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1

Blast Pendulum Testing of Milliken Tegris Panels.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Milliken contracted Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to conduct blast pendulum tests on various panels. The blast pendulum allows one to investigate a material's capability of mitigating sample deformation and bulk structural loading that result from '...

D. J. Grosch E. J. Sagebiel H. Eleazer

2008-01-01

2

BAE systems brownout landing aid system technology (BLAST) system overview and flight test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rotary wing aircraft continue to experience mishaps caused by the loss of visual situational awareness and spatial disorientation due to brownout or whiteout in dusty, sandy or snowy conditions as the downwash of the rotor blades creates obscurant clouds that completely engulf the helicopter during approaches to land. BAE Systems has developed a "see-through" brownout landing aid system technology (BLAST) based on a small and light weight 94GHz radar with proven ability to penetrate dust, coupled with proprietary antenna tracking, signal processing and digital terrain morphing algorithms to produce a cognitive real-time 3D synthetic image of the ground and proximate surface hazards in and around the landing zone. A series of ground and flight tests have been conducted at the United States Army's Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona that reflect operational scenarios in relevant environments to progressively mature the technology. A description of the BLAST solution developed by BAE Systems and results from recent flight tests is provided.

Sykora, Brian

2012-05-01

3

Complex craniofacial trauma resulting from fireworks blast.  

PubMed

The authors report the case of a patient who sustained a complex craniofacial trauma secondary to a recreational fireworks blast. Initial assessment and management were performed with a multidisciplinary approach to achieve control of cerebral hemorrhage, debridement of wounds and brain, isolation of the brain from the external environment, reconstruction of the cranial base floor, and orbital and facial reconstruction. Modification of multiple conventional approaches, along with a multispecialty surgical team, were used to deal effectively with this unusual patient who was treated by single-stage immediate management. Reconstruction of both the intracranial and extracranial compartments was considered successful with a satisfactory cosmetic result. PMID:18362706

Romano, Fabio; Catalfamo, Luciano; Siniscalchi, Enrico Nastro; Conti, Alfredo; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; De Ponte, Francesco Saverio; Tomasello, Francesco

2008-03-01

4

Design of blast simulators for nuclear testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quasi-dimensional computational technique is used to model the flow of a large, complicated shock tube. The shock tube, or Large Blast Simulator, is used to simulate conventional or nuclear explosions by shaping the pressure history. Results from computations show favorable agreement when compared with data taken in the facility at Gramat, France. Such future shock tubes will include a

A. Mark; K. O. Opalka; C. W. Jr. Kitchens

1981-01-01

5

Test and Evaluation of the Modified Ocd Blast Closure Valves.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Eight OCD blast closure valves were tested and evaluated by the U. S. Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory. Three sizes of valves were included -- 600 cfm, 1,200 cfm, and 2,500 cfm. The valves are designed to be closed by blast actuation and/or pneumaticall...

J. Andon

1965-01-01

6

Physics Results from the Blast Detector at the Bates Accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report preliminary physics results from recent runs of the BLAST detector on the South Hall Ring at the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at MIT. A highly polarized electron beam of 850 MeV was incident on internal polarized targets of hydrogen and deuterium, and the BLAST detector was used to provide data on spin observables in elastic and quasi-elastic scattering. These data were used to extract information on nucleon form factors, deuteron structure, and the nucleon-nucleon interaction.

Redwine, R. P.

2007-10-01

7

Small-Scale Shock Reactivity and Internal Blast Test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Explosives react from a strong shock, even in quantities too small for detonation. The potential for a new material to be an explosive can be evaluated from this shock reactivity. The recently developed small-scale shock reactivity test (SSRT) uses very high confinement to allow prompt reactions to occur in less than half-gram samples well below critical diameter. Early and late-time reactions are simultaneously measured from a single sample subjected to the output from an RP-80 detonator. Prompt reactions are quantified by a dent in a soft aluminum witness block, while later reactions, such as from fuel/air combustion, are measured by recording blast pressure. Internal blast quasi-static pressure is obtained by confining the sample apparatus within a three-liter chamber. Late-time reaction effects of plastics, and results from HMX, HMX/Aluminum, and a plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) are reported.

Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.

2006-07-01

8

Use of Blast Test Device (BTD) During Auditory Blast Overpressure Measurement. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 4-2-831.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Test Operations Procedure (TOP) defines procedures for blast overpressure tests that must simultaneously address both the auditory and non- auditory hazards of a weapon or explosive during a single measurement opportunity.

2008-01-01

9

New Results from the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (blast)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experiment using the novel technique of scattering a longitudinally polarized electron beam from polarized internal hydrogen/deuterium gas targets was carried out in the South Hall Ring at the MIT-Bates Accelerator Center. The scattered particles were detected by the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) detector. The proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, (GEp)/(G_M^p) at Q2 = 0.1 - 0.65 (GeV/c)2 has been determined from the experiment by measuring the spin-dependent ep elastic scattering asymmetry in the two symmetric sectors of the BLAST simultaneously for the first time. The neutron electric form factor GEn in the same Q2 range has been extracted by measuring the spin-dependent asymmetry from the ?c d(?c e,e'n) process with a vector polarized deuterium target. These results on the nucleon form factors from the BLAST experiment are presented.

Gao, Haiyan

10

Comparison of seismic and explosive energy in five smooth blasting test rounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The seismic monitoring and analysis of five smooth blasting test rounds in hardrock (gneiss) is described. The ultimate goal of the test blasts was to avoid large seismic vibration levels. Vibrations were measured with a time resolution of 32,000 samples per second with three-component accelerometers at distances between 3 and 9m from the charges. Examination of the accelerograms resulted in

K.-G. Hinzen

1998-01-01

11

Performance on tests of central auditory processing by individuals exposed to high-intensity blasts.  

PubMed

Thirty-six blast-exposed patients and twenty-nine non-blast-exposed control subjects were tested on a battery of behavioral and electrophysiological tests that have been shown to be sensitive to central auditory processing deficits. Abnormal performance among the blast-exposed patients was assessed with reference to normative values established as the mean performance on each test by the control subjects plus or minus two standard deviations. Blast-exposed patients performed abnormally at rates significantly above that which would occur by chance on three of the behavioral tests of central auditory processing: the Gaps-In-Noise, Masking Level Difference, and Staggered Spondaic Words tests. The proportion of blast-exposed patients performing abnormally on a speech-in-noise test (Quick Speech-In-Noise) was also significantly above that expected by chance. These results suggest that, for some patients, blast exposure may lead to difficulties with hearing in complex auditory environments, even when peripheral hearing sensitivity is near normal limits. PMID:23341276

Gallun, Frederick J; Diedesch, Anna C; Kubli, Lina R; Walden, Therese C; Folmer, Robert L; Lewis, M Samantha; McDermott, Daniel J; Fausti, Stephen A; Leek, Marjorie R

2012-01-01

12

Recent Results from the BLAST Experiment (Nucleon Form Factors)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent precise polarization measurements have considerably improved constraints on nucleon electromagnetic form factors. The BLAST experiment, carried out at MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center, was designed to study these quantities systematically using the intense polarized stored electron beam of the South Hall Ring, highly polarized internal gas jet targets, and a symmetric toroidal spectrometer. Simultaneous measurements of multiple reaction channels with different combinations of beam and target polarizations were carried out to extract the nucleon form factors with high precision at Q2< 1 GeV2/c2. Results for the nucleon form factors GEp, GMp, GEn, and GMn are presented and discussed.

Franklin, Wilbur A.

2007-06-01

13

Testing the blast wave model with Swift GRBs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The complex structure of the light curves of Swift GRBs (e.g. superimposed flares and shallow decay) has made their interpretation and that of the blast wave caused by the burst, more difficult than in the pre-Swift era. We aim to constrain the blast wave parameters: electron energy distribution, p, density profile of the circumburst medium, k, and the continued energy injection index, q. We do so by comparing the observed multi-wavelength light curves and X-ray spectra of a Swift sample to the predictions of the blast wave model.We can successfully interpret all of the bursts in our multi-wavelength sample of 10, except two, within the framework of the blast wave model, and we can estimate with confidence the electron energy distribution index for 6 of the sample. Furthermore we identify jet breaks in almost half of the bursts. The values of k suggest that the circumburst density profiles are not drawn from only one of the constant density or wind-like media populations. A statistical analysis of the distribution of p reveals that, even in the most conservative case of least scatter, the values are not consistent with a single, universal value. This is in agreement with our results for a larger sample of X-ray only afterglows which we summarise here.

Curran, P. A.; Starling, R. L. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; de Pasquale, M.; Page, M.

2011-04-01

14

Human and Community Response to Military Noise. Results From Field-Laboratory Tests of Small Arms, 25 mm Cannons, Helicopters, and Blast Sounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study reported here utilized paired-comparison tests with listeners in real houses to evaluate human response to test sounds from one of four categories of military sources: (1) small arms fire, (2) 25 millimeter (mm) cannon fire, (3) helicopters, and...

L. J. Benson L. R. Wagner P. D. Schomer

1995-01-01

15

New results from BLAST on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, a new experiment was carried out in the South Hall Ring at the MIT-Bates Accelerator Laboratory. This experiment utilized a polarized electron beam, a pure hydrogen (deuterium) internal polarized gas target, and the symmetric Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) detector. The proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, GEpGMp at Q2= 0.15 - 0.65 (GeV/c)2 has been determined from the experiment by measuring the spin-dependent ep elastic scattering asymmetry in both sectors simultaneously. This is the first experiment to measure GEpGMp using a polarized proton target, which is complementary to recoil polarimetry experiments. The neutron magnetic form factor GMn has been extracted from the measurement of the spin-dependent asymmetry from the inclusive dvec (evec ,e) process in a similar Q2 with a vector polarized deuterium target, and the neutron electric form factor GEn has been extracted by measuring the spin-dependent asymmetry from the coincidence dvec (evec ,e'n) process simultaneously. Preliminary results on the nucleon form factors from the BLAST experiment are presented.

Gao, Haiyan

2006-11-01

16

Recent Results from the BLAST Experiment (Nucleon Form Factors)  

SciTech Connect

Recent precise polarization measurements have considerably improved constraints on nucleon electromagnetic form factors. The BLAST experiment, carried out at MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center, was designed to study these quantities systematically using the intense polarized stored electron beam of the South Hall Ring, highly polarized internal gas jet targets, and a symmetric toroidal spectrometer. Simultaneous measurements of multiple reaction channels with different combinations of beam and target polarizations were carried out to extract the nucleon form factors with high precision at Q2< 1 GeV2/c2. Results for the nucleon form factors G{sub E}{sup p}, G{sub M}{sup p}, G{sub E}{sup n}, and G{sub M}{sup n} are presented and discussed.

Franklin, Wilbur A. [MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center, 21 Manning Rd., Middleton, MA 01949 (United States)

2007-06-13

17

BlaSTorage: a fast package to parse, manage and store BLAST results  

PubMed Central

Background Large-scale sequence studies requiring BLAST-based analysis produce huge amounts of data to be parsed. BLAST parsers are available, but they are often missing some important features, such as keeping all information from the raw BLAST output, allowing direct access to single results, and performing logical operations over them. Findings We implemented BlaSTorage, a Python package that parses multi BLAST results and returns them in a purpose-built object-database format. Unlike other BLAST parsers, BlaSTorage retains and stores all parts of BLAST results, including alignments, without loss of information; a complete API allows access to all the data components. Conclusions BlaSTorage shows comparable speed of more basic parser written in compiled languages as C++ and can be easily integrated into web applications or software pipelines.

2013-01-01

18

RICE BLAST AND SHEATH BLIGHT EVALUATION RESULTS FOR NEWLY INTRODUCED RICE GERMPLASM  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Newly introduced rice germplasm and selected reference cultivars were evaluated in artificially inoculated greenhouse tests with individual blast races at Stuttgart, AR and field nurseries established with inoculation of blast race-mixture, and with inoculation of sheath blight isolates during the 2...

19

New Results from BLAST at MIT-Bates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The BLAST experiment was designed to study in a systematic manner the spin-dependent electromagnetic interaction on few-body nuclei. Utilizing the polarized electron beam in the MIT-Bates South Hall Storage Ring, highly-polarized isotopically pure targets of hydrogen and deuterium, and the symmetric toroidal BLAST detector; precise measurements have been made which permit the extraction of the proton and neutron electric and magnetic form factors. The neutron electric form factor especially is now known to a precision comparable to that of the other nucleon form factors. In this talk, I will present these measurements, as well as their transform into spatial coordinates.

Crawford, Christopher

2008-04-01

20

DESIGN AND TESTING OF COMBINED BLAST AND ANTI-RAM BARRIERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new design concepts are presented for constructing barriers that can be used as both anti-ram and blast barriers. These concepts have performed well as anti-ram barriers, in one particular performance test stopping a 65,000-pound vehicle impacting at 50 miles per hour. Both concepts have also performed well as blast barriers, remaining relatively undamaged when struck with the blasts from

John E. Crawford; Shengrui Lan

21

Fabrication and Testing of a Blast Concussion Burst Sensor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this project, we seek to design passive, wearable sensors for military personnel that will provide an indication of the severity of exposure to explosive blasts in an easily decipherable manner immediately after the fact. This will allow soldiers who m...

J. A. Judge S. A. Mathews

2009-01-01

22

The PARIGA Server for Real Time Filtering and Analysis of Reciprocal BLAST Results  

PubMed Central

BLAST-based similarity searches are commonly used in several applications involving both nucleotide and protein sequences. These applications span from simple tasks such as mapping sequences over a database to more complex procedures as clustering or annotation processes. When the amount of analysed data increases, manual inspection of BLAST results become a tedious procedure. Tools for parsing or filtering BLAST results for different purposes are then required. We describe here PARIGA (http://resources.bioinformatica.crs4.it/pariga/), a server that enables users to perform all-against-all BLAST searches on two sets of sequences selected by the user. Moreover, since it stores the two BLAST output in a python-serialized-objects database, results can be filtered according to several parameters in real-time fashion, without re-running the process and avoiding additional programming efforts. Results can be interrogated by the user using logical operations, for example to retrieve cases where two queries match same targets, or when sequences from the two datasets are reciprocal best hits, or when a query matches a target in multiple regions. The Pariga web server is designed to be a helpful tool for managing the results of sequence similarity searches. The design and implementation of the server renders all operations very fast and easy to use.

Orsini, Massimiliano; Carcangiu, Simone; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Uva, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

2013-01-01

23

The PARIGA server for real time filtering and analysis of reciprocal BLAST results.  

PubMed

BLAST-based similarity searches are commonly used in several applications involving both nucleotide and protein sequences. These applications span from simple tasks such as mapping sequences over a database to more complex procedures as clustering or annotation processes. When the amount of analysed data increases, manual inspection of BLAST results become a tedious procedure. Tools for parsing or filtering BLAST results for different purposes are then required. We describe here PARIGA (http://resources.bioinformatica.crs4.it/pariga/), a server that enables users to perform all-against-all BLAST searches on two sets of sequences selected by the user. Moreover, since it stores the two BLAST output in a python-serialized-objects database, results can be filtered according to several parameters in real-time fashion, without re-running the process and avoiding additional programming efforts. Results can be interrogated by the user using logical operations, for example to retrieve cases where two queries match same targets, or when sequences from the two datasets are reciprocal best hits, or when a query matches a target in multiple regions. The Pariga web server is designed to be a helpful tool for managing the results of sequence similarity searches. The design and implementation of the server renders all operations very fast and easy to use. PMID:23667459

Orsini, Massimiliano; Carcangiu, Simone; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Uva, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

2013-05-07

24

Testing the blast wave model with Swift GRBs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The complex structure of the light curves of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) has made the identification of breaks, and the interpretation of the blast wave caused by the burst, more difficult than in the pre-Swift era. We aim to identify breaks, which are possibly hidden, and to constrain the blast wave parameters; electron energy distribution, p, density profile of the circumburst medium, k, and the continued energy injection index, q. We do so by comparing the observed multiwavelength light curves and X-ray spectra of our sample to the predictions of the blast wave model. We can successfully interpret all of the bursts in our sample of 10, except two, within this framework and we can estimate, with confidence, the electron energy distribution index for 6 of the sample. Furthermore, we identify jet breaks in a number of the bursts. A statistical analysis of the distribution of p reveals that, even in the most conservative case of least scatter, the values are not consistent with a single, universal value. The values of k suggest that the circumburst density profiles are not drawn from only one of the constant density or wind-like media populations.

Curran, P. A.; Starling, R. L. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

2009-05-01

25

Performance tests of a fast-acting valve for the driver tubes of a large blast\\/thermal simulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes the testing of a fast-acting throat valve element designed by Eaton Consolidated Controls for use in driver tubes, (blast generators) of a Large Blast\\/Thermal Simulator (LB\\/TS). An LB\\/TS is used to simulate decaying blast waves such as are generated by nuclear explosions. The Eaton Throat Valve Element (ETVE) was tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

Marcela R. Stacey

1992-01-01

26

Blast testing of ultra-high performance fibre and FRP-retrofitted concrete slabs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of tests was conducted to investigate the blast resistances of slabs constructed with both plain ultra-high performance fibre concrete (UHPFC) and reinforced ultra-high performance fibre concrete (RUHPFC), and slabs reinforced with externally bonded (EB) fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) plates. Normal reinforced concrete (NRC) slabs were tested as control specimens. LVDTs and pressure transducers were used to record deflection

C. Wu; D. J. Oehlers; M. Rebentrost; J. Leach; A. S. Whittaker

2009-01-01

27

PLAN: a web platform for automating high-throughput BLAST searches and for managing and mining results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: BLAST searches are widely used for sequence alignment. The search results are commonly adopted for various functional and comparative genomics tasks such as annotating unknown sequences, investigating gene models and comparing two sequence sets. Advances in sequencing technologies pose challenges for high-throughput analysis of large-scale sequence data. A number of programs and hardware solutions exist for efficient BLAST searching,

Ji He; Xinbin Dai; Xuechun Zhao

2007-01-01

28

Blasting Tests in a Porphyry Copper Deposit in Preparation for in situ Extraction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A fragmentation experiment was conducted in a porphyry copper molybdenum deposit near the Sierrita pit south of Tucson, Ariz. This experiment evaluated the fragmentation created in a 10-hole test blast having blasthole spacings of 25, 20, and 15 feet. The...

R. C. Steckley W. C. Larson D. V. D'Andrea

1975-01-01

29

PSI protein classifier: A new program automating PSI-BLAST search results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new program, PSI Protein Classifier, generalizing the results of both successive and independent iterations of the PSI-BLAST\\u000a program was developed. The technical opportunities of the program are described and illustrated by two examples. An iterative\\u000a screening of the amino acid sequence database detected potential evolutionary relationships between GH5, GH13, GH27, GH31,\\u000a GH36, GH66, GH101 and GH114 families of glycoside

D. G. Naumoff; M. Carreras

2009-01-01

30

How to test brain and brain simulant at ballistic and blast strain rates.  

PubMed

Mechanical properties of brain tissue and brain simulant at strain rate in the range of 1000 s-1 are essential for computational simulation of intracranial responses for ballistic and blast traumatic brain injury. Testing these ultra-soft materials at high strain rates is a challenge to most conventional material testing methods. The current study developed a modified split Hopkinson bar techniques using the combination of a few improvements to conventional split Hopkinson bar including: using low impedance aluminum bar, semiconductor strain gauge, pulse shaping technique and annular specimen. Feasibility tests were conducted using a brain stimulant, Sylgard 527. Stress-strain curves of the simulant were successfully obtained at strain rates of 2600 and 2700 s-1 for strain levels up to 60%. This confirmed the applicability of Hopkinson bar for mechanical properties testing of brain tissue in the ballistic and blast domain. PMID:19141904

Zhang, Jiangyue; Song, Bo; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Chen, Weinong; Gennarelli, Thomas A

2008-01-01

31

Interpreting Laboratory Test Results  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Interpreting Laboratory Test Results A laboratory test is a medical procedure in which a sample of blood , urine , or other tissues or substances in the ...

32

Assessment of Ore Waste and Dilution Resulting From Buffer/Choke Blasting in Surface Gold Mines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A discrete element computer program named DMC(underscore)BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece (ampersand) Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or ...

D. S. Preece S. H. Chung J. P. Tidman

1997-01-01

33

Small-scale materials blast testing using gram-range explosives and air-shock loading  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many material properties are unknown under the high strain rates of shock wave impulse from an explosion in air. Actual blast testing is required for this, but full-scale explosive tests are expensive and dangerous, and yield limited data. Here we explore the possibility that gram-range explosive charges can be used for such testing in an ordinary laboratory setting. The explosion is characterized by high-speed digital shadowgraphy and piezoelectric pressure records of shock speed and overpressure duration. These data yield an explosive impulse describing the strength of shock loading at various standoff distances from a material sample (typically 25cm diameter). Simultaneously, twin high-speed digital cameras and surface tracking software provide material displacement and strain rate data during the test. In principle, these data and the measured shock loading provide a means to find dynamic material properties by an inverse computational approach. A scaling analysis also relates the gram-range blast test to a large-scale blast from the same or a different explosive.

Hargather, Michael; Settles, Gary

2006-11-01

34

HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint and provides worker protection by continuously recycling the material and dust for the decontamination tasks. The proposed work would increase the cleaning rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites. This work focuses on redesigning and improving existing vacuum blasting technology including blast head nozzles, ergonomic handling of the blast head by reducing its weight; brush-ring design, vacuum level regulator, efficiency of the dust separator, and operational control sensors. The redesign is expected to enhance the productivity and economy of the vacuum blasting system by at least 50% over current vacuum blasting systems. There are three phases in the project. Phase I consists of developing and testing mathematical models. Phase II consists of pre-prototype design and fabrication and pre-prototype unit testing. Phase III consists of prototype design and field verification testing. In phase I, mathematical models are developed and analyzed for the nozzle, blast head, wind curtain, and dust separator, first as individual devices and then combined as an integrated model. This allows study of respective airflow and design parameters. The Contractor shall, based on the results of the mathematical modeling studies, design experimental models of the components and test these models. In addition, the Contractor shall develop sensors to detect the relationship of the blast head to the blast surfaces and controls to minimize the dependency on an operator's skill and judgment to obtain optimum positioning, as well as real-time characterization sensors to determine as the blast head is moving the depth to which coatings must be removed, thereby improving production and minimizing waste. In phase II, the Contractor shall design and construct a pre-prototype of the nozzle, blast head with wind curtain, sensors, and dust separator and test this system to assess the performance of the new design under controlled conditions at the contractor's facility. In phase III, the Contractor shall design and construct a prototype of the High Productivity Vacuum Blasting System, based on the results of the pre-prototype design and testing performed. This unit will be a full-scale prototype and will be tested at a designated Department of Energy (DOE) facility. Based on the results, the system performance, the productivity, and the economy of the improved vacuum blasting system will be evaluated.

William S. McPhee

1999-05-31

35

Dynamic test of a corrugated steel keyworker blast shelter MISTY PICTURE. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 18-man blast shelter was tested dynamically on May 14, 1987 in the MISTY PICTURE event at White Sands Missile Range, NM. The main section of the shelter was fabricated from a 9-foot-diameter, 27.5-foot-long section of 10-gage, galvanized, corrugated steel culvert. The shelter included a vertical entryway and air intake and exhaust stacks. The shelter design was found to be

R. L. Holmes; T. R. Slawson; A. L. Harris

1987-01-01

36

Clean Coal III Project: Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project Trial 1 Report - Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection - Results with Low Volatile Coal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the first coal trial test conducted with the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Burns Harbor Plant. This demonstration project is divided into three phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation The design phase was conducted in 1991-1993. Construction of the facility began in August 1993 and was completed in late 1994. The coal injection facility began operating in January 1995 and Phase III began in November 1995. The Trial 1 base test orI C furnace was carried out in October 1996 as a comparison period for the analysis of the operation during subsequent coal trials.

None

1997-11-01

37

Clean Coal III Project: Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project Trail 1 Report - Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection - Results with Low Volatile Coal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the first coal trial test conducted with the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Burns Harbor Plant. This demonstration project is divided into three phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation The design phase was conducted in 1991-1993, Construction of the facility began in August 1993 and was completed in late 1994. The coal injection facility began operating in January 1995 and Phase III began in November 1995. The Trial 1 base test on C furnace was carried out in October 1996 as a comparison period for the analysis of the operation during subsequent coal trials.

None

1997-11-01

38

Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 1. Welcome, invited papers, shipboard shock, blast and ground shock, shock testing, and analysis  

SciTech Connect

Partial contents include: Solid Mechanics Program at ONR; Army research in shock mechanics; Air Force basic research in dynamics and control of large space structures; State-of the art assessment of structural dynamic response analysis methods (DYNAS); DYNAS survey - Part 2 -- A participant view; Computation of excitation forces using structural response data; Underwater shock trials on a plain, unreinforced cylinder; Investigation into the effects of using detonating cord to remove a conventional propeller from a water borne surface ship; Dynamic response of armor plate to non-penetrating projectile impact; Evaluation of shock response in combat vehicles -- Scale model results; Yield effects on the response of a buried blast shelter; Shelter response in a simulated one megaton nuclear event; Vibration characteristics of a large scale buried structure; A numerical gauge for structural assessment; Active one-dimensional protective layers; Dependence of free-field impulse on the decay time of energy efflux for a jet flow; Computer implementation of a muzzle blast prediction technique; and Interim design criteria and acceptance test specifications for blast-resistant windows.

Not Available

1986-08-01

39

Computational studies for 1\\/57-scale Large Blast Simulator (LBS) configurations with the BLAST2D code. Final report, January 1988January 1990  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the continuing research efforts of the Blast Dynamics Branch at the U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL) is to simulate the flow that results from nuclear explosions and to test the nuclear survivability of military equipment. When atmospheric nuclear blast tests were banned, chemical explosive tests were designed and conducted to simulate the blast and thermal pulses produced

Hisley

1990-01-01

40

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1993--94 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900{degrees}C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter there were two major accomplishments.

Crelling, J.C.

1995-12-31

41

Climax Granite Test Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only tho...

L. D. Ramspott

1980-01-01

42

Felborrningen och dess Spraengtekniska Konsekvenser: -ett Utkast till Datorstoedd Utvaerdering (Drill Hole Deviation Resulting from Consequences of Blasting).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the follow-up of the driving of the Storsjo Tunnel in 1987-89, SveDeFo and Skanska have developed both a measuring method and computer programs to evaluate the drill hole deviations from plan and the resulting consequences on the blasting. The work...

F. Ouchterlony L. Karlsson M. Wistedt

1989-01-01

43

Performance tests of a fast-acting valve for the driver tubes of a large blast\\/thermal simulator. Final report, Jan 91Jan 92  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes the testing of a fast-acting throat valve element designed by Eaton Consolidated Controls for use in driver tubes, (blast generators) of a Large Blast\\/Thermal Simulator (LB\\/TS). An LB\\/TS is used to simulate decaying blast waves such as are generated by nuclear explosions. The Eaton Throat Valve Element (ETVE) was tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

Stacey

1992-01-01

44

CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies  

SciTech Connect

Initial tests with CO{sub 2} pellet blasting as a decontamination technique were completed in 1993 at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During 1996, a number of additional CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies with Alpheus Cleaning Technologies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pennsylvania State University were conducted. After the testing with Alpheus was complete, an SDI-5 shaved CO{sub 2} blasting unit was purchased by the ICPP to test and determine its capabilities before using in ICPP decontamination efforts. Results of the 1996 testing will be presented in this report.

Archibald, K.E.

1997-01-01

45

LRAD radon test results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel recently tested Long-Range Alpha Detection (LRAD) technology for radon and radon daughter response in the calibration chamber at DOE Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO), Colorado. Radon concentrations range...

J. P. Johnson R. D. Bolton S. E. Garner K. L. Benham G. L. Langer

1994-01-01

46

Accidental head explosion: an unusual blast wave injury as a result of self-made fireworks.  

PubMed

A 33-year old hobby pyrotechnician sustained a lethal craniofacial trauma secondary to a salute fireworks blast. He was examining a misfire of a self-constructed salute gun, when it detonated, causing an explosively rupture of his forehead, which led to his immediate death. An autopsy was performed to achieve knowledge of the injury and to be able to reconstruct the events that lead to it. The pressure effect of the explosion caused a shredded rupture of the forehead with a regional spread of brain tissue and small polygonal skull fragments up to 30m from the detonation site. Furthermore multiple cinderlike fragments of black powder were embedded in the skin of the face and the anterior aspect of the neck (s.c. blast tattoo). The complete destruction of the forehead in combination with the multiple blast tattooing suggested that the explosion detonated while he was leaning over the device. PMID:21570222

Kunz, S N; Zinka, B; Peschel, O; Fieseler, S

2011-05-12

47

Arundo Donax Test Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Arundo Donax was received from Greenwood Resources via Portland General Electric. PGE plans to transition a coal-fired boiler to 100% biomass by 2020, and has partnered with EPRI and INL to conduct the necessary testing and development to understand what ...

C. Nichol T. L. Westover

2012-01-01

48

Large blast and thermal simulator advanced concept driver design by computational fluid dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The construction of a large test facility is proposed for simulating the blast and thermal environment resulting from nuclear explosions. This facility would be used to test the survivability and vulnerability of military equipment such as trucks, tanks and helicopters in a simulated thermal and blast environment, and to perform research into nuclear blast phenomenology. The proposed advanced design concepts,

Klaus O. Opalka

1989-01-01

49

Dynamic test of a corrugated steel keyworker blast shelter MISTY PICTURE. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 18-man blast shelter was tested dynamically on May 14, 1987 in the MISTY PICTURE event at White Sands Missile Range, NM. The main section of the shelter was fabricated from a 9-foot-diameter, 27.5-foot-long section of 10-gage, galvanized, corrugated steel culvert. The shelter included a vertical entryway and air intake and exhaust stacks. The shelter design was found to be conservative during a previous 50-psi validation test, and some constructibility problems were encountered with the entryway-to-shelter connections. This test was conducted to validate the modifications made to the shelter design. The modifications were made to reduce construction costs and improve constructibility. Primary modifications included: replacing the stiffened endwalls with lighter-weight unstiffened plates, connecting the entryway to an endwall rather than to the main section of the shelter, and the inclusion of an emergency exit. The structure was located at the anticipated 200-psi peak overpressure level. Post-test inspection revealed that the main section of the shelter suffered very little damage during the test. Due to the failure of the emergency exit cover plate, it was necessary to determine if enough pressure entered the shelter to affect its structural response. This test also investigated the shock environment inside the shelter.

Holmes, R.L.; Slawson, T.R.; Harris, A.L.

1987-11-01

50

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to da...

J. C. Crelling

1994-01-01

51

Performance testing of blast furnace slag for immobilization of technetium in grout  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary results of a grout development effort to identify grout formulas that can satisfactorily sequester /sup 99/Tc contained in an existing Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant waste. Technetium is of particular concern to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because of its mobility and biological activity. The mobility of technetium results in large part from the movement of the pertechnate anion (prevalent in low-level radioactive waste (LLW)) through soil and geologic strata with little or no interaction with the surrounding matrix. Ground blast furnace slag has been shown to improve the leach resistance of cement-based waste forms, particularly in regard to technetium. This improved performance has been attributed to fewer and smaller pores in the solidified slags (versus a neat cement paste) and to the reduction of the pertechnate ion to a less soluble form. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.; Evans-Brown, B.S.; Morgan, I.L.; Shoemaker, J.L.; Bostick, W.D.

1988-01-01

52

Pressure locking test results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; we will publish the results of our thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

1996-06-01

53

Seismic tests of a pile-supported structure in liquefiable sand using large-scale blast excitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extensive, large-amplitude vibration tests of a pile-supported structure in a liquefiable sand deposit have been performed at a large-scale mining site. Ground motions from large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for vibration tests. A simple pile-supported structure was constructed in an excavated 3m-deep pit. The test pit was backfilled with 100% water-saturated clean uniform sand. Accelerations were measured

Naotaka Kamijo; Hideaki Saito; Kazuhiro Kusama; Osamu Kontani; Robert Nigbor

2004-01-01

54

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

A new use for Illinois coal is as fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as first step in steel production. Because of cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. Purpose of this study is to evaluate combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a pilot plant test facility. (Limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high S and Cl contents are suitable for blast furnace injection.) This proposal is intended to complete the study under way with Armco and Inland and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for injection. Main feature of current work is testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s pilot plant coal combustion facility. During this quarter, two additional 300-pound samples of coal (IBCSP-110 Springfield No. 5 and an Appalachian coal) were delivered. Six Illinois Basin coals were analyzed with the CANMET model and compared with other bituminous coals from the Appalachians, France, Poland, South Africa, and Colombia. Based on computer modeling, lower rank bituminous coals, including coal from the Illinois Basin, compare well in injection with a variety of other bituminous coals.

Crelling, J.C.

1995-12-31

55

LTC vacuum blasting machine (concrete): Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

NONE

1997-07-31

56

Demonstration Testing of Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) at LetterKenny Army Depot.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Army has recognized the potential of plastic media blasting (PMB) as an innovative waste minimization alternative to conventional paint removal techniques. However, little information was available on the use, effectiveness and potential cost sav...

A. A. Balasco C. C. Scholl C. G. d'Agincourt R. S. Lindstrom

1989-01-01

57

Performance tests of a fast-acting valve for the driver tubes of a large blast/thermal simulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document describes the testing of a fast-acting throat valve element designed by Eaton Consolidated Controls for use in driver tubes, (blast generators) of a Large Blast/Thermal Simulator (LB/TS). An LB/TS is used to simulate decaying blast waves such as are generated by nuclear explosions. The Eaton Throat Valve Element (ETVE) was tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to evaluate its performance against the design criteria. The ETVE was mounted at the end of a driver tube and actuated 16 times at 6 different driver pressures ranging from 396 kPa to 12.4 MPa (57.5 psi to 1,800 psi). The valve seals survived successfully all 16 tests with the driver gas at room temperature and maintained an acceptable leak rate throughout the test program. The average valve lag time was determined to vary from 36 to 120 ms; however, the valve was found to chatter, going through several (up to 20) opening/closing cycles after actuation before settling in the open position. An increase in the pneumatic supply pressure driving the valve showed a minor decrease in the number of chattering cycles. When the valve was actuated with no pressure in the driver tube, no chattering was observed. At the conclusion of the test sequence, the valve seals were inspected and were in good condition. The shock waves appeared to agree with code predictions when the chattering effects were disregarded.

Stacey, Marcela R.

1992-05-01

58

Blast Injuries  

MedlinePLUS

... blast over-pressurization wave travels at a high velocity and is affected by the environment; for example, ... injuries are similar to those observed following high-speed motor vehicle accidents. Quaternary blast injury can occur ...

59

Large blast and thermal simulator advanced concept driver design by computational fluid dynamics. Final report, 1987-1989  

Microsoft Academic Search

The construction of a large test facility has been proposed for simulating the blast and thermal environment resulting from nuclear explosions. This facility would be used to test the survivability and vulnerability of military equipment such as trucks, tanks, and helicopters in a simulated thermal and blast environment, and to perform research into nuclear blast phenomenology. The proposed advanced design

Opalka

1989-01-01

60

Concentrating solar collector test results  

SciTech Connect

Some of the results obtained from three years of testing concentrating solar collectors at Sandia National Laboratories are summarized. Efficiency and thermal loss test data is shown for 16 collectors from 11 different manufacturers.

Dudley, V. E.; Workhoven, R. M.

1980-01-01

61

Single round blasting of 10-foot diameter X 65-foot depth emplacement collar holes at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Since 1961 REECo has drilled and mined emplacement holes for testing nuclear devices underground. An oversize drill pattern was the primary method used. The application of drilling the final size configuration hole to a 65-foot depth and mucking with the Auger Rig was then investigated. Numerous drilling patterns, loading and time schemes and methods were tried. Some were successful. Most were expensive. All concerned looked for a better and less costly method for this collar casing installation. Poor fragmentation in the collar holes prior to Atlas Powder becoming involved resulted in slow hole cleanout and excessive rig maintenance with associated excessive costs. One of the more successful shots was a 120-inch diameter {times} 60-foot deep hole that was drilled using 3 1/2-inch holes and then casing them to a 2-inch diameter using PVC pipe. A 30-inch burn hole was drilled to total depth. Twenty-seven 3 1/2-inch holes were drilled and then loaded with 1 1/2-inch powder boosted with Detaprimes and wired using all 0 delay caps. This shot smooth walled and the blast holes were visible all the way from top to bottom. Fragmentation was excellent and the Auger Rig mucked out quickly. The 28-inch bit used for the burn hole was a high cost item in this test and other methods continued to be investigated.

Not Available

1991-01-01

62

Blast injury research models  

PubMed Central

Blast injuries are an increasing problem in both military and civilian practice. Primary blast injury to the lungs (blast lung) is found in a clinically significant proportion of casualties from explosions even in an open environment, and in a high proportion of severely injured casualties following explosions in confined spaces. Blast casualties also commonly suffer secondary and tertiary blast injuries resulting in significant blood loss. The presence of hypoxaemia owing to blast lung complicates the process of fluid resuscitation. Consequently, prolonged hypotensive resuscitation was found to be incompatible with survival after combined blast lung and haemorrhage. This article describes studies addressing new forward resuscitation strategies involving a hybrid blood pressure profile (initially hypotensive followed later by normotensive resuscitation) and the use of supplemental oxygen to increase survival and reduce physiological deterioration during prolonged resuscitation. Surprisingly, hypertonic saline dextran was found to be inferior to normal saline after combined blast injury and haemorrhage. New strategies have therefore been developed to address the needs of blast-injured casualties and are likely to be particularly useful under circumstances of enforced delayed evacuation to surgical care.

Kirkman, E.; Watts, S.; Cooper, G.

2011-01-01

63

Interpretation of grease test results  

SciTech Connect

Standard ASTM tests, their typical results and how those results may be interpreted by the practicing lubrication engineer or specialist in the field will be discussed. Some field experiences and examples will be given. In addition, examples of inventive non-standard field tests will be shown and described. Illustrations from the old and revised lubrication engineers handbook will be used.

Rush, R.E. [Uno-Ven Co., Arlington Heights, IL (United States)

1995-09-01

64

Modeling of the Non-Auditory Response to Blast Overpressure.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of this project is to develop mathematical models of the physical processes that cause blast injury so that the results of these tests using animals in simple blast environments can be safely translated to estimating hazard to man exposed to blas...

J. H. Stuhmiller

1987-01-01

65

Thermal nuclear blast simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The facility includes a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, and two point-focus parabolic concentrators. All can be used for simulating the thermal portion of nuclear pulses. The heliostat field contains 222 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW/sub t/. Thermal nuclear blasts have been simulated using a high-speed shutter (opening and closing time of 0.15 sec over a 1-m wide aperture) in combination with heliostat control to produce square or shaped pulses. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 /times/ 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel located behind the shutter can accommodate samples up to 48 /times/ 76 cm with simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow at velocities up to 120 m/s. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, a non-tracking parabolic concentrator, and an attenuator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW/sub t/. A second furnace, currently under construction, will produce flux levels up to 1000 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 4-cm diameter and total power of 65 kW/sub t/. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11-m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 2.5-cm diameter and total power of 75 kW/sub t/. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses. 5 figs.

Cameron, C.P.; Ghanbari, C.M.

1989-01-01

66

MITG test procedure and results  

SciTech Connect

Elements and modules for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator have been performance tested since the inception of the RTG program. These test articles seldom resembled flight hardware and often lacked adequate diagnostic instrumentation. Because of this, performance problems were not identified in the early stage of program development. The lack of test data in an unexpected area often hampered the development of a problem solution. A procedure for conducting the MITG Test was developed in an effort to obtain data in a systematic, unambiguous manner. This procedure required the development of extensive data acquisition software and test automation. The development of a facility to implement the test procedure, the facility hardware and software requirements, and the results of the MITG testing are the subject of this paper.

Eck, M.B.; Mukunda, M.

1983-01-01

67

Variability of aflatoxin test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 12 lb samples, 280 g subsamples, the Waltking method of analysis, and densitometric procedures, the sampling, subsampling,\\u000a and analytical variances associated with aflatoxin test procedures were estimated. Regression analysis indicated that each\\u000a of the above variance components is a function of the concentration of aflatoxin in the population being tested. Results,\\u000a for the test procedures given above, showed that

T. B. Whitaker; J. W. Dickens; R. J. Monroe

1974-01-01

68

Blast wave energy diagnostic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distance radiation waves that supersonically propagate in optically thick, diffusive media are energy sensitive. A blast wave can form in a material when the initially diffusive, supersonic radiation wave becomes transonic. Under specific conditions, the blast wave is visible with radiography as a density perturbation. [Peterson et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056901 (2006)] showed that the time-integrated drive energy can be measured using blast wave positions with uncertainties less than 10% at the Z Facility. In some cases, direct measurements of energy loss through diagnostic holes are not possible with bolometric and x-ray radiometric diagnostics. Thus, radiography of high compression blast waves can serve as a complementary technique that provides time-integrated energy loss through apertures. In this paper, we use blast waves to characterize the energy emerging through a 2.4 mm aperture and show experimental results in comparison to simulations.

Tierney, Thomas E.; Tierney, Heidi E.; Idzorek, George C.; Watt, Robert G.; Peterson, Robert R.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Fryer, Christopher L.; Lopez, Mike R.; Jones, Michael C.; Sinars, Daniel; Rochau, Gregory A.; Bailey, James E.

2008-10-01

69

Evaluation of copper slag blast media for railcar maintenance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Copper slag was tested as a blasting substitute for zirconium silicate which is used to remove paint from railroad cars. The copper slag tested is less costly, strips paint faster, is produced near the point of need, provides a good bonding surface for paint, and permits the operator to work in a more comfortable position, i.e., standing nearly erect instead of having to crouch. Outdoor blasting with the tested Blackhawk (20 to 40 mesh) copper slag is also environmentally acceptable to the State of Utah. Results of tests for the surface erosion rate with copper slag blasting are included.

Sagers, N. W.; Finlayson, Mack H.

1989-06-01

70

Evolution of blast wave profiles in simulated air blasts: experiment and computational modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shock tubes have been extensively used in the study of blast traumatic brain injury due to increased incidence of blast-induced neurotrauma in Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. One of the important aspects in these studies is how to best replicate the field conditions in the laboratory which relies on reproducing blast wave profiles. Evolution of the blast wave profiles along the length of the compression-driven air shock tube is studied using experiments and numerical simulations with emphasis on the shape and magnitude of pressure time profiles. In order to measure dynamic pressures of the blast, a series of sensors are mounted on a cylindrical specimen normal to the flow direction. Our results indicate that the blast wave loading is significantly different for locations inside and outside of the shock tube. Pressure profiles inside the shock tube follow the Friedlander waveform fairly well. Upon approaching exit of the shock tube, an expansion wave released from the shock tube edges significantly degrades the pressure profiles. For tests outside the shock tube, peak pressure and total impulse reduce drastically as we move away from the exit and majority of loading is in the form of subsonic jet wind. In addition, the planarity of the blast wave degrades as blast wave evolves three dimensionally. Numerical results visually and quantitatively confirm the presence of vortices, jet wind and three-dimensional expansion of the planar blast wave near the exit. Pressure profiles at 90° orientation show flow separation. When cylinder is placed inside, this flow separation is not sustained, but when placed outside the shock tube this flow separation is sustained which causes tensile loading on the sides of the cylinder. Friedlander waves formed due to field explosives in the intermediate-to far-field ranges are replicated in a narrow test region located deep inside the shock tube.

Chandra, N.; Ganpule, S.; Kleinschmit, N. N.; Feng, R.; Holmberg, A. D.; Sundaramurthy, A.; Selvan, V.; Alai, A.

2012-09-01

71

ESF BLAST DESIGN ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this design analysis are to develop controls considered necessary and sufficient to implement the requirements for the controlled drilling and blasting excavation of operations support alcoves and test support alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The conclusions reached in this analysis will flow down into a construction specification ensuring controlled drilling and blasting excavation will be performed within the bounds established here.

E.F. fitch

1995-03-13

72

COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement device, did not operate effectively. Consequently, it is not suitable for application to the AWR process. (4) Initially, the spray ring (operated at approximately 2300 psi) and the nozzles provided by the pump vendor did not perform acceptably. The nozzles were replaced with a more robust model, and the performance was then acceptable. (5) The average solids concentration achieved in the slurry before Bentogrout addition was approximately 16% by weight. The solids concentration of the slurry after Bentogrout addition ranged from 26% to approximately 40%. The slurry pump and ITL system performed well at every concentration. No line plugging or other problems were noted. The results of the CTL runs and later ITL testing are summarized in an appendix to this report.

Abraham, TJ

2003-10-22

73

Blast Loading Experiments of Surrogate Models for Tbi Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical models. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory test cell setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to the conclusion that primary blast effects could cause TBI occurrences.

Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.

2009-12-01

74

Mobile evaporator corrosion test results  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

1997-05-01

75

Blast-wave characteristics near Site 300  

SciTech Connect

The blast-wave overpressures propagating in the atmosphere near the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 have been measured at selected locations to determine whether the Site 300 blast operations will be hindered by the proposed construction of a residential development adjacent to its border.We tested high-explosives (HE) weights ranging from 14 to 545 lb under various weather conditions. Although more tests should be conducted before a definitive statement can be made on the blast propagation near Site 300, we offer the following preliminary interpretation of the results obtained to date. The readings at the closest locations show that the blast-wave overpressures exceed the 126-decibel (dB) level established by LLNL at about 250 lb of HE detonation. The weather conditions do not materially affect the pressure levels at these locations. Insufficient test data exist along the Corral Hollow Road perimeter, making it difficult to reasonably predict HE blast effects along the southern border. Therefore, we recommend that additional measurements be made along this and other boundaries in future tests, to provide more comprehensive data to help determine the blast-wave propagation characteristics in the proposed development areas. Blast-wave focusing may occur in the proposed residential development area under certain weather conditions. We recommend that this possibility should be addressed for its potentially adverse impact on the proposed residential area. Because the testing ground controlled by Physics International, Inc. (PI) is adjacent to Site 300, it is important to be aware of PI`s detonation activities. Peak overpressure measurements near PI`s Corral Hollow Road entrance reveal that PI shots over 25 lb HE have exceeded 126 dB, the limit established by LLNL for safe operations.

Kang, Sang-Wook; Kleiber, J.C. Jr.

1993-08-01

76

BLAST+: architecture and applications  

PubMed Central

Background Sequence similarity searching is a very important bioinformatics task. While Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) outperforms exact methods through its use of heuristics, the speed of the current BLAST software is suboptimal for very long queries or database sequences. There are also some shortcomings in the user-interface of the current command-line applications. Results We describe features and improvements of rewritten BLAST software and introduce new command-line applications. Long query sequences are broken into chunks for processing, in some cases leading to dramatically shorter run times. For long database sequences, it is possible to retrieve only the relevant parts of the sequence, reducing CPU time and memory usage for searches of short queries against databases of contigs or chromosomes. The program can now retrieve masking information for database sequences from the BLAST databases. A new modular software library can now access subject sequence data from arbitrary data sources. We introduce several new features, including strategy files that allow a user to save and reuse their favorite set of options. The strategy files can be uploaded to and downloaded from the NCBI BLAST web site. Conclusion The new BLAST command-line applications, compared to the current BLAST tools, demonstrate substantial speed improvements for long queries as well as chromosome length database sequences. We have also improved the user interface of the command-line applications.

2009-01-01

77

Mixing Effect in Internal Blast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detonation product gases are usually assumed to be completely mixed with an existing atmosphere by the time a peak quasi-static pressure (Pqs) is reached within an enclosed internal blast environment. With incomplete mixing, however, comes a loss in pressure from unburned fuel as well as a previously unrecognized source of error: heat capacity of the gas increases substantially with temperature, providing an energy sink in regions of unmixed hot gas. Our objective was to look at the extent of mixing by measuring gas temperature at several locations within a blast chamber at the time of peak Pqs. We recorded ranges of up to 400° C depending on charge location within the chamber, which is presumed to affect turbulence and mixing. Losses in peak Pqs of up to 13% may be attributed to this mixing effect for 1-kg Pentolite charges in a 62-m3 chamber in the simple geometries tested. A reasonably accurate Pqs may be extracted from blast wave reverberations in a chamber, allowing a closer look at effects such as gas mixing and consistency among multiple gages. These results point to an explanation for missing energy and a better understanding of heat flow in internal blast.

Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.

2009-12-01

78

Azacitidine results in comparable outcome in newly diagnosed AML patients with more or less than 30% bone marrow blasts.  

PubMed

The efficacy of azacitidine has been demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with 20-30% bone marrow (BM) blasts, but limited data is available on patients with ?30% blasts. We analyzed 55 newly diagnosed AML patients, treated with azacitidine. The overall response rate was 42%. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.3 months. We confirmed poor-risk cytogenetics, therapy-related AML, performance score ?2, and white blood cell count ?15×10(9)/L as independent adverse predictors for OS. The BM blast percentage, however, had no impact on OS (P=0.55). In conclusion, administration of azacitidine is effective in AML patients with 20-30% and >30% BM blasts. PMID:23628552

van der Helm, L H; Veeger, N J G M; Kooy, M van Marwijk; Beeker, A; de Weerdt, O; de Groot, M; Alhan, C; Hoogendoorn, M; Laterveer, L; van de Loosdrecht, A A; Koedam, J; Vellenga, E; Huls, G

2013-04-28

79

SuperORRUBA Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams are needed to provide nuclear structure information far from stability to aid in the development of nuclear models and in the understanding of astrophysical processes. Highly granular, low threshold detector arrays are needed to perform such experiments. The SuperORRUBA (Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array) was created to measure lower threshold reactions with better energy resolution than the original ORRUBA detectors. The new array consists of 18 silicon detectors, each with a 64 non-resistive strip front side and a 4 non-resistive strip back side. To collect the data from these 1224 channels, the ASICs (Application-Specific Integrated Circuits) are used for timing, triggering, shaping, and digitizing the signals, with each chip handling 32 channels. Utilizing the ASICs system and a triple-alpha source, SuperORRUBA detectors were tested to ensure proper function. In addition, all preamps and ASICs elements were tested. The depletion voltage of each detector was found, and the detectors were tested for any shift in gain over time. Finally, issues with crosstalk causing poor resolution on particular channels were investigated. A detailed description of the system and the test results will be presented.

Burkhart, A. J.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.

2012-10-01

80

Densification of pond ash by blasting  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash from thermal power plants is disposed, in huge quantities in ash ponds, which occupy large land areas otherwise useful for agriculture, housing, or other development. For effective rehabilitation of ash ponds, densification of the slurry deposit is essential to increase the bearing capacity and to improve its resistance to liquefaction. Extensive field trials were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of deep blasting for densification of deposited fly ash. Ninety explosions comprising 15 single blasts, with varying depths and quantities of charges, and 3 group blasts, each having 25 charges placed at various spacings, were carried out. The compaction achieved in terms of an increase in relative density was evaluated from surface settlement measurements. Extensive field monitoring was undertaken through pore-water pressure measurements, vibration measurements, penetration tests, and block vibration tests. For the average charge of 2--4 g of explosive per cubic meter of untreated deposit, the average relative density was found to improve from 50% to 56--58%. Analysis of the test results indicates that deep blasting may be an effective technique for modest compaction of loose fly ash deposits. The field testing program presented in this paper provides valuable information that can be used for planning blast densification of fly ash deposits.

Gandhi, S.R.; Dey, A.K.; Selvam, S. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1999-10-01

81

Simulation of blast-furnace raceway conditions in a wire-mesh reactor: interference by the reactions of molybdenum mesh and initial results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel trapped air injection system has been built for a wire-mesh reactor to enable tests with short exposure times to air that are intended to simulate typical residence times in blast-furnace raceways. Initial tests have shown that the molybdenum wire-mesh sample-holder reacts with Oâ under conditions intended for this work. By varying the proportions of solid MoOâ (weight gain),

Long Wu; N. Paterson; D. R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti

2006-01-01

82

RSG Deployment Case Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

2005-09-01

83

Computer cast blast modelling  

SciTech Connect

Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. The more overburden removed by explosives, the less blasted material there is left to be transported with mechanical equipment, such as draglines and trucks. In order to optimize the percentage of rock that is cast, a higher powder factor than normal is required plus an initiation technique designed to produce a much greater degree of horizontal muck movement. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC, applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARCstation 10--41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC computer. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

Chung, S. [ICI Explosives Canada, North York, ON (Canada); McGill, M. [ICI Explosives USA, Dallas, TX (United States); Preece, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-07-01

84

SOFIS FTS EM test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Solar Occultation FTS for Inclined-orbit Satellite (SOFIS) is a solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer developed by the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) in Japan for the Global Change Observation Mission-A1 (GCOM-A1) satellite. GCOM-A1 will be placed in a 650 km non-sun-synchronous orbit, with an inclination angle of 69 degrees. ABB-Bomem is a sub-contractor of NTSpace (NEC-Toshiba Space) for the design and manufacturing of the FTS Engineering Model of SOFIS. SOFIS measures the vertical profile of the atmospheric constituents with 0.2 cm-1 spectral resolution for the spectral range covering 3-13 ?m. The atmospheric vertical resolution of SOFIS is 1 km. The target of SOFIS measurements is a global distribution of O3, HNO3, NO2, N2O, CH4, H2O, CO2, CFC-11, CFC-12, ClONO2, aerosol extinction, atmospheric pressure and temperature. NTSpace in Japan is the prime contractor of SOFIS. The spectrometer is an adapted version of the classical Michelson interferometer using an optimized optical layout and moving retro-reflectors. A solid-state laser diode operating at 1550 nm is used as metrology source of the interferometer. Its highly folded optical design results in a high performance instrument with a compact size. SOFIS FTS implements high performance control techniques to achieve outstanding speed stability of the moving mechanism. This paper describes the test activities of the SOFIS-FTS Engineering Model (EM) and preliminary results. The performances of the FTS are presented in terms of key parameters like signal-to-noise ratio, modulation efficiency and stability. Spectra acquired are shown and test methodology and analyses are presented. Lessons learned during assembly, integration and testing are described as well as improvements planned to be implemented in the Flight Model.

Soucy, Marc-Andre A.; Levesque, Luc E.; Tanii, Jun; Kawashima, Takahiro; Nakajima, Hideaki

2003-04-01

85

LTC vacuum blasting maching (concrete): Baseline report: Greenbook (Chapter)  

SciTech Connect

The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjuction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

NONE

1997-07-31

86

Dissociated methanol vehicle test results  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of chassis dynamometer testing of a 1980 Chevrolet Citation modified to run on dissociated methanol. Data are presented on the composition of the dissociated methanol gas during steady-state operation, vehicle fuel consumption during steady-state and transient operation, and exhaust emissions during transient operation. During low speed, low load operation there are significant amounts of unconverted methanol and side products to the desired dissociation reaction. Despite this, fuel economy improvements over baseline gasoline operation are high. Fuel economies of 13.3 km/L (31.3 mpg) and 11.4 km/L (26.8 mpg) were obtained at steady speed road load conditions of 65 km/h and 90 km/h respectively. Methanol fuel economy over the EPA '74 CVS hot start city driving cycle was 7.74 km/L (18.2 mpg). Methanol fuel economy over the EPA highway fuel economy test was 10.2 km/L (24.0 mpg).

Finegold, J.G.

1984-05-01

87

Heliport Surface Maneuvering Test Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During late fall 1987 and early spring 1988 flight tests were conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center's National Concepts Development and Demonstration Heliport. The purpose of these tests was to measure pilot perception of...

C. J. Wolf J. G. Morrow R. M. Weiss S. L. Erlichman

1989-01-01

88

Results of PRIM gyroscope testing  

SciTech Connect

The tests were designed so that motions of the gyroscope and the Partially Restrained Internal Member (PRIM) could be measured at different conditions of spin and PRIM clearance gaps. Two types of PRIM drive were tested. A round shaft configuration was used to test theory. An octagon drive was used to simulate the XM785 design.

Cornell, R.

1985-03-01

89

Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6, blast measurements. Part 3. Pressure near ground level. Section 4. Blast asymmetry from aerial photographs. Section 5. Ball-crusher-gauge measurements of peak pressure  

SciTech Connect

Aerial motion pictures from manned aircraft were taken of the Dog, Easy, and George Shots and from a drone aircraft on Dog Shot to determine whether asymmetries in the blast waves could be detected and measured. Only one film, that taken of Dog Shot from a drone, was considered good enough to warrant detailed analysis, but this failed to yield any positive information on asymmetries. The analysis showed that failure to obtain good arrival-time data arose from a number of cases, but primarily from uncertainities in magnification and timing. Results could only be matched with reliable data from blast-velocity switches by use of large corrections. Asymnetries, if present, were judged to have been too small or to have occurred too early to be detected with the slow-frame speed used. Recommendations for better results include locating the aircraft directly overhead at the time of burst and using a camera having greater frame speed and provided with timing marks.

Not Available

1985-04-01

90

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

NONE

1995-08-01

91

Test Results for CSTR Test 4  

SciTech Connect

One of the 3 technologies currently being developed for the Savannah River Salt Waste Processing Program is the Small-Tank Tetraphenylborate Process (STTP). This process uses sodium tetraphenylborate to precipitate and remove radioactive Cs from the waste and monosodium titanate to sorb and remove radioactive Sr and actinides. ORNL is demonstrating this process at the 1:4000 scale using a 20-liter continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The primary goal of Test 4 was to verify that the STTP process could achieve and maintain the necessary Cs decontamination while TPB was actively decomposing. Even with TPB being decomposed by the off-normal conditions of this test, the decontaimination factor for {sup 137}Cs obtained for the filtrate from the Slurry Concentrating Tank ranged from 47,000 to 646,000, exceeding the WAC standard.

Lee, D.D.

2001-05-31

92

Mobile evaporator corrosion test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase,

A. Rozeveld; D. B. Chamberlain

1997-01-01

93

Determination of Explosive Blast Loading Equivalencies with AN Explosively Driven Shock Tube  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently there has been significant interest in evaluating the potential of many different non-ideal energetic materials to cause blast damage. We present a method intended to quantitatively compare the blast loading generated by different energetic materials through use of an explosively driven shock tube. The test explosive is placed at the closed breech end of the tube and initiated with a booster charge. The resulting shock waves are then contained and focused by the tube walls to form a quasi-one-dimensional blast wave. Pressure transducers along the tube wall measure the blast overpressure versus distance from the source and allow the use of the one-dimensional blast scaling relationship to determine the energy deposited into the blast wave per unit mass of test explosive. These values were measured for C4, ANFO, and two perchlorate explosives. Explosive equivalencies from these values were found to agree with prior theory and experiment.

Jackson, Scott I.; Morris, John S.; Hill, Larry G.

2009-12-01

94

Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 2. 9. Blast injuries in foxholes  

SciTech Connect

This experiment was conducted to gain information about the amount of protection from direct blast effects that may be provided by foxholes of uniform dimensions located within distances of a nuclear explosion that are recognized as lethal for combinations of thermal and ionzing radiations and indirect blast injuries. Sixteen dogs protected in foxholes were exposed in pairs to the nuclear detonation. Autopsies performed between 10 and 15 hours after the blast demonstrated mild to moderately severe lung hemorrhages and three instances of mild to moderately severe brain hemorrhage. Ruptured ear drums and blast damage to abdominal viscera were infrequent. Evidences of acute ionizing radiation injury consisted in decreases in absolute lymphocyte counts and changes in lymph nodes and spleens. Photographs and diagrams of foxholes, animals, and tissue speciments; graphs of blast pressures, gamma doses, and neutron fluxes are included.

Talbot, J.M.; Maupin, C.S.

1985-04-01

95

Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this programâ??s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

Duane P. Moser; Ken Czerwinski; Charles E. Russell; Mavrik Zavarin

2010-07-13

96

Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program’s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

Duane P. Moser, Jim Bruckner, Jen Fisher, Ken Czerwinski, Charles E. Russell, and Mavrik Zavarin

2010-09-01

97

Primary Blast Traumatic Brain Injury in the Rat: Relating Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Behavior  

PubMed Central

The incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among military personnel is at its highest point in U.S. history. Experimental animal models of blast have provided a wealth of insight into blast injury. The mechanisms of neurotrauma caused by blast, however, are still under debate. Specifically, it is unclear whether the blast shockwave in the absence of head motion is sufficient to induce brain trauma. In this study, the consequences of blast injury were investigated in a rat model of primary blast TBI. Animals were exposed to blast shockwaves with peak reflected overpressures of either 100 or 450?kPa (39 and 110?kPa incident pressure, respectively) and subsequently underwent a battery of behavioral tests. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a promising method to detect blast injury in humans, was performed on fixed brains to detect and visualize the spatial dependence of blast injury. Blast TBI caused significant deficits in memory function as evidenced by the Morris Water Maze, but limited emotional deficits as evidenced by the Open Field Test and Elevated Plus Maze. Fractional anisotropy, a metric derived from DTI, revealed significant brain abnormalities in blast-exposed animals. A significant relationship between memory deficits and brain microstructure was evident in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in memory function. The results provide fundamental insight into the neurological consequences of blast TBI, including the evolution of injury during the sub-acute phase and the spatially dependent pattern of injury. The relationship between memory dysfunction and microstructural brain abnormalities may provide insight into the persistent cognitive difficulties experienced by soldiers exposed to blast neurotrauma and may be important to guide therapeutic and rehabilitative efforts.

Budde, Matthew D.; Shah, Alok; McCrea, Michael; Cullinan, William E.; Pintar, Frank A.; Stemper, Brian D.

2013-01-01

98

Primary blast traumatic brain injury in the rat: relating diffusion tensor imaging and behavior.  

PubMed

The incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among military personnel is at its highest point in U.S. history. Experimental animal models of blast have provided a wealth of insight into blast injury. The mechanisms of neurotrauma caused by blast, however, are still under debate. Specifically, it is unclear whether the blast shockwave in the absence of head motion is sufficient to induce brain trauma. In this study, the consequences of blast injury were investigated in a rat model of primary blast TBI. Animals were exposed to blast shockwaves with peak reflected overpressures of either 100 or 450?kPa (39 and 110?kPa incident pressure, respectively) and subsequently underwent a battery of behavioral tests. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a promising method to detect blast injury in humans, was performed on fixed brains to detect and visualize the spatial dependence of blast injury. Blast TBI caused significant deficits in memory function as evidenced by the Morris Water Maze, but limited emotional deficits as evidenced by the Open Field Test and Elevated Plus Maze. Fractional anisotropy, a metric derived from DTI, revealed significant brain abnormalities in blast-exposed animals. A significant relationship between memory deficits and brain microstructure was evident in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in memory function. The results provide fundamental insight into the neurological consequences of blast TBI, including the evolution of injury during the sub-acute phase and the spatially dependent pattern of injury. The relationship between memory dysfunction and microstructural brain abnormalities may provide insight into the persistent cognitive difficulties experienced by soldiers exposed to blast neurotrauma and may be important to guide therapeutic and rehabilitative efforts. PMID:24133481

Budde, Matthew D; Shah, Alok; McCrea, Michael; Cullinan, William E; Pintar, Frank A; Stemper, Brian D

2013-10-14

99

Chemical compatibility screening test results  

SciTech Connect

A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1997-12-01

100

Rib butterfly fractures as a possible indicator of blast trauma.  

PubMed

Forensic anthropologists have become increasingly involved in the interpretation of skeletal trauma caused by exploding ordnance. This study examines the cause and significance of butterfly fractures observed in a recent study investigating skeletal blast trauma by Christensen et al. Fractured ribs resulting from blast events carried out in the original study were re-examined revealing that rib butterfly fractures with the tensile indicator on the visceral surface were present in 100% of viable pig specimens. Additionally, manual fracture testing was performed on 46 pig ribs to simulate the bending force believed to have been sustained in the original blast events. Fracture testing resulted in 93% of specimens presenting butterfly fractures with the tensile indicator on the visceral surface. This fracture pattern differs significantly from that normally observed in association with other types of trauma events and may aid forensic anthropologists and other investigators in the identification and interpretation of blast events. PMID:23126284

Christensen, Angi M; Smith, Victoria A

2012-11-05

101

Results of Weathervane Test Series.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During June of 1973 four ionospheric barium releases were made at the Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR). This test series, code-name Weathervane, is part of a larger research program code-named HAPREX (High-Altitude Propagation Experiment) that is investigati...

D. R. McDaniel

1973-01-01

102

Bayesian detection of acoustic muzzle blasts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Acoustic detection of gunshots has many security and military applications. Most gunfire produces both an acoustic muzzle-blast signal as well as a high-frequency shockwave. However some guns do not propel bullets with the speed required to cause shockwaves, and the use of a silencer can significantly reduce the energy of muzzle blasts; thus, although most existing commercial and military gunshot detection systems are based on shockwave detection, reliable detection across a wide range of applications requires the development of techniques which incorporate both muzzle-blast and shockwave phenomenologies. The detection of muzzle blasts is often difficult due to the presence of non-stationary background signals. Previous approaches to muzzle blast detection have applied pattern recognition techniques without specifically considering the non-stationary nature of the background signals and thus these techniques may perform poorly under realistic operating conditions. This research focuses on time domain modeling of the non-stationary background using Bayesian auto-regressive models. Bayesian parameter estimation can provide a principled approach to non-stationary modeling while also eliminating the stability concerns associated with standard adaptive procedures. Our proposed approach is tested on a synthetic dataset derived from recordings of actual background signals and a database of isolated gunfire. Detection results are compared to a standard adaptive approach, the least-mean squares (LMS) algorithm, across several signal to background ratios in both indoor and outdoor conditions.

Morton, Kenneth D., Jr.; Collins, Leslie

2009-05-01

103

Brain Injury Risk from Primary Blast.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Objectives: Increased use of explosive devices in recent military conflicts have resulted in, blast overpressure is the primary cause of traumatic brain injury among combat veterans (Owens, 2008). Primary blast injury has been studied extensively in air-c...

C. R. Bass K. A. Rafaels M. B. Panzer R. S. Salzar W. A. Woods

2012-01-01

104

Blast load assessment using hydrocodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of pressures and impulses produced by blast loads with the aid of hydrocodes is studied in this paper. Numerical results are compared with those obtained with existing analytical expressions for different scaled distances and boundary conditions. In particular, the capacity of both methods to capture multiple reflections of the blast load is analyzed. The effects of mesh size

B. Luccioni; D. Ambrosini; R. Danesi

2006-01-01

105

Characterizing the Relationship Between Blast Exposure and Mild TBI with Dynamic Modeling and Testing in a New Mouse Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this research is to determine through analytical modeling and animal-based experiments the blast-level threshold for mild traumatic brain injury in humans. We have cataloged brain material properties and determined microtubule geometry and ...

C. L. Floyd J. W. Shepard

2011-01-01

106

Characterizing the Relationship Between Blast Exposure and Mild TBI with Dynamic Modeling and Testing in a New Mouse Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this research is to determine through analytical modeling and animal-based experiments the blast-level threshold for mild traumatic brain injury in humans. We have cataloged brain material properties and determined axon bundle geometry. Bas...

C. L. Floyd J. W. Shepard

2010-01-01

107

Feasibility Investigation of a Permanent Fuel-Air Explosive Blast Simulator.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Initial results from an investigation to determine the feasibility of using fuel-air-explosives (FAE) to simulate the airblast from a 1 KT nuclear blast are reported. A small scale blast facility was developed and tested. Up to 22.7 kg (50 lbs) of fuel su...

R. T. Sedgwick H. B. Kratz R. G. Herrmann

1978-01-01

108

Blast injury.  

PubMed

The shock wave generated by an explosion ("blast wave") may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

de Candole, C A

1967-01-28

109

Blast Injury  

PubMed Central

The shock wave generated by an explosion (“blast wave”) may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude.

de Candole, C. A.

1967-01-01

110

Performance tests of a fast-acting valve for the driver tubes of a large blast/thermal simulator. Final report, Jan 91-Jan 92  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the testing of a fast-acting throat valve element designed by Eaton Consolidated Controls for use in driver tubes, (blast generators) of a Large Blast/Thermal Simulator (LB/TS). An LB/TS is used to simulate decaying blast waves such as are generated by nuclear explosions. The Eaton Throat Valve Element (ETVE) was tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to evaluate its performance against the design criteria. The ETVE was mounted at the end of a driver tube and actuated 16 times at 6 different driver pressures ranging from 396 kPa to 12.4 MPa (57.5 psi to 1,800 psi). The valve seals survived successfully all 16 tests with the driver gas at room temperature and maintained an acceptable leak rate throughout the test program. The average valve lag time was determined to vary from 36 to 120 ms; however, the valve was found to chatter, going through several (up to 20) opening/closing cycles after actuation before settling in the open position. An increase in the pneumatic supply pressure driving the valve showed a minor decrease in the number of chattering cycles. When the valve was actuated with no pressure in the driver tube, no chattering was observed. At the conclusion of the test sequence, the valve seals were inspected and were in good condition. The shock waves appeared to agree with code predictions when the chattering effects were disregarded.

Stacey, M.R.

1992-05-01

111

Uncemented total hip arthroplasty using the CLS stem: a titanium alloy implant with a corundum blast finish. Results at a mean 6 years in a prospective study.  

PubMed

An uncemented titanium alloy stem with a corundum blast finish and an uncemented titanium fibermetal mesh socket were implanted in a series of 57 hips. These prostheses were selected for use in the youngest, most active, and/or heaviest candidates for total hip arthroplasty. Fifty hips were available for study at a minimum 60 months. At a mean 6 years, 92% of the hips were rated good or excellent. The mean Harris hip score was 92. One patient experienced mild thigh pain. The corundum blast finish was associated with reliable implant stability. Survival analysis predicted a 96% rate of implant survival at 92 months. Loss of bone density was rated mild, minimal, or none in 88% of the hips. Three hips developed severe bone loss due to systemic disease. Polyethylene wear was measurable in 86% of the hips. Twenty hips developed focal proximal femoral bone erosions. One hip had endosteal cavitation distal to zone 7. The presence of proximal femoral erosions or endosteal cavitation correlated positively with the presence of measurable polyethylene wear. The limited and proximal distribution of femoral bone erosion despite evidence of extensive polyethylene wear suggested that bone apposition to the corundum blast finish resulted in a barrier to migration of wear debris. PMID:8713908

Robinson, R P; Deysine, G R; Green, T M

1996-04-01

112

Explosions and blast injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Powerful explosions have the potential to inflict many different types of injuries on victims, some of which may be initially occult. Flying debris and high winds commonly cause conventional blunt and penetrating trauma. Injuries caused by blast pressures alone result from complex interactions on living tissues. Interfaces between tissues of different densities or those between tissues and trapped air result

John M. Wightman; Sheri L. Gladish

2001-01-01

113

LTC 1073 vacuum blasting (concrete) human factors assessment -- Baseline (summary)  

SciTech Connect

The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high capacity, direct pressure blasting system incorporating a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast head. A vacuum system removes dust and debris from the surfaces as it is blasted. After cleaning the surface, the abrasive, together with the rust or coating that was removed from the surface, is vacuumed into the machine through the suction hose. The dust separator contains angled steel collision pads, working with the force of gravity, to allow any reusable abrasive to fall back into the pressure vessel. The filters are manually back flushed to prevent clogging. After back flushing, dust is dumped from the dust chamber into the dust collection bag or drum by operation of the bellows valve. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on dust and noise exposure. Dust exposure was found to be minimal, but noise exposure was potentially significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place may cause the results to be inapplicable to indoor settings. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

NONE

1997-07-31

114

Thermal nuclear blast simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The facility includes a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, and two point-focus parabolic concentrators. All can be used for simulating the thermal portion of nuclear pulses. The heliostat field contains 222 computer-controlled mirrors,

C. P. Cameron; C. M. Ghanbari

1989-01-01

115

Full-scale field tests of concrete slabs subjected to blast loads  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes full-scale field explosion tests on protected and unprotected concrete slabs. The experiments were performed by the Protective Technologies Research & Development Center of the Faculty of Engineering Sciences of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU-PTR&DC) under a contract with the Israeli Ministry of Defense (MoD) and the supervision of the IDF Steering Committee for R&D of

András Schenker; Ido Anteby; Erez Gal; Yosef Kivity; Eyal Nizri; Oren Sadot; Ron Michaelis; Oran Levintant; Gabi Ben-Dor

2008-01-01

116

On Relation of Soil Moisture to Development of Rice Blast Disease with Special Reference to Results of Inoculation Experiments on Leaves and Spike Pedicels of Plants Grown in Soils Differing in Moisture and in Amounts of Silica and Fertilizer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results are reported of inoculation experiments on rice seedlings, adult leaves, and the spike pedicel of rice plants grown on soils with varying moisture content, and fertilizer and silica application. The susceptibility of the rice plant to rice blast d...

H. Suzuki

1968-01-01

117

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced b...

J. C. Crelling

1995-01-01

118

Explosive signatures: Pre & post blast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Manuscripts 1 and 2 of this dissertation both involve the pre-blast detection of trace explosive material. The first manuscript explores the analysis of human hair as an indicator of exposure to explosives. Field analysis of hair for trace explosives is quick and non-invasive, and could prove to be a powerful linkage to physical evidence in the form of bulk explosive material. Individuals tested were involved in studies which required handling or close proximity to bulk high explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX. The second manuscript reports the results of research in the design and application of canine training aids for non-traditional, peroxide-based explosives. Organic peroxides such as triacetonetriperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylenetriperoxidediamine (HMTD) can be synthesized relatively easily with store-bought ingredients and have become popular improvised explosives with many terrorist groups. Due to the hazards of handling such sensitive compounds, this research established methods for preparing training aids which contained safe quantities of TATP and HMTD for use in imprinting canines with their characteristic odor. Manuscripts 3 and 4 of this dissertation focus on research conducted to characterize pipe bombs during and after an explosion (post-blast). Pipe bombs represent a large percentage of domestic devices encountered by law enforcement. The current project has involved the preparation and controlled explosion of over 90 pipe bombs of different configurations in order to obtain data on fragmentation patterns, fragment velocity, blast overpressure, and fragmentation distance. Physical data recorded from the collected fragments, such as mass, size, and thickness, was correlated with the relative power of the initial device. Manuscript 4 explores the microstructural analysis of select pipe bomb fragments. Shock-loading of the pipe steel led to plastic deformation and work hardening in the steel grain structure as evidenced by optical microscopy and microhardness testing respectively.

Bernier, Evan Thomas

119

Evaluation of Hydraulic Test Model (HTM) flow distribution test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CRBR steam generator Hydraulic Test Model (HTM) flow distribution test results were evaluated, and it is found that the performance degradation due to the flow nonuniformity observed in the HTM test is negligible; 0.06% for the evaporator and nil for the superheater. Also, the fact that ambient temperature water was used in the test instead of hot sodium with

Y. J. Lee

1977-01-01

120

PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for

J Steimke; T Timothy Steeper

2008-01-01

121

Salmonella mutagenicity test results for 250 chemicals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This publication is a presentation of Salmonella testing results on 250 coded chemicals, encompassing 370 tests. The majority of these results were previously summarized in issues of the National Toxicology Program Technical Bulletin. However, some interpretations were changed since publication in the NTP Bulletin, based upon a reevaluation of the data. The presentation here is designed both to summarize the

Steve Haworth; Timothy Lawlor; Kristien Mortelmans; William Speck; Errol Zeiger

1983-01-01

122

Head injury and blast exposure: vestibular consequences.  

PubMed

Young adults are more likely to suffer blast injury and traumatic brain injury (TBI) than other age groups. This article reviews the literature on the vestibular consequences of blast exposure and TBI and concussion. In addition, the vestibular test findings obtained from 31 veterans with a history of blast exposure and/or mild TBI are presented. The authors discuss loss of horizontal semicircular canal function and postural instability related to head injury. Preliminary data suggest the novel theory that otolith organs are uniquely vulnerable to head injury and blast exposure. PMID:21474007

Akin, Faith W; Murnane, Owen D

2011-04-01

123

Review of Fenton Hill HDR test results  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells-one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region-would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

Brown, D.

1997-01-01

124

Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests.

Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

2006-08-01

125

Primary and secondary skeletal blast trauma.  

PubMed

This study examines primary (resulting from blast wave) and secondary (resulting from disintegrated, penetrating fragments) blast trauma to the skeleton. Eleven pigs were exposed to semi-controlled blast events of varying explosive type, charge size, and distance, including some cases with shrapnel. Skeletal trauma was found to be extensive, presenting as complex, comminuted fractures with numerous small, displaced bone splinters and fragments. Traumatic amputation of the limbs and cranium was also observed. Fractures were concentrated in areas nearer the blast, but there was generally no identifiable point of impact. Fractures were more random in appearance and widespread than those typically associated with gunshot or blunt force injury events. These patterns appear to be uniquely associated with blast trauma and may therefore assist forensic anthropologists and other forensic examiners in the interpretation of skeletal trauma by enabling them to differentiate between blast trauma and trauma resulting from some other cause. PMID:21981586

Christensen, Angi M; Smith, Victoria A; Ramos, Vanessa; Shegogue, Candie; Whitworth, Mark

2011-10-07

126

Alternative filtration testing program: Pre-evaluation of test results  

SciTech Connect

Based on results of testing eight solids removal technologies and one pretreatment option, it is recommended that a centrifugal ultrafilter and polymeric ultrafilter undergo further testing as possible alternatives to the Norton Ceramic filters. Deep bed filtration should be considered as a third alternative, if a backwashable cartridge filter is shown to be inefficient in separate testing.

Georgeton, G.K.; Poirier, M.R.

1990-09-28

127

BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST). Phase I test results  

SciTech Connect

A new full height BWR system simulator has been built under the Full-Integral-Simulation-Test (FIST) program to investigate the system responses to various transients. The test program consists of two test phases. This report provides a summary, discussions, highlights and conclusions of the FIST Phase I tests. Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests have investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. Results and governing phenomena of each test have been evaluated and discussed in detail in this report. One of the FIST program objectives is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two pretest predictions made with TRACB02 are presented and compared with test data in this report.

Hwang, W.S.; Alamgir, M.; Sutherland, W.A.

1984-09-01

128

Brain injuries from blast.  

PubMed

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) from blast produces a number of conundrums. This review focuses on five fundamental questions including: (1) What are the physical correlates for blast TBI in humans? (2) Why is there limited evidence of traditional pulmonary injury from blast in current military field epidemiology? (3) What are the primary blast brain injury mechanisms in humans? (4) If TBI can present with clinical symptoms similar to those of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), how do we clinically differentiate blast TBI from PTSD and other psychiatric conditions? (5) How do we scale experimental animal models to human response? The preponderance of the evidence from a combination of clinical practice and experimental models suggests that blast TBI from direct blast exposure occurs on the modern battlefield. Progress has been made in establishing injury risk functions in terms of blast overpressure time histories, and there is strong experimental evidence in animal models that mild brain injuries occur at blast intensities that are similar to the pulmonary injury threshold. Enhanced thoracic protection from ballistic protective body armor likely plays a role in the occurrence of blast TBI by preventing lung injuries at blast intensities that could cause TBI. Principal areas of uncertainty include the need for a more comprehensive injury assessment for mild blast injuries in humans, an improved understanding of blast TBI pathophysiology of blast TBI in animal models and humans, the relationship between clinical manifestations of PTSD and mild TBI from blunt or blast trauma including possible synergistic effects, and scaling between animals models and human exposure to blasts in wartime and terrorist attacks. Experimental methodologies, including location of the animal model relative to the shock or blast source, should be carefully designed to provide a realistic blast experiment with conditions comparable to blasts on humans. If traditional blast scaling is appropriate between species, many reported rodent blast TBI experiments using air shock tubes have blast overpressure conditions that are similar to human long-duration nuclear blasts, not high explosive blasts. PMID:22012085

Bass, Cameron R; Panzer, Matthew B; Rafaels, Karen A; Wood, Garrett; Shridharani, Jay; Capehart, Bruce

2011-10-20

129

Paint removal using wheat starch blast media  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the Wheat Starch Blasting technology is presented. Laboratory evaluations covering Almen Arc testing on bare 2024-T3 aluminum and magnesium, as well as crack detection on 7075-T6 bare aluminum, are discussed. Comparisons with Type V plastic media show lower residual stresses are achieved on aluminum and magnesium with wheat starch media. Dry blasting effects on the detection of

Terry Foster; John Oestreich

1993-01-01

130

Caloric testing 2. results in normal subjects.  

PubMed

A large number of variables were examined simultaneously for 43 normal subjects over the four irrigations of a caloric test. Care was used for every step of the testing procedure and data analysis to eliminate as much of the variance in the caloric responses as possible. The normality of each variable's distribution was examined using the Wilk-Shapiro W test and corrected if necessary by the best of several transformations. The means, standard deviation, and 95% confidence intervals of the resultant data were derived. Statistical tests of temperature, sidedness, and directionality were done on the variables and several important sources of variance were found and explained. PMID:410352

Sills, A W; Baloh, R W; Honrubia, V

131

Cell Transformation Test Results on Chlorinated Paraffins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Please find enclosed cell transformation test results on two chlorinated paraffins (58% chlorination of short chain length n-paraffins and 70% chlorination of long chain length n-paraffins) conducted at Huntingdon Research Centre for one International Chl...

A. Williams J. A. Allen M. Richold S. J. Ransome

1982-01-01

132

Clinical False-Positive Drug Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A confirmed positive drug test reassures all the parties involved in the drug testing process that the reported positive result\\u000a is an analytical true positive and as such is evidence that the individual has been exposed to the drug. That individual may\\u000a not be a drug abuser and may have a valid alternative explanation for the positive result. In this

Tai C. Kwong

133

Viscoelastic Materials Study for the Mitigation of Blast-Related Brain Injury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent preliminary research into the causes of blast-related brain injury indicates that exposure to blast pressures, such as from IED detonation or multiple firings of a weapon, causes damage to brain tissue resulting in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Current combat helmets are not sufficient to protect the warfighter from this danger and the effects are debilitating, costly, and long-lasting. Commercially available viscoelastic materials, designed to dampen vibration caused by shock waves, might be useful as helmet liners to dampen blast waves. The objective of this research is to develop an experimental technique to test these commercially available materials when subject to blast waves and evaluate their blast mitigating behavior. A 40-mm-bore gas gun is being used as a shock tube to generate blast waves (ranging from 1 to 500 psi) in a test fixture at the gun muzzle. A fast opening valve is used to release nitrogen gas from the breech to impact instrumented targets. The targets consist of aluminum/ viscoelastic polymer/ aluminum materials. Blast attenuation is determined through the measurement of pressure and accelerometer data in front of and behind the target. The experimental technique, calibration and checkout procedures, and results will be presented.

Bartyczak, Susan; Mock, Willis, Jr.

2011-06-01

134

Canister Decontamination Chamber No. 1 operability test results  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF Canister Decontamination Chamber No. 1 (CDC) was installed at the TNX facility in October, 1986 for operability testing. Operability testing was required because this equipment is unique and is a critical part of the defense waste process. The test was successful in demonstrating the canister decontamination operation. Testing verified proper nozzle locations, frit suspension, level probe and CCTV operations. The following recommendations are based on data obtained from frit blasting 24 canisters: reduce the recirculation pump speed, to allow proper level probes operation; add an extension to the chamber rinse nozzle which allows removal of frit from the top of the upper guide rinse nozzle; increase visibility through the CCTV camera; make the CMM grapple jaw pins more compatible with the MSM; and improve canister guide capability to aid in canister loading. CDC Operability Testing was completed October, 1987. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Magoulas, V.E.

1987-10-30

135

Nineteen-Foot Diameter Explosively Driven Blast Simulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the 19-foot diameter blast tunnel at Sandia National Laboratories. The blast tunnel configuration consists of a 6 foot diameter by 200 foot long shock tube, a 6 foot diameter to 19 foot diameter conical expansion section that is 40 feet long, and a 19 foot diameter test section that is 65 feet long. Therefore, the total blast

MANUEL G

2001-01-01

136

Blast Loading Experiments of Developed Surrogate Models for TBI Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical systems. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells followed by SLA prototyped skulls housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted with the simple geometries to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head due to impedance mismatches. Results from the strain correlations added to the theory of internal shearing between tissues.

Alley, Matthew; Son, Steven

2009-06-01

137

Sequential Circuit Test Generator (STG) benchmark results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report on the results of running a version of the Sequential Circuit Test Generator (STG3) on the ISCAS-89 sequential circuit benchmarks. First, they present a brief history of STG and briefly describe the algorithms used. They then describe the conditions under which the experiments were run and give the benchmark results. No particular problems were encountered when running

W.-T. Cheng; S. Davidson

1989-01-01

138

Mask materials for powder blasting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Powder blasting, or abrasive jet machining (AJM), is a technique in which a particle jet is directed towards a target for mechanical material removal. It is a fast, cheap and accurate directional etch technique for brittle materials such as glass, silicon and ceramics. The particle jet (which expands to about 1 cm in diameter) can be optimized for etching, while the mask defines the small and complex structures. The quality of the mask influences the performance of powder blasting. In this study we tested and compared several mask types and added a new one: electroplated copper. The latter combines a highly resistant mask material for powder blasting with the high-resolution capabilities of lithography, which makes it possible to obtain an accurate pattern transfer and small feature sizes (<50 µm).

Wensink, Henk; Jansen, Henri V.; Berenschot, J. W.; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

2000-06-01

139

Testing alleged mediumship: methods and results.  

PubMed

Mediums claim to be able to communicate with the deceased. Such claims attract a considerable amount of public interest and, if valid, have important implications for many areas of psychology. For over 100 years, researchers have tested alleged mediums. This work has obtained mixed results and provoked a considerable amount of methodological debate. This paper reviews the key issues in this debate, describes how the authors devised a method of testing that aimed to prevent the many problems that have hindered past research, and how they then used this method to test several professional mediums. The results of this work did not support the existence of genuine mediumistic ability. Competing interpretations of these results are discussed, along with ways in which the methodology presented in the paper could be used to assess conceptually similar, but non-paranormal, claims made in clinical, occupational and forensic contexts. PMID:15969829

O'keeffe, Ciarán; Wiseman, Richard

2005-05-01

140

A mouse model of blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are one of the main causes for casualties among civilians and military personnel in the present war against terror. Mild traumatic brain injury from IEDs induces various degrees of cognitive, emotional and behavioral disturbances but knowledge of the exact brain pathophysiology following exposure to blast is poorly understood. The study was aimed at establishing a murine model for a mild BI-TBI that isolates low-level blast pressure effects to the brain without systemic injuries. An open-field explosives detonation was used to replicate, as closely as possible, low-level blast trauma in the battlefield or at a terror-attack site. No alterations in basic neurological assessment or brain gross pathology were found acutely in the blast-exposed mice. At 7 days post blast, cognitive and behavioral tests revealed significantly decreased performance at both 4 and 7 m distance from the blast (5.5 and 2.5 PSI, respectively). At 30 days post-blast, clear differences were found in animals at both distances in the object recognition test, and in the 7 m group in the Y maze test. Using MRI, T1 weighted images showed an increased BBB permeability 1 month post-blast. DTI analysis showed an increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) and a decrease in radial diffusivity. These changes correlated with sites of up-regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase 2 in neurons and CXC-motif chemokine receptor 3 around blood vessels in fiber tracts. These results may represent brain axonal and myelin abnormalities. Cellular and biochemical studies are underway in order to further correlate the blast-induced cognitive and behavioral changes and to identify possible underlying mechanisms that may help develop treatment- and neuroprotective modalities. PMID:21946269

Rubovitch, Vardit; Ten-Bosch, Meital; Zohar, Ofer; Harrison, Catherine R; Tempel-Brami, Catherine; Stein, Elliot; Hoffer, Barry J; Balaban, Carey D; Schreiber, Shaul; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Pick, Chaim G

2011-09-17

141

Reactor calculation ''Benchmark'' PCA blind test results  

SciTech Connect

The PCA-PV Benchmark Facility was used to test the accuracy of neutron transport calculations. Several laboratories in the PCA Blind Test, including vendors of power reactors, calculated the neutron flux-spectra and reaction rates of foil detectors for specified locations in the PCA Benchmark. This was done without prior knowledge of the results of dosimetry measurements which were performed in the same configurations. The results showed that the agreement between calculations and measurements was in the range of 10 to 25%. However, a definite tendency toward under-calculation was noted. 24 refs., 22 figs., 13 tabs.

Stallmann, F.W.; Kam, F.B.K.; Eastham, J.F.; Baldwin, C.A.

1981-01-01

142

First results from MIRI verification model testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) is one of the three scientific instruments to fly on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which is due for launch in 2013. MIRI contains two sub-instruments, an imager, which has low resolution spectroscopy and coronagraphic capabilities in addition to imaging, and a medium resolution IFU spectrometer. A verification model of MIRI was assembled in 2007 and a cold test campaign was conducted between November 2007 and February 2008. This model was the first scientifically representative model, allowing a first assessment to be made of the performance. This paper describes the test facility and testing done. It also reports on the first results from this test campaign.

Lim, Tanya; Alvarez, Jose L.; Bauwens, Eva; Garcia Bedregal, Alejandro; Blommaert, Joris; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Eccleston, Paul; Ferlet, Marc; Fischer, Sebastian; Garcia-Marin, Macarena; Glasse, Alistair; Glauser, Adrian Michael; Gordon, Karl; Greene, Tom; Grundy, Tim; Hennemann, Martin; Klaas, Ulrich; Labiano, Alvaro; Lahuis, Fred; Martínez-Galarza, Juan Rafael; Martin, Bruno Merin; Morrison, Jane; Nakos, Theodoros; O'Sullivan, Brian; Pindor, Bart; Ressler, Michael; Shaughnessy, Bryan; Vandenbussche, Bart; Wells, Martyn; Wright, Gillian; Zuther, Jens

2008-08-01

143

False positive tuberculosis skin test results.  

PubMed Central

The re-emergence of tuberculosis as a significant public health threat has led to greatly renewed activity in tuberculin skin testing to identify infected persons. However, even use of the preferred skin test technique (intradermal injection of purified protein derivative via the Mantoux method) can lead to either false positive or false negative results. Interpretation of a Mantoux test can be influenced by cross reactions with other mycobacteria, intertester variation, host-response variation, and product related problems. At least 25 apparent false positive purified protein derivative skin test reactions in New York State in 1992 appeared to be associated with lots of the derivative produced by one manufacturer. These unexpected skin test results led to examination of a product with an altered appearance that may have caused the unanticipated responses. After announcement of these false positive results to the press, the company removed the product from the market. Food and Drug Administration analysis later revealed particulate matter in vials of the suspected lots of purified protein derivative.

Grabau, J C; DiFerdinando, G T; Novick, L F

1995-01-01

144

Blast shock wave mitigation using the hydraulic energy redirection and release technology.  

PubMed

A hydraulic energy redirection and release technology has been developed for mitigating the effects of blast shock waves on protected objects. The technology employs a liquid-filled plastic tubing as a blast overpressure transformer to transfer kinetic energy of blast shock waves into hydraulic energy in the plastic tubings. The hydraulic energy is redirected through the plastic tubings to the openings at the lower ends, and then is quickly released with the liquid flowing out through the openings. The samples of the specifically designed body armor in which the liquid-filled plastic tubings were installed vertically as the outer layer of the body armor were tested. The blast test results demonstrated that blast overpressure behind the body armor samples was remarkably reduced by 97% in 0.2 msec after the liquid flowed out of its appropriate volume through the openings. The results also suggested that a volumetric liquid surge might be created when kinetic energy of blast shock wave was transferred into hydraulic energy to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of the liquid. The volumetric liquid surge has a strong destructive power, and can cause a noncontact, remote injury in humans (such as blast-induced traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder) if it is created in cardiovascular system. The hydraulic energy redirection and release technology can successfully mitigate blast shock waves from the outer surface of the body armor. It should be further explored as an innovative approach to effectively protect against blast threats to civilian and military personnel. PMID:22745740

Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

2012-06-20

145

Antioxidant treatment reduces blast-induced cochlear damage and hearing loss.  

PubMed

Exposure to blast overpressure has become one of the hazards of both military and civilian life in many parts of the world due to war and terrorist activity. Auditory damage is one of the primary sequela of blast trauma, affecting immediate situational awareness and causing permanent hearing loss. Protecting against blast exposure is limited by the inability to anticipate the timing of these exposures, particularly those caused by terrorists. Therefore a therapeutic regimen is desirable that is able to ameliorate auditory damage when administered after a blast exposure has occurred. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of a combination of antioxidants 2,4-disulfonyl ?-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone (HPN-07) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) beginning 1 h after blast exposure could reduce both temporary and permanent hearing loss. To this end, a blast simulator was developed and the operational conditions established for exposing rats to blast overpressures comparable to those encountered in an open-field blast of 14 pounds per square inch (psi). This blast model produced reproducible blast overpressures that resulted in physiological and physical damage to the auditory system that was proportional to the number and amplitude of the blasts. After exposure to 3 consecutive 14 psi blasts 100% of anesthetized rats had permanent hearing loss as determined at 21 days post exposure by auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing. Animals treated with HPN-07 and NAC after blast exposure showed a significant reduction in ABR threshold shifts and DPOAE level shifts at 2-16 kHz with significant reduction in inner hair cell (IHC) and outer hair cell (OHC) loss across the 5-36 kHz region of the cochlea compared with control animals. The time course of changes in the auditory system was documented at 3 h, 24 h, 7 day and 21 day after blast exposure. At 3 h after blast exposure the auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold shifts were elevated by 60 dB in both treated and control groups. A partial recovery of to 35 dB was observed at 24 h in the controls, indicative of a temporary threshold shift (TTS) and there was essentially no further recovery by 21 days representing a permanent threshold shift (PTS) of about 30 dB. Antioxidant treatment increased the amount of both TTS and PTS recovery relative to controls by 10 and 20 dB respectively. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) reached a maximum level shift of 25-30 dB measured in both control and treated groups at 3 h after blast exposure. These levels did not change by day 21 in the control group but in the treatment group the level shifts began to decline at 24 h until by day 21 they were 10-20 dB below that of the controls. Loss of cochlear hair cells measured at 21 day after blast exposure was mostly in the outer hair cells (OHC) and broadly distributed across the basilar membrane, consistent with the distribution of loss of frequency responses as measured by ABR and DPOAE analysis and typical of blast-induced damage. OHC loss progressively increased after blast exposure reaching an average loss of 32% in the control group and 10% in the treated group at 21 days. These findings provide the first evidence that a combination of antioxidants, HPN-07 and NAC, can both enhance TTS recovery and prevent PTS by reducing damage to the mechanical and neural components of the auditory system when administered shortly after blast exposure. PMID:22326291

Ewert, Donald L; Lu, Jianzhong; Li, Wei; Du, Xiaoping; Floyd, Robert; Kopke, Richard

2012-02-06

146

Drop weight impact on hybrid-fiber ECC blast\\/shelter panels  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of an experimental study to evaluate the damage and failure mode of hybrid-fiber engineered cementitious composite (ECC) panels caused by large projectiles or fragments with the aim towards quantifying the extent to which hybrid-fiber ECC improves the resistance of blast panels against impact loading. Drop weight tests are conducted on full-scale blast\\/shelter panels (2 m

J. Zhang; M. Maalej; S. T. Quek; Y. Y. Teo

147

SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results  

SciTech Connect

The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

1985-10-01

148

Mild blast events alter anxiety, memory, and neural activity patterns in the anterior cingulate cortex.  

PubMed

There is a general interest in understanding of whether and how exposure to emotionally traumatizing events can alter memory function and anxiety behaviors. Here we have developed a novel laboratory-version of mild blast exposure comprised of high decibel bomb explosion sound coupled with strong air blast to mice. This model allows us to isolate the effects of emotionally fearful components from those of traumatic brain injury or bodily injury typical associated with bomb blasts. We demonstrate that this mild blast exposure is capable of impairing object recognition memory, increasing anxiety in elevated O-maze test, and resulting contextual generalization. Our in vivo neural ensemble recording reveal that such mild blast exposures produced diverse firing changes in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region processing emotional memory and inhibitory control. Moreover, we show that these real-time neural ensemble patterns underwent post-event reverberations, indicating rapid consolidation of those fearful experiences. Identification of blast-induced neural activity changes in the frontal brain may allow us to better understand how mild blast experiences result in abnormal changes in memory functions and excessive fear generalization related to post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:23741416

Xie, Kun; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z

2013-05-31

149

Mild Blast Events Alter Anxiety, Memory, and Neural Activity Patterns in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex  

PubMed Central

There is a general interest in understanding of whether and how exposure to emotionally traumatizing events can alter memory function and anxiety behaviors. Here we have developed a novel laboratory-version of mild blast exposure comprised of high decibel bomb explosion sound coupled with strong air blast to mice. This model allows us to isolate the effects of emotionally fearful components from those of traumatic brain injury or bodily injury typical associated with bomb blasts. We demonstrate that this mild blast exposure is capable of impairing object recognition memory, increasing anxiety in elevated O-maze test, and resulting contextual generalization. Our in vivo neural ensemble recording reveal that such mild blast exposures produced diverse firing changes in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region processing emotional memory and inhibitory control. Moreover, we show that these real-time neural ensemble patterns underwent post-event reverberations, indicating rapid consolidation of those fearful experiences. Identification of blast-induced neural activity changes in the frontal brain may allow us to better understand how mild blast experiences result in abnormal changes in memory functions and excessive fear generalization related to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Xie, Kun; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z.

2013-01-01

150

Qualification test results for the TIRS cryocooler  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ball Aerospace has completed qualification testing of its flight Stirling-cycle mechanical cryocooler for the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), an instrument slated to fly on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) platform. The TIRS cooler, developed under subcontract to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, consists of a sophisticated and highly reliable, two-stage, fixed regenerator Stirling cryocooler and its drive electronics. The TIRS cooler provides 2 W of 38 K cooling to the TIRS detectors and 9.8 W shield cooling to 85 K for less than 225 W total input power. Performance test results are reported.

Marquardt, Eric; Gully, Wilfred; Marquardt, Jennifer; Boyle, Robert; Hale, Taylor

2012-06-01

151

Simulation of blast waves with shock tubes  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that quasi-one-dimensional computational techniques can be successfully used to model the flow in large, geometrically complicated shock tubes. Such shock tubes, or blast simulators, can be used to simulate nuclear or conventional explosions by shaping the pressure history. Results from computations show favorable agreement when compared with data taken in a blast simulator facility in Gramat, France.

Andrew Mark

1990-01-01

152

The Biological Effects Of Repeated Blasts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of investigations on the biological effects of repeated blasts were reviewed. In the present study, sheep and swine were subjected to multiple blasts at a rate of one per minute in a high-explosive-driven shocktube. Three 1% lethal doses (LD1)...

D. R. Richmond E. R. Fletcher J. T. Yelverton

1981-01-01

153

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast neurotrauma mouse model.  

PubMed

Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein-linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and correlated with impaired axonal conduction and defective activity-dependent long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Intracerebral pressure recordings demonstrated that shock waves traversed the mouse brain with minimal change and without thoracic contributions. Kinematic analysis revealed blast-induced head oscillation at accelerations sufficient to cause brain injury. Head immobilization during blast exposure prevented blast-induced learning and memory deficits. The contribution of blast wind to injurious head acceleration may be a primary injury mechanism leading to blast-related TBI and CTE. These results identify common pathogenic determinants leading to CTE in blast-exposed military veterans and head-injured athletes and additionally provide mechanistic evidence linking blast exposure to persistent impairments in neurophysiological function, learning, and memory. PMID:22593173

Goldstein, Lee E; Fisher, Andrew M; Tagge, Chad A; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Velisek, Libor; Sullivan, John A; Upreti, Chirag; Kracht, Jonathan M; Ericsson, Maria; Wojnarowicz, Mark W; Goletiani, Cezar J; Maglakelidze, Giorgi M; Casey, Noel; Moncaster, Juliet A; Minaeva, Olga; Moir, Robert D; Nowinski, Christopher J; Stern, Robert A; Cantu, Robert C; Geiling, James; Blusztajn, Jan K; Wolozin, Benjamin L; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Stein, Thor D; Budson, Andrew E; Kowall, Neil W; Chargin, David; Sharon, Andre; Saman, Sudad; Hall, Garth F; Moss, William C; Cleveland, Robin O; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Stanton, Patric K; McKee, Ann C

2012-05-16

154

CLSM bleed water reduction test results  

SciTech Connect

Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report.

Langton, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Rajendran, N. [Bechtel Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1997-04-21

155

Polyurethane Barrier Surface Tracking Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper documents the testing results of the ZR prototype 600-kV mini-Marx trigger generator (MTG) and polyurethane barrier samples from four suppliers. Our goal was to qualify alternative suppliers as future sources of the dielectric interface barriers. The approach was to raise the electric fields on the polyurethane\\/water interface until surface tracks, or flashovers, occurred and compare the hold-off performance

D. L. Smith; J. M. Garde; R. L. Starbird; G. R. Ziska

2005-01-01

156

Rodent model of direct cranial blast injury.  

PubMed

Traumatic brain injury resulting from an explosive blast is one of the most serious wounds suffered by warfighters, yet the effects of explosive blast overpressure directly impacting the head are poorly understood. We developed a rodent model of direct cranial blast injury (dcBI), in which a blast overpressure could be delivered exclusively to the head, precluding indirect brain injury via thoracic transmission of the blast wave. We constructed and validated a Cranium Only Blast Injury Apparatus (COBIA) to deliver blast overpressures generated by detonating .22 caliber cartridges of smokeless powder. Blast waveforms generated by COBIA replicated those recorded within armored vehicles penetrated by munitions. Lethal dcBI (LD(50) ? 515?kPa) was associated with: (1) apparent brainstem failure, characterized by immediate opisthotonus and apnea leading to cardiac arrest that could not be overcome by cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (2) widespread subarachnoid hemorrhages without cortical contusions or intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhages; and (3) no pulmonary abnormalities. Sub-lethal dcBI was associated with: (1) apnea lasting up to 15?sec, with transient abnormalities in oxygen saturation; (2) very few delayed deaths; (3) subarachnoid hemorrhages, especially in the path of the blast wave; (4) abnormal immunolabeling for IgG, cleaved caspase-3, and ?-amyloid precursor protein (?-APP), and staining for Fluoro-Jade C, all in deep brain regions away from the subarachnoid hemorrhages, but in the path of the blast wave; and (5) abnormalities on the accelerating Rotarod that persisted for the 1 week period of observation. We conclude that exposure of the head alone to severe explosive blast predisposes to significant neurological dysfunction. PMID:21639724

Kuehn, Reed; Simard, Philippe F; Driscoll, Ian; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Williams, Alicia; Bochicchio, Grant; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

2011-08-08

157

Plastic Media Blasting Recycling Equipment Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) is a new technology introduced as a candidate to replace wet chemical paint stripping of airframes and component parts. This report documents the physical testing, observations, and laboratory analyses used to evaluate the eff...

1988-01-01

158

Materials Evaluations in an Experimental Blast Furnace.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Seven evaluation tests with blast furnace iron-bearing burden materials are described. The effects of pellet strength, fines in the burden, decreasing slag volume, pellet size, eliminating stone with superfluxed sinter, and eliminating stone by prefluxing...

P. L. Woolf

1984-01-01

159

Nucleon Form Factors from BLAST  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The BLAST (Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid) experiment has been carried out at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center to study spin-dependent electron scattering from protons and deuterons with small systematic uncertainties. The experiment used a longitudinally polarized, intense electron beam stored in the Bates South Hall Ring in combination with isotopically pure, highly-polarized internal targets of polarized hydrogen and vector- and tensor-polarized deuterium from an atomic beam source. The BLAST data have been used to extract precise results for the elastic form factor ratios GE/GM of the proton and the neutron at low momentum transfer.

Kohl, Michael

2009-08-01

160

Blast waves in frozen soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present results of experimental studies of spherical blast waves in seasonally frozen soils with different physical and mechanical properties at different temperatures. A comparison with results in [i, 2] shows that the wave parameters depend strongly on the characteristics of the soil in the initial unfrozen state and on the temperature. When the temperature falls, the maximum stresses and

G. M. Lyakhov; G. B. Frash

1983-01-01

161

LTC American`s, Inc. vacuum blasting machine: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise.

NONE

1997-07-31

162

PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the range of 1 to 6 atm (15 to 90 psia). Temperatures could be controlled in the range from ambient to 80 C. Hydrogen generated at the cathode of the cell was collected for the purpose of flow measurement and composition analysis. The test facility proved to be easy to operate, versatile, and reliable.

Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

2008-08-05

163

Scientific director`s report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1.6. Blast measurements, Part I. Summary report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of the blast pressures in Shots Dog, Easy, and George, together with earth-shock measurements on Shots Easy and George, gave new and important information concerning the magnitude and character of the blast wave near an atomic bomb. These experiments showed that secondary phenomena due presumably to thermal radiation and ion combination affect the pressure wave rather markedly near the

G. K. Hartmann; C. W. Lampson; C. J. Aronson

1951-01-01

164

JWST near infrared detectors: latest test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The James Webb Space Telescope, an infrared-optimized space telescope being developed by NASA for launch in 2014, will utilize cutting-edge detector technology in its investigation of fundamental questions in astrophysics. JWST's near infrared spectrograph, NIRSpec utilizes two 2048 × 2048 HdCdTe arrays with Sidecar ASIC readout electronics developed by Teledyne to provide spectral coverage from 0.6 microns to 5 microns. We present recent test and calibration results for the "pathfinder NIRSpec detector subsystem" as well as data processing routines for noise reduction and cosmic ray rejection.

Smith, Erin C.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Clemons, Brian L.; Engler, Chuck; Garrison, Matthew B.; Hill, Robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Cheryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Schnurr, Richard; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wilson, Donna; Loose, Markus; Bagnasco, Giorgio; Böker, Torsten; de Marchi, Guido; Ferruit, Pierre; Jakobsen, Peter; Strada, Paolo

2009-08-01

165

Blast furnace stove control  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines the process model and model-based control techniques implemented on the hot blast stoves for the No. 7 Blast Furnace at the Inland Steel facility in East Chicago, Indiana. A detailed heat transfer model of the stoves is developed. It is then used as part of a predictive control scheme to determine the minimum amount of fuel necessary to achieve the blast air requirements. The controller also considers maximum and minimum temperature constraints within the stove.

Muske, K.R. [Villanova Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Hansen, G.A.; Howse, J.W.; Cagliostro, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chaubal, P.C. [Inland Steel Industries Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States). Research Labs.

1998-12-31

166

Preliminary test results for the SVX4  

SciTech Connect

We present and summarize the preliminary test results for SVX4 chip testing. There are presently two versions of the SVX4. Version 2 has on-chip bypassing and Version 1 does not. The on-chip bypassing is a layer of transistors under the front-end analog pipeline that acts as a bypassing capacitor for the voltage supply. Its size is about a microfarad. We aggressively choose to test Version 2 because of this feature. The feature is advantageous for hybrid design because it eliminates the need for an additional passive component on the hybrid itself by placing it on the actual SVX4 die. Also, the SVX4 was designed to operate in two modes: D. and CDF. One can set which mode the chip will operate by placing a jumper in the proper position on the SVX4 chip carrier. In either mode, the chip can either use the operating parameters from the shift register or the shadow register. Similarly, this is selected by placing a jumper on the SVX4 chip carrier. This chip has this feature because it was unknown whether the new design of the shadow register would be operable. The shadow register is also call the SEU register or Single Event Upset register. An introduction into the functionality of the chip and an explanation on the difference between D. and CDF mode can be found in the SVX4 User's Manual [1].

Christofek, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Rapidis, P.; Utes, M.; /Fermilab

2005-06-01

167

HMD fast jet flying test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) system has several advantages in comparison with other displays used in the aeroplane. For example, no matter in which direction the pilot looks he always can see relevant flight data. Another point is the support of the pilot by projecting sensor pictures on the visor, especially increasing the pilot's view during night flights by an overlaid FLIR picture on the visor. The weapon delivery is faster and easier assisted by the displayed symbology and the tracking system. It is possible to lock a missile without the necessity of flight maneuvers. In more than 20 night flights on a Tornado Trainer seven different test pilows have tested a binocular HMD prototype. The helmet has been proved in ergonomic aspects, readibility and visibility of the stroke symbology and an overlaid sensor flights. There are great weaknesses for example in ergonomic aspects. The final result of the tests is that the system is not yet ready for series production. There are some important points that much be overworked, especially with the view to an application in fast jets.

Becker, Stefan; Sandl, Peter

2000-06-01

168

Electric Vehicle Battery Test Plan and Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This test plan describes methods and procedures used in testing EV batteries at TVA. Each individual module and vehicle battery pack is given an identification that is traceable through its history. Computer-controlled battery capacity testing equipment i...

T. W. Blickwedel

1984-01-01

169

Centrifugal shot blast system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997.

NONE

1998-02-01

170

FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) cobalt test assembly results  

SciTech Connect

A cobalt test assembly containing yttrium hydride pins for neutron moderation was irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility during Cycle 9A for 137.7 equivalent full power days at a power level of 291 MW. The 36 test pins consisted of a batch of 32 pins containing cobalt metal to produce Co-60, and a set of 4 pins with europium oxide to produce Gd-153, a radioisotope used in detection of the bone disease Osteoporosis. Post-irradiation examination of the cobalt pins determined the Co-60 produced with an accuracy of about 5%. The measured Co-60 spatially distributed concentrations were within 20% of the calculated concentrations. The assembly average Co-60 measured activity was 4% less than the calculated value. The europium oxide pins were gamma scanned for the europium isotopes Eu-152 and Eu-154 to an absolute accuracy of about 10%. The measured europium radioisotope and Gd-153 concentrations were within 20% of calculated values. In conclusion, the hydride assembly performed well and is an excellent vehicle for many Fast Flux Test Facility isotope production applications. The results also demonstrate that the calculational methods developed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company are very accurate. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Rawlins, J.A.; Wootan, D.W.; Carter, L.L.; Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.

1987-10-01

171

Blast predictions for Coyote Canyon explosions  

SciTech Connect

In order to conduct tests of small explosives (up to 7.5 tons of TNT) on the Kirkland Air Force Base without damaging nearby structures or seriously disturbing neighbors, explosive yield limits have been developed for no damage regardless of weather conditions and for keeping the sonic effects below the threshold of general audibility. In addition, an up-to-date blast prediction procedure, based on locally available weather data and forecasts, was developed for use by USAF meteorologists. The data used, development methods, and results are presented. (LCL)

Reed, J.W.

1982-01-01

172

13. BUILDING NO. 621, INTERIOR, TOP OF BLASTING TUB UNDERNEATH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. BUILDING NO. 621, INTERIOR, TOP OF BLASTING TUB UNDERNEATH SAWDUST HOPPER. BLASTING TUB HAS DOUBLE WALLS OF 3/4' THICK STEEL ARMOR PLATE. CHARGE TO BE TESTED IS BURIED IN SAWDUST WITH FLAME RESISTANT CHEMICALS. ELEVATOR BEHIND TUB CARRIES SAWDUST BACK TO TOP OF SAWDUST HOPPER AFTER TEST IS COMPLETED AND SAWDUST IN BLASTING TUB HAS BEEN SIFTED FOR SHELL FRAGMENTS. LOUVERS IN WALLS ARE HINGED FREELY SO THEY OPEN TO RELIEVE BLAST PRESSURE DURING A TEST. - Picatinny Arsenal, 600 Area, Test Areas District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

173

Diffuse and spatially variable white matter disruptions are associated with blast-related mild traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) due to explosive blast is common among military service members and often associated with long term psychological and cognitive disruptions. Little is known about the neurological effects of blast-related mTBI and whether they differ from those of civilian, non-blast mTBI. Given that brain damage from blasts may be diffuse and heterogeneous, we tested the hypothesis that blast mTBI is associated with subtle white matter disruptions in the brain that are spatially inconsistent across individuals. We used diffusion tensor imaging to examine white matter integrity, as quantified by fractional anisotropy (FA), in a group of American military service members with (n=25) or without (n=33) blast-related mTBI who had been deployed as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom. History of civilian non-blast mTBI was equally common across groups, which enabled testing of both blast and non-blast mTBI effects on measures sensitive to (1) concentrated, spatially consistent (average FA within a region of interest [ROI]), (2) concentrated, spatially variable (number of ROIs with low average FA), and (3) diffuse (number of voxels with low FA) disruptions of white matter integrity. Blast mTBI was associated with a diffuse, global pattern of lower white matter integrity, and this pattern was not affected by previous civilian mTBI. Neither type of mTBI had an effect on the measures sensitive to more concentrated and spatially consistent white matter disruptions. Additionally, individuals with more than one blast mTBI tended to have a larger number of low FA voxels than individuals with a single blast injury. These results indicate that blast mTBI is associated with disrupted integrity of several white matter tracts, and that these disruptions are diluted by averaging across the large number of voxels within an ROI. The reported pattern of effects supports the conclusion that the neurological effects of blast mTBI are diffuse, widespread, and spatially variable. PMID:22040736

Davenport, Nicholas D; Lim, Kelvin O; Armstrong, Michael T; Sponheim, Scott R

2011-10-20

174

Effect of Metal Particle Size on Blast Performance of RDX-Based Explosives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the role that aluminum particle size has on explosives blast performance. Tests were performed using a small sealed chamber and an open-ended shock tube. Three explosives were tested and the results presented. The Al particle size examined was 20 microns and 150 nanometers in a pressed PBXN-109 analog composition. (PBXN-109 was also tested.) A noticeable difference in

Jeffery J. Davis; Philip J. Miller

2002-01-01

175

Electric vehicle battery test plan and results  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes methods and procedures used in testing EV batteries at TVA. Each individual module and vehicle battery pack is given an identification that is traceable through its history. Computer-controlled battery capacity testing equipment is used. Three types of tests are performed - acceptance, in-vehicle, and static load. Records of tests are maintained on the forms illustrated and on computer-generated outputs shown.

Blickwedel, T.W.

1984-05-01

176

Effect of the Blasting Angle on Blast Processing of a Cylindrical Surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blast processing is a substrate processing technique during which spherical or granular materials are jetted against the substrate surface using compressed air. Blasting techniques is widely used for various mechanical parts as a surface reforming technique. When performing blast processing to a complicated-shaped substrate for the purpose of thermal spraying method, it is difficult to set blasting angle to a constant value and it is necessary to clarify the effect of state of substrate on blast processing. In present paper, the effect of blasting angle to removal processing effect and the modification state of substrate is investigated. Results from this investigation are summarized as follows: When blasting angle ? was 30º, the removal quantity ? showed the maximum. The removal quantity became large as cylindrical diameter D was larger. Removal quantity of particle diameter a =100 ?m is bigger than that of a =700 ?m. As a nozzle movement rate v increased, removal quantity ? became small. As blasting angle ? became small, removal quantity ? became large even though nozzle movement rate v was changed. As blasting pressure P increases, removal quantity ? became big.

Kubohori, Toshifumi; Binti Khalil, Nur Zalikha; Tojo, Yuichi; Takahashi, Shigetaka

177

Flash lidar performance testing: configuration and results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future planetary and lunar landers can benefit from a hazard detection (HD) system that employs a lidar to create a highresolution 3D terrain map in the vicinity of the landing site and an onboard computer to process the lidar data and identify the safest landing site within the surveyed area. A divert maneuver would then be executed to land in this safe site. An HD system enables landing in regions with a relatively high hazard abundance that would otherwise be considered unacceptably risky, but are of high interest to the scientific community. A key component of a HD system is a lidar with the ability to generate a 3D terrain image with the required range precision in the prescribed time and fits within the project resource constraints. In this paper, we present the results obtained during performance testing of a prototype "GoldenEye" 3D flash lidar developed by ASC, Inc. The testing was performed at JPL with the lidar and the targets separated by 200 m. The analysis of the lidar performance obtained for different target types and albedos, pulse energies, and fields of view is presented and compared to key HD lidar requirements identified for the Mars 2018 lander.

Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Johnson, Andrew; Chang, Daniel; Ek, Eric; Natzic, David; Spiers, Gary; Penniman, Steve; Short, Brad

2012-05-01

178

Effects of geometry on blast-induced loadings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simulations of blasts in an urban environment were performed using Loci/BLAST, a full-featured fluid dynamics simulation code, and analyzed. A two-structure urban environment blast case was used to perform a mesh refinement study. Results show that mesh spacing on and around the structure must be 12.5 cm or less to resolve fluid dynamic features sufficiently to yield accurate results. The effects of confinement were illustrated by analyzing a blast initiated from the same location with and without the presence of a neighboring structure. Analysis of extreme pressures and impulses on structures showed that confinement can increase blast loading by more than 200 percent.

Moore, Christopher Dyer

179

Blasting injuries in surface mining with emphasis on flyrock and blast area security  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problem: Blasting is a hazardous component of surface mining. Serious injuries and fatalities result from improper judgment or practice during rock blasting. This paper describes several fatal injury case studies, analyzes causative factors, and emphasizes preventive measures. Method: This study examines publications by MSHA, USGS, and other authors. The primary source of information was MSHA's injury-related publications. Results: During the

T. S. Bajpayee; T. R. Rehak; G. L. Mowrey; D. K. Ingram

2004-01-01

180

Los Alamos test-room results  

SciTech Connect

Fourteen Los Alamos test rooms have been operated for several years; this paper covers operation during the winters of 1980-81 and 1981-82. Extensive data have been taken and computer analyzed to determine performance parameters such as efficiency, solar savings fraction, and comfort index. The rooms are directly comparable because each has the same net coefficient and solar collection area and thus the same load collector ratio. Configurations include direct gain, unvented Trombe walls, water walls, phase change walls, and two sunspace geometries. Strategies for reducing heat loss include selective surfaces, two brands of superglazing windows, a heat pipe system, and convection-suppression baffles. Significant differences in both backup heat and comfort are observed among the various rooms. The results are useful, not only for direct room-to-room comparisons, but also to provide data for validation of computer simulation programs.

McFarland, R.D.; Balcomb, J.D.

1982-01-01

181

Repeated blast exposure alters open field behavior recorded under low illumination.  

PubMed

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) can have devastating behavioral consequences. This study was designed to evaluate the behavioral consequences of single or repeated bTBI, as evaluated by an open field (OF) test conducted in near-darkness to avoid confounding effects of illumination and photophobia. Sprague-Dawley rats under isoflurane anesthesia were exposed to a series of 3 sub-lethal blasts into a compressed air-driven blast chamber separated by 2 week intervals (n=11). Sham controls received anesthesia but without blast exposure (n=11). OF tests were performed 1 or 7 days after each blast using a computerized video tracking system in near-darkness to monitor spontaneous activity. Spatial and temporal variables calculated for both blast and sham groups were: Distance moved (cm) and time (s) spent in the center or periphery zones of the field, total distance traveled, speed in center and periphery zones, rearing events and non-linear regressions of distance moved and rearing events on time. Results showed that the sham group expressed the expected decrease (habituation) in total distance walked, and distance walked as well as speed in center and periphery in successive exposures to the OF while the blast group did not, a sign of impaired learning. The blast group also walked more and faster and demonstrated more rearing behavior, both considered OF signs of anxiety. These results indicate that OF outcomes of bTBI in animals have resemblance to alterations observed in human subjects with this condition and might be useful in evaluating the response of behavioral outcomes of bTBI to experimental treatments. PMID:23850767

Huang, Emerald; Ngo, Mai; Yee, Stuart; Held, Laura; Norman, Keith; Scremin, A M Erika; Scremin, Oscar

2013-07-11

182

Material Systems for Blast-Energy Dissipation  

SciTech Connect

Lightweight panels have been designed to protect buildings and vehicles from blast pressures by activating energy dissipation mechanisms under the influence of blast loading. Panels were fabricated which featured a variety of granular materials and hydraulic dissipative deformation mechanisms and the test articles were subjected to full-scale blast loading. The force time-histories transmitted by each technology were measured by a novel method that utilized inexpensive custom-designed force sensors. The array of tests revealed that granular materials can effectively dissipate blast energy if they are employed in a way that they easily crush and rearrange. Similarly, hydraulic dissipation can effectively dissipate energy if the panel features a high fraction of porosity and the panel encasement features low compressive stiffness.

James Schondel; Henry S. Chu

2010-10-01

183

BLAST FURNACE GRANULAR COAL INJECTION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC) requested financial assistance from the Department of Energy (DOE), for the design, construction and operation of a 2,800-ton-per-day blast furnace granulated coal injection (BFGCI) system for two existing iron-making blast furnaces. The blast furnaces are located at BSC's facilities in Burns Harbor, Indiana. The demonstration project proposal was selected by the DOE and awarded to Bethlehem in November 1990. The design of the project was completed in December 1993 and construction was completed in January 1995. The equipment startup period continued to November 1995 at which time the operating and testing program began. The blast furnace test program with different injected coals was completed in December 1998.

Unknown

1999-10-01

184

Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results  

SciTech Connect

The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

1990-04-01

185

Results of the HESSI Test Mishap Investigation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On March 21, 2000, the High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) spacecraft was subjected to a series of vibration tests at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as a part of its flight certification program. The structural qualification test, denoted ...

D. B. Worth R. N. Phillips

2000-01-01

186

Blast furnace reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vast a dvances h ave b een m ade in blast-furnace t echnology d uring t he p ast two decades through p lant t rials and plant d evelopments a ssisted by research to provide b etter u nderstanding of physical and chemical w orkings of the blast f urnace. T he f ields of research have i ncluded

E. T. Turkdogan

1978-01-01

187

A computational model of blast loading on the human eye.  

PubMed

Ocular injuries from blast have increased in recent wars, but the injury mechanism associated with the primary blast wave is unknown. We employ a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computational model to understand the stresses and deformations incurred by the globe due to blast overpressure. Our numerical results demonstrate that the blast wave reflections off the facial features around the eye increase the pressure loading on and around the eye. The blast wave produces asymmetric loading on the eye, which causes globe distortion. The deformation response of the globe under blast loading was evaluated, and regions of high stresses and strains inside the globe were identified. Our numerical results show that the blast loading results in globe distortion and large deviatoric stresses in the sclera. These large deviatoric stresses may be indicator for the risk of interfacial failure between the tissues of the sclera and the orbit. PMID:23591604

Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Ziegler, Kimberly; Seo, Jung Hee; Ramesh, K T; Nguyen, Thao D

2013-04-17

188

A new non-uniform blast load model for SDOF method of one-way reinforced concrete slab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new effective model for calculation of the equivalent uniform blast load for non-uniform blast load such as close-in explosion of a one-way square and rectangle reinforced concrete slab is proposed in this paper. The model is then validated using single degree of freedom (SDOF) system with the experiments and blast tests for square slabs and rectangle slabs. Test results showed that the model is accurate in predicting the explosive charge weight and stand-off distance to impose a given damage level on the tested RC slabs especially for close-in blast load. It is shown that the new model is more accurate than the conventional SDOF analysis and is running faster than the FE analysis.

Wang, W.; Zhang, D.; Lu, F.; Wang, S.-C.; Tang, F.

2012-08-01

189

An assessment of environmental impacts of quarry-blasting operation: a case study in Istanbul, Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluates the impacts resulting from quarry-blasting operation on nearby buildings and structures as it generates ground vibration, air blast, and fly rocks. In this paper, first blasting operation and its possible environmental effects are defined. Then the methods of blast-vibration prediction and commonly accepted criteria to prevent damage were introduced. A field experimental work was conducted to minimize

Cengiz Kuzu; Hasan Ergin

2005-01-01

190

TESLA Test Facility:status and results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The TESLA Test Facility (TTF), under construction at DESY by an international collaboration, is an R&D test bed for the superconducting option for future linear e+\\/e- colliders. It consists of an infrastructure to process and test the cavities and of a 500 MeV linac. The infrastructure has been installed and is fully operational. It includes a complex of clean rooms,

B. Aune

1996-01-01

191

MHD air preheaters: Results of thermomechanical tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thermomechanical tests conducted on four different high-purity periclase magnesia-fired brick were used to select suitable refractory material for the design of a regenerative heat exchanger (Cowper type) for an open-cycle indirect preheating, MHD pilot plant. Tests were conducted under the most severe temperature condition allowable in standard test equipment. The choice among the refractories were made supposing that the

Valente

1994-01-01

192

Reduction of sidewall inclination and blast lag of powder blasted channels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Powder blasting (abrasive jet machining) is a fast directional machining technique for brittle materials like silicon and glass. The cross-section of a powder blasted channel has a rounded V-shape. These inclined sidewalls are caused by the typical impact angle dependent removal rate for brittle materials. It has a negative influence on the channel depth and aspect ratio, and results in

Henk Wensink; Miko C. Elwenspoek

2002-01-01

193

Autogenous shrinkage of concrete containing granulated blast-furnace slag  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the experimental results and prediction model for the autogenous shrinkage of concrete made with various water-to-cementitious materials ratios (w\\/cm) ranging from 0.27 to 0.42 and granulated blast-furnace slag (BFS) in the range of 0% to 50% by mass of the total cementitious materials. Test results showed that BFS concrete exhibited greater autogenous shrinkage than ordinary concrete with

K. M. Lee; H. K. Lee; S. H. Lee; G. Y. Kim

2006-01-01

194

Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

Leader, D.R.

1993-09-15

195

Hematuria home screening: repeat testing results.  

PubMed

To determine at what interval screening should be repeated to detect bladder cancer before it becomes muscle invasive 856 men who had 14 negative daily home tests for hematuria with a chemical reagent strip 9 months previously performed repeat tests. Of these men 50 (5.8%) had at least 1 positive test during the second 14-day screening period and 38 were evaluated, 15 of whom (39.5%) had significant urological pathological conditions, including 8 with malignancies. Bladder cancer was noted in 7 men, with no tumor invading the muscularis propria. The finding of 7 bladder cancers in 856 men (0.82%) who had a negative test 9 months previously indicates that bladder cancer has a brief preclinical duration and that testing must be repeated at least annually for screening to detect bladder cancer consistently before invasion occurs. PMID:7776456

Messing, E M; Young, T B; Hunt, V B; Newton, M A; Bram, L L; Vaillancourt, A; Hisgen, W J; Greenberg, E B; Kuglitsch, M E; Wegenke, J D

1995-07-01

196

Evaluation of Liquefaction Susceptibility of Clean Sands after Blast Densification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of earthquakes on infrastructure facilities is an important topic of interest in geotechnical research. A key design issue for such facilities is whether or not liquefaction will occur during an earthquake. The consequences of this type of ground failure are usually severe, resulting in severe damage to a facility and in some cases the loss of human life. One approach to minimize the effect of liquefaction is to improve the ground condition by controlled blasting. The main limitations of the blast densification technique are that the design is mostly empirical and verification studies of densification have resulted in contradictory results in some case studies. In such cases, even though the ground surface settles almost immediately after blasting, common verification tests such as the cone penetration test (CPT), standard penetration test (SPT), and shear wave velocity test (Vs) suggest that the soil mass has not been improved at all. This raises concerns regarding the future performance of the soil and casts doubts on whether or not the improved deposit is still susceptible to liquefaction. In this work, a blast densification program was implemented at the Oakridge Landfill located in Dorchester County, SC, to gain information regarding the condition of a loose sand deposit during and after each blast event. In addition, an extensive laboratory testing program was conducted on reconstituted sand specimens to evaluate the mechanical behavior of saturated and gassy, medium dense sands during monotonic and cyclic loading. The results from the field and laboratory program indicate that gas released during blasting can remain trapped in the soil mass for several years, and this gas greatly affects the mechanical behavior of the sand. Gas greatly increases the liquefaction resistance of the soil. If the gas remains in the sand over the life of a project, then it will maintain this increased resistance to liquefaction, whether or not the penetration resistance increases with time. As part of this work, a methodology based on the critical state concepts was described to quantify the amount of densification needed at a certain project to make the soil more resistant to liquefaction and flow.

Vega Posada, Carlos Alberto

197

Acceleration of Ungapped Extension in Mercury BLAST  

PubMed Central

The amount of biosequence data being produced each year is growing exponentially. Extracting useful information from this massive amount of data efficiently is becoming an increasingly difficult task. There are many available software tools that molecular biologists use for comparing genomic data. This paper focuses on accelerating the most widely used such tool, BLAST. Mercury BLAST takes a streaming approach to the BLAST computation by off loading the performance-critical sections to specialized hardware. This hardware is then used in combination with the processor of the host system to deliver BLAST results in a fraction of the time of the general-purpose processor alone. This paper presents the design of the ungapped extension stage of Mercury BLAST. The architecture of the ungapped extension stage is described along with the context of this stage within the Mercury BLAST system. The design is compact and runs at 100 MHz on available FPGAs, making it an effective and powerful component for accelerating biosequence comparisons. The performance of this stage is 25× that of the standard software distribution, yielding close to 50× performance improvement on the complete BLAST application. The sensitivity is essentially equivalent to that of the standard distribution.

Buhler, Jeremy; Chamberlain, Roger D.

2007-01-01

198

Implementation of the exploding wire technique to study blast-wave-structure interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effort invested in improving our understanding of the physics of high-energy explosion events has been steadily increasing since the latter part of the twentieth century. Moreover, the dramatic increase in computer power over the last two decades has made the numerical simulation approach the dominant tool for investigating blast phenomena and their effects. However, field tests, on both large and small scales, are still in use. In the current paper, we present an experimental tool to better resolve and study the blast-structure interaction phenomenon and to help validate the numerical simulations of the same. The experimental tool uses an exploding wire technique to generate small-scale cylindrical and spherical blast waves. This approach permits safe operation, high repeatability, and the use of advanced diagnostic systems. The system was calibrated using an analytical model, an empirical model, and numerical simulation. To insure that spherical blast geometry was achieved, a set of free air blast experiments was done in which high-speed photography was used to monitor the blast structure. A scenario in which an explosion occurred in the vicinity of a structure demonstrated the system's capabilities. Using this simple but not trivial configuration showed unequivocally the effectiveness of this tool. From this comparison, it was found that at early times of blast-structure interaction, the agreement between the two sets of results was very good, but at later times incongruences appeared. Effort has been made to interpret this observation. Furthermore, by using similitude analysis, the results obtained from the small-scale experiments can be applied to the full-scale problem. We have shown that an exploding wire system offers an inexpensive, safe, easy to operate, and effective tool for studying phenomena related to blast-wave-structure interactions.

Ram, O.; Sadot, O.

2012-11-01

199

Photovoltaic concentrator test results and interpretations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of actively- and passively-cooled photovoltaic modules and arrays have been tested at the Sandia Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility. Four actively-cooled collectors were studied: (1) the Acurex parabolic trough module efficiency is 7.9%, (2) the E-systems module demonstrates a 9.9% efficiency, (3) the General Electric module has an 8.2% efficiency, and (4) the Varian module measures a 14%

H. J. Gerwin

1981-01-01

200

A miniature pressure sensor for blast event evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to people who deal with explosive devices. Protection from TBI has attracted more and more interest. Great efforts have been taken to the studies on the understanding of the propagation of the blast events and its effect on TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges is that the current available pressure sensors are not fast enough to capture the blast wave especially the transient period. This paper reports an ultrafast pressure sensor that could be very useful for analysis of the fast changing blast signal. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. It uses a 45º angle polished fiber sitting in a V-groove on a silicon chip. The endface of the angle polished fiber and the diaphragm which is lifted off on the side wall of the V-groove form the FP cavity. The sensor is very small and can be mounted on different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. The tests were conducted at Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) in Natick, MA. The sensors were mounted in a shock tube, side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increased pressure. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors and their response time is comparable.

Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

2011-05-01

201

Alkahest NuclearBLAST : a user-friendly BLAST management and analysis system  

PubMed Central

Background - Sequencing of EST and BAC end datasets is no longer limited to large research groups. Drops in per-base pricing have made high throughput sequencing accessible to individual investigators. However, there are few options available which provide a free and user-friendly solution to the BLAST result storage and data mining needs of biologists. Results - Here we describe NuclearBLAST, a batch BLAST analysis, storage and management system designed for the biologist. It is a wrapper for NCBI BLAST which provides a user-friendly web interface which includes a request wizard and the ability to view and mine the results. All BLAST results are stored in a MySQL database which allows for more advanced data-mining through supplied command-line utilities or direct database access. NuclearBLAST can be installed on a single machine or clustered amongst a number of machines to improve analysis throughput. NuclearBLAST provides a platform which eases data-mining of multiple BLAST results. With the supplied scripts, the program can export data into a spreadsheet-friendly format, automatically assign Gene Ontology terms to sequences and provide bi-directional best hits between two datasets. Users with SQL experience can use the database to ask even more complex questions and extract any subset of data they require. Conclusion - This tool provides a user-friendly interface for requesting, viewing and mining of BLAST results which makes the management and data-mining of large sets of BLAST analyses tractable to biologists.

Diener, Stephen E; Houfek, Thomas D; Kalat, Sam E; Windham, DE; Burke, Mark; Opperman, Charles; Dean, Ralph A

2005-01-01

202

Passive blast pressure sensor  

DOEpatents

A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

2013-03-19

203

Construction of Customized Sub-Databases from NCBI-nr Database for Rapid Annotation of Huge Metagenomic Datasets Using a Combined BLAST and MEGAN Approach  

PubMed Central

We developed a fast method to construct local sub-databases from the NCBI-nr database for the quick similarity search and annotation of huge metagenomic datasets based on BLAST-MEGAN approach. A three-step sub-database annotation pipeline (SAP) was further proposed to conduct the annotation in a much more time-efficient way which required far less computational capacity than the direct NCBI-nr database BLAST-MEGAN approach. The 1st BLAST of SAP was conducted using the original metagenomic dataset against the constructed sub-database for a quick screening of candidate target sequences. Then, the candidate target sequences identified in the 1st BLAST were subjected to the 2nd BLAST against the whole NCBI-nr database. The BLAST results were finally annotated using MEGAN to filter out those mistakenly selected sequences in the 1st BLAST to guarantee the accuracy of the results. Based on the tests conducted in this study, SAP achieved a speedup of ?150–385 times at the BLAST e-value of 1e–5, compared to the direct BLAST against NCBI-nr database. The annotation results of SAP are exactly in agreement with those of the direct NCBI-nr database BLAST-MEGAN approach, which is very time-consuming and computationally intensive. Selecting rigorous thresholds (e.g. e-value of 1e–10) would further accelerate SAP process. The SAP pipeline may also be coupled with novel similarity search tools (e.g. RAPsearch) other than BLAST to achieve even faster annotation of huge metagenomic datasets. Above all, this sub-database construction method and SAP pipeline provides a new time-efficient and convenient annotation similarity search strategy for laboratories without access to high performance computing facilities. SAP also offers a solution to high performance computing facilities for the processing of more similarity search tasks.

Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong

2013-01-01

204

Performance predictions for the large blast\\/thermal simulator based on experimental and computational results. Final report, Aug 89Mar 91  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computational study was performed with the BRL-Q1D code to determine the expected performance characteristics fo the proposed U.S. Large Blast\\/Thermal Simulator (LB\\/TS). This computational study complements an earlier experimental parametric study which was performed in the 25.4-cm shock tube located at the BRL. For the experiments, the BRL 25.4-cm shock tube was configured as a 1:57 scale, axisymmetric, single-driver

Schraml

1991-01-01

205

Feasibility investigation of a permanent fuel-air explosive blast simulator. Topical report 9 May 77-9 Aug 78  

Microsoft Academic Search

Initial results from an investigation to determine the feasibility of using fuel-air-explosives (FAE) to simulate the airblast from a 1 KT nuclear blast are reported. A small scale blast facility was developed and tested. Up to 22.7 kg (50 lbs) of fuel such as propylene oxide can be disseminated through a hemispherical nozzle head containing 600 nozzles to form 9.14

R. T. Sedgwick; H. B. Kratz; R. G. Herrmann

1978-01-01

206

The effects of primary thoracic blast injury and morphine on the response to haemorrhage in the anaesthetised rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

1 h _ 1 I.V.), were allocated randomly to one of three groups: Group I, sham blast; Group II, thoracic blast; Group III, thoracic blast plus morphine (0.5 mg kg _1 I.V. given 5 min after blast). Blast (Groups II and III) resulted in significant (P < 0.05, ANOVA) bradycardia, hypotension and apnoea. Sham blast (Group I) had no effect.

M. Sawdon; M. Ohnishi; P. E. Watkins; E. Kirkman

2002-01-01

207

Study of blast event propagation in different media using a novel ultrafast miniature optical pressure sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI, also called intracranial injury) is a high potential threat to our soldiers. A helmet structural health monitoring system can be effectively used to study the effects of ballistic/blast events on the helmet and human skull to prevent soldiers from TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges lies in that the pressure sensor installed inside the helmet system must be fast enough to capture the blast wave during the transient period. In this paper, an ultrafast optical fiber sensor is presented to measure the blast signal. The sensor is based on a Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometeric principle. An FP cavity is built between the endface of an etched optical fiber tip and the silica thin diaphragm attached on the end of a multimode optical fiber. The sensor is small enough to be installed in different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. Several groups of tests regarding multi-layer blast events were conducted to evaluate the sensors' performance. The sensors were mounted in different segments of a shock tube side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increasing pressure. The segments of the shock tube were filled with different media. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors. In addition, the home-made shock tube could provide a good resource to study the propagation of blast event in different media.

Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Hongtao; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

2011-05-01

208

Pion Electroproduction from Deuterium at BLAST  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The latest pion electroproduction results from the BLAST (Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid) experiment at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center are presented. The experiment used the BLAST detector, a longitudinally polarized electron beam at 850 MeV, and internal targets of polarized hydrogen and vector and tensor polarized deuterium. Event selection and particle identification will be discussed. The measured asymmetries for exclusive pion electroproduction from deuterium will be presented and compared with results obtained from hydrogen and available theoretical predictions.

Shinozaki, Aki

2007-04-01

209

Photovoltaic concentrator test results and interpretations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of actively- and passively-cooled photovoltaic modules and arrays have been tested at the Sandia Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility. Four actively-cooled collectors were studied: (1) the Acurex parabolic trough module efficiency is 7.9%, (2) the E-systems module demonstrates a 9.9% efficiency, (3) the General Electric module has an 8.2% efficiency, and (4) the Varian module measures a 14% efficiency. Among the passively-cooled collectors tested is the Martin-Marietta Array, and it is shown that a 10 C difference in cell temperature changes the conversion efficiency from 9.0 to about 9.4%. In addition, the Spectrolab array has been 99.2% reliable and has a measured efficiency of 7.4%. Finally, the Motorola module demonstrates efficiencies of 7.8% and 10.7%. In order to compare collector performances, each design must be optimized.

Gerwin, H. J.

210

Macro-mechanical modelling of blast wave mitigation in foams. Part I: review of available experiments and models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multiphase flows, which involve compressible or incompressible fluids with linear or nonlinear dynamics, are found in all areas of technology at all length scales and flow regimes. In this contribution, we discuss application of aqueous-foam barriers against blast wave impact. The first experiments demonstrating this behaviour were conducted in the early 1980s in free-field tests. Based on structural requirements, various foams with different blast energy contents were tested with the aim of characterizing the time history of the blast pressure reduction. A number of consistent methodologies for calculating this pressure reduction in foam are based on the effective gas flow model. For estimating the uncertainties of these methodologies, we briefly demonstrate their comparison with existing experimental data. Thereafter, we present various modifications of modelling approaches and their comparison with new results of blast wave experiments.

Britan, A.; Shapiro, H.; Liverts, M.; Ben-Dor, G.; Chinnayya, A.; Hadjadj, A.

2013-02-01

211

Phase C Flygt Mixer Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) teamed with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and ITT Flygt Corporation to conduct a test program evaluating shrouded axial propeller mixers (Flygt mixers) for heel removal in SRS Tank 19. SRS is identifying and investigating techniques to remove sludge heels from waste tanks such as Tank 19.

Poirier, M.R.

1999-06-08

212

Code Verification Results of an LLNL ASC Code on Some Tri-Lab Verification Test Suite Problems  

SciTech Connect

As scientific codes become more complex and involve larger numbers of developers and algorithms, chances for algorithmic implementation mistakes increase. In this environment, code verification becomes essential to building confidence in the code implementation. This paper will present first results of a new code verification effort within LLNL's B Division. In particular, we will show results of code verification of the LLNL ASC ARES code on the test problems: Su Olson non-equilibrium radiation diffusion, Sod shock tube, Sedov point blast modeled with shock hydrodynamics, and Noh implosion.

Anderson, S R; Bihari, B L; Salari, K; Woodward, C S

2006-12-29

213

A34 MAT TESTS: RESULTS AND ANALYSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT This report describes a series of tests conducted on a UK trunk road in which the dynamic,tyre forces generated by over 1500 heavy goods vehicles (HGV’s) were measured,using a load measuring mat containing 144 capacitive strip sensors. This data was used to investigate the relative road damaging potential of the various classes of vehicles, and the degree of spatial

A. C. Collop; D. Cebon; D. J. Cole; T. E. C. Potter

1994-01-01

214

HTS SMES magnet design and test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes design, construction, and testing of a 5 kJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) magnet. This magnet was built by American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) for Gesellschaft fur Innovative Energieumwandlung und Speicherung (EUS) of Germany. The magnet consists of a solenoidal coil constructed from a silver-sheathed BiPb2Sr2Ca2Cu2O (Bi-2223) conductor which was reacted before winding. The coil is epoxy impregnated

S. S. Kalsi; D. Aized; B. Conner; G. Snitchier; J. Campbell; R. E. Schwall; J. Kellers; T. Stephanblome; A. Tromm; P. Winn

1997-01-01

215

Test Results for Fmvss 110. Volume 2. 12 Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The following automobile and tire combinations were tested for compliance with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 110: Cougar A, Goodyear Wide Tread; Chevelle G, Uniroyal Laredo; Dodge Monaco, Goodyear Power Cushion; Pontiac Firebird 1, Goodyear Speedw...

1969-01-01

216

Single round blasting of 10-foot diameter X 65-foot depth emplacement collar holes at the Nevada Test Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Since 1961 REECo has drilled and mined emplacement holes for testing nuclear devices underground. An oversize drill pattern was the primary method used. The application of drilling the final size configuration hole to a 65-foot depth and mucking with the ...

1991-01-01

217

Development of a pebble-bed liquid-nitrogen evaporator\\/superheater for the BRL 1\\/6th-scale large blast\\/thermal simulator test bed. Phase 1. Prototype design and analysis. Final report, Sep 87-Oct 88  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the context of design studies for the U.S. Large Blast\\/Thermal Simulator (LB\\/TS), a liquid-nitrogen (LN), pebble-bed evaporator and superheater was designed for the 1\\/6th-scale LB\\/TS Test Bed. This pebble-bed heater would produce hot nitrogen gas at a predetermined temperature from a cryogenic LN2 source at pressure up to 1700 psig. The flow rate would be sufficient to fill the

I. B. Osofsky; G. P. Mason; M. J. Tanaka

1991-01-01

218

OPERA Resistive Plate Chambers underground test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The OPERA experiment [M. Guler et al., CERN/SPSC 2000-028, SPSC/P318, LNGS P25/2000, July 10, 2000; M. Guler et al., CERN/SPSC 2001-025, SPSC/M668, LNGS-EXP 30/2001 Add. 1/01, August 21, 2001] will study ??? oscillations through ? appearance on the 732 Km long CERN to Gran Sasso baseline. The magnet yokes of the two muon spectrometers are instrumented with 44 layers of high resistivity bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) operated in streamer mode. Each layer covers about 70 m2. Four RPC planes were instrumented and the first tests were performed confirming a good behaviour of the installed RPCs in terms of intrinsic noise and operating currents. The measured noise maps agree with those obtained in the extensive quality tests performed at surface. Counting rates are below 20 Hz/m2. Single an multiple cosmic muon tracks were also reconstructed. The estimated efficiency is close to the geometrical limit and the very first measurements of the absolute and differential muon flux are in agreement with expectations.

Bergnoli, A.; Brugnera, R.; Candela, A.; Carrara, E.; Ciesielski, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Degli Esposti, L.; di Giovanni, A.; D'Incecco, M.; di Troia, C.; Dusini, S.; Fanin, C.; Felici, G.; Gambarara, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gatta, M.; Grianti, F.; Gustavino, C.; Lindozzi, M.; Longhin, A.; Mengucci, A.; Monacelli, P.; Paoloni, A.; Stanco, L.; Tatananni, E.; Terranova, F.; Spinetti, M.; Stipcevic, M.; Sugonyaev, V.; Terminiello, L.; Ventura, M.; Votano, L.

2006-08-01

219

Uncertainty in in-place filter test results  

SciTech Connect

Some benefits of accounting for uncertainty in in-place filter test results are explored. Information the test results provide relative to system performance acceptance limits is evaluated in terms of test result uncertainty. An expression for test result uncertainty is used to estimate uncertainty in in-place filter tests on an example air cleaning system. Modifications to the system test geometry are evaluated in terms of effects on test result uncertainty.

Scripsick, R.C.; Beckman, R.J.; Mokler, B.V.

1996-12-31

220

Nucleon and Deuteron Form Factors from BLAST  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The BLAST experiment was designed to study in a systematic manner the spin-dependent, electromagnetic interaction on hydrogen and deuterium. Measuring only asymmetries in electron scattering with respect to the beam helicity, target spin, or both; the BLAST experiment was able to extract information on nucleon and deuteron form factors independent of beam intensity or target density. By further forming ``super-ratios'' of asymmetries, measurements were possible independent of beam and target polarization thus reducing uncertainties due to these quantities as well. Some of the form factor results from BLAST will be briefly presented here. Also, in response to observed discrepancies between polarization measurements and those obtained using traditional Rosenbluth separation techniques a proposed experiment, OLYMPUS, which will use the BLAST detector to measure the two photon contribution to elastic electron scattering will also be presented.

Hasell, D. K.

2009-12-01

221

Test Results for Residual Moisture - Atryn  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... ID 000482, “pH Determination”. Solubility was evaluated after reconstitution with 10 ml of ASTM Type 1 reagent grade water. ... More results from www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvaccines/bloodbloodproducts/approvedproducts

222

Prediction of ground vibrations resulting from the blasting operations in an open-pit mine by adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study is to predict the peak particle velocity (PPV) values from both presently constructed simple regression model and fuzzy-based model. For this purpose, vibrations induced by bench blasting operations were measured in an open-pit mine operated by the most important magnesite producing company (MAS) in Turkey. After gathering the ordered pairs of distance and PPV values, the site-specific parameters were determined using traditional regression method. Also, an attempt has been made to investigate the applicability of a relatively new soft computing method called as the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict PPV. To achieve this objective, data obtained from the blasting measurements were evaluated by constructing an ANFIS-based prediction model. The distance from the blasting site to the monitoring stations and the charge weight per delay were selected as the input parameters of the constructed model, the output parameter being the PPV. Valid for the site, the PPV prediction capability of the constructed ANFIS-based model has proved to be successful in terms of statistical performance indices such as variance account for (VAF), root mean square error (RMSE), standard error of estimation, and correlation between predicted and measured PPV values. Also, using these statistical performance indices, a prediction performance comparison has been made between the presently constructed ANFIS-based model and the classical regression-based prediction method, which has been widely used in the literature. Although the prediction performance of the regression-based model was high, the comparison has indicated that the proposed ANFIS-based model exhibited better prediction performance than the classical regression-based model.

Iphar, Melih; Yavuz, Mahmut; Ak, Hakan

2008-11-01

223

Optimization and application of blasting parameters based on the "pushing-wall" mechanism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The large structure parameter of a sublevel caving method was used in Beiminghe iron mine. The ores were generally lower than the medium hardness and easy to be drilled and blasted. However, the questions of boulder yield, "pushing-wall" accident rate, and brow damage rate were not effectively controlled in practical blasting. The model test of a similar material shows that the charge concentration of bottom blastholes in the sector is too high; the pushing wall is the fundamental reason for the poor blasting effect. One of the main methods to adjust the explosive distribution is to increase the length of charged blastholes. Therefore, the field tests with respect to increasing the length of uncharged blastholes were made in 12# stope of -95 subsection and 6# stope of Beiminghe iron mine. This paper took the test result of 12# stope as an example to analyze the impact of charge structure on blasting effect and design an appropriate blasting parameter that is to similar to No.12 stope.

Ren, Feng-yu; Sow, Thierno Amadou Mouctar; He, Rong-xing; Liu, Xin-rui

2012-10-01

224

Airlift recirculation well test results -- Southern sector  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated solvents used in the A and M-Areas at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from 1952--1982 have contaminated the groundwater under the site. A plume of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) in the Lost Lake aquifer is moving generally southward with the natural flow of groundwater. To comply with the requirements of the current SCDHEC Part B Permit, a series of wells is being installed to contain and treat the plume. Airlift Recirculation Wells (ARW) are a new and innovative technology with potential for more cost effective implementation than conventional pump and treat systems. Two Airlift Recirculation Wells have been installed and tested to quantify performance parameters needed to locate a line of these wells along the leading edge of the contaminant plume. The wells proved to be very sensitive to proper development, but after this requirement was met, performance was very good. The Zone of Capture has been estimated to be within a radius of 130--160 ft. around the wells. Thus a line of wells spaced at 250 ft. intervals could intercept the contaminant plume. At SSR-012, TCE was stripped from the groundwater at approximately 1.2 lb./day. The longer term effect of the recirculation wells upon the plume and the degree of recirculation within the aquifer itself will require additional data over a longer time period for an accurate review. Data collection is ongoing.

White, R.M.; Hiergesell, R.A.

1997-08-01

225

Panoramic night vision goggle flight test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Panoramic Night Vision Goggle (PNVG) has begun operational test and evaluation with its 100-degree horizontal by 40-degree vertical field of view (FOV) on different aircraft and at different locations. Two configurations of the PNVG are being evaluated. The first configuration design (PNVG I) is very low in profile and fits underneath a visor. PNVG I can be retained by the pilot during ejection. This configuration is interchangeable with a day helmet mounted tracker and display through a standard universal connector. The second configuration (PNVG II) resembles the currently fielded 40-degree circular FOV Aviator Night Vision Imaging Systems (ANVIS) and is designed for non-ejection seat aircraft and ground applications. Pilots completed subjective questionnaires after each flight to compare the capability of the 100-degree horizontal by 40-degree vertical PNVG to the 40-degree circular ANVIS across different operational tasks. This paper discusses current findings and pilot feedback from the flight trials objectives of the next phase of the PNVG program are also discussed.

Franck, Douglas L.; Geiselman, Eric E.; Craig, Jeffrey L.

2000-06-01

226

Project SAVE: Evaluation of Pilot Test Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The long-term goal of Project SAVE (Stop Alcohol Violations Early) is to reduce underage drinking. When a major revision of the program was initiated, the pilot program was evaluated for statistically measurable changes against short-term goals. The results of that evaluation are presented here. Four elements were included in the evaluation…

Bell, Mary Lou; Bliss, Kappie

227

49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Review of drug testing results. 199.109 Section 199.109...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.109 Review of drug testing...

2012-10-01

228

49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Review of drug testing results. 199.109 Section 199.109...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.109 Review of drug testing...

2011-10-01

229

Extracellular cyclophilin A protects against blast-induced neuronal injury.  

PubMed

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subsequent neurobehavioral deficits are major disabilities suffered by the military and civilian population worldwide. Rigorous scientific research is underway to understand the mechanism of blast TBI and thereby develop effective therapies for protection and treatment. By using an in vitro shock tube model of blast TBI with SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, we have demonstrated that blast exposure leads to neurobiological changes in an overpressure and time dependent manner. Paradoxically, repeated blast exposures resulted in less neuronal injury compared to single blast exposure and suggested a potential neuroprotective mechanism involving released cyclophilin A (CPA). In the present study, we demonstrate accumulation of CPA in the culture medium after repeated blast exposures supporting the notion of extracellular CPA mediated neuroprotection. Post-exposure treatment of the cells with purified recombinant CPA caused significant protection against blast-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore, repeated blast exposure was associated with phosphorylation of the proteins ERK1/2 and Bad suggesting a potential mechanism of neuroprotection by extracellular CPA and may aid in the development of targeted therapies for protection against blast-induced TBI. PMID:23511555

Arun, Peethambaran; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Wang, Ying; Long, Joseph B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

2013-03-17

230

Rice blast evaluation of newly introduced germplasm  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Genetic resistance to the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph Pyricularia grisea oryzae) was identified in newly introduced rice germplasm through quarantine when tested in artificially inoculated greenhouse and field nursery tests during the 2007 growing season. Of 229 accessions, 31 we...

231

Blast lung: experience at CIMS.  

PubMed

Blast lung is a clinical condition which is characterised by respiratory difficulty and hypoxia without obvious external injury to the chest in bomb blast cases. Two patients of the bomb blast episode were brought at emergency department at Chhattisgarh Institute of Medical Sciences, Bilaspur in a state of shock. After proper wound care, resuscitation and investigation both the cases proved to be that of blast lung. In bomb blast cases although there might not be any external injury over chest wall, it will be sensible to rule out blast lung in all cases with the help of computerised tomography. PMID:23029850

Singh, Archana; Deshkar, A M; Kashyap, B K; Choudhary, K N; Naik, S K; Tembhurnikar, P S; Singh, B P

2012-02-01

232

Experimental and Computational Study of Water Blast Mitigation Associated with Different Water Configurations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An explosion yielding a shock wave is just one of the many threats the US faces. This threat can cause damage to equipment, structures, and cause significant risk to personnel. These threats define an immediate importance for understanding blast mitigation techniques via readily available mitigants. Specific blast mitigation techniques using water are being studied. Four fundamentally different water configurations are being considered. The fundamental mitigation mechanisms such as momentum transfer, large impedance differences, and evaporation are being explored. Laboratory testing using an explosively driven shock tube and a pressurized air shock tube are used for configurations including: solid water barriers, water sprays, water sheets, and individual droplets of water. Trends observed will be explained based on simulations coupled with known droplet breakup phenomena and analysis. We will report on experimental results and analysis, in addition to discussing the various blast mechanisms associated with each testing configuration.

Zakrajsek, Andrew; Miklaszewski, Eric; Son, Steven

2011-06-01

233

12 CFR 252.157 - Disclosure of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Disclosure of stress test results. 252.157 Section 252...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations...Companies § 252.157 Disclosure of stress test results. (a) Public...

2013-01-01

234

12 CFR 252.147 - Reports of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.147 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.147 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

2013-01-01

235

12 CFR 252.148 - Disclosure of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Disclosure of stress test results. 252.148 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.148 Disclosure of stress test results. (a) Public...

2013-01-01

236

12 CFR 325.207 - Publication of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Publication of stress test results. 325.207 Section 325.207...GENERAL POLICY CAPITAL MAINTENANCE Annual Stress Test § 325.207 Publication of stress test results. (a) Publication...

2013-01-01

237

Jet Blast Fence Investigation at John F. Kennedy International Airport.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A blast fence installed at the departure end of runway 31L at John F. Kennedy International Airport intended to protect aircraft landing on runway 4R from the effects of jet blast was believed to be ineffective. Tests were conducted in two phases. The ini...

G. H. Christiansen

1975-01-01

238

Assessment of Atmospheric Emissions from Quenching of Blast Furnace Slag with Blast Furnace Blowdown Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report gives results of 15 emission measurements made on a laboratory scale facility simulating typical plant slag quenching practice. The measurements were made to determine if a potential alternative to treatment prior to discharge of blast furnace ...

G. Annamraju W. Kemner P. J. Schworer

1984-01-01

239

Blast Furnace Operation with Oxygen-Enriched Unheated Blast Air.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three trials with oxygen-enriched unheated blast air are described. The trials were conducted in the Bureau of Mines experimental blast furnace located in Bruceton, PA. For the first trial, moisture was added to the oxygenated blast. The second and third ...

P. L. Woolf

1985-01-01

240

Blast Noise Standards and Instrumentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A survey of noise from quarry production blasting was conducted at seven crushed-stone quarries, providing information on close-in noise generation, comparative instrumentation, and evaluation of the sound levels as related to blasting parameters and exis...

D. E. Siskind C. R. Summers

1974-01-01

241

Effect of Blast Exposure on Sleep and Daytime Sleepiness in U.S. Marine Corps Breachers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Traumatic brain injury resulting from blast exposure is an increasingly common problem among Soldiers returning from combat deployment. In order to understand the extent of damage resulting from blast exposure, this study examined students and instructors...

A. Kelley E. Rath J. Athy J. Chiarmonte M. Vasbinder

2010-01-01

242

CFD design studies of an advanced concept driver for a large blast\\/thermal simulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work is underway at the US Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL) to develop a design for a large scale facility to simulate nuclear blast and thermal loading. The facility, termed the US Large Blast\\/Thermal Simulator (LB\\/TS), will be used to test full scale military equipment. The blast portion of the simulation will be produced by a compressed gas driven shock

Klaus O. Opalka; Richard J. Person

1990-01-01

243

Proceedings of the twelfth annual symposium on explosives and blasting research  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain 22 papers presented at the conference. Topics relate to blast vibration assessment, slope stability, rock fragmentation, positioning of mining equipment, blasting legislation and regulations, and blast hole tests. Most papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1996-12-01

244

MEASUREMENT OF AIR BLAST EFFECTS FROM SIMULATED NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE EXCURSIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tests were conducted to evaluate methods of simulating on a small scale, ; the effect of nuclear reactor runaway'' on a containment shell surrounding the ; reactor. Reactor core vessels, simulated by small pressure tanks, were burst by ; chemical reactions of various rates, and the resulting pressure-time histories ; were recorded by piezoelectric air blast gages placed at various

R. J. Larson; W. C. Olson

1957-01-01

245

Strength and pore structure of ternary blended cement mortars containing blast furnace slag and silica fume  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blended cement mortars with fixed workability and incorporating blast furnace slag and silica fume, were tested for compressive strength and mercury intrusion, with a view to comparing their performance with that of plain Portland cement mortar and\\/or slag-cement mortar. The obtained results showed that with high portions of slag and silica fume in the binding system, the mortars reached relatively

L. Bágel

1998-01-01

246

Strengthening effects of finely ground fly ash, granulated blast furnace slag, and their combination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of finely ground fly ash (FGFA), finely ground granulated blast furnace slag (FGGBS), and their combination on the compressive strength of concrete was studied. Test results showed that incorporating 20% FGFA or FGGBS can significantly increase the compressive strength of concrete after 3 days. The compressive strength of concrete incorporating the combination of FGFA and FGGBS is higher

Kefeng Tan; Xincheng Pu

1998-01-01

247

ARCING FLASH\\/BLAST REVIEW WITH SAFETY SUGGESTIONS FOR DESIGN AND MAINTENANCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant engineering and test efforts have been undertaken in the last few years into the area of arc flash\\/blast hazards in electrical equipment. The result has been a better understanding of arcing faults and how to prevent and\\/or minimize the hazards to personnel and equipment. This paper highlights some of the findings that may help in safety management and equipment

Tim Crnko; Steve Dyrnes; Cooper Bussmann

248

Failure Predictions of a Clamped Plate Under Close-in Blast Loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this project was to create an effective computer simulation that predicts the response of a thin clamped plate to close range explosive blast loading. In this study, the response of two models created with the commercial software program LS-Dyna were compared to actual results from physical testing. The first model used a Lagrangian model for the structure

Brigid Toner

2012-01-01

249

Identity Test Results Memo, May 6, 2010 - MenHibrix  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... Identity Test Results Memo, May 6, 2010 - MenHibrix. MEMORANDUM. Date: 06 May, 2010. ... Product. Lot Number. Identity Test Results. Hib-TT. ... More results from www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvaccines/vaccines/approvedproducts

250

Bomb blast injury: effect on middle and inner ear  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To study the symptomatology, clinical findings and the effects of blast injury on middle and inner ear in survivors of bomb\\u000a blast.\\u000a \\u000a Settings City of Mumbai, India.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The study group consisted of 52 patients exposed to the bomb blast that occurred on 25th August 2003.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Result and Analysis  The distance of the victim from the blast site has no major infiuence

M. V. Jagade; R. A. Patil; I. S. Suhail; P. Kelkar; S. Nemane; J. Mahendru; V. Kalbande; P. Kewle

2008-01-01

251

Management of primary blast injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blast waves are produced following the detonation of munitions, the firing of large caliber guns, or from any type of explosion. These blast waves can be powerful enough to injure the individuals exposed to them. This type of injury is called primary blast injury (PBI) and the organs most vulnerable to PBI are the gas-filled organs, namely the ear, the

Gregory J. Argyros

1997-01-01

252

Results of Ocular Dominance Testing Depend on Assessment Method  

PubMed Central

Purpose We developed a near ocular dominance test modeled after the distance hole-in-the card test, and assessed both test-retest reliability of four tests of ocular dominance and agreement between tests. Methods 46 subjects ages 18 to 78 years with visual acuity 20/40 or better in each eye were enrolled from a primary care practice. All subjects had normal eye examinations, with the exception of refractive error, and were examined in their habitual correction. Subjects were tested twice each with the distance hole-in-the-card test, new near hole- in-the-card test, near convergence test, and the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group (PEDIG) fixation preference test. Test-retest reliability and agreement between tests were evaluated with the Kappa statistic. Results There was substantial to almost perfect test-retest reliability for the distance hole-in-the-card test, new near hole-in-the-card test, convergence test, and PEDIG fixation preference test (Kappa, k=0.77, 0.62, 0.84, 0.77, respectively). In contrast, the agreement between the new near hole in the card test and the other three tests – distance hole in the card, near convergence, and PEDIG fixation preference– was moderate to slight (k=0.41, 0.19, 0.11, respectively). Agreement was moderate to fair (k=0.47, 0.32) between the distance hole in the card test and the near convergence test, and between the distance-hole-in-the-card test and the PEDIG fixation preference test. Agreement was fair (k=0.27) between the near convergence test and the PEDIG fixation preference test. Conclusions Although there was excellent test-retest reliability of each ocular dominance test, there was only moderate to slight agreement between tests. Results of ocular dominance tests seem to vary depending on both the testing distance and the specific activity performed as part of the testing procedure.

Rice, Melissa L.; Leske, David A.; Smestad, Christina E.; Holmes, Jonathan M.

2008-01-01

253

Expanded rock blast modeling capabilities of DMC( )BLAST, including buffer blasting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A discrete element computer program named DMC( )BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting. This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented a...

D. S. Preece J. P. Tidman S. H. Chung

1996-01-01

254

Jet Blast Hazards.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report encompasses a broad review of hazards directly related to inadvertent use of jet thrust power and its adverse effects on other aircraft, airport-ramp personnel, passengers and airport equipment. These jet-blast hazards are illustrated by a repr...

1972-01-01

255

Factors Affecting Internal Blast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internal blast refers to explosion effects in confined spaces, which are dominated by the heat output of the explosive. Theoretical temperatures and pressures may not be reached due to heat losses and incomplete gas mixing. Gas mixing can have the largest effect, potentially reducing peak quasi-static pressure by a factor of two due to lack of thermal equilibrium between products

R. H. Granholm; H. W. Sandusky; J. E. Felts

2007-01-01

256

FACTORS AFFECTING INTERNAL BLAST  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internal blast refers to explosion effects in confined spaces, which are dominated by the heat output of the explosive. Theoretical temperatures and pressures may not be reached due to heat losses and incomplete gas mixing. Gas mixing can have the largest effect, potentially reducing peak quasi-static pressure by a factor of two due to lack of thermal equilibrium between products

R. H. Granholm; H. W. Sandusky; J. E. Felts

2007-01-01

257

Transient changes in neuronal cell membrane permeability after blast exposure.  

PubMed

The biochemical mechanisms of explosive blast-induced traumatic brain injury and the subsequent long-term neurobehavioral abnormalities are still not completely understood. We studied the biochemical mechanism of blast traumatic brain injury using our recently reported in-vitro model system with a shock tube. Primary blast exposure of in-vitro models leads to neurobiological changes in an overpressure dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Lactate dehydrogenase was released significantly into the extracellular medium without cell death after blast exposure, indicating compromised cell membrane integrity. We further explored the integrity of cell membrane after blast exposure by fluorescent dye uptake/release techniques in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Our data indicate that blast exposure leads to an overpressure-dependent transient increase in the release of preloaded calcein AM into the culture medium with proportional intracellular decrease. Uptake of an extracellular nucleic acid-binding dye TO-PRO-3 iodide was also increased significantly after blast exposure, indicating that the increased molecular transport is bidirectional and nuclear membrane integrity is also affected by blast exposure. These results suggest that blast exposure perturbs the integrity of the neuronal cell membrane, leading to increased bidirectional transport of molecules--a potential mechanism that can lead to traumatic brain injury. PMID:22426026

Arun, Peethambaran; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Wang, Ying; Long, Joseph B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

2012-04-18

258

Mechanisms of hearing loss after blast injury to the ear.  

PubMed

Given the frequent use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) around the world, the study of traumatic blast injuries is of increasing interest. The ear is the most common organ affected by blast injury because it is the body's most sensitive pressure transducer. We fabricated a blast chamber to re-create blast profiles similar to that of IEDs and used it to develop a reproducible mouse model to study blast-induced hearing loss. The tympanic membrane was perforated in all mice after blast exposure and found to heal spontaneously. Micro-computed tomography demonstrated no evidence for middle ear or otic capsule injuries; however, the healed tympanic membrane was thickened. Auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emission threshold shifts were found to be correlated with blast intensity. As well, these threshold shifts were larger than those found in control mice that underwent surgical perforation of their tympanic membranes, indicating cochlear trauma. Histological studies one week and three months after the blast demonstrated no disruption or damage to the intra-cochlear membranes. However, there was loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) within the basal turn of the cochlea and decreased spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and afferent nerve synapses. Using our mouse model that recapitulates human IED exposure, our results identify that the mechanisms underlying blast-induced hearing loss does not include gross membranous rupture as is commonly believed. Instead, there is both OHC and SGN loss that produce auditory dysfunction. PMID:23840874

Cho, Sung-Il; Gao, Simon S; Xia, Anping; Wang, Rosalie; Salles, Felipe T; Raphael, Patrick D; Abaya, Homer; Wachtel, Jacqueline; Baek, Jongmin; Jacobs, David; Rasband, Matthew N; Oghalai, John S

2013-07-01

259

Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection; [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it will be the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. steel company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals f or such use.

Crelling, J.C.

1993-12-31

260

Effect of micro-roughness produced by TiO 2 blasting—tensile testing of bone attachment by using coin-shaped implants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to examine bone response to micro-rough titanium implants. Forty coin-shaped implants were divided into eight groups according to their surface roughness. The first group had electropolished surfaces. The surfaces of implant groups 2–8 were blasted with TiO2 particles with incremental grain sizes ranging from 7.5–12.5 to 270–330?m. Five implants from each group were

Hans Jacob Rønold; Jan Eirik Ellingsen

2002-01-01

261

Recommendations for a New and Improved ORCA Modeling System Blast Module.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The blast module of the Operational Requirement-based Casualty Assessment (ORCA) modeling system computer software package was reviewed and compared to the WRAIR blast injury model (INJURY). As a result, recommendations are presented in this report to imp...

O. P. Litt

2004-01-01

262

Reporting Test Results to the Public: Exploring the Doughnut.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper examines some of the issues involved in releasing test results to the press. The first part is based on a survey of National Association of Test Directors members (72 of the 142 members completed a questionnaire on reporting test results to the public). The survey included the following: to whom are results reported; what kind of…

Perlman, Carole L.

263

Mathematics Placement Test: Typical Results with Unexpected Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the results of a prior case-study analysis of mathematics placement at one university, the mathematics department developed and piloted a mathematics placement test. This article describes the implementation process for a mathematics placement test and further analyzes the test results for the pilot group. As an unexpected result, the…

Ingalls, Victoria

2011-01-01

264

Mathematics Placement Test: Typical Results with Unexpected Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Based on the results of a prior case-study analysis of mathematics placement at one university, the mathematics department developed and piloted a mathematics placement test. This article describes the implementation process for a mathematics placement test and further analyzes the test results for the pilot group. As an unexpected result, the…

Ingalls, Victoria

2011-01-01

265

CAVITATION TESTING RESULTS FOR A TORTUOUS PATH CONTROL VALVE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Testing results for a control valve of the tortuous path design type employing right angle turns and multiple paths are pre- sented. The results indicate that noise and vibration are so low that normally used testing methods are not applicable. Test results show the unique behavior of this type of flow path in its ability to minimize cavitation activity.

William J. Rahmeyer; Herbert L Miller; Sanjay V. Sherikar

266

Experimental study of blast-induced traumatic brain injury using a physical head model.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to quantify intracranial biomechanical responses and external blast overpressures using physical head model to understand the biomechanics of blast traumatic brain injury and to provide experimental data for computer simulation of blast-induced brain trauma. Ellipsoidal-shaped physical head models, made from 3-mm polycarbonate shell filled with Sylgard 527 silicon gel, were used. Six blast tests were conducted in frontal, side, and 45 degrees oblique orientations. External blast overpressures and internal pressures were quantified with ballistic pressure sensors. Blast overpressures, ranging from 129.5 kPa to 769.3 kPa, were generated using a rigid cannon and 1.3 to 3.0 grams of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) plastic sheet explosive (explosive yield of 13.24 kJ and TNT equivalent mass of 2.87 grams for 3 grams of material). The PETN plastic sheet explosive consisted of 63% PETN powder, 29% plasticizer, and 8% nitrocellulose with a density of 1.48 g/cm3 and detonation velocity of 6.8 km/s. Propagation and reflection of the shockwave was captured using a shadowgraph technique. Shockwave speeds ranging from 423.3 m/s to 680.3 m/s were recorded. The model demonstrated a two-stage response: a pressure dominant (overpressure) stage followed by kinematic dominant (blast wind) stage. Positive pressures in the brain simulant ranged from 75.1 kPa to 1095 kPa, and negative pressures ranged from -43.6 kPa to -646.0 kPa. High- and normal-speed videos did not reveal observable deformations in the brain simulant from the neutral density markers embedded in the midsagittal plane of the head model. Amplitudes of the internal positive and negative pressures were found to linearly correlate with external overpressure. Results from the current study suggested a pressure-dominant brain injury mechanism instead of strain injury mechanism under the blast severity of the current study. These quantitative results also served as the validation and calibration data for computer simulation models of blast brain injuries. PMID:20058556

Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Son, Steven F

2009-11-01

267

Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

Courtney, Michael W.; Courtney, Amy C.

2010-12-01

268

An experimental study on corrosion resistance of concrete with ground granulate blast-furnace slag  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents experimental test results on corrosion resistance of concrete containing ground granulate blast-furnace slag (GGBS) and ASTM Type I or ASTM Type V cement. To investigate the problem, a series of tests were performed. First, rapid chloride permeability tests were executed in accordance with ASTM C 1202 to determine the qualitative terms of chloride-ion penetrability. Second, accelerated chloride-ion

Kyong Yun Yeau; Eun Kyum Kim

2005-01-01

269

Blasting to the Substrate of Various Temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blasting is a substrate processing technique during which spherical or granular materials made of metal or ceramics are jetted against the substrate surface using compressed air. The high speed colliding of blasting materials against the surface produces a peening effect. The purpose of blasting is to create a clean substrate surface. However, there are almost no investigations that consider the influence of the substrate temperature. The object of this investigation is to clarify the influence of substrate temperature on blasting. Results of this investigation are summarized as follows: in spite of the substrate material, the removal rate was the smallest at 260~270 K. Influence of substrate temperature on the removal rate of an Al substrate is larger than that of other substrates. Influence of substrate temperature on arc height is large when higher than the room temperature. Influence of substrate temperature on arc height of an Al substrate is larger than that of other substrates. As hardness HV value increases, arc height becomes large. Even if the substrate temperature changes, an Am substrate can be used as a standard substrate for the blasting process.

Kubohori, Toshifumi; Tojo, Yuichi; Inui, Yasuyuki

2010-10-01

270

Single Pass Streaming BLAST on FPGAs*†  

PubMed Central

Approximate string matching is fundamental to bioinformatics and has been the subject of numerous FPGA acceleration studies. We address issues with respect to FPGA implementations of both BLAST- and dynamic-programming- (DP) based methods. Our primary contribution is a new algorithm for emulating the seeding and extension phases of BLAST. This operates in a single pass through a database at streaming rate, and with no preprocessing other than loading the query string. Moreover, it emulates parameters turned to maximum possible sensitivity with no slowdown. While current DP-based methods also operate at streaming rate, generating results can be cumbersome. We address this with a new structure for data extraction. We present results from several implementations showing order of magnitude acceleration over serial reference code. A simple extension assures compatibility with NCBI BLAST.

Herbordt, Martin C.; Model, Josh; Sukhwani, Bharat; Gu, Yongfeng; VanCourt, Tom

2008-01-01

271

Acurex Solar Corporation modular industrial solar retrofit qualification test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under the Department of Energy's Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit project, industrial process steam systems incorporating line-focus solar thermal collectors were designed and hardware was installed and tested. This report describes the test results for the system designed by Acurex Solar Corporation. The test series included function and safety tests to determine that the system operated as specified, an unattended operations

C. P. Cameron; V. E. Dudley

1986-01-01

272

Acurex Solar Corporation Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under the Department of Energy's Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit project, industrial process steam systems incorporating line-focus solar thermal collectors were designed and hardware was installed and tested. This report describes the test results for the system designed by Acurex Solar Corporation. The test series included function and safety tests to determine that the system operated as specified, an unattended operations

C. P. Cameron; V. E. Dudley

1987-01-01

273

Effects of Testing Conditions on Conceptual Survey Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Pre-testing and post-testing is a commonly used method in Physics Education Research to assess student learning gains. It is well recognized in the community that timings and incentives in delivering conceptual tests can impact test results. However, it is difficult to control these variables across different studies. As a common practice, a…

Ding, Lin; Reay, Neville W.; Lee, Albert; Bao, Lei

2008-01-01

274

Physical separations soil washing system cold test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This test summary describes the objectives, methodology, and results of a physical separations soil-washing system setup and shakedown test using uncontaminated soil. The test is being conducted in preparation for a treatability test to be conducted in the North Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. It will be used to assess the feasibility of using a physical separations process to

McGuire

1993-01-01

275

Removal of phosphate from aqueous solution with blast furnace slag  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blast furnace slag was used to remove phosphate from aqueous solutions. The influence of pH, temperature, agitation rate, and blast furnace slag dosage on phosphate removal was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. In addition, the yield and mechanisms of phosphate removal were explained on the basis of the results of X-ray spectroscopy, measurements of zeta potential

Ensar Oguz

2004-01-01

276

Expanded rock blast modeling capabilities of DMC{_}BLAST, including buffer blasting  

SciTech Connect

A discrete element computer program named DMC{_}BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting. This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in 2-D. DMC{_}BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts. The blast modeling capabilities of DMC{_}BLAST have been expanded to include independently dipping geologic layers, top surface, bottom surface and pit floor. The pit can also now be defined using coordinates based on the toe of the bench. A method for modeling decked explosives has been developed which allows accurate treatment of the inert materials (stemming) in the explosive column and approximate treatment of different explosives in the same blasthole. A DMC{_}BLAST user can specify decking through a specific geologic layer with either inert material or a different explosive. Another new feature of DMC{_}BLAST is specification of an uplift angle which is the angle between the normal to the blasthole and a vector defining the direction of explosive loading on particles adjacent to the blasthole. A buffer (choke) blast capability has been added for situations where previously blasted material is adjacent to the free face of the bench preventing any significant lateral motion during the blast.

Preece, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tidman, J.P.; Chung, S.H. [ICI Explosives (Canada)

1996-12-31

277

Azimuthal variation of radiation of seismic energy from cast blasts  

SciTech Connect

As part of a series of seismic experiments designed to improve the understanding of the impact of mining blasts on verifying a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, a sixteen station network of three-component seismic sensors were deployed around a large cast shot in the Black Thunder Mine. The seismic stations were placed, where possible, at a range of 2.5 kilometers with a constant inter-station spacing of 22.5 degrees. All of the data were recorded with the seismometers oriented such that the radial component pointed to the middle point of the approximately 2 kilometer long shot. High quality data were recorded at each station. Data were scaled to a range of 2.5 kilometers and the sum of the absolute value of the vertical, radial, and transverse channels computed. These observations were used to construct radiation patterns of the seismic energy propagating from the cast shot. It is obvious that cast shots do not radiate seismic energy isotropically. Most of the vertical motion occurs behind the highwall while radial and transverse components of motion are enhanced in directions parallel to the highwall. These findings have implications for local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and possibly for regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic observations of cast blasting. Locally, it could be argued that peak particle velocities could be scaled not only by range but also by azimuthal direction from the shot. This result implies that long term planning of pit orientation relative to sensitive structures could mitigate problems with vibration levels from future blasting operations. Regionally, the local radiation pattern may be important in determining the magnitude of large scale cast blasts. Improving the transparency of mining operations to international seismic monitoring systems may be possible with similar considerations.

Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Martin, R.L. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States)

1996-12-31

278

Dynamic fragmentation of blast mitigants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental evidence from a wide range of sources shows that the expanding cloud of explosively disseminated material comprises “particles” or fragments which have different dimensions from those associated with the original material. Powders and liquids have often been used to surround explosives to act as blast mitigants, and this is the main driver for our research. There are also many other areas of interest where an initially intact material surrounding an explosive charge is dynamically fragmented into a distribution of fragment sizes. Examples of such areas include fuel air explosives and enhanced blast explosives as well as quasi-static pressure mitigation systems, and our studies are thus also relevant to these applications. In this paper, we consider the processes occurring as an explosive interacts with a surrounding layer of liquid or powder and identify why it is important to model these processes as a multiphase material problem as opposed to a single phase, single material velocity problem. We shall present results from this class of numerical modelling. In this paper we shall explore what determines the particle or fragment size distribution resulting from explosive dissemination of a layer of material and discuss reasons why clouds from disseminated liquids and powders look similar. We shall support our analysis with results from recent explosives trials and introduce early results from some ongoing small scale explosive mitigation experiments.

Milne, A. M.; Parrish, C.; Worland, I.

2010-02-01

279

Drug and Alcohol Testing Results. 1997 Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 1997 Annual Report is a compilation and analysis of mass transit drug and alcohol testing reported by transit systems in the United States during 1997. The report covers testing results for the following drug types: ma...

D. F. Nicholas R. Anderson M. Redington E. Rutyna A. Tallon

1998-01-01

280

12 CFR 252.156 - Reports of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.156 Section 252...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations...Covered Companies § 252.156 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

2013-01-01

281

Large mining blasts from the Kursk Mining Region, Russia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Monitoring the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) by seismic means will require identification of seismic sources at magnitude levels where industrial explosions (primarily, mining blasts) may comprise a significant fraction of the total number ...

W. Leith A. Spivak

1997-01-01

282

Electrochemical Concentration and Purification of Spent Sodium Bicarbonate Blasting Media.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The feasibility and economics of recovering the spent blast media generated in sodium bicarbonate depainting operations has been investigated. In laboratory-scale tests, a saturated sodium bicarbonate solution was convened to sodium hydroxide in an electr...

R. D. Levy R. E. Hicks H. Gold

1995-01-01

283

Blast Designs to Improve Dragline Stripping Rates. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Field tests of blasting techniques to improve dragline productivity were undertaken at a midwestern strip coal mine. The program intent was to demonstrate the potential for increased dragline productivity using explosive casting. Explosive casting is the ...

J. A. Lombardi J. G. Simos L. Workman W. A. Crosby

1982-01-01

284

7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. Edwards ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

285

Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 2004 Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the 10th annual report of the results of the Federal Transit Administrations (FTA) Drug and Alcohol Testing Program. This report summarizes the reporting requirements for calendar year 2004, the requirements of the overall drug and alcohol testing...

M. Redington E. Rutyna N. Grace F. Shanahan

2006-01-01

286

Results from the 2008 Drug and Alcohol Testing Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the results of the 2008 Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Drug and Alcohol Testing Survey. This annual survey measures the percentage of drivers with commercial drivers licenses who test positive for controlled substances ...

M. A. Khan

2010-01-01

287

Drug and Alcohol Testing Results. 1996 Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is a compilation and analysis of mass transit drug and alcohol testing reported by transit systems in the United States during 1996. The report covers testing results for the following drug types: marijuana (THC), cocaine, phencyclidine (PCP), ...

J. Ault B. Center R. David S. Michener G. Wilson

1997-01-01

288

49 CFR 199.229 - Reporting of alcohol testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reporting of alcohol testing results. 199.229 Section 199.229...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.229...

2012-10-01

289

Current single event effect test results for candidate spacecraft electronics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present both proton and heavy ion single event effect (SEE) ground test results for candidate spacecraft electronics. A variety of digital and analog devices were tested, including EEPROMs, DRAMs, and DC-DC converters

Kenneth A. LaBel; Amy K. Moran; Donald K. Hawkins; Anthony B. Sanders; Christina M. Seidleck; Hak S. Kim; James E. Forney; E. G. Stassinopoulos; Paul Marshall; Cheryl Dale; J. Kinnison; B. Carkhuff

1996-01-01

290

Single event effect test results for candidate spacecraft electronics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present both heavy ion and proton single event effect (SEE) ground test results for candidate spacecraft electronics. A variety of digital, analog, and fiber optic devices were tested, including DRAMs, FPGAs and fiber links

Kenneth A. Label; Amy K. Moran; Christina M. Seidleck; E. G. Stassinopoulos; J. M. Barth; P. Marshall; M. Carts; C. Marshall; J. Kinnison; B. Carkhuff

1997-01-01

291

Test results of the DOE\\/Sandia 17 meter VAWT  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review is given of the test program of a 17 meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine VAWT. Performance test results are discussed including difficulties encountered during the VAWT operation along with ways of solving these problems.

R. O. Nellums; M. H. Worstell

1979-01-01

292

49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605 Section...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.605 Positive drug...

2012-10-01

293

49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605 Section...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.605 Positive drug...

2011-10-01

294

Effects of testing conditions on conceptual survey results  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Pre-testing and post-testing is a commonly used method in Physics Education Research to assess student learning gains. It is well recognized in the community that timings and incentives in delivering conceptual tests can impact test results. However, it is difficult to control these variables across different studies. As a common practice, a pre-test is often administered either at or near the beginning of a course, while a post-test can be given either at or near the end of a course. Also, in conducting such tests there often is no norm as to whether incentives should be offered to students. Because these variations can significantly affect test results, it is important to study and document their impact. We analyzed five years of data that were collected at The Ohio State University from over 2100 students, who took both the pre-test and post-test of the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism under various timings and incentives. We observed that the actual time frame for giving a test has a marked effect on the test results and that incentive granting also has a significant influence on test outcomes. These results suggest that one should carefully monitor and document the conditions under which tests are administered.

Ding, Lin; Reay, Neville W.; Lee, Albert; Bao, Lei

2008-09-22

295

Acurex Solar Corporation Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test results  

SciTech Connect

Under the Department of Energy's Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit project, industrial process steam systems incorporating line-focus solar thermal collectors were designed and hardware was installed and tested. This report describes the test results for the system designed by Acurex Solar Corporation. The test series included function and safety tests to determine that the system operated as specified, an unattended operations test to demonstrate automatic operation, performance tests to provide a database for predicting system performance, and life cycle tests to evaluate component and maintenance requirements. Component-level modifications to improve system performance and reliability were also evaluated.

Cameron, C.P.; Dudley, V.E.

1987-04-01

296

Acurex Solar Corporation modular industrial solar retrofit qualification test results  

SciTech Connect

Under the Department of Energy's Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit project, industrial process steam systems incorporating line-focus solar thermal collectors were designed and hardware was installed and tested. This report describes the test results for the system designed by Acurex Solar Corporation. The test series included function and safety tests to determine that the system operated as specified, an unattended operations test to demonstrate automatic operation, performance tests to provide a database for predicting system performance, and life cycle tests to evaluate component and maintenance requirements. Component-level modifications to improve system performance and reliability were also evaluated.

Cameron, C.P.; Dudley, V.E.

1986-10-01

297

Safer blasting agents and procedures for blasting in gassy non-coal mines. [Quarterly] technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines` research program is focused on developing procedures and guidelines for acceptable underground oil shale blasting that fulfill the operational requirements for efficiency while maintaining a high level of safety when operating under gassy mine conditions. This work is aimed at providing new information, alternate methods, and innovation in underground blasting procedures. The results from this research will have direct impact on regulatory standards for blasting under gassy mine conditions. Based on the low incendivity data from the Cannon Gallery and several months of recent testing in their mine, Kennecott`s Greens Creek base metal mine in Alaska had decided to exclusively use a low incendive bulk emulsion product in place of the low incendive water gel prod ct for all blasting operations. As was the case with the low incendive water gel product, the use of this bulk product resulted in: no dust ignitions and related injuries and/or production/equipment losses; the elimination if preblasting measures of using stemming and water sprays, and the improvement of roadways due to the reduction of water.

Weiss, E.S.

1993-11-01

298

Experimental and numerical studies on the response of quadrangular stiffened plates. Part II: localised blast loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

This two-part article presents the results of experimental and numerical work on the response of built-in mild steel quadrangular plates with different stiffener configurations (unstiffened (flat), single (S), double (D), cross (C) and double cross (DC)) subjected to blast loading. Part I reports on the response of these plates to uniform blast loading while localised blast loading is examined in

G. S. Langdon; S. Chung Kim Yuen; G. N. Nurick

2005-01-01

299

Experiments on multiple short-delay blasting of coal (in two parts)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1949 a study was undertaken in Bureau of Mines Experimental coal mine near Pittsburgh, Pa., to investigate conditions under which simultaneous multiple and short-delay multiple blasting of coal may be used without danger of igniting gas or coal dust in coal mines and to study the vibrations of the mine roof during such blasting. Results of blasting and roof-vibration

I. Hartmann; J. Nagy; H. C. Howarth

1952-01-01

300

Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 1999 Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 1999 Annual Report is a compilation and analysis of drug and alcohol testing results reported by transit systems in the United States during 1999. The report covers results for the following drug types: marijuana (THC)...

R. Anderson B. Baker M. Redington E. Rutyna

2000-01-01

301

Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 2000 Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 2000 Annual Report is a compilation and analysis of drug and alcohol testing results reported by transit systems in the United State during 2000. The report covers results for the following drug types: marijuana (THC),...

R. Anderson B. Baker R. Buchanan S. Chen R. Clarke

2001-01-01

302

Testing of a composite thermal structure to insulate the drivers of a large-scale blast\\/thermal simulator. Final report, Sep 86-Jun 88  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the developmental testing of the thermal and mechanical properties of two versions of a composite structure which were developed for insulating the walls of high-pressure vessels containing hot nitrogen gas against heat loss and the results of these tests are presented. Included herein are data on thermal diffusivity, specific heat, density, expansion coefficients, thermal conductivity and mechanical

McCue

1991-01-01

303

Results of W-87\\/Mk21 Deployment Separation Shock Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes results of the W-87\\/Mk21 Deployment Separation Shock Tests conducted at the Survivability and Vulnerability Integration Center (SVIC) Hill Air Force Base in Ogden, Utah, from 10\\/5\\/98 to 10\\/8\\/98. Specific details regarding the test plan and procedures can be found in the Master Test Plan listed in the references.

C. A. Avalle

1999-01-01

304

TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS  

EPA Science Inventory

Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

305

Preliminary test results of prototype urban maglev train  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Urban Maglev Program is a unique type of R&D project in the sense that it is a combination of R&D project and construction project. The prototype maglev vehicles of commercialization model were built and have been under various tests on the test track. The preliminary test results of the maglev vehicles show that the performances including powering and braking,

Byung Chun Shin

2010-01-01

306

BLAST BIOLOGY. Technical Progress Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental data regarding the biologic consequences of exposure to ;\\u000a several environmental variations associated with actual and simulated explosive ;\\u000a detonations were reviewed. Blast biology is discussed relative to primary, ;\\u000a secondary, tentiary, and miscellaneous blast effects as those attributable, ;\\u000a respectively, to variations in environmental pressure, trauma from blast-produced ;\\u000a missiles (both penetrating and nonpenetrating), the consequences of physical

C. S. White; D. R. Richmond

1959-01-01

307

Coupled rock motion and gas flow modeling in blasting  

SciTech Connect

The spherical element computer code DMC (Distinct Motion Code) used to model rock motion resulting from blasting has been enhanced to allow routine computer simulations of bench blasting. The enhancements required for bench blast simulation include: (1) modifying the gas flow portion of DMC, (2) adding a new explosive gas equation of state capability, (3) modifying the porosity calculation, and (4) accounting for blastwell spacing parallel to the face. A parametric study performed with DMC shows logical variation of the face velocity as burden, spacing, blastwell diameter and explosive type are varied. These additions represent a significant advance in the capability of DMC which will not only aid in understanding the physics involved in blasting but will also become a blast design tool. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Preece, D.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Knudsen, S.D. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-01-01

308

EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results  

SciTech Connect

The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure thru a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

Mersman, C.R.

1993-09-01

309

A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage.  

PubMed

We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4 psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:22504073

Hines-Beard, Jessica; Marchetta, Jeffrey; Gordon, Sarah; Chaum, Edward; Geisert, Eldon E; Rex, Tonia S

2012-04-07

310

Celiac Disease: Are Endomysial Antibody Test Results Being Used Appropriately?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The aim of this study was to retrospec- tively examine how positive IgA-endomysial antibody (EMA) test results for celiac disease were being inter- preted and acted on by physicians in the Calgary Health Region. Methods: We reviewed consecutive EMA test results, with or without a serum IgA, obtained during a 17- month period. Seropositive tests were cross-referenced to the

Kelly E. McGowan; Martha E. Lyon; Steven D. Loken; J. Decker Butzner

2007-01-01

311

DBSQC Chemical Test Results Memorandum - MenHibrix  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... Food and Drug Administration Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research ... DBSQC, OCBQ, HFM-680 Subject: DBSQC Chemical Test Results for ... More results from www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvaccines/vaccines/approvedproducts

312

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2002  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 2002. Results from the tests provide hydrologic information that supports the needs of RCRA waste management characterization and sitewide groundwater monitoring and modeling programs and reduces the uncertainty of groundwater flow conditions at selected Hanford locations.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thorne, Paul D.

2003-03-10

313

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2001. Results obtained from these tests provide hydrologic information that supports the needs of RCRA waste management area characterization and sitewide groundwater monitoring and modeling programs.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2002-12-03

314

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A; Thorne, Paul D; Newcomer, Darrell R

2001-05-15

315

Early results of gate valve flow interruption blowdown tests  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary results of the USNRC/INEL high-energy BWR line break flow interruption testing are presented. Two representative nuclear valve assemblies were cycled under design basis Reactor Water Cleanup pipe break conditions to provide input for the technical basis for resolving the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Generic Issue 87. The effects of the blowdown hydraulic loadings on valve operability, especially valve closure stem forces, were studied. The blowdown tests showed that, given enough thrust, typical gate valves will close against the high flow resulting from a line break. The tests also showed that proper operator sizing depends on the correct identification of values for the sizing equation. Evidence exists that values used in the past may not be conservative for all valve applications. The tests showed that improper operator lock ring installation following test or maintenance can invalidate in-situ test results and prevent the valve from performing its design function. 2 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

DeWall, K.G.

1988-01-01

316

Three principal results from recent Fenton Hill flow testing  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells -- one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region -- would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

Brown, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DuTeaux, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-01-01

317

Development of a thermal reclamation system for spent blasting abrasive  

SciTech Connect

Abrasive blasting is the most economical method for paint removal from large surface areas such as the hulls and tanks of oceangoing vessels. Tens of thousands of tons of spent abrasive are generated annually by blasting operations in private and US Navy shipyards. Some of this material is classified as hazardous waste, and nearly all of it is currently being either stockpiled or disposed in landfills. The rapid decline in available landfill space and corresponding rise in landfill tipping fees pose a severe problem for shipyard operators throughout the US. This paper discusses the results of a research and development program initiated by the Institute of Gas Technology and supported by the US Navy to develop and test a fluidized-bed thermal reclamation system for spent abrasive waste minimization. Bench- and pilot-scale reclaimer tests and reclaimed abrasive performance tests are described along with the current status of a program to build and test a 5-ton/hour prototype reclaimer at a US Navy shipyard.

Bryan, B.B.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rehmat, A.G.

1991-01-01

318

In vitro crosstalk between fibroblasts and native human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts via local cytokine networks results in increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of AML cells as well as increased levels of proangiogenic Interleukin 8.  

PubMed

Interactions between native human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts and nonleukemic cells in the bone marrow microenvironment seem important both for disease development chemosensitivity. Native human AML blasts from consecutive patients were cultured with normal human bone marrow stromal cells and two fibroblast lines (HFL1 and Hs27) separated by a semipermeable membrane. This bidirectional crosstalk via the cytokine network between AML blasts and fibroblasts caused (i) increased proliferation, (ii) mediated antiapoptotic signalling and (iii) increased local levels of proangiogenic IL8. PMID:15607368

Ryningen, Anita; Wergeland, Line; Glenjen, Nils; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Bruserud, Oystein

2005-02-01

319

Performance test results for the Eaton dc development power train in an electric test bed vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of the tests performed on a direct current (dc) power train in a test bed vehicle developed by the Eaton Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The tests were performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the INEL testing was to provide test

R. L. Crumley; M. R. Donaldson

1987-01-01

320

Performance test results for the Eaton dc developmental power train in an electric test bed vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of the tests performed on a direct current (dc) power train in a test bed vehicle developed by the Eaton Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests were performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the INEL testing was to provide test

R. L. Crumley; M. R. Donaldson

1987-01-01

321

Results of the Centralia underground coal gasification field test  

SciTech Connect

The Centralia Partial Seam CRIP (PSC) test described herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981 to 1982 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington site. The LBK tests consisted of five small scale experiments in which approximately 900 to 1800 cubic feet (25 to 50 cubic meters) of coal were affected in each test. The LBK tests indicated that the Centralia site was a reasonable candidate for UCG. The PSC test was then conceived along with a third test, the Full Seam CRIP test, to provide the technical data needed to further evaluate the economic potential of UCG at the Centralia site, as well as enhance our general knowledge concerning the UCG process. The PSC test represents a 20 to 30 fold increase in scale over the LBK tests with the full-seam test representing another five fold increase in size. This series of three tests have become known as the Tono Basin Tests. During the active gasification phase, which lasted 30 days, 1400 cubic meters (2000 tons) of coal were affected. The test utilized primarily steam and oxygen as the injected reactants. Three distinct periods of gasification were observed. The initial period in which the vertical production well was in use which yielded a typical dry gas heating value of 219 kJ/mol (248 Btu/scf). This period was followed by a period of considerably higher gas quality, 261 kJ/mol (296 Btu/scf), which resulted from the switch to the slant production well and the CRIP maneuver. The final period began when a large-scale underground roof fall occurred and the typical dry gas heating value fell to 194 kJ/mol (220 Btu/scf). 7 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

Hill, R.W.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.; Stephens, D.R.

1984-08-01

322

Reporting Test Results to the School Board. Using and Reporting Test Results, Monograph #5. Steps in the Right Direction!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is the fifth in a series of six monographs developed to help local educators use and report Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) test results. An organized plan facilitates the important task of reporting test results to the school board quickly and accurately. This monograph gives one approach that enables the staff to take the…

Caswell, Martha S.; Roeber, Edward D.

323

Argon Spill Duct Bellows Leak Test Procedures and Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This engineering note describes the testing of the argoll spill duct bellows. It includes a detailed explanation of the procedures, along with a summary of the results of the testing done on 2\\/18\\/91 and 2\\/19\\/91 by Gary Trotter. The original bellows were purchased from Expansion Joint Systems (see Appendix 2). The general conclusion from the testing was that the leaks

G. R. Trotter; J. Wu

1991-01-01

324

Psychometric Foundations for the Interpretation of Neuropsychological Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The purpose of this chapter is to illustrate how an understanding of the psychometric properties of tests, normative samples,\\u000a and test scores are an essential foundation for meaningful and accurate clinical interpretations and reduces the likelihood\\u000a of misinterpreting test results. Our goal is to present this information in an easy-to-understand format that facilitates\\u000a clinicians’ knowledge of basic psychometrics in the

Brian L. Brooks; Elisabeth M. S. Sherman; Grant L. Iverson; Daniel J. Slick; Esther Strauss

325

Blast furnace injection symposium: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain 14 papers related to blast furnace injection issues. Topics include coal quality, coal grinding, natural gas injection, stable operation of the blast furnace, oxygen enrichment, coal conveying, and performance at several steel companies. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1996-12-31

326

B-52B/Dtv (Drop Test Vehicle) Flight Test Results: Drop Test Missions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The NASA test airplane, B-52B-008, was a carrier for drop tests of the shuttle booster recovery parachute system. The purpose of the test support by Boeing was to monitor the vertical loads on the pylon hooks. The hooks hold the Drop Test Vehicle to the B...

L. J. Doty

1985-01-01

327

Evaluation of LOINC for Representing Constitutional Cytogenetic Test Result Reports  

PubMed Central

Genetic testing is becoming increasingly important to medical practice. Integrating genetics and genomics data into electronic medical records is crucial in translating genetic discoveries into improved patient care. Information technology, especially Clinical Decision Support Systems, holds great potential to help clinical professionals take full advantage of genomic advances in their daily medical practice. However, issues relating to standard terminology and information models for exchanging genetic testing results remain relatively unexplored. This study evaluates whether the current LOINC standard is adequate to represent constitutional cytogenetic test result reports using sample result reports from ARUP Laboratories. The results demonstrate that current standard terminology is insufficient to support the needs of coding cytogenetic test results. The terminology infrastructure must be developed before clinical information systems will be able to handle the high volumes of genetic data expected in the near future.

Heras, Yan Z.; Mitchell, Joyce A.; Williams, Marc S.; Brothman, Arthur R.; Huff, Stanley M.

2009-01-01

328

Detection of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Military Personnel  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Blast-related traumatic brain injuries have been common in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, but fundamental questions about the nature of these injuries remain unanswered. METHODS We tested the hypothesis that blast-related traumatic brain injury causes traumatic axonal injury, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), an advanced form of magnetic resonance imaging that is sensitive to axonal injury. The subjects were 63 U.S. military personnel who had a clinical diagnosis of mild, uncomplicated traumatic brain injury. They were evacuated from the field to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany, where they underwent DTI scanning within 90 days after the injury. All the subjects had primary blast exposure plus another, blast-related mechanism of injury (e.g., being struck by a blunt object or injured in a fall or motor vehicle crash). Controls consisted of 21 military personnel who had blast exposure and other injuries but no clinical diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. RESULTS Abnormalities revealed on DTI were consistent with traumatic axonal injury in many of the subjects with traumatic brain injury. None had detectible intracranial injury on computed tomography. As compared with DTI scans in controls, the scans in the subjects with traumatic brain injury showed marked abnormalities in the middle cerebellar peduncles (P<0.001), in cingulum bundles (P = 0.002), and in the right orbitofrontal white matter (P = 0.007). In 18 of the 63 subjects with traumatic brain injury, a significantly greater number of abnormalities were found on DTI than would be expected by chance (P<0.001). Follow-up DTI scans in 47 subjects with traumatic brain injury 6 to 12 months after enrollment showed persistent abnormalities that were consistent with evolving injuries. CONCLUSIONS DTI findings in U.S. military personnel support the hypothesis that blast-related mild traumatic brain injury can involve axonal injury. However, the contribution of primary blast exposure as compared with that of other types of injury could not be determined directly, since none of the subjects with traumatic brain injury had isolated primary blast injury. Furthermore, many of these subjects did not have abnormalities on DTI. Thus, traumatic brain injury remains a clinical diagnosis. (Funded by the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program and the National Institutes of Health; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00785304.)

Mac Donald, Christine L.; Johnson, Ann M.; Cooper, Dana; Nelson, Elliot C.; Werner, Nicole J.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Witherow, John R.; Fang, Raymond; Flaherty, Stephen F.; Brody, David L.

2011-01-01

329

Test results for SEU and SEL immune memory circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test results for three SEU logic\\/circuit hardened CMOS memory circuits verify upset and latch-up immunity for two configurations to be in excess of 120 MeV cm(exp 2)\\/mg using a commercial, non-radiation hardened CMOS process. Test chips from three separate fabrication runs in two different process were evaluated.

D. Wiseman; J. Canaris; S. Whitaker; J. Gambles; K. Arave; L. Arave

1993-01-01

330

The Reliability of Results from National Curriculum Testing in England  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: National curriculum tests have been administered in England for well over a decade. Although reliability evidence has been published, critics have argued that there is not enough evidence (of the right kind) and that test results may be insufficiently reliable. Purpose: This article collates and discusses evidence on the reliability of…

Newton, Paul E.

2009-01-01

331

Social context of disclosing HIV test results in Tanzania  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to understand how individuals reveal their HIV test results to others and the ways in which social relations affect the disclosure process. The data were collected through open-ended interviews administered in Swahili to informants who had just been tested for HIV and to those who were living with HIV in Dar es Salaam and Iringa regions. Analysis

Joe Lugalla; Stanley Yoder; Huruma Sigalla; Charles Madihi

2011-01-01

332

Microgravity two-phase flow experiment and test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A two-phase flow system was tested in the NASA KC-135 reduced gravity test facility. Its innovative flow configuration results in an unusual ease of control and significantly reduced power and heat rejection requirements, while permitting flow regimes, pressure drops, and boiling and condensing heat transfer to be examined. Numerous design features were incorporated that minimize the impact of the KC-135

Wayne S. Hill; Frederick R. Best

1991-01-01

333

RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results  

SciTech Connect

Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted.

Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M. [Lockheed Martin Corporation P.O. Box 8555, 29B41-KB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

1997-01-10

334

RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results  

SciTech Connect

Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M. [Lockheed Martin Corporation P.O. Box 8555, 29B41-KB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania19101 (United States)

1997-01-01

335

Results of acoustic tests of a Prop-Fan model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of acoustic tests in a low speed open jet anechoic wind tunnel are presented for a counter rotation Prop-Fan model. The model tested had 5 front and 5 rear rotor blades with swept planform. Noise spectra are presented showing the influence of operating and configuration variables such as: (1) power absorption, (2) tip speed, (3) rotor-rotor spacing, (4) power

F. B. Metzger; P. C. Brown

1987-01-01

336

Swine influenza test results from animal health laboratories in Canada.  

PubMed

Due to its infrastructure and partnerships the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network was able to rapidly collect test results from 9 Canadian laboratories that were conducting primary testing for influenza on swine-origin samples, in response to the threat posed by the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in 2009. PMID:24155436

Kloeze, Harold; Mukhi, Shamir N; Alexandersen, Soren

2013-05-01

337

Experiences with computer systems in blast furnace operation control at Rautaruukki  

SciTech Connect

Low energy consumption, together with high productivity and stable blast furnace operation, has been achieved at Rautaruukki's Raahe Steel Works as a result of the efficient use of computer technology in process control and improvements in raw materials quality. The blast furnace supervision system is designed to support the decision-making in medium and long-term process control. The information presenting the blast furnace operation phenomena is grouped so that little time is needed to obtain the current state of the process. Due to the complexity of the blast furnace process, an expert system to guide and diagnose the short and medium-term blast furnace operation has been developed.

Inkala, P.; Karppinen, A. (Rautaruukki Oy, Raahe (Finland). Raahe Steel Works); Seppanen, M. (Rautaruukki Oy Engineering, Oulu (Finland))

1994-09-01

338

Validated finite element analysis model of blast wall panels under shock pressure loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of field tests was carried out at the BakerRisk test site in San Antonio, TX, on 1\\/4 scale stainless steel blast panels. The panel design was based on a deep trough trapezoidal profile with flexible welded angle connections. The loading applied to the test panel was a shocked pressure pulse representative of an air blast. The aim of

G. K. Schleyer; T. H. Kewaisy; J. W. Wesevich; G. S. Langdon

2006-01-01

339

Results of no-flow rotary drill bit comparison testing  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of testing of a newer rotary sampling bit and sampler insert called the No-Flow System. This No-Flow System was tested side by side against the currently used rotary bit and sampler insert, called the Standard System. The two systems were tested using several ''hard to sample'' granular non-hazardous simulants to determine which could provide greater sample recovery. The No-Flow System measurably outperformed the Standard System in each of the tested simulants.

WITWER, K.S.

1998-11-30

340

Interphase ribosomal RNA cistron silver staining in refractory anaemias with and without excess blasts.  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate the haemopoietic function of bone marrow blood forming cells in human myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by silver staining of nucleolar organiser regions (AgNORs). METHODS: Nucleoli were investigated in bone marrow blast cells and in erythroid, granulocytic, and megakaryocytic cells from 12 haematologically healthy subjects, and from 26 patients with MDS, including 14 with refractory anaemia (RA), nine with RA with excess blasts (RAEB), and three with RAEB in transformation (RAEB-t). The investigation was performed before treatment using a one step silver staining method. In each case 50 to 100 blasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, immature (pronormoblastic and basophilic normoblastic) and mature (polychromatic normoblastic) erythroid elements, and megakaryocytes were evaluated for the mean numbers of nucleoli and AgNORs per nucleus. Student's t test was used to compare the patient and control groups. Other statistical analyses were carried out by the computer assisted "HEMA" system. RESULTS: Compared with controls, the number of AgNORs in blasts, promyelocytes, immature erythroid elements, and megakaryocytes was decreased, whereas in myelocytes and polychromatic normoblasts it was similar. There was also a difference in the AgNOR scores in blood forming cells from patients with RAEB/ RAEB-t v RA. CONCLUSIONS: The loss of AgNOR sites in cellular series in MDS may result from the decrease of their proliferative potential with disease progression, intrinsic defects in maturation, and extensive apoptosis.

Mamaev, N N; Salogub, G N; Nefedova, I B

1997-01-01

341

Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 2003 Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the eighth annual report of the results of the Federal Transit Administrations (FTA) Drug and Alcohol Testing Program. The report summarizes the new reporting requirements introduced for calendar year 2003, the requirements of the overall drug and...

R. Clarke R. Gaumer M. Redington E. Rutyna

2005-01-01

342

Interpreting Results from the Standardized UXO Test Sites.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) was tasked by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESCTP) to complete a detailed analysis of the results of testing c...

M. May M. Tuley

2007-01-01

343

Results of the Locust Pesticide Testing Trials in Sudan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The technical report discusses the results of locust pesticide testing trials in the Sudan. Six pesticides were used against the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria). The pesticides were: bendiocarb, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, lambda-cyhalothr...

1988-01-01

344

Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 2002 Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the seventh annual report of the results of the Federal Transit Administrations (FTA) Drug and Alcohol Testing Program. The report summarizes the new reporting requirements introduced for calendar year 2001, the requirements of the overall drug an...

R. Clarke R. Gaumer M. Redington E. Rutyna

2005-01-01

345

Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 2001 Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the sixth annual report of the results of the Federal Administration's Drug and Alcohol Testing Program. The report summarizes the new reporting requirements introduced for calendar year 2001, the requirements of the overall drug and alcohol testi...

R. Clarke R. Gaumer E. Rutyna M. Redington

2003-01-01

346

Results from the BABAR electromagnetic calorimeter beam test  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present results from the PSI test beam run for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the BABAR experiment. A system of 25 CsI(Tl) crystals was tested with electrons and pions in the momentum range from 100 to 405MeV\\/c. Results are presented on crystal light output, on coherent and incoherent noise, on energy resolution and on spatial resolution. The design energy resolutions

Roger J. Barlow; Roland Bernet; Christopher K. Bowdery; Jens Brose; Theresa Champion; Gerd Dahlinger; Paul Dauncey; Peter Eckstein; Gerald Eigen; Dietrich Freytag; John Fry; Neil I. Geddes; Vladimir Ivanchenko; Colin Jessop; Damian Johnson; Mary King; Eckart Lorenz; Helmut Marsiske; Steve McMahon; Howard Nicholson; Jim Reidy; Rafe Schindler; Klaus R. Schubert; Rainer Schwierz; Iain Scott; Reiner Seitz; Zurab Silagadze; Bernhard Spaan; David P. Stoker; Edward Tetteh-Lartey; Roland Waldi; William J. Wisniewski; Craig R. Wuest

1999-01-01

347

Test results for the High Dynamics Instrumentation Set  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GPS Range Applications Program requires accurate time-space-position information (TSPI) for the triservice test and training ranges. To meet this requirement, a family of GPS-user equipments has been developed which includes the High Dynamics Instrumentation Set (HDIS). This paper presents the evaluation of initial test results of HDIS from static and dynamic field runs. The results show that the HDIS meets or exceeds all TSPI performance requirements within the ability of the truth source to measure accuracy.

Kaatz, Greg; Kido, Tom; Richmond, Carlton; Snow, Robert

348

Delta undulator model: Magnetic field and beam test results  

SciTech Connect

A novel type of in-vacuum Elliptical Polarization Undulator (EPU) magnet optimized for linac beam (Delta undulator) was developed at the Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics (LEPP) at Cornell University as part of insertion device development for the future Cornell 5 GeV Energy Recovery Source of coherent hard X-rays [1,7]. To evaluate mechanical, vacuum and magnetic properties of the magnet, a short 30 cm model with a 5 mm diameter round gap and a 2.4 cm period was built and tested in LEPP. The beam test of the Delta undulator model was conducted at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in BNL with {approx}60 MeV linac beam. The beam testing results confirmed basic properties of the undulator magnet obtained through the magnetic field measurement. In the paper we describe the magnet design, techniques and setups used for the magnetic field measurement and the beam testing results.

Temnykh A.; Babzien M.; Davis, D.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Park, J.; Yakimenko, V.

2010-11-10

349

Low-energy demonstration accelerator (LEDA) test results and plans  

SciTech Connect

The LEDA 75-keV injector and 6.7-MeV RFQ have been tested with pulsed and cw proton beam currents up to 100 mA. Several LINAC2000 papers give the results of those measurements. A follow-on experiment, to intentionally introduce and measure beam halo on the RFQ output beam, is reported in several papers at this conference (PAC2001). In this paper we summarize the LEDA RFQ commissioning results and the beam-halo measurements and we discuss future test plans for this high-current, high-average-power rf structures test bed.

Smith, H. V. (Horace V.); Schneider, J. D. (J. David); Sheffield, R. L. (Richard L.)

2001-01-01

350

Large mining blasts from the Kursk Mining Region, Russia  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) by seismic means will require identification of seismic sources at magnitude levels where industrial explosions (primarily, mining blasts) may comprise a significant fraction of the total number of events recorded, and may for some countries dominate the seismicity. Thus, data on blasting practice have both political significance for the negotiation of treaties involving seismic monitoring of nuclear tests, and operational applications in terms of establishing monitoring and inspection needs on a mine-by-mine basis. While it is generally accepted that mining explosions contribute to seismicity at lower seismic magnitudes (less than about magnitude 3.5), the rate of mining seismicity as a function of seismic magnitude is unknown for most countries outside the U.S. This results in a large uncertainty when estimating the task of discriminating nuclear explosions from chemical explosions and earthquakes, by seismic means, under a comprehensive nuclear test ban. This uncertainty directly affects estimates of seismic network enhancements required to achieve treaty verification requirements at magnitudes less than about 3.5. 24 refs., 64 figs., 11 tabs.

Leith, W. Adushkin, V.; Spivak, A.

1997-01-01

351

An automatic MEG low-frequency source imaging approach for detecting injuries in mild and moderate TBI patients with blast and non-blast causes.  

PubMed

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild (and some moderate) TBI can be difficult to diagnose because the injuries are often not detectable on conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in TBI patients generate abnormal low-frequency magnetic activity (ALFMA, peaked at 1-4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by magnetoencephalography (MEG). We developed a new automated MEG low-frequency source imaging method and applied this method in 45 mild TBI (23 from combat-related blasts, and 22 from non-blast causes) and 10 moderate TBI patients (non-blast causes). Seventeen of the patients with mild TBI from blasts had tertiary injuries resulting from the blast. The results show our method detected abnormalities at the rates of 87% for the mild TBI group (blast-induced plus non-blast causes) and 100% for the moderate group. Among the mild TBI patients, the rates of abnormalities were 96% and 77% for the blast and non-blast TBI groups, respectively. The spatial characteristics of abnormal slow-wave generation measured by Z scores in the mild blast TBI group significantly correlated with those in non-blast mild TBI group. Among 96 cortical regions, the likelihood of abnormal slow-wave generation was less in the mild TBI patients with blast than in the mild non-blast TBI patients, suggesting possible protective effects due to the military helmet and armor. Finally, the number of cortical regions that generated abnormal slow-waves correlated significantly with the total post-concussive symptom scores in TBI patients. This study provides a foundation for using MEG low-frequency source imaging to support the clinical diagnosis of TBI. PMID:22542638

Huang, Ming-Xiong; Nichols, Sharon; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Drake, Angela; Holland, Martin; Asmussen, Sarah; D'Andrea, John; Chun, Won; Levy, Michael; Cui, Li; Song, Tao; Baker, Dewleen G; Hammer, Paul; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Coimbra, Raul; Diwakar, Mithun; Boyd, Cynthia; Neff, John; Liu, Thomas T; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer; Farinpour, Roxanna; Cheung, Catherine; Harrington, Deborah L; Heister, David; Lee, Roland R

2012-04-20

352

Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) waste treatment technology  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and occupational hazard regulations have motivated consideration of several new developments in paint removal technology. Plastic Media Blasting (PMB)/paint wastes consist predominantly of degraded plastic media plus the stripped paint. They are, in general, placed in the category of being characteristically hazardous'' according to the definition in the RCRA Act because of the excess leachability of toxic metals. The objective of the studies described in this paper is the identification and development of optimum methods for treating PMB/paint stripping wastes, particularly the type of such wastes generated by depainting operations performed at Hill Air Force Base. An optimum treatment method would be one which minimizes disposal costs, generally by waste volume reduction, and which results in a nonhazardous solidified product according to the established EPA criteria. The work has progressed in three phases. In Phase 1, the physical properties of the waste material were determined and full range of treatment methods were tested and evaluated. Phase 2 concentrated on a few selected treatments and encapsulation methods. Phase 3, which is currently in its early setup stages, is a demonstration test being conducted at Hill Air Force Base. 6 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Jermyn, H. (Air Force Engineering and Services Center, Tyndall AFB, FL (USA)); Wichner, R.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1991-10-18

353

Blast-induced phenotypic switching in cerebral vasospasm.  

PubMed

Vasospasm of the cerebrovasculature is a common manifestation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) reported among combat casualties in the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Cerebral vasospasm occurs more frequently, and with earlier onset, in bTBI patients than in patients with other TBI injury modes, such as blunt force trauma. Though vasospasm is usually associated with the presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), SAH is not required for vasospasm in bTBI, which suggests that the unique mechanics of blast injury could potentiate vasospasm onset, accounting for the increased incidence. Here, using theoretical and in vitro models, we show that a single rapid mechanical insult can induce vascular hypercontractility and remodeling, indicative of vasospasm initiation. We employed high-velocity stretching of engineered arterial lamellae to simulate the mechanical forces of a blast pulse on the vasculature. An hour after a simulated blast, injured tissues displayed altered intracellular calcium dynamics leading to hypersensitivity to contractile stimulus with endothelin-1. One day after simulated blast, tissues exhibited blast force dependent prolonged hypercontraction and vascular smooth muscle phenotype switching, indicative of remodeling. These results suggest that an acute, blast-like injury is sufficient to induce a hypercontraction-induced genetic switch that potentiates vascular remodeling, and cerebral vasospasm, in bTBI patients. PMID:21765001

Alford, Patrick W; Dabiri, Borna E; Goss, Josue A; Hemphill, Matthew A; Brigham, Mark D; Parker, Kevin Kit

2011-07-15

354

Spectrum of abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type  

PubMed Central

Introduction Abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type is always challenging for diagnosis. Air containing abdominal viscera is most vulnerable to effects of primary blast injury. In any patient exposed to a primary blast wave who presents with an acute abdomen, an abdominal organ injury is to be kept in a clinical suspicion. Aim Study various abdominal organ injuries occurring in a primary type of blast injury. Material and methods: All those who had exploratory laparotomy for abdominal organ injuries after a primary blast injury for a period of 10 years from January 1998 - January 2008 were included in this retrospective study. Results Total 154 patients had laparotomy for abdominal organ injuries with a primary blast type of injury. Small intestine was damaged in 48 patients (31.1%) followed by spleen in 22.7% cases. 54 patients (35.06%) had more than one organ injured. Liver laceration was present in 30 patients (19.48%). Multiple small gut perforations were present in 37 patients (77.08%). Negative laparotomy was found in 5 patients (3.24%) whereas 3 (1.94%) had re-exploration. Mortality was present in 6 patients (3.89%). Conclusions Primary blast injury causes varied abdominal organ injuries. Single or multiple organ damage can be there. Small intestine is commonest viscera injured. Laparotomy gives final diagnosis.

2009-01-01

355

Blast-induced phenotypic switching in cerebral vasospasm  

PubMed Central

Vasospasm of the cerebrovasculature is a common manifestation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) reported among combat casualties in the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Cerebral vasospasm occurs more frequently, and with earlier onset, in bTBI patients than in patients with other TBI injury modes, such as blunt force trauma. Though vasospasm is usually associated with the presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), SAH is not required for vasospasm in bTBI, which suggests that the unique mechanics of blast injury could potentiate vasospasm onset, accounting for the increased incidence. Here, using theoretical and in vitro models, we show that a single rapid mechanical insult can induce vascular hypercontractility and remodeling, indicative of vasospasm initiation. We employed high-velocity stretching of engineered arterial lamellae to simulate the mechanical forces of a blast pulse on the vasculature. An hour after a simulated blast, injured tissues displayed altered intracellular calcium dynamics leading to hypersensitivity to contractile stimulus with endothelin-1. One day after simulated blast, tissues exhibited blast force dependent prolonged hypercontraction and vascular smooth muscle phenotype switching, indicative of remodeling. These results suggest that an acute, blast-like injury is sufficient to induce a hypercontraction-induced genetic switch that potentiates vascular remodeling, and cerebral vasospasm, in bTBI patients.

Alford, Patrick W.; Dabiri, Borna E.; Goss, Josue A.; Hemphill, Matthew A.; Brigham, Mark D.; Parker, Kevin Kit

2011-01-01

356

LIMESTONE WET-SCRUBBING TEST RESULTS AT THE EPA ALKALI SCRUBBING TEST FACILITY. CAPSULE REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

This capsule report discusses the highlights of the first detailed engineering progress report. It describes the test facility and test program and presents results to date of the limestone wet-scrubbing testing. In addition, the realiability and operability of the test facility ...

357

Reproducibility of in vitro contracture test results in patients tested for malignant hyperthermia susceptibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The in vitro contracture test (IVCT) is the golden standard to diagnose malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). A high reproducibility is important for a high validity of a test. Methods: We have therefore analyzed IVCT in 838 patients, in- vestigated in two laboratories. Each halothane and caffeine test was performed in two muscle strips. The test results were ana- lyzed

G. ISLANDER; H. Ö RDING; D. B ENDIXEN; E. RANKLEV TWETMAN

358

Performance test results for the EATON AC3 developmental powertrain in an electric test bed vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the INEL testing was to provide test results from which an evaluation of the performance capabilities of the Eaton ac powertrain could be made and compared with other electric vehicle propulsion systems. The major portion of the testing involved the use of a chassis dynamometer to simulate the road load losses of the test bed vehicle. Road

Heiselmann

1986-01-01

359

Stable operation for No. 1 blast furnace at Baosteel  

SciTech Connect

Until Sept. 1994, No. 1 blast furnace in Baoshan Steel (Group) Co. had been operating successfully with high productivity. At present, it still keeps its strong potential for production capacity. The philosophy and methodology of the efficient blast furnace operation will be described. The most important aspect for stable operation and long campaign life of a blast furnace is reasonable gas flow distribution in the furnace. The topics to be discussed include: introduction to ironmaking in Baosteel; operational results; experience of stable operation, philosophy, gas distribution control, stabilization raw material property, furnace maintenance and supervision system.

Cai, X.; Lu, S. [Baoshan Steel Corp., Shanghai (China)

1995-07-01

360

Radiative shell thinning in intense laser-driven blast waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The structural evolution of blast waves launched by intense laser pulses in gases is investigated. These blast waves exhibit significant energy loss through radiation while propagating in xenon as evidenced by interferometric imaging revealing radiative precursors and deceleration parameters well below those of an energy-conserving wave. Thinning of the blast wave shell from radiative cooling is observed through comparison of shocks launched in gases of differing atomic number. Shell thinning is also measured when the gas density is altered, indicating the influence of conditions within the preshock medium. These results are compared with radiative-hydrodynamic simulations. British Crown Copyright 2009/MOD.

Osterhoff, J.; Symes, D. R.; Edens, A. D.; Moore, A. S.; Hellewell, E.; Ditmire, T.

2009-02-01

361

Pediatric blast lung injury from a fireworks-related explosion.  

PubMed

Blast injuries related to explosions have been described in the literature but are uncommon in children. We describe a multisystem blast injury in a child resulting from a commercial firework-related explosion in her home. She presented with respiratory failure, shock, altered level of consciousness, and multiple orthopedic injuries. The patient required immediate stabilization and resuscitation in the emergency department and a prolonged hospitalization. This report reviews the spectrum of injuries that are seen in blast-related trauma and the emergency measures needed for rapid stabilization of these critical patients. PMID:22668665

Ratto, Jessica; Johnson, Bernadette K; Condra, Cole S; Knapp, Jane F

2012-06-01

362

Cold vacuum drying proof of performance (first article testing) test results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents and details the test results of the first of a kind process referred to as Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD). The test results are compiled from several months of testing of the first process equipment skid and ancillary components to de-water and dry Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCO) filled with Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). The tests results provide design verifications, equipment validations, model validation data, and establish process parameters.

MCCRACKEN, K.J.

1999-06-23

363

Indeterminate and discrepant rapid HIV test results in couples' HIV testing and counselling centres in Africa  

PubMed Central

Background Many HIV voluntary testing and counselling centres in Africa use rapid antibody tests, in parallel or in sequence, to establish same-day HIV status. The interpretation of indeterminate or discrepant results between different rapid tests on one sample poses a challenge. We investigated the use of an algorithm using three serial rapid HIV tests in cohabiting couples to resolve unclear serostatuses. Methods Heterosexual couples visited the Rwanda Zambia HIV Research Group testing centres in Kigali, Rwanda, and Lusaka, Zambia, to assess HIV infection status. Individuals with unclear HIV rapid antibody test results (indeterminate) or discrepant results were asked to return for repeat testing to resolve HIV status. If either partner of a couple tested positive or indeterminate with the screening test, both partners were tested with a confirmatory test. Individuals with indeterminate or discrepant results were further tested with a tie-breaker and monthly retesting. HIV-RNA viral load was determined when HIV status was not resolved by follow-up rapid testing. Individuals were classified based on two of three initial tests as "Positive", "Negative" or "Other". Follow-up testing and/or HIV-RNA viral load testing determined them as "Infected", "Uninfected" or "Unresolved". Results Of 45,820 individuals tested as couples, 2.3% (4.1% of couples) had at least one discrepant or indeterminate rapid result. A total of 65% of those individuals had follow-up testing and of those individuals initially classified as "Negative" by three initial rapid tests, less than 1% were resolved as "Infected". In contrast, of those individuals with at least one discrepant or indeterminate result who were initially classified as "Positive", only 46% were resolved as "Infected", while the remainder was resolved as "Uninfected" (46%) or "Unresolved" (8%). A positive HIV serostatus of one of the partners was a strong predictor of infection in the other partner as 48% of individuals who resolved as "Infected" had an HIV-infected spouse. Conclusions In more than 45,000 individuals counselled and tested as couples, only 5% of individuals with indeterminate or discrepant rapid HIV test results were HIV infected. This represented only 0.1% of all individuals tested. Thus, algorithms using screening, confirmatory and tie-breaker rapid tests are reliable with two of three tests negative, but not when two of three tests are positive. False positive antibody tests may persist. HIV-positive partner serostatus should prompt repeat testing.

2011-01-01

364

The BLAST experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bates large acceptance spectrometer toroid (BLAST) experiment was operated at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center from 2003 until 2005. The detector and experimental program were designed to study, in a systematic manner, the spin-dependent electromagnetic interaction in few-nucleon systems. As such the data will provide improved measurements for neutron, proton, and deuteron form factors. The data will also allow details of the reaction mechanism, such as the role of final state interactions, pion production, and resonances to be studied. The experiment used: a longitudinally polarized electron beam stored in the South Hall Storage Ring; a highly polarized, isotopically pure, internal gas target of hydrogen or deuterium provided by an atomic beam source; and a symmetric, general purpose detector based on a toroidal spectrometer with tracking, time-of-flight, Cherenkov, and neutron detectors. Details of the experiment and operation are presented.

Hasell, D.; Akdogan, T.; Alarcon, R.; Bertozzi, W.; Booth, E.; Botto, T.; Calarco, J. R.; Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Degrush, A.; Dow, K.; Dutta, D.; Farkhondeh, M.; Fatemi, R.; Filoti, O.; Franklin, W.; Gao, H.; Geis, E.; Gilad, S.; Hersman, W.; Holtrop, M.; Ihloff, E.; Karpius, P.; Kelsey, J.; Kohl, M.; Kolster, H.; Krause, S.; Lee, T.; Maschinot, A.; Matthews, J.; McIlhany, K.; Meitanis, N.; Milner, R.; Rapaport, J.; Redwine, R.; Seely, J.; Shinozaki, A.; Sindile, A.; Širca, S.; Smith, T.; Sobczynski, S.; Tanguay, M.; Tonguc, B.; Tschalaer, C.; Tsentalovich, E.; Turchinetz, W.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van der Laan, J.; Wang, F.; Wise, T.; Xiao, Y.; Xu, W.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, Z.; Ziskin, V.; Zwart, T.

2009-05-01

365

Proposed Interventions to Decrease the Frequency of Missed Test Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Numerous studies have identified that delays in diagnosis related to the mishandling of abnormal test results are an import contributor to diagnostic errors. Factors contributing to missed results included organizational factors, provider factors and patient-related factors. At the diagnosis error conference continuing medical education…

Wahls, Terry L.; Cram, Peter

2009-01-01

366

Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

1999-03-01

367

Statistical analysis of Salmonella test data and comparison to results of animal cancer tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A quantitative framework for the analysis of results of the Salmonella (Ames) test is presented, and the relationship between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis is examined. Color graphics are used for the Salmonella data to describe variability, and trends across multiple chemicals and test conditions. Positivity in the Salmonella test, using statistical criteria to classify results, is compared to positivity in

Joyce McCann; L SWIRSKYGOLD; Laura Horn; R. McGill; T. E. Graedel; John Kaldor

1988-01-01

368

Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results  

SciTech Connect

The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

Wardlaw, R. Jr.

1982-09-01

369

Results of irradiated cladding tests and clad plate experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two aspects critical to the fracture behavior of three-wire stainless steel cladding were investigated by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program: (1) radiation effects on cladding strength and toughness, and (2) the response of mechanically loaded, flawed structures in the presence of cladding (clad plate experiments). Postirradiation testing results show that, in the test temperature range from \\/minus\\/125 to 288\\/degree\\/C,

F. M. Haggag; S. K. Iskander

1988-01-01

370

Results of benchmark tests for different numerical BPM algorithms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Key results of a benchmark test, initiated in 1992 by the Working Group 2 of COST Project 240 at a modelling workshop in Teupitz, Germany, are presented. A great number of algorithms--FFT-BPM, various types of FD-BPM, wide angle approximations, adaptive FE- BPM and MoL-BPM--are compared. The quasi-analytic character of the benchmark tests provides a deeper insight into the absolute accuracy of algorithms.

Nolting, Hans P.; Maerz, Reinhard

1994-08-01

371

DWPF Sampling Device Development Test Results and Design Recommendation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the development and testing of a sample device for the DWPF sample cells. The clamp actuated manual Hydraguard valve used in conjunction with the concentric needle fill device is recommended for use in the DWPF. This is based on test results which indicate that this sampler is capable of obtaining samples within five percent of the solids concentration of the process stream at flow rates from 0.5 to 3.5 gpm.

Wilds, G.W.

2001-07-17

372

Physical separations soil washing system cold test results  

SciTech Connect

This test summary describes the objectives, methodology, and results of a physical separations soil-washing system setup and shakedown test using uncontaminated soil. The test is being conducted in preparation for a treatability test to be conducted in the North Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. It will be used to assess the feasibility of using a physical separations process to reduce the volume of contaminated soils in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The test is described in DOE-RL (1993). The setup test was conducted at an uncontrolled area located approximately 3.2 km northwest of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The material processed was free of contamination. The physical separation equipment to be used in the test was transferred to the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory. On May 13, 1993, soil-washing equipment was moved to the cold test location. Design assistance and recommendation for operation was provided by the EPA.

McGuire, J.P.

1993-07-28

373

Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW[trademark]) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test.

Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr. (Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)); Sola, D.V.; Horn, S.G.; Christofferson, J.L. (Conestoga-Rovers and Associates Limited, St. Paul, MN (United States))

1992-01-01

374

Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW{trademark}) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test.

Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Sola, D.V.; Horn, S.G.; Christofferson, J.L. [Conestoga-Rovers and Associates Limited, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1992-11-01

375

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01

376

Thermal analysis of low layer density multilayer insulation test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Investigation of the thermal performance of low layer density multilayer insulations is important for designing long-duration space exploration missions involving the storage of cryogenic propellants. Theoretical calculations show an analytical optimal layer density. However, the appropriate test data by which to evaluate these calculations have been only recently obtained. As part of a recent research project, NASA procured several multilayer insulation test articles for calorimeter testing. These blanket-type test articles were configured to allow a layer density variation from 0.5 to 2.5 layers per millimeter. The coupon testing was completed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center using the cylindrical Cryostat-100 apparatus. The results show insulation properties as a function of layer density for multiple points. Overlaying these new results with data from the literature reveals an optimum layer density; however, the value is approximately twice as high as predicted. The data also show that the transition region between high vacuum and no vacuum is dependent on the spacing of the reflective layers. These results aid in the understanding of the performance parameters of MLI and help to complete the body of literature on the topic.

Johnson, Wesley

2012-06-01

377

Advanced Tactical Air Reconnaissance System development test and evaluation RF-4C final flight test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sverdrup Technology Inc., provided technical, engineering, and analytical support for a limited development test and evaluation (DT&E) of the advanced tactical air reconnaissance system (ATARS) at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. The 46th Electronic Combat Test Squadron, reconnaissance and imaging sensors test flight (46 ECTS/OGER) conducted the test from 12 February to 4 October 1993. This paper presents an overview of the sensor performance test results from this limited DT&E. Detailed results are presented in the U.S. Air Force Development Test Center technical report.

Minor, John L.

1994-10-01

378

Biogas plasticization coupled anaerobic digestion: batch test results.  

PubMed

Biogas has unique properties for improving the biodegradability of biomass solids during anaerobic digestion (AD). This report presents batch test results of the first investigation into utilizing biogas plasticization to "condition" organic polymers during active digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS). Preliminary design calculations based on polymer diffusion rate limitation are presented. Analysis of the 20 degrees C batch test data determined the first order (k(1)) COD conversion coefficient to be 0.167 day(-1) with a maximum COD utilization rate of 11.25 g L(-1) day(-1). Comparison of these batch test results to typical conventional AD performance parameters showed orders of magnitude improvement. These results show that biogas plasticization during active AD could greatly improve renewable energy yields from biomass waste materials such as MSW RDF, STP sludges, food wastes, animal manure, green wastes, and agricultural crop residuals. PMID:17054122

Schimel, Keith A

2007-06-01

379

Multiplexer/amplifier test results for SP-100  

SciTech Connect

Multiplexer and amplifier systems must be designed with transistors that can perform satisfactorily over ten years to a total gamma dose of 120E6 rads and a total neutron fluence of 1.6E15 nvt for the SP-100 reactor system. Series of gamma and neutron tests have been completed to measure transistor degradation as a function of total dose, fluence, and temperature. Test results indicate that modest increases in temperature result in substantial improvement of transistor performance at a neutron flux of 8E8 n/cm{sup 2}/s. 2 refs., 3 figs.

King, D.B.; Luker, S.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Ryan, R. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (USA))

1990-01-01

380

Test results for 36-V Li/FeS battery  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a collaborative effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Westinghouse Naval System Division from 1986 to 1989. This effort resulted in the design, fabrication, and testing of two 36-V lithium-alloy/iron monosulfide (Li/FeS) batteries. The test results provided validation of a conceptual design for a full-scale electric van battery, as well as design and performance data for 12-V Li/FeS modules and fractional-scale battery components. 16 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs.

Chilenskas, A.A.; Malecha, R.F.; DeLuca, W.H.; Tummillo, A.F.; Hogrefe, R.L.

1990-01-01

381

Large coil task and results of testing US coils  

SciTech Connect

The United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland have collaborated since 1978 in development of superconducting toroidal field coils for fusion reactor applications. The United States provided a test facility nd three coils; the other participants, one coil each. All coils have the same interface dimensions and performance requirements (stable at 8 T), but internal design was decided by each team. Two US coil teams chose bath-cooled NbTi, 10-kA conductors. One developed a Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor, cooled by internal flow, rated at 18 kA. All US coils have diagnostic instrumentation and imbedded heaters that enable stability tests and simulated nuclear heating experiments. In single-coil tests, each coil operated at full current in self-field (6.4 T). In six-coil tests that began in July 1986, one US coil and the Japanese coil hve been successfully operated at full current at 8 T. The other coils have operated as background coils while awaiting their turn as test coil. Coil tests have been informative and results gratifying. The facility has capably supported coil testing and its operation has provided information that will be useful in designing future fusion systems. Coil capabilities beyond nominal design points will be determined.

Haubenreich, P.N.

1986-01-01

382

Results of W-87/Mk21 Deployment Separation Shock Tests  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of the W-87/Mk21 Deployment Separation Shock Tests conducted at the Survivability and Vulnerability Integration Center (SVIC) Hill Air Force Base in Ogden, Utah, from 10/5/98 to 10/8/98. Specific details regarding the test plan and procedures can be found in the Master Test Plan listed in the references. Test Objectives: (1) Evaluate the performance of a set of servo accelerometers during and post Re-entry Vehicle (RV) separation events. These ultra-sensitive accelerometers ({mu}g) needed operate during and after the separation shock events and these tests would serve as confirmation of proper functioning. These sensors were later flown on FrU-15, a development flight unit supporting the Instrumented High Fidelity Joint Test Assembly Program, as part of an experimental Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) measure RV dynamics during RV mechanical separation and spin-up. (2) Measure separation shock response at the IMU accelerometer locations. (3) Measure separation shock response at locations on the warhead and RV common to locations used on MMIII separation tests conducted at LMMS Valley Forge for data comparison.

Avalle, C.A.

1999-04-21

383

Discovery of B cell antigen on blast cells of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of a common antigen on B lymphocytes of healthy blood donors and on myeloblasts of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the blast crisis (BC) stage was established with the aid of an antimyeloblast serum by the indirect surface immunofluorescence test. In the cytotoxic test this antigen was found on the blast cells of 27 patients with

L. F. Morozova; N. I. Belyanchikova; R. M. Radzikhovskaya; A. Yu. Baryshnikov; M. A. Volkova; Yu. É. Vinogradova; I. V. Frenovskaya; V. G. Markaryan; T. M. Polotskaya; E. R. Vasil'eva

1979-01-01

384

Effect of water–silt composite blasting on the stability of rocks surrounding a tunnel  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new method using water–silt composite blasting for tunneling and the field tests conducted in the Tieshanping\\u000a tunnel, Chongqing City, China. In this method, water–silt composite is substituted for the traditional pure silt stemming\\u000a of the blast holes. Because of the incompressibility of water, the attenuation of the blasting wave is postponed and the effect\\u000a of the

Zhen-Dong Cui

385

Results of the Centralia underground coal gasification field test  

SciTech Connect

The Centralia Partial-Seam CRIP (controlled retracting injection point) test is described which herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981-82 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington site. Three distinct periods of gasification were observed. The initial period in which the vertical production well was in use which yielded a typical dry gas heating value of 219 kJ/mol (248 Btu/scf). This period was followed by a period of considerably higher gas quality, 261 kJ/mol (296 Btu/scf), which resulted from the switch to the slant production well and the CRIP maneuver. The final period began when a large-scale underground roof fall occurred and the typical dry gas heating value fell to 194 kJ/mol (220 Btu/scf).

Hill, R.W.; Cena, R.J.; Stephens, D.R.; Thorsness, C.B.

1985-01-01

386

Cassini stellar reference unit: performance test approach and results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cassini Stellar Reference Unit (SRU) is the prime attitude determination sensor on the Cassini spacecraft. It must operate continuously and reliably during both the cruise and the Saturnian tour phases of the mission. In fact, accuracy requirements are most critical toward the end of the mission, during the four years of scientific observations at Saturn. To ensure that the SRU will operate within specification for the entire mission, an extensive test program has been undertaken to characterize the SRU performance prior to launch and to quantify any expected performance degradation. Results from several complimentary test programs are presented and compared with pre-test performance predictions. Additionally, a unique approach is described for enabling closed-loop testing of the SRU with the other elements of the Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem when no optical stimulation is available.

Thomas, Valerie C.; Blue, Randel C.; Procopio, Dorico

1996-10-01

387

The advanced receiver 2: Telemetry test results in CTA 21  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Telemetry tests with the Advanced Receiver II (ARX II) in Compatibility Test Area 21 are described. The ARX II was operated in parallel with a Block-III Receiver/baseband processor assembly combination (BLK-III/BPA) and a Block III Receiver/subcarrier demodulation assembly/symbol synchronization assembly combination (BLK-III/SDA/SSA). The telemetry simulator assembly provided the test signal for all three configurations, and the symbol signal to noise ratio as well as the symbol error rates were measured and compared. Furthermore, bit error rates were also measured by the system performance test computer for all three systems. Results indicate that the ARX-II telemetry performance is comparable and sometimes superior to the BLK-III/BPA and BLK-III/SDA/SSA combinations.

Hinedi, S.; Bevan, R.; Marina, M.

1991-02-01

388

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-11-01

389

Axisymmetric calculations for the Large Blast/Thermal Simulator (LB/TS) shock tube configuration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational fluid dynamics is a tool which predicts the gas dynamics of blast problems of interest to the Army by solving a set of mathematical equations with a high-speed digital computer. The governing equations for the blast problems presented here are the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations. The computations were performed on a Cray XMP/48 supercomputer by discretizing the Euler equations with an upwind, Total Variation Diminishing, finite volume, implicit scheme. Details of the scheme are presented in the paper. The algorithm is used here to provide gas dynamic information for a candidate large-scale blast simulator (LBS) concept. A growing need exists for nuclear blast survivability testing of tactical equipment. In order to meet this need, research is conducting into the design and operation of a Large-scale Blast Thermal Simulator, essentially a large multi-driver shock tube. Experiments with heated and unheated driver gas have been performed in a single driver, 1/67 scale model of the LB/TS design concept but without the thermal simulation (LBS). One dimensional calculations have been performed for the 1/67 scale LBS with useful results. However, the one-dimensional calculations have had limited success for accurately predicting the flow through the diverging portion of the LBS design because the flow in this region is multi-dimensional. The flow is multi-dimensional due to the rapid and large area change that exists in the diverging nozzle. The paper presents results which demonstrates the nature of fluid physics in the 1/57 scale LBS.

Hisley, Dixie M.; Molvik, Gregory A.

1988-09-01

390

Operational Results from a High Power Alternator Test Bed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH was used to simulate the operating conditions and evaluate the performance of the ATU and its interaction with various LPSF components in accordance with the current Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) requirements. The testing was carried out at the breadboard development level. These results successfully demonstrated excellent ATU power bus characteristics and rectified user load power quality during steady state and transient conditions. Information gained from this work could be used to assist the design and primary power quality considerations for a possible future FSPS. This paper describes the LPSF components and some preliminary test results.

Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

2007-01-01

391

Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01

392

GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2003-08-01

393

GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

2003-03-01

394

GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2004-01-01

395

Blast-Induced Translational Effects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A mathematical model was developed to predict the time displacement histories of objects translated by the blast winds from conventional or nuclear explosions; these predictions were then compared to actual experiments. The objects studied varied in size ...

E. R. Fletcher I. G. Bowen

1966-01-01

396

High power MHD system: Facility status and magnet test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

AEDC has been requested by the Aero Propulsion Laboratory to design, fabricate, and install facility hardware necessary to conduct tests to demonstrate the performance of high power MHD generator systems developed by AFWAL contractors. This report summarizes the AEDC effort since program inception, describes the facility under development, gives the status of each major facility component, and summarizes the results

G. L. Whitehead

1982-01-01

397

The ESA Herschel Telescope Tiger Team metrology review: test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

ESA commissioned a Tiger Team to review the discrepancy between the prediction and measurement of the telescope back focal length. A team of 16 engineers and scientists collocated at ESA's Estec facility to review the test results in the context of the mission requirements and predictions for behavior of the telescope. Extensive analysis was performed on the random and systematic

Brian E. Catanzaro; Dominic Doyle; Johannes Pfund; Nathalie Ninane; Yvette Houbrechts; Bernhard Braunecker

2008-01-01

398

Sleep Affects Concussion-Testing Results, Study Finds  

MedlinePLUS

... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sleep Affects Concussion-Testing Results, Study Finds Athletes with the least ... Preidt Monday, July 15, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Pages Concussion Sleep Disorders SATURDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Getting ...

399

Similar Cases Retrieval from the Database of Laboratory Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

We proposed a suitable method to search similar cases from the laboratory test results database, whose data are basically numerical and ordinal data. We transformed raw data into ordinal ranks and into new scores lying between 0 and 1, then calculated the Mahalanobis distances as a similarity measure. We used 3000 cases of blood count data. In 100 sample cases,

Zhenjun Yang; Yasushi Matsumura; Shigeki Kuwata; Hideo Kusuoka; Hiroshi Takeda

2003-01-01

400

Similar Cases Retrieval From the Database of Laboratory Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

We proposed a suitable method to search similar cases from the laboratory test results database, whose data are basically numerical and ordinal data. We transformed raw data into ordinal ranks and into new scores lying between 0 and 1, then calculated the Mahalanobis distances as a similarity measure. We used 3000 cases of blood count data. In 100 sample cases,

Zhenjun Yang; Yasushi Matsumura; Shigeki Kuwata; Hideo Kusuoka; Hiroshi Takeda

2003-01-01

401

Recent results from the TESLA Test Facility (TTF)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present recent results of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). The most important milestone was the operation with the TESLA design current, macropulses of 800 ?s with bunches of 4 nC at a rate of 2.25 MHz. Further studies include measurements of higher order modes (HOMs) in superconducting cavities, optimization of the TTF free electron laser at

M. Huning; RWTH Aachen

2001-01-01

402

Relationships between driving simulator performance and driving test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is considered relevant because: 1) car driving is an everyday and safety-critical task; 2) simulators are used to an increasing extent for driver training (related topics: training, virtual reality, human – machine interaction); 3) the article addresses relationships between performance in the simulator and driving test results–a relevant topic for those involved in driver training and the virtual

J. C. F. de Winter; S. de Groot; M. Mulder; P. A. Wieringa; J. Dankelman; J. A. Mulder

2009-01-01

403

ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker test-beam results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several prototypes of the Transition Radiation Tracker for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC have been built and tested at the CERN SPS accelerator. Results from detailed studies of the straw-tube hit registration efficiency and drift-time measurements and of the pion and electron spectra without and with radiators are presented.

Akesson, T.; Arik, E.; Baker, K.; Baron, S.; Benjamin, D.; Bertelsen, H.; Bondarenko, V.; Bytchkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Capeans, M.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Catinaccio, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Cwetanski, P.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Dittus, F.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouichi, C.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagnon, P.; Grichkevitch, Y.; Grigalashvili, N.; Hajduk, Z.; Hansen, P.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G.; Khristatchev, A.; Konovalov, S.; Koudine, L.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kruger, K.; Laritchev, A.; Lichard, P.; Luehring, F.; Lundberg, B.; Maleev, V.; Markina, I.; McFarlane, K.; Mialkovski, V.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mindur, B.; Morozov, S.; Munar, A.; Muraviev, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Newcomer, F. M.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S.; Olszowska, J.; Passmore, S.; Patritchev, S.; Peshekhonov, V.; Petti, R.; Price, M.; Rembser, C.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rust, D. R.; Ryabov, Yu.; Schegelsky, V.; Seliverstov, D.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Smirnov, S.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Soutchkov, V.; Spiridenkov, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V.; Vassilieva, L.; Wang, C.; Williams, H. H.; Zalite, A.

2004-04-01

404

49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...services as part of its anti-drug program. (b) MRO qualifications...The MRO must report all drug test results to the operator in accordance...operator, by a substance abuse professional under contract...resolving problems with drug abuse, does not...

2010-10-01

405

49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...services as part of its anti-drug program. (b) MRO qualifications...The MRO must report all drug test results to the operator in accordance...operator, by a substance abuse professional under contract...resolving problems with drug abuse, does not...

2009-10-01

406

First Test Results of the New LANSCE Wire Scanner  

SciTech Connect

The Beam Diagnostics and Instrumentation Team (BDIT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE facility is presently developing a new and improved wire scanner diagnostics system controlled by National Instrument's cRIO platform. This paper describes the current state of development of the control system along with the results gathered from the latest actuator motion performance and accelerator-beam data acquisition tests.

Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01

407

RESULTS: INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON - BIOCONCENTRATION TESTS USING EASTERN OYSTERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report summarizes the results of an interlaboratory comparison for bioconcentration (BCF) testing using the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and the organic chemicals pentachlorophenol (PCP), 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB), and p, p'-DDE. The means BCFs and high to low BC...

408

Communication of Advanced Test Reactor probabilistic risk assessment results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) Level 1 results were efficiently communicated in two reports following the completion of revision 1 of the ATR PRA. As the ATR PRA including external events fills four large volume, it wa...

T. A. Thatcher S. A. Atkinson S. A. Eide

1992-01-01

409

Communication of Advanced Test Reactor probabilistic risk assessment results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) Level 1 results were efficiently communicated in two reports following the completion of revision 1 of the ATR PRA. As the ATR PRA including external events fills four large volume, it was considered impractical to expect all of the individuals at ATR who could benefit from the information to read the

T. A. Thatcher; S. A. Atkinson; S. A. Eide

1992-01-01

410

Global primary blast injury: a rat model.  

PubMed

Blast wave injury from bombs cause a unique but poorly understood spectrum of injuries. Previous blast wave models involved high energy explosives detonated in an open field without the sophisticated monitoring of laboratory equipment. We characterized a rodent model that produces a global blast injury in a safe laboratory environment. Male rats, prospectively randomized to four groups of ten, were anesthetized and subjected to a blast at 2.0 cm, 2.5 cm, or 3.5 cm from the blast nozzle. The control group received no blast. Intensity of the blast (80-120 psi peak pressure, 1-2 msec duration) was controlled by varying the distance of the blast wave generator to the rat. The rats were monitored for three hours following the blast and then euthanized. Bradycardia was an immediate but transient response to blast injury. Mean arterial pressure was bimodal with severe hypotension occurring immediately after the blast and, again, two to three hours later. The characteristic injuries from a blast wave, such as pulmonary hemorrhage with increased lung weight, intestinal serosal hemorrhage, and hemoperitoneum, were found in the rats subjected to the blast pressure wave. In conclusion, our rodent model accurately reproduces the clinical spectrum of injuries seen in blast victims and will provide a powerful tool for studying the pathophysiology and potential treatments of bomb blast victims. PMID:9793276

Irwin, R J; Lerner, M R; Bealer, J F; Lightfoot, S A; Brackett, D J; Tuggle, D W

1998-10-01

411

Investigation of cavitation as a possible damage mechanism in blast-induced traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Cavitation was investigated as a possible damage mechanism for war-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to an improvised explosive device (IED) blast. When a frontal blast wave encounters the head, a shock wave is transmitted through the skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue, causing negative pressure at the contrecoup that may result in cavitation. Numerical simulations and shock tube experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of cranial cavitation from realistic IED non-impact blast loading. Simplified surrogate models of the head consisted of a transparent polycarbonate ellipsoid. The first series of tests in the 18-inch-diameter shock tube were conducted on an ellipsoid filled with degassed water to simulate CSF and tissue. In the second series, Sylgard gel, surrounded by a layer of degassed water, was used to represent the tissue and CSF, respectively. Simulated blast overpressure in the shock tube tests ranged from a nominal 10-25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig; 69-170?kPa). Pressure in the simulated CSF was determined by Kulite thin line pressure sensors at the coup, center, and contrecoup positions. Using video taken at 10,000 frames/sec, we verified the presence of cavitation bubbles at the contrecoup in both ellipsoid models. In all tests, cavitation at the contrecoup was observed to coincide temporally with periods of negative pressure. Collapse of the cavitation bubbles caused by the surrounding pressure and elastic rebound of the skull resulted in significant pressure spikes in the simulated CSF. Numerical simulations using the DYSMAS hydrocode to predict onset of cavitation and pressure spikes during cavity collapse were in good agreement with the tests. The numerical simulations and experiments indicate that skull deformation is a significant factor causing cavitation. These results suggest that cavitation may be a damage mechanism contributing to TBI that requires future study. PMID:22489674

Goeller, Jacques; Wardlaw, Andrew; Treichler, Derrick; O'Bruba, Joseph; Weiss, Greg

2012-05-14

412

Salmonella mutagenicity tests. IV. Results from the testing of 300 chemicals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hundred chemicals were tested for mutagenicity, under code, in Salmonella typhimurium, using a preincubation protocol. All tests were performed in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation, and in the presence of liver S-9 from Aroclor-induced male Sprague-Dawley rats and Syrian hamsters. The results and data from these tests are presented.

Errol Zeiger; Beth Anderson; Steve Haworth; Timothy Lawlor; Kristien Mortelmans

1988-01-01

413

Autoclave Curing — Comparisons of Model and Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tests were performed measuring the temperature, ionic conductivity, and compaction in 16 to 200 ply thick graphite-epoxy laminates made of either Fiberite T300\\/976 (tape or fabric) or Hercules AS\\/3501-6 (tape). The data were compared to results calculated by the Loos-Springer CURE model. Good agreement was found between the model results and the data indicating that the model can be used

Peter R. Ciriscioli; Qiuling Wang; George S. Springer

1992-01-01

414

STUDY OF ANOMALOUS MINE BLASTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Altai-Sayan mining region located east of Novosibirsk, Russia, comprises over 72 mines which are located between 7 and 559 km from the International Monitoring System (IMS) primary 3-component station ZAL. We have origin time and location estimates of 853 blasts that have occurred in this trend between 1\\/1\\/1995 and 6\\/30\\/2000. The mines are known to use millisecond delay-fire blasting

Michael A. H. Hedlin; Vitaly I. Khalturin

415

Water blasting paint removal methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water blasting is a paint removal technique that has been used for cleaning and paint removal for many years. The major disadvantages until recently were the slow rate of paint removal and the possibility of damage to the substrate from the high pressures used. With the improvement in nozzle design that allows for higher operating pressures and the use of environmentally compliant paint softeners or strippers, water blasting is becoming a recognized technique for paint removal in the aircraft industry.

Foster, Terry

1995-04-01

416

First results of the full-array LCT coil tests  

SciTech Connect

The international Large Coil Task (LCT) has designed, built, and is testing six different toroidal field coils. Each has a 2.5- x 3.5-m D-shaped bore, a current between 10 and 18 kA, and is designed for stable operation at 8 T. Three coils are bath-cooled; three are cooled by forced flow of helium at supercritical pressure. One uses Nb/sub 3/Sn; the others NbTi. The test coils are equipped with voltage, temperature, magnetic field, flow pressure, strain, displacement, and acoustic emission sensors sufficient for penetrating analysis of performance field. Shakedown operation of the test facility and preliminary tests of the first three coils were accomplished in 1984. Tests of the full six-coil toroidal array began early in 1986 and have progressed to the stage of design-current, design-field stability tests. Results to date have elucidated complex structural and electrical interactions in a multicoil array and provide gratifying assurance of coil performance.

Shen, S.S.; Baylor, L.R.; Clinard, J.A.; Cogswell, F.D.; Dresner, L.; Ellis, J.F.; Fietz, W.A.; Fletcher, W.M.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Herz, W.

1986-09-01

417

In-orbit test results of the first SILEX terminal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Semi conductor Inter satellite Link EXperiment, SILEX, consists of two terminals, one terminal embarked on the French LEO observation satellite SPOT4 and one terminal embarked on the ESA GEO telecommunication satellite ARTEMIS. The objective of SILEX is first to perform optical communication experiments in orbit and then on an operational basis transmit SPOT4 earth observation data to ARTEMIS, which will relay the data to ground via its Ka band feeder link. SPOT4 with the SILEX terminal was successfully launched on 22nd March 1998. While waiting for the counter terminal on ARTEMIS, a test program has been undertaken to characterize the performances without a counter terminal. The test program involves CCD calibrations, laser diode calibrations, emit/transmit co- alignment calibrations, measurement of point ahead mechanism accuracy, star acquisitions and tracking, sensitivity to sunlight, and characterization of platform/terminal dynamic interaction. The paper reports on test results of the in orbit testing, with comparison to similar ground testing and predictions. The conclusion of the test program is that the first optical communication terminal in orbit is in very good health and that the demonstrated performances are stable and considerably better than the expected.

Tolker-Nielsen, Toni; Demelenne, Benoit; Desplats, Eric

1999-04-01

418

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

2012-12-01

419

Updated test results of a pumped monopropellant propulsion system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Significant progress was made in 1992 and 1993 towards demonstration at the system level of a high-performance pumped monopropellant propulsion system. Two separate breadboard systems were designed, fabricated and tested with hydrazine at vacuum and sea level conditions. Both designs utilized improved warm-gas-driven reciprocating pumps to transfer fuel from a low-pressure hydrazine tank (70 psig) directly to a pair of 56-lbf thrusters operating at 580 psia chamber pressure. The system most recently tested included direct warm gas pressurization of the hydrazine tank. This novel propulsion system design has been presented and discussed in various configurations in previous papers. This paper will provide an update to test results presented in 1991. This recent testing of these latest system designs included a continuous 60-second burn of a 42-lbf thruster operating at sea level, in addition bootstrap and pulse-mode firings. These results have demonstrated that improvements to the 3-way valve design of the pump were successful, and have verified performance predictions obtained from a mathematical model of the system. Further testing of a more advanced breadboard system is planned for late 1993.

Maybee, Jeffrey C.; Swink, Don G.; Whitehead, John C.

1993-11-01

420

Results of MACE tests M0 and M1  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program underway at Argonne National Laboratory under ACE/EPRI sponsorship. The program addresses the efficacy of water to terminate an accident situation if melt progression were to result in a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) in the reactor containment. Large-scale experiments are being conducted in parallel with related modeling efforts, involving the addition of water to an MCI already underway. The experiments utilize UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}/Zr corium mixtures, direct electrical heating for simulation of decay heating, and various types of concrete basemats. Currently the tests involve 430 kg corium mass, 25 cm depth, in a 50 cm square test section. Test MO was a successful scoping test, but the first full size test, Ml, failed to achieve melt-water contact owing to existence of a preexisting bridge crust of corium charge. A heat flux of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} was measured in MO which removed energy from the corium pool equivalent to its entire heat of solidification prior to abatement by formation of an interfacial crust. The crust subsequently limited heat extraction to 600 kW/m{sup 2} and less. Both tests MO and Ml revealed physical evidence of large pool swelling events which resulted in extrusion (and ejection) of melt into water above the crust, significantly increasing the overall quench and reducing the remaining melt in contact with the concrete. Furthermore, test Ml provided evidence of occasional ``burst mode`` ablation events and one additional important benefit of overlying water -- aerosol capture.

Spencer, B.W.; Farmer, M.T.; Armstrong, D.R.; Kilsdonk, D.J.; Aeschlimann, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Fischer, M. [Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany)

1992-04-01

421

Results of MACE tests M0 and M1  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program underway at Argonne National Laboratory under ACE/EPRI sponsorship. The program addresses the efficacy of water to terminate an accident situation if melt progression were to result in a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) in the reactor containment. Large-scale experiments are being conducted in parallel with related modeling efforts, involving the addition of water to an MCI already underway. The experiments utilize UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}/Zr corium mixtures, direct electrical heating for simulation of decay heating, and various types of concrete basemats. Currently the tests involve 430 kg corium mass, 25 cm depth, in a 50 cm square test section. Test MO was a successful scoping test, but the first full size test, Ml, failed to achieve melt-water contact owing to existence of a preexisting bridge crust of corium charge. A heat flux of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} was measured in MO which removed energy from the corium pool equivalent to its entire heat of solidification prior to abatement by formation of an interfacial crust. The crust subsequently limited heat extraction to 600 kW/m{sup 2} and less. Both tests MO and Ml revealed physical evidence of large pool swelling events which resulted in extrusion (and ejection) of melt into water above the crust, significantly increasing the overall quench and reducing the remaining melt in contact with the concrete. Furthermore, test Ml provided evidence of occasional burst mode'' ablation events and one additional important benefit of overlying water -- aerosol capture.

Spencer, B.W.; Farmer, M.T.; Armstrong, D.R.; Kilsdonk, D.J.; Aeschlimann, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Fischer, M. (Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany))

1992-01-01

422

Test results of the ALICE-HMPID detector commissioning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) consists of seven identical proximity focusing RICH counters. It covers in total 11 m2, exploiting large area CsI photocathodes for Cherenkov light imaging. The detector is installed in the ALICE solenoid, ready for the data acquisition. By means of the Detector Control System, the Front-end (FEE) and the Readout (R/O) electronics, the MWPC high voltages, the cooling and the gas system have been tested. The HMPID module gas pressure, temperature, current and voltage trends have been monitored and archived in the ORACLE database. In this paper a comprehensive review on the test results is presented.

Volpe, G.

2008-06-01

423

Blast injury with particular reference to recent terrorist bombing incidents.  

PubMed Central

The aetiology of primary blast lung is discussed with reference to the biodynamics of blast injury, and the clinical and pathological features of the condition are described. An analysis of casualties from bomb blast incidents occurring in Northern Ireland leads to the following conclusions concerning the injuries found in persons exposed to explosions: (1) there is a predominance of head and neck trauma, including fractures, lacerations, burns, and eye and ear injuries; (2) fractures and traumatic amputations are common and often multiple; (3) penetrating trunk wounds carry a grave prognosis; and (4) primary blast lung is rare. A comparison of four bombing incidents in England in 1973 and 1974 shows how the type and severity of injury are related to the place in which the explosion occurs. The administrative and clinical aspects of the management of casualties resulting from terrorist bombing activities are discussed.

Hill, J. F.

1979-01-01

424

Results of an integrated water recovery system test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of an integrated advanced water recovery system test are presented. The test evaluated the ability of the system to recover potable water from human generated wastewater. Primary processing was performed by a biological water processor (BWP), which included microbial organic carbon oxidation and nitrification. The majority of inorganic contaminant removal was accomplished with reverse osmosis (RO). Water from RO brine was recovered using an air evaporation system. Ultraviolet oxidation and ion exchange polished the recovered water to potable specifications. All subsystems were designed for operation in microgravity. All water produced during the test met NASA potable water standards. Subsystem performance is summarized. The influence of subsystem performance on overall system efficiency is also discussed.

Pickering, K.; Pariani, G.; Campbell, M.; Finger, B.; Verostko, C.; Wines, K.

425

Planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrade: beam tests results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The performance of planar silicon pixel sensors, in development for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades, has been examined in a series of beam tests at the CERN SPS facilities since 2009. Salient results are reported on the key parameters, including the spatial resolution, the charge collection and the charge sharing between adjacent cells, for different bulk materials and sensor geometries. Measurements are presented for n+-in-n pixel sensors irradiated with a range of fluences and for p-type silicon sensors with various layouts from different vendors. All tested sensors were connected via bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel read-out chip. The tests reveal that both n-type and p-type planar sensors are able to collect significant charge even after the lifetime fluence expected at the HL-LHC.

Weingarten, J.; Altenheiner, S.; Beimforde, M.; Benoit, M.; Bomben, M.; Calderini, G.; Gallrapp, C.; George, M.; Gibson, S.; Grinstein, S.; Janoska, Z.; Jentzsch, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Kishida, T.; La Rosa, A.; Libov, V.; Macchiolo, A.; Marchiori, G.; Muenstermann, D.; Nagai, R.; Piacquadio, G.; Ristic, B.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rummler, A.; Takubo, Y.; Troska, G.; Tsiskaridtze, S.; Tsurin, I.; Unno, Y.; Weigell, P.; Wittig, T.

2012-10-01

426

TEST RESULTS FROM GAMMA IRRADIATION OF ALUMINUM OXYHYDROXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated metal oxides or oxyhydroxides boehmite and gibbsite that can form on spent aluminum-clad nuclear fuel assemblies during in-core and post-discharge wet storage were exposed as granular powders to gamma irradiation in a {sup 60}Co irradiator in closed laboratory test vessels with air and with argon as separate cover gases. The results show that boehmite readily evolves hydrogen with exposure up to a dose of 1.8 x 10{sup 8} rad, the maximum tested, in both a full-dried and moist condition of the powder, whereas only a very small measurable quantity of hydrogen was generated from the granular powder of gibbsite. Specific information on the test setup, sample characteristics, sample preparation, irradiation, and gas analysis are described.

Fisher, D.; Westbrook, M.; Sindelar, R.

2012-02-01

427

SP-100 Fuel Pin Performance: Results from Irradiation Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pins are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

Makenas, Bruce J.; Paxton, Dean M.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Marietta, Martin; Hoth, Carl W.

1994-07-01

428

TEST RESULTS FOR LHC INSERTION REGION DEPOLE MAGNETS.  

SciTech Connect

The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has made 20 insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These 9.45 m-long, 8 cm aperture magnets have the same coil design as the arc dipoles now operating in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL and are of single aperture, twin aperture, and double cold mass configurations. They are required to produce fields up to 4.14 T for operation at 7.56 TeV. Eighteen of these magnets have been tested at 4.5 K using either forced flow supercritical helium or liquid helium. The testing was especially important for the twin aperture models, whose construction was very different from the RHIC dipoles, except for the coil design. This paper reports on the results of these tests, including spontaneous quench performance, verification of quench protection heater operation, and magnetic field quality.

MURATORE, J.; JAIN, A.; ANERELLA, M.; COSSOLINO, J.; ET AL.

2005-05-16

429

Experimental and numerical studies on the response of quadrangular stiffened plates. Part I: subjected to uniform blast load  

Microsoft Academic Search

This two-part article presents the results of experimental and numerical work on the response of built-in mild steel quadrangular plates with different stiffener configurations (unstiffened, single, double, cross and double cross), subjected to blast loading. Part I studies the response of plates to uniform blast loading, while Part II examines the response to localised blast loading. The approach in both

S. Chung Kim Yuen; G. N. Nurick

2005-01-01

430

Correlation of the results of shock-initiation tests  

SciTech Connect

Results from a variety of shock initiation and detonation propagation tests including the results from a large scale propellant initiation study have been correlated, applying a critical energy fluence criterion to pressure histories. Organization of the results shows systematic differences between pressed explosives and cast propellants. Further, the composite materials used in the large-scale propellant study must be considered as belonging to another class that differs from ideal explosives. Hydrodynamic calculations are employed to establish the precise nature of the correlation. It is shown how simple approximations can be used to evaluate shock initiation thresholds.

Weston, A.M.; Kincaid, J.F.; James, E.; Lee, E.L.; Green, L.G.; Walton, J.R.

1981-01-01

431

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of the study described in this report is to provide experimental data for the first key technical area, potential plugging of small breaches, by performing small-scale tests with a range of orifice sizes and orientations representative of the WTP conditions. The simulants used were chosen to represent the range of process stream properties in the WTP. Testing conducted after the plugging tests in the small- and large-scale test stands addresses the second key technical area, aerosol generation. The results of the small-scale aerosol generation tests are included in Mahoney et al. 2012. The area of spray generation from large breaches is covered by large-scale testing in Schonewill et al. 2012.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

2012-09-01

432

Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it was known that the accelerated aging process decreases insulation life by approximately 50% for each 10 C temperature rise. Therefore, the first phases of the program, not reported in these test results, were to select wire insulation constructions that could operate at high temperature and low pressure for over 10,000 hours with negligible shrinkage and little materials' deterioration.The final phase of the program was to determine accelerated aging characteristics. When an insulation construction is subjected to partial discharges the insulation is locally heated by the bombardment of the discharges, the insulation is also subjected to ozone and other deteriorating gas particles that may significantly increase the aging process. Several insulation systems using either a single material or combinations of teflon, kapton, and glass insulation constructions were tested. All constructions were rated to be partial discharge and/or corona-free at 240 volts, 400 Hz and 260 C (500 F) for 50, 000 hours at altitudes equivalent to the Paschen law. Minimum partial discharge aging tests were preceded by screening tests lasting 20 hours at 260 C. The aging process was accelerated by subjecting the test articles to temperatures up to 370 C (700 F) with and without partial discharges. After one month operation with continuous glow discharges surrounding the test articles, most insulation systems were either destroyed or became brittle, cracked, and unsafe for use. Time with space radiation as with partial discharges is accumulative.

Dunbar, William G.

1995-11-01

433

Tyre-blast injuries.  

PubMed

A teenager college student was fatally injured by burst tyre air pressure while waiting on a public bus stand to catch a bus to reach her college at Kuala Lumpur. She accidentally came near the wheel while boarding when tube and tyre got burst .The air pressure had blown the girl in the air and she subsequently fell on a rough surface. The iron-locking rim of the wheel acted as a missile and hit the girl. She died on her way to the hospital. A medico-legal autopsy was performed which showed extensive injuries in the cranial and chest cavity. Head had large scalp laceration with diffuse separation and gaping from in the vault region; skull bones were fractured. Chest cavity had extensive rib fractures, lacerated lungs and haemo-thorax while externally there was no obvious injury. It requires intensive care management and screening of the victims. Tyre-blast injuries are not so common. This case exposes the hazard due to burst tyre. PMID:19329081

Murty, O P

2009-01-29

434

Test Results for a High Power Thermal Management System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In response to the identified needs of emerging high power spacecraft applications, a multiple evaporator hybrid loop heat pipe (H-LHP) was developed and tested as part of a Dual Use Science and Technology (DUS&T) program co-sponsored by ATK and AFRL/PRP. During the course of the DUS&T program, a two-kilowatt system with three evaporators was developed and tested to identify viable system architectures and characterize system performance capabilities as a function of heat load profiles and spatial distribution of the evaporators. Following the successful development of the two-kilowatt system, a 10-kilowatt system with six evaporators was fabricated and tested. Tests were performed with the system operating in a totally passive mode, where applying a small amount of power to a sweepage evaporator provides the auxiliary flow through the primary evaporators, and as a self-regulating, capillary-controlled mechanically pumped system. This paper will provide a description of the 10-kilowatt multi-evaporator system and present the results of the passive and mechanically pump test programs.

Wrenn, Kimberly R.; Wolf, David A.

2008-01-01

435

Experimental Results of Integrated Refrigeration and Storage System Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Launch operations engineers at the Kennedy Space Center have identified an Integrated Refrigeration and Storage system as a promising technology to reduce launch costs and enable advanced cryogenic operations. This system uses a closed cycle Brayton refrigerator to remove energy from the stored cryogenic propellant. This allows for control of the temperature and pressure of the fluid, and enables advanced operations such as zero boil off storage and zero loss transfer. If required, this also can serve as a propellant densification system or liquefier. However, the behavior of the fluid in this type of system is different than typical cryogenic storage systems, and there will be a learning curve associated with its use. A 400 liter research cryostat has been designed, fabricated and delivered to KSC to test the thermofluid behavior of liquid oxygen as energy is removed from the cryogen by a simulated DC cycle cryocooler. Results of the initial testing phase focusing on heat exchanger characterization and zero loss storage operations using liquid oxygen are presented in this paper. Future plans for testing of oxygen densification tests and oxygen liquefaction tests will also be discussed.

Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Oliveira, J.; Jumper, K.

2010-04-01

436

Blast trauma: the fourth weapon of mass destruction.  

PubMed

Injury from blast is becoming more common in the non-military population. This is primarily a result of an increase in politically motivated bombings within the civilian sector. Explosions unrelated to terrorism may also occur in the industrial setting. Civilian physicians and surgeons need to have an understanding of the pathomechanics and physiology of blast injury and to recognize the hallmarks of severity in order to increase survivorship. Because victims may be transported rapidly to the hospital, occult injury to gas and fluid containing organs (particularly the ears, bowel and lungs) may go unrecognized. Information surrounding the physical environment of the explosion (whether inside or outside, underwater, associated building collapse, etc) will prove useful. Most of the immediate deaths are caused by primary blast injury from the primary blast wave, but secondary blast injury from flying debris can also be lethal and involve a much wider radius. Liberal use of X-ray examination in areas of skin punctures will help to identify a need for exploration and/or foreign body removal. Biologic serum markers may have a role in identifying victims of primary blast injury and assist in monitoring their clinical progress. Tertiary blast injury results from the airborne propulsion of the victim by the shockwave and is a source of additional blunt head and torso trauma as well as fractures. Miscellaneous (quaternary) blast injury include thermal or dust inhalation exposure as well as crush and compartment syndromes from building collapse. Any explosion has the potential to be associated with nuclear, biologic or chemical contaminants, and this should remain a consideration for healthcare givers until proven otherwise. PMID:16425623

Born, C T

2005-01-01

437

Horizontal grout barrier project results of the latest testing  

SciTech Connect

Throughout United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites are situations where storage tanks and pits are leaking or have the potential to leak contamination into the soil. Subsequent leaching from rain and groundwater flow disperses the contamination far from the original site and, in some cases, into aquifers which serve as a drinking water source. Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) at Fernald working with the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) and two subcontractors, is pursuing the goal of placing a barrier beneath the contamination to prevent this dispersion. The technology being developed is an in situ approach based on directional drilling and jet grouting techniques developed in the oil fields. The unique barrier techniques being developed depend on innovative tooling and special grouts to install a horizontal barrier underground without disturbing the contaminated soils above. The initial tool designs were tested in December 1992 and were encouraging enough that the DOE agreed to fund continued development. A second set of designs were tested in August 1994. The testing results were less than expected but did provide a number of lessons learned. This paper reports on the third set of tool designs and the results of testing these tools prior to the full demonstration project at Fernald.

Riedel, K.W. [PARSONS Environmental Remedial Action Project, Fairfield, OH (United States); Ridenour, D.E. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Walker, J. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-03-01

438

Blasting Rocks and Blasting Cars Applied Engineering  

ScienceCinema

June 30, 2004 Berkeley Lab lecture: Deb Hopkins works with industries like automobile, mining and paper to improve their evaluation and measuring techniques. For several years, she has coordinated ... June 30, 2004 Berkeley Lab lecture: Deb Hopkins works with industries like automobile, mining and paper to improve their evaluation and measuring techniques. For several years, she has coordinated a program at Berkeley Lab funded under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, a collaboration between the federal government and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research. Nondestructive evaluation techniques to test a car's structural integrity are being developed for auto assembly lines.

439

Factory acceptance test results for the DIRSP projection optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Factory Acceptance Test (FAT) results for the projection optical subsystem (POS) of US Army STIRCOM's dynamic infrared scene projector (DIRSP) are presented in this paper. DIRSP is a low background (-35 degrees Celsius) hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL), long-wave infrared (LWIR) scene projector built by Mission Research Corporation (MRC) for use by the Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC). It has an effective emitter array size of 1632 X 672 suspended-membrane micro-resistor elements. The POS is responsible for generating this effective array size from three smaller arrays using a mosaic image combiner, adding background light from an external blackbody, and collimating the combined radiation with a 5:1 vacuum enclosed -35 degree Celsius zoom lens. The FAT results reported demonstrate good POS performance compared to the design for focal length, F/#, MTF and apparent temperature.

Thomas, Matthew C.; Ward, Craig S.

2000-07-01

440

Contribution of systemic factors in the pathophysiology of repeated blast-induced neurotrauma.  

PubMed

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury is complex and involves multiple factors including systemic pathophysiological factors in addition to direct brain injuries. We hypothesize that systemic activation of platelets/leukocytes plays a major role in the development and exacerbation of brain injury after blast exposure. A mouse model of repeated blast exposure that results in significant neuropathology, neurobehavioral changes and regional specific alterations in various biomolecules in the brain was used for the proposed study. Activation of platelets was evaluated by flow cytometry and serotonin content was analyzed by ELISA. Expression of myeloperoxidase was analyzed by Western blotting. Histopathology of the brain was used to assess blast-induced cerebral vasoconstriction. The data showed an increase in the activation of platelets at 4h after repeated blast exposures, indicating changes in platelet phenotype in blast neurotrauma. Platelet serotonin concentration showed a significant decrease at 4h after blast with a concurrent increase in the plasma serotonin levels, confirming the early onset of platelet activation after repeated blast exposures. Blood, plasma and brain myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and expression was increased in repeated blast exposed mice at multiple time points. Histopathological analysis of the brains of blast exposed mice showed constriction of blood vessels compared to the respective controls, a phenomenon similar to the reported cerebral vasoconstriction in blast affected victims. These results suggest that repeated blast exposure leads to acute activation of platelets/leukocytes which can augment the pathological effects of brain injury. Platelet/leukocyte targeted therapies can be evaluated as potential acute treatment strategies to mitigate blast-induced neurotrauma. PMID:23370286

Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Alamneh, Yonas; Wang, Ying; Arun, Peethambaran; Oguntayo, Samuel; Wei, Yanling; Long, Joseph B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

2013-01-28

441

Results of Three Years’ Experience with the Deoxyuridine Suppression Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of deoxyuridine (dU) suppression tests performed on 400 marrow samples aspirated over a 3-year period are summarised. High dU-suppressed values were found in all patients with vitamin B12 or folate deficiency, in some patients receiving inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase, in 4 of 19 epileptics receiving anticonvulsants and in 2 of 21 patients with iron deficiency anaemia. High dU-suppressed

S. N. Wickramasinghe; J. E. Saunders

1977-01-01

442

Tc99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products

Shas V. Mattigod; Dawn M. Wellman; Elizabeth C. Golovich; Elsa A. Cordova; Ronald M. Smith

2010-01-01

443

NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications program were to investigate the effects of atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and AO with UV synergistic effects on wire insulation materials. The AO exposure was on the order of 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm and the vacuum UV radiation was on the order of 10,000 ESH. The results of these tests are presented in this document

Vaughn, Jason A.

1995-11-01

444

The ACES Mission: System Tests Results and Development Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) testing fundamental laws of physics with high-performance atomic clocks1 . Operated on-board the International Space Station, the ACES payload will distribute a clock signal with fractional frequency instability and inaccuracy of 1·10-16 . This frequency reference is resulting from the medium-term stability of an active

Luigi Cacciapuoti

2010-01-01

445

Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples  

SciTech Connect

A series of analytical tests was conducted on a suite of granitic rock samples from the Daya Bay region of southeast China. The objective of these analyses was to determine key rock properties that would affect the suitability of this location for the siting of a neutrino oscillation experiment. This report contains the results of chemical analyses, rock property measurements, and a calculation of the mean atomic weight.

Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji

2004-10-12

446

Results of 1 MWe heat exchanger tests on OTEC-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heat exchanger test results for the first deployment of OTEC-1 are reported. These tests were aimed at evaluating the performance of a state-of-the-art 1 MWe, titanium shell-and-tube evaporator and condenser in an ocean environment. The evaporator was unique in that it consisted of both a plain and an enhanced tube bundle, whereas the condenser had plain tubes only. All tests with the evaporator were conducted in the sprayed-bundle mode. Experimental results for the condenser and plain-tube portion of the evaporator were found to be in excellent agreement with performance predictions. This result is important because it demonstrates that the thermal performance of large plain-tube heat exchangers can be predicted with a high level of confidence. On the other hand, performance of the enhanced-tube portion of the evaporator was much lower than predicted. Evidence strongly suggested that this poor performance was attributable mainly to fouling of the High Flux surface by corrosion products consisting predominantly of hydrated aluminum oxides.

Lorenz, J. J.; Yung, D.; Howard, P. A.; Panchal, C. B.; Poucher, F. W.

1981-12-01

447

Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the [open quotes]sources[close quotes] and [open quotes]targets[close quotes] requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

Thomas, B.

1993-03-01

448

A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent cast  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and ICI Explosives USA have worked together since 1987 to develop computer modeling techniques for Rock Blasting. A result of this effort is the computer program DMC (Distinct Motion Code) which was developed for two-dimensional simulation of rock motion following a blast (Taylor and Preece, 1989 1992). This program has been used to study blasting-induced rock motion resulting from oil shale mining and has been coupled with a gas flow computation capability for better treatment of the explosive behavior. This past year it has been customized for simulations of bench blasting in coat mines and rock quarries (Preece and Knudsen, 1992b). The explicit descretized nature of DMC gives it an advantage over previous blast modeling programs because subtle differences, such as row delay timing, have an influence on the results. This paper will present a DMC study of the influence on percent cast of row delay timing in a typical coal mine bench blast.

Preece, D.S.

1992-01-01

449

Vehicle overturning vulnerability from air blast loads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The overturning response of an armored personnel carrier to air blast loads derived from a nuclear blast environment is presented. The orientation of the vehicle is side-on to the air blast shock front. It is assumed there is no translation at the downwind wheels, i.e., the roll over point. In addition, the vehicle is assumed to behave as a rigid body. That is, the suspension system are taken as rigid, so that the wheels and axles rotate in unison with the body. It can be shown that this assumption slightly overestimates the overturning resistance of vehicles with suspension systems. For a stiff suspension system, such as that of the APC, the rigid body behavior assumption is justified. The only motion possible for this analysis is rotation about the rollover point. The effect of overturning restraint systems has been included in the analysis by incorporating a perfectly plastic vehicle to ground connection on the upwind side of the vehicle. The results give the threshold nuclear environment that just causes overturning. The threshold environment is given in terms of a peak overpressure corresponding to a weapon yield. Results are presented for a range of weapon yields from 1KT to 1MT.

Robinson, R. R.; Napadensky, H.; Longinow, A.

1984-08-01

450

Full-scale aircraft impact test for evaluation of impact forces: Part 1, Test plan, test method, and test results  

SciTech Connect

One of the factors considered in the design of critical concrete structures is the estimation of the global elasto-plastic structural response caused by the accidental impact of an aircraft. To estimate the response of the structure, the impact force (the force versus time relationship) must be known. Previous analytical studies have derived the forcing function using the impact velocity of the aircraft and the calculated mass and strength distribution of the aircraft. This paper describes a test conducted on April 19, 1988, at an existing rocket sled facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, in which an actual F-4 Phantom aircraft was impacted at a nominal velocity of 215 m/s into an essentially rigid block of concrete. This was accomplished by supporting the F-4 on four struts that were attached to the sled track by carriage shoes to direct the path of the aircraft. Propulsion was accomplished by two stages of rockets. The concrete target was 'floated' on a set of air bearings. Data acquisition consisted of measurements of the acceleration of the fuselage and engines of the F-4, and measurements of the displacement, velocity and acceleration of the concrete target. High-speed photography recorded the impact process and also permitted the determination of the impact velocity. This paper describes the test plan, method and results, while a companion paper discusses the analyses of the results. 6 refs., 11 figs.

von Riesemann, W.A.; Parrish, R.L.; Bickel, D.C.; Heffelfinger, S.R.; Muto, K.; Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Koshika, N.; Suzuki, M.; Ohrui, S.

1989-03-01

451

Blast injuries--and the pivotal role of trauma surgeons.  

PubMed

An explosion is the sudden release of energy and its radial propagation through air, solid structures and living tissue. Treatment of blast injuries is complex and combines the principles of penetrating and blunt trauma, chemical or thermal burns and disaster and mass casualty management. Primary blast injuries are a direct result of the explosion itself. The sudden release of energy is translated into a shock wave that travels at supersonic speed (5000 metres/second). There is a sudden and short-lived rise in pressure, followed by a prolonged negative pressure, or vacuum, responsible for additional injury. The organs most at risk for primary blast injuries are the lungs, the ears and the gastrointestinal tract. The explosion also sets solid objects in motion; these act as projectiles, and can travel over far greater distances (secondary blast injuries), and their management is no different from penetrating or blunt trauma from other causes. The explosion may cause not only "projectiles," but the body itself to be displaced: These tertiary blast injuries include traumatic amputations and crush injuries following land mine explosions. Finally, quaternary blast injuries comprise other forms of associated trauma, such as burns, asphyxia or poisoning from release of noxious substances by the blast. These injuries can be particularly taxing for rescue teams because of their tendency to affect large amounts of patients and the risk they pose to the rescuers themselves. Individual management of the blast injury victim requires a multidisciplinary team; terrorist or wartime bombings also require expertise in disaster management and triage. PMID:21158326

Luks, F I

452

Underground tank vitrification: Engineering-scale test results  

SciTech Connect

Contamination associated with underground tanks at US Department of Energy sites and other sites may be effectively remediated by application of in situ vitrification (ISV) technology. In situ vitrification converts contaminated soil and buried wastes such as underground tanks into a glass and crystalline block, similar to obsidian with crystalline phases. A radioactive engineering-scale test performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in September 1989 demonstrated the feasibility of using ISV for this application. A 30-cm-diameter (12-in.-diameter) buried steel and concrete tank containing simulated tank sludge was vitrified, producing a solid block. The tank sludge used in the test simulated materials in tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous components of the tank sludge were immobilized or removed and captured in the off-gas treatment system. The steel tank was converted to ingots near the bottom of the block and the concrete walls were dissolved into the resulting glass and crystalline block. Although one of the four moving electrodes froze'' in place about halfway into the test, operations were able to continue. The test was successfully completed and all the tank sludge was vitrified. 7 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

Campbell, B.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Bonner, W.F.

1990-06-01

453

Test results for the Gemini Planet Imager data reduction pipeline  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility instrument for the Gemini Observatory designed to detect and characterize planets and debris disks orbiting nearby stars; its s