advanced materials. DeWind produces a wind turbine blade which includes the use of high-strength and stiffness materials. NREL and DeWind had a mutual interest in defining the necessary facilities, equipment, and test methods for testing large wind turbine blades which incorporate advanced materials and adaptive structures, as the demands on test equipment and infrastructure are greater than current capabilities. Work under this CRADA would enable DeWind to verify domestic capability for certification-class static and fatigue testing, while NREL would be able to identify and develop specialized test capabilities based on the test requirements.

  15. On the application of the KitagawaTakahashi diagram to foreign-object damage and high-cycle fatigue

    E-print Network

    Hutchinson, John W.

    -object damage (FOD) and its effect on high-cycle fatigue (HGF) failures in a turbine engine Ti­ 6Al­4V alloy to markedly reduce the fatigue strength of the alloy, primarily due to four factors: stress concentration for evaluating the detrimental effect of FOD on HCF failures in Ti­ 6Al­4V blade alloys. Ó 2002 Elsevier Science

  16. A Micromechanics-Based Method for Multiscale Fatigue Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John Allan

    An estimated 80% of all structural failures are due to mechanical fatigue, often resulting in catastrophic, dangerous and costly failure events. However, an accurate model to predict fatigue remains an elusive goal. One of the major challenges is that fatigue is intrinsically a multiscale process, which is dependent on a structure's geometric design as well as its material's microscale morphology. The following work begins with a microscale study of fatigue nucleation around non- metallic inclusions. Based on this analysis, a novel multiscale method for fatigue predictions is developed. This method simulates macroscale geometries explicitly while concurrently calculating the simplified response of microscale inclusions. Thus, providing adequate detail on multiple scales for accurate fatigue life predictions. The methods herein provide insight into the multiscale nature of fatigue, while also developing a tool to aid in geometric design and material optimization for fatigue critical devices such as biomedical stents and artificial heart valves.

  17. Practical Guideline for Fatigue Management in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Kreijne, J E; Lie, M R K L; Vogelaar, L; van der Woude, C J

    2016-01-01

    During active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) fatigue is a common symptom, which seems related to active gut inflammation. However, even in remission many patients suffer from fatigue that negatively affects quality of life and work productivity. Currently, robust knowledge on the pathogenesis and treatment of IBD-related fatigue is lacking. In order to alleviate the burden of IBD-related fatigue, a systematic approach is mandatory. We propose a fatigue attention cycle to enhance identification, evaluation and management of fatigued IBD patients. The benefits of the cycle are twofold. Firstly, it allows the systematic and uniform identification of patients with severe fatigue, in turn allowing tailored non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions. Secondly, uniform identification of such patients creates a well-defined patient base to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of fatigue, resulting in a greater understanding of this debilitating phenomenon and possibly resulting in the discovery of predictive factors and new treatment interventions. PMID:26392414

  18. H. J. Sutherland and P. S. Veers, "Effects of Cyclic Stress Distribution Models on Fatigue Life Predictions," Wind Energy -1995, Musial, Hock and Berg (eds), SED-Vol.

    E-print Network

    Predictions," Wind Energy - 1995, Musial, Hock and Berg (eds), SED-Vol. 16, ASME, January-February 1995, pp. Sutherland and Paul S. Veers Wind Energy Technology Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185-0708 ABSTRACT 1 The fatigue analysis of a wind turbine component typically uses representative samples of cyclic

  19. A variable hydraulic damper for vibration reduction in helicopter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Quan

    This study investigates the potential aeronautical application of structural control technology developed in earthquake engineering to reduce the vibration of helicopter blades. The major objective is to evaluate and to apply the semi-active control method. Reducing vibrations for helicopter blades is quite similar to the approach of earthquake protective systems. We need not regulate the displacement of blades to a certain value, or to force the blade vibration to track given time histories. Instead, we only want to limit the vibration level within an acceptable range. Conventional blade vibration reduction by adding passive damping is ineffective. In this study, the concept of semi-active control is developed and successfully applied. The control philosophy is, first, to change the system stiffness so as to avoid resonance, to reduce input energy, and to lower the blade's displacement. The damping is applied to further reduce the response, to dissipate the imposed energy, and to minimize the structural damage. The semi-active control system originally developed for earthquake engineering application is modified to reduce the blade vibration. As the essential element of semi-active control technology, a variable hydraulic damper is designed. Simulations are carried out to develop a mechanical model for the variable hydraulic damper. In the simulation, several nonlinearities are considered such as Karnopp friction model and cubic stiffness model. The superior performance by a variable damper is quantitatively observed from damper component tests, damper fatigue tests, and blade dynamic tests. The simulation results correlate well with experiments in both the force-displacement relation and the force-velocity relation. Based on the mechanical model, a Kelvin-Voigt type of analytical model is developed, which is used in the finite element analysis of the blade with the variable damper. It is shown that the analytical model predicts the behavior of the damper measured in experiments. Successful application of the seismic control technology to vibration control of helicopter blades has provided beneficial feed-backs to seismic response control. Several such feedbacks have been identified through the studies on the simplified model. The optimal damping exists and switching control states can achieve optimal structural responses.

  20. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart A.; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the %22remaining life%22 of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  1. Fabrication of low-cost Mod-OA wood composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Gougeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zuteck, M.

    1983-01-01

    The wood composite blades were fabricated by using epoxy resin-bonded laminates of Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge spar sections and honeycomb-cored birch plywood panels for the blade trailing edge or afterbody sections. The blade was joined to the wind turbine hub assembly by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs. The wood composite blades were installed in the Mod-OA wind turbine test facility at Kahuku, Hawaii. The wood composite blades have successfully completed high power (average of 150 kW) operations for an eighteen month period (nearly 8,000 hr) before replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The original set of blades was taken out of service because of the failure of the shank on one stud. An inspection of the blades at NASA-Lewis showed that the shank failure was caused by a high stress concentration at a corrosion pit on the shank fillet radius which resulted in fatigue stresses in excess of the endurance limit.

  2. High temperature tension-compression fatigue behavior of a tungsten copper composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Gabb, Timothy P.

    1990-01-01

    The high temperature fatigue of a (O)12 tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite was investigated. Specimens having fiber volume percentages of 10 and 36 were fatigued under fully-reversed, strain-controlled conditions at both 260 and 560 C. The fatigue life was found to be independent of fiber volume fraction because fatigue damage preferentially occurred in the matrix. Also, the composite fatigue lives were shorter at 560 C as compared to 260 C due to changes in mode of matrix failure. On a total strain basis, the fatigue life of the composite at 560 C was the same as the life of unreinforced copper, indicating that the presence of the fibers did not degrade the fatigue resistance of the copper matrix in this composite system. Comparison of strain-controlled fatigue data to previously-generated load-controlled data revealed that the strain-controlled fatigue lives were longer because of mean strain and mean stress effects.

  3. An evaluation of sensing technologies in a wind turbine blade: some issues, challenges and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Mark A.

    2011-04-01

    The Department of Energy and the Sandia National Laboratories Wind Power Technology Department have initiated a number of wind turbine blade sensing technology projects with a major goal of understanding the issues and challenges of incorporating new sensing technologies in wind turbine blades. The projects have been highly collaborative with teams from several commercial companies, universities, other national labs, government agencies and wind industry partners. Each team provided technology that was targeted for a particular application that included structural dynamics, operational monitoring, non-destructive evaluation and structural health monitoring. The sensing channels were monitored, in some or all cases, during blade fabrication, field testing of the blade on an operating wind turbine, and lab testing where the life of the blade was accelerated to blade failure. Implementing sensing systems in wind turbine blades is an engineering challenge and solutions often require the collaboration with a diverse set of expertise. This report discusses some of the key issues, challenges and lessons-learned while implementing sensing technologies in wind turbine blades. Some of the briefly discussed topics include cost and reliability, coordinate systems and references, blade geometry, blade composites, material compatibility, sensor ingress and egress, time synchronization, wind turbine operation environments, and blade failure mechanisms and locations.

  4. Fatigue analyses of the prototype Francis runners based on site measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Chamberland-Lauzon, J.; Oram, C.; Klopfer, A.; Ruchonnet, N.

    2014-03-01

    With the increasing development of solar power and wind power which give an unstable output to the electrical grid, hydropower is required to give a rapid and flexible compensation, and the hydraulic turbines have to operate at off-design conditions frequently. Prototype Francis runners suffer from strong vibrations induced by high pressure pulsations at part load, low part load, speed-no-load and during start-stops and load rejections. Fatigue and damage may be caused by the alternating stress on the runner blades. Therefore, it becomes increasingly important to carry out fatigue analysis and life time assessment of the prototype Francis runners, especially at off-design conditions. This paper presents the fatigue analyses of the prototype Francis runners based on the strain gauge site measurements and numerical simulations. In the case of low part load, speed-no-load and transient events, since the Francis runners are subjected to complex hydraulic loading, which shows a stochastic characteristic, the rainflow counting method is used to obtain the number of cycles for various dynamic amplitude ranges. From middle load to full load, pressure pulsations caused by Rotor-stator- Interaction become the dominant hydraulic excitation of the runners. Forced response analysis is performed to calculate the maximum dynamic stress. The agreement between numerical and experimental stresses is evaluated using linear regression method. Taking into account the effect of the static stress on the S-N curve, the Miner's rule, a linear cumulative fatigue damage theory, is employed to calculate the damage factors of the prototype Francis runners at various operating conditions. The relative damage factors of the runners at different operating points are compared and discussed in detail.

  5. Constructal blade shape in nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chao; Wang, Liqiu

    2011-01-01

    Blade configuration of nanofluids has been proven to perform much better than dispersed configuration for some heat conduction systems. The analytical analysis and numerical calculation are made for the cylinder--shaped and regular-rectangular-prism--shaped building blocks of the blade-configured heat conduction systems (using nanofluids as the heat conduction media) to find the optimal cross-sectional shape for the nanoparticle blade under the same composing materials, composition ratio, volumetric heat generation rate, and total building block volume. The regular-triangular-prism--shaped blade has been proven to perform better than all the other three kinds of blades, namely, the regular-rectangular-prism--shaped blade, the regular-hexagonal-prism--shaped blade, and the cylinder--shaped blade. Thus, the regular-triangular-prism--shaped blade is selected as the optimally shaped blade for the two kinds of building blocks that are considered in this study. It is also proven that the constructal cylinder--regular-triangular-prism building block performs better than the constructal regular-rectangular-prism--regular-triangular-prism building block. PMID:21711751

  6. Constructal blade shape in nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Blade configuration of nanofluids has been proven to perform much better than dispersed configuration for some heat conduction systems. The analytical analysis and numerical calculation are made for the cylinder--shaped and regular-rectangular-prism--shaped building blocks of the blade-configured heat conduction systems (using nanofluids as the heat conduction media) to find the optimal cross-sectional shape for the nanoparticle blade under the same composing materials, composition ratio, volumetric heat generation rate, and total building block volume. The regular-triangular-prism--shaped blade has been proven to perform better than all the other three kinds of blades, namely, the regular-rectangular-prism--shaped blade, the regular-hexagonal-prism--shaped blade, and the cylinder--shaped blade. Thus, the regular-triangular-prism--shaped blade is selected as the optimally shaped blade for the two kinds of building blocks that are considered in this study. It is also proven that the constructal cylinder--regular-triangular-prism building block performs better than the constructal regular-rectangular-prism--regular-triangular-prism building block. PMID:21711751

  7. Fatigue in industry.

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, E

    1979-01-01

    Physical fatigue is a painful phenomenon which is localised in overstressed muscles. Mental fatigue is a diffuse sensation of weariness; it is a functional state, one of several intermediate conditions between the two extremes of alarm and sleep. A neurophysiological model of fatigue, involving an activating and inhibitory system has been developed. Fatigue in industrial practice has clinical symptoms: psychic instability, fits of depression and increased liability to illness. Indicators of fatigue are work of performance, subjective feelings of fatigue, electroencephalography, flicker-fusion frequency and various psychomotor and mental tests. Several field studies do, to some extent, confirm the above-mentioned concept of fatigue. PMID:40999

  8. Stator Blade Laser Window Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugas, Grant A.

    2004-01-01

    All turbofan engines used in modern aviation contain a series of fan blades and compressor blades which are all connected to one drive shaft. Inside the jet engine between each set of blades are stator blades, which are pitched opposite of the fan and compressor blades, the stator blades are both rotational and axial fixed in place. The project that I was assigned to involves the QAT 22 fan test rig; which is currently under final design review and very soon will be fabricated. The purpose of this research facility is to better understand the effects of stator blades. Stator blades are used to straiten the air in a turbine. The researcher's primary aim is to determine what the airflow is like at both the leading edge and the trailing edge of a stator blade. My work focused on designing the windows usable for both a compressor rig and a test fan rig. The difference between the two is the test fan application will be looking into a stator blade array rather than just looking at the rotor. My discussion will include a detailed explanation of how the PIV laser window system functions fiom start to finish. I will also discuss how the information is gathered and organized. Further more I plan to talk about the purpose of this kind of research and the advantages to using this technology to determine the airflow characteristics of blade designs. Finally I will discuss the researcher s conclusion on the relationship between aerodynamics of a blade and how noise is produced. NASA's main goal with this particular facility is find ways to quiet engine noise by reducing the amount of cavitations that occurs around the blades of a turbofan engine. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  9. The Effects of Hot Corrosion Pits on the Fatigue Resistance of a Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Hazel, Brian; Mourer, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of hot corrosion pits on low cycle fatigue life and failure modes of the disk superalloy ME3 were investigated. Low cycle fatigue specimens were subjected to hot corrosion exposures producing pits, then tested at low and high temperatures. Fatigue lives and failure initiation points were compared to those of specimens without corrosion pits. Several tests were interrupted to estimate the fraction of fatigue life that fatigue cracks initiated at pits. Corrosion pits significantly reduced fatigue life by 60 to 98 percent. Fatigue cracks initiated at a very small fraction of life for high temperature tests, but initiated at higher fractions in tests at low temperature. Critical pit sizes required to promote fatigue cracking were estimated, based on measurements of pits initiating cracks on fracture surfaces.

  10. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  11. Damage-based life prediction model for uniaxial low-cycle stress fatigue of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Di; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-08-01

    Based on the experimental observations for the uniaxial low-cycle stress fatigue failure of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy microtubes (Song et al 2015 Smart Mater. Struct. 24 075004) and a new definition of damage variable corresponding to the variation of accumulated dissipation energy, a phenomenological damage model is proposed to describe the damage evolution of the NiTi microtubes during cyclic loading. Then, with a failure criterion of Dc = 1, the fatigue lives of the NiTi microtubes are predicted by the damage-based model, the predicted lives are in good agreement with the experimental ones, and all of the points are located within an error band of 1.5 times.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Effects of Random Loading on the Fatigue Life of Notched Cantilever-Beam Specimens of 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralich, Robert W.

    1959-01-01

    Results of random-loading fatigue tests on 125 notched cantilever-beam specimens and constant-amplitude fatigue tests on 46 similar specimens are presented in terms of the root-mean-square value of peak stresses. The results from the two sets of tests are compared on the basis of time to failure, where the results from the constant-amplitude tests are expressed in terms of an equivalent time to failure based on the natural period of vibration. Compared on this basis, failure at the lower stress levels occurred in a shorter time for the random loading than for the constant-amplitude loading, whereas at the higher stress levels failure occurred in the reverse order. A theoretical result for random loading is also presented and compared with the experimental results. The theoretical result shows good agreement with experiment for low values of stress but underestimates the time to failure at the higher stresses.

  13. Snubber assembly for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2013-09-03

    A snubber associated with a rotatable turbine blade in a turbine engine, the turbine blade including a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall opposed from the pressure wall. The snubber assembly includes a first snubber structure associated with the pressure sidewall of the turbine blade, a second snubber structure associated with the suction sidewall of the turbine blade, and a support structure. The support structure extends through the blade and is rigidly coupled at a first end portion thereof to the first snubber structure and at a second end portion thereof to the second snubber structure. Centrifugal loads exerted by the first and second snubber structures caused by rotation thereof during operation of the engine are at least partially transferred to the support structure, such that centrifugal loads exerted on the pressure and suctions sidewalls of the turbine blade by the first and second snubber structures are reduced.

  14. A Summary of the Fatigue Properties of Wind Turbine Materials

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, HERBERT J.

    1999-10-07

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. The materials used to construct these machines are subjected to a unique loading spectrum that contains several orders of magnitude more cycles than other fatigue critical structures, e.g., an airplane. To facilitate fatigue designs, a large database of material properties has been generated over the past several years that is specialized to materials typically used in wind turbines. In this paper, I review these fatigue data. Major sections are devoted to the properties developed for wood, metals (primarily aluminum) and fiberglass. Special emphasis is placed on the fiberglass discussion because this material is current the material of choice for wind turbine blades. The paper focuses on the data developed in the U.S., but cites European references that provide important insights.

  15. Compression and compression fatigue testing of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of moisture and temperature on the fatigue and fracture response of composite laminates under compression loads were investigated. The structural laminates studied were an intermediate stiffness graphite-epoxy composite (a typical angle ply laimna liminate had a typical fan blade laminate). Full and half penetration slits and impact delaminations were the defects examined. Results are presented which show the effects of moisture on the fracture and fatigue strength at room temperature, 394 K (250 F), and 422 K (300 F). Static tests results show the effects of defect size and type on the compression-fracture strength under moisture and thermal environments. The cyclic tests results compare the fatigue lives and residual compression strength under compression only and under tension-compression fatigue loading.

  16. Evaluation of urethane for feasibility of use in wind turbine blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieblein, S.; Ross, R. S.; Fertis, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation was conducted of the use of cast urethane as a possible material for low-cost blades for wind turbines. Specimen test data are presented for ultimate tensile strength, elastic modulus, flexural strain, creep, and fatigue properties of a number of urethane formulations. Data are also included for a large-scale urethane blade section composed of cast symmetrical half-profiles tested as a cantilever beam. Based on these results, an analysis was conducted of a full-scale blade design of cast urethane that meets the design specifications of the rotor blades for the NASA/DOE experimental 100-kW MOD-0 wind turbine. Because of the low value of elastic modulus for urethane (around 457 000 psi), the design loads would have to be carried by metal reinforcement. Considerations for further evaluation are noted.

  17. Design, fabrication and spin testing of ceramic blade metal disk attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, G.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic turbine blade-metal disk attachment was designed for small, non man-rated turbine engine applications. The selected design consisted of a hot pressed silicon nitride blade having a skewed dovetail attachment with a compliant interlayer between the disk and the blade. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses predicted that life goals could be achieved, considering both NDE limitations and crack growth rates for the ceramic material. Twenty ceramic blades were fabricated to closely-held manufacturing tolerances. New fracture mechanics data at elevated temperature are presented.

  18. Microstructurally based model of fatigue initiation and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockenbrough, J. R.; Hinkle, A. J.; Magnusen, P. E.; Bucci, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    A model to calculate fatigue life is developed based on the assumption that fatigue life is entirely composed of crack growth from an initial microstructural inhomogeneity. Specifically, growth is considered to start from either an ellipsoidal void, a cracked particle, or a debonded particle. The capability of predicting fatigue life from material microstructure is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics principles, the sizes of the crack-initiating microstructural inhomogeneities, and an initiation parameter that is proportional to the cyclic plastic zone size. A key aspect of this modeling approach is that it is linked with a general purpose probability program to analyze the effect of the distribution of controlling microstructural features within the material. This enables prediction of fatigue stress versus life curves for various specimen geometries using distributional statistics obtained from characterizations of the microstructure. Results are compared to experimental fatigue data from an aluminum alloy.

  19. Ceramic blade with tip seal

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, B.; Bhardwaj, N.K.; Jones, R.B.

    1997-08-05

    The present gas turbine engine includes a disc assembly defining a disc having a plurality of blades attached thereto. The disc has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc. A shroud assembly is attached to the gas turbine engine and is spaced from the plurality of blades a preestablished distance forming an interface there between. Positioned in the interface is a seal having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades. 4 figs.

  20. Low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of Ni-based alloy 230 at 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Yang, Zhiqing; Sokolov, Mikhail A; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James

    2013-01-01

    Strain-controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep-fatigue testing of Ni-based alloy 230 were carried out at 850 C. The material creep-fatigue life decreased compared with its low cycle fatigue life at the same total strain range. Longer hold time at peak tensile strain further reduced the material creep-fatigue life. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction, a novel material deformation characterization method was applied, which revealed that in low cycle fatigue testing as the total strain range increased, the deformation was segregated to grain boundaries since the test temperature was higher than the material equicohesive temperature and grain boundaries became weaker regions compared with grains. Creep-fatigue tests enhanced the localized deformation, resulting in material interior intergranular cracking, and accelerated material damage. Precipitation in alloy 230 helped slip dispersion, favorable for fatigue property, but grain boundary cellular precipitates formed after material exposure to the elevated temperature had a deleterious effect on the material low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue property.