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1

BAE systems brownout landing aid system technology (BLAST) system overview and flight test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rotary wing aircraft continue to experience mishaps caused by the loss of visual situational awareness and spatial disorientation due to brownout or whiteout in dusty, sandy or snowy conditions as the downwash of the rotor blades creates obscurant clouds that completely engulf the helicopter during approaches to land. BAE Systems has developed a "see-through" brownout landing aid system technology (BLAST) based on a small and light weight 94GHz radar with proven ability to penetrate dust, coupled with proprietary antenna tracking, signal processing and digital terrain morphing algorithms to produce a cognitive real-time 3D synthetic image of the ground and proximate surface hazards in and around the landing zone. A series of ground and flight tests have been conducted at the United States Army's Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona that reflect operational scenarios in relevant environments to progressively mature the technology. A description of the BLAST solution developed by BAE Systems and results from recent flight tests is provided.

Sykora, Brian

2012-06-01

2

Results of tests of MTA-2 TPS on the SRB hold-down bolt blast container  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The four solid rocket booster (SRB) hold-down posts are fastened to the mobile launch platform (MLP) with four large nuts. At liftoff the nuts are split with explosive changes to release the SRB/Shuttle. A blast container is placed over the nuts to protect the vehicle from flying debris. The blast container is a reusable part and has to be protected from aerodynamic heating during flight. The thermal protection system (TPS) used to protect these blast containers is cork. Fitting the flat cork sheet to this hemispherical shaped blast container is both time consuming and expensive. Another problem is removing the charred cork and epoxy glue from the blast containers. Replacements of this cork with another TPS material such as MTA-2 was examined. Heating rates along the centerline of the forward facing areas of the blast container were determined. The feasibility of using 1/2 in. MTA-2 on the SRB blast containers for protection from ascent, plume impingement and reentry heating is demonstrated.

Dean, W. G.

1982-01-01

3

Performance testing of lead free primers: blast waves, velocity variations, and environmental testing  

E-print Network

Results are presented for lead free primers based on diazodinitrophenol (DDNP)compared with tests on lead styphnate based primers. First, barrel friction measurements in 5.56 mm NATO are presented. Second, shot to shot variations in blast waves are presented as determined by detonating primers in a 7.62x51mm rifle chamber with a firing pin, but without any powder or bullet loaded and measuring the blast wave at the muzzle with a high speed pressure transducer. Third, variations in primer blast waves, muzzle velocities, and ignition delay are presented after environmental conditioning (150 days) for two lead based and two DDNP based primers under cold and dry (-25 deg C,0% relative humidity), ambient (20 deg C, 50% relative humidity), and hot & humid (50 deg C, 100% relative humidity) conditions in 5.56 mm NATO. Taken together, these results indicate that DDNP based primers are not sufficiently reliable for service use.

Courtney, Elya; Summer, Peter David; Courtney, Michael

2014-01-01

4

Adapting blasting technologies to the characteristics of rock masses in order to improve blasting results and reduce blasting vibrations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complex interrelations between rock properties and variable technological drilling and blasting parameters is statistically analysed. The blastability of rock mass is defined by means of the acoustic impedance of the rock and the block size in situ.In addition, an equation derived from a statistical consideration facilitates an approximate determination of the specific blasting effect, Sg. For this purpose the

B. Müller

1997-01-01

5

Analysis and interpretation of a test for characterizing the response of sandwich panels to water blast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metallic sandwich panels are more effective at resisting underwater blast than monolithic plates at equivalent mass\\/area. The present assessment of this benefit is based on a recent experimental study of the water blast loading of a sandwich panel with a multilayered core, using a Dyno-crusher test. The tests affirm that the transmitted pressure and impulse are significantly reduced when a

Z. Wei; K. P. Dharmasena; H. N. G. Wadley; A. G. Evans

2007-01-01

6

49 CFR Appendix D to Part 173 - Test Methods for Dynamite (Explosive, Blasting, Type A)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Test Methods for Dynamite (Explosive, Blasting, Type A) D Appendix D to Part 173 Transportation Other Regulations Relating...REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Pt. 173, App. D Appendix D to Part 173—Test Methods for...

2013-10-01

7

49 CFR Appendix D to Part 173 - Test Methods for Dynamite (Explosive, Blasting, Type A)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Test Methods for Dynamite (Explosive, Blasting, Type A) D Appendix D to Part 173 Transportation Other Regulations Relating...REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Pt. 173, App. D Appendix D to Part 173—Test Methods for...

2010-10-01

8

49 CFR Appendix D to Part 173 - Test Methods for Dynamite (Explosive, Blasting, Type A)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Test Methods for Dynamite (Explosive, Blasting, Type A) D Appendix D to Part 173 Transportation Other Regulations Relating...REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Pt. 173, App. D Appendix D to Part 173—Test Methods for...

2011-10-01

9

Your Kidney Test Results  

MedlinePLUS

... Program Name: Date: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Tests Results Why It Is Important Serum Creatinine and Estimated ... an eGFR less than 60 Your Serum Creatinine Result: Your eGFR Result: eGFR estimates how well your ...

10

Testing and modeling the dynamic response of foam materials for blast protection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The pressure wave released from an explosion can cause injury to the lungs. A personal armor system concept for blast lung injury protection consists of a polymer foam layer behind a rigid armor plate to be worn over the chest. This research develops a method for testing and modeling the dynamic response of foam materials to be used for down-selection of materials for this application. Constitutive equations for foam materials are incorporated into a lumped parameter model of the combined armor plate and foam system. Impact testing and shock tube testing are used to measure the foam model parameters and validate the model response to a pressure wave load. The plate and foam armor model is then coupled to a model of the human thorax. With a blast pressure wave input, the armor model is evaluated based on how it affects the injury-causing mechanism of chest wall motion. Results show that to reduce chest wall motion, the foam must compress at a relatively constant stress level, which requires a sufficient foam thickness.

Fitek, John H.

11

Lithium cell test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

Bragg, B. J.

1977-01-01

12

Results of patch tests  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this work were to construct, install, and operate a patch testing unit on a hot gas stream at a coal-fired fluidized-bed boiler. A 2,000-hour patch test was conducted on ceramic disks of materials used in the fabrication of ceramic candles and ceramic cross-flow filters. The primary issues addressed in these tests were the long-term physical, thermal, and chemical stability of the ceramic materials; long-term pressure drop and filtration characteristics of the ceramic filters; potential for irreversible blinding of filter elements; and long-term performance and reliability of auxiliary hardware, such as the tube sheet and pulse-cleaning systems. Results on three samples, or patches, 10 cm in diameter are given.

Pontius, D.H.

1994-10-01

13

Climax granite test results  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

Ramspott, L.D.

1980-01-15

14

HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint and provides worker protection by continuously recycling the material and dust for the decontamination tasks. The proposed work would increase the cleaning rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites. This work focuses on redesigning and improving existing vacuum blasting technology including blast head nozzles, ergonomic handling of the blast head by reducing its weight; brush-ring design, vacuum level regulator, efficiency of the dust separator, and operational control sensors. The redesign is expected to enhance the productivity and economy of the vacuum blasting system by at least 50% over current vacuum blasting systems. There are three phases in the project. Phase I consists of developing and testing mathematical models. Phase II consists of pre-prototype design and fabrication and pre-prototype unit testing. Phase III consists of prototype design and field verification testing. In phase I, mathematical models are developed and analyzed for the nozzle, blast head, wind curtain, and dust separator, first as individual devices and then combined as an integrated model. This allows study of respective airflow and design parameters. The Contractor shall, based on the results of the mathematical modeling studies, design experimental models of the components and test these models. In addition, the Contractor shall develop sensors to detect the relationship of the blast head to the blast surfaces and controls to minimize the dependency on an operator's skill and judgment to obtain optimum positioning, as well as real-time characterization sensors to determine as the blast head is moving the depth to which coatings must be removed, thereby improving production and minimizing waste. In phase II, the Contractor shall design and construct a pre-prototype of the nozzle, blast head with wind curtain, sensors, and dust separator and test this system to assess the performance of the new design under controlled conditions at the contractor's facility. In phase III, the Contractor shall design and construct a prototype of the High Productivity Vacuum Blasting System, based on the results of the pre-prototype design and testing performed. This unit will be a full-scale prototype and will be tested at a designated Department of Energy (DOE) facility. Based on the results, the system performance, the productivity, and the economy of the improved vacuum blasting system will be evaluated.

William S. McPhee

1999-05-31

15

NETEX UWB test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Networking in Extreme Environments (NETEX) program is to create a wireless networking technology for the military user that enables robust connectivity in harsh environments and support its integration into new and emerging sensor and communication systems. Phase 1, resulted in a thorough understanding of the effects of ultra wide band

A. H. Light

2004-01-01

16

Clean Coal III Project: Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project Trial 1 Report - Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection - Results with Low Volatile Coal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the first coal trial test conducted with the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Burns Harbor Plant. This demonstration project is divided into three phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation The design phase was conducted in 1991-1993. Construction of the facility began in August 1993 and was completed in late 1994. The coal injection facility began operating in January 1995 and Phase III began in November 1995. The Trial 1 base test orI C furnace was carried out in October 1996 as a comparison period for the analysis of the operation during subsequent coal trials.

None

1997-11-01

17

Clean Coal III Project: Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project Trail 1 Report - Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection - Results with Low Volatile Coal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the first coal trial test conducted with the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Burns Harbor Plant. This demonstration project is divided into three phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation The design phase was conducted in 1991-1993, Construction of the facility began in August 1993 and was completed in late 1994. The coal injection facility began operating in January 1995 and Phase III began in November 1995. The Trial 1 base test on C furnace was carried out in October 1996 as a comparison period for the analysis of the operation during subsequent coal trials.

None

1997-11-01

18

Portland cement-blast furnace slag blends in oilwell cementing applications  

SciTech Connect

Recent investigations of blast furnace slag cementing technologies. have been expanded to include Portland cement/blast furnace slag blends. Mixtures of Portland cement and blast furnace slag, while having a long history of use in the construction industry, have not been used extensively in oilwell cementing applications. Test results indicate that blending blast furnace slag with Portland cement produces a high quality well cementing material. Presented are the design guidelines and laboratory test data relative to mixtures of blast furnace slag and Portland cements. Case histories delineating the use of blast furnace slag - Portland cement blends infield applications are also included.

Mueller, D.T.; DiLullo, G.; Hibbeler, J. [and others

1995-12-31

19

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1993--94 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900{degrees}C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter there were two major accomplishments.

Crelling, J.C.

1995-12-31

20

CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies  

SciTech Connect

Initial tests with CO{sub 2} pellet blasting as a decontamination technique were completed in 1993 at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During 1996, a number of additional CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies with Alpheus Cleaning Technologies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pennsylvania State University were conducted. After the testing with Alpheus was complete, an SDI-5 shaved CO{sub 2} blasting unit was purchased by the ICPP to test and determine its capabilities before using in ICPP decontamination efforts. Results of the 1996 testing will be presented in this report.

Archibald, K.E.

1997-01-01

21

FFTF status and test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general description of the FFTF is presented concerning the construction progress; status of startup and selected startup test results; and planned experiment program during and subsequent to the startup testing program. The FFTF is a 400 MWt, sodium cooled test reactor plant consisting of a fast-neutron reactor fueled by mixed plutonium oxide-uranium oxide fuel elements, three independent heat transport

Noordhoff

1979-01-01

22

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900 C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter a sample of the Herrin No. 6 coal (IBCSP 112) was delivered to the CANMET facility and testing is scheduled for the week of 11 December 1994. Also at this time, all of the IBCSP samples are being evaluated for blast furnace injection using the CANMET computer model.

Crelling, J.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology

1994-12-31

23

State Test Results Are Predictable  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Out-of-school, community demographic and family-level variables have an important influence on student achievement as measured by large-scale standardized tests. Studies described here demonstrated that about half of the test score is accounted for by variables outside the control of teachers and school administrators. The results from these…

Tienken, Christopher H.

2014-01-01

24

Porcine head response to blast.  

PubMed

Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740?kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9?ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30?s and the remaining two recovered within 8?min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390?kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300-2830?kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G's and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R(2)?=?0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are presented to provide experimental data for computer model validation. PMID:22586417

Shridharani, Jay K; Wood, Garrett W; Panzer, Matthew B; Capehart, Bruce P; Nyein, Michelle K; Radovitzky, Raul A; Bass, Cameron R 'dale'

2012-01-01

25

COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement device, did not operate effectively. Consequently, it is not suitable for application to the AWR process. (4) Initially, the spray ring (operated at approximately 2300 psi) and the nozzles provided by the pump vendor did not perform acceptably. The nozzles were replaced with a more robust model, and the performance was then acceptable. (5) The average solids concentration achieved in the slurry before Bentogrout addition was approximately 16% by weight. The solids concentration of the slurry after Bentogrout addition ranged from 26% to approximately 40%. The slurry pump and ITL system performed well at every concentration. No line plugging or other problems were noted. The results of the CTL runs and later ITL testing are summarized in an appendix to this report.

Abraham, TJ

2003-10-22

26

Mobile evaporator corrosion test results  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

1997-05-01

27

AXAF hypervelocity impact test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Composite and honeycomb panels are commonly used for spacecraft structural components. The impact test results and analysis of six different composite and honeycomb combinations for use on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility (AXAF) are reported. The AXAF consists of an X-ray telescope and the associated detecting devices attached to an octagonal spacecraft with an internal propulsion system. The spacecraft's structural panels and optical bench are made of two different graphite fiber reinforced polyimides or composite panels bonded to either side of an aluminum honeycomb. The instrument is required to have at least a 0.92 probability of no failure of any of the critical elements due to meteoroids and debris. In relation to the no-failure probability determination in its low earth orbit environment, hypervelocity impact testing was performed to determine the ballistic limit range and the extent of damage due to impact. The test results for a power and signal cable bundle located behind a panel are presented. Tests planned for a multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket and four types of cable bundles are discussed.

Frost, Cynthia L.; Rodriguez, Pedro I.

1997-01-01

28

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

A new use for Illinois coal is as fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as first step in steel production. Because of cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. Purpose of this study is to evaluate combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a pilot plant test facility. (Limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high S and Cl contents are suitable for blast furnace injection.) This proposal is intended to complete the study under way with Armco and Inland and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for injection. Main feature of current work is testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s pilot plant coal combustion facility. During this quarter, two additional 300-pound samples of coal (IBCSP-110 Springfield No. 5 and an Appalachian coal) were delivered. Six Illinois Basin coals were analyzed with the CANMET model and compared with other bituminous coals from the Appalachians, France, Poland, South Africa, and Colombia. Based on computer modeling, lower rank bituminous coals, including coal from the Illinois Basin, compare well in injection with a variety of other bituminous coals.

Crelling, J.C.

1995-12-31

29

Diagnostic Tests and Examination Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the usefulness of several diagnostic tests for selecting students to enter a civil engineering program found that the tests were not appropriate and that tests should be developed specifically for civil engineering. (MSE)

Barker, Dennis

1988-01-01

30

SOFIS FTS EM test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Solar Occultation FTS for Inclined-orbit Satellite (SOFIS) is a solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer developed by the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) in Japan for the Global Change Observation Mission-A1 (GCOM-A1) satellite. GCOM-A1 will be placed in a 650 km non-sun-synchronous orbit, with an inclination angle of 69 degrees. ABB-Bomem is a sub-contractor of NTSpace (NEC-Toshiba Space) for the design and manufacturing of the FTS Engineering Model of SOFIS. SOFIS measures the vertical profile of the atmospheric constituents with 0.2 cm-1 spectral resolution for the spectral range covering 3-13 ?m. The atmospheric vertical resolution of SOFIS is 1 km. The target of SOFIS measurements is a global distribution of O3, HNO3, NO2, N2O, CH4, H2O, CO2, CFC-11, CFC-12, ClONO2, aerosol extinction, atmospheric pressure and temperature. NTSpace in Japan is the prime contractor of SOFIS. The spectrometer is an adapted version of the classical Michelson interferometer using an optimized optical layout and moving retro-reflectors. A solid-state laser diode operating at 1550 nm is used as metrology source of the interferometer. Its highly folded optical design results in a high performance instrument with a compact size. SOFIS FTS implements high performance control techniques to achieve outstanding speed stability of the moving mechanism. This paper describes the test activities of the SOFIS-FTS Engineering Model (EM) and preliminary results. The performances of the FTS are presented in terms of key parameters like signal-to-noise ratio, modulation efficiency and stability. Spectra acquired are shown and test methodology and analyses are presented. Lessons learned during assembly, integration and testing are described as well as improvements planned to be implemented in the Flight Model.

Soucy, Marc-Andre A.; Levesque, Luc E.; Tanii, Jun; Kawashima, Takahiro; Nakajima, Hideaki

2003-04-01

31

BLAST: THE REDSHIFT SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has recently surveyed approx =8.7 deg{sup 2} centered on Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South at 250, 350, and 500 mum. In Dye et al., we presented the catalog of sources detected at 5sigma in at least one band in this field and the probable counterparts to these sources in other wavebands. In this paper, we present the results of a redshift survey in which we succeeded in measuring redshifts for 82 of these counterparts. The spectra show that the BLAST counterparts are mostly star-forming galaxies but not extreme ones when compared to those found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Roughly one quarter of the BLAST counterparts contain an active nucleus. We have used the spectroscopic redshifts to carry out a test of the ability of photometric redshift methods to estimate the redshifts of dusty galaxies, showing that the standard methods work well even when a galaxy contains a large amount of dust. We have also investigated the cases where there are two possible counterparts to the BLAST source, finding that in at least half of these there is evidence that the two galaxies are physically associated, either because they are interacting or because they are in the same large-scale structure. Finally, we have made the first direct measurements of the luminosity function in the three BLAST bands. We find strong evolution out to z = 1, in the sense that there is a large increase in the space density of the most luminous galaxies. We have also investigated the evolution of the dust-mass function, finding similar strong evolution in the space density of the galaxies with the largest dust masses, showing that the luminosity evolution seen in many wavebands is associated with an increase in the reservoir of interstellar matter in galaxies.

Eales, Stephen; Dye, Simon; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Raymond, Gwenifer [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Devlin, Mark J.; Rex, Marie; Semisch, Christopher; Truch, Matthew D. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia PA, 19104 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Patanchon, Guillaume [Universite Paris Diderot, Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France); Siana, Brian [California Institute of Technology, MS 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2009-12-20

32

Reconstruction of massive midfoot bone and soft tissue loss as a result of blast injury.  

PubMed

Lower extremity blast injuries represent a unique challenge to surgeons and often involve complex, limb-threatening wounds with extensive soft tissue and bone loss. Surgical treatment of these injuries can be difficult because of limited autogenous resources for reconstruction of the defect. In this article, we describe a technique for medial column reconstruction using iliac crest bone graft and soft tissue coverage with an abductor hallucis rotational flap combined with a split-thickness skin graft. This method addresses the extensive bone and soft tissue defects that frequently characterize blast injuries to the foot, and may be applicable in other situations where trauma or infection has caused extensive destruction of the medial column. PMID:20350822

Banerjee, Rahul; Waterman, Brian; Nelson, James; Abdelfattah, Adham

2010-01-01

33

Dissociated methanol vehicle test results  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of chassis dynamometer testing of a 1980 Chevrolet Citation modified to run on dissociated methanol. Data are presented on the composition of the dissociated methanol gas during steady-state operation, vehicle fuel consumption during steady-state and transient operation, and exhaust emissions during transient operation. During low speed, low load operation there are significant amounts of unconverted methanol and side products to the desired dissociation reaction. Despite this, fuel economy improvements over baseline gasoline operation are high. Fuel economies of 13.3 km/L (31.3 mpg) and 11.4 km/L (26.8 mpg) were obtained at steady speed road load conditions of 65 km/h and 90 km/h respectively. Methanol fuel economy over the EPA '74 CVS hot start city driving cycle was 7.74 km/L (18.2 mpg). Methanol fuel economy over the EPA highway fuel economy test was 10.2 km/L (24.0 mpg).

Finegold, J.G.

1984-05-01

34

Results of PRIM gyroscope testing  

SciTech Connect

The tests were designed so that motions of the gyroscope and the Partially Restrained Internal Member (PRIM) could be measured at different conditions of spin and PRIM clearance gaps. Two types of PRIM drive were tested. A round shaft configuration was used to test theory. An octagon drive was used to simulate the XM785 design.

Cornell, R.

1985-03-01

35

An introductory characterization of a combat-casualty-care relevant swine model of closed head injury resulting from exposure to explosive blast.  

PubMed

Explosive blast has been extensively used as a tactical weapon in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and more recently in Operation Enduring Freedom(OEF). The polytraumatic nature of blast injuries is evidence of their effectiveness,and brain injury is a frequent and debilitating form of this trauma. In-theater clinical observations of brain-injured casualties have shown that edema, intracranial hemorrhage, and vasospasm are the most salient pathophysiological characteristics of blast injury to the brain. Unfortunately, little is known about exactly how an explosion produces these sequelae as well as others that are less well documented. Consequently, the principal objective of the current report is to present a swine model of explosive blast injury to the brain. This model was developed during Phase I of the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) PREVENT (Preventing Violent Explosive Neurotrauma) blast research program. A second objective is to present data that illustrate the capabilities of this model to study the proximal biomechanical causes and the resulting pathophysiological, biochemical,neuropathological, and neurological consequences of explosive blast injury to the swine brain. In the concluding section of this article, the advantages and limitations of the model are considered, explosive and air-overpressure models are compared, and the physical properties of an explosion are identified that potentially contributed to the in-theater closed head injuries resulting from explosions of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). PMID:19215189

Bauman, Richard A; Ling, Geoffrey; Tong, Lawrence; Januszkiewicz, Adolph; Agoston, Dennis; Delanerolle, Nihal; Kim, Young; Ritzel, Dave; Bell, Randy; Ecklund, James; Armonda, Rocco; Bandak, Faris; Parks, Steven

2009-06-01

36

Evaluation of copper slag blast media for railcar maintenance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Copper slag was tested as a blasting substitute for zirconium silicate which is used to remove paint from railroad cars. The copper slag tested is less costly, strips paint faster, is produced near the point of need, provides a good bonding surface for paint, and permits the operator to work in a more comfortable position, i.e., standing nearly erect instead of having to crouch. Outdoor blasting with the tested Blackhawk (20 to 40 mesh) copper slag is also environmentally acceptable to the State of Utah. Results of tests for the surface erosion rate with copper slag blasting are included.

Sagers, N. W.; Finlayson, Mack H.

1989-01-01

37

Blast Loading Experiments of Surrogate Models for Tbi Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical models. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory test cell setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to the conclusion that primary blast effects could cause TBI occurrences.

Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.

2009-12-01

38

High-speed measurement of firearm primer blast waves  

E-print Network

This article describes a method and results for direct high-speed measurements of firearm primer blast waves employing a high-speed pressure transducer located at the muzzle to record the blast pressure wave produced by primer ignition. Key findings are: 1) Most of the lead styphnate based primer models tested show 5.2-11.3% standard deviation in the magnitudes of their peak pressure. 2) In contrast, lead-free diazodinitrophenol (DDNP) based primers had standard deviations of the peak blast pressure of 8.2-25.0%. 3) Combined with smaller blast waves, these large variations in peak blast pressure of DDNP-based primers led to delayed ignition and failure to fire in brief field tests.

Courtney, Michael; Eng, Jonathan; Courtney, Amy

2012-01-01

39

Experimental electrochemical capacitor test results  

SciTech Connect

Various electrochemical capacitors (ultracapacitors) are being developed for hybrid vehicles as candidate power assist devices for the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) fast-response engine. The envisioned primary functions of the ultracapacitor are to level the dynamic power loads on the primary propulsion device and recover available energy from regenerative breaking during off-peak power periods. This paper will present test data from selected US Department of Energy (DOE) supported ultracapacitor projects designed to meet the fast response engine requirements. This paper will address the temperature dependence of test data obtained from a set of three devices provided from Maxwell Energy Products, Inc. These devices are rated at 2,300 F at 2.3 V. Constant-current, constant-power, and self-discharge testing as a function of temperature have been conducted. From these tests were determined the capacitance, equivalent series resistance, specific energy and power, and the self-discharge energy loss factor as a function of the device operating temperature.

Wright, R.B.; Murphy, T.C.; Rogers, S.A.; Sutula, R.A.

1998-07-01

40

Evolution of blast wave profiles in simulated air blasts: experiment and computational modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shock tubes have been extensively used in the study of blast traumatic brain injury due to increased incidence of blast-induced neurotrauma in Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. One of the important aspects in these studies is how to best replicate the field conditions in the laboratory which relies on reproducing blast wave profiles. Evolution of the blast wave profiles along the length of the compression-driven air shock tube is studied using experiments and numerical simulations with emphasis on the shape and magnitude of pressure time profiles. In order to measure dynamic pressures of the blast, a series of sensors are mounted on a cylindrical specimen normal to the flow direction. Our results indicate that the blast wave loading is significantly different for locations inside and outside of the shock tube. Pressure profiles inside the shock tube follow the Friedlander waveform fairly well. Upon approaching exit of the shock tube, an expansion wave released from the shock tube edges significantly degrades the pressure profiles. For tests outside the shock tube, peak pressure and total impulse reduce drastically as we move away from the exit and majority of loading is in the form of subsonic jet wind. In addition, the planarity of the blast wave degrades as blast wave evolves three dimensionally. Numerical results visually and quantitatively confirm the presence of vortices, jet wind and three-dimensional expansion of the planar blast wave near the exit. Pressure profiles at 90° orientation show flow separation. When cylinder is placed inside, this flow separation is not sustained, but when placed outside the shock tube this flow separation is sustained which causes tensile loading on the sides of the cylinder. Friedlander waves formed due to field explosives in the intermediate-to far-field ranges are replicated in a narrow test region located deep inside the shock tube.

Chandra, N.; Ganpule, S.; Kleinschmit, N. N.; Feng, R.; Holmberg, A. D.; Sundaramurthy, A.; Selvan, V.; Alai, A.

2012-09-01

41

Toxicology of blast overpressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blast overpressure (BOP) or high energy impulse noise, is the sharp instantaneous rise in ambient atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation or firing of weapons. Blasts that were once confined to military and to a lesser extent, occupational settings, are becoming more universal as the civilian population is now increasingly at risk of exposure to BOP from terrorist bombings that

Nabil M. Elsayed

1997-01-01

42

Porcine Head Response to Blast  

PubMed Central

Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740?kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9?ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30?s and the remaining two recovered within 8?min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390?kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830?kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2?=?0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are presented to provide experimental data for computer model validation. PMID:22586417

Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. 'Dale'

2012-01-01

43

Computer assisted blast design and assessment tools  

SciTech Connect

In general the software required by a blast designer includes tools that graphically present blast designs (surface and underground), can analyze a design or predict its result, and can assess blasting results. As computers develop and computer literacy continues to rise the development of and use of such tools will spread. An example of the tools that are becoming available includes: Automatic blast pattern generation and underground ring design; blast design evaluation in terms of explosive distribution and detonation simulation; fragmentation prediction; blast vibration prediction and minimization; blast monitoring for assessment of dynamic performance; vibration measurement, display and signal processing; evaluation of blast results in terms of fragmentation; and risk and reliability based blast assessment. The authors have identified a set of criteria that are essential in choosing appropriate software blasting tools.

Cameron, A.R. [Golder Associates Ltd., Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Kleine, T.H. [Golder Associates Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Forsyth, W.W. [Golder Associates Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1995-12-31

44

Testing of a composite thermal structure to insulate the drivers of a large-scale blast/thermal simulator. Final report, Sep 86-Jun 88  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the developmental testing of the thermal and mechanical properties of two versions of a composite structure which were developed for insulating the walls of high-pressure vessels containing hot nitrogen gas against heat loss and the results of these tests are presented. Included herein are data on thermal diffusivity, specific heat, density, expansion coefficients, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties, as well as energy transfer and temperature profiles for each of the composite systems. A subscale driver tube assembly modeling a driver tube of a Large Blast/Thermal Simulator and consisting of a nitrogen supply system, a gas heater, and the heat-insulated driver tube complete with instrumentation was designed and constructed. A future testing program under actual operating conditions is recommended.

McCue, L.F.

1991-03-01

45

Experimental Studies of Mitigation Materials for Blast Induced Tbi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this experimental study is to compare the effects of various materials obstructing the flow of a blast wave and the ability of the material to reduce the damage caused by the blast. Several methods of energy transfer in blast wave flows are expected including: material interfaces with impedance mismatches, density changes in a given material, internal shearing, and particle fracture. Our hypothesis is that the greatest energy transfer within the obstructing material will yield the greatest mitigation effects to the blast. Sample configurations of foam were varied to introduce material interfaces and filler materials with varying densities and impedances (liquids and powders). The samples were dynamically loaded using a small scale blast produced by an explosive driven shock tube housing gram-scale explosive charges. The transmitted blast profiles were analyzed for variations in impulse characteristics and frequency components as compared to standard free field profiles. The results showed a rounding effect of the transmitted blast profile for all samples with the effects of the high density fillers surpassing all others tested. These results lead to a conclusion that low porosity, high density materials offer superior attenuation by reducing air blast features and spatially distributing the transmitted wave.

Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.; Christou, G.; Goel, R.; Young, L.

2009-12-01

46

Determination of explosive blast loading equivalencies with an explosively driven shock tube  

SciTech Connect

Recently there has been significant interest in evaluating the potential of many different non-ideal energetic materials to cause blast damage. We present a method intended to quantitatively compare the blast loading generated by different energetic materials through use of an explosively driven shock tube. The test explosive is placed at the closed breech end of the tube and initiated with a booster charge. The resulting shock waves are then contained and focused by the tube walls to form a quasi-one-dimensional blast wave. Pressure transducers along the tube wall measure the blast overpressure versus distance from the source and allow the use of the one-dimensional blast scaling relationship to determine the energy deposited into the blast wave per unit mass of test explosive. These values are then compared for different explosives of interest and to other methods of equivalency determination.

Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

47

Repeated blast exposures cause brain DNA fragmentation in mice.  

PubMed

The pathophysiology of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subsequent behavioral deficits are not well understood. Unraveling the mechanisms of injury is critical to derive effective countermeasures against this form of neurotrauma. Preservation of the integrity of cellular DNA is crucial for the function and survival of cells. We evaluated the effect of repeated blast exposures on the integrity of brain DNA and tested the utility of cell-free DNA (CFD) in plasma as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of blast-induced polytrauma. The results revealed time-dependent breakdown in cellular DNA in different brain regions, with the maximum damage at 24 h post-blast exposures. CFD levels in plasma showed a significant transient increase, which was largely independent of the timing and severity of brain DNA damage; maximum levels were recorded at 2 h after repeated blast exposure and returned to baseline at 24 h. A positive correlation was observed between the righting reflex time and CFD level in plasma at 2 h after blast exposure. Brain DNA damage subsequent to repeated blast was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased release of cytochrome C, and up-regulation of caspase-3, all of which are indicative of cellular apoptosis. Shock-wave-induced DNA damage and initiation of mitochondrial-driven cellular apoptosis in the brain after repeated blast exposures indicate that therapeutic strategies directed toward inhibition of DNA damage or instigation of DNA repair may be effective countermeasures. PMID:24074345

Wang, Ying; Arun, Peethambaran; Wei, Yanling; Oguntayo, Samuel; Gharavi, Robert; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Long, Joseph B

2014-03-01

48

40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.  

...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12 Test results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test...

2014-07-01

49

40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12 Test results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test...

2010-07-01

50

Primary Blast Traumatic Brain Injury in the Rat: Relating Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Behavior  

PubMed Central

The incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among military personnel is at its highest point in U.S. history. Experimental animal models of blast have provided a wealth of insight into blast injury. The mechanisms of neurotrauma caused by blast, however, are still under debate. Specifically, it is unclear whether the blast shockwave in the absence of head motion is sufficient to induce brain trauma. In this study, the consequences of blast injury were investigated in a rat model of primary blast TBI. Animals were exposed to blast shockwaves with peak reflected overpressures of either 100 or 450?kPa (39 and 110?kPa incident pressure, respectively) and subsequently underwent a battery of behavioral tests. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a promising method to detect blast injury in humans, was performed on fixed brains to detect and visualize the spatial dependence of blast injury. Blast TBI caused significant deficits in memory function as evidenced by the Morris Water Maze, but limited emotional deficits as evidenced by the Open Field Test and Elevated Plus Maze. Fractional anisotropy, a metric derived from DTI, revealed significant brain abnormalities in blast-exposed animals. A significant relationship between memory deficits and brain microstructure was evident in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in memory function. The results provide fundamental insight into the neurological consequences of blast TBI, including the evolution of injury during the sub-acute phase and the spatially dependent pattern of injury. The relationship between memory dysfunction and microstructural brain abnormalities may provide insight into the persistent cognitive difficulties experienced by soldiers exposed to blast neurotrauma and may be important to guide therapeutic and rehabilitative efforts. PMID:24133481

Budde, Matthew D.; Shah, Alok; McCrea, Michael; Cullinan, William E.; Pintar, Frank A.; Stemper, Brian D.

2013-01-01

51

Recent radiation test results at JPL  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper documents recent TID (including ELDRS) and proton damage test results obtained by JPL. Unusual test results, such as abnormally low or high failure levels or unusual failure or response mechanisms, are emphasized.

Bruce E. Pritchard; Bernard G. Rax; Steven S. McClure

2003-01-01

52

ESF BLAST DESIGN ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this design analysis are to develop controls considered necessary and sufficient to implement the requirements for the controlled drilling and blasting excavation of operations support alcoves and test support alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The conclusions reached in this analysis will flow down into a construction specification ensuring controlled drilling and blasting excavation will be performed within the bounds established here.

E.F. fitch

1995-03-13

53

Mechanical and histological characterization of trachea tissue subjected to blast-type pressures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Injuries to the respiratory system can be a component of polytrauma in blast-loading injuries. Tissues located at air-liquid interfaces, including such tissues in the respiratory system, are particularly vulnerable to damage by blast overpressures. There is a lack of information about the mechanical and cellular responses that contribute to the damage of this class of tissues subjected to the high strain rates associated with blast loading. Here, we describe the results of dynamic blast-like pressure loading tests at high strain rates on freshly harvested ex vivo trachea tissue specimens.

Butler, B. J.; Bo, C.; Tucker, A. W.; Jardine, A. P.; Proud, W. G.; Williams, A.; Brown, K. A.

2014-05-01

54

BLAST+: architecture and applications  

PubMed Central

Background Sequence similarity searching is a very important bioinformatics task. While Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) outperforms exact methods through its use of heuristics, the speed of the current BLAST software is suboptimal for very long queries or database sequences. There are also some shortcomings in the user-interface of the current command-line applications. Results We describe features and improvements of rewritten BLAST software and introduce new command-line applications. Long query sequences are broken into chunks for processing, in some cases leading to dramatically shorter run times. For long database sequences, it is possible to retrieve only the relevant parts of the sequence, reducing CPU time and memory usage for searches of short queries against databases of contigs or chromosomes. The program can now retrieve masking information for database sequences from the BLAST databases. A new modular software library can now access subject sequence data from arbitrary data sources. We introduce several new features, including strategy files that allow a user to save and reuse their favorite set of options. The strategy files can be uploaded to and downloaded from the NCBI BLAST web site. Conclusion The new BLAST command-line applications, compared to the current BLAST tools, demonstrate substantial speed improvements for long queries as well as chromosome length database sequences. We have also improved the user interface of the command-line applications. PMID:20003500

2009-01-01

55

Rib butterfly fractures as a possible indicator of blast trauma.  

PubMed

Forensic anthropologists have become increasingly involved in the interpretation of skeletal trauma caused by exploding ordnance. This study examines the cause and significance of butterfly fractures observed in a recent study investigating skeletal blast trauma by Christensen et al. Fractured ribs resulting from blast events carried out in the original study were re-examined revealing that rib butterfly fractures with the tensile indicator on the visceral surface were present in 100% of viable pig specimens. Additionally, manual fracture testing was performed on 46 pig ribs to simulate the bending force believed to have been sustained in the original blast events. Fracture testing resulted in 93% of specimens presenting butterfly fractures with the tensile indicator on the visceral surface. This fracture pattern differs significantly from that normally observed in association with other types of trauma events and may aid forensic anthropologists and other investigators in the identification and interpretation of blast events. PMID:23126284

Christensen, Angi M; Smith, Victoria A

2013-01-01

56

Modelling human eye under blast loading.  

PubMed

Primary blast injury (PBI) is the general term that refers to injuries resulting from the mere interaction of a blast wave with the body. Although few instances of primary ocular blast injury, without a concomitant secondary blast injury from debris, are documented, some experimental studies demonstrate its occurrence. In order to investigate PBI to the eye, a finite element model of the human eye using simple constitutive models was developed. The material parameters were calibrated by a multi-objective optimisation performed on available eye impact test data. The behaviour of the human eye and the dynamics of mechanisms occurring under PBI loading conditions were modelled. For the generation of the blast waves, different combinations of explosive (trinitrotoluene) mass charge and distance from the eye were analysed. An interpretation of the resulting pressure, based on the propagation and reflection of the waves inside the eye bulb and orbit, is proposed. The peculiar geometry of the bony orbit (similar to a frustum cone) can induce a resonance cavity effect and generate a pressure standing wave potentially hurtful for eye tissues. PMID:23521031

Esposito, L; Clemente, C; Bonora, N; Rossi, T

2015-02-01

57

Altitude Compensating Nozzle Cold Flow Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A suite of four altitude compensating nozzle (ACN) concepts were evaluated by NASA MSFC in the Nozzle Test Facility. The ACN concepts were a dual bell, a dual expander, an annular plug nozzle and an expansion deflection nozzle. Two reference bell nozzles were also tested. Axial thrust and nozzle wall static pressures were measured for each nozzle over a wide range of nozzle pressure ratios. The nozzle hardware and test program are described. Sample test results are presented.

Ruf, J. H.; McDaniels, D. M.

2002-01-01

58

Experimental Studies of Mitigation Materials for Blast Induced TBI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this experimental study is to compare the effects of various materials obstructing the flow of a blast wave and the ability of the given material to reduce the damage caused by the blast. Several methods of energy transfer in blast wave flows are known or expected including: material interfaces with impedance mismatches, density changes in a given material, internal shearing, and particle fracture. The theory applied to this research is that the greatest energy transfer within the obstructing material will yield the greatest mitigation effects to the blast. Sample configurations of foam were varied to introduce material interfaces and filler materials with varying densities and impedances (liquids and powders). The samples were loaded according to a small scale blast produced by an explosive driven shock tube housing gram-range charges. The transmitted blast profiles were analyzed for variations in impulse characteristics and frequency components as compared to standard free field profiles. The results showed a rounding effect of the transmitted blast profile for all samples with the effects of the low density fillers surpassing all others tested.

Alley, Matthew; Son, Steven

2009-06-01

59

Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6, blast measurements. Part 3. Pressure near ground level. Section 4. Blast asymmetry from aerial photographs. Section 5. Ball-crusher-gauge measurements of peak pressure  

SciTech Connect

Aerial motion pictures from manned aircraft were taken of the Dog, Easy, and George Shots and from a drone aircraft on Dog Shot to determine whether asymmetries in the blast waves could be detected and measured. Only one film, that taken of Dog Shot from a drone, was considered good enough to warrant detailed analysis, but this failed to yield any positive information on asymmetries. The analysis showed that failure to obtain good arrival-time data arose from a number of cases, but primarily from uncertainities in magnification and timing. Results could only be matched with reliable data from blast-velocity switches by use of large corrections. Asymnetries, if present, were judged to have been too small or to have occurred too early to be detected with the slow-frame speed used. Recommendations for better results include locating the aircraft directly overhead at the time of burst and using a camera having greater frame speed and provided with timing marks.

Not Available

1985-04-01

60

A Multiscale Approach to Blast Neurotrauma Modeling: Part I - Development of Novel Test Devices for in vivo and in vitro Blast Injury Models  

PubMed Central

The loading conditions used in some current in vivo and in vitro blast-induced neurotrauma models may not be representative of real-world blast conditions. To address these limitations, we developed a compressed-gas driven shock tube with different driven lengths that can generate Friedlander-type blasts. The shock tube can generate overpressures up to 650?kPa with durations between 0.3 and 1.1?ms using compressed helium driver gas, and peak overpressures up to 450?kPa with durations between 0.6 and 3?ms using compressed nitrogen. This device is used for short-duration blast overpressure loading for small animal in vivo injury models, and contrasts the more frequently used long duration/high impulse blast overpressures in the literature. We also developed a new apparatus that is used with the shock tube to recreate the in vivo intracranial overpressure response for loading in vitro culture preparations. The receiver device surrounds the culture with materials of similar impedance to facilitate the propagation of a single overpressure pulse through the tissue. This method prevents pressure waves reflecting off the tissue that can cause unrealistic deformation and injury. The receiver performance was characterized using the longest helium-driven shock tube, and produced in-fluid overpressures up to 1500?kPa at the location where a culture would be placed. This response was well correlated with the overpressure conditions from the shock tube (R2?=?0.97). Finite element models of the shock tube and receiver were developed and validated to better elucidate the mechanics of this methodology. A demonstration exposing a culture to the loading conditions created by this system suggest tissue strains less than 5% for all pressure levels simulated, which was well below functional deficit thresholds for strain rates less than 50?s?1. This novel system is not limited to a specific type of culture model and can be modified to reproduce more complex pressure pulses. PMID:22470367

Panzer, Matthew B.; Matthews, Kyle A.; Yu, Allen W.; Morrison, Barclay; Meaney, David F.; Bass, Cameron R.

2012-01-01

61

DARPA February 1992 ATIS benchmark test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper documents the third in a series of Benchmark Tests for the DARPA Air Travel Information System (ATIS) common task domain. The first results in this series were reported at the June 1990 Speech and Natural Language Workshop [1], and the second at the February 1991 Speech and Natural Language Workshop [2]. The February 1992 Benchmark Tests include: (1)

David S. Pallett; Nancy L. Dahlgren; Jonathan G. Fiscus; William M. Fisher; John S. Garofolo; Brett C. Tjaden

1992-01-01

62

LTC 1073 vacuum blasting (concrete) human factors assessment -- Baseline (summary)  

SciTech Connect

The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high capacity, direct pressure blasting system incorporating a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast head. A vacuum system removes dust and debris from the surfaces as it is blasted. After cleaning the surface, the abrasive, together with the rust or coating that was removed from the surface, is vacuumed into the machine through the suction hose. The dust separator contains angled steel collision pads, working with the force of gravity, to allow any reusable abrasive to fall back into the pressure vessel. The filters are manually back flushed to prevent clogging. After back flushing, dust is dumped from the dust chamber into the dust collection bag or drum by operation of the bellows valve. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on dust and noise exposure. Dust exposure was found to be minimal, but noise exposure was potentially significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place may cause the results to be inapplicable to indoor settings. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

NONE

1997-07-31

63

Module Hipot and ground continuity test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hipot (high voltage potential) and module frame continuity tests of solar energy conversion modules intended for deployment into large arrays are discussed. The purpose of the tests is to reveal potentially hazardous voltage conditions in installed modules, and leakage currents that may result in loss of power or cause ground fault system problems, i.e., current leakage potential and leakage voltage distribution. The tests show a combined failure rate of 36% (69% when environmental testing is included). These failure rates are believed easily corrected by greater care in fabrication.

Griffith, J. S.

1984-01-01

64

Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

2014-09-01

65

Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 2. 9. Blast injuries in foxholes  

SciTech Connect

This experiment was conducted to gain information about the amount of protection from direct blast effects that may be provided by foxholes of uniform dimensions located within distances of a nuclear explosion that are recognized as lethal for combinations of thermal and ionzing radiations and indirect blast injuries. Sixteen dogs protected in foxholes were exposed in pairs to the nuclear detonation. Autopsies performed between 10 and 15 hours after the blast demonstrated mild to moderately severe lung hemorrhages and three instances of mild to moderately severe brain hemorrhage. Ruptured ear drums and blast damage to abdominal viscera were infrequent. Evidences of acute ionizing radiation injury consisted in decreases in absolute lymphocyte counts and changes in lymph nodes and spleens. Photographs and diagrams of foxholes, animals, and tissue speciments; graphs of blast pressures, gamma doses, and neutron fluxes are included.

Talbot, J.M.; Maupin, C.S.

1985-04-01

66

Canister Decontamination Chamber No. 1 operability test results  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF Canister Decontamination Chamber No. 1 (CDC) was installed at the TNX facility in October, 1986 for operability testing. Operability testing was required because this equipment is unique and is a critical part of the defense waste process. The test was successful in demonstrating the canister decontamination operation. Testing verified proper nozzle locations, frit suspension, level probe and CCTV operations. The following recommendations are based on data obtained from frit blasting 24 canisters: reduce the recirculation pump speed, to allow proper level probes operation; add an extension to the chamber rinse nozzle which allows removal of frit from the top of the upper guide rinse nozzle; increase visibility through the CCTV camera; make the CMM grapple jaw pins more compatible with the MSM; and improve canister guide capability to aid in canister loading. CDC Operability Testing was completed October, 1987. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Magoulas, V.E.

1987-10-30

67

Adaptive structures - Test hardware and experimental results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The facilities and procedures used at JPL to test adaptive structures such as the large deployable reflector (LDR) are described and preliminary results are reported. The applications of adaptive structures in future NASA missions are outlined, and the techniques which are employed to modify damping, stiffness, and isolation characteristics, as well as geometric changes, are listed. The development of adaptive structures is shown to be effective as a result of new actuators and sensors, and examples are listed for categories such as fiber optics, shape-memory materials, piezoelectrics, and electrorheological fluids. Some ground test results are described for laboratory truss structures and truss test beds, which are shown to be efficient and easy to assemble in space. Adaptive structures are shown to be important for precision space structures such as the LDR, and can alleviate ground test requirements.

Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Kuo, Chin-Po

1990-01-01

68

NEXT Single String Integration Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a critical part of NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) test validation process, a single string integration test was performed on the NEXT ion propulsion system. The objectives of this test were to verify that an integrated system of major NEXT ion propulsion system elements meets project requirements, to demonstrate that the integrated system is functional across the entire power processor and xenon propellant management system input ranges, and to demonstrate to potential users that the NEXT propulsion system is ready for transition to flight. Propulsion system elements included in this system integration test were an engineering model ion thruster, an engineering model propellant management system, an engineering model power processor unit, and a digital control interface unit simulator that acted as a test console. Project requirements that were verified during this system integration test included individual element requirements ; integrated system requirements, and fault handling. This paper will present the results of these tests, which include: integrated ion propulsion system demonstrations of performance, functionality and fault handling; a thruster re-performance acceptance test to establish baseline performance: a risk-reduction PMS-thruster integration test: and propellant management system calibration checks.

Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.; Pinero, Luis; Herman, Daniel A.; Snyder, Steven John

2010-01-01

69

Test Result Management in Global Health Settings  

PubMed Central

OVERVIEW Across the globe, the ways in which patients' test results are managed are as varied as the many different types of healthcare systems that manage these data. The outcomes, however, are often not too dissimilar: too many clinically significant test results fall through the cracks. The consequences of not following up test results in a timely manner are serious and often devastating to patients: diagnoses are delayed, treatments are not initiated or altered in time, and diseases progress. In resource-poor settings, test results too commonly get filed away within the paper chart in ways that isolate them and prevent passage to future providers caring for a patient. To make matters worse, the onus to act upon these test results often rests on patients who need to return to the clinic within a specified timeframe in order to obtain their results but who may not have the means or are too ill to do so. Even in more developed healthcare settings that use electronic records, clinical data residing in the electronic medical record (EMR) are often stubbornly “static”—key pieces of clinical information are frequently not recognized, retrieved, or shared easily. In this way, EMRs are not unlike paper record systems, and therefore, EMRs alone will not solve this problem. To illustrate this problem, consider the case of a patient newly diagnosed with HIV in 3 different healthcare delivery settings. PMID:24278831

Palazuelos, Daniel; Payne, Jonathan D.

2012-01-01

70

Test result management in global health settings.  

PubMed

Across the globe, the ways in which patients' test results are managed are as varied as the many different types of healthcare systems that manage these data. The outcomes, however, are often not too dissimilar: too many clinically significant test results fall through the cracks. The consequences of not following up test results in a timely manner are serious and often devastating to patients: diagnoses are delayed, treatments are not initiated or altered in time, and diseases progress. In resource-poor settings, test results too commonly get filed away within the paper chart in ways that isolate them and prevent passage to future providers caring for a patient. To make matters worse, the onus to act upon these test results often rests on patients who need to return to the clinic within a specified timeframe in order to obtain their results but who may not have the means or are too ill to do so. Even in more developed healthcare settings that use electronic records, clinical data residing in the electronic medical record (EMR) are often stubbornly "static"-key pieces of clinical information are frequently not recognized, retrieved, or shared easily. In this way, EMRs are not unlike paper record systems, and therefore, EMRs alone will not solve this problem. To illustrate this problem, consider the case of a patient newly diagnosed with HIV in 3 different healthcare delivery settings. PMID:24278831

Palazuelos, Daniel; Payne, Jonathan D; Dalal, Anuj K

2012-09-01

71

On the Propagation and Interaction of Spherical Blast Waves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The characteristics and the scaling laws of isolated spherical blast waves have been briefly reviewed. Both self-similar solutions and numerical solutions of isolated blast waves are discussed. Blast profiles in the near-field (strong shock region) and the far-field (weak shock region) are examined. Particular attention is directed at the blast overpressure and shock propagating speed. Consideration is also given to the interaction of spherical blast waves. Test data for the propagation and interaction of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure.

Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert

2007-01-01

72

Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) - Component test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The preliminary design of the ART and some of the component test results are presented. The goals for the future rotorcraft transmissions include a 25-percent weight reduction in comparison with current state-of-the-art transmissions, a 10-dB reduction in the transmitted noise level, and a system reliability of 5,000 hr mean-time-between-removal for the transmission. The ART tests completed to date support the attainment of the three major goals of the program.

Henry, Z. S.

1992-07-01

73

JPL pyro shock test approaches and results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the overall approach at JPL in performing spacecraft pyrotechnic shock qualification testing. Initially, the assembly shock requirements are developed early in the program based on previous spacecraft test experience and data. Pyrotechnic device development testing firings and spacecraft Development Test Model (DTM) pyro firings are then conducted to verify the adequacy of the assembly shock requirements and to determine the subsystem test firing and the subsequent system level test firing requirements. The electro-dynamic shaker, through shock synthesis techniques, is utilized to qualify the shock sensitive flight equipment with margins applied. Actual pyrotechnic device firings on spacecraft equipment or science instruments are performed when the influence of the pyros is localized and can be ignored at the system level. Full spacecraft system level shock tests, which include multiple firings of certain critical pyro devices, are conducted to verify the spacecraft design structural integrity and functions as well as to qualify hardware items which have not been previously qualified. These tests also provide a source of data from which assembly level requirements can be evaluated and compared. For example, during the Galileo program, the results demonstrated that good agreement between predicted and measured shock environments and adequate qualification of the flight spacecraft was achieved.

Chang, Kurng Y.

1986-01-01

74

BPX insulation irradiation program test results  

SciTech Connect

The toroidal field coil insulation for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) is expected to receive a radiation dose of nearly 10{sup 10} rad and to withstand significant mechanical stresses. An irradiation test program was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) using the Advanced Technology Reactor (ATR) for irradiations to doses on the order of 3 {times} 10{sup 10} rad. The flexure and shear strength with compression of commercially procured sheet material were reported earlier. A second series of tests has been performed to slightly higher dose levels with vacuum impregnated materials, glass strand material, and Spaulrad-S sheet samples. Vacuum impregnation with a Shell 9405 resin and 9470 hardener was used to produce bonded copper squares and flexure samples of both pure resin and resin with S-glass. A new test fixture was developed to test the bonded samples in shear without applied compression. The Spaulrad-S flexure samples demonstrated a loss of strength with irradiation, similar to previous results. The pure resin lost nearly all flexibility, while the S-glass-reinforced samples retained between 30% and 40% of the initial flexure strength. The S-glass strands showed a 30% loss of strength at the higher dose level when tested in tension. The bonded copper squares had a low room-temperature shear strength of approximately 17 MPa before irradiation, which was unchanged in the irradiated samples. Shear testing of unirradiated bonded copper squares with ten different types of surface treatment revealed that the low shear strength resulted from the polyurethane primer used. In the later series of test, the epoxy-based primers and DZ-80 from Ciba-Geigy did much better, with shear strengths on the order of 40 MPa. These samples also demonstrated a resistance to cryogenic shock. One irradiated bonded sample was tested up 10 210 MPa in compression, the limit of the test fixture, without failure.

McManamy, T.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Kanemoto, G. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Snook, P.G. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1991-01-01

75

Nuclear Blast  

MedlinePLUS

... including blinding light, intense heat (thermal radiation), initial nuclear radiation, blast, fires started by the heat pulse and ... time, and is the main source of residual nuclear radiation. Fallout from a nuclear explosion may be carried ...

76

Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. Based upon the results of the 2009 distillation comparison test (DCT) and recommendations of the expert panel, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) project advanced the technology by increasing reliability of the system through redesign of bearing assemblies and improved rotor dynamics. In addition, the project improved the CDS power efficiency by optimizing the thermoelectric heat pump (TeHP) and heat exchanger design. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell d International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades as compared to previous system performance. The system was challenged with Solution 1 from the NASA Exploration Life Support (ELS) distillation comparison testing performed in 2009. Solution 1 consisted of a mixed stream containing human-generated urine and humidity condensate. A secondary objective of this testing is to evaluate the performance of the CDS as compared to the state of the art Distillation Assembly (DA) used in the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). This was done by challenging the system with ISS analog waste streams. This paper details the results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

Callahan, Michael R.; Pensinger, Stuart; Sargusingh, Miriam J.

2014-01-01

77

CA Testing Workshops: Process, Issues, Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation will describe the organization and conduct of the workshops, list the topics discussed, and conclude with a more-detailed examination of a related set of issues dear to the presenters heart. Because the current HSCT configuration is expected to have (mostly) turbulent flow over the wings, and because current CFD predictions assume fully-turbulent flow, the wind tunnel testing to date has attempted to duplicate this condition at the lower Reynolds numbers attainable on the ground. This frequently requires some form of artificial boundary layer trip to induce transition near the wing's leading edge. But this innocent-sounding goal leads to a number of complications, and it is not clear that present-day testing technology is adequate to the task. An description of some of the difficulties, and work underway to address them, forms the "Results" section of this talk. Additional results of the testing workshop will be covered in presentations by other team members.

Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.

1999-01-01

78

Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this programâ??s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

Duane P. Moser; Ken Czerwinski; Charles E. Russell; Mavrik Zavarin

2010-07-13

79

Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program’s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

Duane P. Moser, Jim Bruckner, Jen Fisher, Ken Czerwinski, Charles E. Russell, and Mavrik Zavarin

2010-09-01

80

Operation GREENHOUSE. Scientific Director's Report of Atomic Weapon Tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 2.9. Blast Injuries in Foxholes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This experiment was conducted to gain information about the amount of protection form direct blast effects that may be provided by foxholes of uniform dimensions locatex witshin distances of a nuclear explosion that are recognized as lethal for combinatio...

J. M. Talbot, C. S. Maupin

1985-01-01

81

Photographs of Blast Effects on Structures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This photograph collection shows a wood-frame house located 1,100 meters from ground zero, exposed to a nuclear blast at the Nevada Test Site. The test was Upshot-Knothole Annie, a 16 Kt tower shot, on March 17, 1953. Exposure to thermal radiation was 25 cal/cm2, about one-quarter of that experienced at ground zero in Hiroshima. The blast over pressure was 5 psi, and the blast wave created surface winds of 160 mph.

Griffith, Christopher

82

Aquifer test results, Green Swamp area, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An aquifer test conducted in the Green Swamp area December 15-16 , 1975 was designed to stress the uppermost part of the Floridan aquifer so that the leakage characteristics of the overlying confining bed could be determined. A well tapping the upper part of the Floridan aquifer was pumped at a rate of about 1,040 gallons per minute for 35 hours; drawdown was measured in the Floridan aquifer and in two horizons in the confining bed. Analysis of the data indicates that the transmissivity of the uppper 160 feet of the Floridan is 13,000 square feet per day, the storage coefficient is about 0.0002.5, and the overlying confining bed leakance coefficient is about 0.02 to 0.025 per day. The vertical hydraulic diffusivity of the confining bed ranged from 610 square feet per day to 16,000 square feet per day. Results of the test indicate that, in the area of the test site, a Floridan aquifer well field would induce additional recharge to the Floridan. As a result of that increased recharge , water levels in the surficial aquifer would tend to stand lower, runoff from the area would tend to be less, and, perhaps, evapotranspiration would be less than normal.(USGS)

Tibbals, C. H.; Grubb, Hayes F.

1982-01-01

83

Evaluating high-temperature intumescent insulation materials under fire and blast conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes recent testing conducted to evaluate the performance of high-temperature intumescent materials under adverse fire and blast conditions. Results from fire performance evaluations currently protecting offshore oil platforms are presented. Extensive fire and blast qualification testing of epoxy-based intumescent materials has been conducted utilizing specially designed blast chambers, jet fire facilities, and laboratory furnaces. Blast chambers are capable of loading up to a 3 x 3-m insulated bulkhead assembly to a 2 bar over pressure and having a duration of approximately 250 millisecond generated by a controlled flammable vapor cloud explosion. The jet fire test exposes an insulated test specimen to a fire environment characterized by temperatures of approximately 1100 C, sonic gas velocities, and peak heat flux levels in excess of 300 kW/m{sup 2}.

Parker, A.J. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1997-11-01

84

GENIE Flight Test Results and System Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has envisioned a suite of lander test vehicles that will be flown in Earth s atmosphere to incrementally demonstrate applicable lunar lander performance in the terrestrial environment. As each terrestrial rocket progresses in maturity, relevant space flight technology matures to a higher technology readiness level, preparing it for inclusion on a future lunar lander design.. NASA s "Project M" lunar mission concept flew its first terrestrial rocket, RR1, in June 2010 in Caddo Mills, Texas. The Draper Laboratory built GENIE (Guidance Embedded Navigator Integration Environment) successfully demonstrated accurate, real time, embedded performance of Project M navigation and guidance algorithms in a highly dynamic environment. The RR1 vehicle, built by Armadillo Aerospace, performed a successful 60 second free flight and gave the team great confidence in Project M s highly reliable and robust GNC system design and implementation. This paper provides an overview of the GENIE system and describes recent flight performance test results onboard the RR1 terrestrial rocket.

Brady, Tye; Paschall, Stephen, II; Crain, Timothy P., II; Demars, Kyle; Bishop, Robert

2011-01-01

85

Test Results From a High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stirling cycle power conversion is an enabling technology that provides high thermodynamic efficiency but also presents unique challenges with regard to electrical power generation, management, and distribution. The High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig (HPLATR) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio is a demonstration test bed that simulates electrical power generation from a Stirling engine driven alternator. It implements the high power electronics necessary to provide a well regulated DC user load bus. These power electronics use a novel design solution that includes active rectification and power factor control, active ripple suppression, along with a unique building block approach that permits the use of high voltage or high current alternator designs. This report describes the HPLATR, the test program, and the operational results.

Birchenough, Arthur G.; Hervol, David S.; Gardner, Brent G.

2010-01-01

86

Review of sodium analysis proficiency test results.  

PubMed

Proficiency testing results for sodium analysis in foods raised concerns over the proportion of laboratories achieving satisfactory z-scores. Test materials for sodium analysis include fruit juice, canned meat meal, tomato sauce, cheese and pasta meal, and snack food. Fruit juice and tomato sauce data sets are the most problematic in deriving the assigned value with sufficiently low uncertainty to provide evaluative z-scores. The standard deviation for proficiency is derived from Horwitz, with a lack of collaborative trial data for these matrices to provide other guidance. The status of accreditation for the method/matrix does not appear to influence the observed variation in results. Microwave digestion is much less commonly used than simple acid digestion. The choice of determination method appears to be entirely matrix dependent (whether flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, flame photometry or inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy). Results for juice matrix may be overestimated if flame photometry is used, due to either potassium interference or careless reporting where potassium is also determined. PMID:21240823

Sykes, M; Parmar, B; Knaggs, M

2011-02-01

87

Design of blast deflectors for a mine resistant vehicle by CFD/CSD simulations  

SciTech Connect

Results of a successful effort to significantly improve resistance of the tactical wheeled vehicle to mine detonation are reported. The design methodology is based on a comprehensive use of numerical simulation for blast/structure interaction and structure deformation as a result of blast load. Both Computational Fluid and Structural Dynamic (CFD and CSD) simulations are performed in three dimensions for the most comprehensive representation of the tactical wheeled vehicle geometry. Detailed three dimensional simulations of interaction of the blast waves generated by mine detonations against full configurations of tactical wheeled vehicles were validated by dedicated experiments. Three main scenarios for mine detonation were considered: command detonation of a mine under the truck crew cab, detonation of the mine under the front wheel, and detonation under the middle or aft wheel. Blast deflectors, designed using this comprehensive CFD/CSD methodology, were built and tested for blast loads generated by high explosive detonations. Results of these tests demonstrate a remarkable level of blast protection achieved by low cost deflectors of very simple geometry placed in key locations. The study demonstrates the advantages of including high level CFD/CSD simulations in blast deflectors design.

Lottati, I.; Eidelman, S. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Dillon, J.; Sergi, S.; Sousk, S. [Army Communications-Electronics Command, Ft. Belvoir, VA (United States). Research Development and Engineering Center

1996-12-31

88

Partial-array test results in IFSMTF  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary performance tests of two large superconducting magnets have been carried out in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF). Each of the Japanese (JA) and General Dynamics/Convair (GD) coils was operated up to its full design current of 10.2 kA with the other serving as an adjacent background coil at 40% of design current. Cryostatic stability was demonstrated for both coils by noting recovery from a full half-turn (5 m) driven normal. A new pick-up coil compensation scheme was successfully used for the quench detection system. Each coil remained superconducting when the other was dumped. Unique instrumentation was used to measure changes in bore dimensions and displacement of the winding from the coil case. Agreement between structural analysis and measurement of bore dimension changes resulting from magnetic loads is good. The Swiss (CH) coil underwent only a cryogenic test. The forced cooling worked well and an inlet temperature of 3.8 K was demonstrated.

Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Koizumi, K.; Lubell, M.S.; Luton, J.N.; Shen, S.S.; Zahn, G.R.; Zichy, J.A.

1985-01-01

89

Preliminary test results for the SVX4  

SciTech Connect

We present and summarize the preliminary test results for SVX4 chip testing. There are presently two versions of the SVX4. Version 2 has on-chip bypassing and Version 1 does not. The on-chip bypassing is a layer of transistors under the front-end analog pipeline that acts as a bypassing capacitor for the voltage supply. Its size is about a microfarad. We aggressively choose to test Version 2 because of this feature. The feature is advantageous for hybrid design because it eliminates the need for an additional passive component on the hybrid itself by placing it on the actual SVX4 die. Also, the SVX4 was designed to operate in two modes: D. and CDF. One can set which mode the chip will operate by placing a jumper in the proper position on the SVX4 chip carrier. In either mode, the chip can either use the operating parameters from the shift register or the shadow register. Similarly, this is selected by placing a jumper on the SVX4 chip carrier. This chip has this feature because it was unknown whether the new design of the shadow register would be operable. The shadow register is also call the SEU register or Single Event Upset register. An introduction into the functionality of the chip and an explanation on the difference between D. and CDF mode can be found in the SVX4 User's Manual [1].

Christofek, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Rapidis, P.; Utes, M.; /Fermilab

2005-06-01

90

49 CFR 234.273 - Results of inspections and tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Results of inspections and tests. 234.273 Section...Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.273 Results of inspections and tests. (a) Results of inspections and tests made in...

2010-10-01

91

Correction of Slug Test Results for Heterogeneity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most important activities in characterizing a groundwater site involves the determination of the hydraulic conductivity distribution. Many methods have been used and current research continues to investigate promising techniques. Slug tests have been used for many years in this regard. Over the last several years we have been conducting research on improving the slug test method. Most of our work has been done in a semi-confined alluvial aquifer with potentially high values of hydraulic conductivity. It has been necessary to use a nonlinear model for the slug test analyses, which covers the range from underdamped to overdamped responses. Multilevel slug tests in fully screened wells have yielded vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity with depth. It has been found that decreasing the slugged interval can give finer resolution for the hydraulic conductivity profile. Generally, we have found that storage effects are not too important at our site and a Hvorslev type description of the aquifer is appropriate. Using the nonlinear model with the Hvorslev approximation to analyze the multilevel slug test data has shown the presence of various layers with substantial contrast in hydraulic conductivity. The Hvorslev shape factor expression was originally derived for a homogeneous hydraulic conductivity and for a semi-ellipsoid casing. This means that error is being introduced by using the traditional Hvorslev shape factor. Since the analyzed data show a variation in hydraulic conductivity with depth, it would be desirable to correct for this heterogeneity. We have used a numerical radial model, which allows a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity and a circular casing, to calculate the correct Hvorslev shape factor for various boundary conditions. We find that the Hvorslev shape factor near the center of the aquifer for a homogeneous hydraulic conductivity is accurate within a few percent. In a similar manner, we find the Hvorslev suggested correction for anisotropy to be accurate within a few percent for a homogeneous hydraulic conductivity. Having verified the agreement of the numerical model with the traditional Hvorslev results, we proceeded to apply the model to correct for heterogeneities and proximity to boundaries. We have applied the numerical model to correct some of our profile data. In general, we find the correction sharpens peaks and valleys in the hydraulic conductivity distribution, apparently correcting for some of the averaging that has occurred in the field data. Overall the correction for our data has not been large, on the order of plus or minus 5 percent. However, for very large variations in hydraulic conductivity or as various boundaries are approached with the slugged interval, the correction may become much larger.

McElwee, C. D.

2001-05-01

92

The NASA B-757 HIRF Test Series: Flight Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1995, the NASA Langley Research Center conducted a series of aircraft tests aimed at characterizing the electromagnetic environment (EME) in and around a Boeing 757 airliner. Measurements were made of the electromagnetic energy coupled into the aircraft and the signals induced on select structures as the aircraft was flown past known RF transmitters. These measurements were conducted to provide data for the validation of computational techniques for the assessment of electromagnetic effects in commercial transport aircraft. This paper reports on the results of flight tests using RF radiators in the HF, VHF, and UHF ranges and on efforts to use computational and analytical techniques to predict RF field levels inside the airliner at these frequencies.

Moeller, Karl J.; Dudley, Kenneth L.

1997-01-01

93

Results from the SPI Imaging Test Setup  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SPI Imaging Test Setup (SPITS) was built at MPE to allow experimental verification of the imaging properties of the Spectrometer onboard INTEGRAL (SPI). Of special importance is the possibility to validate simulations which are needed for SPI image reconstruction with laboratory measurements. SPITS consists of a coded mask and two Germanium detectors. The coded mask is based on a SPI mask development model, has the same Tungsten-alloy HURA mask coding as SPI, and is made of SPI flight model materials. The two hexagonal Ge-detectors in their Al caps (each 6 cm sideto-side and 7 cm long) are from the same manufacturing line as the SPI flight detectors. They are housed in a common Al end cap and cooled with liquid nitrogen. Mounted on an XY-table, they can be moved to cover the 19 Ge detector positions of the SPI camera. The SPI plastic scintillator anticoincidence is replaced by a plexiglass sheet, and no BGO anticoincidence system is used. We have measured the response of SPITS to radioactive sources (60 keV to 1.8 MeV) at a distance of 9 m from the detector plane. We use both image deconvolution algorithms foreseen for SPI data analysis (spiros and spiskymax) for our analysis. In addition, accelerator tests are planned for May 2001. Photons from (p,?)-reactions (up to 9 MeV) will be used to test SPITS imaging capabilites. We present our findings for the angular resolution and the point-source-location capability of SPITS as a function of energy and for different source geometries relative to the mask coding. Thus SPITS results complement the calibration performed with the flight model of SPI.

Wunderer, C. B.; Diehl, R.; Georgii, R.; Kienlin, A. V.; Lichti, G. G.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A.; Connell, P.; Hammer, J. W.; Sanchez, F.; Vedrenne, G.

2001-08-01

94

Test results of heavily irradiated Si detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A large use of silicon microstrip detectors is foreseen for the intermediate part of the CMS tracker. A specific research and development program has been carried out with the aim of finding design layouts and technological solutions for allowing silicon microstrip detectors to be reliably used on a high radiation level environment. As a result of this work single sided, AC-coupled, polysilicon biased, 300 ? m thick, p + on n substrate detectors were chosen. Irradiation tests have been performed on prototypes up to fluence 2×10 14 n/cm 2. The detector performances do not significantly change if the detectors are biased well above the depletion voltage. S/ N is reduced by less than 20%, still enough to insure a good efficiency and space resolution. Multiguard structures has been developed in order to reach high voltage operation (above 500 V).

Albergo, S.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Bartalini, P.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B.; Ciampolini, P.; Civinini, C.; Connotte, J.; Creanza, D.; D'Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; de Palma, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Della Marina, R.; Eklund, C.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; Focardi, E.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Giassi, A.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W. H.; Hall, G.; Hammerstrom, R.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Karimaki, V.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Martignon, G.; Mc Evoy, B.; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Raffaelli, F.; Raso, G.; Raymond, M.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Skog, K.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Wang, Y.; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B.

1999-02-01

95

Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

2002-01-01

96

Blast Initiation Detector Proof-Of-Concept Wind Tunnel Testing of Optical/Aeroshell Interface.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Interceptors with fragmenting warheads that detonate in proximity to target vehicles are being used in missile defense tests. As part of this effort, it is necessary to be able to measure the performance of an interceptor during the endgame and it is pref...

L. R. Gauthier, L. A. Mattes, C. L. Eddins

2000-01-01

97

Full length prototype SSC dipole test results  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from tests of the first full length prototype SSC dipole magnet. The cryogenic behavior of the magnet during a slow cooldown to 4.5K and a slow warmup to room temperature has been measured. Magnetic field quality was measured at currents up to 2000 A. Averaged over the body field all harmonics with the exception of b/sub 2/ and b/sub 8/ are at or within the tolerances specified by the SSC Central Design Group. (The values of b/sub 2/ and b/sub 8/ result from known design and construction defects which will be be corrected in later magnets.) Using an NMR probe the average body field strength is measured to be 10.283 G/A with point to point variations on the order of one part in 1000. Data are presented on quench behavior of the magnet up to 3500 A (approximately 55% of full field) including longitudinal and transverse velocities for the first 250 msec of the quench.

Strait, J.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.; Engler, N.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.; Koepke, K.; Kuchnir, M.; Larson, E.; Lundy, R.

1987-04-24

98

Karhula hot gas cleanup test results  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to develop a practical hot gas filter design that meets the performance and operational requirements of pressurized fluidized bed combustion--bubbling bed, circulating bed and second generation--applications. The Westinghouse hot gas candle filter system is currently installed in the Ahlstrom Pyropower 10 MW (thermal) pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB) test facility located in Karhula, Finland. The overall objective of the testing is to evaluate the filter design and operating reliability for selection and implementation into the Midwest Power DMEC-1 PCFB 150 MW(e) repowering project (Clean Coal III Selection). During 1,026 hours of operation represented by Test Segment 2 and current testing in Test Segment 3, the filter unit and test facility has performed very well and operated without major equipment failures. The filter has demonstrated stable pressure drop and has operated without candle failure. Tables summarize the filter operating parameters during these tests.

Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Isaksson, J. [Ahlstrom Pyropower, Karhula (Finland)

1994-10-01

99

Power Actuation and Switching Module Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The X2000 Power System Electronics (PSE) is a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) task to develop a new generation of power system building blocks for use on future deep-space missions. The effort includes the development of electronic components and modules that can be used as building blocks in the design of generic spacecraft power systems. All X2000 avionics components and modules are designed for use in centralized or distributed spacecraft architectures. The Power Actuation and Switching Module (PASM) has been developed under the X2000 program. This component enables a modular and scalable design approach for power switching applications, which can result in a wide variety of power switching architectures using this simple building block. The PASM is designed to provide most of the necessary power switching functions of spacecraft for various Deep Space missions including future missions to Mars, comets, Jupiter and its moons. It is fabricated using an ASIC process that is tolerant of high radiation. The development included two application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and support circuitry all packaged using High Density Interconnect (HDI) technology. It can be operated in series or parallel with other PASMs. It can be used as a high-side or low-side switch and it can drive thruster valves, pyrotechnic devices such as NASA standard initiators, bus shunt resistors, and regular spacecraft component loads. Each PASM contains two independent switches with internal current limiting and over-current trip-off functions to protect the power subsystem from load faults. During turnon and turnoff each switch can limit the rate of current change (di/dt) to a value determined by the user. Three-way majority-voted On/Off commandability and full switch status telemetry (both analog and digital) are built into the module. This paper is a follow up to the one presented at he IECEC 2004 conference that will include the lessons learned and test results from the development.

Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Franco, Lauro; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treichler, John; Wester, Gene

2006-01-01

100

Blast shock wave mitigation using the hydraulic energy redirection and release technology.  

PubMed

A hydraulic energy redirection and release technology has been developed for mitigating the effects of blast shock waves on protected objects. The technology employs a liquid-filled plastic tubing as a blast overpressure transformer to transfer kinetic energy of blast shock waves into hydraulic energy in the plastic tubings. The hydraulic energy is redirected through the plastic tubings to the openings at the lower ends, and then is quickly released with the liquid flowing out through the openings. The samples of the specifically designed body armor in which the liquid-filled plastic tubings were installed vertically as the outer layer of the body armor were tested. The blast test results demonstrated that blast overpressure behind the body armor samples was remarkably reduced by 97% in 0.2 msec after the liquid flowed out of its appropriate volume through the openings. The results also suggested that a volumetric liquid surge might be created when kinetic energy of blast shock wave was transferred into hydraulic energy to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of the liquid. The volumetric liquid surge has a strong destructive power, and can cause a noncontact, remote injury in humans (such as blast-induced traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder) if it is created in cardiovascular system. The hydraulic energy redirection and release technology can successfully mitigate blast shock waves from the outer surface of the body armor. It should be further explored as an innovative approach to effectively protect against blast threats to civilian and military personnel. PMID:22745740

Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

2012-01-01

101

Blast Shock Wave Mitigation Using the Hydraulic Energy Redirection and Release Technology  

PubMed Central

A hydraulic energy redirection and release technology has been developed for mitigating the effects of blast shock waves on protected objects. The technology employs a liquid-filled plastic tubing as a blast overpressure transformer to transfer kinetic energy of blast shock waves into hydraulic energy in the plastic tubings. The hydraulic energy is redirected through the plastic tubings to the openings at the lower ends, and then is quickly released with the liquid flowing out through the openings. The samples of the specifically designed body armor in which the liquid-filled plastic tubings were installed vertically as the outer layer of the body armor were tested. The blast test results demonstrated that blast overpressure behind the body armor samples was remarkably reduced by 97% in 0.2 msec after the liquid flowed out of its appropriate volume through the openings. The results also suggested that a volumetric liquid surge might be created when kinetic energy of blast shock wave was transferred into hydraulic energy to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of the liquid. The volumetric liquid surge has a strong destructive power, and can cause a noncontact, remote injury in humans (such as blast-induced traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder) if it is created in cardiovascular system. The hydraulic energy redirection and release technology can successfully mitigate blast shock waves from the outer surface of the body armor. It should be further explored as an innovative approach to effectively protect against blast threats to civilian and military personnel. PMID:22745740

Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

2012-01-01

102

Drop weight impact on hybrid-fiber ECC blast\\/shelter panels  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of an experimental study to evaluate the damage and failure mode of hybrid-fiber engineered cementitious composite (ECC) panels caused by large projectiles or fragments with the aim towards quantifying the extent to which hybrid-fiber ECC improves the resistance of blast panels against impact loading. Drop weight tests are conducted on full-scale blast\\/shelter panels (2 m

J. Zhang; M. Maalej; S. T. Quek; Y. Y. Teo

103

Recovery from blast fishing on coral reefs: a tale of two scales.  

PubMed

Dynamite or "blast" fishing is one of the most immediate and destructive threats to coral reefs worldwide. However, little is known about the long-term ecosystem effects of such blasts or the dynamics of recovery. Here, we examine coral reef recovery in the simplest case of acute single blasts of known age, as well as recovery from chronic blasting over greater spatial and temporal scales. Rubble resulting from single blasts slowly stabilized, and craters filled in with surrounding coral and new colonies. After five years, coral cover within craters no longer differed significantly from control plots. In contrast, extensively bombed areas showed no significant recovery over the six years of this study, despite adequate supply of coral larvae. After extensive blasting, the resulting coral rubble shifts in ocean currents, forming unstable "killing fields" for new recruits. While recently tested rehabilitation methods might be feasible on a small scale, human intervention is unlikely to be effective on large spatial scales, highlighting the need for effective management to prevent blast fishing in the first place. PMID:17069358

Fox, Helen E; Caldwell, Roy L

2006-10-01

104

Durability of Portland blast-furnace slag cement concrete  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarizes the results of studies carried out at the Building Research Establishment in the UK, on the performance and long-term durability of concrete where ground glassy blast-furnace slag (granulated and pelletized) has been used as a cementitious material. Using data from tests on site structures and laboratory and exposure site studies, comparisons are made of the properties and

G. J. Osborne

1999-01-01

105

Code Verification Results of an LLNL ASC Code on Some Tri-Lab Verification Test Suite Problems  

SciTech Connect

As scientific codes become more complex and involve larger numbers of developers and algorithms, chances for algorithmic implementation mistakes increase. In this environment, code verification becomes essential to building confidence in the code implementation. This paper will present first results of a new code verification effort within LLNL's B Division. In particular, we will show results of code verification of the LLNL ASC ARES code on the test problems: Su Olson non-equilibrium radiation diffusion, Sod shock tube, Sedov point blast modeled with shock hydrodynamics, and Noh implosion.

Anderson, S R; Bihari, B L; Salari, K; Woodward, C S

2006-12-29

106

Blast Loading Experiments of Developed Surrogate Models for TBI Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical systems. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells followed by SLA prototyped skulls housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted with the simple geometries to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head due to impedance mismatches. Results from the strain correlations added to the theory of internal shearing between tissues.

Alley, Matthew; Son, Steven

2009-06-01

107

Gram-range explosive blast scaling and associated materials response  

E-print Network

Gram-range explosive blast scaling and associated materials response M. J. Hargather1 , G. S. Laboratory-scale gram-range explosive blast testing of materials is shown to be feasible. Blast loading from different explosive compounds is coupled to a witness plate through the air by way of a shock wave of known

Settles, Gary S.

108

Monitoring and Testing the Parts Cleaning Stations, Abrasive Blasting Cabinets, and Paint Booths  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I have the opportunity to work in the Environmental Management Office (EMO) this summer. One of the EMO's tasks is to make sure the Environmental Management System is implemented to the entire Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Environmental Management System (EMS) is a policy or plan that is oriented toward minimizing an organization's impact to the environment. Our EMS includes the reduction of solid waste regeneration and the reduction of hazardous material use, waste, and pollution. With the Waste Management Team's (WMT) help, the EMS can be implemented throughout the NASA Glenn Research Center. The WMT is responsible for the disposal and managing of waste throughout the GRC. They are also responsible for the management of all chemical waste in the facility. My responsibility is to support the waste management team by performing an inventory on parts cleaning stations, abrasive cabinets, and paint booths through out the entire facility. These booths/stations are used throughout the center and they need to be monitored and tested for hazardous waste and material. My job is to visit each of these booths/stations, take samples of the waste, and analyze the samples.

Jordan, Tracee M.

2004-01-01

109

Flash Lidar Performance Testing: Configuration and Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lidar-based hazard detection and avoidance will enable safe landing in scientifically interesting terrain with higher hazard abundance. ASC GoldenEye flash lidar was tested at JPL as part of EDL technology development for Mars 2018

Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Johnson, Andrew; Chang, Daniel; Ek, Eric; Natzic, David; Spiers, Gary; Penniman, Steve; Short, Brad

2012-01-01

110

X-48B Preliminary Flight Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the preliminary Flight tests of the X-48B development program. The X-48B is a blended wing body aircraft that is being used to test various features of the BWB concept. The research concerns the following: (1) Turbofan Development, (2) Intelligent Flight Control and Optimization, (3) Airdata Calibration (4) Parameter Identification (i.e., Determination of the parameters of a mathematical model of a system based on observation of the system inputs and response.)

Taylor, Brian R.

2009-01-01

111

Photovoltaic concentrator test results and interpretations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of actively- and passively-cooled photovoltaic modules and arrays have been tested at the Sandia Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility. Four actively-cooled collectors were studied: (1) the Acurex parabolic trough module efficiency is 7.9%, (2) the E-systems module demonstrates a 9.9% efficiency, (3) the General Electric module has an 8.2% efficiency, and (4) the Varian module measures a 14% efficiency. Among the passively-cooled collectors tested is the Martin-Marietta Array, and it is shown that a 10 C difference in cell temperature changes the conversion efficiency from 9.0 to about 9.4%. In addition, the Spectrolab array has been 99.2% reliable and has a measured efficiency of 7.4%. Finally, the Motorola module demonstrates efficiencies of 7.8% and 10.7%. In order to compare collector performances, each design must be optimized.

Gerwin, H. J.

112

www.nasa.gov Flight Test Results  

E-print Network

-X Objectives Demonstrate Controllability of new launch vehicle Assemble and Recover new launch vehicle Characterize in-flight roll characteristics Perform staging of new launch vehicle Demonstrate parachute Flight Purpose of a development test flight (unlike a prototype) is to learn Only true failure is failure

Waliser, Duane E.

113

Blast overpressure relief using air vacated buffer medium  

E-print Network

Blast waves generated by intense explosions cause damage to structures and human injury. In this thesis, a strategy is investigated for relief of blast overpressure resulting from explosions in air. The strategy is based ...

Avasarala, Srikanti Rupa

2009-01-01

114

Conical isogrid adapter structural test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structural characteristics of isogrid composite structures are discussed. To demonstrate the feasibility of applying isogrid to conical structures, a full scale flanged isogrid conical adapter similar to the configuration of the D-1 Centaur equipment module was constructed. The adapter was tested to evaluate the response of the conical isogrid structure to various combinations of bending and axial compression loading. The analysis techniques for predicting conical isogrid structural capability are examined.

Dyer, J. E.; Slysh, P.

1974-01-01

115

Electrophysiological white matter dysfunction and association with neurobehavioral deficits following low-level primary blast trauma.  

PubMed

There is strong evidence that primary blast injuries can cause neuropathological alterations in the brain. Clinical findings from war veterans indicating evidence of diffuse axonal injury have been corroborated by numerous primary blast models in animals. However, the effect of a subclinical blast (blast with no obvious sign of external trauma or lung injury) as a contributing factor to the neurological symptoms and neuropathology is less clear. Our group recently developed a model of low-level primary blast and characterized aberrant expression of white matter cytoskeletal proteins in the cortex and hippocampus following a subclinical wave shock exposure. Here we examined the susceptibility of the corpus callosum following subclinical blast. We also demonstrate that white matter dysfunction is associated with neurobehavioral deficits associated with anxiety and stress in rats. Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (~300 g) were exposed to a primary blast (approx. 28 kPa), below the threshold required to induce pulmonary trauma. Rats were evaluated on three behavioral outcome measures; the rotarod, the light/dark box and open field anxiety test. We used Western blotting to examine expression and degradation of axonally expressed ?II-spectrin, NF200 and voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) in the corpus callosum. Acute slice preparations were used for electrophysiological analysis of evoked compound action potentials (CAPs) in the corpus callosum. There was evidence of ?II-spectrin degradation in the corpus callosum at 48 h post-injury detectable up to 14 days post-injury, as well as increased heavy neurofilament expression. A reduction in VGSC expression was observed at 48 h post-blast as well as a reduction in the interaction between ankyrin G and intact ?II-spectrin. Blast exposed rats had significantly lower rotarod latency times relative to sham rats (p=0.002). Increased anxiety-related and stress-related behavior were observed in blast rats relative to sham animals as indicated by the increased frequency of fecal droppings (p=0.029) and reduced exploratory activity (p=0.036) in the open-field test. Blast rats had fewer transitions and time spent in lit sections of the light/dark box. Electrophysiological recordings from the corpus callosum indicated greater deficits in unmyelinated fibers of the corpus callosum relative to myelinated fibers characterized by reduced CAP amplitude response at 14 days post-injury. Analysis of the relationship between stimulation distance to evoked response indicated an underlying abnormality in N1 myelinated fibers at close stimulation distances. Collectively, our results indicate that subclinical blast exposure can result in persistent neurological changes in cerebral white matter occurring in parallel with detectable neurobehavioral deficits. PMID:23238347

Park, Eugene; Eisen, Rebecca; Kinio, Anna; Baker, Andrew J

2013-04-01

116

Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

2001-01-01

117

Test Results for Fmvss 110. Volume 2. 12 Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The following automobile and tire combinations were tested for compliance with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 110: Cougar A, Goodyear Wide Tread; Chevelle G, Uniroyal Laredo; Dodge Monaco, Goodyear Power Cushion; Pontiac Firebird 1, Goodyear Speedw...

1969-01-01

118

42 CFR 493.1281 - Standard: Comparison of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Standard: Comparison of test results. 493.1281 Section 493.1281 ...1281 Standard: Comparison of test results. (a) If a laboratory performs...and defines the relationship between test results using the different methodologies,...

2010-10-01

119

Simulation of blast-furnace raceway conditions in a wire-mesh reactor: interference by the reactions of molybdenum mesh and initial results  

SciTech Connect

A novel trapped air injection system has been built for a wire-mesh reactor to enable tests with short exposure times to air that are intended to simulate typical residence times in blast-furnace raceways. Initial tests have shown that the molybdenum wire-mesh sample-holder reacts with O{sub 2} under conditions intended for this work. By varying the proportions of solid MoO{sub 2} (weight gain), vapor phase oxides (weight loss) may form, depending on reaction conditions. Oxide formation pathways thus become relevant to coal weight loss determinations during experiments. If, in addition to solid MoO{sub 2} formation, significant formation of vapor phase oxides occurs, then the weight change is more complicated to understand and the impact on the O{sub 2} concentration cannot be unravelled. Furthermore, it turns out that O{sub 2}-scavenging by the mesh affects the amount of O{sub 2} that is available to react with the coal sample. It was concluded that it is only possible to conduct reliable tests under conditions which the favor the formation of solid MoO{sub 2} only, as this leads to a quantifiable weight gain. Its impact can then be accounted for in the evaluation of the experimental weight change. In the case of MoO{sub 2} formation, the impact of the mesh oxidation on the amount of O{sub 2} available to react with the sample can also be estimated. It has been found that the wire-mesh reactor, equipped with the trapped air injection system, can be used to obtain valid data at up to 1600{sup o} C and 0.5 MPa. This pressure is similar to that of the blast-furnace raceway, but the temperature is several hundred degrees lower. However, preliminary tests have shown that useful kinetic data on the extents of reaction can be obtained with the equipment, provided it is operated under conditions that minimize the formation of vapor phase Mo oxides. 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Long Wu; N. Paterson; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2006-12-15

120

Test beam results of ATLAS Pixel Sensors  

E-print Network

Silicon pixel detectors produced according to the ATLAS Pixel Detector design were tested in a beam at CERN in the framework of the ATLAS collaboration. The detectors used n+/n sensors with oxygenated silicon substrates. The experimental behaviour of the detectors after irradiation to 1.1 10**15 n_eq/cm**2 and 600 kGy is discussed. At the sensor bias voltage of 600 V the depleted depth is measured to be 229 um, the mean collected charge is 20000 electrons, the detection efficiency is 98.2% and the spatial resolution is 9.6 um

T. Lari

2002-10-18

121

Airlift recirculation well test results -- Southern sector  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated solvents used in the A and M-Areas at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from 1952--1982 have contaminated the groundwater under the site. A plume of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) in the Lost Lake aquifer is moving generally southward with the natural flow of groundwater. To comply with the requirements of the current SCDHEC Part B Permit, a series of wells is being installed to contain and treat the plume. Airlift Recirculation Wells (ARW) are a new and innovative technology with potential for more cost effective implementation than conventional pump and treat systems. Two Airlift Recirculation Wells have been installed and tested to quantify performance parameters needed to locate a line of these wells along the leading edge of the contaminant plume. The wells proved to be very sensitive to proper development, but after this requirement was met, performance was very good. The Zone of Capture has been estimated to be within a radius of 130--160 ft. around the wells. Thus a line of wells spaced at 250 ft. intervals could intercept the contaminant plume. At SSR-012, TCE was stripped from the groundwater at approximately 1.2 lb./day. The longer term effect of the recirculation wells upon the plume and the degree of recirculation within the aquifer itself will require additional data over a longer time period for an accurate review. Data collection is ongoing.

White, R.M.; Hiergesell, R.A.

1997-08-01

122

Test results of a prototype dielectric microcalorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The initial development work on a dielectric microcalorimeter is presented. It focuses on the dielectric properties of the ferroelectric material KTa(1-x)Nb(x)O3 (KTN). Measurements of the temperature dependent dielectric constant are given together with the first alpha particle detection results from a prototype composite microcalorimeter operating at 1.3 K. A nonthermal mechanism for detecting 6 MeV alpha particles in a monolithic KTN sample is also reported.

Pfafman, T. E.; Silver, E.; Labov, S.; Beeman, J.; Goulding, F.; Hansen, W.; Landis, D.; Madden, N.

1990-11-01

123

U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC's results of the TG-53 experiment and field test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Herein is described the U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC's purpose and series of activities conducted at the 2008 NATO SET-093 TG-53 experiment and field test. The overall purpose of the field test as stated by SET-093 panel was to provide a baseline test capable of providing relevant scenarios and data regarding a variety of impulsive generated acoustic events. As organized, the field experiment also allowed the room o study sensor interoperability across multiple platforms and multi-national users via the spider communication framework/reporting structure. This multinational network maintained by the host ETBS with a standardized messaging format with specific goals for each participating organization. ARDEC's role and purpose for the test was to provide situational awareness via the Spider and associated messaging format to the ETBS command center while continuing to gather unique acoustic data from various vantage points. ARDEC had several deliverables for the TG-53 field experiment derived from the mission and spirit of the field test. The most relevant deliverable was to demonstrate sensor interoperability via the Spider network and provide situational awareness by describing the said mortar/artillery events. The second purpose revolved around a relevant environment algorithm validation of the muzzle blast discrimination for future UGS transition in particular the UTAMS II. The algorithm validation information remained internal to the specific data acquisition system and not broadcasted out on the Spider network. The TG-53 field experiments provided the added opportunity to further test and refine the algorithm based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and multiresolution analysis. These techniques are used to classify and reliably discriminates between launch and impact artillery and/or mortar events via acoustic signals produced during detonation. Distinct characteristics are found within the acoustic signatures since impact events emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while launch events are similar to explosions, designed to expel and propel an artillery round from a gun. The ensuing signatures are readily characterized by variations in the corresponding peak pressure and rise time of the waveform, differences in the ratio of positive pressure amplitude to the negative amplitude, variations in the prominent frequencies associated with the blast events and variations in the overall duration of the resulting waveform. Unique attributes can also be identified that depend upon the properties of the gun tube, projectile speed at the muzzle, and the explosive/concussive properties associated with the events. The event allows the examination of particular extreme battlefield acoustic challenges not normally documented or readily studied. The final portion will focus on the unique acoustic signatures data collected and how it allowed very relevant situations to be tested in a variety of scenarios.

Desai, Sachi V.; Morcos, Amir

2009-05-01

124

12 CFR 252.147 - Reports of stress test results.  

... 2014-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.147 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.147 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

2014-01-01

125

12 CFR 252.147 - Reports of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.147 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.147 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

2013-01-01

126

12 CFR 325.207 - Publication of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Publication of stress test results. 325.207 Section 325.207...GENERAL POLICY CAPITAL MAINTENANCE Annual Stress Test § 325.207 Publication of stress test results. (a) Publication...

2013-01-01

127

12 CFR 252.148 - Disclosure of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Disclosure of stress test results. 252.148 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.148 Disclosure of stress test results. (a) Public...

2013-01-01

128

12 CFR 252.157 - Disclosure of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Disclosure of stress test results. 252.157 Section 252...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations...Companies § 252.157 Disclosure of stress test results. (a) Public...

2013-01-01

129

Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results  

E-print Network

1 Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run aah #12;2 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results ! Doc # 3308 v#3 by A. Ledovskoy " Using Data from 2004 Test Beam " Used "triplet" method for beam nominally perpendicular to Straw

130

LTC American`s, Inc. vacuum blasting machine: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise.

NONE

1997-07-31

131

49 CFR 236.110 - Results of tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Results of tests. 236.110 Section 236.110 Transportation...Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.110 Results of tests. (a) Results of tests made in compliance with §§...

2010-10-01

132

Response of Plate Structures to Close-Range Blast Loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 2008, the Department of Homeland Security has been investigating the failure patterns of thin aluminum structures from close-range blasts (<10in). In order to improve Finite Element models, a parametric study of various simulation techniques using LS-DYNA was done and the results compared to physical testing data from the Aberdeen Test Center. Variations included element sizes, use of solid versus

Benjamin Barkel; Benjamin Bjerke

2011-01-01

133

Initial test results with single cylinder rhombic drive Stirling engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief description is given of the GPU 3-2 hardware, the test methods used, and the result of these tests. Comparison is made to unpublished data from similar hydrogen tests performed by the U.S. Army.

Cairelli, J. E.

1978-01-01

134

13. BUILDING NO. 621, INTERIOR, TOP OF BLASTING TUB UNDERNEATH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. BUILDING NO. 621, INTERIOR, TOP OF BLASTING TUB UNDERNEATH SAWDUST HOPPER. BLASTING TUB HAS DOUBLE WALLS OF 3/4' THICK STEEL ARMOR PLATE. CHARGE TO BE TESTED IS BURIED IN SAWDUST WITH FLAME RESISTANT CHEMICALS. ELEVATOR BEHIND TUB CARRIES SAWDUST BACK TO TOP OF SAWDUST HOPPER AFTER TEST IS COMPLETED AND SAWDUST IN BLASTING TUB HAS BEEN SIFTED FOR SHELL FRAGMENTS. LOUVERS IN WALLS ARE HINGED FREELY SO THEY OPEN TO RELIEVE BLAST PRESSURE DURING A TEST. - Picatinny Arsenal, 600 Area, Test Areas District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

135

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity,

Frank A. Spane; Paul D. Thorne; Darrell R. Newcomer

2001-01-01

136

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - FY 1999\\/011  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity,

Frank A Spane; Paul D Thorne; Darrell R Newcomer

2001-01-01

137

Results of Ocular Dominance Testing Depend on Assessment Method  

PubMed Central

Purpose We developed a near ocular dominance test modeled after the distance hole-in-the card test, and assessed both test-retest reliability of four tests of ocular dominance and agreement between tests. Methods 46 subjects ages 18 to 78 years with visual acuity 20/40 or better in each eye were enrolled from a primary care practice. All subjects had normal eye examinations, with the exception of refractive error, and were examined in their habitual correction. Subjects were tested twice each with the distance hole-in-the-card test, new near hole- in-the-card test, near convergence test, and the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group (PEDIG) fixation preference test. Test-retest reliability and agreement between tests were evaluated with the Kappa statistic. Results There was substantial to almost perfect test-retest reliability for the distance hole-in-the-card test, new near hole-in-the-card test, convergence test, and PEDIG fixation preference test (Kappa, k=0.77, 0.62, 0.84, 0.77, respectively). In contrast, the agreement between the new near hole in the card test and the other three tests – distance hole in the card, near convergence, and PEDIG fixation preference– was moderate to slight (k=0.41, 0.19, 0.11, respectively). Agreement was moderate to fair (k=0.47, 0.32) between the distance hole in the card test and the near convergence test, and between the distance-hole-in-the-card test and the PEDIG fixation preference test. Agreement was fair (k=0.27) between the near convergence test and the PEDIG fixation preference test. Conclusions Although there was excellent test-retest reliability of each ocular dominance test, there was only moderate to slight agreement between tests. Results of ocular dominance tests seem to vary depending on both the testing distance and the specific activity performed as part of the testing procedure. PMID:18455935

Rice, Melissa L.; Leske, David A.; Smestad, Christina E.; Holmes, Jonathan M.

2008-01-01

138

Implementation of the exploding wire technique to study blast-wave-structure interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effort invested in improving our understanding of the physics of high-energy explosion events has been steadily increasing since the latter part of the twentieth century. Moreover, the dramatic increase in computer power over the last two decades has made the numerical simulation approach the dominant tool for investigating blast phenomena and their effects. However, field tests, on both large and small scales, are still in use. In the current paper, we present an experimental tool to better resolve and study the blast-structure interaction phenomenon and to help validate the numerical simulations of the same. The experimental tool uses an exploding wire technique to generate small-scale cylindrical and spherical blast waves. This approach permits safe operation, high repeatability, and the use of advanced diagnostic systems. The system was calibrated using an analytical model, an empirical model, and numerical simulation. To insure that spherical blast geometry was achieved, a set of free air blast experiments was done in which high-speed photography was used to monitor the blast structure. A scenario in which an explosion occurred in the vicinity of a structure demonstrated the system's capabilities. Using this simple but not trivial configuration showed unequivocally the effectiveness of this tool. From this comparison, it was found that at early times of blast-structure interaction, the agreement between the two sets of results was very good, but at later times incongruences appeared. Effort has been made to interpret this observation. Furthermore, by using similitude analysis, the results obtained from the small-scale experiments can be applied to the full-scale problem. We have shown that an exploding wire system offers an inexpensive, safe, easy to operate, and effective tool for studying phenomena related to blast-wave-structure interactions.

Ram, O.; Sadot, O.

2012-11-01

139

Structural blast design  

E-print Network

Blast design is a necessary part of design for more buildings in the United States. Blast design is no longer limited to underground shelters and sensitive military sites, buildings used by the general public daily must ...

Kieval, Tamar S. (Tamar Shoshana), 1980-

2004-01-01

140

49 CFR 229.313 - Product testing results and records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics § 229.313 Product testing results and records. (a) Results of product testing conducted by a...

2012-10-01

141

49 CFR 229.313 - Product testing results and records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics § 229.313 Product testing results and records. (a) Results of product testing conducted by a...

2013-10-01

142

Color changing photonic crystals detect blast exposure  

PubMed Central

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is the “signature wound” of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, with no objective information of relative blast exposure, warfighters with bTBI may not receive appropriate medical care and are at risk of being returned to the battlefield. Accordingly, we have created a colorimetric blast injury dosimeter (BID) that exploits material failure of photonic crystals to detect blast exposure. Appearing like a colored sticker, the BID is fabricated in photosensitive polymers via multi-beam interference lithography. Although very stable in the presence of heat, cold or physical impact, sculpted micro- and nano-structures of the BID are physically altered in a precise manner by blast exposure, resulting in color changes that correspond with blast intensity. This approach offers a lightweight, power-free sensor that can be readily interpreted by the naked eye. Importantly, with future refinement this technology may be deployed to identify soldiers exposed to blast at levels suggested to be supra-threshold for non-impact blast-induced mild TBI. PMID:21040795

Cullen, D. Kacy; Xu, Yongan; Reneer, Dexter V.; Browne, Kevin D.; Geddes, James W.; Yang, Shu; Smith, Douglas H.

2010-01-01

143

Study of blast event propagation in different media using a novel ultrafast miniature optical pressure sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI, also called intracranial injury) is a high potential threat to our soldiers. A helmet structural health monitoring system can be effectively used to study the effects of ballistic/blast events on the helmet and human skull to prevent soldiers from TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges lies in that the pressure sensor installed inside the helmet system must be fast enough to capture the blast wave during the transient period. In this paper, an ultrafast optical fiber sensor is presented to measure the blast signal. The sensor is based on a Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometeric principle. An FP cavity is built between the endface of an etched optical fiber tip and the silica thin diaphragm attached on the end of a multimode optical fiber. The sensor is small enough to be installed in different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. Several groups of tests regarding multi-layer blast events were conducted to evaluate the sensors' performance. The sensors were mounted in different segments of a shock tube side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increasing pressure. The segments of the shock tube were filled with different media. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors. In addition, the home-made shock tube could provide a good resource to study the propagation of blast event in different media.

Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Hongtao; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

2011-06-01

144

Mathematics Placement Test: Typical Results with Unexpected Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the results of a prior case-study analysis of mathematics placement at one university, the mathematics department developed and piloted a mathematics placement test. This article describes the implementation process for a mathematics placement test and further analyzes the test results for the pilot group. As an unexpected result, the…

Ingalls, Victoria

2011-01-01

145

40 CFR 204.57-5 - Reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Reporting of test results. 204.57-5 Section 204.57-5...Compressors § 204.57-5 Reporting of test results. (a)(1) The manufacturer shall...Compressor serial number. (iv) Test results by serial numbers (3) The...

2010-07-01

146

L1B test results Jos de Kloe,  

E-print Network

ADM-Aeolus L1B test results Jos de Kloe, L1B PM16 10-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

Stoffelen, Ad

147

L2B test results Jos de Kloe,  

E-print Network

ADM-Aeolus L2B test results Jos de Kloe, L2B PM15 11-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

Stoffelen, Ad

148

Autogenous shrinkage of concrete containing granulated blast-furnace slag  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the experimental results and prediction model for the autogenous shrinkage of concrete made with various water-to-cementitious materials ratios (w\\/cm) ranging from 0.27 to 0.42 and granulated blast-furnace slag (BFS) in the range of 0% to 50% by mass of the total cementitious materials. Test results showed that BFS concrete exhibited greater autogenous shrinkage than ordinary concrete with

K. M. Lee; H. K. Lee; S. H. Lee; G. Y. Kim

2006-01-01

149

GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe Life Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was built as a life test unit for the loop heat pipes on the GOES N-Q series satellites. This propylene LHP was built by Dynatherm Corporation in 2000 and tested continuously for approximately 14 months. It was then put into storage for 3 years. Following the storage period, the LHP was tested at Swales Aerospace to verify that the loop performance hadn t changed. Most test results were consistent with earlier results. At the conclusion of testing at Swales, the LHP was transferred to NASA/GSFC for continued periodic testing. The LHP has been set up for testing in the Thermal Lab at GSFC since 2006. A group of tests consisting of start-ups, power cycles, and a heat transport limit test have been performed every six to nine months since March 2006. Tests results have shown no change in the loop performance over the five years of testing. This presentation will discuss the test hardware, test set-up, and tests performed. Test results to be presented include sample plots from individual tests, along with conductance measurements for all tests performed.

Ottenstein, Laura

2011-01-01

150

Simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.  

SciTech Connect

U.S. soldiers are surviving blast and impacts due to effective body armor, trauma evacuation and care. Blast injuries are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military personnel returning from combat. Understanding of Primary Blast Injury may be needed to develop better means of blast mitigation strategies. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of blast direction and strength on the resulting mechanical stress and wave energy distributions generated in the brain.

Taylor, Paul Allen; Ford, Corey C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-01

151

TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS  

E-print Network

TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS Gregor v. BOCHMANN and Omar B. BELLAL Université de Montréal Montréal, Canada Abstract: There are two aspects to testing: (1) the selection of appropriate test inputs and (2) the analysis of the observed interactions of the implementation under test

von Bochmann, Gregor

152

Effects of Testing Conditions on Conceptual Survey Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pre-testing and post-testing is a commonly used method in Physics Education Research to assess student learning gains. It is well recognized in the community that timings and incentives in delivering conceptual tests can impact test results. However, it is difficult to control these variables across different studies. As a common practice, a…

Ding, Lin; Reay, Neville W.; Lee, Albert; Bao, Lei

2008-01-01

153

Rock blasting environmental impacts  

SciTech Connect

The rock blasting environmental impacts such as: flyrock, ground vibrations, air-blast, and/or noise, dust and fumes are identified and mentioned. Some comments on the correction factors that might be taken into consideration to calculate the initial velocity and the maximum projection of the rock fragments are mentioned as well. The blast fumes causes, its alleviation and protective measures are identified, described and discussed. To mitigate, minimize and/or avoid blast fumes, the AN/FO, Al/AN/FO and S/AN/FO dry blasting agents optimum equations are developed, discussed and recommended.

Agreda, C. [Peruvian Mining Research Co., Lima (Peru)

1995-12-31

154

Modern BLAST Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is arguably the most widely used program in bioinformatics. By sacrificing sensitivity for speed, it makes sequence comparison practical on huge sequence databases currently available. The original version of BLAST was developed in 1990. Since then it has spawned a variant of specialized programs. This chapter surveys the development of BLAST and BLAST-like programs for homology search, discusses alignment statistics that are used in assessment of reported matches in BLAST, and provides the reader with guidance to select appropriate programs and set proper parameters to match research requirements.

Ma, Jian; Zhang, Louxin

155

12 CFR 252.156 - Reports of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.156 Section 252...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations...Covered Companies § 252.156 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

2013-01-01

156

Results of recent KROTOS FCI tests: alumina versus corium melts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent results from KROTOS fuel-coolant interaction experiments are discussed. Five tests with alumina were performed under highly subcooled conditions, all of these tests resulted in spontaneous steam explosions. Additionally, four tests were performed at low subcooling to confirm, on one hand, the suppression of spontaneous steam explosions under such conditions and, on the other hand, that such a system is

I Huhtiniemi; D Magallon; H Hohmann

1999-01-01

157

A miniature pressure sensor for blast event evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to people who deal with explosive devices. Protection from TBI has attracted more and more interest. Great efforts have been taken to the studies on the understanding of the propagation of the blast events and its effect on TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges is that the current available pressure sensors are not fast enough to capture the blast wave especially the transient period. This paper reports an ultrafast pressure sensor that could be very useful for analysis of the fast changing blast signal. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. It uses a 45º angle polished fiber sitting in a V-groove on a silicon chip. The endface of the angle polished fiber and the diaphragm which is lifted off on the side wall of the V-groove form the FP cavity. The sensor is very small and can be mounted on different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. The tests were conducted at Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) in Natick, MA. The sensors were mounted in a shock tube, side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increased pressure. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors and their response time is comparable.

Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

2011-06-01

158

Investigation of atmospheric blasts by fast radiometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blasts and detonations release large amount of energy in short time duration. Some of this energy is released through radiation in the whole optical spectrum. Measurement of this radiation may serve as a base for investigation of the blast phenomena. A fast multispectral radiometer that operates in proper chosen spectral bands provides extensive information on the physical processes that govern the blast. This information includes the time dependence of the temperature, area of the blast as-well-as of the aerosols and gases that are generated. Analysis of this data indicates the order of the detonation and provides good estimation on the masses and types of the high-explosives (HE) materials and their casing. This paper presents the methodology and instrumentation of fast multispectral radiometry in application to the blast measurement and analysis in a Near-ground Explosion Test (NET). In NET, the flash radiation of the blast was measured for two HE materials: TNT and composition B (CB). The investigation includes charges of different masses (0.25 - 20.0 kg) and of various casing materials (steel, Al, PVC), thickness (2 - 6 mm) and various casing type (open on both face ends and hermetically closed). Analysis of the data demonstrates the power of fast radiometry methodology and reveals the governing characteristics of atmospheric blasts.

Ben-Dov, R.; Bushlin, Y.; Devir, A. D.; Lessin, A. B.; Mendelewicz, I.; Shvebelman, M.

2014-06-01

159

Test results of the DOE/Sandia 17 meter VAWT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review is given of the test program of a 17 meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine VAWT. Performance test results are discussed including difficulties encountered during the VAWT operation along with ways of solving these problems.

Nellums, R. O.; Worstell, M. H.

1979-01-01

160

Single event effect test results for candidate spacecraft electronics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present both heavy ion and proton single event effect (SEE) ground test results for candidate spacecraft electronics. A variety of digital, analog, and fiber optic devices were tested, including DRAMs, FPGAs and fiber links

Kenneth A. Label; Amy K. Moran; Christina M. Seidleck; E. G. Stassinopoulos; J. M. Barth; P. Marshall; M. Carts; C. Marshall; J. Kinnison; B. Carkhuff

1997-01-01

161

Current single event effect test results for candidate spacecraft electronics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present both proton and heavy ion single event effect (SEE) ground test results for candidate spacecraft electronics. A variety of digital and analog devices were tested, including EEPROMs, DRAMs, and DC-DC converters

Kenneth A. LaBel; Amy K. Moran; Donald K. Hawkins; Anthony B. Sanders; Christina M. Seidleck; Hak S. Kim; James E. Forney; E. G. Stassinopoulos; Paul Marshall; Cheryl Dale; J. Kinnison; B. Carkhuff

1996-01-01

162

49 CFR 199.229 - Reporting of alcohol testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reporting of alcohol testing results. 199.229 Section 199.229...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.229...

2013-10-01

163

49 CFR 199.229 - Reporting of alcohol testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reporting of alcohol testing results. 199.229 Section 199.229...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.229...

2012-10-01

164

Effects of testing conditions on conceptual survey results  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Pre-testing and post-testing is a commonly used method in Physics Education Research to assess student learning gains. It is well recognized in the community that timings and incentives in delivering conceptual tests can impact test results. However, it is difficult to control these variables across different studies. As a common practice, a pre-test is often administered either at or near the beginning of a course, while a post-test can be given either at or near the end of a course. Also, in conducting such tests there often is no norm as to whether incentives should be offered to students. Because these variations can significantly affect test results, it is important to study and document their impact. We analyzed five years of data that were collected at The Ohio State University from over 2100 students, who took both the pre-test and post-test of the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism under various timings and incentives. We observed that the actual time frame for giving a test has a marked effect on the test results and that incentive granting also has a significant influence on test outcomes. These results suggest that one should carefully monitor and document the conditions under which tests are administered.

Ding, Lin; Reay, Neville W.; Lee, Albert; Bao, Lei

2008-09-22

165

Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem drop test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An air drop test program was conducted as part of the development of a decelerator subsystem for recovering the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. This development test program consisted of six drops performed over the period from June 1977 to September 1978 at a parachute test center in California. The testing concerned a 48,000-lb drop test vehicle released from the B-52 mothership. The drop test program is described and pertinent test results are discussed. Data include snatch loads, inflation characteristics, peak inflation and disreef loads, and drag performance. Performance characteristics of the drogue parachute and the main parachute are established.

Moog, R. D.; Sheppard, J. D.; Kross, D. A.

1979-01-01

166

7 CFR 91.24 - Reports of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports of test results. 91.24 Section 91.24 Agriculture Regulations...INFORMATION Reporting § 91.24 Reports of test results. (a) Results of analyses are provided, in writing, by...

2010-01-01

167

Impact of receiving blood cholesterol test results on dietary change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: The study objective was to determine the impact of receivin results of a blood cholesterol test on changes in dietary behaviors among individuals participating in a Health Risk Appraisal Program.Methods: This randomized trial of maintenance employees at six hospitals included two groups: Group 1 received their blood cholesterol test results at the pretest; Group 2 received results only at

Irene M. Strychar; François Champagne; Parviz Ghadirian; André Bonin; Milos Jenicek; Thomas M. Lasater

1998-01-01

168

Test Results for Entry Guidance Methods for Space Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are a number of approaches to advanced guidance and control that have the potential for achieving the goals of significantly increasing reusable launch vehicle (or any space vehicle that enters an atmosphere) safety and reliability, and reducing the cost. This paper examines some approaches to entry guidance. An effort called Integration and Testing of Advanced Guidance and Control Technologies has recently completed a rigorous testing phase where these algorithms faced high-fidelity vehicle models and were required to perform a variety of representative tests. The algorithm developers spent substantial effort improving the algorithm performance in the testing. This paper lists the test cases used to demonstrate that the desired results are achieved, shows an automated test scoring method that greatly reduces the evaluation effort required, and displays results of the tests. Results show a significant improvement over previous guidance approaches. The two best-scoring algorithm approaches show roughly equivalent results and are ready to be applied to future vehicle concepts.

Hanson, John M.; Jones, Robert E.

2004-01-01

169

The Next Generation BLAST Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was a suborbital experiment designed to map magnetic fields in order to study their role in star formation processes. BLASTPol made detailed polarization maps of a number of molecular clouds during its successful flights from Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. We present the next-generation BLASTPol instrument (BLAST-TNG) that will build off the success of the previous experiment and continue its role as a unique instrument and a test bed for new technologies. With a 16-fold increase in mapping speed, BLAST-TNG will make larger and deeper maps. Major improvements include a 2.5-m carbon fiber mirror that is 40% wider than the BLASTPol mirror and 3000 polarization sensitive detectors. BLAST-TNG will observe in three bands at 250, 350, and 500 ?m. The telescope will serve as a pathfinder project for microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) technology, as applied to feedhorn-coupled submillimeter detector arrays. The liquid helium cooled cryostat will have a 28-day hold time and will utilize a closed-cycle 3He refrigerator to cool the detector arrays to 270 mK. This will enable a detailed mapping of more targets with higher polarization resolution than any other submillimeter experiment to date. BLAST-TNG will also be the first balloon-borne telescope to offer shared risk observing time to the community. This paper outlines the motivation for the project and the instrumental design.

Galitzki, Nicholas; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Beall, James A.; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J.; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Klein, Jeffrey; van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P.; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G.; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P.; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel N.; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

170

A GP's duty to follow up test results.  

PubMed

Medical negligence claims alleging 'failure to diagnose' are a common cause of claims against general practitioners. In these claims there is often an underlying weakness in the GP's test result and patient tracking systems. This article discusses the duty of care of a GP to follow up patients and their test results. Guidance is provided on how to establish an effective test result tracking system in order to minimise the possibility of a claim arising from 'failure to diagnose'. PMID:12647659

Bird, Sara

2003-01-01

171

Preliminary test results of prototype urban maglev train  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Urban Maglev Program is a unique type of R&D project in the sense that it is a combination of R&D project and construction project. The prototype maglev vehicles of commercialization model were built and have been under various tests on the test track. The preliminary test results of the maglev vehicles show that the performances including powering and braking,

Byung Chun Shin

2010-01-01

172

Flight Test Results for a Turbulence Detection Radar  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of flight tests conducted on an aircraft turbulence detection radar system. Topics covered include: flight operations summary, radar data collection, baseline algorithm methodology, radar hazard tables and proposed alert criteria. Flight tests results are presented and summarized. Data analysis from these flight tests are also included.

Schaffner, Phil

2003-01-01

173

Results of high performance conductively coupled thermoelectric cell life tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents results of life tests of four conductively coupled thermoelectric cells. Two are on test at Lockheed Martin Astro Space and two at JPL. These cells were assembled in the summer of 1994 with modifications of the engineering cell design and fabrication processes aimed at extending life, improving performance and reducing costs. Testing commenced in September 1994. A

C. Edward Kelly; Paul M. Klee

1996-01-01

174

TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS  

EPA Science Inventory

Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

175

MSFC/Ball Space-Act Test Results of SBMD  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of two cryo tests of the SBMD that were funded by Ball Aerospace through a Space-Act Agreement with MSFC will be discussed. These tests followed the formal completion of the SBMD program. The PhaseCam interferometer, rather than the Wavescope Shack-Hartmann sensor, was used during these tests.

Hadaway, James; Brown, Bob; Eng, Ron; Stahl, Phil

2002-01-01

176

Porcine head response to blast  

E-print Network

Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational ...

Nyein, Michelle K.

177

Blast Effects of Twin Variable-Cant Rocket Nozzles on Visibility During Landing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Blast Effects of Twin Variable-Cant Rocket Nozzles on Visibility During Landing on a Particle-Covered Surface. A limited investigation has been conducted to determine the jet-blast effect of twin variable-cant supersonic nozzles. These tests were made to examine the result of using canted main rocket engines to sweep the blast debris outward from the proposed landing area of a rocket-powered vehicle making a vertical approach to a touchdown. Cant angles from 0 degrees to 75 degrees, at intervals of 15 degrees, were tested at low ambient pressure and at atmospheric ambient pressure. Nozzle chamber pressures used were 400 psi and 2000 psi. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030964. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

1964-01-01

178

2006 Toyota Highlander-5681 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A860005681). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

179

2006 Toyota Highlander-6395 Hyrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A160006395). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

180

2007 Toyota Camry-7129 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K773007129). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

181

2007 Nissan Altima-7982 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number 1N4CL21E27C177982). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Grey; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

182

A novel closed-head model of mild traumatic brain injury caused by primary overpressure blast to the cranium produces sustained emotional deficits in mice.  

PubMed

Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month-old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25-40?psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50-60?psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2-8?weeks after blast, 50-60?psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, but did observe scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50 to 60?psi mice 3-8?weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50-60?psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to "diffuse" axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI. PMID:24478749

Heldt, Scott A; Elberger, Andrea J; Deng, Yunping; Guley, Natalie H; Del Mar, Nobel; Rogers, Joshua; Choi, Gy Won; Ferrell, Jessica; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

2014-01-01

183

Correlating Flammability of Materials with FTIR Analysis Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this experiment was to correlate flammability data with FTIR test results. Kydex 100 is a blend of chlorinated polyvinyl chloride and polymethylmethacrylate, with some filler materials. Samples supplied were 0.125 in. thick. 10 samples were taken from a sheet of Kydex and analyzed for flammability and by FTIR spectroscopy. This material was utilized as a round robin sample for flammability testing. The flammability test results were found to vary across the same sheet.

Moore, Robin; Whitfield, Steve

2003-01-01

184

Comparing teachers’ assessments and national test results – evidence from Sweden  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares results on national tests with teachers’ assessment of student performance, by using Swedish data of grade 9 students (16 years old). I examine whether there are systematic differences correlated with gender and ethnic background. That is, if the relationship between school leaving certificates and national test results differs between girls and boys or between natives and non-natives.

Erica Lindahl

2007-01-01

185

Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs.  

PubMed Central

The BLAST programs are widely used tools for searching protein and DNA databases for sequence similarities. For protein comparisons, a variety of definitional, algorithmic and statistical refinements described here permits the execution time of the BLAST programs to be decreased substantially while enhancing their sensitivity to weak similarities. A new criterion for triggering the extension of word hits, combined with a new heuristic for generating gapped alignments, yields a gapped BLAST program that runs at approximately three times the speed of the original. In addition, a method is introduced for automatically combining statistically significant alignments produced by BLAST into a position-specific score matrix, and searching the database using this matrix. The resulting Position-Specific Iterated BLAST (PSI-BLAST) program runs at approximately the same speed per iteration as gapped BLAST, but in many cases is much more sensitive to weak but biologically relevant sequence similarities. PSI-BLAST is used to uncover several new and interesting members of the BRCT superfamily. PMID:9254694

Altschul, S F; Madden, T L; Schaffer, A A; Zhang, J; Zhang, Z; Miller, W; Lipman, D J

1997-01-01

186

The Dornier 328 Acoustic Test Cell (ATC) for interior noise tests and selected test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To perform acoustic studies for achieving low noise levels for the Dornier 328, an acoustic test cell (ATC) of the Dornier 328 has been built. The ATC consists of a fuselage section, a realistic fuselage suspension system, and three exterior noise simulation rings. A complex digital 60 channel computer/amplifier noise generation system as well as multichannel digital data acquisition and evaluation system have been used. The noise control tests started with vibration measurements for supporting acoustic data interpretation. In addition, experiments have been carried out on dynamic vibration absorbers, the most important passive noise reduction measure for low frequency propeller noise. The design and arrangement of the current ATC are presented. Furthermore, exterior noise simulation as well as data acquisition are explained. The most promising results show noise reduction due to synchrophasing and dynamic vibration absorbers.

Hackstein, H. Josef; Borchers, Ingo U.; Renger, Klaus; Vogt, Konrad

1992-01-01

187

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-01-19

188

[Results of testing defibrillator function of implanted cardioverter/defibrillators].  

PubMed

Postoperative tests of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are routinely performed to ensure appropriate defibrillation by the device. However, efficacy and complications of this procedure are unknown. To scrutinize the currently accepted indications to test the defibrillation function of the ICD we retrospectively analyzed 844 ICD-tests in 439 ICD-systems and 409 patients. 755 ICD-tests (89.4%) were routinely performed (57% before discharge and 43% during follow-up); 58 tests (6.9%) were performed after a change of the antiarrhythmic drug regimen, 24 tests (2.9%) after a revision of a part of the ICD-system, and seven tests (0.8%) because of a suspected dysfunction of the ICD. During routine-tests six ICD-systems (0.8%) failed to defibrillate the patient. However, in all but one test abnormalities of the ICD-system had been observed before the test. After addition of antiarrhythmic drugs, three of 58 ICD-systems (5.2%) failed to defibrillate the patient during the test (amiodarone: n = 2, flecainide: n = 1). Four of seven ICD-systems (57%) tested due to a suspected dysfunction failed to defibrillate the patient. After revisions of parts of the ICD-systems, ICD-tests never revealed a failure of defibrillation. During 16 ICD-tests (1.9%) complications occurred. The most frequent complications was inappropriate shocks (n = 10; 1.2%), the most severe one (transient) neurologic symptoms (n = 4; 0.48%). Our experience demonstrates that postoperative tests of the defibrillation function of ICDs rarely reveal ICD-dysfunction. As testing is unpleasant for the patient and not free of complications, tests might be restricted to those patients in whom an ICD-dysfunction is suspected (based on clinical presentation, results of chest-x-ray, testing of sensing signal and stimulation threshold) or class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs have been added to the antiarrhythmic drug regimen. PMID:9324876

Brunn, J; Block, M; Weber, M; Bänsch, D; Seifert, T; Castrucci, M; Isbruch, F; Böcker, D; Breithardt, G

1997-06-01

189

Environmental testing results over a tracker drive train  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental testing following the draft of the IEC62817 standard has been carried out at ISFOC using a Soitec Solar tracker drive. The objective of this work is twofold; first to assure that the tracker design can perform under varying conditions and survive under extreme conditions and secondly to test the viability and usefulness of the tests described in the standard. After some changes in the device under test (specifically, gear-box oil) the drive system produced satisfactory results, assuring its performance under operational temperatures. Therefore, this work has demonstrated that the tests described in the standard are useful for detecting early failures.

Martínez, María; Calvo-Parra, Gustavo; Gil, Eduardo; de la Rubia, Oscar; Hillebrand, Mario; Rubio, Francisca; Aipperspach, Wolfgang; Gombert, Andreas

2014-09-01

190

NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation consists of viewgraph which review the test program and the results of the tests for the Gas Generator (GG) component for the Fastrac Engine. Included are pictures of the Fastrac (MC-1) Engine and the GG, diagrams of the flight configuration, and schematics of the LOX, and the RP-1 systems and the injector assembly. The normal operating parameters are reviewed, as are the test instrumentation. Also shown are graphs of the hot gas temperature, and the test temperature profiles. The results are summarized.

Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, Tim; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

191

Directed Relativistic Blast Wave  

E-print Network

A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

Andrei Gruzinov

2007-04-23

192

Turbine Air-Flow Test Rig CFD Results for Test Matrix  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the Turbine Air-Flow Test (TAFT) rig computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results for test matrix. The topics include: 1) TAFT Background; 2) Design Point CFD; 3) TAFT Test Plan and Test Matrix; and 4) CFD of Test Points. This paper is in viewgraph form.

Wilson, Josh

2003-01-01

193

Strengthening effects of finely ground fly ash, granulated blast furnace slag, and their combination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of finely ground fly ash (FGFA), finely ground granulated blast furnace slag (FGGBS), and their combination on the compressive strength of concrete was studied. Test results showed that incorporating 20% FGFA or FGGBS can significantly increase the compressive strength of concrete after 3 days. The compressive strength of concrete incorporating the combination of FGFA and FGGBS is higher

Kefeng Tan; Xincheng Pu

1998-01-01

194

Strength and pore structure of ternary blended cement mortars containing blast furnace slag and silica fume  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blended cement mortars with fixed workability and incorporating blast furnace slag and silica fume, were tested for compressive strength and mercury intrusion, with a view to comparing their performance with that of plain Portland cement mortar and\\/or slag-cement mortar. The obtained results showed that with high portions of slag and silica fume in the binding system, the mortars reached relatively

L. Bágel

1998-01-01

195

Failure Predictions of a Clamped Plate Under Close-in Blast Loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this project was to create an effective computer simulation that predicts the response of a thin clamped plate to close range explosive blast loading. In this study, the response of two models created with the commercial software program LS-Dyna were compared to actual results from physical testing. The first model used a Lagrangian model for the structure

Brigid Toner

2012-01-01

196

Effects of scale on internal blast measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a comparative study between large and small-scale internal blast experiments with the goal of using the small-scale analog for energetic performance evaluation. In the small-scale experiment, highly confined explosive samples <0.5 g were subjected to the output from a PETN detonator while enclosed in a 3-liter chamber. Large-scale tests up to 23 kg were unconfined and released in a chamber with a factor of 60,000 increase in volume. The comparative metric in these experiments is peak quasi-static overpressure, with the explosive sample expressed as sample energy/chamber volume, which normalizes measured pressures across scale. Small-scale measured pressures were always lower than the large-scale measurements, because of heat-loss to the high confinement inherent in the small-scale apparatus. This heat-loss can be quantified and used to correct the small-scale pressure measurements. In some cases the heat-loss was large enough to quench reaction of lower energy samples. These results suggest that small-scale internal blast tests do correlate with their large-scale counterparts, provided that heat-loss to confinement can be measured, and that less reactive or lower energy samples are not quenched by heat-loss.

Granholm, R.; Sandusky, H.; Lee, R.

2014-05-01

197

Impact on HIV test providers of giving a positive test result  

Microsoft Academic Search

The provision of a positive HIV antibody test result and the direction and support given to the test recipient are critical components of care and prevention. There has been little research that describes what happens in such interactions between recipient and provider. The impact on the test provider of delivering the HIV test result is an important issue to consider.

Ted Myers; Catherine Worthington; Jeffrey P. Aguinaldo; Dennis J. Haubrich; Karen Ryder; Brian Rawson

2007-01-01

198

Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings  

SciTech Connect

The paper reports on several years of mechanical testing of thermal barrier coatings. The test results were generated to support the development of durability models for the coatings in heat engine applications. The test data that are reviewed include modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data. The test methods and results are discussed, along with the significant difficulties inherent in mechanical testing of thermal barrier coating materials. The materials include 7 percent wt. and 8 percent wt. yttria, partially stabilized zirconia as well as a cermet material. Both low pressure plasma spray and electron-beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

Cruse, T.A.; Johnsen, B.P.; Nagy, A.

1995-10-01

199

Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper reports on several years of mechanical testing of thermal barrier coatings. The test results were generated to support the development of durability models for the coatings in heat engine applications. The test data that are reviewed include modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data. The test methods and results are discussed, along with the significant difficulties inherent in mechanical testing of thermal barrier coating materials. The materials include 7 percent wt. and 8 percent wt. yttria, partially stabilized zirconia as well as a cermet material. Both low pressure plasma spray and electron-beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

Cruse, Thomas A.; Johnsen, B. P.; Nagy, Andrew

1995-01-01

200

Physical and chemical test results of electrostatic safe flooring materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This test program was initiated because a need existed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to have this information readily available to the engineer who must make the choice of which electrostatic safe floor to use in a specific application. The information, however, should be of value throughout both the government and private industry in the selection of a floor covering material. Included are the test results of 18 floor covering materials which by test evaluation at KSC are considered electrostatically safe. Tests were done and/or the data compiled in the following areas: electrostatics, flammability, hypergolic compatibility, outgassing, floor type, material thickness, and available colors. Each section contains the test method used to gather the data and the test results.

Gompf, R. H.

1988-04-01

201

A Comparison Between The NORCAT Rover Test Results and the ISRU Excavation System Model Predictions Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Excavation System Model has been written to simulate the collection and transportation of regolith on the moon. The calculations in this model include an estimation of the forces on the digging tool as a result of excavation into the regolith. Verification testing has been performed and the forces recorded from this testing were compared to the calculated theoretical data. The Northern Centre for Advanced Technology Inc. rovers were tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Simulated Lunar Operations facility. This testing was in support of the In-Situ Resource Utilization program Innovative Partnership Program. Testing occurred in soils developed at the Glenn Research Center which are a mixture of different types of sands and whose soil properties have been well characterized. This testing is part of an ongoing correlation of actual field test data to the blade forces calculated by the Excavation System Model. The results from this series of tests compared reasonably with the predicted values from the code.

Gallo, Christopher A.; Agui, Juan H.; Creager, Colin M.; Oravec, Heather A.

2012-01-01

202

2007 Toyota Camry-6330 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K673006330). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct AVTA for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

203

2007 Nissan Altima-2351 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and the battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima HEV, number 2351 (VIN 1N4CL21E87C172351). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec). The Idaho National Laboratory and eTec conduct the AVTA for DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

204

Rotor systems research aircraft airplane configuration flight-test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) has been undergoing ground and flight tests by Ames Research Center since late 1979, primarily as a compound aircraft. The purpose was to train pilots and to check out and develop the design flight envelope established by the Sikorsky Aircraft Company. This paper reviews the preparation and flight test of the RSRA in the airplane, or fixed-wing, configuration and discusses the results of that test.

Painter, W. D.; Erickson, R. E.

1984-01-01

205

Development and Results of a First Generation Least Expensive Approach to Fission: Module Tests and Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on the Module Unfueled Thermal-hydraulic Test (MUTT) article has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper discusses the results of these experiments and identifies future tests to be performed.

Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Tom; Pederson, Kevin; Sena, J. Tom; VanDyke, Melissa; Dickens, Ricky; Reid, Bob J.; Martin, Jim

2000-01-01

206

A Retrospective View on Children Turing Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a research work on children Turing test (CTT). The main difference between our test program and other ones is its knowledge-based character, which is supported by a massive commonsense knowledge base. The motivation, design, techniques, experimental results and platform (including a knowledge engine and a conversation engine) of the CTT are described in this paper. Finally, some

LU Ru-Qian; ZHANG Song-Mao

2004-01-01

207

EVALUATION OF THE EFFICIENCY OF INDUSTRIAL FLARES: TEST RESULTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of Phases 3 and 4 of a four-phase research program to quantify emissions from, and efficiencies of, industrial flares. Phase 1 consisted of the experimental design; Phase 2, the design of the test facilities; Phase 3, development of the test facilities; a...

208

Results of an integrated water recovery system test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of an integrated advanced water recovery system test are presented. The test evaluated the ability of the system to recover potable water from human generated wastewater. Primary processing was performed by a biological water processor (BWP), which included microbial organic carbon oxidation and nitrification. The majority of inorganic contaminant removal was accomplished with reverse osmosis (RO). Water from

K. Pickering; G. Pariani; M. Campbell; B. Finger; C. Verostko; K. Wines

2002-01-01

209

Interpreting fatigue test results using a probabilistic fracture approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The foundation for the structural airworthiness of many military aircraft is an airframe fatigue test conducted using representative loading. Traditionally, the results from the fatigue test are scaled by empirical scatter factors to derive a safe economic life of the airframe aligned to an acceptable probability of structural failure. This paper illustrates a relatively novel approach to the estimation of

Paul White; Loris Molent; Simon Barter

2005-01-01

210

NICMOS SAA Contour Test: Results from SMOV data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Instrument Science Report presents the results of the analysis of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) contour test executed in June 1997 during SMOV. The goal of the test is to determine the optimal SAA limits for the NICMOS detectors operations, and the orbital radiation effects on the NICMOS dark current during passages and when coming out of the SAA.

Doris Daou; Daniela Calzetti

1997-01-01

211

RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results  

SciTech Connect

Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted.

Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M. [Lockheed Martin Corporation P.O. Box 8555, 29B41-KB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

1997-01-10

212

RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results  

SciTech Connect

Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M. [Lockheed Martin Corporation P.O. Box 8555, 29B41-KB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania19101 (United States)

1997-01-01

213

Documenting and Explaining Major Field Test Results among Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors investigated the results of the Educational Testing Service Major Field Test (ETS-MFT) administered to business majors at a U.S. state university. Longitudinal trends and cross-sectional differences are documented, including significant performance differences among students of different majors. Findings suggest that a cohort affect…

Contreras, Salvador; Badua, Frank; Chen, Jiun Shiu; Adrian, Mitchell

2011-01-01

214

B-52B/DTV (Drop Test Vehicle) flight test results: Drop test missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA test airplane, B-52B-008, was a carrier for drop tests of the shuttle booster recovery parachute system. The purpose of the test support by Boeing was to monitor the vertical loads on the pylon hooks. The hooks hold the Drop Test Vehicle to the B-52 pylon during drop test missions. The loads were monitored to assure the successful completion of the flight and the safety of the crew.

Doty, L. J.

1985-01-01

215

Structural fatigue test results for large wind turbine blade sections  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to provide quantitative information on the operating life capabilities of wind turbine rotor blade concepts for root-end load transfer, a series of cantilever beam fatigue tests was conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted on a laminated wood blade with bonded steel studs, a low cost steel spar (utility pole) with a welded flange, a utility pole with additional root-end thickness provided by a swaged collar, fiberglass spars with both bonded and nonbonded fittings, and, finally, an aluminum blade with a bolted steel fitting (Lockheed Mod-0 blade). Photographs, data, and conclusions for each of these tests are presented. In addition, the aluminum blade test results are compared to field failure information; these results provide evidence that the cantilever beam type of fatigue test is a satisfactory method for obtaining qualitative data on blade life expectancy and for identifying structurally underdesigned areas (hot spots).

Faddoul, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.

1982-01-01

216

Fiber Optic System Test Results In A Tactical Military Aircraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The YAV-8B Electromagnetic Immunity and Flight-Test Program was established to evaluate the susceptibility of wire and optical fiber signal transmission lines to electromagnetic interference when these lines are installed in a graphite/epoxy composite wing and to demonstrate the flightworthiness of fiber optics interconnects in the vertical/ short takeoff and landing aircraft environment. In response, two fiber optic systems were designed, fabricated, and flight tested by McDonnell Aircraft Co. (MCAIR), a division of the McDonnell Douglas Corporation, on the two YAV-8B V/STOL flight test aircraft. The program successfully demonstrated that fiber optics are compatible with the attack aircraft environment. As a result, the full scale development AV-8B will incorporate fiber optics in a point-to-point data link. We describe here the fiber optic systems designs, test equipment development, cabling and connection requirements, fabrication and installation experience, and flight test program results.

Uhlhorn, Roger W.; Greenwell, Roger A.

1980-09-01

217

Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During 2000 and 2001, the validity and reliability of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2.0 (ADT 2.0) were formally investigated through the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project. The ADT 2.0 was administered as a pre-test to 5346 students and as a post-test to 3842 students. Student test results were collected from 97 classes that ranged in size from 4 to 320 students with 30 states represented. The 68 professors participating in the ADT National Project taught classes at universities (54%), 4-year colleges (27%), and 2-year colleges (19%). The database was analyzed for reliability at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. A pre-test value for Cronbach's alpha of 0.65 and post-test value of 0.76 demonstrate an acceptable degree of internal consistency. The average score for the 44 participating professors who completed the ADT as experts was 98%. Face and content validity were established by combining results from the experts with feedback from 60 student interviews. Student results from the National Project yielded an average score of 32.4% for the pre-test and 47.3% for the post-test. There is a gender discrepancy in favor of males that persists in both the pre-test (11% points) and the post-test (12% points) scores. The variations across geographic distribution and institution types were not significant. In addition to the 21 content items, the ADT 2.0 has 12 student background questions enabling instructors to have a better understanding of who takes introductory astronomy. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 (GD) and DGE-9714489 (BH).

Deming, G. L.

2001-12-01

218

Blast furnace reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vast a dvances h ave b een m ade in blast-furnace t echnology d uring t he p ast two decades through p lant t rials and plant d evelopments a ssisted by research to provide b etter u nderstanding of physical and chemical w orkings of the blast f urnace. T he f ields of research have i ncluded

E. T. Turkdogan

1978-01-01

219

Lightweight blast shield  

DOEpatents

A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

Mixon, Larry C. (Madison, AL); Snyder, George W. (Huntsville, AL); Hill, Scott D. (Toney, AL); Johnson, Gregory L. (Decatur, AL); Wlodarski, J. Frank (Huntsville, AL); von Spakovsky, Alexis P. (Huntsville, AL); Emerson, John D. (Arab, AL); Cole, James M. (Huntsville, AL); Tipton, John P. (Huntsville, AL)

1991-01-01

220

Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection; [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it will be the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. steel company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals f or such use.

Crelling, J.C.

1993-12-31

221

Update on results of SPRE testing at NASA Lewis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine with a linear alternator, is being tested at NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) as a candidate for high capacity space power. Results are presented from recent SPRE tests designed to investigated the effects of variation in the displacer seal clearance and piston centering port area on engine performance and dynamics. The impact of these variations on PV power and efficiency are presented. Comparisons of the displacer seal clearance tests results with HFAST code predictions show good agreement for PV power, but show poor agreement for PV efficiency. Correlations are presented relating the piston midstroke position to the dynamic Delta P across the piston and the centering port area. Test results indicate that a modest improvement in PV power and efficiency may be realized with a reduction in piston centering port area.

Cairelli, James E.; Swec, Diane M.; Wong, Wayne A.; Doeberling, Thomas J.; Madi, Frank J.

1991-01-01

222

Energy components in rock blasting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten production blasts and one single-hole confined blast have been monitored in two quarries in order to assess the measurable forms of energy in which the energy delivered by the explosive is transformed in rock blasting. The seismic field from seismographs readings, the initial velocity of the blasted rock face obtained from high-speed video camera records, and the fragment size

José A. Sanchidrián; Pablo Segarra; Lina M. López

2007-01-01

223

A Multivariate Randomization Test of Association Applied to Cognitive Test Results  

E-print Network

A Multivariate Randomization Test of Association Applied to Cognitive Test Results Albert Ahumada and Bettina Beard NASA Ames Research Center Abstract Randomization tests provide a conceptually simple, distribution-free way to implement significance testing. We have applied this method to the problem

224

LIMESTONE WET-SCRUBBING TEST RESULTS AT THE EPA ALKALI SCRUBBING TEST FACILITY. CAPSULE REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

This capsule report discusses the highlights of the first detailed engineering progress report. It describes the test facility and test program and presents results to date of the limestone wet-scrubbing testing. In addition, the realiability and operability of the test facility ...

225

Estimation of the power of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid blast from optical, seismic, and infrasonic observation data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The power of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid blast is estimated from model calculations and the results of optic, seismic, and infrasonic observations. The power of the blast has been determined as 1-3 kt of TNT.

Krasnov, V. M.; Drobzheva, Ya. V.; Salikhov, N. M.; Zhumabaev, B. T.; Lazurkina, V. B.

2014-03-01

226

Electrocardiographic changes following primary blast injury to the thorax.  

PubMed

Profound physiological changes occur following primary blast exposure but the contribution of cardiac arrhythmias is unknown. Thirteen rats, under intravenous anaesthesia, were exposed to a blast wave directed at the thorax (Group II); 10 other animals underwent abdominal blast (Group III) and nine animals acted as controls (Group I). Animals were monitored before, during and after blast exposure. Group II animals demonstrated apnoea, bradycardia and hypotension. No significant physiological changes were seen in Groups I or III. Group II displayed a variety of ECG disturbances, from ventricular extrasystoles to ventricular fibrillation. All abnormalities reverted to sinus rhythm within minutes except in fatally injured animals. These ECG changes probably result from stress wave injury. Significant disturbances might account for some fatalities following primary blast exposure and may exacerbate the triad of apnoea, bradycardia and hypotension. Such observations may have important consequences for the management of blast casualties. PMID:11346922

Guy, R J; Watkins, P E; Edmondstone, W M

2000-01-01

227

Quality of coal for blast furnace injection  

SciTech Connect

CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC) has been involved in a research program to evaluate the suitability of various coals for blast furnace injection. The primary objectives of this program are to provide essential information on coal combustion in the blast furnace and to establish proper criteria for evaluating and selecting coals for blast furnace injection. The program comprises three parts. Parts one and two have been completed. To date, the program has encompassed both a theoretical assessment of cooling and coke replacement characteristics of coals using CETC`s computer model and an experimental determination of the combustibility of coals of different ranks and particle sizes as well as the influence of oxygen enrichment on burnout. The experimental part was conducted in CETC`s pilot-scale injection unit that simulates blast furnace blowpipe-tuyere conditions. Part three now being developed will incorporate results of experimental trials into a blast furnace raceway model in order to predict total combustibility of coals at different blast furnace operating conditions. This paper describes CETC`s facility and methodology of work, and presents and discusses results.

Hutny, W.P.; Giroux, L.; MacPhee, J.A.; Price, J.T. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre/Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

1996-12-31

228

Nanoenhanced polyurea as a blast resistant coating for concrete masonry walls  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blast impact is a major concern in the world today. The leading cause of death due to blast impacts is rapidly moving debris. To prevent this many researchers are looking for methods of improved blast resistance for concrete masonry walls. However, many available protective coatings are not flame retardant. This thesis focuses on nanoenhanced polyurea for applications in improving blast resistance, while possessing improved flame retardancy, of concrete masonry walls. The polyurea that is being researched is enhanced with nanoadditives in an effort improve both blast and fire resistance. These materials are dynamically tested and those showing marked improvement are chosen for experimental and computational testing.

Rivera, Heather Kathryn Daniell

229

Statistical analysis of Salmonella test data and comparison to results of animal cancer tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A quantitative framework for the analysis of results of the Salmonella (Ames) test is presented, and the relationship between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis is examined. Color graphics are used for the Salmonella data to describe variability, and trends across multiple chemicals and test conditions. Positivity in the Salmonella test, using statistical criteria to classify results, is compared to positivity in

Joyce McCann; L SWIRSKYGOLD; Laura Horn; R. McGill; T. E. Graedel; John Kaldor

1988-01-01

230

Results of radiation hardness tests and performance tests of the HS9008RH flash ADC  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results from tests characterizing the performance and radiation hardness of the HS9008RH flash analog to digital convertor (FADC) are presented. These tests were performed primarily to evaluate the suitability of this device for use in the GEM Central Tracker at the SSC experiment. Basic performance characteristics and susceptibility of these characteristics to radiation were examined. Performance test results indicate that

S. Nutter; G. Tarle; H. B. Crawley; R. McKay; W. T. Meyer; E. I. Rosenberg; W. D. Thomas

1994-01-01

231

Faint Object Classification and Analysis System standard test image results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A set of standard test images has been analyzed using the Faint Object Classification and Analysis System (FOCAS). This paper presents an outline of the FOCAS software and algorithms followed by a summary of the results and a description of the archive containing the detailed analysis. The archive is available on magnetic tape. The detailed results may be used to

Francisco Valdes

1989-01-01

232

Proposed Interventions to Decrease the Frequency of Missed Test Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous studies have identified that delays in diagnosis related to the mishandling of abnormal test results are an import contributor to diagnostic errors. Factors contributing to missed results included organizational factors, provider factors and patient-related factors. At the diagnosis error conference continuing medical education conference…

Wahls, Terry L.; Cram, Peter

2009-01-01

233

An experimental study on corrosion resistance of concrete with ground granulate blast-furnace slag  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents experimental test results on corrosion resistance of concrete containing ground granulate blast-furnace slag (GGBS) and ASTM Type I or ASTM Type V cement. To investigate the problem, a series of tests were performed. First, rapid chloride permeability tests were executed in accordance with ASTM C 1202 to determine the qualitative terms of chloride-ion penetrability. Second, accelerated chloride-ion

Kyong Yun Yeau; Eun Kyum Kim

2005-01-01

234

COMPARISON OF RESPONSE OF 9977 TEST PACKAGES TO ANALYTICAL RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Each of the hypothetical accident test cases for the 9977 prototypes was included in the battery of finite element structural analyses performed for the package. Comparison of the experimental and analytical results provides a means of confirming that the analytical model correctly represents the physical behavior of the package. The ability of the analytical model to correctly predict the performance of the foam overpack material for the crush test is of particular interest. The dissipation of energy in the crushing process determines the deceleration of the package upon impact and the duration of the impact. In addition, if the analytical model correctly models the foam behavior, the predicted deformation of the package will match that measured on the test articles. This study compares the deformations of the test packages with the analytical predictions. In addition, the impact acceleration and impact duration for the test articles are compared with those predicted by the analyses.

Smith, A; Tsu-Te Wu, T

2007-12-05

235

Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

1999-03-01

236

Test results of Ya-21u thermionic space power system  

SciTech Connect

The Soviet-made TOPAZ-II space nuclear power system unit designated Ya-21u underwent a total of 15 tests both in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR) (1989--1990) and in the US (August 1993 to March 1995) for a cumulative test/operation time of 7681 h at conditions far exceeding design limits. These tests included steady-state operation at different power levels, fast start-ups and power optimizations, and shock and vibration tests. Test results are presented and analyzed. Results indicate a gradual change in the performance parameters such as the optimum cesium pressure and optimum load voltage. The electric power and conversion efficiency of the unit at an input thermal power of 105 kW decreased from 3.7 kW (electric) and 4% in the test in the USSR to 2.13 kW (electric) and 2.3% in the last test in the US. A discussion and qualitative assessment of potential causes of the performance changes of the Ya-21u unit are given.

Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01

237

DWPF Sampling Device Development Test Results and Design Recommendation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the development and testing of a sample device for the DWPF sample cells. The clamp actuated manual Hydraguard valve used in conjunction with the concentric needle fill device is recommended for use in the DWPF. This is based on test results which indicate that this sampler is capable of obtaining samples within five percent of the solids concentration of the process stream at flow rates from 0.5 to 3.5 gpm.

Wilds, G.W.

2001-07-17

238

Acoustic results of the Boeing model 360 whirl tower test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An evaluation is presented for whirl tower test results of the Model 360 helicopter's advanced, high-performance four-bladed composite rotor system intended to facilitate over-200-knot flight. During these performance measurements, acoustic data were acquired by seven microphones. A comparison of whirl-tower tests with theory indicate that theoretical prediction accuracies vary with both microphone position and the inclusion of ground reflection. Prediction errors varied from 0 to 40 percent of the measured signal-to-peak amplitude.

Watts, Michael E.; Jordan, David

1990-01-01

239

Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results  

SciTech Connect

The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

Wardlaw, R. Jr.

1982-09-01

240

Dipole model test with one superconducting coil: results analysed  

E-print Network

This report is the deliverable report 7.3.1 “Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed “. The report has four parts: “Design report for the dipole magnet”, “Dipole magnet structure tested in LN2”, “Nb3Sn strand procured for one dipole magnet” and “One test double pancake copper coil made”. The 4 report parts show that, although the magnet construction will be only completed by end 2014, all elements are present for a successful completion. Due to the importance of the project for the future of the participants and given the significant investments done by the participants, there is a full commitment to finish the project.

Bajas, H; Benda, V; Berriaud, C; Bajko, M; Bottura, L; Caspi, S; Charrondiere, M; Clément, S; Datskov, V; Devaux, M; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Ferracin, P; Fessia, P; Gauthier, R; Giloux, C; Guinchard, M; Kircher, F; Manil, P; Milanese, A; Millot, J-F; Muñoz Garcia, J-E; Oberli, L; Perez, J-C; Pietrowicz, S; Rifflet, J-M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F; Todesco, E; Viret, P; Ziemianski, D

2013-01-01

241

Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed  

E-print Network

This report is the deliverable report 7.3.1 “Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed “. The report has four parts: “Design report for the dipole magnet”, “Dipole magnet structure tested in LN2”, “Nb3Sn strand procured for one dipole magnet” and “One test double pancake copper coil made”. The 4 report parts show that, although the magnet construction will be only completed by end 2014, all elements are present for a successful completion. Due to the importance of the project for the future of the participants and given the significant investments done by the participants, there is a full commitment to finish the project.

Durante, M; Ferracin, P; Fessia, P; Gauthier, R; Giloux, C; Guinchard, M; Kircher, F; Manil, P; Milanese, A; Millot, J-F; Muñoz Garcia, J-E; Oberli, L; Perez, J-C; Pietrowicz, S; Rifflet, J-M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F; Todesco, E; Viret, P; Ziemianski, D

2013-01-01

242

Argon Spill Duct Bellows Leak Test Procedures and Results  

SciTech Connect

This engineering note describes the testing of the argoll spill duct bellows. It includes a detailed explanation of the procedures, along with a summary of the results of the testing done on 2/18/91 and 2/19/91 by Gary Trotter. The original bellows were purchased from Expansion Joint Systems (see Appendix 2). The general conclusion from the testing was that the leaks that were found were small enough so that they would not show up at the design pressure of 0.1 psig. Therefore, the leaks were acceptable, and the conclusion was that the bellows were fit for use.

Trotter, G.R.; Wu, J.; /Fermilab

1991-03-11

243

ART-XC/SRG: results of thermo-vacuum tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ART-XC - a medium-x-ray-energy survey instrument for SRG project is being developed in Russia. Space Research institute (IKI) and Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) has developed and tested the STM (Structural and Thermal Model) of ART-XC/SRG Instrument. The STM was tested in a 40 m3 vacuum chamber, equipped with black cryogenic screens, cooled by liquid nitrogen. During the tests various thermal telescope modes were simulated. In particular we have simulated emergency mode, when mirrors heaters were switched-off. During the tests temperature of instrument's structure was controlled by 64 independent sensors. Stability of optical axis of mirror systems was also measured. STM test has shown that temperature of mirror system was lower than required, temperature of detectors met the requirements. The test also confirmed geometrical stability of the carbon fiber housing despite of significant temperature gradients. Additional experiments with two mirror systems, each containing a full set of simple nickel shells, were performed. In these experiments we have measured longitudinal and transverse temperature gradients of mirror systems. Next thermovacuum tests of the qualification model of the ART-XC instrument are being prepared. Results of STM tests are presented in this paper.

Semena, N.; Pavlinsky, M.; Buntov, M.; Serbinov, D.; Gurova, E.; Tambov, V.; Roiz, I.; Garin, M.; Lazarchuk, V.; Zaytcev, A.; Martunov, V.; Shabarchin, A.; Sokolov, A.

2014-07-01

244

Development of a pebble-bed liquid-nitrogen evaporator/superheater for the BRL 1/6th-scale large blast/thermal simulator test bed. Phase 1. Prototype design and analysis. Final report, Sep 87-Oct 88  

SciTech Connect

In the context of design studies for the U.S. Large Blast/Thermal Simulator (LB/TS), a liquid-nitrogen (LN), pebble-bed evaporator and superheater was designed for the 1/6th-scale LB/TS Test Bed. This pebble-bed heater would produce hot nitrogen gas at a predetermined temperature from a cryogenic LN2 source at pressure up to 1700 psig. The flow rate would be sufficient to fill the driver tube of the BRL LB/TS Test Bed rapidly enough to minimize the heat losses through the uninsulated driver walls and to maintain the required nitrogen gas temperature.

Osofsky, I.B.; Mason, G.P.; Tanaka, M.J.

1991-08-01

245

Biogas plasticization coupled anaerobic digestion: batch test results.  

PubMed

Biogas has unique properties for improving the biodegradability of biomass solids during anaerobic digestion (AD). This report presents batch test results of the first investigation into utilizing biogas plasticization to "condition" organic polymers during active digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS). Preliminary design calculations based on polymer diffusion rate limitation are presented. Analysis of the 20 degrees C batch test data determined the first order (k(1)) COD conversion coefficient to be 0.167 day(-1) with a maximum COD utilization rate of 11.25 g L(-1) day(-1). Comparison of these batch test results to typical conventional AD performance parameters showed orders of magnitude improvement. These results show that biogas plasticization during active AD could greatly improve renewable energy yields from biomass waste materials such as MSW RDF, STP sludges, food wastes, animal manure, green wastes, and agricultural crop residuals. PMID:17054122

Schimel, Keith A

2007-06-01

246

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. For the combination of both test stands, the round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the much larger flow rates and equipment that would be required. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2013-05-29

247

The Next Generation BLAST Experiment  

E-print Network

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was a suborbital experiment designed to map magnetic fields in order to study their role in star formation processes. BLASTPol made detailed polarization maps of a number of molecular clouds during its successful flights from Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. We present the next-generation BLASTPol instrument (BLAST-TNG) that will build off the success of the previous experiment and continue its role as a unique instrument and a test bed for new technologies. With a 16-fold increase in mapping speed, BLAST-TNG will make larger and deeper maps. Major improvements include a 2.5 m carbon fiber mirror that is 40% wider than the BLASTPol mirror and ~3000 polarization sensitive detectors. BLAST-TNG will observe in three bands at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The telescope will serve as a pathfinder project for microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) technology, as applied to feedhorn coupled submillimeter detector arrays. The liquid he...

Galitzki, Nicholas; Angilè, Francesco E; Ashton, Peter; Beall, James A; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J; Dober, Bradley J; Fissel, Laura M; Fukui, Yasuo; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D; Klein, Jeffrey; Van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Santos, Fabio P; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel N; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R; Ward-Thompson, Derek

2014-01-01

248

NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

2000-01-01

249

Large coil task and results of testing US coils  

SciTech Connect

The United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland have collaborated since 1978 in development of superconducting toroidal field coils for fusion reactor applications. The United States provided a test facility nd three coils; the other participants, one coil each. All coils have the same interface dimensions and performance requirements (stable at 8 T), but internal design was decided by each team. Two US coil teams chose bath-cooled NbTi, 10-kA conductors. One developed a Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor, cooled by internal flow, rated at 18 kA. All US coils have diagnostic instrumentation and imbedded heaters that enable stability tests and simulated nuclear heating experiments. In single-coil tests, each coil operated at full current in self-field (6.4 T). In six-coil tests that began in July 1986, one US coil and the Japanese coil hve been successfully operated at full current at 8 T. The other coils have operated as background coils while awaiting their turn as test coil. Coil tests have been informative and results gratifying. The facility has capably supported coil testing and its operation has provided information that will be useful in designing future fusion systems. Coil capabilities beyond nominal design points will be determined.

Haubenreich, P.N.

1986-01-01

250

New blast weapons.  

PubMed

Over the last decade a large number of weapon systems have appeared that use blast as their primary damage mechanism. This is a notable trend; until recently very few warheads relied on blast as their primary output. Most warheads in service use explosives to drive metal such as fragments and shaped charge jets to engage targets. New technologies are now being integrated into warheads that claim to have enhanced blast performance. Blast weapons could have been designed to fill a gap in capability; they are generally used for the attack of 'soft' targets including personnel, both in the open and within protective structures. With the increased number and range of these weapons, it is likely that UK forces will have to face them in future conflicts. This paper briefly describes fuel-air explosive blast weapons and reviews a range of enhanced blast weapons that have been developed recently. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the reasons why enhanced blast technologies may be proliferating and how this could affect the Defence Medical Services. PMID:11307681

Dearden, P

2001-02-01

251

Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992-93 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. Steel Company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals for such use. During this quarter samples of two feed coals and the IBCSP 112 (Herrin No. 6) were prepared for reactivity testing and compared to blast furnace coke, and char fines taken from an active blast furnace. As the initial part of a broad reactivity analysis program, these same samples were also analyzed on a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) to determine their combustion and reactivity properties.

Crelling, J.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1994-09-01

252

Monitoring thermal impact resulting from solid rocket motor test operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of remote sensing is discussed with respect to determining the thermal conditions and the immediate environmental effects of large-scale rocket propulsion tests. Data acquired during a test firing of a solid rocket motor are presented including thermal data and surface temperatures from before, during, and after the firing. Thermal impact directly behind the nozzle is assessed, temperature values within the plume are determined, and data are generated for use in an environmental monitoring system which can analyze and forecast impact. The airborne multispectral scanner and thermocouples behind the solid rocket motor discerned that radiant temperatures are higher than predictions indicate and that the testing affects 34 acres of ground. The results are of use in determining the design and area required for developing testing facilities for rocket motors.

Davis, Bruce A.; Thurman, Charles; Carr, Hugh V.

1990-01-01

253

The advanced receiver 2: Telemetry test results in CTA 21  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Telemetry tests with the Advanced Receiver II (ARX II) in Compatibility Test Area 21 are described. The ARX II was operated in parallel with a Block-III Receiver/baseband processor assembly combination (BLK-III/BPA) and a Block III Receiver/subcarrier demodulation assembly/symbol synchronization assembly combination (BLK-III/SDA/SSA). The telemetry simulator assembly provided the test signal for all three configurations, and the symbol signal to noise ratio as well as the symbol error rates were measured and compared. Furthermore, bit error rates were also measured by the system performance test computer for all three systems. Results indicate that the ARX-II telemetry performance is comparable and sometimes superior to the BLK-III/BPA and BLK-III/SDA/SSA combinations.

Hinedi, S.; Bevan, R.; Marina, M.

1991-01-01

254

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-11-01

255

Suit Port Aft Bulkhead Mockup 2008 Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Electric Rover (LER), formerly called the Small Pressurized Rover (SPR), is currently being carried as an integral part of the current Lunar Surface Architectures under consideration in the Constellation program. One element of the LER is the suit port, the means by which the crew performs Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Two suit port deliverables were produced in fiscal year 2008: an aft bulkhead mockup for functional integrated testing with the 1-G LER mockup and a functional and pressurizable Engineering Unit (EU). This paper focuses on the aft bulkhead mockup test results from Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) October 2008 testing at Black Point Lava Flow (BPLF), Arizona. Refer to 39th International Conference on Environmental Systems (ICES) for test results of the EU. The suit port aft bulkhead mockup was integrated with the mockup of the LER cabin and chassis. It is located on the aft bulkhead of the LER cabin structure and includes hatches, a locking mechanism, seals, interior and exterior suit don/doff aids, and exterior platforms to accommodate different crewmember heights. A lightweight mockup of the Mark III suit was tested with the suit port aft bulkhead mockup. There are several limitations to the suit port and mockup suits, and results of the suit port evaluation are presented and interpreted within the context of the limitations.

Romig, Barbara A.; Allton, Charles S.; Litaker, Harry L.

2009-01-01

256

Wind tunnel test IA300 analysis and results, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The analysis and interpretation of wind tunnel pressure data from the Space Shuttle wind tunnel test IA300 are presented. The primary objective of the test was to determine the effects of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) plumes on the integrated vehicle forebody pressure distributions, the elevon hinge moments, and wing loads. The results of this test will be combined with flight test results to form a new data base to be employed in the IVBC-3 airloads analysis. A secondary objective was to obtain solid plume data for correlation with the results of gaseous plume tests. Data from the power level portion was used in conjunction with flight base pressures to evaluate nominal power levels to be used during the investigation of changes in model attitude, eleveon deflection, and nozzle gimbal angle. The plume induced aerodynamic loads were developed for the Space Shuttle bases and forebody areas. A computer code was developed to integrate the pressure data. Using simplified geometrical models of the Space Shuttle elements and components, the pressure data were integrated to develop plume induced force and moments coefficients that can be combined with a power-off data base to develop a power-on data base.

Kelley, P. B.; Beaufait, W. B.; Kitchens, L. L.; Pace, J. P.

1987-01-01

257

Mechanisms of Hearing Loss after Blast Injury to the Ear  

PubMed Central

Given the frequent use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) around the world, the study of traumatic blast injuries is of increasing interest. The ear is the most common organ affected by blast injury because it is the body’s most sensitive pressure transducer. We fabricated a blast chamber to re-create blast profiles similar to that of IEDs and used it to develop a reproducible mouse model to study blast-induced hearing loss. The tympanic membrane was perforated in all mice after blast exposure and found to heal spontaneously. Micro-computed tomography demonstrated no evidence for middle ear or otic capsule injuries; however, the healed tympanic membrane was thickened. Auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emission threshold shifts were found to be correlated with blast intensity. As well, these threshold shifts were larger than those found in control mice that underwent surgical perforation of their tympanic membranes, indicating cochlear trauma. Histological studies one week and three months after the blast demonstrated no disruption or damage to the intra-cochlear membranes. However, there was loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) within the basal turn of the cochlea and decreased spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and afferent nerve synapses. Using our mouse model that recapitulates human IED exposure, our results identify that the mechanisms underlying blast-induced hearing loss does not include gross membranous rupture as is commonly believed. Instead, there is both OHC and SGN loss that produce auditory dysfunction. PMID:23840874

Cho, Sung-Il; Gao, Simon S.; Xia, Anping; Wang, Rosalie; Salles, Felipe T.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Abaya, Homer; Wachtel, Jacqueline; Baek, Jongmin; Jacobs, David; Rasband, Matthew N.; Oghalai, John S.

2013-01-01

258

Attic testing at the Roof Research Center: Initial results  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, a series of tests was performed on residential attics using an attic test module built to permit research to be accomplished on a number of issues related to attics. This test module was used in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) at the Roof Research Center. This combination of test module and LSCS permitted the Center to perform a number of studies under closely controlled interior and climatic conditions including: evaluation of uninsulated attic performance and comparison with previously published results, evaluation of the thermal performance of the attic with loose-fill fiberglass insulation, and the identification of heat loss due to convective air movement through the loose-fill insulation under simulated winter conditions. Testing, in general, showed reasonable agreement with previously published results for each of the above areas of investigation. Thermal performance improved markedly with the installation of the loose-fill insulation. However, the thermal performance of the loose-fill fiberglass insulation tested under winter conditions declined by as much as a factor of two as the temperature difference across the insulation increased. This decline in thermal performance is attributed to the initiation of convection through the insulation as the temperature declines. These findings were documented by both energy flow analysis using the LSCS guarded hot box and infrared scans of the insulation surface in the attic. It should be noted that the present experiments were performed with one type of loose-fill fiberglass insulation. Similar results would be expected for other products that have similar air flow and thermal properties. However, further testing is required to document the performance of the full range of insulations currently available. 4 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Wilkes, K.E.; Wendt, R.L.; Delmas, A.; Childs, P.W.

1991-01-01

259

Operational Results From a High Power Alternator Test Bed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio was used to simulate the operating conditions and evaluate the performance of the ATU and its interaction with various LPSF components in accordance with the current Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) requirements. The testing was carried out at the breadboard development level. These results successfully demonstrated excellent ATU power bus characteristics and rectified user load power quality during steady state and transient conditions. Information gained from this work could be used to assist the design and primary power quality considerations for a possible future FSPS. This paper describes the LPSF components and some preliminary test results.

Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

2007-01-01

260

Infrared sensor system (IRSS) laboratory and field test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research (ONR) has developed an infrared search and track (IRST) demonstrator system named the infrared sensor system (IRSS). This technology-base sensor was successfully developed and tested both in the laboratory and at-sea. IRSS now is being transitioned to the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAUSEA) IRST Engineering and Manufacturing Development (E&MD) Program, where it will serve, with appropriate modifications, as the engineering development model (EDM) and will be fielded aboard a U.S. Navy ship. This paper summarizes the process of developing and fielding IRSS, describes test results accomplished at sea during 1996, and discusses the technical and engineering lessons associated with design, development and testing of IRSS. Results are presented covering the areas of sensor component and overall system radiometrics (e.g., sensitivity and dynamic range), channel uniformity, stabilization, and optical, electrical and information (i.e., signal processing/track) resolution.

Ax, George R., Jr.; Buss, James R.

1997-08-01

261

GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2004-01-01

262

GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2003-08-01

263

GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

2003-03-01

264

RESULTS: INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON - BIOCONCENTRATION TESTS USING EASTERN OYSTERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report summarizes the results of an interlaboratory comparison for bioconcentration (BCF) testing using the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and the organic chemicals pentachlorophenol (PCP), 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB), and p, p'-DDE. The means BCFs and high to low BC...

265

University of Massachusetts: MUC3 test results and analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We believe that the score reports we obtained for TST2 provide an accurate assessment of our system's capabilities insofar as they are consistent with the results of our own internal tests conducted near the end of phase 2.. The required TST2 score reports indicate that our system achieved the highest combined scores for recall (51%) and precision (62%) as well

Wendy G. Lehnert; Claire Cardie; David Fisher; Ellen Riloff; Robert Williams

1991-01-01

266

Myeloma Patient's Guide to Understanding Your Test Results  

MedlinePLUS

... It is a much more precise study than x-ray, THE MYELOMA PATIENT’S GUIDE TO Understanding Your Test Results and can provide clear, detailed images of bone. Downsides include limited coverage of the body, and the possible need to use contrast agents that can pose problems for myeloma patients with ...

267

First Test Results of the New LANSCE Wire Scanner  

SciTech Connect

The Beam Diagnostics and Instrumentation Team (BDIT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE facility is presently developing a new and improved wire scanner diagnostics system controlled by National Instrument's cRIO platform. This paper describes the current state of development of the control system along with the results gathered from the latest actuator motion performance and accelerator-beam data acquisition tests.

Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01

268

SSPS results of test and operation, 1981-1984  

SciTech Connect

The results of three years of testing and operation of the two dissimilar solar thermal power plants of the SSPS project are summarized. The project includes: (1) a Distributed Collector System, and (2) a Central Receiver System. Environmental conditions are presented and an economical assessment of the project is provided. (BCS)

none,

1985-05-01

269

SIMS prototype system 3 test results: Engineering analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results obtained during testing of a closed hydronic drain down solar system designed for space and hot water heating is presented. Data analysis is included which documents the system performance and verifies the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 3 for field installation.

1978-01-01

270

Understanding Your Soil Test Results Education Center and Info Line  

E-print Network

. Glossary ofTerms on the Report Form pH - Indicates whether the soil is acid or alkaline. 7.0 is a neutral level; less than 7.0 is acidic and greater than 7.0 is alkaline. Although NH soils are naturally veryUnderstanding Your Soil Test Results Education Center and Info Line practical solutions to everyday

New Hampshire, University of

271

An EBIS-based RHIC Preinjector Test EBIS Results  

E-print Network

Energy Vacuum Arc Ion source Hollow Cathode Ion Source A variety of low charge state gaseous and metal-Accelerator Department E. Beebe Test EBIS Results Machine Advisory Committee 3/10/04 #12;Linac-based Preinjector - Source "requirements" 1. Intensity for 1 x 109 Au ions/bunch in RHIC : ~ 3 x 109 Au32+ ions/pulse from the source 2

272

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

2012-12-01

273

Evaluation of dense gas dispersion test results. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A national Spill Test Facility (STF) program dedicated to public safety in the use and transport of fuels and other chemicals was established by Congress. The program is charged with developing technology for spill prediction, prevention, and mitigation. The Spill Test Facility, located northeast of Mercury, Nevada, is to be used for research leading to the development of tools for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment in response to accidental spills of hazardous materials. Public laws, including the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990, also require that the Secretary of Energy make the STF and STF test data available to industry, academia, and other government agencies. The objective of this subtask is to produce a data base allowing the chemical and fuel accident responder to access emergency management information quickly and efficiently. The work has involved (1) archiving spill test facility results from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (LGFSTF) at the Nevada National Test Site, (2) updating the data base on spill control technology documents and data, and (3) transferring this information to the public.

Sheesley, D.

1997-03-01

274

Thermomechanical Modelling of a Blast Furnace Hearth J. Brulin1,2  

E-print Network

Thermomechanical Modelling of a Blast Furnace Hearth J. Brulin1,2 , A. Rekik1 , E. Blond1 , L Abstract The goal of this work is to develop a thermo-mechanical model of a blast furnace hearth able-situ instrumentation results. 1. Introduction The blast furnace (BF) hearth is the most critical part within the whole

Boyer, Edmond

275

Phase III Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) results - Space Station ECLSS testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During 1989, phase III testing of Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) began at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the Simplified Integrated Test. This test, conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), was the first time the four baseline air revitalization subsystems were integrated together. This paper details the results and lessons learned from the phase III SIT. Future plans for testing at the MSFC CMIF are also discussed.

Roberts, Barry C.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Dubiel, Melissa Y.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Perry, Jay L.; Whitley, Ken M.

1990-01-01

276

Indeterminate and discrepant rapid HIV test results in couples' HIV testing and counselling centres in Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Many HIV voluntary testing and counselling centres in Africa use rapid antibody tests, in parallel or in sequence, to establish\\u000a same-day HIV status. The interpretation of indeterminate or discrepant results between different rapid tests on one sample\\u000a poses a challenge. We investigated the use of an algorithm using three serial rapid HIV tests in cohabiting couples to resolve\\u000a unclear serostatuses.

Debrah I Boeras; Nicole Luisi; Etienne Karita; Shila McKinney; Tyronza Sharkey; Michelle Keeling; Elwyn Chomba; Colleen Kraft; Kristin Wall; Jean Bizimana; William Kilembe; Amanda Tichacek; Angela M Caliendo; Eric Hunter; Susan Allen

2011-01-01

277

Semiparametric models for malaria rapid diagnosis test result  

PubMed Central

Background More than 75% of the total of Ethiopia is malarious. Therefore, malaria is a leading public health problem in Ethiopia. This study aims to identify socio-economic, geographic and demographic factors contributing to the spread of malaria and is based on the results of a malaria Rapid Diagnosis Test survey. Methods The data used in this study originates from the baseline malaria indicator survey, conducted in the Amhara, Oromiya and Southern Nation Nationalities and People (SNNP) regions of Ethiopia from December 2006 to January 2007. The study applies the method of generalized additive mixed model (GAMM) to analyse data. The response variable is the presence or absence of malaria, using the malaria Rapid Diagnosis Test (RDT). Results The results provide an improved insight into the distribution of malaria in relation to the age of affected people, the altitude, the total number of rooms, the total number of mosquito nets, family size, and the number of months that their rooms have been sprayed. The results confirm that positive malaria RDT test results are high for children under 15 years and for older persons. Gender, source of drinking water, time needed to fetch water, toilet facilities, main materials used for the construction of walls, floors and roofs, and use of mosquito nets were all found to have a significant impact on the results of the malaria rapid diagnosis test. Conclusion The result of the analysis identifies poor socio-economic conditions as a major contributing factor or determinant for the spread of malaria. With the correct use of mosquito nets, indoor residual spraying with insecticide and other preventative measures, the incidence of malaria could be decreased. In addition, improving housing conditions is a means to reduce the risk of malaria. Other measures such as creating awareness of the use of mosquito nets, indoor residual spraying with insecticide, and malaria transmission, can lead to a further reduction in the number of malaria cases. PMID:24418514

2014-01-01

278

Natural rice rhizospheric microbes suppress rice blast infections  

PubMed Central

Background The natural interactions between plant roots and their rhizospheric microbiome are vital to plant fitness, modulating both growth promotion and disease suppression. In rice (Oryza sativa), a globally important food crop, as much as 30% of yields are lost due to blast disease caused by fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Capitalizing on the abilities of naturally occurring rice soil bacteria to reduce M. oryzae infections could provide a sustainable solution to reduce the amount of crops lost to blast disease. Results Naturally occurring root-associated rhizospheric bacteria were isolated from California field grown rice plants (M-104), eleven of which were taxonomically identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Bacterial isolates were tested for biocontrol activity against the devastating foliar rice fungal pathogen, M. oryzae pathovar 70–15. In vitro, a Pseudomonas isolate, EA105, displayed antibiosis through reducing appressoria formation by nearly 90% as well as directly inhibiting fungal growth by 76%. Although hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a volatile commonly produced by biocontrol pseudomonads, the activity of EA105 seems to be independent of its HCN production. During in planta experiments, EA105 reduced the number of blast lesions formed by 33% and Pantoea agglomerans isolate, EA106 by 46%. Our data also show both EA105 and EA106 trigger jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) dependent induced systemic resistance (ISR) response in rice. Conclusions Out of 11 bacteria isolated from rice soil, pseudomonad EA105 most effectively inhibited the growth and appressoria formation of M. oryzae through a mechanism that is independent of cyanide production. In addition to direct antagonism, EA105 also appears to trigger ISR in rice plants through a mechanism that is dependent on JA and ET signaling, ultimately resulting in fewer blast lesions. The application of native bacteria as biocontrol agents in combination with current disease protection strategies could aid in global food security. PMID:24884531

2014-01-01

279

Copper staves in the blast furnace  

SciTech Connect

Operational data for stave cooling systems for two German blast furnaces show good correlation with predicted thermal results. Copper staves have been installed in blast furnaces in the zones exposed to the highest thermal loads. The good operational results achieved confirm the choice of copper staves in the areas of maximum heat load. Both temperature measurements and predictions establish that the MAN GHH copper staves do not experience large temperature fluctuations and that the hot face temperatures will be below 250 F. This suggests that the copper staves maintain a more stable accretion layer than the cast iron staves. Contrary to initial expectations, heat flux to the copper staves is 50% lower than that to cast iron staves. The more stable accretion layer acts as an excellent insulator for the stave and greatly reduces the number of times the hot face of the stave is exposed to the blast furnace process and should result in a more stable furnace operation. In the future, it may be unnecessary to use high quality, expensive refractories in front of copper staves because of the highly stable accretion layer that appears to rapidly form due to the lower operating temperature of the staves. There is a balance of application regions for cast iron and copper staves that minimizes the capital cost of a blast furnace reline and provides an integrated cooling system with multiple campaign life potential. Cast iron staves are proven cooling elements that are capable of multiple campaign life in areas of the blast furnace which do not experience extreme heat loads. Copper staves are proving to be an effective and reliable blast furnace cooling element that are subject to virtually no wear and are projected to have a longer campaign service life in the areas of highest thermal load in the blast furnace.

Helenbrook, R.G. [ATSI, Inc., Amherst, NY (United States); Kowalski, W. [Thyssen Stahl AG, Duisburg (Germany); Grosspietsch, K.H. [Preussag Stahl AG, Saltzgitter (Germany); Hille, H. [MAN GHH AG, Oberhausen (Germany)

1996-08-01

280

Results of pumping test, city well four, Pullman, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Geological Survey, on July 10, 1957, was requested by the Washington State Department of Conservation to participate in a pumping test to be made by the city of Pullman on their city well 4, scheduled to begin July 15, 1957. The area was visited on July 11 by Mr. Holmberg, and on July 14 by Mr. Foxworthy, both of the Geological Sruvey. Measurements of water level on city well 4 and on nearby wells were continued by them onto July 16. Results of the pumping test are described in this report, and tabulation of water-level measurement, hydrographs, and descriptions of pertinent wells are included.

Foxworty, Bruce L.

1957-01-01

281

Test results of the HIRFL-CSR cluster target  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The HIRFL-CSR internal target can operate in two modes: cluster target mode and polarized target mode. The cluster target may provide the gas target of H 2, N 2, inert gases and small molecular gases. The test experiments have been done for H 2, N 2 and Ar gases. The target thicknesses of 6.6×10 12, 1.2×10 13 and 1.0×10 13 atoms/cm 2 are obtained for H 2, N 2 and Ar gases, respectively. In this paper, the structure and the test results of the HIRFL-CSR cluster target system are reported.

Cai, Xiaohong; Lu, Rongchun; Shao, Caojie; Ruan, Fangfang; Yu, Deyang; Li, Mingsheng; Zhan, Wenlong; Torpokov, D. K.; Nikolenko, D.

2005-12-01

282

Field test results prove GPS performance and utility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A summary of the statistical and operational results of field tests on Phase III GPS user equipment is presented. The GPS user equipment includes a one-channel Manpack/Vehicular configuration for backpack, land vehicle, and small watercraft applications; a two-channel configuration for Army helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; a five-channel configuration for Air Force and Navy helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; and a five-channel ship configuration for Navy ocean going vessels. The signal-processing and data-processing architectures of the receivers are described. Specific test data are presented which highlight dynamic position accuracy, static position accuracy, acquisition times, and field reliability.

Blank, R. W.; Rhodes, W. D., Jr.

283

Test results of the ALICE-HMPID detector commissioning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) consists of seven identical proximity focusing RICH counters. It covers in total 11 m2, exploiting large area CsI photocathodes for Cherenkov light imaging. The detector is installed in the ALICE solenoid, ready for the data acquisition. By means of the Detector Control System, the Front-end (FEE) and the Readout (R/O) electronics, the MWPC high voltages, the cooling and the gas system have been tested. The HMPID module gas pressure, temperature, current and voltage trends have been monitored and archived in the ORACLE database. In this paper a comprehensive review on the test results is presented.

Volpe, G.

2008-06-01

284

Characterization of explosive devices in luggage: Initial results of the ART-IIC test series  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics and damage associated with exploded luggage aboard aircraft are presented in this paper. Plastic-sided suitcases filled with typical travel possessions were exploded inside the fuselage of decomissioned B-52 aircraft. Multilayered shield panels, mounted to one side of the fuselage, served to protect the aircraft body and flight system components from both the blast wave and exploded fragments. The resulting damage produced by the explosions was characterized and the absorbing characteristics of the shielding were evaluated. In addition, the energy of the luggage fragments was estimated.

Akerman, M.A.; Kass, M.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Clough, B.T. [Wright Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

1993-12-31

285

Planar blast scaling with condensed-phase explosives in a shock tube  

SciTech Connect

Blast waves are strong shock waves that result from large power density deposition into a fluid. The rapid energy release of high-explosive (HE) detonation provides sufficiently high power density for blast wave generation. Often it is desirable to quantify the energy released by such an event and to determine that energy relative to other reference explosives to derive an explosive-equivalence value. In this study, we use condensed-phase explosives to drive a blast wave in a shock tube. The explosive material and quantity were varied to produce blast waves of differing strengths. Pressure transducers at varying lengths measured the post-shock pressure, shock-wave arrival time and sidewall impulse associated with each test. Blast-scaling concepts in a one-dimensional geometry were then used to both determine the energy release associated with each test and to verify the scaling of the shock position versus time, overpressure versus distance, and impulse. Most blast scaling measurements to-date have been performed in a three-dimensional geometry such as a blast arena. Testing in a three-dimensional geometry can be challenging, however, as spherical shock-wave symmetry is required for good measurements. Additionally, the spherical wave strength decays rapidly with distance and it can be necessary to utilize larger (several kg) quantities of explosive to prevent significant decay from occurring before an idealized blast wave has formed. Such a mode of testing can be expensive, require large quantities of explosive, and be limited by both atmospheric conditions (such as rain) and by noise complaints from the population density near the test arena. Testing is possible in more compact geometries, however. Non-planar blast waves can be formed into a quasi-planar shape by confining the shock diffraction with the walls of a shock tube. Regardless of the initial form, the wave shape will begin to approximate a planar front after successive wave reflections from the tube walls. Such a technique has previously been used to obtain blast scaling measurements in the planar geometry with gaseous explosives and the condensed-phase explosive nitroguanidine. Recently, there has been much interest in the blast characterization of various non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) materials. With non-ideals, the detonation reaction zone is significantly larger (up to several cm for ANFO) than more ideal explosives. Wave curvature, induced by charge-geometry, can significantly affect the energy release associated with NIHEs. To measure maximum NIHE energy release accurately, it is desirable to minimize any such curvature and, if possible, to overdrive the detonation shock to ensure completion of chemical reactions ahead of the sonic locus associated with the reaction zone. This is achieved in the current study through use of a powerful booster HE and a charge geometry consisting of short cylindrical lengths of NIHE initiated along the charge centerline.

Jackson, Scott L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25

286

Correlation of the results of shock-initiation tests  

SciTech Connect

Results from a variety of shock initiation and detonation propagation tests including the results from a large scale propellant initiation study have been correlated, applying a critical energy fluence criterion to pressure histories. Organization of the results shows systematic differences between pressed explosives and cast propellants. Further, the composite materials used in the large-scale propellant study must be considered as belonging to another class that differs from ideal explosives. Hydrodynamic calculations are employed to establish the precise nature of the correlation. It is shown how simple approximations can be used to evaluate shock initiation thresholds.

Weston, A.M.; Kincaid, J.F.; James, E.; Lee, E.L.; Green, L.G.; Walton, J.R.

1981-01-01

287

Planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrade: beam tests results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The performance of planar silicon pixel sensors, in development for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades, has been examined in a series of beam tests at the CERN SPS facilities since 2009. Salient results are reported on the key parameters, including the spatial resolution, the charge collection and the charge sharing between adjacent cells, for different bulk materials and sensor geometries. Measurements are presented for n+-in-n pixel sensors irradiated with a range of fluences and for p-type silicon sensors with various layouts from different vendors. All tested sensors were connected via bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel read-out chip. The tests reveal that both n-type and p-type planar sensors are able to collect significant charge even after the lifetime fluence expected at the HL-LHC.

Weingarten, J.; Altenheiner, S.; Beimforde, M.; Benoit, M.; Bomben, M.; Calderini, G.; Gallrapp, C.; George, M.; Gibson, S.; Grinstein, S.; Janoska, Z.; Jentzsch, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Kishida, T.; La Rosa, A.; Libov, V.; Macchiolo, A.; Marchiori, G.; Muenstermann, D.; Nagai, R.; Piacquadio, G.; Ristic, B.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rummler, A.; Takubo, Y.; Troska, G.; Tsiskaridtze, S.; Tsurin, I.; Unno, Y.; Weigell, P.; Wittig, T.

2012-10-01

288

High-Speed, High-Temperature Finger Seal Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Finger seals have significantly lower leakage rates than conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines and are expected to decrease specific fuel consumption by over 1 percent and to decrease direct operating cost by over 0.5 percent. Their compliant design accommodates shaft growth and motion due to thermal and dynamic loads with minimal wear. The cost to fabricate these finger seals is estimated to be about half the cost to fabricate brush seals. A finger seal has been tested in NASA's High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig at operating conditions up to 1200 F, 1200 ft/s, and 75 psid. Static, performance and endurance test results are presented. While seal leakage and wear performance are acceptable, further design improvements are needed to reduce the seal power loss.

Proctor, Margaret P.; Kumar, Arun; Delgado, Irebert R.

2002-01-01

289

Cycom 977-2 Composite Material: Impact Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The reaction frequency data from 13A testing by MSFC and WSTF appear well behaved for the sample number used by each and exhibit the same type of energy level dependency. The reaction frequency shift in energy level is unexplained at this time. All the 13A data suggest that only a small amount of material is consumed when reactions take place. At ambient pressure, most of not all reactions are quenched as indicated by the small mass loss. As test pressure is increased in LOX using 13B results. Cycom does not support initiation of reactions or propagations of reactions in GOX at 100 psis based on tests at MSFC and WSTF at 72 ft-lb impact energy. No batch effect was identified in LOX or GOX.

Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen; Watkins, Casey

2005-01-01

290

TEST RESULTS FROM GAMMA IRRADIATION OF ALUMINUM OXYHYDROXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated metal oxides or oxyhydroxides boehmite and gibbsite that can form on spent aluminum-clad nuclear fuel assemblies during in-core and post-discharge wet storage were exposed as granular powders to gamma irradiation in a {sup 60}Co irradiator in closed laboratory test vessels with air and with argon as separate cover gases. The results show that boehmite readily evolves hydrogen with exposure up to a dose of 1.8 x 10{sup 8} rad, the maximum tested, in both a full-dried and moist condition of the powder, whereas only a very small measurable quantity of hydrogen was generated from the granular powder of gibbsite. Specific information on the test setup, sample characteristics, sample preparation, irradiation, and gas analysis are described.

Fisher, D.; Westbrook, M.; Sindelar, R.

2012-02-01

291

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of the study described in this report is to provide experimental data for the first key technical area, potential plugging of small breaches, by performing small-scale tests with a range of orifice sizes and orientations representative of the WTP conditions. The simulants used were chosen to represent the range of process stream properties in the WTP. Testing conducted after the plugging tests in the small- and large-scale test stands addresses the second key technical area, aerosol generation. The results of the small-scale aerosol generation tests are included in Mahoney et al. 2012. The area of spray generation from large breaches is covered by large-scale testing in Schonewill et al. 2012.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

2012-09-01

292

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20

293

Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube.  

PubMed

The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test. PMID:21198058

Courtney, Michael W; Courtney, Amy C

2010-12-01

294

Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

Courtney, Michael W.; Courtney, Amy C.

2010-12-01

295

Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it was known that the accelerated aging process decreases insulation life by approximately 50% for each 10 C temperature rise. Therefore, the first phases of the program, not reported in these test results, were to select wire insulation constructions that could operate at high temperature and low pressure for over 10,000 hours with negligible shrinkage and little materials' deterioration.The final phase of the program was to determine accelerated aging characteristics. When an insulation construction is subjected to partial discharges the insulation is locally heated by the bombardment of the discharges, the insulation is also subjected to ozone and other deteriorating gas particles that may significantly increase the aging process. Several insulation systems using either a single material or combinations of teflon, kapton, and glass insulation constructions were tested. All constructions were rated to be partial discharge and/or corona-free at 240 volts, 400 Hz and 260 C (500 F) for 50, 000 hours at altitudes equivalent to the Paschen law. Minimum partial discharge aging tests were preceded by screening tests lasting 20 hours at 260 C. The aging process was accelerated by subjecting the test articles to temperatures up to 370 C (700 F) with and without partial discharges. After one month operation with continuous glow discharges surrounding the test articles, most insulation systems were either destroyed or became brittle, cracked, and unsafe for use. Time with space radiation as with partial discharges is accumulative.

Dunbar, William G.

1995-11-01

296

Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it was known that the accelerated aging process decreases insulation life by approximately 50% for each 10 C temperature rise. Therefore, the first phases of the program, not reported in these test results, were to select wire insulation constructions that could operate at high temperature and low pressure for over 10,000 hours with negligible shrinkage and little materials' deterioration.The final phase of the program was to determine accelerated aging characteristics. When an insulation construction is subjected to partial discharges the insulation is locally heated by the bombardment of the discharges, the insulation is also subjected to ozone and other deteriorating gas particles that may significantly increase the aging process. Several insulation systems using either a single material or combinations of teflon, kapton, and glass insulation constructions were tested. All constructions were rated to be partial discharge and/or corona-free at 240 volts, 400 Hz and 260 C (500 F) for 50, 000 hours at altitudes equivalent to the Paschen law. Minimum partial discharge aging tests were preceded by screening tests lasting 20 hours at 260 C. The aging process was accelerated by subjecting the test articles to temperatures up to 370 C (700 F) with and without partial discharges. After one month operation with continuous glow discharges surrounding the test articles, most insulation systems were either destroyed or became brittle, cracked, and unsafe for use. Time with space radiation as with partial discharges is accumulative.

Dunbar, William G.

1995-01-01

297

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

2013-08-01

298

Results of a sub-scale model rotor icing test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A heavily instrumented sub-scale model of a helicopter main rotor was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in September and November 1989. The four-bladed main rotor had a diameter of 1.83 m (6.00 ft) and the 0.124 m (4.9 in) chord rotor blades were specially fabricated for this experiment. The instrumented rotor was mounted on a Sikorsky Aircraft Powered Force Model, which enclosed a rotor balance and other measurement systems. The model rotor was exposed to a range of icing conditions that included variations in temperature, liquid water content, and median droplet diameter, and was operated over ranges of advance ratio, shaft angle, tip Mach number (rotor speed) and weight coefficient to determine the effect of these parameters on ice accretion. In addition to strain gage and balance data, the test was documented with still, video, and high speed photography, ice profile tracings, and ice molds. The sensitivity of the model rotor to the test parameters is given, and the result to theoretical predictions are compared. Test data quality was excellent, and ice accretion prediction methods and rotor performance prediction methods (using published icing lift and drag relationships) reproduced the performance trends observed in the test. Adjustments to the correlation coefficients to improve the level of correlation are suggested.

Flemming, Robert J.; Bond, Thomas H.; Britton, Randall K.

1991-01-01

299

Experimental Results of Integrated Refrigeration and Storage System Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launch operations engineers at the Kennedy Space Center have identified an Integrated Refrigeration and Storage system as a promising technology to reduce launch costs and enable advanced cryogenic operations. This system uses a close cycle Brayton refrigerator to remove energy from the stored cryogenic propellant. This allows for the potential of a zero loss storage and transfer system, as well and control of the state of the propellant through densification or re-liquefaction. However, the behavior of the fluid in this type of system is different than typical cryogenic behavior, and there will be a learning curve associated with its use. A 400 liter research cryostat has been designed, fabricated and delivered to KSC to test the thermo fluid behavior of liquid oxygen as energy is removed from the cryogen by a simulated DC cycle cryocooler. Results of the initial testing phase focusing on heat exchanger characterization and zero loss storage operations using liquid oxygen are presented in this paper. Future plans for testing of oxygen densification tests and oxygen liquefaction tests will also be discussed. KEYWORDS: Liquid Oxygen, Refrigeration, Storage

Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Jumper, K.

2009-01-01

300

HELIOS surface materials, test-predictions and test-results of orbit conditions compared with mission results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The severe HELIOS mission environment asked for an appropriate material selection for optical surfaces based on a good approach to predict degradation and contamination effects by analysis and an adequate vertification by test. Analysis results are compared with flight data of the HELIOS-A mission.

Winkler, W.

1975-01-01

301

Honeywell Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, distillation systems have been actively pursued as one of the technologies for water recovery. The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a vacuum rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. The CDS was previously under development through Honeywell and NASA. In 2009, an assessment was performed to collect data to support down-selection and development of a primary distillation technology for application in a lunar outpost water recovery system. Based on the results of this testing, an expert panel concluded that the CDS showed adequate development maturity, TRL-4, together with the best product water quality and competitive weight and power estimates to warrant further development. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) worked to address weaknesses identified by The Panel; namely bearing design and heat pump power efficiency. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades. The CDS will also have been challenged with ISS analog waste streams and a subset of those being considered for Exploration architectures. This paper details interim results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam

2014-01-01

302

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Tone Modal Structure Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This investigation is part of a test series that was extremely comprehensive and included aerodynamic and acoustic testing of a fan stage using two different fan rotors and three different stator designs. The test series is known as the Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) and was conducted by NASA Glenn as part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. Tone mode measurements of one of the rotors with three different stators were made. The stator designs involve changes in vane count and sweep at constant solidity. The results of both inlet and exhaust tone mode measurements are presented in terms of mode power for both circumferential and radial mode orders. The results show benefits of vane sweep to be large, up to 13 dB in total tone power. At many conditions, the increase in power due to cutting on the rotor/stator interaction is more than offset by vane sweep. The rotor locked mode is shown as an important contributor to tone power when the blade tip speed is near and above Mach one. This is most evident in the inlet when the direct rotor field starts to cut on.

Heidelberg, Laurence J.

2002-01-01

303

Removal of phosphate from aqueous solution with blast furnace slag  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blast furnace slag was used to remove phosphate from aqueous solutions. The influence of pH, temperature, agitation rate, and blast furnace slag dosage on phosphate removal was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. In addition, the yield and mechanisms of phosphate removal were explained on the basis of the results of X-ray spectroscopy, measurements of zeta potential

Ensar Oguz

2004-01-01

304

[Blast lung injuries].  

PubMed

In armed conflicts and during terrorist attacks, explosive devices are a major cause of mortality. The lung is one of the organs most sensitive to blasts. Thus, today it is important that every GP at least knows the basics and practices regarding treatment of blast victims. We suggest, following a review of the explosions and an assessment of the current threats, detailing the lung injuries brought about by the explosions and the main treatments currently recommended. PMID:20933166

Clapson, P; Pasquier, P; Perez, J-P; Debien, B

2010-09-01

305

Factory acceptance test results for the DIRSP projection optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Factory Acceptance Test (FAT) results for the projection optical subsystem (POS) of US Army STIRCOM's dynamic infrared scene projector (DIRSP) are presented in this paper. DIRSP is a low background (-35 degrees Celsius) hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL), long-wave infrared (LWIR) scene projector built by Mission Research Corporation (MRC) for use by the Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC). It has an effective emitter array size of 1632 X 672 suspended-membrane micro-resistor elements. The POS is responsible for generating this effective array size from three smaller arrays using a mosaic image combiner, adding background light from an external blackbody, and collimating the combined radiation with a 5:1 vacuum enclosed -35 degree Celsius zoom lens. The FAT results reported demonstrate good POS performance compared to the design for focal length, F/#, MTF and apparent temperature.

Thomas, Matthew C.; Ward, Craig S.

2000-07-01

306

Preliminary Results from a Test Beam of ADRIANO Prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physics program at future colliders demands an energy resolution of the calorimetric component of detectors at the limits of traditional techniques. The ADRIANO technology (A Dual-readout Integrally Active Non-segmented Option) is under development with an expected excellent performance. Results from detailed Monte Carlo studies on performance with respect to energy resolution, linear response and transverse containment and a preliminary optimization of the layout are presented. A baseline configuration is chosen with an estimated energy resolution of ?(E)/E ? 30%/?E, to support an extensive R&D program recently started by T1015 Collaboration at Fermilab. Preliminary results from a test beam at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) of a ~ 1?I prototype are presented, along with simulation studies. Future prospects with ultra-heavy glass are, also, summarized.

Gatto, C.; Di Benedetto, V.; Mazzacane, A.; T1015 Collaboration

2012-12-01

307

Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples  

SciTech Connect

A series of analytical tests was conducted on a suite of granitic rock samples from the Daya Bay region of southeast China. The objective of these analyses was to determine key rock properties that would affect the suitability of this location for the siting of a neutrino oscillation experiment. This report contains the results of chemical analyses, rock property measurements, and a calculation of the mean atomic weight.

Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji

2004-10-12

308

NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications program were to investigate the effects of atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and AO with UV synergistic effects on wire insulation materials. The AO exposure was on the order of 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm and the vacuum UV radiation was on the order of 10,000 ESH. The results of these tests are presented in this document

Vaughn, Jason A.

1995-11-01

309

CDM Substructure in Gravitational Lenses: Tests and Results  

E-print Network

We use a simple statistical test to show that the anomalous flux ratios observed in gravitational lenses are created by gravitational perturbations from substructure rather than propagation effects in the interstellar medium or incomplete models for the gravitational potential of the lens galaxy. We review current estimates that the substructure represents between 0.6% and 7% (90% confidence) of the lens galaxy mass, and outline future observational programs which can improve the results.

C. S. Kochanek; N. Dalal

2002-12-11

310

NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications program were to investigate the effects of atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and AO with UV synergistic effects on wire insulation materials. The AO exposure was on the order of 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm and the vacuum UV radiation was on the order of 10,000 ESH. The results of these tests are presented in this document

Vaughn, Jason A.

1995-01-01

311

Test Results of Tesla-Style Cryomodules at Fermilab  

E-print Network

Commissioning and operation of the first Tesla-style Cryomodule (CM-1) at Fermilab was concluded in recent months. A second Tesla Type III+ module, RFCA002, will be replacing it. CM-1 is the first 8-cavity ILC style cryomodule to be built at Fermilab and also the first accelerating cryomodule of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). We report on the operating results of both of these cryomodules.

Harms, E; Chase, B; Crawford, D; Cullerton, E; Edstrom, D; Hocker, A; Kucera, M; Leibfritz, J; Nezhevenko, O; Nicklaus, D; Pischalnikov, Y; Prieto, P; Reid, J; Schappert, W; Varghese, P

2013-01-01

312

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

2013-08-01

313

A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage.  

PubMed

We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4 psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:22504073

Hines-Beard, Jessica; Marchetta, Jeffrey; Gordon, Sarah; Chaum, Edward; Geisert, Eldon E; Rex, Tonia S

2012-06-01

314

A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage  

PubMed Central

We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:22504073

Hines-Beard, Jessica; Marchetta, Jeffrey; Gordon, Sarah; Chaum, Edward; Geisert, Eldon E.; Rex, Tonia S.

2012-01-01

315

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

2005-01-01

316

Qualification test results for blue-red reflecting solar covers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent market forces and design innovations have spurred the development of solar cell covers that significantly reduce the solar absorptance for a cell array. GaAs cells, using Ge as the substrate host material, can have a significantly higher output if the solar absorptance of the cell array is reduced. New optical coating design techniques have allowed the construction of covers that reflect the ultraviolet energy (below 350 nm) and the near infrared energy (above 900 nm) resulting in the beneficial reduction in absorptance. Recent modeling suggests three or more present output increase due to the lowered temperature with such a device. Within the last several months we have completed the testing of production samples of these new covers in a qualification series that included the usual environmental effects associated with the routine testing of solar cell covers and the combined effects of protons, electrons and solar UV as would be encountered in space. For the combined effects testing the samples were exposed to 300 sun days equivalent UV, 5 x 10(exp 14)/sq cm of 0.5 MeV protons and 10(exp 15)/sq cm of 1.0 MeV electrons. Measurements of the reflectance, transmission, emittance and other appropriate parameters were made before and after the testing. As measured by the averaged transmission over the cell operating band, the change in transmission for the samples was less than or about equal to 1 percent. The details of the testing and the results in terms of transmission, reflectance and emittance are discussed in the paper.

Beauchamp, W. T.

1994-01-01

317

SCD1 thermal design and test result analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SCD 01 (Satelite de Coleta de Dados 01) is a spin stabilized low Earth orbit satellite dedicated to the collection and distribution of environmental data. It was completely developed at the Brazilian Institute for Space Research (INPE) and is scheduled to be launched in 1992. The SCD 01 passive thermal control design configuration is presented and the thermal analysis results are compared with the temperatures obtained from a Thermal Balance Test. The correlation between the analytical and experimental results is considered very good. Numerical flight simulations show that the thermal control design can keep all the subsystem temperatures within their specified temperature range.

Cardoso, Humberto Pontes; Muraoka, Issamu; Mantelli, Marcia Barbosa Henriques; Leite, Rosangela M. G.

1990-01-01

318

Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project  

SciTech Connect

Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports.

BRADSHAW, ROBERT W.; DAWSON, DANIEL B.; DE LA ROSA, WILFREDO; GILBERT, ROCKWELL; GOODS, STEVEN H.; HALE, MARY JANE; JACOBS, PETER; JONES, SCOTT A.; KOLB, GREGORY J.; PACHECO, JAMES E.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.; REILLY, HUGH E.; SHOWALTER, STEVEN K.; VANT-HULL, LORIN L.

2002-01-01

319

Chronic cannabis users: Further analysis of objective test results.  

PubMed

Twelve objective tests, generating 16 psychological test variables were administered to 850 chronic cannabis takers and 839 non-takers, all Egyptian males, ranging in age between 15 and 50 years, and representing various positions on continua of literacy-illiteracy and urbanism-ruralism. The tests were intended to assess different modalities of 5 broad psychological functions: speed of psychomotor performance, estimation of moderate distances, estimation of a few minutes time interval, immediate memory for digits and designs and visual-motor co-ordination. Analysis of variance based on 3 x 3 x 2 factorial design was carried out and revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups of subjects on most of the test variables. Detailed analyses showed that controls displayed better performance than drug users on the majority of the variables. Significant second order interaction effects emerged in a big number of cases denoting that, under certain conditions relating to literacy-illiteracy and urbanism-ruralism, the superiority of controls over cannabis users became much more impressive. Our findings were discussed in the light of investigations which were conducted on the psychological correlates and/or effects of long term and short term cannabis consumption. The clinical psychological literature was cited where slowness of psychomotor performance, defective visual-motor co-ordination and impaired memory for designs were reported to be associated with psychiatric disorder. It is suggested that our results point to meaningful associations between chronic cannabis consumption and manifestations of psychopathology. PMID:1044285

Soueif, M I

1975-01-01

320

Test results of the advanced translator processing system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Translator Processing System was developed to provide a low cost alternative to tracking translated GPS signals. It is backwards compatible with the Translator Processing System (TPS) currently used to track Ballistic Missile Translators (BMT) by the US Ranges. NAVSYS has also developed a BMT compatible Translator. A key element of the ATPS is the Preamplifier/Downconvertor (P/DC) module which was developed by NAVSYS to condition the received Translator signal so it can be tracked with a conventional C/A code receiver. This significantly reduces the cost of the hardware by allowing the ATPS to be constructed mostly from off-the-shelf components. The ATPS and Translator were tested against the RAJPO Ballistic Missile and Translator Processing System Specifications. This paper presents the results of tests demonstrating the performance of the ATPS and Translator under different operating conditions. NAVSYS has also developed a Post Test Processing System (PTPS), incorporating the same components, which records the Translator data during the tests. When this data is played back, high-accuracy Time and Space Position

Brown, Alison K.; Sward, William; Brown, Peter

1992-11-01

321

Test results for the Gemini Planet Imager data reduction pipeline  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility instrument for the Gemini Observatory designed to detect and characterize planets and debris disks orbiting nearby stars; its science camera is a near infrared integral field spectrograph. We have developed a data pipeline for this instrument, which will be made publicly available to the community. The GPI data reduction pipeline (DRP) incorporates all necessary image reduction and calibration steps for high contrast imaging in both the spectral and polarimetric modes, including datacube generation, wavelength solution, astrometric and photometric calibrations, and speckle suppression via ADI and SSDI algorithms. It is implemented in IDL as a flexible modular system, and includes both command line and graphical interface tools including a customized viewer for GPI datacubes. This GPI data reduction pipeline is currently working very well, and is in use daily processing data during the instrument’s ongoing integration and test period at UC Santa Cruz. Here we summarize the results from recent pipeline tests, and present reductions of instrument test data taken with GPI. We will continue to refine and improve these tools throughout the rest of GPI’s testing and commissioning, and they will be released to the community, including both IDL source code and compiled versions that can be used without an IDL license.

Maire, Jérôme; Perrin, Marshall D.; Doyon, René; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Larkin, James E.; Weiss, Jason L.; Marois, Christian; Konopacky, Quinn M.; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell; Graham, James R.; Dunn, Jennifer; Galicher, Raphael; Marchis, Franck; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Labrie, Kathleen; Thomas, Sandrine J.; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Rantakyro, Fredrik T.; Palmer, David W.; Macintosh, Bruce A.

2012-09-01

322

30 CFR 57.22607 - Blasting on shift (III mines).  

...NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Explosives... When blasting on shift, tests for methane shall be made in the mine atmosphere...not be done when 1.0 percent or more methane is...

2014-07-01

323

Critical composite joint subcomponents: Analysis and test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This program has been conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints of a composite wing structure meeting design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. A prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Load sharing between bolts in multirow joints was computed by a nonlinear analysis program (A4FJ) which was used both to assess the efficiency of different joint design concepts and to predict the strengths of large test articles representing a section from a wing root chord-wise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. A highlight of these tests was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains on the order of 0.005 which represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art. The improvement was attained largely as the result of the better understanding of the load sharing in multirow joints provided by the analysis. The typical load intensity on the structural joints was about 40 to 45 thousand pound per inch in laminates having interspersed 37 1/2-percent 0-degree plies, 50-percent + or - 45-degrees plies and 12 1/2-percent 90-degrees plies. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.010-inch thick unidirectional tape.

Bunin, B. L.

1983-01-01

324

Attenuation Analysis of Quarry Blast Vibrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study we analyzed seismograms created by rock quarry blasts and the effect of rock composition and structure on the attenuation of seismic energy. Luck Stone, a well-known rock quarry company in Virginia, provided the seismic database with the goal of analyzing rates of attenuation at their Boscobel and Leesburg sites, which consist of different rock types (granite and diabase, respectively). Over the years, the sites where these quarries are located have become progressively more residential. As a result, public awareness of quarry blasting has increased, and vibrations in residential areas are increasingly reported. Luck Stone operates seismometers throughout the region and closely monitors vibrations. We analyzed changes in amplitude and frequency content of quarry blast seismograms using power spectra, and compare the rate of attenuation with the propagation distance and local rock type. Our results improve the understanding of how these different rocks types attenuate energy and may help quarries develop specific approaches to further diminish blast vibrations at these locations. We also briefly discuss a comparison of the quarry blast data with attenuation of seismic energy from local earthquakes in similar rock types.

Brooks, T.; Courtier, A. M.

2009-12-01

325

Vented Tank Resupply Experiment--Flight Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reports the results of the Vented Tank Resupply Experiment (VTRE) which was flown as a payload on STS 77. VTRE looks at the ability of vane Propellant Management Devices (PMD) to separate liquid and gas in low gravity. VTRE used two clear 0.8 cubic foot tanks one spherical and one with a short barrel section and transferred Refrigerant 113 between them as well as venting it to space. Tests included retention of liquid during transfer, liquid free venting, and recovery of liquid into the PMD after thruster firing. Liquid was retained successfully at the highest flow rate tested (2.73 gpm). Liquid free vents were achieved for both tanks, although at a higher flow rate (0.1591 cfm) for the spherical tank than the other (0.0400 cfm). Recovery from a thruster firing which moved the liquid to the opposite end of the tank from the PMD was achieved in 30 seconds.

Chato, David J.; Martin, Timothy A.

1997-01-01

326

Results of field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is obtaining information on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being tested to: (a) develop a low-level waste data base, and (b) obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. This paper updates field testing of those waste forms during FY-1989. The results of the lysimeters is presented and the use of lysimeter data in performance assessment is discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

1990-01-01

327

Multislit optimized spectrometer: flight-like environment test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA ESTO funded Multislit Optimized Spectrometer (MOS) Instrument Incubator Program advances a spatial multiplexing spectrometer for coastal ocean remote sensing from laboratory demonstration to flight-like environment testing. The multiple slit design reduces the required telescope aperture leading to mass and volume reductions over conventional spectrometers when applied to the GEO-CAPE oceans mission. This paper discusses the performance and characterization of the MOS instrument from laboratory and thermal vacuum testing. It also presents the current technology readiness level and possible future applications. Results of an ocean color data product simulation study using flight-like performance data from MOS are also covered. The MOS instrument implementation for GEO-CAPE provides system benefits that may lead to measurable cost savings and reductions in risks while meeting its science objectives.

Good, William S.; Valle, Tim; Davis, Curtiss O.; Tufillaro, Nicholas; Spuhler, Peter; Hardesty, Chuck; Staples, Conor

2014-09-01

328

Research study for materials/properties test results database  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lubricants Data Base System was designed and developed for operation on the DEC PDP 11/24 computer. The procedures are written in Datatrieve. In transferring the Lubricants System to the VAX 8600 computer, the Datatrieve had to be 80 percent rewritten. At the end of the contract the Lubricants System is operational on both the PDP 11/24 and VAX 8600 computers. The LOX/GOX, Aluminum/Steel, Toxic, VCM, and Flammability Systems are operational only on the PDP 11/24 computer. The Toxic, VCM, and Flammability Systems do not contain any useable data, only test data. However, the LOX/GOX file does contain test data results supplied by MSFC.

1988-01-01

329

Engineering test results for the Moog Single Line Disconnect  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New and innovative types of disconnects will be required to service, resupply, and maintain future spacecraft subsystems. Efficiently maintaining orbiting scientific instruments, spacecraft support systems, and a manned space station over a long period of time will require the periodic replenishment of consumables and the replacement of components. To accomplish these tasks, the fluid disconnect must be designed to allow the connection and separation of fluid lines and components with minimal hazard to crew and equipment. The capability to simply connect a refueling line or to easily replace a failed component greatly extends the life of a space based fluid system. A test program was initiated to evaluate the Moog Single Line Disconnect. The objective of the test program was to demonstrate the operational characteristics of the disconnect and to verify compliance with current safety regulations. The results of the program are summarized in the referenced document.

Glubke, Scott E.

1990-01-01

330

Tensile Test Results on Compacted and Annealed 316LN Material  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The torodial-field (TF) magnet coils for ITER are made by superconducting cable in conduit conductors (CICC) using 316LN for the conduit. Compaction of the conduit and heat treatment to react the Nb3Sn material are one of the main steps during manufacture of this type of conductor. Therefore a systematic investigation was done to examine the influence of compaction and heat treatment on the mechanical behavior of this material. Several 316LN tubes were deformed to smaller radii to obtain different stages of compaction, followed by a heat treatment. From these tubes flat specimen were made by electron-discharge-machining (EDM) for tensile tests. The results are reported and compared to former tests on samples either compacted or heat treated.

Weiss, K.-P.; Ehrlich, A.; della Corte, A.; Vostner, A.

2010-04-01

331

LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results  

SciTech Connect

The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here.

Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McCarthy, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Toole, L. [Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States)

1998-12-31

332

Prediction of shuttle vehicle damping from component test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A dissipative energy approach for predicting the damping of four-component space shuttle model by means of modal parameters obtained from tests of the individual components is presented. A relationship between modal damping energy per cycle and peak strain (or kinetic) energy is first determined empirically from test data for each component. Undamped analytical models of each component are also developed, and combined into a system model from which are obtained modal kinetic (or strain) energies for its respective modes. These data are then used with the empirical damping curves to apportion the proper amount of damping energy to each component in a combined system mode, and thereby allow a prediction of damping ratio. Some discrepancies in results are noted to occur because of incomplete modeling of connecting link mechanisms and anomalies in modal responses.

Kana, D. D.

1973-01-01

333

A critical review of anaesthetised animal models and alternatives for military research, testing and training, with a focus on blast damage, haemorrhage and resuscitation.  

PubMed

Military research, testing, and surgical and resuscitation training, are aimed at mitigating the consequences of warfare and terrorism to armed forces and civilians. Traumatisation and tissue damage due to explosions, and acute loss of blood due to haemorrhage, remain crucial, potentially preventable, causes of battlefield casualties and mortalities. There is also the additional threat from inhalation of chemical and aerosolised biological weapons. The use of anaesthetised animal models, and their respective replacement alternatives, for military purposes -- particularly for blast injury, haemorrhaging and resuscitation training -- is critically reviewed. Scientific problems with the animal models include the use of crude, uncontrolled and non-standardised methods for traumatisation, an inability to model all key trauma mechanisms, and complex modulating effects of general anaesthesia on target organ physiology. Such effects depend on the anaesthetic and influence the cardiovascular system, respiration, breathing, cerebral haemodynamics, neuroprotection, and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Some anaesthetics also bind to the NMDA brain receptor with possible differential consequences in control and anaesthetised animals. There is also some evidence for gender-specific effects. Despite the fact that these issues are widely known, there is little published information on their potential, at best, to complicate data interpretation and, at worst, to invalidate animal models. There is also a paucity of detail on the anaesthesiology used in studies, and this can hinder correct data evaluation. Welfare issues relate mainly to the possibility of acute pain as a side-effect of traumatisation in recovered animals. Moreover, there is the increased potential for animals to suffer when anaesthesia is temporary, and the procedures invasive. These dilemmas can be addressed, however, as a diverse range of replacement approaches exist, including computer and mathematical dynamic modelling of the human body, cadavers, interactive human patient simulators for training, in vitro techniques involving organotypic cultures of target organs, and epidemiological and clinical studies. While the first four of these have long proven useful for developing protective measures and predicting the consequences of trauma, and although many phenomena and their sequelae arising from different forms of trauma in vivo can be induced and reproduced in vitro, non-animal approaches require further development, and their validation and use need to be coordinated and harmonised. Recommendations to these ends are proposed, and the scientific and welfare problems associated with animal models are addressed, with the future focus being on the use of batteries of complementary replacement methods deployed in integrated strategies, and on greater transparency and scientific cooperation. PMID:24329746

Combes, Robert D

2013-11-01

334

The startup of coal injection on Bethlehem Steel`s Burns Harbor blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect

Despite the simplicity of operation and the excellent results from natural gas injection at Bethlehem Steel, there were concerns about future supply and price stability. Furthermore, the maximum projected gas rates still required coke consumption in excess of Burns Harbor`s coke production capacity. Thus in 1990 Bethlehem Steel entered into an agreement to participate in the DOE Clean Coal Technology demonstration project by installing a granular coal injection facility at Burns Harbor. This agreement called for a facility to be constructed which was capable of processing and injecting a wide range of coal types in either granular or pulverized form. Tests were to be conducted to assess the effects of a range of coal properties, coal sizing, and injection rates on a number of key blast furnace parameters. During all the transitioning from natural gas injection to coal injection and subsequent tests it was essential that the blast furnaces maintain their historic operating performance in support of the Burns Harbor Division`s product market requirements. Unlike many coal injection facilities, the Burns Harbor installation is owned by Bethlehem Steel and the operation and maintenance from raw coal unloading through the tuyeres is the responsibility of the Blast Furnace Department. As the authors will discuss, the start-up of this major installation involved significant challenges, the most critical of which was maintaining historically high blast furnace operating standards while commissioning a new facility and adapting the furnace process to coal injection.

Hill, D.G.; Strayer, T.J.; Durko, D.P.; Dwelly, M.J.

1996-12-31

335

Experimental test results from an environmental protection agency test method for determination of vapor suppressant effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results obtained from laboratory experiments conducted using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) subpart WWWW of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 63 (1)-test method are discussed in this article. The original test method was developed to measure the effectiveness of wax suppressants used to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from unsaturated polyester (UP)\\/vinyl ester resins. Wax additions of

Richard W. Tock; Daniel W. Ahern

2005-01-01

336

Relationships between driving simulator performance and driving test results.  

PubMed

This article is considered relevant because: 1) car driving is an everyday and safety-critical task; 2) simulators are used to an increasing extent for driver training (related topics: training, virtual reality, human-machine interaction); 3) the article addresses relationships between performance in the simulator and driving test results--a relevant topic for those involved in driver training and the virtual reality industries; 4) this article provides new insights about individual differences in young drivers' behaviour. Simulators are being used to an increasing extent for driver training, allowing for the possibility of collecting objective data on driver proficiency under standardised conditions. However, relatively little is known about how learner drivers' simulator measures relate to on-road driving. This study proposes a theoretical framework that quantifies driver proficiency in terms of speed of task execution, violations and errors. This study investigated the relationships between these three measures of learner drivers' (n=804) proficiency during initial simulation-based training and the result of the driving test on the road, occurring an average of 6 months later. A higher chance of passing the driving test the first time was associated with making fewer steering errors on the simulator and could be predicted in regression analysis with a correlation of 0.18. Additionally, in accordance with the theoretical framework, a shorter duration of on-road training corresponded with faster task execution, fewer violations and fewer steering errors (predictive correlation 0.45). It is recommended that researchers conduct more large-scale studies into the reliability and validity of simulator measures and on-road driving tests. PMID:18972239

de Winter, J C F; de Groot, S; Mulder, M; Wieringa, P A; Dankelman, J; Mulder, J A

2009-02-01

337

The ACES Mission: System Tests Results and Development Status  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) testing fundamental laws of physics with high-performance atomic clocks1 . Operated on-board the International Space Station, the ACES payload will distribute a clock signal with fractional frequency instability and inaccuracy of 1·10-16 . This frequency reference is resulting from the medium-term stability of an active hydrogen maser (SHM) and the long-term stability and accuracy of a primary standard based on samples of laser cooled Cs atoms (PHARAO). The ACES clocks are combined by two servo-loops, the first stabilizing the PHARAO local oscillator on SHM, the second controlling the long-term instabilities of SHM using the error signal generated by the PHARAO Cesium resonator. A link in the microwave domain (MWL) and an optical link (ELT) will make the ACES clock signal available to ground laboratories equipped with atomic clocks, connecting them in a worldwide network. Space-to-ground and ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards will be used to test Einstein's theory of general relativity including a precision measurement of the gravitational red-shift, a search for time variations of fundamental constants, and Lorentz Invariance tests. Applications in geodesy, optical time transfer, and ranging will also be supported. The ACES main instruments and subsystems have now reached an advanced status of devel-opment, demonstrated by the completion and the successful test of their engineering models. In particular, a dedicated test campaign has recently verified the performance of the ACES system, where PHARAO and SHM, locked together via the ACES servo loops, are operated as a unique oscillator to generate the ACES frequency reference. The test campaign conducted 1 Luigi Cacciapuoti and Christophe Salomon, Space Clocks and Fundamental Tests: The ACES Experiment, EPJ Special topics 172, 57 (2009). at CNES premises in Toulouse between July and November 2009 concluded the engineering models phase, releasing the manufacturing of the ACES flight models. The first prototype of the ACES MWL ground terminal is being assembled. The ACES ground segment architecture has been defined. Based on an extension of the standard Columbus USOC (User Support and Operations Center) located in CADMOS-Toulouse, the ACES USOC will remotely control the network of MWL ground terminals, and provide the necessary interfaces with the Columbus Control Center and the ACES users' community. The current development status of the ACES mission elements will be presented and discussed. An overview of future planning will be given.

Cacciapuoti, Luigi

338

Radioactive Testing Results in Support of the In-Tank Precipitation Facility - Filtrate Test  

SciTech Connect

This report documents results investigating the decomposition of excess NaTPB in presence of filtrate from one of the Cycle I Demonstration tests, fulfilling a request by CST Engineering and the ITP Flow Sheet Team.

Hobbs, D.T.

1998-10-21

339

Non-Nuclear Validation Test Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Both NASA and DOE have programs that are investigating advanced power conversion cycles for planetary surface power on the moon or Mars, or for next generation nuclear power plants on earth. Although open Brayton cycles are in use for many applications (combined cycle power plants, aircraft engines), only a few closed Brayton cycles have been tested. Experience with closed Brayton cycles coupled to nuclear reactors is even more limited and current projections of Brayton cycle performance are based on analytic models. This report describes and compares experimental results with model predictions from a series of non-nuclear tests using a small scale closed loop Brayton cycle available at Sandia National Laboratories. A substantial amount of testing has been performed, and the information is being used to help validate models. In this report we summarize the results from three kinds of tests. These tests include: 1) test results that are useful for validating the characteristic flow curves of the turbomachinery for various gases ranging from ideal gases (Ar or Ar/He) to non-ideal gases such as CO2, 2) test results that represent shut down transients and decay heat removal capability of Brayton loops after reactor shut down, and 3) tests that map a range of operating power versus shaft speed curve and turbine inlet temperature that are useful for predicting stable operating conditions during both normal and off-normal operating behavior. These tests reveal significant interactions between the reactor and balance of plant. Specifically these results predict limited speed up behavior of the turbomachinery caused by loss of load, the conditions for stable operation, and for direct cooled reactors, the tests reveal that the coast down behavior during loss of power events can extend for hours provided the ultimate heat sink remains available.

Wright, Steven A.

2007-01-01

340

The Castor 120 (TM) motor: Development and qualification testing results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses Thiokol Corporation's static test results for the development and qualification program of the Castor 120(TM) motor. The demonstration program began with a 25,000-pound motor to demonstrate the new technologies and processes that would be used on the larger Castor 120(TM) motor. The Castor 120(TM) motor was designed to be applicable as a first stage, second stage, or strap-on motor. Static test results from the Castor 25 and two Castor 120(TM) motors are discussed in this paper. The results verified the feasibility of tailoring the propellant grain configuration and nozzle throat diameter to meet various customer requirements. The first and second motors were conditioned successfully at ambient temperature and 28 F, respectively, to demonstrate that the design could handle a wide range of environmental launch conditions. Furthermore, the second Castor 120(TM) motor demonstrated a systems tunnel and forward skirt extension to verify flight-ready stage hardware. It is anticipated that the first flight motor will be ready by the fall of 1994.

Hilden, Jack G.; Poirer, Beverly M.

1993-01-01

341

Hydrogen-burn survival: preliminary thermal model and test results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents preliminary Hydrogen Burn Survival (HBS) Program experimental and analytical work conducted through February 1982. The effects of hydrogen deflagrations on safety-related equipment in nuclear power plant containment buildings are considered. Preliminary results from hydrogen deflagration experiments in the Sandia Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES) are presented and analytical predictions for these tests are compared and discussed. Analytical estimates of component thermal responses to hydrogen deflagrations in the upper and lower compartments of an ice condenser, pressurized water reactor are also presented.

McCulloch, W.H.; Ratzel, A.C.; Kempka, S.N.; Furgal, D.T.; Aragon, J.J.

1982-08-01

342

Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests  

SciTech Connect

There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

1980-04-01

343

Regenerable Microbial Check Valve - Life cycle tests results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Life cycle regeneration testing of the Microbial Check Valve (MCV) that is used on the Shuttle Orbiter to provide microbial control of potable water is currently in progress. Four beds are being challenged with simulated reclaimed waters and repeatedly regenerated. Preliminary results indicate that contaminant systems exhibit unique regeneration periodicities. Cyclic throughput diminishes with increasing cumulative flow. It is considered to be feasible to design a regenerable MCV system which will function without human intervention and with minimal resupply penalty for the 30 year life of the Space Station.

Atwater, James E.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Olivadoti, J. T.; Sauer, Richard L.; Flanagan, David T.

1992-01-01

344

NASA wiring for space applications program test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The electrical power wiring tests results from the NASA Wiring for Space Applications program are presented. The goal of the program was to develop a base for the building of a lightweight, arc track-resistant electrical wiring system for aerospace applications. This new wiring system would be applied to such structures as pressurized modules, trans-atmospheric vehicles, LEO/GEO environments, and lunar and Martian environments. Technological developments from this program include the fabrication of new insulating materials, the production of new wiring constructions, an improved system design, and an advanced circuit protection design.

Stavnes, Mark; Hammoud, Ahmad

1995-01-01

345

JWST Near-Infrared Detectors: Latest Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The James Webb Space Telescope, an infrared-optimized space telescope being developed by NASA for launch in 2013, will utilize cutting-edge detector technology in its investigation of fundamental questions in astrophysics. JWST's near infrared spectrograph, NIRSpec utilizes two 2048 x 2048 HdCdTe arrays with Sidecar ASIC readout electronics developed by Teledyne to provide spectral coverage from 0.6 microns to 5 microns. We present recent test and calibration results for the NIRSpec flight arrays as well as data processing routines for noise reduction and cosmic ray rejection.

Smith, Erin C.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Chiao, Meng; Clemons, Brian L.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, Robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lavaque, Dodolfo J.; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Cheryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Schnurr, Richard; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn

2009-01-01

346

Results of ladar ATR captive flight testing experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of an ongoing captive flight test demonstration project at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, CA, two Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms were implemented in hardware, integrated with the second in a series of ladar sensors, and flown aboard a T-39 aircraft against both fixed and stationary mobile target sites on the ranges of the Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), also at China Lake, CA. The first ATR algorithm was developed to recognize fixed targets and to select aim-points with a performance goal of a five pixel Circular Error Probability (CEP.) The second ATR algorithm was developed to detect stationary mobile targets, such as tanks and trucks. The performance goal for this algorithm was to achieve 90% probability of detection. Both of these algorithms operate by exploiting the very accurate 3D geometry provided by the ladar. This paper describes the 1999 and 2000 captive flight tests involving these two algorithms, including the flight tests themselves, the hardware implementations, and the resulting ATR performance. Additionally, the large ladar data set, collected during twenty-four two-hour flights, will be briefly described.

Cook, T. D.

2001-10-01

347

Test results from large wing and fuselage panels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the first results in an assessment of the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance of stiffened wing and fuselage subcomponents. Under this NASA funded program, 10 large wing and fuselage panels, variously fabricated by automated tow placement and dry-stitched preform/resin transfer molding, are to be tested. The first test of an automated tow placement six-longeron fuselage panel under shear load was completed successfully. Using NASTRAN finite-element analysis the stiffness of the panel in the linear range prior to buckling was predicted within 3.5 percent. A nonlinear analysis predicted the buckling load within 10 percent and final failure load within 6 percent. The first test of a resin transfer molding six-stringer wing panel under compression was also completed. The panel failed unexpectedly in buckling because of inadequate supporting structure. The average strain was 0.43 percent with a line load of 20.3 kips per inch of width. This strain still exceeds the design allowable strains. Also, the stringers did not debond before failure, which is in contrast to the general behavior of unstitched panels.

Madan, Ram C.; Voldman, Mike

1993-01-01

348

Relating results from earthworm toxicity tests to agricultural soil  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The artificial soil tests of the European Economic Community and of the Organization for Economic Cooperation produce data relating earthworm mortality to pesticide concentrations in soil under laboratory conditions. To apply these results to agricultural soils it is necessary to relate these concentrations to amounts of pesticide applied per area. This paper reviews the relevant published literature and suggests a simple relation for regulatory use. Hazards to earthworms from pesticides are suggested to be greatest soon after application, when the pesticides may be concentrated in a soil layer a few millimeters thick. For estimating exposure of earthworms, however, a thicker soil layer should be considered, to account for their movement through soil. During favorable weather conditions, earthworms belonging to species appropriate to the artificial soil test have been reported to confine their activity to a layer about 5 cm. If a 5-cm layer is accepted as relevant for regulatory purposes, then an application of 1 kg/ha would be equivalent to 1-67 ppm (dry) in the artificial soil test.

Beyer, W.N.

1992-01-01

349

The X-31A quasi-tailless flight test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A quasi-tailless flight investigation was launched using the X-31A enhanced fighter maneuverability airplane. In-flight simulations were used to assess the effect of partial to total vertical tail removal. The rudder control surface was used to cancel the stabilizing effects of the vertical tail, and yaw thrust vector commands were used to restabilize and control the airplane. The quasi-tailless mode was flown supersonically with gentle maneuvering and subsonically in precision approaches and ground attack profiles. Pilot ratings and a full set of flight test measurements were recorded. This report describes the results obtained and emphasizes the lessons learned from the X-31A flight test experiment. Sensor-related issues and their importance to a quasi-tailless simulation and to ultimately controlling a directionally unstable vehicle are assessed. The X-31A quasi-tailless flight test experiment showed that tailless and reduced tail fighter aircraft are definitely feasible. When the capability is designed into the airplane from the beginning, the benefits have the potential to outweigh the added complexity required.

Bosworth, John T.; Stoliker, P. C.

1996-01-01

350

LUCIFER: status and results of the hardware testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LUCIFER (LBT NIR-Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral-Field Unit for Extragalactic Research) is a NIR spectrograph and imager (wavelength range 0.9 to 2.5 micron) for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona. It is built by a consortium of five German institutes and will be one of the first light instruments for the LBT. Later, a second copy for the second mirror of the telescope will follow. Both instruments will be mounted at the bent Gregorian foci of the two individual telescope mirrors. The instrument is equipped with three exchangeable cameras for imaging and spectroscopy: two of them are optimized for seeing-limited conditions, the third camera for the diffraction-limited case with the LBT adaptive secondary mirror working. The spectral resolution will allow for OH suppression. Up to 33 exchangeable masks will be available for longslit and multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) over the full field of view (FOV). The detector will be a Rockwell HAWAII-2 HgCdTe-array. Extensive tests were done for all the electro-mechanical functions. Those include the grating selection and the grating tilt unit and the drive for the fold mirror to compensate for image movement due to flexure. Furthermore several optical and opto-mechanical units were tested. The procedures and results of the tests are presented in detail and compared with the specifications.

Seifert, Walter; Laun, Werner; Lehmitz, Michael; Mandel, Holger; Schuetze, Andreas; Seltmann, Andreas

2004-09-01

351

The Internationalization of Test Reviewing: Trends, Differences, and Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the characteristics of five test review models are described. The five models are the US review system at the Buros Center for Testing, the German Test Review System of the Committee on Tests, the Brazilian System for the Evaluation of Psychological Tests, the European EFPA Review Model, and the Dutch COTAN Evaluation System for…

Evers, Arne

2012-01-01

352

Single Pass Streaming BLAST on FPGAs*†  

PubMed Central

Approximate string matching is fundamental to bioinformatics and has been the subject of numerous FPGA acceleration studies. We address issues with respect to FPGA implementations of both BLAST- and dynamic-programming- (DP) based methods. Our primary contribution is a new algorithm for emulating the seeding and extension phases of BLAST. This operates in a single pass through a database at streaming rate, and with no preprocessing other than loading the query string. Moreover, it emulates parameters turned to maximum possible sensitivity with no slowdown. While current DP-based methods also operate at streaming rate, generating results can be cumbersome. We address this with a new structure for data extraction. We present results from several implementations showing order of magnitude acceleration over serial reference code. A simple extension assures compatibility with NCBI BLAST. PMID:19081828

Herbordt, Martin C.; Model, Josh; Sukhwani, Bharat; Gu, Yongfeng; VanCourt, Tom

2008-01-01

353

A new approach to oxygen enriched high temperature blast generation  

SciTech Connect

When increasing fuel injection in a blast furnace in order to reduce coke consumption and/or to increase production, the blast furnace operator tries to keep similar raceway conditions, for instance, an equivalent flame temperature. To compensate for the cooling effect due to the higher injection rate, two solutions can be selected or combined: to raise the temperature of the blast and/or to increase the level of oxygen in the blast. Whatever the choice, the Blast Furnace manager will certainly try to reduce the resulting investment and operating costs to a minimum. Air Liquide and Kvaerner Davy are trying to provide a new way to address these needs by offering a new technology for blast heating. A higher blast temperature will not only allow a higher fuel injection at tuyere level, a lower coke consumption, but also a lower oxygen consumption. Air Liquide and Kvaerner Davy are now able to offer a new heat regenerator with major advantages over conventional stoves. This new device can be used as a permanent substitute for a stove, or as a temporary one during repair, or stove improvement. It can also be added to an existing set of stoves to increase the average blast temperature.

Queille, P.H.; Macauley, D.

1996-12-31

354

Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of ˜1000 K.

Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Nichols, Kenneth; Brown, Nicholas

2005-02-01

355

Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop  

SciTech Connect

A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of {approx}1000 K.

Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Brown, Nicholas [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Fuller, Robert; Nichols, Kenneth [Barber Nichols 6325 W 55th Ave., Arvada, Colorado 80002 (United States)

2005-02-06

356

Operational results of a Closed Brayton Cycle test-loop.  

SciTech Connect

A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kW{sub th} with a maximum outlet temperature of {approx}1000 K.

Fuller, Robert (Barber Nichols, Arvada, Colorado); Wright, Steven Alan; Nichols, Kenneth Graham. (Barber Nichols, Arvada, Colorado); Brown, Nicholas; Lipinski, Ronald J.

2004-11-01

357

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01

358

Recent improvements in casthouse practices at the Kwangyang blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect

POSCO`s Kwangyang blast furnaces have continuously carried out high production and low fuel operation under a high pulverized coal injection rate without complications since the Kwangyang No. 1 blast furnace was blown-in in 1987. The Kwangyang blast furnaces have focused on improving the work environment for the increase of competitive power in terms of increased production, cost savings, and management of optimum manpower through use of low cost fuel and raw material. At this time, the casthouse work lags behind most work in the blast furnace. Therefore, the Kwangyang blast furnaces have adopted a remote control system for the casthouse equipment to solve complications in the casthouse work due to high temperature and fumes. As the result, the casthouse workers can work in clean air and the number of workers has been reduced to 9.5 personnel per shift by reduction of the workload.

Jang, Y.S.; Han, K.W.; Kim, K.Y.; Cho, B.R.; Hur, N.S.

1997-12-31

359

Airframe Noise Results from the QTD II Flight Test Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With continued growth in air travel, sensitivity to community noise intensifies and materializes in the form of increased monitoring, regulations, and restrictions. Accordingly, realization of quieter aircraft is imperative, albeit only achievable with reduction of both engine and airframe components of total aircraft noise. Model-scale airframe noise testing has aided in this pursuit; however, the results are somewhat limited due to lack of fidelity of model hardware, particularly in simulating full-scale landing gear. Moreover, simulation of true in-flight conditions is non-trivial if not infeasible. This paper reports on an investigation of full-scale landing gear noise measured as part of the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD2) flight test program. Conventional Boeing 777-300ER main landing gear were tested, along with two noise reduction concepts, namely a toboggan fairing and gear alignment with the local flow, both of which were down-selected from various other noise reduction devices evaluated in model-scale testing at Virginia Tech. The full-scale toboggan fairings were designed by Goodrich Aerostructures as add-on devices allowing for complete retraction of the main gear. The baseline-conventional gear, faired gear, and aligned gear were all evaluated with the high-lift system in the retracted position and deployed at various flap settings, all at engine idle power setting. Measurements were taken with flyover community noise microphones and a large aperture acoustic phased array, yielding far-field spectra, and localized sources (beamform maps). The results were utilized to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the merit of each noise reduction concept. Complete similarity between model-scale and full-scale noise reduction levels was not found and requires further investigation. Far-field spectra exhibited no noise reduction for both concepts across all angles and frequencies. Phased array beamform maps show inconclusive evidence of noise reduction at selective frequencies (1500 to 3000 Hz) but are otherwise in general agreement with the far-field spectra results (within measurement uncertainty).

Elkoby, Ronen; Brusniak, Leon; Stoker, Robert W.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Abeysinghe, Amal; Moe, Jefferey W.

2007-01-01

360

A Multi-Mode Shock Tube for Investigation of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury  

PubMed Central

Abstract Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave components contributing to bTBI. PMID:21083431

Reneer, Dexter V.; Hisel, Richard D.; Hoffman, Joshua M.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Lusk, Braden T.

2011-01-01

361

Recent flight-test results of optical airdata techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Optical techniques for measuring airdata parameters were demonstrated with promising results on high performance fighter aircraft. These systems can measure the airspeed vector, and some are not as dependent on special in-flight calibration processes as current systems. Optical concepts for measuring freestream static temperature and density are feasible for in-flight applications. The best feature of these concepts is that the air data measurements are obtained nonintrusively, and for the most part well into the freestream region of the flow field about the aircraft. Current requirements for measuring air data at high angle of attack, and future need to measure the same information at hypersonic flight conditions place strains on existing techniques. Optical technology advances show outstanding potential for application in future programs and promise to make common use of optical concepts a reality. Results from several flight-test programs are summarized, and the technology advances required to make optical airdata techniques practical are identified.

Bogue, Rodney K.

1993-01-01

362

TMED-4 INTERIM REPORT PURE ZR EQUILIBRIUM TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Due to higher than expected permeation rates in the production of tritium in the TVA, a development and testing program was implemented to develop the understanding of why the higher rates were occurring. In addition, improved data are needed for both the design as well as the predictive models. One part of the program was to determine the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen and tritium over NPZ (1). During the course of this testing, some curious results were discovered (2) compared to the published literature data (3). Due to these apparently results, a follow-on task was undertaken to determine the equilibrium pressure of protium and deuterium over pure zirconium. A series of experiments were conducted to determine equilibrium pressures and isotherm data for the zirconium - protium and zirconium - deuterium systems. The data match the published literature data reasonably well with the plateau extending to loadings of about 1.4. There is a significant pressure rise for loadings greater than 1.7.

Korinko, P.; Morgan, G.

2010-12-17

363

Preliminary QCGAT program test results. [Quiet, Clean General Aviation Turbofan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper presents the NASA Lewis program to demonstrate that large engine technology can be applied to general aviation engines to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel consumption. After a Phase I study, two contractors, Garrett AiResearch and AVCO-Lycoming, were selected to design, manufacture, assemble, test, and deliver their Quiet, Clean, General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) engines to NASA. Noise, emission, and performance goals and how well they were met are discussed. Noise goals involve take off noise 3.5 n. mi. from runway threshold, sideline noise at .25 n mi. and approach noise 1 n mi. from the runway at an altitude of 370 ft. The AiResearch engines power a stretched Learjet 35 and the Lycoming a specially conceived Beech executive jet, resulting in differing power goals. Thus the thrust goal for the Lycoming was 1622 lb. while the AiResearch goal was 3937 lb. Cruise thrust goals were 485 lb. at Mach 0.6 at 25,000 ft. and 903 lb. at Mach 0.8 at 40,000 ft. respectively. The design of both engines, based on existing cores, is studied, noting such special QCGAT features as new reduction gears, combustor and power turbine. Test results are given, indicating that while the goals for noise and thrust were met those for emissions were only partially met.

Koenig, R. W.; Sievers, G. K.

1979-01-01

364

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

2003-01-01

365

Experiences with computer systems in blast furnace operation control at Rautaruukki  

SciTech Connect

Low energy consumption, together with high productivity and stable blast furnace operation, has been achieved at Rautaruukki's Raahe Steel Works as a result of the efficient use of computer technology in process control and improvements in raw materials quality. The blast furnace supervision system is designed to support the decision-making in medium and long-term process control. The information presenting the blast furnace operation phenomena is grouped so that little time is needed to obtain the current state of the process. Due to the complexity of the blast furnace process, an expert system to guide and diagnose the short and medium-term blast furnace operation has been developed.

Inkala, P.; Karppinen, A. (Rautaruukki Oy, Raahe (Finland). Raahe Steel Works); Seppanen, M. (Rautaruukki Oy Engineering, Oulu (Finland))

1994-09-01

366

Performance of polymer-steel sandwich structures under blast loads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The applicability of the polymer-steel sandwich structures has become a topic of interest over the last few years. To study the effect of polymers (which are well-known energy absorbers) on the performance of sandwich structures under blast loads, a set of experiments were carried out on circular polyurea-steel sandwich samples in a 3 Hopkinson bar setup. Using a physics-based material model for polyurea, the test was numerically modeled in LS-DYNA and verified by comparing to experimental results.

Samiee, Ahsan; Isaacs, Jon; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

2009-03-01

367

Results of the mole penetration tests in different materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mole devices are low velocity, medium to high energy, self-driven penetrators, designed as a carrier of different sensors for in situ investigations of subsurface layers of planetary bodies. The maximum insertion depth of such devices is limited by energy of single mole's stroke and soil resistance for the dynamic penetration. A mole penetrator ‘KRET' has been designed, developed, and successfully tested at Space Research Centre PAS in Poland. The principle of operation of the mole bases on the interaction between three masses: the cylindrical casing, the hammer, and the rest of the mass, acting as a support mass. This approach takes advantage of the MUPUS penetrator (a payload of Philae lander on Rosetta mission) insertion tests knowledge. Main parameters of the mole KRET are listed below: - outer diameter: 20.4mm, - length: 330mm, - total mass: 488g, - energy of the driving spring: 2.2J, - average power consumption: 0.28W, - average insertion progress/stroke: 8.5mm, The present works of Space Research Center PAS team are focused on three different activities. First one includes investigations of the mole penetration effectiveness in the lunar analogues (supported by ESA PECS project). Second activity, supported by Polish national fund, is connected with numerical calculation of the heat flow investigations and designing and developing the Heat Flow Probe Hardware Component (HPHC) for L-GIP NASA project. It's worth noting that L-GIP project refers to ILN activity. Last activity focuses on preparing the second version of the mole ready to work in low thermal and pressure conditions. Progress of a mole penetrator in granular medium depends on the mechanical properties of this medium. The mole penetrator ‘KRET' was tested in different materials: dry quartz sand (0.3 - 0.8 grain size), wet quartz sand, wheat flour and lunar regolith mechanical simulant - Chemically Enhanced OB-1 (CHENOBI). Wheat flour was selected due to its high cohesion rate and small grain size. Influence of the material compaction on the mole progress was also investigated. For these tests the small testbed has been used. It allowed us to test our mole penetrator up to the depth of 0.5 meters. Obtained results show that 'KRET' is able to penetrate even compacted lunar regolith simulant CHENOBI with minimum progress rate about 2mm per stroke. Moreover, we have confirmed that the mole works properly in both materials with low and high cohesion.

Wawrzaszek, Roman; Seweryn, Karol; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Rybus, Tomasz; Wisniewski, Lukasz; Neal, Clive R.; Huang, Shaopeng

2010-05-01

368

Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.  

SciTech Connect

A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater (U.S. Department of Energy); Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S. (U.S. Department of Energy); Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Brochard, Didier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany)

2004-05-01

369

Recent results from the National Battery Test Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The testing of EV batteries is the demanding and requires the most versatile test program. The National Battery Test Laboratory was established in 1977 and became operational in 1978. It is computer automated and operates around-the-clock. The facility has room for the simultaneous testing of about 76 batteries, each independently operated, under various environmental conditions and over a wide range

F. Hornstra; N. P. Yao

1984-01-01

370

Attic testing at the Roof Research Center: Initial results  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1990, a series of tests was performed on residential attics using an attic test module built to permit research to be accomplished on a number of issues related to attics. This test module was used in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) at the Roof Research Center. This combination of test module and LSCS permitted the Center to perform

K. E. Wilkes; R. L. Wendt; A. Delmas; P. W. Childs

1991-01-01

371

Distinguishing Realistic Military Blasts from Firecrackers in Mitigation Studies of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury  

SciTech Connect

In their Contributed Article, Nyein et al. (1,2) present numerical simulations of blast waves interacting with a helmeted head and conclude that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). A face shield may indeed be important for future military helmets, but the authors derive their conclusions from a much smaller explosion than typically experienced on the battlefield. The blast from the 3.16 gm TNT charge of (1) has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 10 atm, 0.25 ms, and 3.9 psi-ms at the front of the head (14 cm from charge), and 1.4 atm, 0.32 ms, and 1.7 psi-ms at the back of a typical 20 cm head (34 cm from charge). The peak pressure of the wave decreases by a factor of 7 as it traverses the head. The blast conditions are at the threshold for injury at the front of the head, but well below threshold at the back of the head (4). The blast traverses the head in 0.3 ms, roughly equal to the positive phase duration of the blast. Therefore, when the blast reaches the back of the head, near ambient conditions exist at the front. Because the headform is so close to the charge, it experiences a wave with significant curvature. By contrast, a realistic blast from a 2.2 kg TNT charge ({approx} an uncased 105 mm artillery round) is fatal at an overpressure of 10 atm (4). For an injury level (4) similar to (1), a 2.2 kg charge has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 2.1 atm, 2.3 ms, and 18 psi-ms at the front of the head (250 cm from charge), and 1.8 atm, 2.5 ms, and 16.8 psi-ms at the back of the head (270 cm from charge). The peak pressure decreases by only a factor of 1.2 as it traverses the head. Because the 0.36 ms traversal time is much smaller than the positive phase duration, pressures on the head become relatively uniform when the blast reaches the back of the head. The larger standoff implies that the headform locally experiences a nearly planar blast wave. Also, the positive phase durations and blast impulses are much larger than those of (1). Consequently, the blast model used in (1) is spatially and temporally very different from a military blast. It would be useful to repeat the calculations using military blast parameters. Finally, (1) overlooks a significant part of (5). On page 1 and on page 3, (1) states that (5) did not consider helmet pads. But pages pages 3 and 4 of (5) present simulations of blast wave propagation across an ACH helmeted head form with and without pads. (5) states that when the pads are present, the 'underwash' of air under the helmet is blocked when compared to the case without. (1) reaches this same conclusion, but reports it as a new result rather than a confirmation of that already found in (5).

Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

2011-01-21

372

Metrology and Tests beamline at SOLEIL Design and first results  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project is install at the 2.75 GeV SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source a calibration and metrology test facility for the R and D of optical components and detectors. We have build, on a bending magnet, two branches to cover an energy range from few eV to 28 keV and give access to white beam. This installation will first address the needs of the SOLEIL experimental groups(Optics and Detectors)and will be used by a large community. This beamline will also be valuable as a general-purpose beamline to prepare, test and set up a wide range of experiments in the field of Astrophysics, laser plasma etc...A complementary important aspect of this installation is the realization of primary standard: the metrology beamline of SOLEIL could become the national primary standard source in collaboration with the Laboratoire National d'Essais(LNE)and help in the design and characterization of several diagnostics for the Megajoule Laser in Bordeaux in collaboration with the CEA DIF. The beamline has been designed to provide great flexibility. In this paper, we describe the beamline design, the end station instrumentation and give also some preliminary results.

Idir, Mourad; Mercere, Pascal; Moreno, Thierry; Delmotte, Aurelien; Dasilva, Paulo; Modi, Mohammed H. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin-BP 48 91192 GIF-sur-YVETTE CEDEX (France)

2010-06-23

373

PROTEC TM TEAR-OFFS: RESULTS OF LONG TERM TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a series of tests (Phases 1 and 2) to assess the potential use of a Mylar{reg_sign} tear-off system as a primary or secondary protective barrier to minimize acid etching ('frosting'), accidental scratching, and/or radiation damage for shielded cells, glovebox, and/or chemical hood windows. Conceptually, thin, multi-layered sheets of Mylar (referred to throughout this report as the ProTec{trademark} tear-off system) can be directly applied to the shielded cell, glovebox, or hood sash window to serve as a secondary (or primary) barrier. Upon degradation of visual clarity due to accidental scratching, spills/splatters, and/or radiation damage, the outer layer (or sheet) of Mylar could be removed refreshing or restoring the view. Due to the multilayer aspect, the remaining Mylar layers would provide continued protection for the window from potential reoccurrences. Although the concept of using a tear-off system as a protective barrier is conceptually enticing, potential technical issues were identified and addressed as part of this phased study to support implementation of this type of system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specific test conditions of interest to the DWPF included the performance of the tear-off system exposed to or under the following conditions: (1) acid(s) (concentrated (28.9 M) HF, concentrated (15.9M) HNO{sub 3}, 6M HCl, and 0.6M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}); (2) base (based on handling of radioactive sludges with pH of {approx}12-13); (3) gamma radiation (due to radioactive sources or materials being used in the analytical cells); (4) scratch resistance (simulating accidental scratching with the manipulators); and (5) in-situ testing (sample coupons exposed to actual field conditions in DWPF). The results of the Phase 1 study indicated that the ProTec tear-off concept (as a primary or secondary protective barrier) is a potential technical solution to prevent or retard excessive damage that would result from acid etching, base damage (as a result of a sludge spill or splatter), gamma radiation damage, and/or accidental scratching (due to manipulator/tool contact). Although identified as a potential solution, the Phase 1 testing was relatively short-term with exposure times up to 1-2 months for the acid and gamma radiation tests. Phase 2 testing included longer exposure times for the acid resistance (up to 456 days) and gamma radiation exposure (700 days with a cumulative gamma dose of {approx}3.1 x 10{sup 5} rad) assessments. The tear-off system continued to perform well in these longer-term acid resistance testing and gamma exposure conditions. Complete removal of the tear-offs after these long-term exposure times indicate that not only could visual clarity be restored but the mechanical integrity could be retained. The results also provided insight into the ability of the ProTec tear-off system to withstand the chemical and physical abuses expected in off-normal shielded cells operations. The conceptual erasing of scratches or marks by excessive manipulator abuse was demonstrated in the SRNL Shielded Cells mock-up facility through the removal of the outer layer tear-off with manipulators. In addition, the Phase 2 testing included an in-situ assessment of a prototype tear-off system in the DWPF Sampling Cells where the system was exposed to actual field conditions including radioactive sources, acidic and basic environments, dusting, and chemical cleaning solutions over a 5-6 month period. DWPF personnel were extremely satisfied with the performance (including the successful removal of 3 layers with manipulators) of the ProTec tear-off system under actual field conditions. The successful removal of the outer layer tear-offs with the manipulator, using tabs not specifically designed for remote operations, demonstrates that the system is 'manipulator-friendly' and could be implemented in a remote environment. The ability to remove the outer layer tear-off not only regains visual clarity but also reduces waste disposal volumes (i.e., dispo

Peeler, D

2008-07-24

374

In-flight and laboratory vacuum-friction test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coefficient of friction measurements were made for six unlubricated metal couples exposed to the space environment aboard the OV-1-13 spacecraft and exposed to laboratory vacuum. Materials studied included mutually soluble, partially soluble, and insoluble metal combinations. Two samples of each material couple were tested in space and in the laboratory using the disk and rider technique. Linear velocity was 0.10 cm/s (2.5 in/min) and rider normal load was 4.45 N (1 lb) for the gold versus silver couples and 8.90 N (2lb) for the other combinations. Results showed that friction data obtained in a clean ion-pumped laboratory vacuum of 10 to the minus 10 power materials with low mutual solubility can be correlated to operation in the vicinity of a typical scientific spacecraft that is exposed to an ambient pressure as low as 10 to the minus 12 power torr. The expected increase in coefficient of friction with solubility was shown. Material couples with high mutual solubility present the hazard of unpredictable drastic friction increase in orbit which may not be evident in laboratory testing at levels down to 10 to the minus 10 power torr. It was also shown that gross cold welding of unlubricated metals exposed to a satellite environment does not occur.

Devine, E. J.; Evans, H. E.; Leasure, W. A.

1973-01-01

375

Stirling cryocooler test results and design model verification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A long-life Stirling cycle cryocooler being developed for spaceborne applications is described. The results from tests on a preliminary breadboard version of the cryocooler used to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and to validate the generator design code used in its development are presented. This machine achieved a cold-end temperature of 65 K while carrying a 1/2-W cooling load. The basic machine is a double-acting, flexure-bearing, split Stirling design with linear electromagnetic drives for the expander and compressors. Flat metal diaphragms replace pistons for sweeping and sealing the machine working volumes. The double-acting expander couples to a laminar-channel counterflow recuperative heat exchanger for regeneration. The PC-compatible design code developed for this design approach calculates regenerator loss, including heat transfer irreversibilities, pressure drop, and axial conduction in the regenerator walls. The code accurately predicted cooler performance and assisted in diagnosing breadboard machine flaws during shakedown and development testing.

Shimko, Martin A.; Stacy, W. D.; McCormick, John A.

376

Experimental test results from an environmental protection agency test method for determination of vapor suppressant effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results obtained from laboratory experiments conducted using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) subpart WWWW of 40\\u000a Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 63 (1)-test method are discussed in this article. The original test method was developed\\u000a to measure the effectiveness of wax suppressants used to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from unsaturated polyester\\u000a (UP)\\/vinyl ester resins. Wax additions of

Richard W. Tock; Daniel W. Ahern

2005-01-01

377

Large scale gas injection test (Lasgit): Results from two gas injection tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the initial results from a large scale gas injection test (Lasgit) performed at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden. Lasgit is a full-scale field-scale experiment based on the Swedish KBS-3V repository concept, examining the processes controlling gas and water flow in compact buffer bentonite. The first 2 years of the test focused on the artificial hydration of

Robert J. Cuss; Jon F. Harrington; Dave J. Noy; Anders Wikman; Patrik Sellin

378

Effect of test method on pop plot results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CTH hydrocode simulations performed for this study demonstrate that test method can affect shock reactivity measurements as displayed on the POP plot. For run distances greater than about 7 mm and pressures lower than 50 kbar, the run distances produced with the use of a flyer plate were shorter than those produced by a plane wave lens system. In contrast, the run distances were similar for pressures above 50 kbar. The plane wave lens system simulated was based on a 4' PWL used at the Army Research Laboratory and a combination of buffer plates. The sample explosive was taken to be Composition C4. Other simulations showed that measuring an average velocity of the buffer plate outside the center of the buffer plate will result in lower input pressures being calculated from the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions than those that would be calculated if the corresponding peak initial velocity at the buffer plate center was used.

Sutherland, Gerrit

2012-03-01

379

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wickliff, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-08-01

380

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Jastrow, J.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wickliff, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01

381

Pregnancy feelings among adolescents awaiting pregnancy test results.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The authors surveyed adolescent girls about their feelings regarding pregnancy. METHODS: A survey was administered to 117 13- to 18-year-olds who obtained pregnancy tests at nine clinics in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1998. The survey included four measures of pregnancy feelings. The authors used bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine the associations of these measures with engagement with school, future expectations, social and environmental characteristics, and perceived partner desire for pregnancy. RESULTS: The four measures of pregnancy feelings were highly correlated (P = 0.0001). Participants reported a range of positive, negative, and ambivalent feelings on all measures. Perceived partner desire for pregnancy, limited future expectations, and lack of school engagement were significantly associated with positive pregnancy feelings for the four measures. CONCLUSIONS: Successful adolescent pregnancy prevention interventions may include the involvement of partners and key adults as well as strategies to enhance the educational or employment aspirations of girls and adolescents. PMID:11889284

Hellerstedt, W. L.; Fee, R. M.; McNeely, C. A.; Sieving, R. E.; Shew, M. L.; Resnick, M. D.

2001-01-01

382

Results from the Exoplanet Search Programmes with BEST and TEST  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg (TLS) has started to operate a small dedicated telescope --- the Tautenburg Exoplanet Search Telescope (TEST) --- searching for transits of extrasolar planets in photometric time series observations. In a joint effort with the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST) operated by the Institut für Planetenforschung of the ``Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR)'' at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), France, two observing sites are used to optimise transit search. Here, we give a short overview of these systems and the data analysis. We describe a software pipeline that we have set up to identify transit events of extrasolar planets and variable stars in time series data from these and other telescopes, and report on some initial results.

Eislöffel, J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Rauer, H.; Voss, H.; Erikson, A.; Eigmüller, P.; Guenther, E.

2007-05-01

383

Computational Modeling of NEXT 2000-hour Wear Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ion optics computational models are invaluable tools for the design of ion optics systems. In this study, a new computational model developed by an outside vendor for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presented. This model is a gun code which has been modified to model the plasma sheaths both upstream and downstream of the ion optics. The model handles multiple species (e.g. singly and doubly-charged ions) and includes a charge-exchange model for erosion estimates. The model uses commercially available solid design and meshing software, allowing high flexibility in ion optics geometric configurations. This computational model is compared to experimental results from the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) 2000-hour wear test, including over-focusing along the edge apertures, pit-and-groove erosion due to charge exchange, and beamlet distortion at the edge of the hole pattern.

Malone, Shane; Soulas, George

2004-11-01

384

Business jet approach noise abatement techniques - Flight test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Operational techniques for reducing approach noise from business jet aircraft were evaluated in flight by measuring the noise generated by five such aircraft during modified approaches. Approaches with 4-deg glide slopes were approximately 4.0 EPNdB quieter than approaches with standard 3-deg glide slopes. Noise reductions for low-drag 3-deg approaches varied widely among the airplanes tested; the fleet-weighted reduction was 8.5 EPNdB. Two-segment approaches resulted in noise reductions of 7.0 EPNdB to 8.5 EPNdB 3 nautical miles and 5 nautical miles from touchdown. Pilot workload increased progressively for the 4-deg, low-drag 3-deg, and two-segment approach.

Putnam, T. W.; Burcham, F. W.

1976-01-01

385

Results from the Exoplanet Search Programmes with BEST and TEST  

E-print Network

Thueringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg (TLS) has started to operate a small dedicated telescope - the Tautenburg Exoplanet Search Telescope (TEST) - searching for transits of extrasolar planets in photometric time series observations. In a joint effort with the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST) operated by the Institut fuer Planetenforschung of the "Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR)" at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), France, two observing sites are used to optimise transit search. Here, we give a short overview of these systems and the data analysis. We describe a software pipeline that we have set up to identify transit events of extrasolar planets and variable stars in time series data from these and other telescopes, and report on some first results.

Jochen Eisloeffel; Artie P. Hatzes; Heike Rauer; Holger Voss; Anders Erikson; Philipp Eigmueller; Eike Guenther

2006-05-23

386

Preliminary Test Results for the MICE Spectrometer Superconducting Solenoids  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the MICE spectrometer solenoids as built. Each magnet consists of five superconducting coils. Two coils are used to tune the beam going from or to the MICE spectrometer from the rest of the MICE cooling channel. Three spectrometer coils (two end coils and a long center coil) are used to create a uniform 4 T field (to {+-}0.3 percent) over a length of 1.0 m within a diameter of 0.3 m. The three-coil spectrometer set is connected in series. The two end coils use small power supplies to tune the uniform field region where the scintillating fiber tracker is located. This paper will present the results of the preliminary testing of the first spectrometer solenoid.

Virostek, Steve P.; Green, Michael A; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, S.T.; Wahrer, R.; Taylor, Clyde; Lu, X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, Mimi; Juang, Tiki

2008-08-02

387

Computational Modeling of NEXT 2000-Hour Wear Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ion optics computational models are invaluable tools for the design of ion optics systems. In this study, a new computational model developed by an outside vendor for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presented. This model is a gun code which has been modified to model the plasma sheaths both upstream and downstream of the ion optics. The model handles multiple species (e.g. singly and doubly-charged ions) and includes a charge-exchange model for erosion estimates. The model uses commercially available solid design and meshing software, allowing high flexibility in ion optics geometric configurations. This computational model is compared to experimental results from the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) 2000-hour wear test, including over-focusing along the edge apertures, pit-and-groove erosion due to charge exchange, and beamlet distortion at the edge of the hole pattern.

Malone, Shane P.

2004-01-01

388

GPS interferometric attitude and heading determination - Initial flight test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attitude and heading determination using GPS interferometry is a well-understood concept. However, efforts have been concentrated mainly in the development of robust algorithms and applications for low-dynamic, rigid platforms (e.g., shipboard). This paper presents results of what is believed to be the first real-time flight test of a GPS attitude and heading determination system. Signals from four antennas are processed by a 24-channel GPS receiver. Data from the receiver are sent to a microcomputer for storage and further computations. Attitude and heading data are sent to a second computer for display on a software-generated artificial horizon. Demonstration of this technique proves its candidacy for augmentation of aircraft state estimation for flight control and navigation, as well as for numerous other applications.

Van Graas, Frank; Braasch, Michael

1992-01-01

389

Results of MPBX studies at the single heater test  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an extensometer for measurement of distance and displacements in a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. This is an optical extensometer that measures distance using a modulated laser beam. In this design, reflecting targets are placed at desired measurement locations, and distance between each target and an optical head are measured repeatedly using the modulated laser beam. Moreover, all electronic and moving parts are located outside of the hostile or difficult environment as the optical head is connected to the laser, switching and signal analysis hardware using optical fibers. A reference beam is utilized to provide direct correction of system behavior. `Be system also - utilizes movable reflective anchors that can be repositioned if desired. We have installed the system in the Single Heater Test being conducted in Alcove 5 of the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, and report preliminary results.

Blair, S. C.,LLNL

1997-10-01

390

Compound 49b protects against blast-induced retinal injury  

PubMed Central

Aim To determine whether Compound 49b, a novel beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, can prevent increased inflammation and apoptosis in mice after exposure to ocular blast. Methods Eyes of C57/BL6 mice were exposed to a blast of air from a paintball gun at 26 psi (?0.18 MPa). Eyes were collected 4 hours, 24 hours, and 72 hours after blast exposure. In a subset of mice, Compound 49b eyedrops (1 mM) were applied within 4 hours, 24 hours, or 72 hours of the blast. Three days after blast exposure, all mice were sacrificed. One eye was used to measure levels of retinal proteins (TNF?, IL-1?, Bax, BcL-xL, caspase 3, and cytochrome C). The other eye was used for TUNEL labeling of apoptotic cells, which were co-labeled with NeuN to stain for retinal ganglion cells. Results We found that ocular exposure to 26 psi air pressure led to a significant increase in levels of apoptotic and inflammatory mediators within 4 hours, which lasted throughout the period investigated. When Compound 49b was applied within 4 hours or 24 hours of blast injury, levels of apoptotic and inflammatory mediators were significantly reduced. Application of Compound 49b within 72 hours of blast injury reduced levels of inflammatory mediators, but not to untreated levels. Conclusions Ocular blast injury produces a significant increase in levels of key inflammatory and apoptotic markers in the retina as early as 4 hours after blast exposure. These levels are significantly reduced if a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist is applied within 24 hours of blast exposure. Data suggest that local application of beta-adrenergic receptor agonists may be beneficial to reduce inflammation and apoptosis. PMID:23899290

2013-01-01

391

42 CFR 493.1281 - Standard: Comparison of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing...testing sites, the laboratory must have a system that twice a year...sites. (b) The laboratory must have a system to identify and...

2011-10-01

392

42 CFR 493.1281 - Standard: Comparison of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing...testing sites, the laboratory must have a system that twice a year...sites. (b) The laboratory must have a system to identify and...

2012-10-01

393

42 CFR 493.1281 - Standard: Comparison of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing...testing sites, the laboratory must have a system that twice a year...sites. (b) The laboratory must have a system to identify and...

2013-10-01

394

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the resluts of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, verticla flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-05-15

395

Making Sense of Your Pap and HPV Test Results  

MedlinePLUS

... same symptoms or health problems. Cervical Cancer Screening Tests One important way to prevent cervical cancer is ... lead to cervical cancer. The Pap and HPV tests can find early problems that could lead to ...

396

Physics of IED Blast Shock Tube Simulations for mTBI Research  

PubMed Central

Shock tube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull–brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury. A shock tube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic improvised explosive device blast profiles obtained from full scale field tests. The response of the skull–brain surrogate is monitored using pressure and strain measurements. Fluid–structure interaction is modeled using a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the air blast, and a finite element model for the structural response. The results help to understand the physics of wave propagation, from air blast into the skull–brain. The presence of openings on the skull and its orientation does have a strong effect on the internal pressure. A parameter study reveals that when there is an opening in the skull, the skull gives little protection and the internal pressure is fairly independent on the skull stiffness; the gelatin shear stiffness has little effect on the internal pressure. Simulations show that the presence of pressure sensors in the gelatin hardly disturbs the pressure field. PMID:21960984

Mediavilla Varas, Jesus; Philippens, M.; Meijer, S. R.; van den Berg, A. C.; Sibma, P. C.; van Bree, J. L. M. J.; de Vries, D. V. W. M.

2011-01-01

397

Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Three crystalline silicon module designs were distributed in five replicas each to five laboratories for testing according to the IEC 62804 (Committee Draft) system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules. The stress tests were performed in environmental chambers at 60 degrees C, 85% relative humidity, 96 h, and with module nameplate system voltage applied.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Mathiak, G.; Ebert, M.

2013-09-01

398

Delaware Student Testing Program: A Score Results Guide for Parents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report is intended to help parents understand the Delaware Student Testing Program (DSTP) and the reports it generates. The tests of the DSTP are tied to the Delaware content standards that define the knowledge and skills required for students to succeed beyond high school. In spring 2001, the DSTP reading, writing, and mathematics tests were…

Delaware State Dept. of Education, Dover. Assessment and Accountability Branch.

399

Delaware Student Testing Program: A Score Results Guide for Parents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is intended to help parents understand the Delaware Student Testing Program (DSTP) and the reports it generates. The DSTP tests are administered to provide an accurate measure of how well students are doing relative to Delaware's rigorous content standards. DSTP tests are administered in reading, writing, mathematics, science, and…

Delaware State Dept. of Education, Dover. Assessment and Accountability Branch.

400

Statistical analysis of the Blizzard Challenge 2007 listening test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blizzard 2007 is the third Blizzard Challenge, in which partic- ipants build voices from a common dataset. A large listening test is conducted which allows comparison of systems in terms of naturalness and intelligibility. New sections were added to the listening test for 2007 to test the perceived similarity of the speaker's identity between natural and synthetic speech. In this

Robert A. J. Clark; Monika Podsiado; Mark Fraser; Catherine Mayo; Simon King

2007-01-01

401

Results of Copper–Silver Rail Materials Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this phase of our investigation of better rail materials was to assess the multiple shot performances of copper-silver alloy (Cu-24% Ag) test coupons. The focus of these tests was on the assessment of changes in material properties and microstructure of test coupons. The primary metric used was the change in hardness. Material surface deformations and microstructure changes

Zachira Castro; Chadee Persad

2007-01-01

402

Patch Test Results with Metals and Meteorological Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Nickel, cobalt and chromium are some of the most common causes of type IV sensitizations and subsequent allergic contact dermatitis. Accurate diagnosis of contact sensitization to these metal salts is made possible through standardized patch testing; however, patch tests with metal allergens may be influenced by meteorological conditions at the time of testing. We aimed to investigate how patch

Janice Hegewald; Wolfgang Uter; Birger Kränke; Axel Schnuch; Olaf Gefeller; Annette Pfahlberg

2008-01-01

403

Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

2000-01-01

404

KASCADE: Astrophysical results and tests of hadronic interaction models  

E-print Network

KASCADE is a multi-detector setup to get redundant information on single air shower basis. The information is used to perform multiparameter analyses to solve the threefold problem of the reconstruction of (i)the unknown primary energy, (ii) the primary mass, and (iii) to quantify the characteristics of the hadronic interactions in the air-shower development. In this talk recent results of the KASCADE data analyses are summarized concerning cosmic ray anisotropy studies, determination of flux spectra for different primary mass groups, and approaches to test hadronic interaction models. Neither large scale anisotropies nor point sources were found in the KASCADE data set. The energy spectra of the light element groups result in a knee-like bending and a steepening above the knee. The topology of the individual knee positions shows a dependency on the primary particle. Though no hadronic interaction model is fully able to describe the multi-parameter data of KASCADE consistently, the more recent models or improved versions of older models reproduce the data better than few years ago.

A. Haungs; T. Antoni

2004-12-23

405

Pre-course Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present selected results from the January 1999 semester pre-course administration of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT), a research-based, multiple-choice instrument that assesses student knowledge and understanding about selected concepts in astronomy. The ADT is valid for undergraduate non-science majors taking an introductory astronomy course. This paper briefly summarises the development and validation processes, which included pre-course administration to 1557 students in 22 classes attending 17 various post-secondary institutions across the USA in the January 1999 semester. Two interesting results of the ADT's pre-course administration are (1) the average class score of the ADT is about the same (32%) regardless of type of post-secondary institution or class size and (2) there is a significant gender difference, with women scoring an average of 28% and men 38%, with the standard errors both less than 1%. The current version of the ADT (Version 2 dated 21 June 1999) and a comparative by-class database is available to astronomy instructors at the (USA) Association of Astronomy Educators' and the National Institute for Science Education's (NISE) WebPages.

Hufnagel, Beth; Slater, Timothy; Deming, Grace; Adams, Jeff; Adrian, Rebecca L.; Brick, Christine; Zeilik, Michael

2000-08-01

406

DEM integrity monitor experiment (DIME) flight test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses flight test results of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) integrity monitor. The DEM Integrity Monitor Experiment (DIME) was part of the NASA Synthetic Vision System (SVS) flight trials at Eagle-Vail, Colorado (EGE) in August/September, 2001. SVS provides pilots with either a Heads-down Display (HDD) or a Heads-up Display (HUD) containing aircraft state, guidance and navigation information, and a virtual depiction of the terrain as viewed 'from the cockpit'. SVS has the potential to improve flight safety by increasing the situational awareness (SA) in low to near zero-visibility conditions to a level of awareness similar to daytime clear-weather flying. This SA improvement not only enables low-visibility operations, but may also reduce the likelihood of Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT). Because of the compelling nature of SVS displays high integrity requirements may be imposed on the various databases used to generate the imagery on the displays even when the target SVS application does not require an essential or flight-critical integrity level. DIME utilized external sensors (WAAS and radar altimeter) to independently generate a 'synthesized' terrain profile. A statistical assessment of the consistency between the synthesized profile and the profile as stored in the DEM provided a fault-detection capability. The paper will discuss the basic DIME principles and will show the DIME performance for a variety of approaches to Runways 7 and 25 at EGE. The monitored DEMs are DTED Level 0, USGS with a 3-arcsec spatial resolution, and a DEM provided by NASA Langley. The test aircraft was a Boeing 757-200.

Uijt de Haag, Maarten; Young, Steve D.; Sayre, Jonathon; Campbell, Jacob; Vadlamani, Ananth

2002-07-01

407

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results  

SciTech Connect

California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

2006-04-06

408

2011 Hyundai Sonata 4932 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid HEV (VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01

409

The pathobiology of blast injuries and blast-induced neurotrauma as identified using a new experimental model of injury in mice.  

PubMed

Current experimental models of blast injuries used to study blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) vary widely, which makes the comparison of the experimental results extremely challenging. Most of the blast injury models replicate the ideal Friedländer type of blast wave, without the capability to generate blast signatures with multiple shock fronts and refraction waves as seen in real-life conditions; this significantly reduces their clinical and military relevance. Here, we describe the pathophysiological consequences of graded blast injuries and BINT generated by a newly developed, highly controlled, and reproducible model using a modular, multi-chamber shock tube capable of tailoring pressure wave signatures and reproducing complex shock wave signatures seen in theater. While functional deficits due to blast exposure represent the principal health problem for today's warfighters, the majority of available blast models induces tissue destruction rather than mimic functional deficits. Thus, the main goal of our model is to reliably reproduce long-term neurological impairments caused by blast. Physiological parameters, functional (motor, cognitive, and behavioral) outcomes, and underlying molecular mechanisms involved in inflammation measured in the brain over the 30 day post-blast period showed this model is capable of reproducing major neurological changes of clinical BINT. PMID:21074615

Cernak, Ibolja; Merkle, Andrew C; Koliatsos, Vassilis E; Bilik, Justin M; Luong, Quang T; Mahota, Theresa M; Xu, Leyan; Slack, Nicole; Windle, David; Ahmed, Farid A

2011-02-01

410

Test results of chemical reactivity test (CRT) analysis of structural materials and explosives  

SciTech Connect

The chemical reactivity test, CRT, is a procedure used to screen the compatibility of component structure materials with explosives. This report contains the results of CRT materials evaluations conducted at Mound Facility. Data about materials combinations are catalogued both under the name of the explosive and the nonexplosive.

Back, P.S.; Barnhart, B.V.; Walters, R.R.; Haws, L.D.; Collins, L.W.

1980-03-21

411

Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials.  

PubMed

Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3?m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson-Cranz scaled distance of 3.02?m?kg(-1/3), 100?kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14?m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411-413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast. PMID:24711494

Arora, H; Kelly, M; Worley, A; Del Linz, P; Fergusson, A; Hooper, P A; Dear, J P

2014-05-13

412

Results of module and system testing at NREL  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents performance data on the long-term outdoor testing of amorphous silicon (a-Si), copper indium diselenide (CIS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) modules undergoing performance testing at the Outdoor Test Site at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) over the past several years [1]. The paper also presents data on several of the emerging and commercial PV technology systems being

L. Mrig; R. Hansen; B. Kroposki; T. Strand

1996-01-01

413

Dynamic analysis and test results of the Viking Orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Viking Orbiter (VO) was launched in August 1975 on a new Titan/Centaur launch vehicle. Weight limitations of the VO and the use of a new launch vehicle made it necessary to conduct a load analysis which was verified by a test. The load analysis required a good mathematical dynamic model. Attention is given to aspects of mathematical formulation, subsystem characteristics, the body displacement functions, the propulsion subsystem, details regarding the dynamic model, the static test, and the sine vibration test.

Wada, B. K.; Garba, J. A.

1975-01-01

414

Strength and pore structure of ternary blended cement mortars containing blast furnace slag and silica fume  

SciTech Connect

Blended cement mortars with fixed workability and incorporating blast furnace slag and silica fume, were tested for compressive strength and mercury intrusion, with a view to comparing their performance with that of plain Portland cement mortar and/or slag-cement mortar. The obtained results showed that with high portions of slag and silica fume in the binding system, the mortars reached relatively satisfactory level of compressive strength and contributed to the significantly denser pore structure.

Bagel, L. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia). Inst. of Construction and Architecture] [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia). Inst. of Construction and Architecture

1998-07-01

415

Advanced stellar compass deep space navigation, ground testing results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Deep space exploration is in the agenda of the major space agencies worldwide and at least the European Space Agency (SMART & Aurora Programs) and the American NASA (New Millennium Program) have set up programs to allow the development and the demonstration of technologies that can reduce the risks and the costs of the deep space missions. Navigation is the Achilles' heel of deep space. Being performed on ground, it imposes considerable constraints on the system and the operations, it is very expensive to execute, especially when the mission lasts several years and, above all, it is not failure tolerant. Nevertheless, up to now, ground navigation has been the only possible solution. The technological breakthrough of advanced star trackers, like the micro-Advanced Stellar Compass (?ASC) might change this situation. Indeed, exploiting the capabilities of this instrument, the authors have devised a method to determine the orbit of a spacecraft autonomously, on-board and without any a-priori knowledge of any kind. The solution is robust, elegant and fast. This paper presents the preliminary performances obtained during the ground tests. The results are very positive and encouraging.

Betto, M.; Jørgensen, J. L.; Jørgensen, P. S.; Denver, T.

2003-11-01

416

Advanced stellar compass deep space navigation, ground testing results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Deep space exploration is in the agenda of the major space agencies worldwide and at least the European Space Agency (SMART & Aurora Programs) and the American NASA (New Millennium Program) have set up programs to allow the development and the demonstration of technologies that can reduce the risks and the costs of the deep space missions. Navigation is the Achilles’ heel of deep space. Being performed on ground, it imposes considerable constraints on the system and the operations, it is very expensive to execute, especially when the mission lasts several years and, above all, it is not failure tolerant. Nevertheless, up to now, ground navigation has been the only possible solution. The technological breakthrough of advanced star trackers, like the micro-advanced stellar compass (?ASC) might change this situation. Indeed, exploiting the capabilities of this instrument, the authors have devised a method to determine the orbit of a spacecraft autonomously, on-board and without any a priori knowledge of any kind. The solution is robust, elegant and fast. This paper presents the preliminary performances obtained during the ground tests. The results are very positive and encouraging.

Betto, M.; Jørgensen, J. L.; Jørgensen, P. S.; Denver, T.

2006-10-01

417

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Vane Unsteady Pressure Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To investigate the nature of fan outlet guide vane pressure fluctuations and their link to rotor-stator interaction noise, time histories of vane fluctuating pressures were digitally acquired as part of the Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test. Vane unsteady pressures were measured at seven fan tip speeds for both a radial and a swept vane configuration. Using time-domain averaging and spectral analysis, the blade passing frequency (BPF) harmonic and broadband contents of the vane pressures were individually analyzed. Significant Sound Pressure Level (SPL) reductions were observed for the swept vane relative to the radial vane for the BPF harmonics of vane pressure, but vane broadband reductions due to sweep turned out to be much smaller especially on an average basis. Cross-correlation analysis was used to establish the level of spatial coherence of broadband pressures between different locations on the vane and integral length scales of pressure fluctuations were estimated from these correlations. Two main results of this work are: (1) the average broadband level on the vane (in dB) increases linearly with the fan tip speed for both the radial and swept vanes, and (2) the broadband pressure distribution on the vane is nearly homogeneous and its integral length scale is a monotonically decreasing function of fan tip speed.

Envia, Edmane

2002-01-01

418

Multi-Level High School Classes: Astronomy Diagnostic Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A content survey, the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT) designed for undergraduate non-science astronomy courses, was administered as a post-course survey to five senior high classes in a Maryland high school. In 2001, the five classes chosen included all three levels of physics and an astronomy class. Each class had an even distribution of male and female students, with a total of 115 girls and 104 boys as subjects. Results of the survey include: (1) The Advanced Placement (AP) physics class scored highest and general physics lowest. (2) The AP class, most of whom will major in engineering or computer sciences, had a mean ADT score similar to post-course undergraduate non-science astronomy classes. (3) For all five classes, the girls had lower mean scores than the boys. (4) In two classes the girls' self-reported mean confidence was 40% lower than the boys' confidence; in the other three classes the confidence levels were the same. Additional detailed research was done on the three cosmology and ten physics questions in the ADT; girls outperformed the boys in only two of these thirteen questions.

Hubbard, R.; Hufnagel, B.

2001-12-01

419

Jefferson Lab IR FEL Cryomodule Modifications and Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Infrared Free Electron Laser being constructed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will require a 42 MeV, 5 mA electron accelerator. The accelerator design requires a 10 MeV injector and a two pass 32 MeV linac, one pass for acceleration and one pass for energy recovery. In order to minimize the cost of the linac, standard CEBAF 1497 MHz Superconducting Radio Frequency cavities and cryomodules are being used with minimal changes. Two SRF cavities, housed in a quarter cryomodule, operate at a nominal 10 MeV/m to provide the injector energy. The linac is composed of one cryomodule, housing eight SRF cavities operating at an average gradient of 8 MeV/m. The modifications to the cryomodule are being made to handle the higher beam current, to improve RF control, and to increase machine reliability. The modifications to the Higher Order Mode loads, cavity tuners, cavity beam line, warm and cold RF windows, and cryogenic shield are described. Test results from the injector quarter cryomodule are also presented.

Wiseman, M.; Preble, J.; Machie, D.; Fisher, J.; Benesch, J.; Phillips, L.; Mammosser, J.

1997-05-01

420

Corrugated Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector Focal Plane Array Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The corrugated quantum-well infrared photodetector (C-QWIP) uses total internal reflection to couple normal incident light into the optically active quantum wells. The coupling efficiency has been shown to be relatively independent of the pixel size and wavelength thus making the C-QWIP a candidate for detectors over the entire infrared spectrum. The broadband coupling efficiency of the C-QWIP makes it an ideal candidate for multiwavelength detectors. We fabricated and tested C-QWIP focal plane arrays (FPAs) with cutoff wavelengths of 11.2 and 16.2 micrometers. Each FPA has 256 x 256 pixels that are bump-bonded to a direct injection readout circuit. Both FPAs provided infrared imagery with good aesthetic attributes. For the 11.2-micrometers FPA, background-limited performance (BLIP) was observed at 60 K with f/3 optics. For the 16.2-micrometers FPA, BLIP was observed at 38 K. Besides the reduction of dark current in C-QWIP structures, the measured internal quantum efficiency (eta) remains to be high. The values for responsivity and quantum efficiency obtained from the FPA results agree well with those measured for single devices.

Goldberg, A.; Choi, K. K.; Das, N. C.; La, A.; Jhabvala, M.

1999-01-01

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