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Sample records for bladed rotor structures

  1. Structural characterization of rotor blades through photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Serafini, Jacopo; Enei, Claudio; Mattioni, Luca; Ficuciello, Corrado; Vezzari, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the use of photogrammetry for the experimental identification of structural and inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades4. The identification procedure is based upon theoretical/numerical algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions which are an extension of those proposed in the past by Larsen, whereas the torsional properties (stiffness and shear center position) are determined through the Euler–Bernoulli beam theory. The identification algorithms require the knowledge of the blade displacement field produced by known steady loads. These data are experimentally obtained through photogrammetric detection technique, which allows the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D digital photos. Indeed, the displacement field is simply evaluated by comparing the markers positions on the loaded configuration with those on the reference one. The proposed identification procedure, numerically and experimentally validated in the past by the authors, has been here applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopters. Strain gauges measurements have been used to assess the accuracy of the identified properties through natural frequencies comparison as well as to evaluate the blades damping characteristics.

  2. Structural modeling for multicell composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Atilgan, Ali R.

    1987-01-01

    Composite material systems are currently good candidates for aerospace structures, primarily for the design flexibility they offer, i.e., it is possible to tailor the material and manufacturing approach to the application. A working definition of elastic or structural tailoring is the use of structural concept, fiber orientation, ply stacking sequence, and a blend of materials to achieve specific performance goals. In the design process, choices of materials and dimensions are made which produce specific response characteristics, and which permit the selected goals to be achieved. Common choices for tailoring goals are preventing instabilities or vibration resonances or enhancing damage tolerance. An essential, enabling factor in the design of tailored composite structures is structural modeling that accurately, but simply, characterizes response. The objective of this paper is to present a new multicell beam model for composite rotor blades and to validate predictions based on the new model by comparison with a finite element simulation in three benchmark static load cases.

  3. Structural response of a rotating bladed disk to rotor whirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    A set of high speed rotating whirl experiments were performed in the vacuum of the MIT Blowdown Compressor Facility on the MIT Aeroelastic Rotor, which is structurally typical of a modern high bypass ratio turbofan stage. These tests identified the natural frequencies of whirl of the rotor system by forcing its response using an electromagnetic shaker whirl excitation system. The excitation was slowly swept in frequency at constant amplitude for several constant rotor speeds in both a forward and backward whirl direction. The natural frequencies of whirl determined by these experiments were compared to those predicted by an analytical 6 DOF model of a flexible blade-rigid disk-flexible shaft rotor. The model is also presented in terms of nondimensional parameters in order to assess the importance of the interation between the bladed disk dynamics and the shaft-disk dynamics. The correlation between the experimental and predicted natural frequencies is reasonable, given the uncertainty involved in determining the stiffness parameters of the system.

  4. A structural model for composite rotor blades and lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Atilgan, Ali R.

    1987-01-01

    Composite material systems are currently candidates for aerospace structures, primarily for the design flexibiity they offer i.e., it is possible to tailor the material and manufacturing approach to the application. Two notable examples are the wing of the Grumman/USAF/DARPA X-29 and rotor blades under development by the U.S.A. Aerostructures Directorate (AVSCOM), Langley Research Center. A working definition of elastic or structural tailoring is the use of structural concept, fiber orientation, ply stacking sequence, and a blend of materials to achieve specific performance goals. In the design process, choices of materials and dimensions are made which produce specific response characteristics which permit the selected goals to be achieved. Common choices for tailoring goals are preventing instabilities or vibration resonances or enhancing damage tolerance. An essential, enabling factor in the design of tailored composite structures is structural modeling that accurately, but simply, characterizes response. The objective of this paper is to improve the single-cell beam model for composite rotor blades or lifting surfaces and to demonstrate its usefullness in applications.

  5. Integration of dynamic, aerodynamic, and structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Summarized here is the first six years of research into the integration of structural, dynamic, and aerodynamic considerations in the design-optimization process for rotor blades. Specifically discussed here is the application of design optimization techniques for helicopter rotor blades. The reduction of vibratory shears and moments at the blade root, aeroelastic stability of the rotor, optimum airframe design, and an efficient procedure for calculating system sensitivities with respect to the design variables used are discussed.

  6. Photogrammetric detection technique for rotor blades structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enei, C.; Bernardini, G.; Serafini, J.; Mattioni, L.; Ficuciello, C.; Vezzari, V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an innovative use of photogrammetric detection techniques to experimentally estimate structural/inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades. The identification algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions are an extension of the ones proposed by Larsen, whereas the procedure for torsional properties determination (stiffness and shear center position) is based on the Euler-Prandtl beam theory. These algorithms rely on measurements performed through photogrammetric detection, which requires the collection of digital photos allowing the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D pictures. The displacements are evaluated by comparing the positions of markers in loaded and reference configuration. Being the applied loads known, the structural characteristics can be directly obtained from the measured displacements. The accuracy of the proposed identification algorithms has been firstly verified by comparison with numerical and experimental data, and then applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopter applications.

  7. Preliminary Structural Design of Composite Blades for Two- and Three-Blade Rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Bir, G.; Migliore, P.

    2004-09-01

    A computerized method has been developed to aid in the preliminary design of composite wind turbine blades. The method allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. Given the blade external geometry description and its design load distribution, the Fortran code uses ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria to compute the design thickness of load-bearing composite laminates. The code also includes an analysis option to obtain blade properties if a composite laminates schedule is prescribed. These properties include bending stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Nonstructural materials-gelcoat, nexus, and bonding adhesive-are also included for computation of mass. The code includes an option to format the output properties that can be directly input to advanced aeroelastic codes. This report summarizes the structural layout of composite laminates within the blade, the design approach, and the computational process. Finally, we present the results of two composite blades designed using this code in support of a project covering comparison of two- and three-blade rotors for a hypothetical turbine.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of torsional vibration characteristics of helicopter rotor blades. Part 1: Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of structural vibration characteristics of rotor blades was carried out. Coupled equations of motion for flapwise bending and torsion were formulated for rotor blades with noncollinear elastic and mass axes. The finite element method was applied for a detailed representation of blade structural properties. Coupled structural mass and stiffness coefficients were evaluated. The range of validity of a set of coupled equations of motion linearized with respect to eccentricity between elastic and mass axes was investigated. The sensitivity of blade vibration characteristics to torsion were evaluated by varying blade geometric properties, boundary conditions, and eccentricities between mass and elastic axes.

  9. Evaluation of Rotor Structural and Aerodynamic Loads using Measured Blade Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Sung N.; You, Young-Hyun; Lau, Benton H.; Johnson, Wayne; Lim, Joon W.

    2012-01-01

    The structural properties of Higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades have been measured using the original set of blades tested in the wind tunnel in 1994. A comprehensive rotor dynamics analysis is performed to address the effect of the measured blade properties on airloads, blade motions, and structural loads of the rotor. The measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. The measured properties are correlated against the estimated values obtained initially by the manufacturer of the blades. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffnesses, up to 30% for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section. The measured offset between the center of gravity and the elastic axis is larger by about 5% chord length, as compared with the estimated value. The comprehensive rotor dynamics analysis was carried out using the measured blade property set for HART I rotor with and without HHC (Higher Harmonic Control) pitch inputs. A significant improvement on blade motions and structural loads is obtained with the measured blade properties.

  10. Rotor blade vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yung H.

    2000-02-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noise-generated by helicopter main rotor blades is one of the most severe noise problems and is very important both in military applications and community acceptance of rotorcraft. Research over the decades has substantially improved physical understanding of noise-generating mechanisms, and various design concepts have been investigated to control noise radiation using advanced blade planform shapes and active blade control techniques. The important parameters to control rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and vibration have been identified: blade tip vortex structures and its trajectory, blade aeroelastic deformation, and airloads. Several blade tip design concepts have been investigated for diffusing tip vortices and also for reducing noise. However, these tip shapes have not been able to substantially reduce blade-vortex interaction noise without degradation of rotor performance. Meanwhile, blade root control techniques, such as higher-harmonic pitch control (HHC) and individual blade control (IBC) concepts, have been extensively investigated for noise and vibration reduction. The HHC technique has proved the substantial blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, up to 6 dB, while vibration and low-frequency noise have been increased. Tests with IBC techniques have shown the simultaneous reduction of rotor noise and vibratory loads with 2/rev pitch control inputs. Recently, active blade control concepts with smart structures have been investigated with the emphasis on active blade twist and trailing edge flap. Smart structures technologies are very promising, but further advancements are needed to meet all the requirements of rotorcraft applications in frequency, force, and displacement.

  11. Rotor blade dynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    The rotor dynamic design considerations are essentially limitations on the vibratory response of the blades which in turn limit the dynamic excitation of the fuselage by forces and moments transmitted to the hub. Quantities which are associated with the blade response and which are subject to design constraints are discussed. These include blade frequencies, vertical and inplane hub shear, rolling and pitching moments, and aeroelastic stability margin.

  12. Rotor anisotropy as a blade damage indicator for wind turbine structural health monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcherniak, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Structural damage of a rotor blade causes structural anisotropy of the rotor. In rotor dynamic, the anisotropy affects the symmetry of the rotor mode shapes, and the latter can be utilized to detect the blade damage. The mode shape symmetry can be characterized by relative blades' magnitude and phase. The study examines the potential use of these parameters as rotor damage indicators. Firstly the indicators are studied analytically using a simple 6 degrees-of-freedom model of a rotating rotor. Floquet analysis is used due to the time periodic nature of the considered system. Floquet analysis allows one to perform analytical modal decomposition of the system and study the sensitivity of the damage indicators to the amount of damage. Secondly, operational modal analysis (OMA) is involved to extract the same damage indicators from simulated experimental data, which was synthesized via numerical simulations. Finally, the same procedure was applied to operating Vestas V27 wind turbine, first using the simulated experimental data obtained by using aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2 and then using the data acquired during the measurement campaign on a real wind turbine. The study demonstrates that the proposed damage indicators are significantly more sensitive than the commonly used changes in natural frequency, and in contrast to the latter, can also pinpoint the faulty blade. It is also demonstrated that these indicators can be derived from blades vibration data obtained from real life experiment.

  13. Influence of cross section variations on the structural behaviour of composite rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Helmut; Woerndle, Rudolf

    1991-09-01

    A highly sophisticated structural analysis is required for helicopter rotor blades with nonhomogeneous cross sections made from nonisotropic material. Combinations of suitable analytical techniques with FEM-based techniques permit a cost effective and sufficiently accurate analysis of these complicated structures. It is determined that in general the 1D engineering theory of bending combined with 2D theories for determining the cross section properties is sufficient to describe the structural blade behavior.

  14. A new sensitivity analysis for structural optimization of composite rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.; Yuan, Kuo-An

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents a detailed mathematical derivation of the sensitivity derivatives for the structural dynamic, aeroelastic stability and response characteristics of a rotor blade in hover and forward flight. The formulation is denoted by the term semianalytical approach, because certain derivatives have to be evaluated by a finite difference scheme. Using the present formulation, sensitivity derivatives for the structural dynamic and aeroelastic stability characteristics, were evaluated for both isotropic and composite rotor blades. Based on the results, useful conclusions are obtained regarding the relative merits of the semi-analytical approach, for calculating sensitivity derivatives, when compared to a pure finite difference approach.

  15. A new sensitivity analysis for structural optimization of composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.; Yuan, Kuo-An

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed mathematical derivation of the sensitivity derivatives for the structural dynamic, aeroelastic stability and response characteristics of a rotor blade in hover and forward flight. The formulation is denoted by the term semianalytical approach, because certain derivatives have to be evaluated by a finite difference scheme. Using the present formulation, sensitivity derivatives for the structural dynamic and aeroelastic stability characteristics, were evaluated for both isotropic and composite rotor blades. Based on the results, useful conclusions are obtained regarding the relative merits of the semi-analytical approach, for calculating sensitivity derivatives, when compared to a pure finite difference approach.

  16. Preliminary structural design of composite main rotor blades for minimum weight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology is developed to perform minimum weight structural design for composite or metallic main rotor blades subject to aerodynamic performance, material strength, autorotation, and frequency constraints. The constraints and load cases are developed such that the final preliminary rotor design will satisfy U.S. Army military specifications, as well as take advantage of the versatility of composite materials. A minimum weight design is first developed subject to satisfying the aerodynamic performance, strength, and autorotation constraints for all static load cases. The minimum weight design is then dynamically tuned to avoid resonant frequencies occurring at the design rotor speed. With this methodology, three rotor blade designs were developed based on the geometry of the UH-60A Black Hawk titanium-spar rotor blade. The first design is of a single titanium-spar cross section, which is compared with the UH-60A Black Hawk rotor blade. The second and third designs use single and multiple graphite/epoxy-spar cross sections. These are compared with the titanium-spar design to demonstrate weight savings from use of this design methodology in conjunction with advanced composite materials.

  17. Structural behavior of two-cell composite rotor blades with elastic couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1991-09-01

    This paper presents an analytical-cum-experimental study of the structural response of composite rotor blades with elastic couplings. Vlasov theory is expanded to analyze two-cell composite rotor blades made out of general composite laminates including the transverse shear deformation of the cross-section. Variation of shear stiffness along the countour of the section is included in the warping function. In order to validate this analysis, two-cell graphite-epoxy composite blades with extension-torsion coupling were fabricated using matched-die molding technique. These blades were tested under tip bending and torsional loads, and their structural response in terms of bending slope and twist was measured with a laser optical system. Good correlation between theory and experiment is achieved.

  18. Composite structure of helicopter rotor blades studied by neutron- and X-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaskó, M.; Veres, I.; Molnár, Gy.; Balaskó, Zs.; Sváb, E.

    2004-07-01

    In order to inspect the possible defects in the composite structure of helicopter rotor blades combined neutron- and X-ray radiography investigations were performed at the Budapest Research Reactor. Imperfections in the honeycomb structure, resin rich or starved areas at the core-honeycomb surfaces, inhomogeneities at the adhesive filling and water percolation at the sealing interfaces of the honeycomb sections were discovered.

  19. Helicopter rotor blade design for minimum vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of blade design parameters in rotor vibratory response and the design of a minimum vibration blade based upon this understanding are examined. Various design approaches are examined for a 4 bladed articulated rotor operating at a high speed flight condition. Blade modal shaping, frequency placement, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and intermodal cancellation are investigated to systematically identify and evaluate blade design parameters that influence blade airloads, blade modal response, hub loads, and fuselage vibration. The relative contributions of the various components of blade force excitation and response to the vibratory hub loads transmitted to the fuselage are determined in order to isolate primary candidates for vibration alleviation. A blade design is achieved which reduces the predicted fuselage vibration from the baseline blade by approximately one half. Blade designs are developed that offer significant reductions in vibration (and fatigue stresses) without resorting to special vibration alleviation devices, radical blade geometries, or weight penalties.

  20. Genetic fuzzy system for online structural health monitoring of composite helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Prashant M.; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2007-07-01

    A structural health monitoring (SHM) methodology is developed for composite rotor blades. An aeroelastic analysis of composite rotor blades based on the finite element method in space and time and with implanted matrix cracking and debonding/delamination damage is used to obtain measurable system parameters such as blade response, loads and strains. A rotor blade with a two-cell airfoil section and [0/±45/90]s family of laminates is used for numerical simulations. The model based measurements are contaminated with noise to simulate real data. Genetic fuzzy systems (GFS) are developed for global online damage detection using displacement and force-based measurement deviations between damaged and undamaged conditions and for local online damage detection using strains. It is observed that the success rate of the GFS depends on number of measurements, type of measurements and training and testing noise level. The GFS work quite well with noisy data and is recommended for online SHM of composite helicopter rotor blades.

  1. Structural design of composite rotor blades with consideration of manufacturability, durability, and manufacturing uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leihong

    A modular structural design methodology for composite blades is developed. This design method can be used to design composite rotor blades with sophisticate geometric cross-sections. This design method hierarchically decomposed the highly-coupled interdisciplinary rotor analysis into global and local levels. In the global level, aeroelastic response analysis and rotor trim are conduced based on multi-body dynamic models. In the local level, variational asymptotic beam sectional analysis methods are used for the equivalent one-dimensional beam properties. Compared with traditional design methodology, the proposed method is more efficient and accurate. Then, the proposed method is used to study three different design problems that have not been investigated before. The first is to add manufacturing constraints into design optimization. The introduction of manufacturing constraints complicates the optimization process. However, the design with manufacturing constraints benefits the manufacturing process and reduces the risk of violating major performance constraints. Next, a new design procedure for structural design against fatigue failure is proposed. This procedure combines the fatigue analysis with the optimization process. The durability or fatigue analysis employs a strength-based model. The design is subject to stiffness, frequency, and durability constraints. Finally, the manufacturing uncertainty impacts on rotor blade aeroelastic behavior are investigated, and a probabilistic design method is proposed to control the impacts of uncertainty on blade structural performance. The uncertainty factors include dimensions, shapes, material properties, and service loads.

  2. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  3. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  4. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  5. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  6. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  7. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  8. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  9. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  10. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  11. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  12. Structural behavior of two-cell composite rotor blades with elastic couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical-cum-experimental study of the structural response of composite rotor blades with elastic couplings. Vlasov theory is expanded to analyze two-cell composite rotor blades made out of general composite laminates including the transverse shear deformation of the cross section. Variation of shear stiffness along the contour of the section is included in the warping function. To validate this analysis, two-cell graphite-epoxy composite blades with extension-torsion coupling were fabricated using a matched-die molding technique. These blades were tested under tip bending and torsional loads, and their structural response in terms of bending slope and twist was measured with a laser optical system. Good correlation between theory and experiment was achieved. Axial force-induced twist rate of the order of 10 deg/m length due to a 4.45-kN force can be realized in extension-torsion coupled blades with a hygrothermally stable lay-up for potential applications in the design of tilt rotors.

  13. Aeroelasticity and structural optimization of composite helicopter rotor blades with swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, K. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis capability for composite helicopter rotor blades with straight and swept tips, and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through structural optimization. A new aeroelastic model is developed in this study which is suitable for composite rotor blades with swept tips in hover and in forward flight. The hingeless blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. Arbitrary cross-sectional shape, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping are included in the blade model. The nonlinear equations of motion, derived using Hamilton's principle, are based on a moderate deflection theory. Composite blade cross-sectbnal properties are calculated by a separate linear, two-dimensional cross section analysis. The aerodynamic loads are obtained from quasi-steady, incompressible aerodynamics, based on an implicit formulation. The trim and steady state blade aeroelastic response are solved in a fully coupled manner. In forward flight, where the blade equations of motion are periodic, the coupled trim-aeroelastic response solution is obtained from the harmonic balance method. Subsequently, the periodic system is linearized about the steady state response, and its stability is determined from Floquet theory.

  14. Blade lock for a rotor disk and rotor blade assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A rotor disk 18 and rotor blade 26 assembly is disclosed having a blade lock 66 which retains the rotor blade against axial movement in an axially extending blade retention slot 58. Various construction details are developed which shield the dead rim region D.sub.d and shift at least a portion of the loads associated with the locking device from the dead rim. In one detailed embodiment, a projection 68 from the live rim D.sub.1 of the disk 18 is adapted by slots 86 to receive blade locks 66.

  15. Cavitation, Flow Structure and Turbulence in the Tip Region of a Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Miorini, R.; Soranna, F.; Katz, J.; Michael, T.; Jessup, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Measure the flow structure and turbulence within a Naval, axial waterjet pump. Create a database for benchmarking and validation of parallel computational efforts. Address flow and turbulence modeling issues that are unique to this complex environment. Measure and model flow phenomena affecting cavitation within the pump and its effect on pump performance. This presentation focuses on cavitation phenomena and associated flow structure in the tip region of a rotor blade.

  16. Optimization of rotor blades for combined structural, dynamic, and aerodynamic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Cheng-Jian; Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Optimal helicopter blade design with computer-based mathematical programming has received more and more attention in recent years. Most of the research has focused on optimum dynamic characteristics of rotor blades to reduce vehicle vibration. There is also work on optimization of aerodynamic performance and on composite structural design. This research has greatly increased our understanding of helicopter optimum design in each of these aspects. Helicopter design is an inherently multidisciplinary process involving strong interactions among various disciplines which can appropriately include aerodynamics; dynamics, both flight dynamics and structural dynamics; aeroelasticity: vibrations and stability; and even acoustics. Therefore, the helicopter design process must satisfy manifold requirements related to the aforementioned diverse disciplines. In our present work, we attempt to combine several of these important effects in a unified manner. First, we design a blade with optimum aerodynamic performance by proper layout of blade planform and spanwise twist. Second, the blade is designed to have natural frequencies that are placed away from integer multiples of the rotor speed for a good dynamic characteristics. Third, the structure is made as light as possible with sufficient rotational inertia to allow for autorotational landing, with safe stress margins and flight fatigue life at each cross-section, and with aeroelastical stability and low vibrations. Finally, a unified optimization refines the solution.

  17. Multilevel decomposition approach to integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural (IADS) optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance, dynamics, and structural analyses with a general purpose optimizer using multilevel decomposition techniques. At the upper level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (stiffnesses, mass, and average strains). At the lower level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (detailed dimensions of the blade structure and stresses). The IADS procedure provides an optimization technique that is compatible with industrial design practices in which the aerodynamic and dynamic design is performed at a global level and the structural design is carried out at a detailed level with considerable dialogue and compromise among the aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural groups. The IADS procedure is demonstrated for several cases.

  18. Integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades using multilevel decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural (IADS) optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance, dynamics, and structural analyses with a general-purpose optimizer using multilevel decomposition techniques. At the upper level, the structure is defined in terms of global quantities (stiffness, mass, and average strains). At the lower level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (detailed dimensions of the blade structure and stresses). The IADS procedure provides an optimization technique that is compatible with industrial design practices in which the aerodynamic and dynamic designs are performed at a global level and the structural design is carried out at a detailed level with considerable dialog and compromise among the aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural groups. The IADS procedure is demonstrated for several examples.

  19. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A

    2013-05-21

    A multiple piece turbine rotor blade with a shell having an airfoil shape and secured between a spar and a platform with the spar including a tip end piece. a snap ring fits around the spar and abuts against the spar tip end piece on a top side and abuts against a shell on the bottom side so that the centrifugal loads from the shell is passed through the snap ring and into the spar and not through a tip cap dovetail slot and projection structure.

  20. Stability of elastic bending and torsion of uniform cantilever rotor blades in hover with variable structural coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, D. H., Roberta.

    1976-01-01

    The stability of elastic flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of uniform, untwisted, cantilever rotor blades without chordwise offsets between the elastic, mass, tension, and areodynamic center axes is investigated for the hovering flight condition. The equations of motion are obtained by simplifying the general, nonlinear, partial differential equations of motion of an elastic rotating cantilever blade. The equations are adapted for a linearized stability analysis in the hovering flight condition by prescribing aerodynamic forces, applying Galerkin's method, and linearizing the resulting ordinary differential equations about the equilibrium operating condition. The aerodynamic forces are obtained from strip theory based on a quasi-steady approximation of two-dimensional unsteady airfoil theory. Six coupled mode shapes, calculated from free vibration about the equilibrium operating condition, are used in the linearized stability analysis. The study emphasizes the effects of two types of structural coupling that strongly influence the stability of hingeless rotor blades. The first structural coupling is the linear coupling between flap and lead-lag bending of the rotor blade. The second structural coupling is a nonlinear coupling between flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion deflections. Results are obtained for a wide variety of hingeless rotor configurations and operating conditions in order to provide a reasonably complete picture of hingeless rotor blade stability characteristics.

  1. Aeroelastic response of composite rotor blades considering transverse shear and structural damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Nam; Kim, Seung Jo

    1994-04-01

    The effects of transverse shear deformations and structural damping on the flutter phenomena of a composite rotor blade in hover have been investigated using the finite element method. First-order shear deformation theory with rotary inertia effects and a damped element model of composite laminates are employed for the structural formulation. A quasisteady aerodynamic theory with a dynamic inflow model is used. Torsion-related out-of-plane warping and noncirculatory aerodynamic components are also incorporated in the formulation. Using these structural and aerodynamic tools, several numerical studies are carried out, first to validate the current approach and second to show the effects of transverse shear deformations and structural damping on the aeroelstic stability of a composite rotor as a function of fiber orientation. The predictions derived by the frequency analysis of this model are found to be more accurate than those given by an alternative approach compared with experimental data. It is shown that the transverse shear flexibility tends to lower the frequency of the rotor, and generally has a destabilizing effect on the lag mode and a stabilizing effect on the flap mode. It is also presented that the magnitude of structural damping can be controlled by changing ply orientation angle.

  2. Aircraft rotor blade with passive tuned tab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A structure for reducing vibratory airloading in a rotor blade with a leading edge and a trailing edge includes a cut out portion at the trailing edge. A substantially wedge shaped cross section, inertially deflectable tab, also with a leading edge and a trailing edge is pivotally mounted in the cut out portion. The trailing edge of the tab may move above and below the rotor blade. A torsion strap applies force against the tab when the trailing edge of the tab is above and below the rotor blade. A restraining member is slidably movable along the torsion strap to vary torsional biasing force supplied by the torsion bar to the tab. A plurality of movable weights positioned between plates vary a center of gravity of the tab. Skin of the tab is formed from unidirectional graphite and fiberglass layers. Sliders coupled with a pinned degree of freedom at rod eliminate bending of tab under edgewise blade deflection.

  3. Classification of defects in honeycomb composite structure of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaskó, M.; Sváb, E.; Molnár, Gy.; Veres, I.

    2005-04-01

    The use of non-destructive testing methods to qualify the state of rotor blades with respect to their expected flight hours, with the aim to extend their lifetime without any risk of breakdown, is an important financial demand. In order to detect the possible defects in the composite structure of Mi-8 and Mi-24 type helicopter rotor blades used by the Hungarian Army, we have performed combined neutron- and X-ray radiography measurements at the Budapest Research Reactor. Several types of defects were detected, analysed and typified. Among the most frequent and important defects observed were cavities, holes and/or cracks in the sealing elements on the interface of the honeycomb structure and the section boarders. Inhomogeneities of the resin materials (resin-rich or starved areas) at the core-honeycomb surfaces proved to be an other important point. Defects were detected at the adhesive filling, and water percolation was visualized at the sealing interfaces of the honeycomb sections. Corrosion effects, and metal inclusions have also been detected.

  4. Structural integrity design for an active helicopter rotor blade with piezoelectric flap actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehwan; Shin, SangJoon

    2011-04-01

    Helicopter uses a rotor system to generate lift, thrust and forces, and its aerodynamic environment is generally complex. Unsteady aerodynamic environment arises such as blade vortex interaction. This unsteady aerodynamic environment induces vibratory aerodynamic loads and high aeroacoustic noise. The aerodynamic load and aeroacoustic noise is at N times the rotor blade revolutions (N/rev). But conventional rotor control system composed of pitch links and swash plate is not capable of adjusting such vibratory loads because its control is restricted to 1/rev. Many active control methodologies have been examined to alleviate the problem. The blade using active control device manipulates the blade pitch angle with N/rev. In this paper, Active Trailing-edge Flap blade, which is one of the active control methods, is designed to reduce the unsteady aerodynamic loads. Active Trailing-edge Flap blade uses a trailing edge flap manipulated by an actuator to change camber line of the airfoil. Piezoelectric actuators are installed inside the blade to manipulate the trailing edge flap.

  5. Shape control of a morphing structure (rotor blade) using a shape memory alloy actuator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushnell, Glenn S.; Arbogast, Darin; Ruggeri, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Development and test results of a rotor blade twist control system that utilizes a thermo-mechanical shape memory alloy (SMA) are presented. The actuation system controls the blade shape during flight operations allowing the blade to be configured for greater lift during takeoff and landing. SMA actuators provided an excellent solution because of their very high torque output to weight ratio and suitability to the dynamic environment of a rotor blade. Several challenges related to the behavior of the SMA material are overcome by innovative control system design. Thermoelectric modules (TEM's) are used to actively transfer heat between SMA tubes and other heat conductor and radiator components. Modeling and system identification techniques and a non-trivial solution to nonlinear and coupled thermal response equations are used to insure effective use of the TEM's and to improve control during SMA phase transition.

  6. Simple theoretical models for composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valisetty, R. R.; Rehfield, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The development of theoretical rotor blade structural models for designs based upon composite construction is discussed. Care was exercised to include a member of nonclassical effects that previous experience indicated would be potentially important to account for. A model, representative of the size of a main rotor blade, is analyzed in order to assess the importance of various influences. The findings of this model study suggest that for the slenderness and closed cell construction considered, the refinements are of little importance and a classical type theory is adequate. The potential of elastic tailoring is dramatically demonstrated, so the generality of arbitrary ply layup in the cell wall is needed to exploit this opportunity.

  7. Stainless-Steel-Foam Structures Evaluated for Fan and Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Cosgriff, Laura M.; Min, James B.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use a sandwich structure design, consisting of two stainlesssteel face sheets and a stainless-steel-foam core, to fabricate engine fan and propeller blades. Current fan blades are constructed either of polymer matrix composites (PMCs) or hollow titanium alloys. The PMC blades are expensive and have poor impact resistance on their leading edges, thereby requiring a metallic leading edge to satisfy the Federal Aviation Administration s impact requirements relating to bird strikes. Hollow titanium blades cost more to fabricate because of the intrinsically difficult fabrication issues associated with titanium alloys. However, both these current concepts produce acceptable lightweight fan blades.

  8. Rotor blades for turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Piersall, Matthew R; Potter, Brian D

    2013-02-12

    A tip shroud that includes a plurality of damping fins, each damping fin including a substantially non-radially-aligned surface that is configured to make contact with a tip shroud of a neighboring rotor blade. At least one damping fin may include a leading edge damping fin and at least one damping fin may include a trailing edge damping fin. The leading edge damping fin may be configured to correspond to the trailing edge damping fin.

  9. Composite rotor blades for wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, W. D.

    The materials, techniques, and methods used to construct a 150 ft test blade, two 31 ft blades for a 40 kW WECS, and rotor blades for the Mod-1 wind turbine are described. Considerations of strength, stiffness, and mass distributions, as well as cost, led to the choice of filament wound fiberglass/epoxy material using transverse filament tape which has structural fibers running across the width of the tape. A number of 90 deg windings were added to the rotor after tape winding to provide compaction and hoop strength. Curing comprised five hours at 180 F. The Mod-1 blades were required to match the steel blades in weight, stiffness, deflection, and frequencies. The finished product weighed 20,000 lb and featured a metal tip cap and braided wire trailing edge strap for lightning protection. The 40 kW was a NACA 23018 in the center and 23012 at the tip, while the Mod-1 blade was a NACA 23025 in the center and 23015 at the tip.

  10. An iterative multidisciplinary analysis for rotor blade shape determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Stefko, George L.

    1993-01-01

    A CFD solver called ADPAC-APES is coupled with a NASTRAN structural analysis and a MARC thermal/heat transfer analysis to determine rotor blade shape. Nonlinear blade displacements due to centrifugal loads, aerodynamic pressures, and nonuniform temperature distribution are determined simultaneously. The effect of blade displacements on aerodynamic pressures and temperatures is then analyzed. These calculations are iterated till a steady state is reached across all the disciplines. This iterative procedure is applied to a ducted fan rotor blade and the manufactured shape is determined from a given operating shape. Effect of a part-span shroud on blade deflections is also analyzed.

  11. Flapping inertia for selected rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; May, Matthew J.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamics of helicopter rotor systems cannot be investigated without consideration for the dynamics of the rotor. One of the principal properties of the rotor which affects the rotor dynamics is the inertia of the rotor blade about its root attachment. Previous aerodynamic investigation have been performed on rotor blades with a variety of planforms to determine the performance differences due to blade planform. The blades tested for this investigation have been tested on the U.S. Army 2 meter rotor test system (2MRTS) in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic tunnel for hover performance. This investigation was intended to provide fundamental information on the flapping inertia of five rotor blades with differing planforms. The inertia of the bare cuff and the cuff with a blade extension were also measured for comparison with the inertia of the blades. Inertia was determined using a swing testing technique, using the period of oscillation to determine the effective flapping inertia. The effect of damping in the swing test was measured and described. A comparison of the flapping inertials for rectangular and tapered planform blades of approximately the same mass showed the tapered blades to have a lower inertia, as expected.

  12. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D.; Plank, William L.

    2016-07-19

    A spar and shell turbine rotor blade with a spar and a tip cap formed as a single piece, the spar includes a bottom end with dovetail or fir tree slots that engage with slots on a top end of a root section, and a platform includes an opening on a top surface for insertion of the spar in which a shell made from an exotic high temperature resistant material is secured between the tip cap and the platform. The spar is tapered to form thinner walls at the tip end to further reduce the weight and therefore a pulling force due to blade rotation. The spar and tip cap piece is made from a NiAL material to further reduce the weight and the pulling force.

  13. Forward sweep, low noise rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A forward-swept, low-noise rotor blade includes an inboard section, an aft-swept section and a forward-swept outboard section. The rotor blade reduces the noise of rotorcraft, including both standard helicopters and advanced systems such as tiltrotors. The primary noise reduction feature is the forward sweep of the planform over a large portion of the outer blade radius. The rotor blade also includes an aft-swept section. The purpose of the aft-swept region is to provide a partial balance to pitching moments produced by the outboard forward-swept portion of the blade. The rotor blade has a constant chord width; or has a chord width which decreases linearly along the entire blade span; or combines constant and decreasing chord widths, wherein the blade is of constant chord width from the blade root to a certain location on the rotor blade, then decreases linearly to the blade tip thereafter. The noise source showing maximum noise reduction is blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Also reduced are thickness, noise, high speed impulsive noise, cabin vibration and loading noise.

  14. Composite hub/metal blade compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, S.

    1978-01-01

    A low cost compressor rotor was designed and fabricated for a small jet engine. The rotor hub and blade keepers were compression molded with graphite epoxy. Each pair of metallic blades was held in the hub by a keeper. All keepers were locked in the hub with circumferential windings. Feasibility of fabrication was demonstrated in this program.

  15. Active twist rotor blade modelling using particle-wake aerodynamics and geometrically exact beam structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, C. E. S.; Opoku, D. G.; Nitzsche, F.; Cheng, T.

    2004-06-01

    An active aeroelastic and aeroacoustic analysis of helicopter rotor systems is presented in this paper. It is a tightly coupled computational aeroelastic code that interfaces a particle-wake panel method code with an active nonlinear mixed variational intrinsic beam element code. In addition, a Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings equation-based acoustic component is incorporated to complete the numerical implementation. The theory behind each component is summarized here as well as the method for coupling the aerodynamic and structural components. Sample acoustic and aeroelastic results are given for different model-scale rotors. Comparisons with available (passive) results show very good agreement. Preliminary study with an active twist rotor is also shown.

  16. Rotor blade system with reduced blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leishman, John G. (Inventor); Han, Yong Oun (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A rotor blade system with reduced blade-vortex interaction noise includes a plurality of tube members embedded in proximity to a tip of each rotor blade. The inlets of the tube members are arrayed at the leading edge of the blade slightly above the chord plane, while the outlets are arrayed at the blade tip face. Such a design rapidly diffuses the vorticity contained within the concentrated tip vortex because of enhanced flow mixing in the inner core, which prevents the development of a laminar core region.

  17. Coupled composite rotor blades under bending and torsional loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    This paper presents an analytical-cum-experimental study of the structural response of composite rotor blades with elastic couplings. Vlasov theory is expanded to analyze two-cell composite rotor blades made out of general composite laminates including the transverse shear deformation of the cross-section. In order to validate this analysis, two-cell graphite-epoxy composite blades with bending-torsion coupling were fabricated using matched-die molding technique. These blades were tested under tip bending and torsional loads, and their structural response in terms of bending slope and twist was measured with a laser optical system. Good correlation between theory and experiment is achieved.

  18. Investigation of rotor blade element airloads for a teetering rotor in the blade stall regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, L. U.; Fukushima, T.

    1974-01-01

    A model of a teetering rotor was tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Blade element airloads measured on an articulated model rotor were compared with the teetering rotor and showed that the teetering rotor is subjected to less extensive flow separation. Retreating blade stall was studied. Results show that stall, under the influence of unsteady aerodynamic effects, consists of four separate stall events, each associated with a vortex shed from the leading edge and sweeping over the upper surface of the rotor blade. Current rotor performance prediction methodology was evaluated through computer simulation.

  19. Extension-twist coupling optimization in composite rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Serkan

    2005-07-01

    For optimal rotor performance in a tiltrotor aircraft the difference in the inflow and the rotor speeds between the hover and cruise flight modes suggests different blade twist and chord distributions. The blade twist rates in current tiltrotor applications are defined based upon a compromise between the figure of merit in hover and propeller efficiency in airplane mode. However, when each operation mode is considered separately the optimum blade distributions are found to be considerably different. Passive blade twist control, which uses the inherent variation in centrifugal forces on a rotor blade to achieve optimum blade twist distributions in each flight mode through the use of extension-twist coupled composite rotor blades, has been considered for performance improvement of tiltrotor aircraft over the last two decades. The challenge for this concept is to achieve the desired twisting deformations in the rotor blade without altering the aeroelastic characteristics of the vehicle. A concept referred to as the sliding mass concept is proposed in this work in order to increase the twist change with rotor speed for a closed-cell composite rotor blade cross-section to practical levels for performance improvement in a tiltrotor aircraft. The concept is based on load path changes for the centrifugal forces by utilizing non-structural masses readily available on a conventional blade, such as the leading edge balancing mass. A multilevel optimization technique based on the simulated annealing method is applied to improve the performance of the XV15 tiltrotor aircraft. A cross-sectional analysis tool, VABS together with a multibody dynamics code, DYMORE are integrated into the optimization process. The optimization results revealed significant improvements in the power requirement in hover while preserving cruise efficiency. It is also shown that about 21% of the improvement is provided through the sliding mass concept pointing to the additional flexibility the concept

  20. Development of a structural optimization capability for the aeroelastic tailoring of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.; Yuan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new structural optimization capability aimed at the aeroelastic tailoring of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The primary objective is to reduce vibration levels in forward flight without diminishing the aeroelastic stability margins of the blade. In the course of this research activity a number of complicated tasks have been addressed: (1) development of a new, aeroelastic stability and response analysis; (2) formulation of a new comprehensive sensitive analysis, which facilitates the generation of the appropriate approximations for the objective and the constraints; (3) physical understanding of the new model and, in particular, determination of its potential for aeroelastic tailoring, and (4) combination of the newly developed analysis capability, the sensitivity derivatives and the optimizer into a comprehensive optimization capability. The first three tasks have been completed and the fourth task is in progress.

  1. Aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotor blades with time-variable, non-linear structural twist and multiple structural redundancy: Mathematical derivation and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The differential equations of motion for the lateral and torsional deformations of a nonlinearly twisted rotor blade in steady flight conditions together with those additional aeroelastic features germane to composite bearingless rotors are derived. The differential equations are formulated in terms of uncoupled (zero pitch and twist) vibratory modes with exact coupling effects due to finite, time variable blade pitch and, to second order, twist. Also presented are derivations of the fully coupled inertia and aerodynamic load distributions, automatic pitch change coupling effects, structural redundancy characteristics of the composite bearingless rotor flexbeam - torque tube system in bending and torsion, and a description of the linearized equations appropriate for eigensolution analyses. Three appendixes are included presenting material appropriate to the digital computer program implementation of the analysis, program G400.

  2. Determination of the structural damping coefficients of six full-scale helicopter rotor blades of different materials and methods of construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Frederick W

    1956-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the structural damping of six full-scale helicopter rotor blades, made to determine the variation of structural damping with materials and methods of construction, are presented. The damping of the blades was determined for the first three flapwise bending modes, first chordwise bending mode, and first torsion mode. The contribution of structural damping to the total damping of the blades is discussed for several aerodynamic conditions in order to point out situations where structural damping is significant.

  3. Improvements to tilt rotor performance through passive blade twist control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    A passive blade twist control is presented in which the twist distribution of a tilt rotor blade is elastically changed as a function of rotor speed. The elastic twist deformation is used to achieve two different blade twist distributions corresponding to the two rotor speeds used on conventional tilt rotors in hover and forward flight. By changing the blade twist distribution, the aerodynamic performance can be improved in both modes of flight. The concept presented obtains a change in twist distribution with extension-twist-coupled composite blade structure. This investigation first determines the linear twists which are optimum for each flight mode. Based on the optimum linear twist distributions, three extension-twist-coupled blade designs are developed using coupled-beam and laminate analyses integrated with an optimization analysis. The designs are optimized for maximum twist deformation subject to material strength limitations. The aerodynamic performances of the final designs are determined which show that the passive blade twist control concept is viable, and can enhance conventional tilt rotor performance.

  4. Variable diameter wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Jamieson, Peter McKeich; Hornzee-Jones, Chris; Moroz, Emilian M.; Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-12-06

    A system and method for changing wind turbine rotor diameters to meet changing wind speeds and control system loads is disclosed. The rotor blades on the wind turbine are able to adjust length by extensions nested within or containing the base blade. The blades can have more than one extension in a variety of configurations. A cable winching system, a hydraulic system, a pneumatic system, inflatable or elastic extensions, and a spring-loaded jack knife deployment are some of the methods of adjustment. The extension is also protected from lightning by a grounding system.

  5. Estimation of blade airloads from rotor blade bending moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1987-01-01

    A method is developed to estimate the blade normal airloads by using measured flap bending moments; that is, the rotor blade is used as a force balance. The blade's rotation is calculated in vacuum modes and the airloads are then expressed as an algebraic sum of the mode shapes, modal amplitudes, mass distribution, and frequency properties. The modal amplitudes are identified from the blade bending moments using the Strain Pattern Analysis Method. The application of the method is examined using simulated flap bending moment data that have been calculated for measured airloads for a full-scale rotor in a wind tunnel. The estimated airloads are compared with the wind tunnel measurements. The effects of the number of measurements, the number of modes, and errors in the measurements and the blade properties are examined, and the method is shown to be robust.

  6. Dynamic response of active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sang Joon; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2001-02-01

    Dynamic characteristics of active twist rotor (ATR) blades are investigated analytically and experimentally in this paper. The ATR system is intended for vibration and potentially for noise reductions in helicopters through individual blade control. An aeroelastic model is developed to identify frequency response characteristics of the ATR blade with integral, generally anisotropic, strain actuators embedded in its composite construction. An ATR prototype blade was designed and manufactured to experimentally study the vibration reduction capabilities of such systems. Several bench and hover tests were conducted and those results are presented and discussed here. Selected results on sensitivity of the ATR system to collective setting (i.e. blade loading), blade rpm (i.e. centrifugal force and blade station velocity), and media density (i.e. altitude) are presented. They indicated that the twist actuation authority of the ATR blade is independent of the collective setting up to approximately 10P, and dependent on rotational speed and altitude near the torsional resonance frequency due to its dependency on the aerodynamic damping. The proposed model captures very well the physics and sensitivities to selected test parameters of the ATR system. The numerical result of the blade torsional loads show an average error of 20% in magnitude and virtually no difference in phase for the blade frequency response. Overall, the active blade model is in very good agreement with the experiments and can be used to analyze and design future active helicopter blade systems.

  7. Rotor system having alternating length rotor blades for reducing blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, Robert C. (Inventor); Visintainer, Joseph A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotor system (4) having odd and even blade assemblies (O.sub.b, E.sub.b) mounting to and rotating with a rotor hub assembly (6) wherein the odd blade assemblies (O.sub.b) define a radial length R.sub.O, and the even blade assemblies (E.sub.b) define a radial length R.sub.E and wherein the radial length R.sub.E is between about 70% to about 95% of the radial length R.sub.O. Other embodiments of the invention are directed to a Variable Diameter Rotor system (4) which may be configured for operating in various operating modes for optimizing aerodynamic and acoustic performance. The Variable Diameter Rotor system (4) includes odd and even blade assemblies (O.sub.b, E.sub.b) having inboard and outboard blade sections (10, 12) wherein the outboard blade sections (12) telescopically mount to the inboard blade sections (10). The outboard blade sections (12) are positioned with respect to the inboard blade sections (10 such that the radial length R.sub.E of the even blade assemblies (E.sub.b) is equal to the radial length R.sub.O of the odd blade assemblies (O.sub.b) in a first operating mode, and such that the radial length R.sub.E is between about 70% to about 95% of the length R.sub.O in a second operating mode.

  8. Dynamic analysis of rotor blade undergoing rotor power shutdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh Quoc

    1990-01-01

    A rigid flap-lag blade analysis was developed to simulate a rotor in a wind tunnel undergoing an emergency power shutdown. Results show that for a rotor at a nonzero shaft tilt angle undergoing an emergency power shutdown, the oscillatory lag response is divergent. The mean lag response is large when tested at high collective pitch angles. Reducing the collective pitch during the emergency shutdown reduces the steady lag response. Increasing the rotor shaft tilt angle increases the oscillatory lag response component. The blade lag response obtained by incorporating a nonlinear lag damper model indicates that in this case the equivalent linear viscous damping is lower than originally expected. Simulation results indicate that large oscillatory lag motions can be suppressed if the rotor shaft is returned to the fully vertical position during the emergency power shutdown.

  9. Projection Moire Interferometry for Rotorcraft Applications: Deformation Measurements of Active Twist Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Soto, Hector L.; South, Bruce W.

    2002-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used during wind tunnel tests to obtain azimuthally dependent blade bending and twist measurements for a 4-bladed Active Twist Rotor (ATR) system in simulated forward flight. The ATR concept offers a means to reduce rotor vibratory loads and noise by using piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators embedded in the blade structure to twist each blade as they rotate throughout the rotor azimuth. The twist imparted on the blades for blade control causes significant changes in blade loading, resulting in complex blade deformation consisting of coupled bending and twist. Measurement of this blade deformation is critical in understanding the overall behavior of the ATR system and the physical mechanisms causing the reduction in rotor loads and noise. PMI is a non-contacting, video-based optical measurement technique capable of obtaining spatially continuous structural deformation measurements over the entire object surface within the PMI system field-of-view. When applied to rotorcraft testing, PMI can be used to measure the azimuth-dependent blade bending and twist along the full span of the rotor blade. This paper presents the PMI technique as applied to rotorcraft testing, and provides results obtained during the ATR tests demonstrating the PMI system performance. PMI measurements acquired at select blade actuation conditions generating minimum and maximum rotor loads are provided to explore the interrelationship between rotor loads, blade bending, and twist.

  10. Design optimization for active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Ji Won

    This dissertation introduces the process of optimizing active twist rotor blades in the presence of embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. Optimum design of active twist blades is a complex task, since it involves a rich design space with tightly coupled design variables. The study presents the development of an optimization framework for active helicopter rotor blade cross-sectional design. This optimization framework allows for exploring a rich and highly nonlinear design space in order to optimize the active twist rotor blades. Different analytical components are combined in the framework: cross-sectional analysis (UM/VABS), an automated mesh generator, a beam solver (DYMORE), a three-dimensional local strain recovery module, and a gradient based optimizer within MATLAB. Through the mathematical optimization problem, the static twist actuation performance of a blade is maximized while satisfying a series of blade constraints. These constraints are associated with locations of the center of gravity and elastic axis, blade mass per unit span, fundamental rotating blade frequencies, and the blade strength based on local three-dimensional strain fields under worst loading conditions. Through pre-processing, limitations of the proposed process have been studied. When limitations were detected, resolution strategies were proposed. These include mesh overlapping, element distortion, trailing edge tab modeling, electrode modeling and foam implementation of the mesh generator, and the initial point sensibility of the current optimization scheme. Examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this process. Optimization studies were performed on the NASA/Army/MIT ATR blade case. Even though that design was built and shown significant impact in vibration reduction, the proposed optimization process showed that the design could be improved significantly. The second example, based on a model scale of the AH-64D Apache blade, emphasized the capability of this framework to

  11. Piezoelectric actuation of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieven, Nicholas A. J.

    2001-07-01

    The work presented in this paper is concerned with the application of embedded piezo-electric actuators in model helicopter rotor blades. The paper outlines techniques to define the optimal location of actuators to excite particular modes of vibration whilst the blade is rotating. Using composite blades the distribution of strain energy is defined using a Finite Element model with imposed rotor-dynamic and aerodynamics loads. The loads are specified through strip theory to determine the position of maximum bending moment and thus the optimal location of the embedded actuators. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated on a 1/4 scale fixed cyclic pitch rotor head. Measurement of the blade displacement is achieved by using strain gauges. In addition a redundant piezo-electric actuator is used to measure the blades' response characteristics. The addition of piezo-electric devices in this application has been shown to exhibit adverse aeroelastic effects, such as counter mass balancing and increased drag. Methods to minimise these effects are suggested. The outcome of the paper is a method for defining the location and orientation of piezo-electric devices in rotor-dynamic applications.

  12. Vortex control for rotor blade devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    To control vortices originating at the tips of a rotor's blades rotating through the air at a revolution frequency f, separation control device(s) are actuated to periodically introduce perturbations into the airflow moving over the blades. The periodic introduction of perturbations is controlled in accordance with a periodic modulating frequency of introduction f.sub.0 while the frequency of the perturbations so-introduced is designated as f.sub.e. Vortex control is achieved when the periodic modulating frequency of introduction f.sub.0 satisfies the relationship nf.ltoreq.f.sub.0.ltoreq.f.sub.e where n is the number of blades.

  13. General approach and scope. [rotor blade design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a joint activity involving NASA and Army researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop optimization procedures aimed at improving the rotor blade design process by integrating appropriate disciplines and accounting for all of the important interactions among the disciplines. The disciplines involved include rotor aerodynamics, rotor dynamics, rotor structures, airframe dynamics, and acoustics. The work is focused on combining these five key disciplines in an optimization procedure capable of designing a rotor system to satisfy multidisciplinary design requirements. Fundamental to the plan is a three-phased approach. In phase 1, the disciplines of blade dynamics, blade aerodynamics, and blade structure will be closely coupled, while acoustics and airframe dynamics will be decoupled and be accounted for as effective constraints on the design for the first three disciplines. In phase 2, acoustics is to be integrated with the first three disciplines. Finally, in phase 3, airframe dynamics will be fully integrated with the other four disciplines. This paper deals with details of the phase 1 approach and includes details of the optimization formulation, design variables, constraints, and objective function, as well as details of discipline interactions, analysis methods, and methods for validating the procedure.

  14. Design of helicopter rotor blades for optimum dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ko, T.; Korn, A. E.; Rossow, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    The possibilities and the limitations of tailoring blade mass and stiffness distributions to give an optimum blade design in terms of weight, inertia, and dynamic characteristics are investigated. Changes in mass or stiffness distribution used to place rotor frequencies at desired locations are determined. Theoretical limits to the amount of frequency shift are established. Realistic constraints on blade properties based on weight, mass moment of inertia size, strength, and stability are formulated. The extent hub loads can be minimized by proper choice of EL distribution is determined. Configurations that are simple enough to yield clear, fundamental insights into the structural mechanisms but which are sufficiently complex to result in a realistic result for an optimum rotor blade are emphasized.

  15. Analysis, design and elastic tailoring of composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Atilgan, Ali R.

    1987-01-01

    The development of structural models for composite rotor blades is summarized. The models are intended for use in design analysis for the purpose of exploring the potential of elastic tailoring. The research was performed at the Center for Rotary Wing Aircraft Technology.

  16. Reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise by active rotor control technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean; Brooks, Thomas F.

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations.

  17. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Requirements § 29.547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is an assembly of rotating components, which includes the rotor hub, blades, blade dampers, the pitch control mechanisms, and all other parts that... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main and tail rotor structure....

  19. Theory/test correlation of helicopter rotor blade element airloads in the blade stall regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobo, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of stall on a rotor blade element in a three-dimensional rotating environment was investigated. The model rotor test provided blade element airloads and local boundary layer flow characteristics at the three-quarter blade radius position for a wide range of rotor operating conditions. A description of the test program and the test results are presented.

  20. Design, fabrication, and test of a composite material wind turbine rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffee, D. G., Jr.; Gustafson, R. E.; More, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic design, structural design, fabrication, and structural testing is described for a 60 foot long filament wound, fiberglass/epoxy resin matrix wind turbine rotor blade for a 125 foot diameter, 100 kW wind energy conversion system. One blade was fabricated which met all aerodynamic shape requirements and was structurally capable of operating under all specified design conditions. The feasibility of filament winding large rotor blades was demonstrated.

  1. Simulation of Rotor Blade Element Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, R. E.; Duisenberg, Ken

    1996-01-01

    A turbulence model has been developed for blade-element helicopter simulation. This model, called Simulation of Rotor Blade Element Turbulence (SORBET), uses an innovative temporal and geometrical distribution algorithm that preserves the statistical characteristics of the turbulence spectra over the rotor disc, while providing velocity components in real time to each of five blade-element stations along each of four blades. An initial investigation of SORBET has been performed using a piloted, motion-based simulation of the Sikorsky UH60A Black Hawk. Although only the vertical component of stochastic turbulence was used in this investigation, vertical turbulence components induce vehicle responses in all translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the helicopter. The single-degree-of-freedom configuration of SORBET was compared to a conventional full 6-degrees-of-freedom baseline configuration, where translational velocity inputs are superimposed at the vehicle center of gravity, and rotational velocity inputs are created from filters that approximate the immersion rate into the turbulent field. For high-speed flight the vehicle responses were satisfactory for both models. Test pilots could not distinguish differences between the baseline configuration and SORBET. In low-speed flight the baseline configuration received criticism for its high frequency content, whereas the SORBET model elicited favorable pilot opinion. For this helicopter, which has fully articulated blades, results from SORBET show that vehicle responses to turbulent blade-station disturbances are severely attenuated. This is corroborated by in-flight observation of the rotor tip path plane as compared to vehicle responses.

  2. Vibration analysis of rotor blades with an attached concentrated mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Barna, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of an attached concentrated mass on the dynamics of helicopter rotor blades is determined. The point transmission matrix method was used to define, through three completely automated computer programs, the natural vibrational characteristics (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of rotor blades. The problems of coupled flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsional vibration of a twisted nonuniform blade and its special subcase pure torsional vibration are discussed. The orthogonality relations that exist between the natural modes of rotor blades with an attached concentrated mass are derived. The effect of pitch, rotation, and point mass parameters on the collective, cyclic, scissor, and pure torsional modes of a seesaw rotor blade is determined.

  3. Aeroelastic characteristics of composite bearingless rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Owing to the inherent unique structural features of composite bearingless rotors, various assumptions upon which conventional rotor aeroelastic analyses are formulated, are violated. Three such features identified are highly nonlinear and time-varying structural twist, structural redundancy in bending and torsion, and for certain configurations a strongly coupled low frequency bending-torsion mode. An examination of these aeroelastic considerations and appropriate formulations required for accurate analyses of such rotor systems is presented. Also presented are test results from a dynamically scaled model rotor and complementary analytic results obtained with the appropriately reformulated aeroelastic analysis.

  4. Structural qualification testing and operational loading on a fiberglass rotor blade for the Mod-OA wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue tests were performed on full- and half-scale root end sections, first to qualify the root retention design, and second to induce failure. Test methodology and results are presented. Two operational blades were proof tested to design limit load to ascertain buckling resistance. Measurements of natural frequency, damping ratio, and deflection under load made on the operational blades are documented. The tests showed that all structural design requirements were met or exceeded. Blade loads measured during 3000 hr of field operation were close to those expected. The measured loads validated the loads used in the fatigue tests and gave high confidence in the ability of the blades to achieve design life.

  5. Structural qualification testing and operational loading on a fiberglass rotor blade for the Mod-OA wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1983-03-01

    Fatigue tests were performed on full- and half-scale root end sections, first to qualify the root retention design, and second to induce failure. Test methodology and results are presented. Two operational blades were proof tested to design limit load to ascertain buckling resistance. Measurements of natural frequency, damping ratio, and deflection under load made on the operational blades are documented. The tests showed that all structural design requirements were met or exceeded. Blade loads measured during 3000 hr of field operation were close to those expected. The measured loads validated the loads used in the fatigue tests and gave high confidence in the ability of the blades to achieve design life.

  6. Performance optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a center-wide activity at NASA Langley Research Center to develop multidisciplinary design procedures by accounting for discipline interactions, a performance design optimization procedure is developed. The procedure optimizes the aerodynamic performance of rotor blades by selecting the point of taper initiation, root chord, taper ratio, and maximum twist which minimize hover horsepower while not degrading forward flight performance. The procedure uses HOVT (a strip theory momentum analysis) to compute the horse power required for hover and the comprehensive helicopter analysis program CAMRAD to compute the horsepower required for forward flight and maneuver. The optimization algorithm consists of the general purpose optimization program CONMIN and approximate analyses. Sensitivity analyses consisting of derivatives of the objective function and constraints are carried out by forward finite differences. The procedure is applied to a test problem which is an analytical model of a wind tunnel model of a utility rotor blade.

  7. Further development of the swinging-blade Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoss, T. K.; Najjar, Y. S. H.

    Savonius rotor performance is improved by allowing both downwind and upwind rotor blades to swing back through an optimum angle. This will minimize the drag on the upwind blade and maximize the drag on the down-wind blade. A combination of 50 degrees upwind blade swing angle and 13.5 degrees downwind blade swing angle have been found experimentally to be the optimum swing angles that increased the rotor maximum power coefficient to about 23.5 percent compared with 18 percent with optimum upwind blade swing alone.

  8. Estimation of blade airloads from rotor blade bending moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the estimation of blade airloads, based on the measurements of flap bending moments. In this procedure, the blade rotation in vacuum modes is calculated, and the airloads are expressed as an algebraic sum of the mode shapes, modal amplitudes, mass distribution, and frequency properties. The method was validated by comparing the calculated airload distribution with the original wind tunnel measurements which were made using ten modes and twenty measurement stations. Good agreement between the predicted and the measured airloads was found up to 0.90 R, but the agreement degraded towards the blade tip. The method is shown to be quite robust to the type of experimental problems that could be expected to occur in the testing of full-scale and model-scale rotors.

  9. Tip cap for a rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofel, W. K.; Tuley, E. N.; Gay, C. H., Jr.; Troeger, R. E.; Sterman, A. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A replaceable tip cap for attachment to the end of a rotor blade is described. The tip cap includes a plurality of walls defining a compartment which, if desired, can be divided into a plurality of subcompartments. The tip cap can include inlet and outlet holes in walls thereof to permit fluid communication of a cooling fluid there through. Abrasive material can be attached with the radially outer wall of the tip cap.

  10. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2014-09-23

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is described. The adaptor assembly includes a turbine blade having a blade root and an adaptor body having an adaptor root. The adaptor body defines a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root of the turbine blade such that the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are adjacent to one another when the blade root of the turbine blade is positioned within the slot. Both the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are configured to be received within the root slot of the rotor disk.

  11. Methods and apparatus for rotor blade ice detection

    SciTech Connect

    LeMieux, David Lawrence

    2006-08-08

    A method for detecting ice on a wind turbine having a rotor and one or more rotor blades each having blade roots includes monitoring meteorological conditions relating to icing conditions and monitoring one or more physical characteristics of the wind turbine in operation that vary in accordance with at least one of the mass of the one or more rotor blades or a mass imbalance between the rotor blades. The method also includes using the one or more monitored physical characteristics to determine whether a blade mass anomaly exists, determining whether the monitored meteorological conditions are consistent with blade icing; and signaling an icing-related blade mass anomaly when a blade mass anomaly is determined to exist and the monitored meteorological conditions are determined to be consistent with icing.

  12. Vibration analysis of rotor blades with pendulum absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Hammond, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of rotor blades with spherical pendulum absorbers is presented. Linearized equations of motion for small oscillations about the steady-state deflection of a spherical pendulum on elastic rotor blades undergoing coupled flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsional vibrations are obtained. A transmission matrix formulation is given to determine the natural vibrational characteristics of rotor blades with spherical or simple flapping pendulum absorbers. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of a hingeless rotor blade with a spherical pendulum are computed.

  13. Psychoacoustic Testing of Modulated Blade Spacing for Main Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan; Booth, Earl R., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Psychoacoustic testing of simulated helicopter main rotor noise is described, and the subjective results are presented. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the potential acoustic benefits of main rotors with modulated (uneven) blade spacing. Sound simulations were prepared for six main rotor configurations. A baseline 4-blade main rotor with regular blade spacing was based on the Bell Model 427 helicopter. A 5-blade main rotor with regular spacing was designed to approximate the performance of the 427, but at reduced tipspeed. Four modulated rotors - one with "optimum" spacing and three alternate configurations - were derived from the 5 bladed regular spacing rotor. The sounds were played to 2 subjects at a time, with care being taken in the speaker selection and placement to ensure that the sounds were identical for each subject. A total of 40 subjects participated. For each rotor configuration, the listeners were asked to evaluate the sounds in terms of noisiness. The test results indicate little to no "annoyance" benefit for the modulated blade spacing. In general, the subjects preferred the sound of the 5-blade regular spaced rotor over any of the modulated ones. A conclusion is that modulated blade spacing is not a promising design feature to reduce the annoyance for helicopter main rotors.

  14. Tower and rotor blade vibration test results for a 100-kilowatt wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Shapton, W. R.; Brown, D.

    1976-01-01

    The predominant natural frequencies and mode shapes for the tower and the rotor blades of the ERDA-NASA 100-kW wind turbine were determined. The tests on the tower and the blades were conducted both before and after the rotor blades and the rotating machinery were installed on top of the tower. The tower and each blade were instrumented with an accelerometer and impacted by an instrumented mass. The tower and blade structure was analyzed by means of NASTRAN, and computed values agree with the test data.

  15. Development of an active twist rotor blade with distributed actuation and orthotropic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierach, Peter; Riemenschneider, Johannes; Keye, Stefan

    2005-05-01

    Individual blade control (IBC) as well as higher harmonic control (HHC) for helicopter rotors promises to be a method to increase flight performance and to reduce vibration and noise. For those controls, an additional twist actuation of the rotor blade is needed. The developed concept comprises the implementation of distributed piezoelectric actuation into the rotor blade skin. In order to maximize the twist within given constraints, as torsional rigidity and given actuator design, the concept takes advantage of an orthotropic rotor blade skin. That way, a combination of shear actuation with orthotropic coupling generates more twist than each one of these effects alone. Previous approaches with distributed actuation used actuators operating in +/-45° direction with quasi-isotropic composites. A FE-Model of the blade was developed and validated using a simplified demonstrator. The objective of this study was to identify the effects of various geometric and material parameters to optimize the active twist performance of the blades. The whole development was embedded in an iterative process followed by an objective assessment. For this purpose a detailed structural model on the basis of the BO105 model rotor blade was developed, to predict the performance with respect to rotor dynamics, stability, aerodynamics and acoustics. Rotor dynamic simulations provided an initial overview of the active twist rotor performance. In comparison to the BO105 baseline rotor a noise reduction of 3 dB was predicted for an active twist of 0.8° at the blade tip. Additionally, a power reduction of 2.3% at 87m/s based on a 2.5 to BO105 was computed. A demonstrator blade with a rotor radius of 2m has been designed and manufactured. This blade will be tested to prove, that the calculated maximum twist can also be achieved under centrifugal loads.

  16. Tip cap for a turbine rotor blade

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2014-03-25

    A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, and a tip cap that includes a row of lugs extending from a bottom side that form dovetail grooves that engage with similar shaped lugs and grooves on a tip end of the spar to secure the tip cap to the spar against radial displacement. The lug on the trailing edge end of the tip cap is aligned perpendicular to a chordwise line of the blade in the trailing edge region in order to minimize stress due to the lugs wanting to bend under high centrifugal loads. A two piece tip cap with lugs at different angles will reduce the bending stress even more.

  17. Whirl speeds of mistuned bladed rotors supported by isotropic stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Taek

    2015-11-01

    As an initial step toward understanding the fully coupled dynamics of mistuned bladed disk-shaft systems, this paper investigates the frequency characteristics of natural whirl speeds associated with the in-plain vibration of a rotating mistuned bladed disk mounted on an isotropic support. Through complex multi-blade coordinate transformation and modulation, a simplistic analysis model describing the essential in-plain whirling behavior of mistuned bladed rotor is derived in a typical form of linear differential equations with time-constant coefficients. By applying ordinary eigenvalue analysis for linear time-invariant systems, the whirl speeds of mistuned bladed rotor are examined for cases of weak and strong inter-blade coupling conditions. The mistuning effect on the whirl speeds of the bladed rotor is then explained by classifying the whirling modes into three types according to their cause of manifestation and the frequency relationship: namely, original, coupled multi-blade, and conjugate whirling modes.

  18. Composite rotor blades for large wind energy installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussmann, A.; Molly, J.; Muser, D.

    1980-04-01

    The design of large wind power systems in Germany is reviewed with attention given to elaboration of the total wind energy system, aerodynamic design of the rotor blade, and wind loading effects. Particular consideration is given to the development of composite glass fiber/plastic or carbon fiber/plastic rotor blades for such installations.

  19. Composite rotor blades for large wind energy installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmann, A.; Molly, J.; Muser, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of large wind power systems in Germany is reviewed with attention given to elaboration of the total wind energy system, aerodynamic design of the rotor blade, and wind loading effects. Particular consideration is given to the development of composite glass fiber/plastic or carbon fiber/plastic rotor blades for such installations.

  20. Design of helicopter rotor blades for optimum dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ko, T.; Korn, A.; Rossow, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The mass and stiffness distributions for helicopter rotor blades are tailored in such a way to give a predetermined placement of blade natural frequencies. The optimal design is pursued with respect of minimum weight, sufficient inertia, and reasonable dynamic characteristics. Finite element techniques are used as a tool. Rotor types include hingeless, articulated, and teetering.

  1. Blade-Pitch Control for Quieting Tilt-Rotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betzina, Mark D.; Nguyen, Khanh Q.

    2004-01-01

    A method of reducing the noise generated by a tilt-rotor aircraft during descent involves active control of the blade pitch of the rotors. This method is related to prior such noise-reduction methods, of a type denoted generally as higher-harmonic control (HHC), in which the blade pitch is made to oscillate at a harmonic of the frequency of rotation of the rotor. A tilt-rotor aircraft is so named because mounted at its wing tips are motors that can be pivoted to enable the aircraft to take off and land like a helicopter or to fly like a propeller airplane. When the aircraft is operating in its helicopter mode, the rotors generate more thrust per unit rotor-disk area than helicopter rotors do, thus producing more blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. BVI is a major source of noise produced by helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft during descent: When a rotor descends into its own wake, the interaction of each blade with the blade-tip vortices generated previously gives rise to large air-pressure fluctuations. These pressure fluctuations radiate as distinct, impulsive noise. In general, the pitch angle of the rotor blades of a tilt-rotor aircraft is controlled by use of a swash plate connected to the rotor blades by pitch links. In both prior HHC methods and the present method, HHC control signals are fed as input to swash-plate control actuators, causing the rotor-blade pitch to oscillate. The amplitude, frequency, and phase of the control signal can be chosen to minimize BVI noise.

  2. Comparison of model helicopter rotor primary and secondary blade/vortex interaction blade slap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, J. E., Jr.; Leighton, K. P.

    1984-05-01

    A study of the relative importance of blade/vortex interactions which occur on the retreating side of a model helicopter rotor disk is described. Some of the salient characteristics of this phenomenon are presented and discussed. It is shown that the resulting Secondary blade slap may be of equal or greater intensity than the advancing side (Primary) blade slap. Instrumented model helicopter rotor data is presented which reveals the nature of the retreating blade/vortex interaction. The importance of Secondary blade slap as it applies to predictive techniques or approaches is discussed. When Secondary blade slap occurs it acts to enlarge the window of operating conditions for which blade slap exists.

  3. A comparison of model helicopter rotor Primary and Secondary blade/vortex interaction blade slap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, J. E., Jr.; Leighton, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the relative importance of blade/vortex interactions which occur on the retreating side of a model helicopter rotor disk is described. Some of the salient characteristics of this phenomenon are presented and discussed. It is shown that the resulting Secondary blade slap may be of equal or greater intensity than the advancing side (Primary) blade slap. Instrumented model helicopter rotor data is presented which reveals the nature of the retreating blade/vortex interaction. The importance of Secondary blade slap as it applies to predictive techniques or approaches is discussed. When Secondary blade slap occurs it acts to enlarge the window of operating conditions for which blade slap exists.

  4. Feasibility study of pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Cheney, M.C.

    2000-02-28

    In work performed under subcontract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a preliminary design study and proof-of-concept field test were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors. A 400 kW turbine was selected for the design study, and a scaled 80 kW rotor was fabricated and tested as a demonstration of the concept. To examine the feasibility of pultruded blades, several issues were addressed, including power performance, tower strikes, yaw stability, stall flutter, fatigue, and rotor cost. Results showed that with proper design, rotors using pultruded blades demonstrate acceptable fatigue life and stable yaw behavior without tower strikes. Furthermore, blades using this technology may be manufactured for approximately half the cost of conventional blades. Field tests of the scaled rotor provided experimental data on power performance and loads while verifying stable yaw operation.

  5. Simulation of rotor blade element turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.; Duisenberg, Ken

    1995-01-01

    A piloted, motion-based simulation of Sikorsky's Black Hawk helicopter was used as a platform for the investigation of rotorcraft responses to vertical turbulence. By using an innovative temporal and geometrical distribution algorithm that preserved the statistical characteristics of the turbulence over the rotor disc, stochastic velocity components were applied at each of twenty blade-element stations. This model was implemented on NASA Ames' Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), and ten test pilots were used to establish that the model created realistic cues. The objectives of this research included the establishment of a simulation-technology basis for future investigation into real-time turbulence modeling. This goal was achieved; our extensive additions to the rotor model added less than a 10 percent computational overhead. Using a VAX 9000 computer the entire simulation required a cycle time of less than 12 msec. Pilot opinion during this simulation was generally quite favorable. For low speed flight the consensus was that SORBET (acronym for title) was better than the conventional body-fixed model, which was used for comparison purposes, and was determined to be too violent (like a washboard). For high speed flight the pilots could not identify differences between these models. These opinions were something of a surprise because only the vertical turbulence component on the rotor system was implemented in SORBET. Because of the finite-element distribution of the inputs, induced outputs were observed in all translational and rotational axes. Extensive post-simulation spectral analyses of the SORBET model suggest that proper rotorcraft turbulence modeling requires that vertical atmospheric disturbances not be superimposed at the vehicle center of gravity but, rather, be input into the rotor system, where the rotor-to-body transfer function severely attenuates high frequency rotorcraft responses.

  6. Predesign study for a modern 4-bladed rotor for RSRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of providing a modern four-bladed rotor for flight research testing on a rotor system aircraft was evaluated. The capabilities of a state of the art rotor system and the contributions of key design parameters to these capabilities were investigated. Three candidate rotors were examined: the UH-60A BLACK HAWK rotor with and without root extenders and the H-3 composite blade rotor. It was concluded that the technical/cost objectives could best be accomplished using the basic BLACK HAWK rotor (i.e. without root extenders). Further, the availability of three existing sets of blade tip of varying design, together with a demonstrated capability for altering airfoil geometry should provide early research information on important design variables at reduced cost.

  7. A study of autogiro rotor-blade oscillations in the plane of the rotor disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B

    1936-01-01

    An analysis of the factors governing the oscillation of an autogiro rotor blade in the plane of the rotor disk showed that the contribution of the air forces to the resultant motion was small and that the oscillation is essentially a direct effect of the rotor-blade flapping motion. A comparison of calculated oscillations with those measured in flight on three different rotors disclosed that the calculations gave satisfactory agreement with experiment. The calculated air forces on the rotor blade appear to be larger than the experimental ones, but this discrepancy can be attributed to the deficiencies in the strip analysis.

  8. Effect of Helicopter Blade Dynamics on Blade Aerodynamic and Structural Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffernan, Ruth M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of rotor blade dynamics on aerodynamic and structural loads is examined for a conventional, main- rotor helicopter using both a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis (CAMRAD) and night test data. The impact of blade dynamics on blade section lift-coefficient time histories is studied by comparing predictions from both a rigid blade analysis and an elastic blade analysis with helicopter flight test data. The elastic blade analysis better predicts high-frequency behavior of section lift. In addition, components of the blade angle of attack, such as elastic blade twist, blade nap rate, blade slope velocity, and inflow, are examined as a function of blade mode. Elastic blade motion affects the blade angle of attack by a few tenths of a degree, and up to the sixth rotor harmonic. A similar study of the influence of blade dynamics on bending and torsion moments was also conducted. The modal analysis of the predicted blade structural loads suggested that five elastic bending deg of freedom (four flap and one lag) and three elastic torsion deg of freedom contributed to calculations of the blade structural loads. However, when structural bending load predictions from several elastic blade analyses were compared with flight test data, an elastic blade model consisting of only three elastic bending modes (first and second flap, and first lag), and two elastic torsion modes was found to be sufficient for maximum correlation.

  9. Minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades with frequency constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Walsh, Joanne L.

    1989-01-01

    The minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades subject to constraints on fundamental coupled flap-lag natural frequencies has been studied in this paper. A constraint has also been imposed on the minimum value of the blade autorotational inertia to ensure that the blade has sufficient inertia to autorotate in case of an engine failure. The program CAMRAD has been used for the blade modal analysis and the program CONMIN has been used for the optimization. In addition, a linear approximation analysis involving Taylor series expansion has been used to reduce the analysis effort. The procedure contains a sensitivity analysis which consists of analytical derivatives of the objective function and the autorotational inertia constraint and central finite difference derivatives of the frequency constraints. Optimum designs have been obtained for blades in vacuum with both rectangular and tapered box beam structures. Design variables include taper ratio, nonstructural segment weights and box beam dimensions. The paper shows that even when starting with an acceptable baseline design, a significant amount of weight reduction is possible while satisfying all the constraints for blades with rectangular and tapered box beams.

  10. The effect of helicopter main rotor blade phasing and spacing on performance, blade loads, and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangwani, S. T.

    1976-01-01

    The performance, blade loads, and acoustic characteristics of a variable geometry rotor (VGR) system in forward flight and in a pullup maneuver were determined by the use of existing analytical programs. The investigation considered the independent effects of vertical separation of two three-bladed rotor systems as well as the effects of azimuthal spacing between the blades of the two rotors. The computations were done to determine the effects of these parameters on the performance, blade loads, and acoustic characteristics at two advance ratios in steady-state level flight and for two different g pullups at one advance ratio. To evaluate the potential benefits of the VGR concept in forward flight and pullup maneuvers, the results were compared as to performance, oscillatory blade loadings, vibratory forces transmitted to the fixed fuselage, and the rotor noise characteristics of the various VGR configurations with those of the conventional six-bladed rotor system.

  11. Composite rotor blades for an experimental 300 kW wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Cools, I.J.J.

    1981-05-01

    A description is given of the structural design and manufacture of the blades for an experimental wind turbine with a rotor diameter of 25 meters. Carbon and Aramid fiber composite materials have been applied on a large scale. Because of the experimental character of the turbine, the blade structure was designed to be manufactured with the aid of relatively simple tooling.

  12. Composite rotor blades for an experimental 300 kW wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cools, I. J. J.

    1981-06-01

    A description is given of the structural design and manufacture of the blades for an experimental wind turbine with a rotor diameter of 25 meters. Carbon and Aramid fiber composite materials have been applied on a large scale. Because of the experimental character of the turbine, the blade structure was designed to be manufactured with the aid of relatively simple tooling.

  13. Integral Twist Actuation of Helicopter Rotor Blades for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, SangJoon; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2001-01-01

    Active integral twist control for vibration reduction of helicopter rotors during forward flight is investigated. The twist deformation is obtained using embedded anisotropic piezocomposite actuators. An analytical framework is developed to examine integrally-twisted blades and their aeroelastic response during different flight conditions: frequency domain analysis for hover, and time domain analysis for forward flight. Both stem from the same three-dimensional electroelastic beam formulation with geometrical-exactness, and axe coupled with a finite-state dynamic inflow aerodynamics model. A prototype Active Twist Rotor blade was designed with this framework using Active Fiber Composites as the actuator. The ATR prototype blade was successfully tested under non-rotating conditions. Hover testing was conducted to evaluate structural integrity and dynamic response. In both conditions, a very good correlation was obtained against the analysis. Finally, a four-bladed ATR system is built and tested to demonstrate its concept in forward flight. This experiment was conducted at NASA Langley Tansonic Dynamics Tunnel and represents the first-of-a-kind Mach-scaled fully-active-twist rotor system to undergo forward flight test. In parallel, the impact upon the fixed- and rotating-system loads is estimated by the analysis. While discrepancies are found in the amplitude of the loads under actuation, the predicted trend of load variation with respect to its control phase correlates well. It was also shown, both experimentally and numerically, that the ATR blade design has the potential for hub vibratory load reduction of up to 90% using individual blade control actuation. Using the numerical framework, system identification is performed to estimate the harmonic transfer functions. The linear time-periodic system can be represented by a linear time-invariant system under the three modes of blade actuation: collective, longitudinal cyclic, and lateral cyclic. A vibration

  14. Stiffness Characteristics of Composite Rotor Blades With Elastic Couplings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piatak, David J.; Nixon, Mark W.; Kosmatka, John B.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies on rotor aeroelastic response and stability have shown the beneficial effects of incorporating elastic couplings in composite rotor blades. However, none of these studies have clearly identified elastic coupling limits and the effects of elastic couplings on classical beam stiffnesses of representative rotor blades. Knowledge of these limits and effects would greatly enhance future aeroelastic studies involving composite rotor blades. The present study addresses these voids and provides a preliminary design database for investigators who may wish to study the effects of elastic couplings on representative blade designs. The results of the present study should provide a basis for estimating the potential benefits associated with incorporating elastic couplings without the need for first designing a blade cross section and then performing a cross-section analysis to obtain the required beam section properties as is customary in the usual one-dimensional beam-type approach.

  15. 14 CFR 27.547 - Main rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main rotor structure. 27.547 Section 27.547... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Main Component Requirements § 27.547 Main rotor structure. (a) Each main rotor assembly (including rotor hubs and blades) must be designed as prescribed...

  16. Modal analysis of UH-60A instrumented rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamade, Karen S.; Kufeld, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of instrumented and production UH-60A Black Hawk main rotor blades were measured, and the results were validated with NASTRAN finite element models. The blades tested included pressure and strain-gage instrumented blades, which are part of the NASA Airloads Flight Research Phase of the Modern Technology Rotor Program. The dynamic similarity of the blades was required for accurate data collection in this program. Therefore, a nonrotating blade modal analysis was performed on the first 10 free-free modes to measure blade similarities. The results showed small differences between the modal frequencies of instrumented and production blades and a close correlation with the NASTRAN models. This type of modal testing and analysis is recommended as a standard procedure for future instrumented blade flight testing.

  17. Modal analysis of UH 60A instrumented rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamade, Karen S.; Kufeld, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of instrumented and production UH-60A Black Hawk main rotor blades were measured, and the results were validated with NASTRAN finite element models. The blades tested included pressure and strain-gage instrumented blades which are part of NASA's Airloads Flight Research Phase of the Modern Technology Rotor Program. The dynamic similarity of the blades was required for accurate data collection in this program. Therefore, a nonrotating blade modal analysis was performed on the first 10 free-free modes to measure blade similarities. The results showed small differences between the modal frequencies of instrumented and production blades and a close correlation with the NASTRAN models. This type of modal testing and analysis is recommended as a standard procedure for future instrumented blade flight testing.

  18. Investigation of Maximum Blade Loading Capability of Lift-Offset Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Maximum blade loading capability of a coaxial, lift-offset rotor is investigated using a rotorcraft configuration designed in the context of short-haul, medium-size civil and military missions. The aircraft was sized for a 6600-lb payload and a range of 300 nm. The rotor planform and twist were optimized for hover and cruise performance. For the present rotor performance calculations, the collective pitch angle is progressively increased up to and through stall with the shaft angle set to zero. The effects of lift offset on rotor lift, power, controls, and blade airloads and structural loads are examined. The maximum lift capability of the coaxial rotor increases as lift offset increases and extends well beyond the McHugh lift boundary as the lift potential of the advancing blades are fully realized. A parametric study is conducted to examine the differences between the present coaxial rotor and the McHugh rotor in terms of maximum lift capabilities and to identify important design parameters that define the maximum lift capability of the rotor. The effects of lift offset on rotor blade airloads and structural loads are also investigated. Flap bending moment increases substantially as lift offset increases to carry the hub roll moment even at low collective values. The magnitude of flap bending moment is dictated by the lift-offset value (hub roll moment) but is less sensitive to collective and speed.

  19. Analysis and Tests of Pultruded Blades for Wind Turbine Rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, M. C.; Olsen, T.; Quandt, G.; Archidiacono, P.

    1999-07-19

    PS Enterprises, Inc. investigated a flexible, downwind, free-yaw, five-blade rotor system employing pultruded blades. A rotor was designed, manufactured and tested in the field. A preliminary design study and proof of concept test were conducted to assess the feasibility of using pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors. A 400 kW turbine was selected for the design study and a scaled 80 kW rotor was fabricated and field tested as a demonstration of the concept. The design studies continued to support the premise that pultruded blades offer the potential for significant reductions in rotor weight and cost. The field test provided experimental performance and loads data that compared well with predictions using the FLEXDYNE aeroelastic analysis. The field test also demonstrated stable yaw behavior and the absence of stall flutter over the wind conditions tested. During the final year of the contract, several studies were conducted by a number of independent consultants to address specific technical issues related to pultruded blades that could impact the commercial viability of turbines using this technology. The issues included performance, tower strikes, yaw stability, stall flutter, fatigue, and costs. While the performance of straight pultruded blades was projected to suffer a penalty of about 13% over fully twisted and tapered blades, the study showed that an aerodynamic fairing over the inner 40% could recover 85% of that loss while still keeping the blade cost well below that of conventional blades. Other results of the study showed that with proper design, rotors using pultruded blades could operate without aeroelastic problems, have acceptable fatigue life, and cost less than half that of rotors employing conventionally manufactured blades.

  20. Anisotropic piezoelectric twist actuation of helicopter rotor blades: Aeroelastic analysis and design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, William Keats

    1997-12-01

    An aeroelastic model suitable for control law and preliminary structural design of composite helicopter rotor blades incorporating embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuator laminae is developed. The aeroelasticity model consists of a linear, nonuniform beam representation of the blade structure, including linear piezoelectric actuation terms, coupled with a nonlinear, finite-state unsteady aerodynamics model. A Galerkin procedure and numerical integration in the time domain are used to obtain a soluti An aeroelastic model suitable for control law and preliminary structural design of composite helicopter rotor blades incorporating embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuator laminae is developed. The aeroelasticity model consists of a linear, nonuniform beam representation of the blade structure, including linear piezoelectric actuation terms, coupled with a nonlinear, finite-state unsteady aerodynamics model. A Galerkin procedure and numerical integration in the time domain are used to obtain amited additional piezoelectric material mass, it is shown that blade twist actuation approaches which exploit in-plane piezoelectric free-stain anisotropies are capable of producing amplitudes of oscillatory blade twisting sufficient for rotor vibration reduction applications. The second study examines the effectiveness of using embedded piezoelectric actuator laminae to alleviate vibratory loads due to retreating blade stall. A 10 to 15 percent improvement in dynamic stall limited forward flight speed, and a 5 percent improvement in stall limited rotor thrust were numerically demonstrated for the active twist rotor blade relative to a conventional blade design. The active twist blades are also demonstrated to be more susceptible than the conventional blades to dynamic stall induced vibratory loads when not operating with twist actuation. This is the result of designing the active twist blades with low torsional stiffness in order to maximize piezoelectric twist authority

  1. Growian rotor blades: Production development, construction and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiele, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Development and construction of three 50 m rotor blades for a 3 MW wind turbine are described. A hybrid concept was chosen, i.e., a load carrying inflexible steel spar and a glass fiber reinforced plastic skin. A test blade was constructed and static loading tests, dynamic vibration tests and fatigue tests on critical welds as well as at the connection between spar and blade skin were performed. All test results show good accordance with calculated values, and were taken into consideration during the construction of two rotor blades.

  2. Flap/Lag/Torsion Dynamics of a Uniform, Cantilever Rotor Blade in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic stability of the flap/lag/torsion motion of a uniform, cantilever rotor blade in hover is calculated. The influence of blade collective pitch, lag frequency, torsional flexibility, structural coupling, and precone angle on the stability is examined. Good agreement is found with the results of an independent analytical investigation.

  3. A Novel Method for Reducing Rotor Blade-Vortex Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glinka, A. T.

    2000-01-01

    One of the major hindrances to expansion of the rotorcraft market is the high-amplitude noise they produce, especially during low-speed descent, where blade-vortex interactions frequently occur. In an attempt to reduce the noise levels caused by blade-vortex interactions, the flip-tip rotor blade concept was devised. The flip-tip rotor increases the miss distance between the shed vortices and the rotor blades, reducing BVI noise. The distance is increased by rotating an outboard portion of the rotor tip either up or down depending on the flight condition. The proposed plan for the grant consisted of a computational simulation of the rotor aerodynamics and its wake geometry to determine the effectiveness of the concept, coupled with a series of wind tunnel experiments exploring the value of the device and validating the computer model. The computational model did in fact show that the miss distance could be increased, giving a measure of the effectiveness of the flip-tip rotor. However, the wind experiments were not able to be conducted. Increased outside demand for the 7'x lO' wind tunnel at NASA Ames and low priority at Ames for this project forced numerous postponements of the tests, eventually pushing the tests beyond the life of the grant. A design for the rotor blades to be tested in the wind tunnel was completed and an analysis of the strength of the model blades based on predicted loads, including dynamic forces, was done.

  4. CFD analysis of rotating two-bladed flatback wind turbine rotor.

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    The effects of modifying the inboard portion of the NREL Phase VI rotor using a thickened, flatback version of the S809 design airfoil are studied using a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A motivation for using such a thicker airfoil design coupled with a blunt trailing edge is to alleviate structural constraints while reducing blade weight and maintaining the power performance of the rotor. The calculated results for the baseline Phase VI rotor are benchmarked against wind tunnel results obtained at 10, 7, and 5 meters per second. The calculated results for the modified rotor are compared against those of the baseline rotor. The results of this study demonstrate that a thick, flatback blade profile is viable as a bridge to connect structural requirements with aerodynamic performance in designing future wind turbine rotors.

  5. Experimental study of complex flow and turbulence structure around a turbomachine rotor blade operating behind a row of Inlet Guide Vanes (IGVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soranna, Francesco

    The flow and turbulence around a rotor blade operating downstream of a row of Inlet Guide Vanes (IGV) are investigated experimentally in a refractive index matched turbomachinery facility that provides unobstructed view of the entire flow field. High resolution 2D and Stereoscopic PIV measurements are performed both at midspan and in the tip region of the rotor blade, focusing on effects of wake-blade, wake-boundary-layer and wake-wake interactions. We first examine the modification to the shape of an IGV-wake as well as to the spatial distribution of turbulence within it as the wake propagates along the rotor blade. Due to the spatially non-uniform velocity distribution, the IGV wake deforms through the rotor passage, expanding near the leading edge and shrinking near the trailing edge. The turbulence within this wake becomes spatially non-uniform and highly anisotropic as a result of interaction with the non-uniform strain rate field within the rotor passage. Several mechanisms, which are associated with rapid straining and highly non-uniform production rate (P), including negative production on the suction side of the blade, contribute to the observed trends. During IGV-wake impingement, the suction side boundary layer near the trailing edge becomes significantly thinner, with lower momentum thickness and more stable profile compared to other phases at the same location. Analysis of available terms in the integral momentum equation indicates that the phase-averaged unsteady term is the main contributor to the decrease in momentum thickness within the impinging wake. Thinning of the boundary/shear layer extends into the rotor near wake, making it narrower and increasing the phase averaged shear velocity gradients and associated production term just downstream of the trailing edge. Consequently, the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) increases causing as much as 75% phase-dependent variations in peak TKE magnitude. Further away from the blade, the rotor wake is bent

  6. Correlation of airloads on a two-bladed helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Francisco; Johnson, Wayne

    1991-01-01

    Airloads measured on a two-bladed helicopter rotor in flight, from the Tip Aerodynamic and Acoustic Test, are compared with calculations from a comprehensive helicopter analysis (CAMRAD/JA), and the pressures compared with calculations from a full-potential rotor code (FPR). The flight test results cover an advance ratio range from 0.19 to 0.38. The lowest speed case is characterized by the presence of significant blade-vortex interactions. Good correlation of peak-to-peak vortex-induced loads and the corresponding pressures is obtained. The results of the correlation for this two-bladed rotor are substantially similar to the results for three- and four-bladed rotors, concerning the tip vortex core size for best correlation, calculation of the peak-to-peak loads on the retreating side, and calculation of vortex-induced loads on inboard radial stations.

  7. Blade loss dynamics of a magnetically supported rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggiano, F.; Schweitzer, G.

    The equations for a rigid rotor in magnetic bearings are derived and examined for their response following a sudden unbalance created by a blade loss. The investigations concentrate on the maximum transient and steady-state response after unbalance. The analytical results are compared with experiments which were performed on a magnetic bearing test stand at our laboratory. A major result is that magnetic bearings are very well suited to cope with the loss of a rotor blade.

  8. Investigation of rotor blade roughness effects on turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, J. L.; Tabibzadeh, R.; Hudson, S. T.

    1992-01-01

    The cold air test program was completed on the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) HPFTP (High Pressure Fuel Turbopump) turbine with production nozzle vane rings and polished coated rotor blades with a smooth surface finish of 30 microinch (0.76 micrometer) RMS (Root Mean Square). The smooth blades were polished by an abrasive flow machining process. The test results were compared with the air test results from production rough coated rotor blades with a surface finish of up to 400 microinch (10.16 micrometer) RMS. Turbine efficiency was higher for the smooth blades over the entire range tested. Efficiency increased 2.1 percentage points at the SSME 104 percent RPL (Rated Power Level) condition. This efficiency improvement could reduce the SSME HPFTP turbine inlet temperature by 57 degrees Rankine (32 degrees Kelvin) increasing turbine durability. The turbine flow parameter increased and the mid-span outlet swirl angle became more axial with the smooth rotor blades.

  9. Thermographic inspection of a wind turbine rotor blade segment utilizing natural conditions as excitation source, Part I: Solar excitation for detecting deep structures in GFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worzewski, Tamara; Krankenhagen, Rainer; Doroshtnasir, Manoucher; Röllig, Mathias; Maierhofer, Christiane; Steinfurth, Henrik

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluates whether subsurface features in rotor blades, mainly made of Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastics (GFRP), can generally be detected with "solar thermography". First, the suitability of the sun is tested for acting as a heat source for applying active thermography on a 30 mm thick GFRP test specimen. Second, a defective rotor blade segment is inspected outdoors under ideal natural conditions using the sun as excitation source. Additionally, numerical FEM-simulations are performed and the comparability between experiment and simulation is evaluated for outdoor measurements.

  10. Dynamic analysis of pretwisted elastically-coupled rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Hinnant, Howard E.

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of using a one-dimensional analysis to predict frequencies of elastically-coupled highly-twisted rotor blades is addressed. Degrees of freedom associated with shear deformation are statically condensed from the formulation, so the analysis uses only those degrees of freedom associated with classical beam theory. The effects of cross section deformation (warping) are considered, and are shown to become significant for some types of elastic coupling. Improved results are demonstrated for highly-coupled blade structures through account of warping in a local cross section analysis, without explicit inclusion of these effects in the beam analysis. A convergence study is also provided which investigates the potential for improving efficiency of elastically-coupled beam analysis through implementation of a p-version beam finite element.

  11. Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-02-01

    Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

  12. Effect of helicopter blade dynamics on blade aerodynamic and structural loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffernan, Ruth M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of rotor blade dynamics on aerodynamic and structural loads is examined for a conventional, main-rotor helicopter using a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis (CAMRAD) and flight-test data. The impact of blade dynamics on blade section lift-coefficient time histories is studied by comparing predictions from a rigid-blade analysis and an elastic-blade analysis with helicopter flight test data. The elastic blade analysis better predicts high-frequency behavior of section lift. In addition, components of the blade angle of attack such as elastic blade twist, blade flap rate, blade slope velocity, and inflow are examined as a function of blade mode. Elastic blade motion changed blade angle of attack by a few tenths of a degree, and up to the sixth rotor harmonic. A similar study of the influence of blade dynamics on bending and torsion moments was also conducted. A correlation study comparing predictions from several elastic-blade analyses with flight-test data revealed that an elastic-blade model consisting of only three elastic bending modes (first and second flap and first lag), and two elastic torsion modes was sufficient for good correlation.

  13. A new dynamic model of rotor-blade systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Lu, Yang; Wu, Zhiyuan; Tai, Xingyu; Li, Hui; Wen, Bangchun

    2015-11-01

    A new dynamic model of rotor-blade systems is developed in this paper considering the lateral and torsional deformations of the shaft, gyroscopic effects of the rotor which consists of shaft and disk, and the centrifugal stiffening, spin softening and Coriolis force of the blades. In this model, the rotating flexible blades are represented by Timoshenko beams. The shaft and rigid disk are described by multiple lumped mass points (LMPs), and these points are connected by massless springs which have both lateral and torsional stiffness. LMPs are represented by the corresponding masses and mass moments of inertia in lateral and rotational directions, where each point has five degrees of freedom (dofs) excluding axial dof. Equations of motion of the rotor-blade system are derived using Hamilton's principle in conjunction with the assumed modes method to describe blade deformation. The proposed model is compared with both finite element (FE) model and real experiments. The proposed model is first validated by comparing the model natural frequencies and vibration responses with those obtained from an FE model. A further verification of the model is then performed by comparing the model natural frequencies at zero rotational speed with those obtained from experimental studies. The results shown a good agreement between the model predicted system characteristics and those obtained from the FE model and experimental tests. Moreover, the following interesting phenomena have been revealed from the new model based analysis: The torsional natural frequency of the system decreases with the increase of rotational speed, and the frequency veering phenomenon has been observed at high rotational speed; The complicated coupling modes, such as the blade-blade coupling mode (BB), the coupling mode between the rotor lateral vibration and blade bending (RBL), and the coupling mode between the rotor torsional vibration and blade bending (RBT), have also been observed when the number of

  14. Early operation experience on the ERDA/NASA 100 kW wind turbine. [rotor blade loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Linscott, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) wind energy program, NASA Lewis Research Center is testing an experimental 100-kW wind turbine. Rotor blade and drive shaft loads and tower deflection were measured during operation of the wind turbine at rated rpm. The blade loads measured are higher than anticipated. Preliminary results indicate that air flow blockage by the tower structure probably caused the high rotor blade bending moments.

  15. Shaft-Torsion and Blade-Bending Coupling Vibrations in a Rotor System with Grouped Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shyh-Chin; Chiu, Yi-Jui

    This paper discussed the shaft-torsion and blade-bending coupling vibrations of a rotor system, in which the blades were grouped with lacing wires. Massless tension springs were used for modeling the lacing wires. An energy principle in conjunction with the assumed modes method was employed to yield the discrete equations of motion. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the system were solved for five- and six-blade cases as examples. Numerical results showed how the natural frequencies varied with the wire stiffness, connecting position, and the rotational speed. The diagrams of the coupling mode shapes and FRF's were drawn. From the results, it was found that lacing wire did not affect the SB (shaft-blades) coupling modes, but the BB (inter-blades) modes were indeed affected by the lacing wire. At moderate range of wire stiffness, the repeated BB modes split into more distinct modes. As expected, increasing the wire stiffness or connecting near outer edge would strengthen the system structure and increasing the natural frequencies of BB modes.

  16. Prediction of stochastic blade loads for three-bladed, rigid-hub rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. D.; Weber, Tim L.; Thresher, R. W.; Butterfield, C. P.

    1989-11-01

    Accurately predicting wind turbine blade loads and response is important for the design of future wind turbines. The need to include turbulent wind inputs in structural dynamics models is widely recognized. The Force and Loads Analysis Program (FLAP) code is used to predict turbulence induced bending moments for the SERI Combined Experiment rotor blade and the Howden 330 kW blade. FLAP code predictions is compared to the power spectra of measured blade bending moments. Two methods are used to generate turbulent wind inputs to FLAP: a theoretical simulation: the Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) simulation theory; and measured wind speed data taken from an array of anemometers upwind of the turbine. Turbulent wind speed time series are input to FLAP for both methods outlined above. Power spectra of predicted flap bending moments are compared to measured results for different wind conditions. Conclusions are also drawn as to the ability of the turbulence simulation models to provide accurate wind input to FLAP and to FLAP's ability to accurately simulate blade response to turbulence. Finally, suggestions are made as to needed improvements in the theoretical model.

  17. Prediction of stochastic blade loads for three-bladed, rigid-hub rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.D.; Weber, T.L.; Thresher, R.W.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1989-11-01

    Accurately predicting wind turbine blade loads and response is important for the design of future wind turbines. The need to include turbulent wind inputs in structural dynamics models is widely recognized. In this paper, the Force and Loads Analysis Program (FLAP) code will be used to predict turbulence-induced bending moments for the SERI Combined Experiment rotor blade and the Howden 330-kW blade. FLAP code predictions will be compared to the power spectra of measured blade-bending moments. Two methods will be used to generate turbulent wind inputs to FLAP: a theoretical simulation: the Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) simulation theory; and measured wind-speed data taken from an array of anemometers upwind of the turbine. Turbulent wind-speed time series are input to FLAP for both methods outlined above. Power spectra of predicted flap-bending moments are compared to measured results for different wind conditions. Conclusions are also drawn as to the ability of the turbulence simulation models to provide accurate wind input to FLAP and to FLAP's ability to accurately simulate blade response to turbulence. Finally, suggestions are made as to needed improvements in the theoretical model. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Finite element analysis for bearingless rotor blade aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivaneri, N. T.; Chopra, I.

    1982-01-01

    A conventional articulated rotor blade has mechanical flap and lag hinges, a lag damper, and a pitch bearing. In connection with an interest in designs of greater mechanical simplicity and increased maintainability, hingeless and bearingless rotors have been developed. A hingeless blade lacks the hinges and is cantilevered at the hub. It does have a pitch bearing for pitch control. A bearingless design eliminates the hinges and the pitch bearing as well. In the present investigation of bearingless rotor blade characteristics, finite element analysis has been successfully applied to determine the solutions of the nonlinear trim equations and the linearized flutter equations of multiple-load-path blades. The employed formulation is based on Hamilton's principle. The spatial dependence of the equations of motion is discretized by dividing the flexbeams, the torque tube, and the outboard into a number of elements.

  19. Measurements of wakes originated from 2-bladed and 3-bladed rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Lyu, Shao-Dong; Chen, Bo-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of wakes originated from 2-bladed and 3-bladed rotors were carried out using a hot-wire probe system in an open jet wind tunnel. Hot-wire anemometry was adopted to characterize the spanwise profiles of mean wind speed, turbulence intensity and momentum flux for downwind locations at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 rotor diameters. The results showed that the 2-bladed rotor spun faster than the 3-bladed one, where the ratio of the two blade angular velocities was 1.065:1 under the same inflow condition with a uniform distribution of 5.4 m/s flow velocity. The turbulence flow statistics of the rotor wakes showed that the wake originated from the 3-bladed rotor has larger velocity deficit, streamwise turbulence intensity, momentum flux magnitude, but smaller spanwise turbulence intensity. The velocity spectrum showed peaks associated with the presence of the blade-induced tip vortices in the near wake region (approximately within 3 rotor diameters).

  20. Effects of blade-to-blade dissimilarities on rotor-body lead-lag dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Small blade-to-blade property differences are investigated to determine their effects on the behavior of a simple rotor-body system. An analytical approach is used which emphasizes the significance of these effects from the experimental point of view. It is found that the primary effect of blade-to-blade dissimilarities is the appearance of additional peaks in the frequency spectrum which are separated from the convention response modes by multiples of the rotor speed. These additional responses are potential experimental problems because when they occur near a mode of interest they act as contaminant frequencies which can make damping measurements difficult. The effects of increased rotor-body coupling and a rotor shaft degree of freedom act to improve the situation by altering the frequency separation of the modes.

  1. Effects of blade-to-blade dissimilarities on rotor-body lead-lag dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Small blade-to-blade property differences are investigated to determine their effects on the behavior of a simple rotor-body system. An analytical approach is used which emphasizes the significance of these effects from the experimental point of view. It is found that the primary effect of blade-to-blade dissimilarities is the appearance of additional peaks in the frequency spectrum which are separated from the conventional response modes by multiples of the rotor speed. These additional responses are potential experimental problems because when they occur near a mode of interest they act as contaminant frequencies which can make damping measurements difficult. The effects of increased rotor-body coupling and a rotor shaft degree of freedom act to improve the situation by altering the frequency separation of the modes.

  2. Effects of Blade to Blade Dissimilarities on Rotor Body Lead Lag Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNulty, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Small blade-to-blade property differences are investigated to determine how they affect the behavior of a simple rotor-body system. An analytical approach is used which emphasizes the significance of these effects from the experimental point of view. It is found that the primary effect of blade-to-blade dissimilarities is the appearance of additional peaks in the frequency spectrum which are separated from the conventional response peaks by multiples of the rotor speed. These additional responses are potential experimental problems because when they occur near a mode of interest they act as contaminant frequencies which can make damping measurements difficult. Increased rotor-body coupling and a rotor shaft degree of freedom act to improve the situation by altering the frequency separation of the modes.

  3. Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry: Online blade damage identification on a multi-blade test rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberholster, A. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometry enables the telemetry-free measurement of online turbomachinery blade vibration. Specifically, the Eulerian or fixed reference frame implementation of laser vibrometry provides a practical solution to the condition monitoring of rotating blades. The short data samples that are characteristic of this measurement approach do however negate the use of traditional frequency domain signal processing techniques. It is therefore necessary to employ techniques such as time domain analysis and non-harmonic Fourier analysis to obtain useful information from the blade vibration signatures. The latter analysis technique allows the calculation of phase angle trends which can be used as indicators of blade health deterioration, as has been shown in previous work for a single-blade rotor. This article presents the results from tests conducted on a five-blade axial-flow test rotor at different rotor speeds and measurement positions. With the aid of artificial neural networks, it is demonstrated that the parameters obtained from non-harmonic Fourier analysis and time domain signal processing on Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry signals can successfully be used to identify and quantify blade damage from among healthy blades. It is also shown that the natural frequencies of individual blades can be approximated from the Eulerian signatures recorded during rotor run-up and run-down.

  4. A rotor technology assessment of the advancing blade concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleasants, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    A rotor technology assessment of the Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) was conducted in support of a preliminary design study. The analytical methodology modifications and inputs, the correlation, and the results of the assessment are documented. The primary emphasis was on the high-speed forward flight performance of the rotor. The correlation data base included both the wind tunnel and the flight test results. An advanced ABC rotor design was examined; the suitability of the ABC for a particular mission was not considered. The objective of this technology assessment was to provide estimates of the performance potential of an advanced ABC rotor designed for high speed forward flight.

  5. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1987-01-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from an airfoil of infinite span chopping through a skewed line vortex. To analyze the interactions between helicopter tail rotor and main rotor tip vortices, we developed a two-step approach: (1) the main rotor tip vortex system is obtained through a free wake geometry calculation of the main rotor using CAMRAD code; (2) acoustic analysis takes the results from the aerodynamic interaction analysis and calculates the farfield pressure signatures for the interactions. It is found that under a wide range of helicopter flight conditions, acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly on the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors. fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly upon the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors.

  6. Three-dimensional viscous drag prediction for rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ching S.

    1989-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in rotor blade drag prediction involves the use of two-dimensional airfoil tables to calculate the drag force on the blade. One of the most serious problems with the current methods is that they cannot be used for airfoils that have yet to be tested. Most of the drag prediction methods also do not take the Reynolds number or the rotational effects of the blade into account, raising doubts about the accuracy of the results. These problems are addressed with the development of an analytical method which includes the shape of airfoil, the effects of Reynolds number, and the rotational motion of the blade.

  7. Preliminary Aerodynamic Investigation of Fan Rotor Blade Morphing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Various new technologies currently under development may enable controlled blade shape variability, or so-called blade morphing, to be practically employed in aircraft engine fans and compressors in the foreseeable future. The current study is a relatively brief, preliminary computational fluid dynamics investigation aimed at partially demonstrating and quantifying the aerodynamic potential of fan rotor blade morphing. The investigation is intended to provide information useful for near-term planning, as well as aerodynamic solution data sets that can be subsequently analyzed using advanced acoustic diagnostic tools, for the purpose of making fan noise comparisons. Two existing fan system models serve as baselines for the investigation: the Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan with a design tip speed of 806 ft/sec and a pressure ratio of 1.294, and the Source Diagnostic Test fan with a design tip speed of 1215 ft/sec and a pressure ratio of 1.470. Both are 22-in. sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle models that have undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The study, restricted to fan rotor blade morphing only, involves a fairly simple blade morphing technique. Specifically, spanwise-linear variations in rotor blade-section setting angle are applied to alter the blade shape; that is, the blade is linearly retwisted from hub to tip. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are made between morphed-blade and corresponding baseline configurations on the basis of equal fan system thrust, where rotor rotational speed for the morphed-blade fan is varied to change the thrust level for that configuration. The results of the investigation confirm that rotor blade morphing could be a useful technology, with the potential to enable significant improvements in fan aerodynamic performance. Even though the study is very limited in scope and confined to simple geometric perturbations of two existing fan

  8. An experimental investigation of the helicopter rotor blade element airloads on a model rotor in the blade stall regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. K., Jr.; Tompkins, J. E.; Bobo, C. J.; Child, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program was conducted on an eight foot diameter model rotor system to determine blade element airloads characteristics in the unstalled and stalled flight regimes. The fully articulated model rotor system utilized three blades with a Vertol 23010-1.58 airfoil section, the blades being 1/7.5 scale models of the Ch-47C rotor blades. Instrumentation was incorporated at the blade 75% radial station to measure pressure and skin friction distributions, surface streamline directions and local angle of attack. The test program was conducted in three phases; non-rotating, hover and forward flight at advance ratios of 0.15, 0.35 and 0.60. Test data were analyzed with respect to providing insight to the mechanisms affecting blade stall, particularly retreating blade stall during forward flight conditions. From such data, an assessment was made as to the applicability of current theoretical analyses used for the prediction of blade element airloads in the stall regime.

  9. Advanced Technology Blade testing on the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, Brent

    1992-01-01

    The XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft has just completed the first series of flight tests with the Advanced Technology Blade (ATB) rotor system. The ATB are designed specifically for flight research and provide the ability to alter blade sweep and tip shape. A number of problems were encountered from first installation through envelope expansion to airplane mode flight that required innovative solutions to establish a suitable flight envelope. Prior to operation, the blade retention hardware had to be requalified to a higher rated centrifugal load, because the blade weight was higher than expected. Early flights in the helicopter mode revealed unacceptably high vibratory control system loads which required a temporary modification of the rotor controls to achieve higher speed flight and conversion to airplane mode. The airspeed in airplane mode was limited, however, because of large static control loads. Furthermore, analyses based on refined ATB blade mass and inertia properties indicated a previously unknown high-speed blade mode instability, also requiring airplane-mode maximum airspeed to be restricted. Most recently, a structural failure of an ATB cuff (root fairing) assembly retention structure required a redesign of the assembly. All problems have been addressed and satisfactory solutions have been found to allow continued productive flight research of the emerging tilt rotor concept.

  10. Lift capability prediction for helicopter rotor blade-numerical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ; Luculescu, Doru

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to describe the key physical features for modelling the unsteady aerodynamic effects found on helicopter rotor blade operating under nominally attached flow conditions away from stall. The unsteady effects were considered as phase differences between the forcing function and the aerodynamic response, being functions of the reduced frequency, the Mach number and the mode forcing. For a helicopter rotor, the reduced frequency at any blade element can't be exactly calculated but a first order approximation for the reduced frequency gives useful information about the degree of unsteadiness. The sources of unsteady effects were decomposed into perturbations to the local angle of attack and velocity field. The numerical calculus and graphics were made in FLUENT and MAPLE soft environments. This mathematical model is applicable for aerodynamic design of wind turbine rotor blades, hybrid energy systems optimization and aeroelastic analysis.

  11. Predesign study for a modern 4-bladed rotor for the NASA rotor systems research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, H. E.; Burkam, J. E.; Heminway, R. C.; Keys, C. N.; Smith, K. E.; Smith, J. H.; Staley, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Trade-off study results and the rationale for the final selection of an existing modern four-bladed rotor system that can be adapted for installation on the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) are reported. The results of the detailed integration studies, parameter change studies, and instrumentation studies and the recommended plan for development and qualification of the rotor system is also given. Its parameter variants, integration on the RSRA, and support of ground and flight test programs are also discussed.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of helicopter rotor blades using guided Lamb modes.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel; Dayal, Vinay

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an application for turning and direct modes in a complex composite laminate structure. The propagation and interaction of turning modes and fundamental Lamb modes are investigated in the skin, spar and web sections of a helicopter rotor blade. Finite element models were used to understand the various mode conversions at geometric discontinuities such as web-spar joints. Experimental investigation was carried out with the help of air coupled ultrasonic transducers. The turning and direct modes were confirmed with the help of particle displacements and velocities. Experimental B-Scans were performed on damaged and undamaged samples for qualitative and quantitative assessment of the structure. A strong correlation between the numerical and experimental results was observed and reported. PMID:24210414

  13. Mach number scaling of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, Kenneth P.; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of model helicopter rotor blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) was conducted in a 5 by 7.5-foot anechoic wind tunnel using model helicopter rotors with two, three, and four blades. The results were compared with a previously developed Mach number scaling theory. Three- and four-bladed rotor configurations were found to show very good agreement with the Mach number to the sixth power law for all conditions tested. A reduction of conditions for which BVI blade slap is detected was observed for three-bladed rotors when compared to the two-bladed baseline. The advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotor exhibited an angular dependence not present for the two-bladed configuration. The upper limits for the advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotors increased with increasing rotational speed.

  14. Characteristics of lightly loaded fan rotor blade wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, B.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1979-01-01

    Low subsonic and incompressible wake flow downstream of lightly loaded rotor was studied. Measurements of mean velocity, turbulence intensity, Reynolds stress, and static variations across the rotor wake at various axial and radial locations were investigated. Wakes were measured at various rotor blade incidences to discern the effect of blade loading on the rotor wake. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements were carried out with a triaxial hot wire probe both rotating with the rotor and stationary behind the rotor. Results indicate that increased loading slows the decay rates of axial and tangential mean velocity defects and radial velocities in the wake. The presence of large radial velocities in the rotor wake indicate the extent of the interactions between one radius and another. Appreciable static pressure variations across the rotor wake were found in the near wake region. Similarity in the profile shape was found for the axial and tangential components of the mean velocity and in the outer layer for axial, tangential, and radial turbulence intensities.

  15. Savonius rotor using swinging blades as an augmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldos, T. K.

    The power output from a Savonius rotor can be improved by reducing the drag force on the up-wind blades. A new method of doing this is experimentally investigated in the present work. The method depends on allowing the rotor blades to swing back when they are on the upwind stroke. A high and real power augmentation may be achieved by the new system at an optimum angle of swing. The system is independent of wind direction, is simple to construct, and requires no additional accessories.

  16. Hover Testing of the NASA/Army/MIT Active Twist Rotor Prototype Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sangloon

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter rotor individual blade control promises to provide a mechanism for increased rotor performance and reduced rotorcraft vibrations and noise. Active material methods, such as piezoelectrically actuated trailing-edge flaps and strain-induced rotor blade twisting, provide a means of accomplishing individual blade control without the need for hydraulic power in the rotating system. Recent studies have indicated that controlled strain induced blade twisting can be attained using piezoelectric active fiber composite technology. In order to validate these findings experimentally, a cooperative effort between NASA Langley Research Center, the Army Research Laboratory, and the MIT Active Materials and Structures Laboratory has been developed. As a result of this collaboration an aeroelastically-scaled active-twist model rotor blade has been designed and fabricated for testing in the heavy gas environment of the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The results of hover tests of the active-twist prototype blade are presented in this paper. Comparisons with applicable analytical predictions of active-twist frequency response in hovering flight are also presented.

  17. Correlation of airloads on a two-bladed helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Francisco J.; Johnson, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    Airloads measured on a two-bladed helicopter rotor in flight during the Ames' Tip Aerodynamic and Acoustic Test are compared with calculations from a comprehensive helicopter analysis (CAMRAD/JA), and the pressures compared with calculations from a full-potential rotor code (FPR). The flight-test results cover an advance ratio range of 0.19 to 0.38. The lowest-speed case is characterized by the presence of significant blade-vortex interactions. Good correlation of peak-to-peak vortex-induced loads and the corresponding pressures is obtained. Results of the correlation for this two-bladed rotor are substantially similar to those for three- and four-bladed rotors, including the tip-vortex core size for best correlation, calculation of the peak-to-peak loads on the retreating side, and calculation of vortex iduced loads on inboard radial stations. The higher-speed cases are characterized by the presence of transonic flow on the outboard sections of the blade. Comparison of calculated and measured airloads on the advancing side is not considered appropriate because the presence of shocks makes chordwise integration of the measured data difficult. However, good correlation of the corresponding pressures is obtained.

  18. Aeroelastic Stability of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.

    1982-01-01

    The flutter stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter analysis. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical models of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is modelled as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam model.

  19. Magnetic nondestructive testing of rotor blade tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Marsili, R.; Rossi, G.; Tomassini, R.

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with a particular magnetic nondestructive technique applied to the control of the position of the steel blades in rotating parts of turbines and engines. The working principle is based on a bridge of four identical magneto-resistive sensors. One sensor is placed near the blades, and the change in magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet and deviated by the change in position of the blade is detected by the sensor bridge. The position of the sensor is indicated, via dedicated FEM simulations, in order to have high sensitivity to the position change and high output signal. The accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method are shown by experimental tests carried out in our laboratories. In particular, the tests indicate that the proposed magnetic nondestructive technique can be used in an almost large velocity range, and for quite different values of blade tip. The method seems also promising for the detection of blade vibrations.

  20. 14 CFR 33.94 - Blade containment and rotor unbalance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Blade containment and rotor unbalance tests... Blade containment and rotor unbalance tests. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, it....p.m. The blade failure must occur at the outermost retention groove or, for integrally-bladed...

  1. Acoustic design of rotor blades using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, V. L.; Han, A. Y.; Crossley, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    A genetic algorithm coupled with a simplified acoustic analysis was used to generate low-noise rotor blade designs. The model includes thickness, steady loading and blade-vortex interaction noise estimates. The paper presents solutions for several variations in the fitness function, including thickness noise only, loading noise only, and combinations of the noise types. Preliminary results indicate that the analysis provides reasonable assessments of the noise produced, and that genetic algorithm successfully searches for 'good' designs. The results show that, for a given required thrust coefficient, proper blade design can noticeably reduce the noise produced at some expense to the power requirements.

  2. Aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with swept tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    This paper presents an analytical study of the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the finite element model are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. It is shown that composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability. At low thrust conditions, certain ply orientations can cause instability in the lag mode. The flap-torsion coupling associated with tip sweep can also induce aeroelastic instability in the blade. This instability can be removed by appropriate ply orientation in the composite construction.

  3. Aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the finite element model are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. It is shown that composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability. At low thrust conditions, certain ply orientations can cause instability in the lag mode. The flap-torsion coupling associated with tip sweep can also induce aeroelastic instability in the blade. This instability can be removed by appropriate ply orientation in the composite construction.

  4. New type of wind turbine with composite rotor blade

    SciTech Connect

    Rys, J.

    1995-11-01

    During the last three years a new type of a wind turbine has been designed and tested in Division of Machine Design at Cracow University of Technology. The wind turbine consists of four main units: (1) rotor with two blades, each of them having an aerodynamically formed surface made of a laminated composite material bordered by a metallic frame; (2) directing system consisting of one rotor unit which drives blades about their own axis and controls the orientation of the turbine towards the wind; (3) supporting and transmissing system; and (4) foundation consisting of typical reinforced concrete plates fastened together, convenient to transport. The paper presents the method describing simulation of motion of the turbine. Such an approach gives one the possibility to analyze the maximum load acting in the vicinity of the blade and the load response of the elements of the turbine. A certain useful technique is demonstrated which can be applied to determine the load distribution. It is used to find e.g. the optimal fastening of internal metallic frame of the rotor blade. Specific and important advantages of the new type of engine are summarized in the final remarks as follows: perfect static and dynamic balancing, nice geometric shape of rotor which can be made of typical materials, low mass and cost per unit, typical technology of elements, easy mounting and dismounting. Several designing and technological solutions are illustrated in graphs and drawings.

  5. Active control of multi-element rotor blade airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, Michael S. (Inventor); Moffitt, Robert C. (Inventor); Bagai, Ashish (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-element rotor blade includes an individually controllable main element and fixed aerodynamic surface in an aerodynamically efficient location relative to the main element. The main element is controlled to locate the fixed aerodynamic surface in a position to increase lift and/or reduce drag upon the main element at various azimuthal positions during rotation.

  6. CFD simulation and analysis for Savonius rotors with different blade configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Huei; Klimina, Liubov A.

    2014-12-01

    Savonius rotor is seldom applied in wind power generation system due to its lower aerodynamic efficiency. But studies about Savonius rotor still continued since the rotor structure is simpler and the manufacturing cost is lower. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are adopted to compare the output power, torque and power coefficient (Cp) for the conventional two-blade Savonius rotors with three different aspect ratios but the same swept area under the same wind condition to investigate the optimum blade configuration. The rotor with tall and thin configuration is found to have the maximum output power and Cp. The rotor with short and wide configuration has the maximum torque but the minimum Cp. The current result suggests the optimum aspect ratio is 4/1. The influence related to the circular cover plates at two ends of rotor was studied also. It reveals that both the torque and power coefficient for Savonius rotor with end-plates are larger than that without end-plates.

  7. Investigation of rotor blade roughness effects on turbine performance

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.L.; Tabibzadeh, R. . Rocketdyne Div.); Hudson, S.T. )

    1993-07-01

    The cold air test program was completed on the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) HPFTP (High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump) turbine with production nozzle vane rings and polished coated rotor blades with a smooth surface finish of 30[mu]in. (0.76 [mu]m) rms (root mean square). The smooth blades were polished by an abrasive flow machining process. The test results were compared with the air test results from production rough-coated rotor blades with a surface finish of up to 400 [mu]in. (10.16 [mu]m) rms. Turbine efficiency was higher for the smooth blades over the entire range tested. Efficiency increased 2.1 percentage points at the SSME 104 percent RPL (Rated Power Level) conditions. This efficiency improvement could reduce the SSME HPFTP turbine inlet temperature by 57 R (32K), increasing turbine durability. The turbine flow parameter increased and the midspan outlet swirl angle became more axial with the smooth rotor blades.

  8. Blade platform seal for ceramic/metal rotor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wertz, John L.

    1982-01-01

    A combination ceramic and metal turbine rotor for use in high temperature gas turbine engines includes a metal rotor disc having a rim with a plurality of circumferentially spaced blade root retention slots therein to receive a plurality of ceramic blades, each including side platform segments thereon and a dovetail configured root slidably received in one of the slots. Adjacent ones of the platform segments including edge portions thereon closely spaced when the blades are assembled to form expansion gaps in an annular flow surface for gas passage through the blades and wherein the assembly further includes a plurality of unitary seal members on the rotor connected to its rim and each including a plurality of spaced, axially extending, flexible fingers that underlie and conform to the edge portions of the platform segments and which are operative at turbine operating temperatures and speeds to distribute loading on the platform segments as the fingers are seated against the underside of the blade platforms to seal the gaps without undesirably stressing thin web ceramic sections of the platform.

  9. A new approach to helicopter rotor blade research instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, V. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A rotor-blade-mounted telemetry instrumentation system developed and used in flight tests by the NASA/Langley Research Center is described. The system uses high-speed digital techniques to acquire research data from miniature pressure transducers on advanced rotor airfoils which are flight tested using an AH-1G helicopter. The system employs microelectronic PCM multiplexer-digitizer stations located remotely on the blade and in a hub-mounted metal canister. The electronics contained in the canister digitizes up to 16 sensors, formats this data with serial PCM data from the remote stations, and transmits the data from the canister which is above the plane of the rotor. Data is transmitted over an RF link to the ground for real-time monitoring and to the helicopter fuselage for tape recording.

  10. Aeroelastic Analysis of Rotor Blades Using Cfd/csd Coupling in Hover Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Wu, Yizhao; Xia, Jian

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is coupled with a computational structural dynamics (CSD) to simulate the unsteady rotor flow with aeroelasticity effects. An unstructured upwind Navier-Stokes solver was developed for this simulation, with 2nd order time-accurate dual-time stepping method for temporal discretization and low Mach number preconditioning method. For turbulent flows, both the Spalart-Allmaras and Menter's SST model are available. Mesh deformation is achieved through a fast dynamic grid method called Delaunay graph map method for unsteady flow simulation. The rotor blades are modeled as Hodges & Dowell's nonlinear beams coupled flap-lag-torsion. The rotorcraft computational structural dynamics code employs the 15-dof beam finite element formulation for modeling. The structure code was validated by comparing the natural frequencies of a rotor model with UMARC. The flow and structure codes are coupled tightly with information exchange several times at every time step. A rotor blade model's unsteady flow field in the hover mode is simulated using the coupling method. Effect of blade elasticity with aerodynamic loads was compared with rigid blade.

  11. A numerical modelling of stator rotor interaction in a turbine stage with oscillating blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnesin, V. I.; Kolodyazhnaya, L. V.; Rzadkowski, R.

    2004-11-01

    In real flows unsteady phenomena connected with the circumferential non-uniformity of the main flow and those caused by oscillations of blades are observed only jointly. An understanding of the physics of the mutual interaction between gas flow and oscillating blades and the development of predictive capabilities are essential for improved overall efficiency, durability and reliability. In the study presented, the algorithm proposed involves the coupled solution of 3D unsteady flow through a turbine stage and the dynamics problem for rotor-blade motion by the action of aerodynamic forces, without separating the outer and inner flow fluctuations. The partially integrated method involves the solution of the fluid and structural equations separately, but information is exchanged at each time step, so that solution from one domain is used as a boundary condition for the other domain. 3-D transonic gas flow through the stator and rotor blades in relative motion with periodicity on the whole annulus is described by the unsteady Euler conservation equations, which are integrated using the explicit monotonous finite volume difference scheme of Godunov Kolgan. The structural analysis uses the modal approach and a 3-D finite element model of a blade. The blade motion is assumed to be constituted as a linear combination of the first natural modes of blade oscillations, with the modal coefficients depending on time. A calculation has been done for the last stage of the steam turbine, under design and off-design regimes. The numerical results for unsteady aerodynamic forces due to stator rotor interaction are compared with results obtained while taking into account blade oscillations. The mutual influence of both outer flow non-uniformity and blade oscillations has been investigated. It is shown that the amplitude-frequency spectrum of blade oscillations contains the high-frequency harmonics, corresponding to the rotor moving past one stator blade pitch, and low

  12. Studies of blade-vortex interaction noise reduction by rotor blade modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    Blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is one of the most objectionable types of helicopter noise. This impulsive blade-slap noise can be particularly intense during low-speed landing approach and maneuvers. Over the years, a number of flight and model rotor tests have examined blade tip modification and other blade design changes to reduce this noise. Many times these tests have produced conflicting results. In the present paper, a number of these studies are reviewed in light of the current understanding of the BVI noise problem. Results from one study in particular are used to help establish the noise reduction potential and to shed light on the role of blade design. Current blade studies and some new concepts under development are also described.

  13. Multidisciplinary Optimization of Tilt Rotor Blades Using Comprehensive Composite Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; McCarthy, Thomas R.; Rajadas, John N.

    1997-01-01

    An optimization procedure is developed for addressing the design of composite tilt rotor blades. A comprehensive technique, based on a higher-order laminate theory, is developed for the analysis of the thick composite load-carrying sections, modeled as box beams, in the blade. The theory, which is based on a refined displacement field, is a three-dimensional model which approximates the elasticity solution so that the beam cross-sectional properties are not reduced to one-dimensional beam parameters. Both inplane and out-of-plane warping are included automatically in the formulation. The model can accurately capture the transverse shear stresses through the thickness of each wall while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the inner and outer surfaces of the beam. The aerodynamic loads on the blade are calculated using the classical blade element momentum theory. Analytical expressions for the lift and drag are obtained based on the blade planform with corrections for the high lift capability of rotor blades. The aerodynamic analysis is coupled with the structural model to formulate the complete coupled equations of motion for aeroelastic analyses. Finally, a multidisciplinary optimization procedure is developed to improve the aerodynamic, structural and aeroelastic performance of the tilt rotor aircraft. The objective functions include the figure of merit in hover and the high speed cruise propulsive efficiency. Structural, aerodynamic and aeroelastic stability criteria are imposed as constraints on the problem. The Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser function is used to formulate the multiobjective function problem. The search direction is determined by the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno algorithm. The optimum results are compared with the baseline values and show significant improvements in the overall performance of the tilt rotor blade.

  14. Higher harmonic rotor blade pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewans, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Tests of a model 'Reverse Velocity Rotor' system at high advance ratios and with twice-per-revolution cyclic pitch control were made under joint Navy-NASA sponsorship in the NASA, Ames 12 ft. pressure tunnel. The results showed significant gains in rotor performance at all advance ratios by using twice-per-revolution control. Detailed design studies have been made of alternative methods of providing higher harmonic motion including four types of mechanical systems and an electro-hydraulic system. The relative advantages and disadvantages are evaluated on the basis of stiffness, weight, volume, reliability and maintainability.

  15. Wind turbine generator rotor blade concepts with low cost potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Cahill, T. P.; Griffee, D. G., Jr.; Gewehr, H. W.

    1977-01-01

    Four processed for producing blades are examined. Two use filament winding techniques and two involve filling a mold or form to produce all or part of a blade. The processes are described and a comparison is made of cost, material properties, design and free vibration characteristics. Conclusions are made regarding the feasibility of each process to produce low cost, structurally adequate blades.

  16. Optimization of an Active Twist Rotor Blade Planform for Improved Active Response and Forward Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the optimum blade tip planform for a model-scale active twist rotor. The analysis identified blade tip design traits which simultaneously reduce rotor power of an unactuated rotor while leveraging aeromechanical couplings to tailor the active response of the blade. Optimizing the blade tip planform for minimum rotor power in forward flight provided a 5 percent improvement in performance compared to a rectangular blade tip, but reduced the vibration control authority of active twist actuation by 75 percent. Optimizing for maximum blade twist response increased the vibration control authority by 50 percent compared to the rectangular blade tip, with little effect on performance. Combined response and power optimization resulted in a blade tip design which provided similar vibration control authority to the rectangular blade tip, but with a 3.4 percent improvement in rotor performance in forward flight.

  17. Methods of making wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, Jamie T.; Burke, Arthur H. E.; Bakhuis, Jan Willem; Van Breugel, Sjef; Billen, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    A method of manufacturing a root portion of a wind turbine blade includes, in an exemplary embodiment, providing an outer layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, providing an inner layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, and positioning at least two bands of reinforcing fibers between the inner and outer layers, with each band of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers. The method further includes positioning a mat of randomly arranged reinforcing fibers between each pair of adjacent bands of reinforcing fibers, introducing a polymeric resin into the root potion of the wind turbine blade, infusing the resin through the outer layer, the inner layer, each band of reinforcing fibers, and each mat of random reinforcing fibers, and curing the resin to form the root portion of the wind turbine blade.

  18. Synthesis of individual rotor blade control system for gust alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ji C.; Chu, Alphonse Y.; Talbot, Peter D.

    1990-01-01

    The utilization of rotor flapping in synthesizing an Individual Blade Control (IBC) system for gust alleviation is demonstrated. The objective is to illustrate and seek to improve Ham's IBC method. A sensor arrangement with two accelerometers mounted on the root and tip of a blade is proposed for estimating of flapping states for feedback control. Equivalent swash plate implementation of IBC is also deliberated. The study concludes by addressing the concept of general rotor states feedback, of which the IBC method is a special case. The blade flapping equation of motion is derived. Ham's original IBC method and a modified IBC scheme called Model Reference (MRIBC) are examined, followed by simulation study with ideal measurements and relative performances of the two methods. The practical aspects of IBC implementation are presented. Different configuration of sensors and their merits are considered. The realization of IBC using equivalent swash plate instead of direct actuator motion is discussed. It is shown that IBC is a particular case of rotor states feedback. The idea of general rotor states feedback is further elaborated. Finally, major conclusions are given.

  19. Noninterference Systems Developed for Measuring and Monitoring Rotor Blade Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.

    2003-01-01

    In the noninterference measurement of blade vibrations, a laser light beam is transmitted to the rotor blade tips through a single optical fiber, and the reflected light from the blade tips is collected by a receiving fiber-optic bundle and conducted to a photodetector. Transmitting and receiving fibers are integrated in an optical probe that is enclosed in a metal tube which also houses a miniature lens that focuses light on the blade tips. Vibratory blade amplitudes can be deduced from the measurement of the instantaneous time of arrival of the blades and the knowledge of the rotor speed. The in-house noninterference blade-vibration measurement system was developed in response to requirements to monitor blade vibrations in several tests where conventional strain gauges could not be installed or where there was a need to back up strain gauges should critical gauges fail during the test. These types of measurements are also performed in the aircraft engine industry using proprietary in-house technology. Two methods of measurement were developed for vibrations that are synchronous with a rotor shaft. One method requires only one sensor; however, it is necessary to continuously record the data while the rotor is being swept through the resonance. In the other method, typically four sensors are employed and the vibratory amplitude is deduced from the data by performing a least square fit to a harmonic function. This method does not require continuous recording of data through the resonance and, therefore, is better suited for monitoring. The single-probe method was tested in the Carl facility at the Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, and the multiple-probe method was tested in NASA Glenn Research Center's Spin Rig facility, which uses permanent magnets to excite synchronous vibrations. Representative results from this test are illustrated in the bar chart. Nonsynchronous vibrations were measured online during testing of the Quiet High Speed Fan in Glenn s 9- by 15-Foot

  20. Design of helicopter rotor blades for optimum dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ko, T.; Korn, A. E.; Rossow, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities and limitations of tailoring blade mass and stiffness distributions to give an optimum blade design in terms of weight, inertia, and dynamic characteristics are discussed. The extent that changes in mass of stiffness distribution can be used to place rotor frequencies at desired locations is determined. Theoretical limits to the amount of frequency shift are established. Realistic constraints on blade properties based on weight, mass, moment of inertia, size, strength, and stability are formulated. The extent that the hub loads can be minimized by proper choice of E1 distribution, and the minimum hub loads which can be approximated by a design for a given set of natural frequencies are determined. Aerodynamic couplings that might affect the optimum blade design, and the relative effectiveness of mass and stiffness distribution on the optimization procedure are investigated.

  1. Prediction of Unshsrouded Rotor Blade Tip Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A. A.; Steinthorsson, E.

    1994-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer on the tip of a turbine rotor blade and on the blade surface in the vicinity of the tip, was successfully predicted. The computations were performed with a multiblock computer code which solves the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations using an efficient multigrid method. The case considered for the present calculations was the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel side turbine. The predictions of the blade tip heat transfer agreed reasonably well with the experimental measurements using the present level of grid refinement. On the tip surface, regions with high rate of heat transfer was found to exist close to the pressure side and suction side edges. Enhancement of the heat transfer was also observed on the blade surface near the tip. Further comparison of the predictions was performed with results obtained from correlations based on fully developed channel flow.

  2. Loads and performance data from a wind-tunnel test of model articulated helicopter rotors with 2 different blade torsional stiffnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, W. T., Jr.; Mantay, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    A passive means of tailoring helicopter rotor blades to improve performance and reduce loads was evaluated. The parameters investigated were blade torsional stiffness, blade section camber, and distance between blade structural elastic axis and blade tip aerodynamic center. This offset was accomplished by sweeping the tip. The investigation was conducted at advance ratios of 0.20, 0.30, and 0.40. Data are presented without analysis; however, cross referencing of performance data and harmonic loads data may be useful to the analyst for validating aeroelastic theories and design methodologies as well as for evaluating passive aeroelastic tailoring or rotor blade parameters.

  3. Determination of HART I Blade Structural Properties by Laboratory Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Sung N.; Lau, Benton H.

    2012-01-01

    The structural properties of higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades were measured using the original set of blades tested in the German-dutch wind tunnel (DNW) in 1994. the measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. the measured properties were compared to the estimated values obtained initially from the blade manufacturer. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffness, up to 30 percent for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section.

  4. Flow performance of highly loaded axial fan with bowed rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Liu, X. J.; Yang, A. L.; Dai, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a partial bowed rotor blade was proposed for a newly designed high loaded axial fan. The blade was positively bowed 30 degrees from hub to 30 percent spanwise position. Flows of radial blade and bowed blade fans were numerically compared for various operation conditions. Results show that the fan's performance is improved. At the designed condition with flow coefficient of 0.52, the efficiency of the bowed blade fan is increased 1.44% and the static pressure rise is increased 11%. Comparing the flow structures, it can be found that the separated flow in the bowed fan is reduced and confined within 20 percent span, which is less than the 35 percent in the radial fan. It means that the bowed blade generates negative blade force and counteracts partial centrifugal force. It is alleviates the radial movements of boundary layers in fan's hub region. Flow losses due to 3D mixing are reduced in the rotor. Inlet flow to downstream stator is also improved.

  5. Investigation of helicopter rotor blade/wake interactive impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, S. J.; Hall, G. F.; Vonlavante, E.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the Tip Aerodynamic/Aeroacoustic Test (TAAT) data was performed to identify possible aerodynamic sources of blade/vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise. The identification is based on correlation of measured blade pressure time histories with predicted blade/vortex intersections for the flight condition(s) where impulsive noise was detected. Due to the location of the recording microphones, only noise signatures associated with the advancing blade were available, and the analysis was accordingly restricted to the first and second azimuthal quadrants. The results show that the blade tip region is operating transonically in the azimuthal range where previous BVI experiments indicated the impulsive noise to be. No individual blade/vortex encounter is identifiable in the pressure data; however, there is indication of multiple intersections in the roll-up region which could be the origin of the noise. Discrete blade/vortex encounters are indicated in the second quadrant; however, if impulsive noise were produced here, the directivity pattern would be such that it was not recorded by the microphones. It is demonstrated that the TAAT data base is a valuable resource in the investigation of rotor aerodynamic/aeroacoustic behavior.

  6. Composite wind turbine rotor blade and method for making same

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.F.; Farone, W.A.; Mikhail, A.

    1990-12-11

    This paper discusses a wind turbine blade including NASA LS(1)-04xx airfoil sections. It comprises a thickness-to-chord ratio of substantially sixteen percent at full radius, the thickness-to-chord ratio increasing to substantially nineteen percent at one half full radius and substantially twenty nine percent at three-tenths full radius; and a twist equal to zero from full radius to fifty percent full radius. The twist varies to a value no greater than eight degrees at a theoretical hub of the rotor blade.

  7. Applying Pressure Sensitive Paint Technology to Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, Jim; Gregory, James W.

    2014-01-01

    This report will present details of a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) system for measuring global surface pressures on rotorcrtaft blades in simulated forward flight at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The basics of the PSP method will be discussed and the modifications that were needed to extend this technology for use on rotor blades. Results from a series of tests will also be presented as well as several areas of improvement that have been identified and are currently being developed for future testing.

  8. Pre-design study for a modern four-bladed rotor for the Rotor System Research Aircraft (RSRA). [integrating the YAH-64 main rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, C. W.; Logan, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Various candidate rotor systems were compared in an effort to select a modern four-bladed rotor for the RSRA. The YAH-64 rotor system was chosen as the candidate rotor system for further development for the RSRA. The process used to select the rotor system, studies conducted to mate the rotor with the RSRA and provide parametric variability, and the development plan which would be used to implement these studies are presented. Drawings are included.

  9. Hover performance tests of baseline metal and Advanced Technology Blade (ATB) rotor systems for the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartie, K.; Alexander, H.; Mcveigh, M.; Lamon, S.; Bishop, H.

    1986-01-01

    Rotor hover performance data were obtained for two full-scale rotor systems designed for the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft. One rotor employed the rectangular planform metal blades (rotor solidity = 0.089) which were used on the initial flight configuration of the XV-15. The second rotor configuration examined the nonlinear taper, composite-construction, Advanced Technology Blade (ATB), (rotor solidity = 0.10) designed to replace the metal blades on the XV-15. Variations of the baseline ATB tip and cuff shapes were also tested. A new six-component rotor force and moment balance designed to obtain highly accurate data over a broad range of thrust and torque conditions is described. The test data are presented in nondimensional coefficient form for the performance results, and in dimensional form for the steady and alternating loads. Some wake and acoustic data are also shown.

  10. Performance and rotor loads measurements of the Lynx XZ170 helicopter with rectangular blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Benton H.; Louie, Alexander W.; Griffiths, Nicholas; Sotiriou, Costantinos P.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a series of flight tests on the Lynx XZ170 helicopter with rectangular blades. The test objectives were to explore the flight envelope and to measure the performance and structural loads of the Lynx main-rotor system. The tests were conducted as part of the British Experimental Rotor Program (BERP) under a contract with the Ministry of Defense in England. Data were acquired for steady-level flights at five weight coefficients. Some flight conditions were tested at beyond the retreating-blade stall boundary, which was defined by a predetermined limit on the pitchlink vibratory load. In addition to documenting the flight conditions and data, this report describes the aircraft, particularly the rotor system, in detail.

  11. 14 CFR 27.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade; and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  12. 14 CFR 27.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade; and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  13. 14 CFR 29.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 29.653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  14. 14 CFR 27.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade; and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  15. 14 CFR 29.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 29.653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  16. 14 CFR 29.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 29.653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  17. 14 CFR 29.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 29.653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  18. 14 CFR 27.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade; and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  19. 14 CFR 27.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade; and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  20. 14 CFR 29.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 29.653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be means for venting the internal pressure of the blade; (2) Drainage holes must be provided for the blade... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of...

  1. Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Myrent, Noah J.; Kusnick, Joshua F.; Barrett, Natalie C.; Adams, Douglas E.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2013-04-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

  2. The investigation of a variable camber blade lift control for helicopter rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awani, A. O.

    1982-01-01

    A new rotor configuration called the variable camber rotor was investigated numerically for its potential to reduce helicopter control loads and improve hover performance. This rotor differs from a conventional rotor in that it incorporates a deflectable 50% chord trailing edge flap to control rotor lift, and a non-feathering (fixed) forward portion. Lift control is achieved by linking the blade flap to a conventional swashplate mechanism; therefore, it is pilot action to the flap deflection that controls rotor lift and tip path plane tilt. This report presents the aerodynamic characteristics of the flapped and unflapped airfoils, evaluations of aerodynamics techniques to minimize flap hinge moment, comparative hover rotor performance and the physical concepts of the blade motion and rotor control. All the results presented herein are based on numerical analyses. The assessment of payoff for the total configuration in comparison with a conventional blade, having the same physical characteristics as an H-34 helicopter rotor blade was examined for hover only.

  3. Helicopter vibration suppression using simple pendulum absorbers on the rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamouda, M.-N. H.; Pierce, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    A design procedure is presented for the installation of simple pendulums on the blades of a helicopter rotor to suppress the root reactions. The procedure consists of a frequency response analysis for a hingeless rotor blade excited by a harmonic variation of spanwise airload distributions during forward flight, as well as a concentrated load at the tip. The structural modeling of the blade provides for elastic degrees of freedom in flap and lead-lag bending plus torsion. Simple flap and lead-lag pendulums are considered individually. Using a rational order scheme, the general nonlinear equations of motion are linearized. A quasi-steady aerodynamic representation is used in the formation of the airloads. The solution of the system equations derives from their representation as a transfer matrix. The results include the effect of pendulum tuning on the minimization of the hub reactions.

  4. Periodic control of the individual-blade-control helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckillip, R. M., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation into methods of controller design for linear periodic systems utilizing an extension of modern control methods. Trends present in the selection of various cost functions are outlined, and closed-loop controller results are demonstrated for two cases: first, on an analog computer simulation of the rigid out of plane flapping dynamics of a single rotor blade, and second, on a 4 ft diameter single-bladed model helicopter rotor in the MIT 5 x 7 subsonic wind tunnel, both for various high levels of advance ratio. It is shown that modal control using the IBC concept is possible over a large range of advance ratios with only a modest amount of computational power required.

  5. Unsteady flow and dynamic response analyses for helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.

    1979-01-01

    Research is presented on helicopter rotor blade vibration and on two and three dimensional analyses of unsteady incompressible viscous flow past oscillating helicopter rotor blades. A summary is presented of the two international research collaborations which resulted from the NASA project: the collaboration under the auspices of NATO between the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of Brussels, Belgium and the Aerodynamics Research Establishment in Goettingen, West Germany, and the collaboration under the auspices of the National Science Foundation between UWM and the University of Hamburg and the Ship Research Establishment in Hamburg, West Germany. A summary is given of the benefits from the NASA project to UWM, the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the participants on the project.

  6. Prediction of helicopter rotor noise from measured blade surface pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succi, G. P.; Brieger, J. T.

    The current techniques of helicopter rotor noise prediction attempt to describe the details of the noise field precisely and remove the empiricisms and restrictions inherent in previous methods. These techniques require detailed inputs of the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and blade surface pressure distribution. The purpose of this paper is to review those techniques in general and the Farassat/Nystrom analysis in particular. The predictions of the Farassat/Nystrom noise computer program, using both measured and calculated blade surface pressure data, are compared to measured noise level data. This study is based on a contract from NASA to Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. (BBN) with measured data from the AH-lG Helicopter Operational Loads Survey flight test program supplied by Bell Helicopter Textron.

  7. A computer program to predict rotor rotational noise of a stationary rotor from blade loading coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Randall, D.; Hosier, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The programing language used is FORTRAN IV. A description of all main and subprograms is provided so that any user possessing a FORTRAN compiler and random access capability can adapt the program to his facility. Rotor blade surface-pressure spectra can be used by the program to calculate: (1) blade station loading spectra, (2) chordwise and/or spanwise integrated blade-loading spectra, and (3) far-field rotational noise spectra. Any of five standard inline functions describing the chordwise distribution of the blade loading can be chosen in order to study parametrically the acoustic predictions. The program output consists of both printed and graphic descriptions of the blade-loading coefficient spectra and far-field acoustic spectrum. The results may also be written on binary file for future processing. Examples of the application of the program along with a description of the rotational noise prediction theory on which the program is based are also provided.

  8. Preform spar cap for a wind turbine rotor blade

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, Jamie T.; Driver, Howard D.; van Breugel, Sjef; Jenkins, Thomas B.; Bakhuis, Jan Willem; Billen, Andrew J.; Riahi, Amir

    2011-07-12

    A spar cap for a wind turbine rotor blade. The spar cap may include multiple preform components. The multiple preform components may be planar sheets having a swept shape with a first end and a second end. The multiple preform components may be joined by mating the first end of a first preform component to the second end of a next preform component, forming the spar cap.

  9. Performance of twist-coupled blades on variable speed rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.; Laino, D.J.

    1999-12-07

    The load mitigation and energy capture characteristics of twist-coupled HAWT blades that are mounted on a variable speed rotor are investigated in this paper. These blades are designed to twist toward feather as they bend with pretwist set to achieve a desirable twist distribution at rated power. For this investigation, the ADAMS-WT software has been modified to include blade models with bending-twist coupling. Using twist-coupled and uncoupled models, the ADAMS software is exercised for steady wind environments to generate C{sub p} curves at a number of operating speeds to compare the efficiencies of the two models. The ADAMS software is also used to generate the response of a twist-coupled variable speed rotor to a spectrum of stochastic wind time series. This spectrum contains time series with two mean wind speeds at two turbulence levels. Power control is achieved by imposing a reactive torque on the low speed shaft proportional to the RPM squared with the coefficient specified so that the rotor operates at peak efficiency in the linear aerodynamic range, and by limiting the maximum RPM to take advantage of the stall controlled nature of the rotor. Fatigue calculations are done for the generated load histories using a range of material exponents that represent materials from welded steel to aluminum to composites, and results are compared with the damage computed for the rotor without twist-coupling. Results indicate that significant reductions in damage are achieved across the spectrum of applied wind loading without any degradation in power production.

  10. Operational load estimation of a smart wind turbine rotor blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jonathan R.; Adams, Douglas E.; Rumsey, Mark A.

    2009-03-01

    Rising energy prices and carbon emission standards are driving a fundamental shift from fossil fuels to alternative sources of energy such as biofuel, solar, wind, clean coal and nuclear. In 2008, the U.S. installed 8,358 MW of new wind capacity increasing the total installed wind power by 50% to 25,170 MW. A key technology to improve the efficiency of wind turbines is smart rotor blades that can monitor the physical loads being applied by the wind and then adapt the airfoil for increased energy capture. For extreme wind and gust events, the airfoil could be changed to reduce the loads to prevent excessive fatigue or catastrophic failure. Knowledge of the actual loading to the turbine is also useful for maintenance planning and design improvements. In this work, an array of uniaxial and triaxial accelerometers was integrally manufactured into a 9m smart rotor blade. DC type accelerometers were utilized in order to estimate the loading and deflection from both quasi-steady-state and dynamic events. A method is presented that designs an estimator of the rotor blade static deflection and loading and then optimizes the placement of the sensor(s). Example results show that the method can identify the optimal location for the sensor for both simple example cases and realistic complex loading. The optimal location of a single sensor shifts towards the tip as the curvature of the blade deflection increases with increasingly complex wind loading. The framework developed is practical for the expansion of sensor optimization in more complex blade models and for higher numbers of sensors.

  11. Advance finite element modeling of rotor blade aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Sangha, K. B.; Panda, B.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced beam finite element has been developed for modeling rotor blade dynamics and aeroelasticity. This element is part of the Element Library of the Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS). The element allows modeling of arbitrary rotor systems, including bearingless rotors. It accounts for moderately large elastic deflections, anisotropic properties, large frame motion for maneuver simulation, and allows for variable order shape functions. The effects of gravity, mechanically applied and aerodynamic loads are included. All kinematic quantities required to compute airloads are provided. In this paper, the fundamental assumptions and derivation of the element matrices are presented. Numerical results are shown to verify the formulation and illustrate several features of the element.

  12. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    SciTech Connect

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  13. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    SciTech Connect

    Delvaux, John McConnel; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Joyce, Kilmer Joseph; Tindell, Allan Randall

    2014-06-03

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is disclosed. The adaptor assembly may generally include an adaptor body having a root configured to be received within the root slot. The adaptor body may also define a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root. The adaptor body may further define a channel. The adaptor assembly may also include a plate having an outwardly extending foot. The foot may be configured to be received within the channel. Additionally, the plate may be configured to cover at least a portion of the open end of the slot when the foot is received within the channel.

  14. Aeroelastic behavior of composite helicopter rotor blades with advanced geometry tips

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.P.; Yuan, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    A new structural and aeroelastic model capable of representing the aeroelastic stability and response of composite helicopter rotor blades with advanced geometry tips is presented. Where it is understood that advanced geometry tips are blade tips having sweep, anhedral and taper in the outboard 10% segment of the blade. The blade is modeled by beam finite elements. A single element is used to represent the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion are derived using the Hamilton`s principle and are based on moderate deflection theory. Thus, the nonlinearities are of the geometric type. The important structural blade attributes captured by the model are arbitrary cross-sectional shape, general anisotropic material behavior, transverse shear and out-of-plane warping. The aerodynamic loads are based on quasi-steady Greenberg theory with reverse flow effects, using an implicit formulation. The nonlinear aeroelastic response of the blade is obtained from a fully coupled propulsive trim/aeroelastic response analysis. Aeroelastic stability is obtained from linearizing the equations of motion about the steady state response of the blade and using Floquet theory. Numerical results for the aeroelastic stability and response of a hingeless composite blade with two cell type cross section are presented, together with vibratory hub shears and moments. The influence of ply orientation and tip sweep is clearly illustrated by the results.

  15. Simulation of realistic rotor blade-vortex interactions using a finite-difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Charles, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical finite-difference code has been used to predict helicopter blade loads during realistic self-generated three-dimensional blade-vortex interactions. The velocity field is determined via a nonlinear superposition of the rotor flowfield. Data obtained from a lifting-line helicopter/rotor trim code are used to determine the instantaneous position of the interaction vortex elements with respect to the blade. Data obtained for three rotor advance ratios show a reasonable correlation with wind tunnel data.

  16. Performance characterization of active fiber-composite actuators for helicopter rotor blade applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh K.; Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    2002-07-01

    The primary objective of this work was to characterize the performance of the Active Fiber Composite (AFC) actuator material system for the Boeing Active Material Rotor (AMR) blade application. The AFCs were a new structural actuator system consisting of piezoceramic fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix and sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes to orient the driving electric field in the fiber direction to use the primary piezoelectric effect. These actuators were integrated directly into the blade spar laminate as active plies within the composite structure to perform structural actuation for vibration control in helicopters. Therefore, it was necessary to conduct extensive electromechanical material characterization to evaluate AFCs both as actuators and as structural components of the rotor blade. The characterization tests designed to extract important electromechanical properties under simulated blade operating conditions included stress-strain tests, free strain tests and actuation under tensile load tests. This paper presents the test results as well as the comprehensive testing process developed to evaluate the relevant AFC material properties. The results from this comprehensive performance characterization of the AFC material system supported the design and operation of the Boeing AMR blade scheduled for hover and forward flight wind tunnel tests.

  17. Demonstration of an elastically coupled twist control concept for tilt rotor blade application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, R. C.; Nixon, M. W.; Wilbur, M. L.; Singleton, J. D.; Mirick, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of passive blade twist control for composite rotor blades. Hover testing of the set of blades produced maximum twist changes of 2.54 degrees for the unballasted blade configuration and 5.24 degrees for the ballasted blade configuration. These results compared well with those obtained from a detailed finite element analysis model of the rotor blade, which yielded maximum twists of 3.02 and 5.61 degrees for the unballasted and ballasted blade configurations, respectively.

  18. Elastically tailored composite rotor blades for stall alleviation and vibration reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floros, Matthew William

    An aeroelastic analysis has been developed to study the effects of elastic couplings on blade response, loads, and dynamic stall. Low and high speed conditions are examined at high thrust and cruise-level thrust for both hingeless and articulated rotor configurations. The blade cross-sectional model is based on Vlasov theory for multi-cell closed sections with thick walls. The structural model includes non-classical effects of transverse shear, torsion-related warping, and two-dimensional inplane elasticity. For the aeroelastic analysis, the blade is modeled as an elastic beam undergoing deflections in flap, lag, and torsion. The blade governing equations are approximated by a finite element in space model. A twelve degree of freedom specialized finite element is employed in the structural model which accounts for torsion-related warping. The analysis includes both a quasisteady and a time-domain unsteady aerodynamic model including the effects of non-linear separation and dynamic stall. The nonlinear periodic response is calculated through a finite element in time procedure with displacement and velocity continuous elements. The blade and hub loads are calculated using the force summation method and the reaction force method. The two loads calculation methods are compared for articulated and hingeless rotor configurations. The reaction force method is shown to more accurately predict blade bending moments in articulated rotors. The blade is modeled as a NACA airfoil section consisting of a D-spar and skin. Elastic couplings are introduced by anisotropy of plies in the D-spar to produce pitch-flap couplings. Results indicate that by coupling elastic twist to the second flap mode, the angle of attack on the retreating side of the rotor disk can be reduced up to two degrees, resulting in a significant reduction in blade stall for both articulated and hingeless rotors. Sensitivity studies are conducted to determine the effects of flap frequency on the induced twist

  19. Boundary Layer Transition Detection on a Rotor Blade Using Rotating Mirror Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heineck, James T.; Schuelein, Erich; Raffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Laminar-to-turbulent transition on a rotor blade in hover has been imaged using an area-scan infrared camera. A new method for tracking a blade using a rotating mirror was employed. The mirror axis of rotation roughly corresponded to the rotor axis of rotation and the mirror rotational frequency is 1/2 that of the rotor. This permitted the use of cameras whose integration time was too long to prevent image blur due to the motion of the blade. This article will show the use of this method for a rotor blade at different collective pitch angles.

  20. Airfoil-shaped extension-twist-coupled composite star-beams for rotor blade tip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadev, Sthanu

    Rotorcraft blade tips provide the most effective region for aerodynamic control. Rotor blade airloads are proportional to dynamic pressure and as a consequence are typically the highest in the distal blade tip region. Therefore, blade control using aerodynamic forces and moments is most effectively accomplished over the distal region of the blade. Composite materials represent the preferred material option for modern rotor blade design, especially in the field of rotorcraft and wind energy, due to superior strength-to-weight ratio, fatigue resistance and their ability to be easily tailored to incorporate different coupling (bend-twist, extension-twist, etc.) among elastic modes of deformation within the structure. An additional form of tailoring can produce compliant mechanisms: structures that are capable of producing a deformation such that the resulting displacement field is similar to the kinematics of an actual mechanism. In prior research, a family of tailored composite structures referred to as "star-beams" and "modified star-beams" have been proposed and investigated as viable candidates for tension-torsion bar applications, including the case of extension-twist coupling, for which "star-beams" preserve the high level of coupling achievable in composite strips. The present work seeks to develop and investigate the extension of prior work to the case of an extension-twist coupled torsionally compliant integral blade tip configuration. The implementation of this structural concept ensures a smooth outer blade-lifting surface and that the smoothness is preserved throughout the desired deformation range while allowing out of plane cross-sectional warping via relative longitudinal sliding along the blade joints. This work focuses on passive control of pitch applications via extension-twist coupling as a result of changes in axial force, typically obtained as a result of change in centrifugal load with rotor speed for a constant thickness, symmetric NACA 0012

  1. Design and initial testing of a one-bladed 30-meter-diameter rotor on the NASA/DOE mod-O wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Ensworth, C. B. F.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of a one-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine has been of interest to wind turbine designers for many years. Many designs and economic analyses of one-bladed wind turbines have been undertaken by both United States and European wind energy groups. The analyses indicate significant economic advantages but at the same time, significant dynamic response concerns. In an effort to develop a broad data base on wind turbine design and operations, the NASA Wind Energy Project Office has tested a one-bladed rotor at the NASA/DOE Mod-O Wind Turbine Facility. This is the only known test on an intermediate-sized one-bladed rotor in the United States. The 15.2-meter-radius rotor consists of a tip-controlled blade and a counterweight assembly. A rigorous test series was conducted in the Fall of 1985 to collect data on rotor performance, drive train/generator dynamics, structural dynamics, and structural loads. This report includes background information on one-bladed rotor concepts, and Mod-O one-bladed rotor test configuration, supporting design analysis, the Mod-O one-blade rotor test plan, and preliminary test results.

  2. A Note about Self-Induced Velocity Generated by a Lifting-Line Wing or Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Franklin D.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an elementary analysis of the induced velocity created by a field of vortices that reside in the wake of a rotor blade. Progress achieved by other researchers in the last 70 years is briefly reviewed. The present work is presented in four stages of complexity that carry a lifting-line representation of a fixed wing into a single-blade rotor. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the lifting rotor's spiraling vortex wake structure has very high induced power when compared to the ideal wing. For an advanced ratio of one-half, induced power is on the order of 10 times that of the wing when the comparison is made at wingspan equal to rotor diameter and wing and rotor having equal lift.

  3. Analytic investigation of helicopter rotor blade appended aeroelastic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytic evaluations of four different passive aeroelastic devices appended to helicopter rotor blades are presented. The devices consist of a passive tuned tab, a control coupled tab, an all-flying tip and a harmonic dilational airfoil tip. Each device was conceived for improving either aerodynamic performance or reducing vibratory control loads or hub shears. The evaluation was performed using a comprehensive rotor aeroelastic analysis (the G400PA code with appropriate modifications), together with data for a realistic helicopter rotor blade (the UH-60A Blackhawk), in high speed flight (90 m/s, 175 kts). The results of this study show that significant performance (L/(D sub e)) gains can be achieved with the all-flying free tip. Results from the harmonic dilational airfoil tip show the potential for moderate improvements in L/(D sub e). Finally, the results for the passive tuned tab and the control coupled tab, as configured for this study, show these devices to be impractical. Sections are included which describe the operation of each device, the required G400PA modifications, and the detailed results obtained for each device.

  4. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Methods are presented for the reduction of helicopter rotor blade vibration through a formal mathematical optimization technique determination of optimum tuning mass sizes and locations; these are used as design variables that are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without large mass penalty. Matrix expressions are obtained for the modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude that are required for FEM structural analysis of the blade as well as the optimization formulation. Sensitivity derivatives are also obtained. Three different optimization strategies are developed and tested.

  5. Application of response surface techniques to helicopter rotor blade optimization procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Joseph Lynn; Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.

    1995-01-01

    In multidisciplinary optimization problems, response surface techniques can be used to replace the complex analyses that define the objective function and/or constraints with simple functions, typically polynomials. In this work a response surface is applied to the design optimization of a helicopter rotor blade. In previous work, this problem has been formulated with a multilevel approach. Here, the response surface takes advantage of this decomposition and is used to replace the lower level, a structural optimization of the blade. Problems that were encountered and important considerations in applying the response surface are discussed. Preliminary results are also presented that illustrate the benefits of using the response surface.

  6. Helicopter rotor blade injury: a persistent safety hazard in the U.S. Army.

    PubMed

    Crowley, J S; Geyer, S L

    1993-09-01

    Rotor blade injuries are an inherent hazard of helicopter operations. To determine the recent incidence of rotor blade injuries in the U.S. Army, a review of accident records (1972-91) was conducted. Crash-related injuries were not included. During the study period, there were 24 blade strike injuries (12 involving the main rotor), 11 (46%) of which were fatal. Comparison with previous reports indicates a lower rotor blade injury rate in the last decade than in any previous period. The head was injured most frequently (65%), followed by the chest (17%) and abdomen (7%). Protective helmets helped to reduce injury in several instances. Flight crew comprised 49% of the victims, passengers 29%, ground crew 14%, and bystanders 8%. Helicopter crews must maintain situational awareness when around turning blades--professional training alone does not guarantee protection from rotor blade injury. PMID:8216149

  7. Structural analysis of wind turbine rotors for NSF-NASA Mod-0 wind power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary estimates are presented of vibratory loads and stresses in hingeless and teetering rotors for the proposed NSF-NASA Mod-0 wind power system. Preliminary blade design utilizes a tapered tubular aluminum spar which supports nonstructural aluminum ribs and skin and is joined to the rotor hub by a steel shank tube. Stresses in the shank of the blade are calculated for static, rated, and overload operating conditions. Blade vibrations were limited to the fundamental flapping modes, which were elastic cantilever bending for hingeless rotor blades and rigid-body rotation for teetering rotor blades. The MOSTAB-C computer code was used to calculate aerodynamic and mechanical loads. The teetering rotor has substantial advantages over the hingeless rotor with respect to shank stresses, fatigue life, and tower loading. The hingeless rotor analyzed does not appear to be structurally stable during overloads.

  8. Material characterization of active fiber composites for integral twist-actuated rotor blade application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh K.; Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    2004-10-01

    The primary objective of this work was to perform material characterization of the active fiber composite (AFC) actuator system for the Boeing active material rotor (AMR) blade application. The purpose of the AMR was to demonstrate active vibration control in helicopters through integral twist-actuation of the blade. The AFCs were a new structural actuator system consisting of piezoceramic fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix and sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes to enhance actuation performance. These conformable actuators were integrated directly into the blade spar laminate as active plies within the composite structure to perform structural control. Therefore, extensive electromechanical material characterization was required to evaluate AFCs both as actuators and as structural components of the blade. The characterization tests designed to extract important electromechanical properties under simulated blade operating conditions included nominal actuation tests, stress-strain tests and actuation under tensile load tests. This paper presents the test results as well as the comprehensive testing procedure developed to evaluate the relevant properties of the AFCs for structural application. The material characterization tests provided an invaluable insight into the behavior of the AFCs under various electromechanical conditions. The results from this comprehensive material characterization of the AFC actuator system supported the design and operation of the AMR blades scheduled for wind tunnel tests.

  9. Effects of blade bending on aerodynamic control of fluctuating loads on teetered HAWT rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, A.J. Jr.; Ashley, H.; Rock, S.M.; Chaney, K.; Digumarthi, R.

    1996-11-01

    Active aerodynamic control, in the form of closed-loop actuation of blade-tip ailerons or all-movable blades, is investigated as a means of increasing the structural fatigue life of HAWT rotors. The rotor considered is upwind and teetered, with two blades of diameter 29.2 m., fiberglass construction and other properties representative of modern light-weight construction. The paper begins with a review of prior work which studied the problem for an essentially rigid structure. For that and the present research, two loading conditions were invoked: exposure to a Rayleigh distribution of operating winds with vertical shear and a 15 percent superimposed spectrum of turbulence; and occasional exposure to 62 m/s hurricanes. Accounted for herein is the effect of flatwise bending flexibility on the loads spectra of root flatwise bending moment, thrust, and torque (both open loop and closed loop). Using Miner`s rule, the moments are converted to fatigue lives. With aerodynamic control, RMS flatwise moments for the flexible blade in turbulence are found to be less than {1/2} of those without control. At a fixed blade weight of 540 kg when hurricane loads are added, the aileron-controlled blade is designed by that limit-load condition. In contrast, the all-movable blade can be feather controlled in the high wind so that its life is dominated by turbulent loads. Simplified fatigue analysis permits weight reductions to be estimated which yield controlled blades capable of 30 years` operation with a safety factor of 11. The resulting weights are about 400 kg for the aileron-controlled blade, and 230 kg for the all-movable blade. However, such light-weight rotors require attention to other design considerations, such as start-stop cycles. Apart from limit loads, the methods of analysis are linearized (locally for aerodynamic loads). It follows that the results are likely to be meaningful in terms of comparative, rather than absolute, values of fatigue life and weight.

  10. Demonstration of an elastically coupled twist control concept for tilt rotor blade application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, R. C.; Nixon, M. W.; Wilbur, M. L.; Singleton, J. D.; Mirick, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Note is to present results from an analytic/experimental study that investigated the potential for passively changing blade twist through the use of extension-twist coupling. A set of composite model rotor blades was manufactured from existing blade molds for a low-twist metal helicopter rotor blade, with a view toward establishing a preliminary proof concept for extension-twist-coupled rotor blades. Data were obtained in hover for both a ballasted and unballasted blade configuration in sea-level atmospheric conditions. Test data were compared with results obtained from a geometrically nonlinear analysis of a detailed finite element model of the rotor blade developed in MSC/NASTRAN.

  11. Rotor Hover Performance and Flowfield Measurements with Untwisted and Highly-Twisted Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramasamy, Manikandan; Gold, Nili P.; Bhagwat, Mahendra J.

    2010-01-01

    The flowfield and performance characteristics of highly-twisted blades were analyzed at various thrust conditions to improve the fundamental understanding relating the wake effects on rotor performance. Similar measurements made using untwisted blades served as the baseline case. Twisted blades are known to give better hover performance than untwisted blades at high thrust coefficients typical of those found in full-scale rotors. However, the present experiments were conducted at sufficiently low thrust (beginning from zero thrust), where the untwisted blades showed identical, if not better, performance when compared with the highly-twisted blades. The flowfield measurements showed some key wake differences between the two rotors, as well. These observations when combined with simple blade element momentum theory (also called annular disk momentum theory) helped further the understanding of rotor performance characteristics.

  12. Blade loading and spanwise effects on the near and far wake characteristics of a compressor rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, B.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the blade loading and spanwise effects on the rotor wake is presented. The investigation was limited to a study of a low subsonic and incompressible wake flow found downstream of a lightly loaded rotor. Measurements were made with a tri-axial hot wire probe mounted in the stationary frame of reference at six radial and nine axial positions. At each measurement location, the rotor was run at different operating conditions to discern the effects of blade loading on the wake. Near and far wake measurements are given, including mean velocity and turbulence intensity characteristics. The loading and spanwise effects on rotor wake characteristics were found to be substantial.

  13. Convective heat transfer with film cooling around a rotor blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, T.

    This paper deals with an experimental convective heat transfer investigation around a high pressure gas turbine film cooled rotor blade. The measurements were performed in the von Karman Institute short duration isentropic light piston compression tube facility allowing a correct simulation of Mach and Reynolds number as well as free stream to wall and free stream to coolant temperature ratios. The airfoil was mounted in a linear stationary cascade environment and heat transfer measurements were obtained by using platinum thin film gages painted on a blade made of machinable glass ceramic. The coolant flow was ejected simultaneously through the leading edge (3 rows of holes), the suction side (2 rows of holes), and the pressure side (1 row of holes). The coolant hydrodynamic behavior is described and the effects of overall coolant to free stream mass weight ratio, coolant to free stream temperature ratio, and free stream turbulence intensity on the convective heat transfer distribution are successively described.

  14. Induced shear piezoelectric actuators for smart rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centolanza, Louis Richard

    In the present work, an induced-shear piezoelectric tube actuator is used in conjunction with a simple lever/cusp hinge amplification device to generate a useful combination of trailing edge flap (or blade tip) deflections and hinge moments. A finite element model of the actuator tube and trailing edge flap (including aerodynamic and inertial loading) was used to guide the design of the actuator/flap system. Both a full scale and small scale tube actuator flap systems and a small scale tube actuator blade tip system were fabricated and experimental bench top testing was conducted to validate the analysis. Hinge moments that corresponded to various rotor speeds were applied to the actuator using mechanical springs. The experimental testing revealed that for an applied electric field of 3 kV/cm, the tube actuator deflected a representative full scale 12 inch flap +/-2.8° at 0 RPM and +/-1.4° for a hinge moment simulating a 400 RPM condition. The percent error between the predicted and experimental full scale flap deflections ranged from 4% (low RPM) to 12.5% (large RPM). Based on the design analysis, the tube actuator can deflect a 12 inch long flap +/-2.5° at a rotation speed of 400 RPM for an electric field of 4 kV/cm. In the experimental testing at an applied electric field of 4 kV/cm of the small scale induced shear tube actuator, a 1.5 inch long flap was deflected +/-12° in a no-load condition and +/-8.5° for a hinge moment simulating a rotor speed of 2000 RPM. The percent error between the predicted and experimental flap deflections ranged from 2% (low RPM) to 8% (large RPM). In addition, a small scale 10% radius blade tip (3.6 inches) was deflected +/-3.15° and +/-2.50° for hinge moments that simulated the 0 and 2000 RPM rotor speed conditions. A numerical analysis was also conducted to investigate the induced shear tube as an active blade twist actuator. Finally, a trade study was conducted to compare the performance of the piezoelectric tube actuator

  15. Fully integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Lamarsh, William J., II; Adelman, Howard M.

    1992-01-01

    A fully integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization procedure is described for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance and dynamic analyses with a general purpose optimizer. The procedure minimizes a linear combination of power required (in hover, forward flight, and maneuver) and vibratory hub shear. The design variables include pretwist, taper initiation, taper ratio, root chord, blade stiffnesses, tuning masses, and tuning mass locations. Aerodynamic constraints consist of limits on power required in hover, forward flight and maneuvers; airfoil section stall; drag divergence Mach number; minimum tip chord; and trim. Dynamic constraints are on frequencies, minimum autorotational inertia, and maximum blade weight. The procedure is demonstrated for two cases. In the first case, the objective function involves power required (in hover, forward flight and maneuver) and dynamics. The second case involves only hover power and dynamics. The designs from the integrated procedure are compared with designs from a sequential optimization approach in which the blade is first optimized for performance and then for dynamics. In both cases, the integrated approach is superior.

  16. Inlet boundary layer effects in an axial compressor rotor. I - Blade-to-blade effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental data measured on the blading and downstream of an isolated compressor rotor with thick inlet endwall boundary layers. The objective of the study was to compare these results with data acquired previously with thin inlet boundary layers and to assess the impact of inlet boundary layer thickness on the secondary flow. Flow visualization results showed the powerful impact of the hub corner stall and how at the same near stall flow coefficient where with thin inlet boundary layers the blade was separated at midspan, with thick inlet boundary layers it was attached. It was also shown that while secondary flow was very weak, it did produce sufficient radial redistribution to cause an apparent negative loss at the blade root.

  17. Effect of blade planform variation on the forward-flight performance of small-scale rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, Kevin W.; Althoff, Susan L.; Samak, Dhananjay K.; Green, Michael D.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel to determine the effect of blade planform variation on the forward-flight performance of four small-scale rotors. The rotors were 5.417 ft in diameter and differed only in blade planform geometry. The four planforms were: (1) rectangular; (2) 3:1 linear taper starting at 94 percent radius; (3) 3:1 linear taper starting at 75 percent radius; and (4) 3:1 linear taper starting at 50 percent radius. Each planform had a thrust-weighted solidity of 0.098. The investigation included forward-flight simulation at advance ratios from 0.14 to 0.43 for a range of rotor lift and drag coefficients. Among the four rotors, the rectangular rotor required the highest torque for the entire range of rotor drag coefficients attained at advanced ratios greater than 0.14 for rotor lift coefficients C sub L from 0.004 to 0.007. Among the rotors with tapered blades and for C sub L = 0.004 to 0.007, either the 75 percent tapered rotor or the 50 percent tapered rotor required the least amount of torque for the full range of rotor drag coefficients attained at each advance ratio. The performance of the 94 percent tapered rotor was generally between that of the rectangular rotor and the 75 and 50 percent tapered rotors at each advance ratio for this range of rotor lift coefficients.

  18. Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurements on 15% Scale Rotor Blades in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, Anthony Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a proof of concept test to examine the feasibility of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) to measure the pressure distributions on a rotor in hover. The test apparatus consisted of the US Army 2-meter Rotor Test Stand (2MRTS) and 15% scale swept tip rotor blades. Two camera/rotor separations were examined: 0.76 and 1.35 radii. The outer 15% of each blade was painted with PSP. Intensity and lifetime based PSP measurement techniques were attempted. Data were collected from all blades at thrust coefficients ranging from 0.004 to 0.009.

  19. Optimization methods applied to the aerodynamic design of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Bingham, Gene J.; Riley, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a formal optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blade design which minimizes hover horsepower while assuring satisfactory forward flight performance. The approach is to couple hover and forward flight analysis programs with a general-purpose optimization procedure. The resulting optimization system provides a systematic evaluation of the rotor blade design variables and their interaction, thus reducing the time and cost of designing advanced rotor blades. The paper discusses the basis for and details of the overall procedure, describes the generation of advanced blade designs for representative Army helicopters, and compares design and design effort with those from the conventional approach which is based on parametric studies and extensive cross-plots.

  20. Blade Displacement Measurements of the Full-Scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Abrego, Anita I.; Olson, Lawrence E.

    2011-01-01

    Blade displacement measurements were acquired during a wind tunnel test of the full-scale UH-60A Airloads rotor. The test was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. Multi-camera photogrammetry was used to measure the blade displacements of the four-bladed rotor. These measurements encompass a range of test conditions that include advance ratios from 0.15 to unique slowed-rotor simulations as high as 1.0, thrust coefficient to rotor solidity ratios from 0.01 to 0.13, and rotor shaft angles from -10.0 to 8.0 degrees. The objective of these measurements is to provide a benchmark blade displacement database to be utilized in the development and validation of rotorcraft computational tools. The methodology, system development, measurement techniques, and preliminary sample blade displacement measurements are presented.

  1. Study of casing treatment stall margin improvement phenomena. [for compressor rotor blade tips compressor blades rotating stalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, D. C., Jr.; Wisler, D. C.; Hilvers, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a program of experimental and analytical research in casing treatments over axial compressor rotor blade tips are presented. Circumferential groove, axial-skewed slot, and blade angle slot treatments were tested. These yielded, for reduction in stalling flow and loss in peak efficiency, 5.8% and 0 points, 15.3% and 2.0 points, and 15.0% and 1.2 points, respectively. These values are consistent with other experience. The favorable stalling flow situations correlated well with observations of higher-then-normal surface pressures on the rotor blade pressure surfaces in the tip region, and with increased maximum diffusions on the suction surfaces. Annular wall pressure gradients, especially in the 50-75% chord region, are also increased and blade surface pressure loadings are shifted toward the trailing edge for treated configurations. Rotor blade wakes may be somewhat thinner in the presence of good treatments, particularly under operating conditions close to the baseline stall.

  2. The development of advanced technology blades for tilt-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Harold R.; Maisel, Martin D.; Giulianetti, Demo J.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the development and ground testing of blades for the XV-15 tilt-rotor demonstrator aircraft. This work was performed under contract NAS2-11250 with NASA Ames Research Center. These blades, known as the Advanced Technology Blades (ATB), replace the rectangular, steel blades which were part of the XV-15 original design. The materials used in the primary structure of the ATB are fiberglass and high strain graphite epoxy laminates. This facilitates the use of 43 deg of nonlinear twist, a nonuniform tapered planform and thin airfoils required for aerodynamic efficiency. Instrumentation life is extended by encapsulating gages and wiring in the composite structure. Tip shells and cuff fairings are removable to provide access to tip weights and retention hardware; they are also replaceable with alternate research configurations. Extensive laboratory testing has validated predicted strength characteristics. Hover testing has demonstrated performance significantly superior to that predicted by contemporary methodology. Key elements of the test rig used for rotor performance measurement were developed as an ancillary part of the present program. The performance testing included measurement of near- and far-field noise. Induced inflow velocity distributions were also determined and photographs of tip vortex condensation trails were taken. These are providing guidance for modifications to hover peformance codes.

  3. Advanced grid-stiffened composite shells for applications in heavy-lift helicopter rotor blade spars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan Nampy, Sreenivas

    Modern rotor blades are constructed using composite materials to exploit their superior structural performance compared to metals. Helicopter rotor blade spars are conventionally designed as monocoque structures. Blades of the proposed Heavy Lift Helicopter are envisioned to be as heavy as 800 lbs when designed using the monocoque spar design. A new and innovative design is proposed to replace the conventional spar designs with light weight grid-stiffened composite shell. Composite stiffened shells have been known to provide excellent strength to weight ratio and damage tolerance with an excellent potential to reduce weight. Conventional stringer--rib stiffened construction is not suitable for rotor blade spars since they are limited in generating high torsion stiffness that is required for aeroelastic stability of the rotor. As a result, off-axis (helical) stiffeners must be provided. This is a new design space where innovative modeling techniques are needed. The structural behavior of grid-stiffened structures under axial, bending, and torsion loads, typically experienced by rotor blades need to be accurately predicted. The overall objective of the present research is to develop and integrate the necessary design analysis tools to conduct a feasibility study in employing grid-stiffened shells for heavy-lift rotor blade spars. Upon evaluating the limitations in state-of-the-art analytical models in predicting the axial, bending, and torsion stiffness coefficients of grid and grid-stiffened structures, a new analytical model was developed. The new analytical model based on the smeared stiffness approach was developed employing the stiffness matrices of the constituent members of the grid structure such as an arch, helical, or straight beam representing circumferential, helical, and longitudinal stiffeners. This analysis has the capability to model various stiffening configurations such as angle-grid, ortho-grid, and general-grid. Analyses were performed using an

  4. Development of a piezoelectric actuator for trailing-edge flap control of rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Ngo, Hieu T.; Anand, V.; Domzalski, David B.

    1999-06-01

    Piezoelectric actuator technology has now reached a level where macro-positioning applications in the context of smart structures can be considered. One application with high payoffs is vibration reduction, noise reduction, and performance improvements in helicopters. Integration of piezoelectric actuators in the rotor blade is attractive, since it attacks the problem at the source. The present paper covers the development of a piezoelectric actuator for trailing edge flap control on a 34-foot diameter helicopter main rotor. The design of an actuator using bi-axial stack columns, and its bench, shake, and spin testing are described. A series of enhancements lead to an improved version that, together with use of latest stack technology, meets the requirements. Next steps in this DARPA sponsored program are development of the actuator and full scale rotor system for wind tunnel testing in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight testing on the MD Explorer.

  5. Weight Assessment for Fuselage Shielding on Aircraft With Open-Rotor Engines and Composite Blade Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly; Pereira, Michael; Kohlman, Lee; Goldberg, Robert; Envia, Edmane; Lawrence, Charles; Roberts, Gary; Emmerling, William

    2013-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been engaged in discussions with airframe and engine manufacturers concerning regulations that would apply to new technology fuel efficient "openrotor" engines. Existing regulations for the engines and airframe did not envision features of these engines that include eliminating the fan blade containment systems and including two rows of counter-rotating blades. Damage to the airframe from a failed blade could potentially be catastrophic. Therefore the feasibility of using aircraft fuselage shielding was investigated. In order to establish the feasibility of this shielding, a study was conducted to provide an estimate for the fuselage shielding weight required to provide protection from an open-rotor blade loss. This estimate was generated using a two-step procedure. First, a trajectory analysis was performed to determine the blade orientation and velocity at the point of impact with the fuselage. The trajectory analysis also showed that a blade dispersion angle of 3deg bounded the probable dispersion pattern and so was used for the weight estimate. Next, a finite element impact analysis was performed to determine the required shielding thickness to prevent fuselage penetration. The impact analysis was conducted using an FAA-provided composite blade geometry. The fuselage geometry was based on a medium-sized passenger composite airframe. In the analysis, both the blade and fuselage were assumed to be constructed from a T700S/PR520 triaxially-braided composite architecture. Sufficient test data on T700S/PR520 is available to enable reliable analysis, and also demonstrate its good impact resistance properties. This system was also used in modeling the surrogate blade. The estimated additional weight required for fuselage shielding for a wing- mounted counterrotating open-rotor blade is 236 lb per aircraft. This estimate is based on the shielding material serving the dual use of shielding and fuselage structure. If the

  6. Flapping response characteristics of hingeless rotor blades by a gereralized harmonic balance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ormiston, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Linearized equations of motion for the flapping response of flexible rotor blades in forward flight are derived in terms of generalized coordinates. The equations are solved using a matrix form of the method of linear harmonic balance, yielding response derivatives for each harmonic of the blade deformations and of the hub forces and moments. Numerical results and approximate closed-form expressions for rotor derivatives are used to illustrate the relationships between rotor parameters, modeling assumptions, and rotor response characteristics. Finally, basic hingeless rotor response derivatives are presented in tabular and graphical form for a wide range of configuration parameters and operating conditions.

  7. An investigation of the vibration characteristics of shrouded-bladed-disk rotor stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L.-T.; Dugundji, J.

    1979-01-01

    Coupled differential equations of motion are given for application to a rotating, pretwisted and heated beam under the effects of thermal stresses and gas bending loads. The circumferential modes of the multi-blade vibration of a bladed-disk rotor stage were studied. A finite element method was developed for the dynamic and static deformation analysis of the blade. The deformations of a bladed disk and a shrouded-bladed disk were studied by introducing a special bladed-disk element and a special shrouded-blade element. Some features of the vibration of part-span-shrouded, bladed-disk rotor stages are discussed. The static deformation, thermal stress and gas bending effects on the blade vibration were presented previously.

  8. Numerical analysis of a variable camber rotor blade as a lift control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awani, A. O.; Stroub, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    A new rotor configuration called the variable camber rotor was numerically investigated as a lift control device. This rotor differs from a conventional (baseline) rotor only in the blade aft section. In this configuration, the aft section or flap is attached to the forward section by pin joint arrangement, and also connected to the rotor control system for the control of rotor thrust level and vectoring. Pilot action to the flap deflection controls rotor lift and tip path plane tilt. The drag due to flaps is presented and the theoretical result correlated with test data. The assessment of payoff for the variable camber rotor in comparison with conventional (baseline) rotor was examined in hover. The variable camber rotor is shown to increase hover power required by 1.35%, but such a minimal power penalty is not significant enough to be considered a negative result. In forward flight, the control needs of the variable camber rotor were evaluated.

  9. Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

  10. Vibratory Loads Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Structurally Tailored Model Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Idol, Robert F.; Mirick, Paul H.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to investigate the use of a Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) rotor structural tailoring concept, known as rotor nodalization, in conjunction with advanced blade aerodynamics as well as to evaluate rotor blade aerodynamic design methodologies. A 1/5-size, four-bladed bearingless hub, three sets of Mach-scaled model rotor blades were tested in forward flight from transition up to an advance ratio of 0.35. The data presented pertain only to the evaluation of the structural tailoring concept and consist of fixed-system and rotating system vibratory loads. These data will be useful for evaluating the effects of tailoring blade structural properties on fixed-system vibratory loads, as well as validating analyses used in the design of advanced rotor systems.