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Sample records for block movement proteins

  1. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  2. Importin-α-Mediated Nucleolar Localization of Potato Mop-Top Virus TRIPLE GENE BLOCK1 (TGB1) Protein Facilitates Virus Systemic Movement, Whereas TGB1 Self-Interaction Is Required for Cell-to-Cell Movement in Nicotiana benthamiana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lukhovitskaya, Nina I.; Cowan, Graham H.; Vetukuri, Ramesh R.; Tilsner, Jens; Torrance, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become evident that nucleolar passage of movement proteins occurs commonly in a number of plant RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm. Systemic movement of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) involves two viral transport forms represented by a complex of viral RNA and TRIPLE GENE BLOCK1 (TGB1) movement protein and by polar virions that contain the minor coat protein and TGB1 attached to one extremity. The integrity of polar virions ensures the efficient movement of RNA-CP, which encodes the virus coat protein. Here, we report the involvement of nuclear transport receptors belonging to the importin-α family in nucleolar accumulation of the PMTV TGB1 protein and, subsequently, in the systemic movement of the virus. Virus-induced gene silencing of two importin-α paralogs in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in significant reduction of TGB1 accumulation in the nucleus, decreasing the accumulation of the virus progeny in upper leaves and the loss of systemic movement of RNA-CP. PMTV TGB1 interacted with importin-α in N. benthamiana, which was detected by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus. The interaction was mediated by two nucleolar localization signals identified by bioinformatics and mutagenesis in the TGB1 amino-terminal domain. Our results showed that while TGB1 self-interaction is needed for cell-to-cell movement, importin-α-mediated nucleolar targeting of TGB1 is an essential step in establishing the efficient systemic infection of the entire plant. These results enabled the identification of two separate domains in TGB1: an internal domain required for TGB1 self-interaction and cell-to-cell movement and the amino-terminal domain required for importin-α interaction in plants, nucleolar targeting, and long-distance movement. PMID:25576325

  3. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  4. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  5. Recent Advances in Research of Plant Virus Movement Mediated by Triple Gene Block

    PubMed Central

    Solovyev, Andrey G.; Kalinina, Natalia O.; Morozov, Sergey Y.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this short review was to summarize recent advances in the field of viral cell-to-cell movement mediated by the triple gene block (TGB). The growing body of new research has uncovered links between virus cell-to-cell trafficking and replication, silencing suppression, virus spread over the plant, as well as suggested the roles of nucleus/nucleolus in plant virus transport and revealed protein-membrane associations occurring during subcellular targeting and cell-to-cell movement. In this context, our review briefly summarized current views on several potentially important functions of TGB proteins and on the development of new experimental systems that improved understanding of the molecular events during TGB-mediated virus movement. PMID:23248633

  6. Triple gene block: modular design of a multifunctional machine for plant virus movement.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Sergey Yu; Solovyev, Andrey G

    2003-06-01

    Many plant virus genera encode a 'triple gene block' (TGB), a specialized evolutionarily conserved gene module involved in the cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of viruses. The TGB-based transport system exploits the co-ordinated action of three polypeptides to deliver viral genomes to plasmodesmata and to accomplish virus entry into neighbouring cells. Although data obtained on both the TGB and well-studied single protein transport systems clearly demonstrate that plant viruses employ host cell pathways for intra- and intercellular trafficking of genomic nucleic acids and proteins, there is no integral picture of the details of molecular events during TGB-mediated virus movement. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular basis of the concerted action of TGB-encoded proteins in transporting viral genomes from cell to cell should provide new insights into the general principles of movement protein function. This review describes the structure, phylogeny and expression of TGB proteins, their roles in virus cell-to-cell movement and potential influence on host antiviral defences. PMID:12771402

  7. Oriented Protein Nanoarrays on Block Copolymer Template.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Zhu, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    Here, a simple yet robust method is developed to fabricate oriented protein nanoarrays by employing a block copolymer (BCP) template, which presents nano-scaled spot areas at high-density arrays. Unlike the conventional BCP nanolithography, the BCP platform described here resists nonspecific protein adsorption and prevents the denaturation of immobilized proteins in aqueous solution. The orderly arranged array areas are functionalized by linking chemistry which allows for the precise control of protein orientation. This approach allows us to generate potentially oriented protein nanoarrays at high-density array spots, which is useful for miniaturized nanoarrays within high-throughput proteomic applications. PMID:26785818

  8. Analysis of barley stripe mosaic virus nucleoprotein complex and triple gene block protein interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) genome contains three movement proteins encoded in an overlapping triple gene block (TGB). The TGB1 (58 kDa), TGB2 (14 kDa), and TGB3 (17 kDa) proteins are each required for cell-to-cell movement of BSMV, and TGB1 binds to ssRNA and dsRNA. We have now isolated a...

  9. Sound and Movement Exploration on a City Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Nana Sue

    The product of a Special Studies Institute, this teacher developed resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents concepts and activities relative to sound and movement as explored in the urban out-of-doors. Emphasis is on integration of cognitive and physical learning ("if a child physically feels a concept, his learning of that…

  10. Reciprocal function of movement proteins and complementation of long-distance movement of Cymbidium mosaic virus RNA by Odontoglossum ringspot virus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Ajjikuttira, Prabha; Loh, Chiang-Shiong; Wong, Sek-Man

    2005-05-01

    Complementation of movement and coat proteins of the orchid-infecting potexvirus Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) and tobamovirus Odontoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV) was investigated. Nicotiana benthamiana, which is susceptible to both CymMV and ORSV, was used as a model system. Four transgenic lines, each harbouring one of the movement protein (MP) or coat protein (CP) genes of CymMV or ORSV, were constructed. The MP of CymMV consists of three overlapping open reading frames, together called the triple-gene block (TGB). CymMV and ORSV mutants, each carrying an inactivated MP or CP, were generated from the respective biologically active full-length cDNA clones. Complementation was studied by infecting transgenic plants with in vitro transcripts generated from these mutants. The cell-to-cell movement of a movement-deficient CymMV was restored in transgenic plants carrying the ORSV MP transgene. Similarly, CymMV TGB1 transgenic plants were able to rescue the cell-to-cell movement of a movement-deficient ORSV mutant. ORSV CP transgenic plants supported systemic movement of a CymMV CP-deficient mutant. However, in these plants, neither encapsidation of CymMV RNA with ORSV CP nor CymMV CP expression was detected. Long-distance movement of an ORSV CP-deficient mutant was not supported by CymMV CP. The complementation of MPs and CPs of CymMV and ORSV facilitates movement of these viruses in plants, except for long-distance movement of ORSV RNA by CymMV CP. PMID:15831968

  11. A dynamical basis for crustal deformation and seismotectonic block movements in central Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1983-01-01

    The stress field in the earth's crust as inferred from satellite gravity data causes crustal deformation and seismotectonic block movements in central Europe. The satellite-determined stresses in the crust of central Europe are consistent with earthquake focal mechanisms, joint-orientation and in situ stress measurements.

  12. Designing a Nanotube Using Naturally Occurring Protein Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Here our goal is to carry out nanotube design using naturally occurring protein building blocks. Inspection of the protein structural database reveals the richness of the conformations of proteins, their parts, and their chemistry. Given target functional protein nanotube geometry, our strategy involves scanning a library of candidate building blocks, combinatorially assembling them into the shape and testing its stability. Since self-assembly takes place on time scales not affordable for computations, here we propose a strategy for the very first step in protein nanotube design: we map the candidate building blocks onto a planar sheet and wrap the sheet around a cylinder with the target dimensions. We provide examples of three nanotubes, two peptide and one protein, in atomistic model detail for which there are experimental data. The nanotube models can be used to verify a nanostructure observed by low-resolution experiments, and to study the mechanism of tube formation. PMID:16683021

  13. Blocked and alternating variable practice and unintended spatial variations in continuous aiming movements.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, David E; Fosler, Jessica

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of the study was to test a prediction of schema theory: a wider range of variable practice would result in better transfer performance compared to a narrower range of variable practice in less-studied, continuous aiming movements. Constant and variable amplitude continuous aiming movements were investigated in the preferred hand of participants of college age (N = 32; 8 men, 24 women). Participants made continuous rapid reversal movements with a lever in the horizontal plane. Groups attempted to reach a short (20 degrees) target and a long target (either 45 degrees or 70 degrees) in separate constant-practice conditions, but alternated between the two targets in a variable practice condition. On the transfer test, participants alternated between unpracticed 10 degrees and 80 degrees targets. Four blocks of practice trials were provided in each condition, with 20 movements made in each. Movements were more accurate and consistent during constant practice compared to variable practice, with the 20 degrees-70 degrees group having greater spatial errors compared to the 20 degrees-45 degrees group. Both groups performed equally well on the novel transfer test suggesting that adequate practice variability had been provided during acquisition. PMID:24032334

  14. Responsive block copolymer photonics triggered by protein-polyelectrolyte coacervation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yin; Tang, Shengchang; Thomas, Edwin L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2014-11-25

    Ionic interactions between proteins and polyelectrolytes are demonstrated as a method to trigger responsive transitions in block copolymer (BCP) photonic gels containing one neutral hydrophobic block and one cationic hydrophilic block. Poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) blocks in lamellar poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) block copolymer thin films are quaternized with primary bromides to yield swollen gels that show strong reflectivity peaks in the visible range; exposure to aqueous solutions of various proteins alters the swelling ratios of the quaternized P2VP (QP2VP) gel layers in the PS-QP2VP materials due to the ionic interactions between proteins and the polyelectrolyte. Parameters such as charge density, hydrophobicity, and cross-link density of the QP2VP gel layers as well as the charge and size of the proteins play significant roles on the photonic responses of the BCP gels. Differences in the size and pH-dependent charge of proteins provide a basis for fingerprinting proteins based on their temporal and equilibrium photonic response. The results demonstrate that the BCP gels and their photonic effect provide a robust and visually interpretable method to differentiate different proteins. PMID:25393374

  15. Coupled movement of permeant and blocking ions in the CFTR chloride channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiandi; Linsdell, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel pore is blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by a broad range of anionic substances added to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Here we investigate the origin of the voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2−, a highly permeant lyotropic anion which also acts as a high-affinity blocker of Cl− permeation. Not only the affinity, but also the voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2− ions is strongly dependent on extracellular Cl− concentration; following replacement of most extracellular Cl− by glucose or by impermeant anions, block by Au(CN)2− shows greatly weakened voltage dependence. This suggests that coupled movement of Au(CN)2− and Cl− ions within the pore contributes to the voltage dependence of block. This explanation requires that interactions between different anions take place within the pore, implying simultaneous binding of multiple anions to intrapore sites. Other anions are able to substitute for extracellular Cl− and interact with intracellular Au(CN)2− ions. Analysis of the effects of different extracellular anions on the apparent affinity and voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2− ions suggests that extracellular anions do not need to permeate through the channel in order to destabilize Au(CN)2− binding within the pore, implying that this destabilizing effect results from binding to an externally accessible site in the permeation pathway. We propose that multiple anions can bind simultaneously within the CFTR channel pore, and that repulsive interactions between bound anions speeds anion exit from the pore. PMID:12679371

  16. Coupled movement of permeant and blocking ions in the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiandi; Linsdell, Paul

    2003-06-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel pore is blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by a broad range of anionic substances added to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Here we investigate the origin of the voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2-, a highly permeant lyotropic anion which also acts as a high-affinity blocker of Cl- permeation. Not only the affinity, but also the voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2- ions is strongly dependent on extracellular Cl- concentration; following replacement of most extracellular Cl- by glucose or by impermeant anions, block by Au(CN)2- shows greatly weakened voltage dependence. This suggests that coupled movement of Au(CN)2- and Cl- ions within the pore contributes to the voltage dependence of block. This explanation requires that interactions between different anions take place within the pore, implying simultaneous binding of multiple anions to intrapore sites. Other anions are able to substitute for extracellular Cl- and interact with intracellular Au(CN)2- ions. Analysis of the effects of different extracellular anions on the apparent affinity and voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2- ions suggests that extracellular anions do not need to permeate through the channel in order to destabilize Au(CN)2- binding within the pore, implying that this destabilizing effect results from binding to an externally accessible site in the permeation pathway. We propose that multiple anions can bind simultaneously within the CFTR channel pore, and that repulsive interactions between bound anions speeds anion exit from the pore. PMID:12679371

  17. Remorin, a solanaceae protein resident in membrane rafts and plasmodesmata, impairs potato virus X movement.

    PubMed

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Lafarge, David; Cluzet, Stéphanie; German Retana, Sylvie; Boubekeur, Tamy; Leborgne-Castel, Nathalie; Carde, Jean-Pierre; Lherminier, Jeannine; Noirot, Elodie; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Laroche-Traineau, Jeanny; Moreau, Patrick; Ott, Thomas; Maule, Andrew J; Reymond, Philippe; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Farmer, Edward E; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2009-05-01

    Remorins (REMs) are proteins of unknown function specific to vascular plants. We have used imaging and biochemical approaches and in situ labeling to demonstrate that REM clusters at plasmodesmata and in approximately 70-nm membrane domains, similar to lipid rafts, in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. From a manipulation of REM levels in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants, we show that Potato virus X (PVX) movement is inversely related to REM accumulation. We show that REM can interact physically with the movement protein TRIPLE GENE BLOCK PROTEIN1 from PVX. Based on the localization of REM and its impact on virus macromolecular trafficking, we discuss the potential for lipid rafts to act as functional components in plasmodesmata and the plasma membrane. PMID:19470590

  18. Nanopatterning of recombinant proteins and viruses using block copolymer templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresce, Arthur Von Wald

    The study of interfaces is important in understanding biological interactions, including cellular signaling and virus infection. This thesis is an original effort to examine the interaction between a block copolymer and both a protein and a virus. Block copolymers intrinsically form nanometer-scale structures over large areas without expensive processing, making them ideal for the synthesis of the nanopatterned surfaces used in this study. The geometry of these nanostructures can be easily tuned for different applications by altering the block ratio and composition of the block copolymer. Block copolymers can be used for controlled uptake of metal ions, where one block selectively binds metal ions while the other does not. 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid is synthesized through ring-opening metathesis polymerization. It formed spherical domains with spheres approximately 30 nm in diameter, and these spheres were then subsequently loaded with nickel ion. This norbornene block copolymer was tested for its ability to bind histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (hisGFP), and it was found that the nickel-loaded copolymer was able to retain hisGFP through chelation between the histidine tag and the metal-containing portions of the copolymer surface. Poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS/P4VP) was also loaded with nickel, forming a cylindrical microstructure. The binding of Tobacco mosaic virus and Tobacco necrosis virus was tested through Tween 20 detergent washes. Electron microscopy allowed for observation of both block copolymer nanostructures and virus particles. Results showed that Tween washes could not remove bound Tobacco mosaic virus from the surface of PS/P4VP. It was also seen that the size and tunability of block copolymers and the lack of processing needed to attain different structures makes them attractive for many applications, including microfluidic devices, surfaces to influence cellular signaling and growth, and as a nanopatterning surface for

  19. Phosphorylation of alfalfa mosaic virus movement protein in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Suk; Halk, Edward L; Merlo, Donald J; Nelson, Steven E; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2014-07-01

    The 32-kDa movement protein, P3, of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is essential for cell-to-cell spread of the virus in plants. P3 shares many properties with other virus movement proteins (MPs); however, it is not known if P3 is posttranslationally modified by phosphorylation, which is important for the function of other MPs. When expressed in Nicotiana tabacum, P3 accumulated primarily in the cell walls of older leaves or in the cytosol of younger leaves. When expressed in Pischia pastoris, P3 accumulated primarily in a soluble form. Metabolic labeling indicated that a portion of P3 was phosphorylated in both tobacco and yeast, suggesting that phosphorylation regulates the function of this protein as it does for other virus MPs. PMID:24435161

  20. Detection of block movements in ortho-rectified HiRISE images of the north pole of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanara, Lida; Gwinner, Klaus; Hauber, Ernst; Oberst, Juergen

    2016-04-01

    We are working toward automatically identifying new and disintegrated blocks at the foot of the steep north polar scarps of Mars. This region has been closely monitored by High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) over the past 9 years. Repeated imaging revealed that mass movement events are very common at the steep margins of the polar cap. The most frequently observed events are block movements, which originate at the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) or at the Basal Unit (BU). Blocks come to rest intact or after breaking up into smaller fragments. Their original sizes are in the order of a couple of cubic meters. We have manually identified hundreds of single-block movements as well as events involving a large number of blocks and are currently developing a process for detecting these automatically. First we accurately locate the events by ortho-rectifying the images using HiRISE Digital Terrain Models (DTMs). Then we use the resulting co-registered images taken at different times as the basis for change detection, at which stage we focus on retrieving the size and shape of the moved blocks in order to classify them according to specific geometric criteria. These results can be combined with the corresponding DTMs to estimate the volume of the mass movements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement n° 607379.

  1. Geodynamics of crustal deformation and seismotectonic block movements in central Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Geological observations reveal the style of neotectonic near-surface stresses and deformations in central Europe. Seismic activity, focal depths and fault plane solutions of earthquakes indicate kinematic reactions within the crust. A crustal deformation model which may account for the Rhine graben systems and the associated seismotectonic block movements in Europe is presented. A computer aided tomography to gravity anomalies is used in determining the crustal stresses in central Europe. Tomographical interpretations of gravity data with respect to seismic stresses are discussed. Kinematics and dynamics are integrated to show that the measured regional stresses in central Europe are derivable from the convection generated traction on the boundary of the elastic spherical shell of the crust as inferred from satellite derived gravity data.

  2. Two Plant–Viral Movement Proteins Traffic in the Endocytic Recycling PathwayW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Sophie; Cowan, Graham H.; Ziegler, Angelika; Roberts, Alison G.; Oparka, Karl J.; Torrance, Lesley

    2005-01-01

    Many plant viruses exploit a conserved group of proteins known as the triple gene block (TGB) for cell-to-cell movement. Here, we investigated the interaction of two TGB proteins (TGB2 and TGB3) of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV), with components of the secretory and endocytic pathways when expressed as N-terminal fusions to green fluorescent protein or monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP). Our studies revealed that fluorophore-labeled TGB2 and TGB3 showed an early association with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and colocalized in motile granules that used the ER-actin network for intracellular movement. Both proteins increased the size exclusion limit of plasmodesmata, and TGB3 accumulated at plasmodesmata in the absence of TGB2. TGB3 contains a putative Tyr-based sorting motif, mutations in which abolished ER localization and plasmodesmatal targeting. Later in the expression cycle, both fusion proteins were incorporated into vesicular structures. TGB2 associated with these structures on its own, but TGB3 could not be incorporated into the vesicles in the absence of TGB2. Moreover, in addition to localization to the ER and motile granules, mRFP-TGB3 was incorporated into vesicles when expressed in PMTV-infected epidermal cells, indicating recruitment by virus-expressed TGB2. The TGB fusion protein-containing vesicles were labeled with FM4-64, a marker for plasma membrane internalization and components of the endocytic pathway. TGB2 also colocalized in vesicles with Ara7, a Rab5 ortholog that marks the early endosome. Protein interaction analysis revealed that recombinant TGB2 interacted with a tobacco protein belonging to the highly conserved RME-8 family of J-domain chaperones, shown to be essential for endocytic trafficking in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Collectively, the data indicate the involvement of the endocytic pathway in viral intracellular movement, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:15608333

  3. Improvement of hand function using different surfaces and identification of difficult movement post stroke in the Box and Block Test.

    PubMed

    Slota, Gregory P; Enders, Leah R; Seo, Na Jin

    2014-07-01

    This study determined the impact of changing block surfaces on hand function, as well as identified particularly time-consuming movement components post stroke, measured by the Box and Block Test (BBT). Eight chronic stroke survivors and eight age- and gender-matched control subjects participated in this study. The BBT score (number of blocks moved) and time for seven movement components were compared for three different block surfaces (wood, paper, and rubber). The rubber blocks improved BBT scores 8% (compared to all other conditions) not only for control subjects but also for the paretic and non-paretic hands of stroke survivors, by reducing movement time for finger closing and contact-to-lift. Modifying daily objects' surfaces with rubber could help stroke survivors' hand function. The paretic hand displayed notably slower movement for contact-to-lift, transport-release, reach before barrier, and reach after barrier suggesting that therapies may focus on goal directed reaching and object grasping/releasing. PMID:24239565

  4. A preliminary research establishing the present-time intraplate blocks movement model on the Chinese mainland based on GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuo-Yu; Zhang, Yue-Gang; Ding, Guo-Yu; Wu, Yun; Qin, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Shun-Ying; Wang, Qi; You, Xin-Zhao; Qiao, Xue-Jun; Shuai, Ping; Deng, Gan-Jin

    1998-07-01

    The Chinese mainland is regarded as the best area for studying the continental crustal movement and dynamics. In the past, based on the ground surface observation, it was very difficult to study the movement of the intraplate blocks within a range of larger space and a time scale of several years quantitatively. In this paper, a method of calculating the Euler vectors of present-time motion among blocks by using Cardan angles has been given completely based on two periods of GPS repetition measurement data of the National Ascending Plan of China (NAPC) — the study and application of current crustal movement and geodynamics in 1994 and 1996. A present-time blocks movement model on the Chinese mainland (PBMC-1), which describes the motion of seven blocks—Tibet, Chuan-Dian, Gan-Qing, Xinjiang, South China, North China and Heilongjiang block, is established preliminarily. The velocity field of the relative motion among the intraplate blocks and boundary motion in the Chinese mainland are firstly given within several years time scale. It is shown by the results calculated with the model that the velocity-rate of each block is reduced gradually from the south to north and from the west to east, and the motion direction changes gradually from NNE to E, even SEE or SE. The collision of Indian plate plays a leading role in the movement of the intraplate blocks in the Chinese mainland, while the motion manner and velocity-rate of block boundary zone (fracture zone) depend on the motion of every block again. The present-time motion of a time scale of several years computed with the model is not only largely consistent with the average motion of a time scale of several million years derived from geology, but also very coincident with the results of geophysical and astronomic observation. It is shown preliminarily that the observed results of space geodesy techniques such as GPS etc. are capable of discovering the crustal movement at present.

  5. Turnip vein clearing virus movement protein nuclear activity: Do Tobamovirus movement proteins play a role in immune response suppression?

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses' cell-to-cell movement requires the function of virally encoded movement proteins (MPs). The Tobamovirus, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has served as the model virus to study the activities of single MPs. However, since TMV does not infect the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana I have used a related Tobamovirus, Turnip vein-clearing virus (TVCV). I recently showed that, despite belonging to the same genus, the behavior of the 2 viruses MPs differ significantly during infection. Most notably, MPTVCV, but not MPTMV, targets the nucleus and induces the formation of F actin-containing filaments that associate with chromatin. Mutational analyses showed that nuclear localization of MPTVCV was necessary for TVCV local and systemic infection in both Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis. In this addendum, I propose possible targets for the MPTVCV nuclear activity, and suggest viewing MPs as viral effector-like proteins, playing a role in the inhibition of plant defense. PMID:26237173

  6. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  7. Protein Crystal Movements and Fluid Flows During Microgravity Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, Titus J.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Snell, Edward H.; Dong, Jun; Lautenschlager, Peter; Potthast, Lothar; Siddons, D. Peter; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gordon, Elspeth; Thompson, Andrew W.; Zagalsky, Peter F.; Bi, Ru-Chang; Helliwell, John R.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals suitable for x-ray crystal structure analysis is an important topic. The quality (perfection) of protein crystals is now being evaluated by mosaicity analysis (rocking curves) and x-ray topographic images as well as the diffraction resolution limit and overall data quality. In yet another study, use of hanging drop vapour diffusion geometry on the IML-2 shuttle mission showed, again via CCD video monitoring, growing apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) protein crystal executing near cyclic movement, reminiscent of Marangoni convection flow of fluid, the crystals serving as "markers" of the fluid flow. A review is given here of existing results and experience over several microgravity missions. Some comment is given on gel protein crystal growth in attempts to 'mimic' the benefits of microgravity on Earth. Finally, the recent new results from our experiments on the shuttle mission LMS are described. These results include CCD video as well as interferometry during the mission, followed, on return to Earth, by reciprocal space mapping at the NSLS, Brookhaven, and full X-ray data collection on LMS and Earth control lysozyme crystals. Diffraction data recorded from LMS and ground control apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) crystals are also described.

  8. Remorin, a Solanaceae Protein Resident in Membrane Rafts and Plasmodesmata, Impairs Potato virus X Movement[W

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Lafarge, David; Cluzet, Stéphanie; German Retana, Sylvie; Boubekeur, Tamy; Leborgne-Castel, Nathalie; Carde, Jean-Pierre; Lherminier, Jeannine; Noirot, Elodie; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Laroche-Traineau, Jeanny; Moreau, Patrick; Ott, Thomas; Maule, Andrew J.; Reymond, Philippe; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Farmer, Edward E.; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Remorins (REMs) are proteins of unknown function specific to vascular plants. We have used imaging and biochemical approaches and in situ labeling to demonstrate that REM clusters at plasmodesmata and in ∼70-nm membrane domains, similar to lipid rafts, in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. From a manipulation of REM levels in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants, we show that Potato virus X (PVX) movement is inversely related to REM accumulation. We show that REM can interact physically with the movement protein TRIPLE GENE BLOCK PROTEIN1 from PVX. Based on the localization of REM and its impact on virus macromolecular trafficking, we discuss the potential for lipid rafts to act as functional components in plasmodesmata and the plasma membrane. PMID:19470590

  9. Nanobiotechnology with S-layer proteins as building blocks.

    PubMed

    Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard; Egelseer, Eva M; Pum, Dietmar; Horejs, Christine M; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Ilk, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    One of the key challenges in nanobiotechnology is the utilization of self- assembly systems, wherein molecules spontaneously associate into reproducible aggregates and supramolecular structures. In this contribution, we describe the basic principles of crystalline bacterial surface layers (S-layers) and their use as patterning elements. The broad application potential of S-layers in nanobiotechnology is based on the specific intrinsic features of the monomolecular arrays composed of identical protein or glycoprotein subunits. Most important, physicochemical properties and functional groups on the protein lattice are arranged in well-defined positions and orientations. Many applications of S-layers depend on the capability of isolated subunits to recrystallize into monomolecular arrays in suspension or on suitable surfaces (e.g., polymers, metals, silicon wafers) or interfaces (e.g., lipid films, liposomes, emulsomes). S-layers also represent a unique structural basis and patterning element for generating more complex supramolecular structures involving all major classes of biological molecules (e.g., proteins, lipids, glycans, nucleic acids, or combinations of these). Thus, S-layers fulfill key requirements as building blocks for the production of new supramolecular materials and nanoscale devices as required in molecular nanotechnology, nanobiotechnology, biomimetics, and synthetic biology. PMID:21999999

  10. Identification of local conformational similarity in structurally variable regions of homologous proteins using protein blocks.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Garima; Mahajan, Swapnil; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2011-01-01

    Structure comparison tools can be used to align related protein structures to identify structurally conserved and variable regions and to infer functional and evolutionary relationships. While the conserved regions often superimpose well, the variable regions appear non superimposable. Differences in homologous protein structures are thought to be due to evolutionary plasticity to accommodate diverged sequences during evolution. One of the kinds of differences between 3-D structures of homologous proteins is rigid body displacement. A glaring example is not well superimposed equivalent regions of homologous proteins corresponding to α-helical conformation with different spatial orientations. In a rigid body superimposition, these regions would appear variable although they may contain local similarity. Also, due to high spatial deviation in the variable region, one-to-one correspondence at the residue level cannot be determined accurately. Another kind of difference is conformational variability and the most common example is topologically equivalent loops of two homologues but with different conformations. In the current study, we present a refined view of the "structurally variable" regions which may contain local similarity obscured in global alignment of homologous protein structures. As structural alphabet is able to describe local structures of proteins precisely through Protein Blocks approach, conformational similarity has been identified in a substantial number of 'variable' regions in a large data set of protein structural alignments; optimal residue-residue equivalences could be achieved on the basis of Protein Blocks which led to improved local alignments. Also, through an example, we have demonstrated how the additional information on local backbone structures through protein blocks can aid in comparative modeling of a loop region. In addition, understanding on sequence-structure relationships can be enhanced through our approach. This has been

  11. Probing interactions between plant virus movement proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tzfira, Tzvi; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2008-01-01

    Most plant viruses move between plant cells with the help of their movement proteins (MPs). MPs are multifunctional proteins, and one of their functions is almost invariably binding to nucleic acids. Presumably, the MP-nucleic acid interaction is directly involved in formation of nucleoprotein complexes that function as intermediates in the cell-to-cell transport of many plant viruses. Thus, when studying a viral MP, it is important to determine whether or not it binds nucleic acids, and to characterize the hallmark parameters of such binding, i.e., preference for single- or double-stranded nucleic acids and binding cooperativity and sequence specificity. Here, we present two major experimental approaches, native gel mobility shift assay and ultra violet (UV) light cross-linking, for detection and characterization of MP binding to DNA and RNA molecules. We also describe protocols for purification of recombinant viral MPs over-expressed in bacteria and production of different DNA and RNA probes for these binding assays. PMID:18370264

  12. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on movement: movable art, relocating families, human rights, and trains and cars. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books, additional resources and activities (PEN)

  13. Protein Block Expert (PBE): a web-based protein structure analysis server using a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, M; Sharma, P; Swamy, C S; Cadet, F; Srinivasan, N; de Brevern, A G; Offmann, B

    2006-07-01

    Encoding protein 3D structures into 1D string using short structural prototypes or structural alphabets opens a new front for structure comparison and analysis. Using the well-documented 16 motifs of Protein Blocks (PBs) as structural alphabet, we have developed a methodology to compare protein structures that are encoded as sequences of PBs by aligning them using dynamic programming which uses a substitution matrix for PBs. This methodology is implemented in the applications available in Protein Block Expert (PBE) server. PBE addresses common issues in the field of protein structure analysis such as comparison of proteins structures and identification of protein structures in structural databanks that resemble a given structure. PBE-T provides facility to transform any PDB file into sequences of PBs. PBE-ALIGNc performs comparison of two protein structures based on the alignment of their corresponding PB sequences. PBE-ALIGNm is a facility for mining SCOP database for similar structures based on the alignment of PBs. Besides, PBE provides an interface to a database (PBE-SAdb) of preprocessed PB sequences from SCOP culled at 95% and of all-against-all pairwise PB alignments at family and superfamily levels. PBE server is freely available at http://bioinformatics.univ-reunion.fr/PBE/. PMID:16844973

  14. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  15. Cell-to-cell movement of Potato virus X: the role of p12 and p8 encoded by the second and third open reading frames of the triple gene block.

    PubMed

    Tamai, A; Meshi, T

    2001-10-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) requires three proteins, p25, p12, and p8, encoded by the triple gene block plus the coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. When each of these proteins was co-expressed with a cytosolic green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana by the microprojectile bombardment-mediated gene delivery method, only p12 enhanced diffusion of co-expressed GFP, indicating an ability to alter plasmodesmal permeability. p25, p12, and CP, expressed transiently in the initially infected cells, transcomplemented the corresponding movement-defective mutants to spread through two or more cell boundaries. Thus, these proteins probably move from cell to cell with the genomic RNA. In contrast, p8 only functioned intracellularly and was not absolutely required for cell-to-cell movement. Since overexpression of p12 overcame the p8 deficiency, p8 appears to facilitate the functioning of p12, presumably by mediating its intracellular trafficking. Considering the likelihood that p12 and p8 are membrane proteins, it is suggested that intercellular as well as intracellular movement of PVX involves a membrane-mediated process. PMID:11605955

  16. Bayesian probabilistic approach for predicting backbone structures in terms of protein blocks.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Hazout, S

    2000-11-15

    By using an unsupervised cluster analyzer, we have identified a local structural alphabet composed of 16 folding patterns of five consecutive C(alpha) ("protein blocks"). The dependence that exists between successive blocks is explicitly taken into account. A Bayesian approach based on the relation protein block-amino acid propensity is used for prediction and leads to a success rate close to 35%. Sharing sequence windows associated with certain blocks into "sequence families" improves the prediction accuracy by 6%. This prediction accuracy exceeds 75% when keeping the first four predicted protein blocks at each site of the protein. In addition, two different strategies are proposed: the first one defines the number of protein blocks in each site needed for respecting a user-fixed prediction accuracy, and alternatively, the second one defines the different protein sites to be predicted with a user-fixed number of blocks and a chosen accuracy. This last strategy applied to the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (alpha/beta protein) shows that 91% of the sites may be predicted with a prediction accuracy larger than 77% considering only three blocks per site. The prediction strategies proposed improve our knowledge about sequence-structure dependence and should be very useful in ab initio protein modelling. PMID:11025540

  17. Protein nanorings organized by poly(styrene-block-ethylene oxide) self-assembled thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmström, Jenny; Wason, Akshita; Roache, Fergus; Yewdall, N. Amy; Radjainia, Mazdak; Wei, Shanghai; Higgins, Michael J.; Williams, David E.; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2015-11-01

    This study explores the use of block copolymer self-assembly to organize Lsmα, a protein which forms stable doughnut-shaped heptameric structures. Here, we have explored the idea that 2-D crystalline arrays of protein filaments can be prepared by stacking doughnut shaped Lsmα protein into the poly(ethylene oxide) blocks of a hexagonal microphase-separated polystyrene-b-polyethylene oxide (PS-b-PEO) block copolymer. We were able to demonstrate the coordinated assembly of such a complex hierarchical nanostructure. The key to success was the choice of solvent systems and protein functionalization that achieved sufficient compatibility whilst still promoting assembly. Unambiguous characterisation of these structures is difficult; however AFM and TEM measurements confirmed that the protein was sequestered into the PEO blocks. The use of a protein that assembles into stackable doughnuts offers the possibility of assembling nanoscale optical, magnetic and electronic structures.This study explores the use of block copolymer self-assembly to organize Lsmα, a protein which forms stable doughnut-shaped heptameric structures. Here, we have explored the idea that 2-D crystalline arrays of protein filaments can be prepared by stacking doughnut shaped Lsmα protein into the poly(ethylene oxide) blocks of a hexagonal microphase-separated polystyrene-b-polyethylene oxide (PS-b-PEO) block copolymer. We were able to demonstrate the coordinated assembly of such a complex hierarchical nanostructure. The key to success was the choice of solvent systems and protein functionalization that achieved sufficient compatibility whilst still promoting assembly. Unambiguous characterisation of these structures is difficult; however AFM and TEM measurements confirmed that the protein was sequestered into the PEO blocks. The use of a protein that assembles into stackable doughnuts offers the possibility of assembling nanoscale optical, magnetic and electronic structures. Electronic supplementary

  18. Phosphorylation of TGB1 by protein kinase CK2 promotes barley stripe mosaic virus movement in monocots and dicots

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue; Li, Zhenggang; Yuan, Cheng; Jin, Xuejiao; Yan, Lijie; Zhao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yongliang; Jackson, Andrew O.; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    The barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) triple gene block 1 (TGB1) protein is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. However, little information is available about how these activities are regulated by post-translational modifications. In this study, we showed that the BSMV Xinjiang strain TGB1 (XJTGB1) is phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro by protein kinase CK2 from barley and Nicotiana benthamiana. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis and in vitro phosphorylation assays demonstrated that Thr-401 is the major phosphorylation site of the XJTGB1 protein, and suggested that a Thr-395 kinase docking site supports Thr-401 phosphorylation. Substitution of Thr-395 with alanine (T395A) only moderately impaired virus cell-to-cell movement and systemic infection. In contrast, the Thr-401 alanine (T401A) virus mutant was unable to systemically infect N. benthamiana but had only minor effects in monocot hosts. Substitution of Thr-395 or Thr-401 with aspartic acid interfered with monocot and dicot cell-to-cell movement and the plants failed to develop systemic infections. However, virus derivatives with single glutamic acid substitutions at Thr-395 and Thr-401 developed nearly normal systemic infections in the monocot hosts but were unable to infect N. benthamiana systemically, and none of the double mutants was able to infect dicot and monocot hosts. The mutant XJTGB1T395A/T401A weakened in vitro interactions between XJTGB1 and XJTGB3 proteins but had little effect on XJTGB1 RNA-binding ability. Taken together, our results support a critical role of CK2 phosphorylation in the movement of BSMV in monocots and dicots, and provide new insights into the roles of phosphorylation in TGB protein functions. PMID:25998907

  19. Downregulation of the NbNACa1 gene encoding a movement-protein-interacting protein reduces cell-to-cell movement of Brome mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Kaido, Masanori; Inoue, Yosuke; Takeda, Yoshika; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Atsushi; Mori, Masashi; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Okuno, Tetsuro; Mise, Kazuyuki

    2007-06-01

    The 3a movement protein (MP) plays a central role in the movement of the RNA plant virus, Brome mosaic virus (BMV). To identify host factor genes involved in viral movement, a cDNA library of Nicotiana benthamiana, a systemic host for BMV, was screened with far-Western blotting using a recombinant BMV MP as probe. One positive clone encoded a protein with sequence similarity to the alpha chain of nascent-polypeptide-associated complex from various organisms, which is proposed to contribute to the fidelity of translocation of newly synthesized proteins. The orthologous gene from N. benthamiana was designated NbNACa1. The binding of NbNACa1 to BMV MP was confirmed in vivo with an agroinfiltration-immunoprecipitation assay. To investigate the involvement of NbNACa1 in BMV multiplication, NbNACa1-silenced (GSNAC) transgenic N. benthamiana plants were produced. Downregulation of NbNACa1 expression reduced virus accumulation in inoculated leaves but not in protoplasts. A microprojectile bombardment assay to monitor BMV-MP-assisted viral movement demonstrated reduced virus spread in GSNAC plants. The localization to the cell wall of BMV MP fused to green fluorescent protein was delayed in GSNAC plants. From these results, we propose that NbNACa1 is involved in BMV cell-to-cell movement through the regulation of BMV MP localization to the plasmodesmata. PMID:17555275

  20. In vitro phosphorylation of the N-terminal half of hordeivirus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Makarov, V V; Iconnikova, A Y; Guseinov, M A; Vishnichenko, V K; Kalinina, N O

    2012-09-01

    The N-terminal half of TGB1 movement protein of poa semilatent hordeivirus, which forms a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in movement of the viral genome in the plant, and its two domains, NTD and ID, are phosphorylated in vitro by a fraction enriched in cell walls from Nicotiana benthamiana. Using a set of protein kinase inhibitors with different specificities, it was found that enzymes possessing activities of casein kinase 1, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C are involved in phosphorylation. Commercial preparations of protein kinases A and C are able to phosphorylate in vitro recombinant proteins corresponding to the N-terminal half of the protein and its domains NTD and ID. Phosphorylation of the NTD has no effect on the efficiency and character of its binding to RNA. However, phosphorylation of the ID leads to a decrease in its RNA-binding activity and in the ability for homological protein-protein interactions. PMID:23157268

  1. Blocking and detection chemistries affect antibody performance on reverse phase protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Ambroz, Kristi L H; Zhang, Yonghong; Schutz-Geschwender, Amy; Olive, D Michael

    2008-06-01

    Antibody specificity is critical for RP protein arrays (RPA). The effects of blocking and detection chemistries on antibody specificity were evaluated for Western blots and RPA. Blocking buffers significantly affected nonspecific banding on Western blots, with corresponding effects on arrays. Tyramide signal amplification (TSA) increased both specific and nonspecific signals on Westerns and arrays, masking the expected gradations in signal intensity. These results suggest that consistent blocking and detection conditions should be used for antibody validation and subsequent RPA experiments. PMID:18563731

  2. Identification of Ourmiavirus 30K movement protein amino acid residues involved in symptomatology, viral movement, subcellular localization and tubule formation.

    PubMed

    Margaria, Paolo; Anderson, Charles T; Turina, Massimo; Rosa, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Several plant viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) classified in the 30K superfamily. Despite a great functional diversity, alignment analysis of MP sequences belonging to the 30K superfamily revealed the presence of a central core region, including amino acids potentially critical for MP structure and functionality. We performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) MP, and studied the effects of amino acid substitutions on MP properties and virus infection. We identified five OuMV mutants that were impaired in systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana, and two mutants showing necrosis and pronounced mosaic symptoms, respectively, in N. benthamiana. Green fluorescent protein fusion constructs (GFP:MP) of movement-defective MP alleles failed to localize in distinct foci at the cell wall, whereas a GFP fusion with wild-type MP (GFP:MPwt) mainly co-localized with plasmodesmata and accumulated at the periphery of epidermal cells. The movement-defective mutants also failed to produce tubular protrusions in protoplasts isolated from infected leaves, suggesting a link between tubule formation and the ability of OuMV to move. In addition to providing data to support the importance of specific amino acids for OuMV MP functionality, we predict that these conserved residues might be critical for the correct folding and/or function of the MP of other viral species in the 30K superfamily. PMID:26637973

  3. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Guo, Ren-Chao; Ng, Hui-Fuang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM) based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins. PMID:27610389

  4. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Guo, Ren-Chao; Ng, Hui-Fuang; Chu, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM) based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins. PMID:27610389

  5. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer-phospholipid hybrid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Nussberger, Stephan; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas; Müller, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  6. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer–phospholipid hybrid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  7. Protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation blocks juvenile hormone action.

    PubMed

    Kethidi, Damu R; Li, Yiping; Palli, Subba R

    2006-03-01

    Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate a wide variety of developmental and physiological processes in insects. Although the biological actions of JH are well documented, the molecular mechanisms underlying JH action are poorly understood. We studied the molecular basis of JH action using a JH response element (JHRE) identified in the promoter region of JH esterase gene cloned from Choristoneura fumiferana, which is responsive to JH and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). In Drosophila melanogaster L57 cells, the JHRE-regulated reporter gene was induced by JH I, JH III, methoprene, and hydroprene. Nuclear proteins isolated from L57 cells bound to the JHRE and exposure of these proteins to ATP resulted in a reduction in their DNA binding. Either JH III or calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) was able to restore the binding of nuclear proteins to the DNA. In addition, protein kinase C inhibitors increased and protein kinase C activators reduced the binding of nuclear proteins to the JHRE. In transactivation assays, protein kinase C inhibitors induced the luciferase gene placed under the control of a minimal promoter and the JHRE. These data suggest that protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation prevents binding of nuclear proteins to juvenile hormone responsive promoters resulting in suppression of JH action. PMID:16448742

  8. Estrogen receptor α inhibitor activates the unfolded protein response, blocks protein synthesis, and induces tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Andruska, Neal D; Zheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Xujuan; Mao, Chengjian; Cherian, Mathew M; Mahapatra, Lily; Helferich, William G; Shapiro, David J

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast and ovarian cancers are often therapy resistant. Using screening and functional validation, we identified BHPI, a potent noncompetitive small molecule ERα biomodulator that selectively blocks proliferation of drug-resistant ERα-positive breast and ovarian cancer cells. In a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer, BHPI induced rapid and substantial tumor regression. Whereas BHPI potently inhibits nuclear estrogen-ERα-regulated gene expression, BHPI is effective because it elicits sustained ERα-dependent activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (EnR) stress sensor, the unfolded protein response (UPR), and persistent inhibition of protein synthesis. BHPI distorts a newly described action of estrogen-ERα: mild and transient UPR activation. In contrast, BHPI elicits massive and sustained UPR activation, converting the UPR from protective to toxic. In ERα(+) cancer cells, BHPI rapidly hyperactivates plasma membrane PLCγ, generating inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), which opens EnR IP3R calcium channels, rapidly depleting EnR Ca(2+) stores. This leads to activation of all three arms of the UPR. Activation of the PERK arm stimulates phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), resulting in rapid inhibition of protein synthesis. The cell attempts to restore EnR Ca(2+) levels, but the open EnR IP3R calcium channel leads to an ATP-depleting futile cycle, resulting in activation of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase and phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). eEF2 phosphorylation inhibits protein synthesis at a second site. BHPI's novel mode of action, high potency, and effectiveness in therapy-resistant tumor cells make it an exceptional candidate for further mechanistic and therapeutic exploration. PMID:25825714

  9. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Petkau-Milroy, Katja; Sonntag, Michael H.; Colditz, Alexander; Brunsveld, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins. PMID:24152447

  10. Analysis of train movement dynamics under various temporal-spatial constraints in fixed-block railway network using extended cellular automaton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yonghua; Zhang, Zhenlin; Liu, Deng

    2014-03-01

    In the fixed-block railway traffic, the trains adjust their speeds in view of their preceding allowable spaces caused by their respective front adjacent trains or specified by scheduling commands. The railway lines have the line-type speed limits within some block sections and the point-type ones at the terminals of block sections. Those speed limits originate from line conditions, scheduling commands and indications of signal equipment. This paper attempts to in detail reveal the train movement mechanism synthetically considering those temporal-spatial constraints. The proposed train movement model defines four kinds of target points and utilizes them to successively engender the instantaneous target points with their corresponding target speeds. It adopts the rule-based description mechanism in cellular automata (CA) but with continuous spaces to replicate restrictive, autonomous and synergistic behaviors of and among trains. The selections of accelerations and decelerations are based upon the data models of practical acceleration and deceleration processes; thereupon, the model is data-driven. The analysis of train movement dynamics through case studies demonstrates that the extended CA model can reproduce the train movement mechanism of grading speed control to satisfy the aforementioned temporal-spatial constraints. The model is applicable to represent the as-is or should-be states of train movements when adjustable parameters are properly configured.

  11. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  13. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  14. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  15. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  16. Subcellular localization of the barley stripe mosaic virsus triple gene block proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) spreads from cell-to-cell through the coordinated actions of three triple gene block proteins (TGB1, TGB2, and TGB3) arranged in overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Our previous studies (Lawrence and Jackson, 2001a,b) have shown that each of these proteins is re...

  17. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  18. Protein Crystal Movements and Fluid Flows During Microgravity Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, Titus J.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Snell, Edward H.; Dong, Jun; Lautenschlager, Peter; Potthast, Lothar; Siddons, D. Peter; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gordon, Elspeth; Thompson, Andrew W.; Zagalsky, Peter F.; Bi, Ru-Chang; Helliwell, John R.

    1997-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals suitable for X-ray crystal structure analysis is an important topic. The methods of protein crystal growth are under increasing study whereby different methods are being compared via diagnostic monitoring including Charge Coupled Device (CCD) video and interferometry. The quality (perfection) of protein crystals is now being evaluated by mosaicity analysis (rocking curves) and X-ray topographic images as well as the diffraction resolution limit and overall data quality. Choice of a liquid-liquid linear crystal growth geometry and microgravity can yield a spatial stability of growing crystals and fluid, as seen in protein crystallization experiments on the unmanned platform EURICA. A review is given here of existing results and experience over several microgravity missions. The results include CCD video as well as interferometry during the mission, followed, on return to earth, by rocking curve experiments and full X-ray data collection on LMS and earth control lysozyme crystals. Diffraction data recorded from LMS and ground control apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) crystals are also described.

  19. Blocking of bacterial biofilm formation by a fish protein coating.

    PubMed

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2008-06-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation on inert surfaces is a significant health and economic problem in a wide range of environmental, industrial, and medical areas. Bacterial adhesion is generally a prerequisite for this colonization process and, thus, represents an attractive target for the development of biofilm-preventive measures. We have previously found that the preconditioning of several different inert materials with an aqueous fish muscle extract, composed primarily of fish muscle alpha-tropomyosin, significantly discourages bacterial attachment and adhesion to these surfaces. Here, this proteinaceous coating is characterized with regards to its biofilm-reducing properties by using a range of urinary tract infectious isolates with various pathogenic and adhesive properties. The antiadhesive coating significantly reduced or delayed biofilm formation by all these isolates under every condition examined. The biofilm-reducing activity did, however, vary depending on the substratum physicochemical characteristics and the environmental conditions studied. These data illustrate the importance of protein conditioning layers with respect to bacterial biofilm formation and suggest that antiadhesive proteins may offer an attractive measure for reducing or delaying biofilm-associated infections. PMID:18424549

  20. Mapping of the Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein and coat protein subgenomic RNA promoters in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grdzelishvili, V Z; Chapman, S N; Dawson, W O; Lewandowski, D J

    2000-09-15

    The Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP) are expressed from 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs). The transcription start site of the MP sgRNA, previously mapped to positions 4838 (Y. Watanabe, T. Meshi, and Y. Okada (1984), FEBS Lett. 173, 247-250) and 4828 (K. Lehto, G. L. Grantham, and W. O. Dawson (1990), Virology 174, 145-157) for the TMV OM and U1 strains, respectively, has been reexamined and mapped to position 4838 for strain U1. Sequences of the MP and CP sgRNA promoters were delineated by deletion analysis. The boundaries for minimal and full MP sgRNA promoter activity were localized between -35 and +10 and -95 and +40, respectively, relative to the transcription start site. The minimal CP sgRNA promoter was mapped between -69 and +12, whereas the boundaries of the fully active promoter were between -157 and +54. Computer analysis predicted two stem-loop structures (SL1 and SL2) upstream of the MP sgRNA transcription start site. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis suggested that SL1 secondary structure, but not its sequence, was required for MP sgRNA promoter activity, whereas a 39-nt deletion removing most of the SL2 region increased MP sgRNA accumulation fourfold. Computer-predicted folding of the fully active CP sgRNA promoter revealed one long stem-loop structure. Deletion analysis suggested that the upper part of this stem-loop, located upstream of the transcription start site, was essential for transcription and that the lower part of the stem had an enhancing role. PMID:11017798

  1. TYLCV-Is movement in planta does not require V2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hak, Hagit; Levy, Yael; Chandran, Sam A.; Belausov, Eduard; Loyter, Abraham; Lapidot, Moshe; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-03-15

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen causing extensive crop losses, is a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus. V2 mutants of TYLCV-Is and related viruses tend to induce symptomless infection with attenuated viral DNA levels, while accumulating close to wild-type DNA levels in protoplasts, suggesting V2 as a movement protein. The discovery of plant-silencing mechanisms and viral silencing suppressors, V2 included, led us to reconsider V2's involvement in viral movement. We studied two mutant versions of the virus, one impaired in V2 silencing-suppression activity, and another carrying a non-translatable V2. While both mutant viruses spread in the infected plant to newly emerged leaves at the same rate as the wild-type virus, their DNA-accumulation levels were tenfold lower than in the wild-type virus. Thus, we suggest that the setback in virus proliferation, previously ascribed to a movement impediment, is due to lack of silencing-suppression activity. - Highlights: • TYLCV-Is V2 protein is localized in distinct microbodies throughout the cell cytoplasm, around the nucleus and in association with cytoplasmic strands but is not associated with the plasmodesmata. • Disruption of RNA-silencing suppression activity of TYLCV-Is V2 protein causes low titer of the virus in the infected plants. • The movement of TYLCV-Is in planta does not require a functional V2 protein.

  2. Characterization of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein domains involved in tubule formation, movement and symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Absence of a reliable reverse genetics system for Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has impeded direct demonstration of gene function. We previously used a Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based expression system to demonstrate that the TSWV NSm protein is able to support cell-to-cell movement in the absen...

  3. Cellular Targets of Functional and Dysfunctional Mutants of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Fused to Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Vitaly; van der Laak, Jessica; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Suslova, Elena; Kwon, Myoung-Ok; Heinlein, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    Intercellular transport of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA involves the accumulation of virus-encoded movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (Pd), in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived inclusion bodies, and on microtubules. The functional significance of these interactions in viral RNA (vRNA) movement was tested in planta and in protoplasts with TMV derivatives expressing N- and C-terminal deletion mutants of MP fused to the green fluorescent protein. Deletion of 55 amino acids from the C terminus of MP did not interfere with the vRNA transport function of MP:GFP but abolished its accumulation in inclusion bodies, indicating that accumulation of MP at these ER-derived sites is not a requirement for function in vRNA intercellular movement. Deletion of 66 amino acids from the C terminus of MP inactivated the protein, and viral infection occurred only upon complementation in plants transgenic for MP. The functional deficiency of the mutant protein correlated with its inability to associate with microtubules and, independently, with its absence from Pd at the leading edge of infection. Inactivation of MP by N-terminal deletions was correlated with the inability of the protein to target Pd throughout the infection site, whereas its associations with microtubules and inclusion bodies were unaffected. The observations support a role of MP-interacting microtubules in TMV RNA movement and indicate that MP targets microtubules and Pd by independent mechanisms. Moreover, accumulation of MP in Pd late in infection is insufficient to support viral movement, confirming that intercellular transport of vRNA relies on the presence of MP in Pd at the leading edge of infection. PMID:11070034

  4. Action of Protein Synthesis Inhibitors in Blocking Electrogenic H+ Efflux from Corn Roots 12

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Chris J.; Lafayette, Peter R.; Hanson, John B.

    1981-01-01

    The block in the electrogenic H+ efflux produced by protein synthesis inhibitors in corn root tissue can be released or by-passed by addition of fusicoccin or nigericin. The inhibition also lowers cell potential, and the release repolarizes. Associated with the inhibition of H+ efflux is inhibition of K+ influx and the growth of the root tip; fusicoccin partially relieves these inhibitions, but nigericin does not. The inhibition of H+ efflux which arises from blocking the proton channel of the ATPase by oligomycin or N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide can also be partially relieved by fusicoccin, but not by nigericin; the inhibition produced by diethylstilbestrol is not relieved by fusicoccin. The results are discussed in terms of the presumed mode of action of fusicoccin on the plasmalemma ATPase. Inhibition of protein synthesis appears to inactivate the proton channel of the ATPase, possibly as the indirect result of disrupted metabolism. Fusicoccin reactivates or bypasses the blocked channel. PMID:16661763

  5. Low-Temperature Processable Block Copolymers That Preserve the Function of Blended Proteins.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Takemoto, Kyohei; Tanaka, Shinya; Taniguchi, Ikuo

    2016-07-11

    Low-temperature processable polymers have attracted increasing interest as ecological materials because of their reduced energy consumption during processing and suitability for making composites with heat-sensitive biomolecules at ambient temperature. In the current study, low-temperature processable biodegradable block copolymers were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide (LLA) using polyphosphoester as a macroinitiator. The polymer films could be processed under a hydraulic pressure of 35 MPa. The block copolymer films swelled in water because the polyphosphoester block was partially hydrated. Interestingly, the swelling ratio of the films changed with temperature. The pressure-induced order-to-disorder transition of the block copolymers was characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering; a crystallinity reduction in the block copolymers was observed after application of pressure. The crystallinity of the block copolymers was recovered after removing the applied pressure. The Young's modulus of the block copolymer films increased as the LLA unit content increased. Moreover, the modulus did not change after multiple processing cycles and the recyclability of the block copolymers was also confirmed. Finally, polymer films with embedded proteinase K as a model protein were prepared. The activity of catalase loaded into the polymer films was evaluated after processing at different temperatures. The activity of catalase was preserved when the polymer films were processed at room temperature but was significantly reduced after high-temperature processing. The suitability of low-temperature processable biodegradable polymers for making biofunctional composites without reducing protein activity was clarified. These materials will be useful for biomedical and therapeutic applications. PMID:27280847

  6. GAPDH-A Recruits a Plant Virus Movement Protein to Cortical Virus Replication Complexes to Facilitate Viral Cell-to-Cell Movement

    PubMed Central

    Kaido, Masanori; Abe, Kazutomo; Mine, Akira; Hyodo, Kiwamu; Taniguchi, Takako; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    The formation of virus movement protein (MP)-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV), a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC) in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A), which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process. PMID:25411849

  7. Single-molecule protein arrays enabled by scanning probe block copolymer lithography.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jinan; Wong, Lu Shin; Giam, Louise; Mirkin, Chad A

    2011-12-01

    The ability to control the placement of individual protein molecules on surfaces could enable advances in a wide range of areas, from the development of nanoscale biomolecular devices to fundamental studies in cell biology. Such control, however, remains a challenge in nanobiotechnology due to the limitations of current lithographic techniques. Herein we report an approach that combines scanning probe block copolymer lithography with site-selective immobilization strategies to create arrays of proteins down to the single-molecule level with arbitrary pattern control. Scanning probe block copolymer lithography was used to synthesize individual sub-10-nm single crystal gold nanoparticles that can act as scaffolds for the adsorption of functionalized alkylthiol monolayers, which facilitate the immobilization of specific proteins. The number of protein molecules that adsorb onto the nanoparticles is dependent upon particle size; when the particle size approaches the dimensions of a protein molecule, each particle can support a single protein. This was demonstrated with both gold nanoparticle and quantum dot labeling coupled with transmission electron microscopy imaging experiments. The immobilized proteins remain bioactive, as evidenced by enzymatic assays and antigen-antibody binding experiments. Importantly, this approach to generate single-biomolecule arrays is, in principle, applicable to many parallelized cantilever and cantilever-free scanning probe molecular printing methods. PMID:22106270

  8. Genetic deficiency of the mitochondrial protein PGAM5 causes a Parkinson’s-like movement disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Springer, Danielle A.; Allen, Michele D.; Zheng, Lixin; Chao, Brittany; Zhang, Yan; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Lenardo, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that selectively disposes of dysfunctional mitochondria. Delineating the molecular regulation of mitophagy is of great importance because defects in this process lead to a variety of mitochondrial diseases. Here we report that mice deficient for the mitochondrial protein, phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5), displayed a Parkinson’s-like movement phenotype. We determined biochemically that PGAM5 is required for the stabilization of the mitophagy-inducing protein PINK1 on damaged mitochondria. Loss of PGAM5 disables PINK1-mediated mitophagy in vitro and leads to dopaminergic neurodegeneration and mild dopamine loss in vivo. Our data indicate that PGAM5 is a regulator of mitophagy essential for mitochondrial turnover and serves a cytoprotective function in dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Moreover, PGAM5 may provide a molecular link to study mitochondrial homeostasis and the pathogenesis of a movement disorder similar to Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25222142

  9. Genetic deficiency of the mitochondrial protein PGAM5 causes a Parkinson's-like movement disorder.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Springer, Danielle A; Allen, Michele D; Zheng, Lixin; Chao, Brittany; Zhang, Yan; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Lenardo, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that selectively disposes of dysfunctional mitochondria. Delineating the molecular regulation of mitophagy is of great importance because defects in this process lead to a variety of mitochondrial diseases. Here we report that mice deficient for the mitochondrial protein, phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5), displayed a Parkinson's-like movement phenotype. We determined biochemically that PGAM5 is required for the stabilization of the mitophagy-inducing protein PINK1 on damaged mitochondria. Loss of PGAM5 disables PINK1-mediated mitophagy in vitro and leads to dopaminergic neurodegeneration and mild dopamine loss in vivo. Our data indicate that PGAM5 is a regulator of mitophagy essential for mitochondrial turnover and serves a cytoprotective function in dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Moreover, PGAM5 may provide a molecular link to study mitochondrial homeostasis and the pathogenesis of a movement disorder similar to Parkinson's disease. PMID:25222142

  10. Substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins block the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1999-03-01

    1. The effects of physiological substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel currents were examined using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines. 2. Two MRP substrates, taurolithocholate-3-sulphate (TLCS) and beta-estradiol 17-(beta-D-glucuronide) (E217betaG) caused a voltage-dependent block of macroscopic CFTR Cl- currents when applied to the intracellular face of excised membrane patches, with mean apparent dissociation constants (KDs) of 96+/-10 and 563+/-103 microM (at 0 mV) respectively. The unconjugated bile salts taurocholate and cholate were also effective CFTR channel blockers under these conditions, with KDs of 453+/-44 and 3760+/-710 microM (at 0 mV) respectively. 3. Reducing the extracellular Cl- concentration from 154 to 20 mM decreased the KD for block intracellular TLCS to 54+/-1 microM, and also significantly reduced the voltage dependence of block, by suggesting that TLCS blocks Cl- permeation through CFTR by binding within the channel pore. 4. Intracellular TLCS reduced the apparent amplitude of CFTR single channel currents, suggesting that the duration of block is very fast compared to the gating of the channel. 5. The apparent affinity of block by TLCs is comparable to that of other well-known CFTR channel blockers, suggesting that MRP substrates may comprise a novel class of probes of the CFTR channel pore. 6. These results also suggest that the related proteins CFTR and MRP may share a structurally similar anion binding site at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. PMID:10217542

  11. Substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins block the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul; Hanrahan, John W

    1999-01-01

    The effects of physiological substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel currents were examined using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines. Two MRP substrates, taurolithocholate-3-sulphate (TLCS) and β-estradiol 17-(β-D-glucuronide) (E217βG) caused a voltage-dependent block of macroscopic CFTR Cl− currents when applied to the intracellular face of excised membrane patches, with mean apparent dissociation constants (KDs) of 96±10 and 563±103 μM (at 0 mV) respectively. The unconjugated bile salts taurocholate and cholate were also effective CFTR channel blockers under these conditions, with KDs of 453±44 and 3760±710 μM (at 0 mV) respectively. Reducing the extracellular Cl− concentration from 154 to 20 mM decreased the KD for block intracellular TLCS to 54±1 μM, and also significantly reduced the voltage dependence of block, by suggesting that TLCS blocks Cl− permeation through CFTR by binding within the channel pore. Intracellular TLCS reduced the apparent amplitude of CFTR single channel currents, suggesting that the duration of block is very fast compared to the gating of the channel. The apparent affinity of block by TLCs is comparable to that of other well-known CFTR channel blockers, suggesting that MRP substrates may comprise a novel class of probes of the CFTR channel pore. These results also suggest that the related proteins CFTR and MRP may share a structurally similar anion binding site at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. PMID:10217542

  12. Movement and self-control in protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Caspar, D L

    1980-01-01

    Purposeful switching among different conformational states exerts self-control in the construction and action of protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence, conceived to explain icosahedral virus structure, arises by differentiation of identical protein subunits into different conformations that conserve essential bonding specificity. Mechanical models designed to represent the energy distribution in the structure, rather than just the arrangement of matter, are used to explore flexibility and self-controlled movements in virus particles. Information about the assembly of bacterial flagella, actin, tobacco mosaic virus and the T4 bacteriophage tail structure show that assembly can be controlled by switching the subunits from an inactive, unsociable form to an active, associable form. Energy to drive this change is provided by the intersubunit bonding in the growing structure; this self-control of assembly by conformational switching is called "autostery", by homology with allostery. A mechanical model of the contractile T4 tail sheath has been constructed to demonstrate how self-controlled activation of a latent bonding potential can drive a purposeful movement. The gradient of quasi-equivalent conformations modelled in the contracting tail sheath has suggested a workable mechanism for self-determination of tail tube length. Concerted action by assemblies of identical proteins may often depend on individually differentiated movements. Images Figure 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6894706

  13. Charge Effects on the Self-Assembly of Protein Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Bradley

    Self-assembly of globular protein-polymer block copolymers into nanostructured phases provides a simple method for structural control in biomaterials. Electrostatics play a major role in the self-assembly of these structures from aqueous solutions. While the specific distribution of charge on the protein plays a relatively minor role in self-assembly, large changes in the total charge have a large impact on the concentration at which the proteins self-assemble. While for near-neutral proteins salt screening promotes disassembly and suggests that electrostatic interactions are attractive, proteins with a highly asymmetric charge have repulsive interactions that suppress self-assembly. Using a zwitterionic block in the bioconjugate was also explored as a means to promote self-assembly; however, zwitterionic fusions self-assemble over a narrower range of composition than fusions of any of the nonionic polymers explored. This suggests that dipolar attractions in charge-asymmetric protein-polymer materials play a significant role in the driving force for self-assembly. However, the sensitivity of zwitterionic materials to salt conditions in the buffer also provides a powerful handle for tuning polymer solubility, enabling salt to be used as a method to induce self-assembly.

  14. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthias C.; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R.; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally ‘program’ the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  15. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments.

    PubMed

    Huber, Matthias C; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally 'program' the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials. PMID:25362355

  16. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  17. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-14

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  18. Insulin/poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) Complexes: Physicochemical Properties and Protein Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Pippa, Natassa; Kalinova, Radostina; Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Pispas, Stergios; Demetzos, Costas

    2015-06-01

    Insulin (INS) was encapsulated into complexes with poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-b-PLys), which is a polypeptide-based block copolymer (a neutral-cationic block polyelectrolyte). The particular cationic-neutral block copolymer can complex INS molecules in aqueous media via electrostatic interactions. Light-scattering techniques are used to study the complexation process and structure of the hybrid nanoparticles in a series of buffers, as a function of protein concentration. The physicochemical and structural characteristics of the complexes depend on the ionic strength of the aqueous medium, while the concentration of PEG-b-PLys was constant through the series of solutions. As INS concentration increased the size distribution of the complexes decreased, especially at the highest ionic strength. The size/structure of complexes diluted in biological medium indicated that the copolymer imparts stealth properties and colloidal and biological stability to the complexes, features that could in turn affect the clearance properties in vivo. Therefore, these studies could be a rational roadmap for designing the optimum complexes/effective nanocarriers for proteins and peptides. PMID:25974620

  19. Control of Protein Affinity of Bioactive Nanocellulose and Passivation Using Engineered Block and Random Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vuoriluoto, Maija; Orelma, Hannes; Zhu, Baolei; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-03-01

    We passivated TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNF) toward human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) by modification with block and random copolymers of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA). The block copolymers reversibly adsorbed on TOCNF and were highly effective in preventing nonspecific interactions with hIgG, especially if short PDMAEMA blocks were used. In such cases, total protein rejection was achieved. This is in contrast to typical blocking agents, which performed poorly. When an anti-human IgG biointerface was installed onto the passivated TOCNF, remarkably high affinity antibody-antigen interactions were observed (0.90 ± 0.09 mg/m(2)). This is in contrast to the nonpassivated biointerface, which resulted in a significant false response. In addition, regeneration of the biointerface was possible by low pH aqueous wash. Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus was also utilized to successfully increase the sensitivity for human IgG recognition (1.28 ± 0.11 mg/m(2)). Overall, the developed system based on TOCNF modified with multifunctional polymers can be easily deployed as bioactive material with minimum fouling and excellent selectivity. PMID:26844956

  20. Impact of blocking and detection chemistries on antibody performance for reverse phase protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Ambroz, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    Careful selection of well-qualified antibodies is critical for accurate data collection from reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA). The most common way to qualify antibodies for RPPA analysis is by Western blotting because the detection mechanism is based on the same immunodetection principles. Western blots of tissue or cell lysates that result in single bands and low cross-reactivity indicate appropriate antibodies for RPPA detection. Western blot conditions used to validate antibodies for RPPA experiments, including blocking and detection reagents, have significant effects on aspects of antibody performance such as cross-reactivity against other proteins in the sample. We have found that there can be a dramatic impact on antibody behavior with changes in blocking reagent and detection method, and offer an alternative method that allows detection reagents and conditions to be held constant in both antibody validation and RPPA experiments. PMID:21901590

  1. Matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus blocks autophagosome fusion with lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gannagé, Monique; Schmid, Dorothee; Albrecht, Randy; Dengjel, Jörn; Torossi, Tania; Rämer, Patrick C.; Lee, Monica; Strowig, Till; Arrey, Frida; Conenello, Gina; Pypaert, Marc; Andersen, Jens; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Münz, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an important human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality every year and threatening the human population with epidemics and pandemics. Therefore, it is important to understand the biology of this virus to develop strategies to control its pathogenicity. Here we demonstrate that live influenza A virus infection causes accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking their fusion with lysosomes. Matrix protein 2 is sufficient and necessary for this inhibition of autophagosome degradation. Macroautophagy inhibition compromises cell survival of influenza virus infected cells, but does not influence viral replication. We propose that influenza A virus, which also encodes pro-apoptotic proteins, is able to determine the death of its host cell by inducing apoptosis and blocking macroautophagy. PMID:19837376

  2. Wortmannin and 1-butanol block activation of a novel family of protein kinases in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Badwey, J A

    1994-07-11

    Neutrophils contain four uncharacterized protein kinases with molecular masses of ca. 69, 63, 49 and 40 kDa that are rapidly activated upon stimulation of these cells with the chemoattractant fMet-Leu-Phe [Ding, J. and Badwey, J.A. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 17326-17333]. We now report that wortmannin and 1-butanol block activation of all four of these kinases. These reagents are known to inhibit superoxide generation in neutrophils stimulated with this agonist. Wortmannin inhibits phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and blocks activation of phospholipase D, whereas 1-butanol can reduce the generation of phosphatidate in cells by serving as a substrate for phospholipase D. These data suggest that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phospholipase D may be involved in the activation of several novel protein kinases in neutrophils and that one or more of these kinases is/are involved in superoxide release. PMID:8034030

  3. Response of rotation-translation blocked proteins using Langevin dynamics on a locally harmonic landscape.

    PubMed

    Manson, Anthony C; Coalson, Rob D

    2012-10-11

    Langevin dynamics is used to compute the time evolution of the nonequilibrium motion of the atomic coordinates of a protein in response to ligand dissociation. The protein potential energy surface (PES) is approximated by a harmonic basin about the minimum of the unliganded state. Upon ligand dissociation, the protein undergoes relaxation from the bound to the unbound state. A coarse graining scheme based on rotation translation blocks (RTB) is applied to the relaxation of the two domain iron transport protein, ferric binding protein. This scheme provides a natural and efficient way to freeze out the small amplitude, high frequency motions within each rigid fragment, thereby allowing for the number of dynamical degrees of freedom to be reduced. The results obtained from all flexible atom (constraint free) dynamics are compared to those obtained using RTB-Langevin dynamics. To assess the impact of the assumed rigid fragment clustering on the temporal relaxation dynamics of the protein molecule, three distinct rigid block decompositions were generated and their responses compared. Each of the decompositions was a variant of the one-block-per-residue grouping, with their force and friction matrices being derived from their fully flexible counterpart. Monitoring the time evolution of the distance separating a selected pair of amino acids, the response curves of the blocked decompositions were similar in shape to each other and to the control system in which all atomic degrees of freedom are fully independent. The similar shape of the blocked responses showed that the variations in grouping had only a minor impact on the kinematics. Compared with the all atom responses, however, the blocked responses were faster as a result of the instantaneous transmission of force throughout each rigid block. This occurred because rigid blocking does not permit any intrablock deformation that could store or divert energy. It was found, however, that this accelerated response could be

  4. Unusual domain movement in a multidomain protein in the presence of macromolecular crowders.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saikat; Chowdhury, Pramit K

    2015-08-14

    Domain movements play a fundamental and critical role in the specific biological function that multidomain proteins have evolved to perform. A significant amount of research has been carried out to investigate the effects of macromolecular crowding agents, mostly on single domain proteins, thereby furthering our appreciation for the crowding phenomenon. However similar studies on proteins having multiple domains are relatively scarce. Using the plasma protein human serum albumin (HSA) as the protein of interest, we have probed the influence of dextran based crowding agents (Dextran 6, Dextran 40, and Dextran 70) on the relative movements of domains I and II using FRET, with Trp-214 in domain II acting as the donor and acrylodan (Ac) covalently attached to Cys-34 of domain I as the acceptor. Amongst the higher molecular weight crowders, while both Dextran 70 and Dextran 40 induced a significant decrease in the distance between the aforesaid domains, however for the latter macromolecular crowder (Dextran 40), beyond 50 g L(-1), no change in domain separation was observed even up to concentrations of 175 g L(-1). On the other hand, contrary to our expectations, Dextran 6, having the highest packing density by virtue of it being the smallest crowding agent used, provided an asymmetric excluded volume which resulted in forced elongation of HSA along the Trp-Ac FRET axis. Additionally both chemical and thermal studies performed at varying concentrations of the chemical denaturant, urea, reveal unusual movements of the two domains, an aspect that can have important implications with regard to HSA being an avid transporter of fatty acids, with the binding of latter being known to invoke appreciable domain displacements. We hypothesise that we see a distinct crossover from entropy dominated depletion effects in the case of Dextran 6 to significant enthalpic contribution for Dextran 70 with Dextran 40 lying midway between these two crowders, having characteristics of both

  5. Chain and pore-blocking effects on matrix degradation in protein-loaded microgels.

    PubMed

    Widenbring, Ronja; Frenning, Göran; Malmsten, Martin

    2014-10-13

    Factors affecting matrix degradation in protein-loaded microgels were investigated for dextran-based microgels, the sugar-binding protein Concanavalin A (ConA), and the dextran-degrading enzyme Dextranase. For this system, effects of enzyme, protein, and glucose concentrations, as well as pH, were considered. Microgel network degradation was monitored by micromanipulator-assisted light microscopy, whereas enzyme and protein distributions were monitored by confocal microscopy. Results show that Dextranase-mediated microgel degradation increased with increasing enzyme concentration, whereas an increased ConA loading in the dextran microgels caused a concentration-dependent decrease in microgel degradation. In the presence of glucose, competitive release of microgel-bound ConA restored the microgel degradation observed in the absence of ConA. To clarify effects of mass transport limitations, microgel degradation was compared to that of non-cross-linked dextran, demonstrating that ConA limits enzyme substrate access in dextran microgels primarily through pore blocking and induction of pore shrinkage. The experimentally observed effects were qualitatively captured by a modified Michaelis-Menten approach for spherical symmetry, in which network blocking by ConA was included. Taken together, the results demonstrate that matrix degradation of protein-loaded microgels depends sensitively on a number of factors, which need to be considered in the use of microgels in biomedical applications. PMID:25144139

  6. Protein Adsorption on Chemically Modified Block Copolymer Nanodomains: Influence of Charge and Flow.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Joshua S; Casey, Brendan J; Kofinas, Peter; Dair, Benita J

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the interactions of biomacromolecules with nanoengineered surfaces is vital for assessing material biocompatibility. This study focuses on the dynamics of protein adsorption on nanopatterned block copolymers (BCPs). Poly(styrene)-block-poly(1,2-butadiene) BCPs functionalized with an acid, amine, amide, or captopril moieties were processed to produce nanopatterned films. These films were characterized using water contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy in air and liquid to determine how the modification process affected. wettability and swelling. Protein adsorption experiments were conducted under static and dynamic conditions via a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. Proteins of various size, charge, and stability were investigated to determine whether their physical characteristics affected adsorption. Significantly decreased contact angles were caused by selective swelling of modified BCP domains. The results indicate that nanopatterned chemistry and experimental conditions strongly impact adsorption dynamics. Depending on the structural stability of the protein, polyelectrolyte surfaces significantly increased adsorption over controls. Further analysis suggested that protein stability may correlate with dissipation versus frequency plots. PMID:27433605

  7. PD Trafficking of Potato Leaf Roll Virus Movement Protein in Arabidopsis Depends on Site-specific Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Many plant viruses encode for specialized movement proteins (MP) to facilitate passage of viral material to and through plasmodesmata (PD). To analyze intracellular trafficking of potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) movement protein (MP17) we performed GFP fusion experiments with distinct deletion variants of MP17. These studies revealed that the C-terminus of MP17 is essential but not sufficient for PD targeting. Interestingly, fusion of GFP to three C-terminal MP17 deletion variants resulted in the accumulation of GFP in chloroplasts. This indicates that MP17 harbors hidden plastid targeting sequences. Previous studies showed that posttranslational protein phosphorylation influences PD targeting of MP and virus spread. Analysis of MP17-derived phospho-peptides by mass spectrometry revealed four phosphorylated serine residues (S71, S79, S137, and S140). Site-directed mutagenesis of S71/S79 and S137/S140 showed that the C-terminal serine residues S137/S140 are dispensable for PD targeting. However, exchange of S71/S79 to A71/A79 abolished PD targeting of the mutated MP17 protein. To mimic phosphorylation of S71/S79 both amino acids were substituted by aspartic acid. The resulting D71/D79 variant of MP17 was efficiently targeted to PD. Further deletion analysis showed that PD targeting of MP17 is dependent on the C-terminus, phosphorylation of S71 and/or S79 and a N-terminal domain. PMID:22645527

  8. Lack of cleavage of IcsA in Shigella flexneri causes aberrant movement and allows demonstration of a cross-reactive eukaryotic protein.

    PubMed

    d'Hauteville, H; Dufourcq Lagelouse, R; Nato, F; Sansonetti, P J

    1996-02-01

    Once in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells, Shigella flexneri expresses a motile phenotype caused by polar directional assembly of actin. This process depends on accumulation of IcsA (VirG), a 120-kDa protein with ATPase activity, at the pole of the bacterium opposite to that at which ongoing septation occurs. IcsA is also secreted into the bacterial supernatant as a 95-kDa species, after cleavage at an SSRRASS sequence which, when mutagenized, blocks processing. MAbF15, an anti-IcsA monoclonal antibody, recognizes an epitope located within repeated Gly-rich boxes in the N-terminal half of the protein. We used this monoclonal antibody to visualize the location of a noncleavable 120-kDa IcsA mutant protein expressed in S. flexneri. We found that this noncleavable IcsA protein no longer localized exclusively to the pole of the bacterium but also could be detected circumferentially. Whereas the monoclonal antibody detected the wild-type cleavable form of IcsA in only 40% of the cells expressing this protein, the noncleavable was easily detectable in all the cells carrying the icsA mutant allele. Similar aberrant localization of the IcsA mutant protein on bacteria growing within the cytoplasm of HeLa cells was observed. The strains expressing the noncleavable IcsA protein expressed abnormal intracellular movement and were often observed moving in a direction perpendicular to their longitudinal axis. The putative protease which processes IcsA may therefore play a role in achieving polar expression of this protein and providing maximum asymmetry essential to directional movement. In addition, MAbF15 allowed us to identify a 70-kDa eukaryotic protein cross-reacting with IcsA. This protein accumulated in the actin tails of motile bacteria and in membrane ruffles of the cells. PMID:8550200

  9. Hydrophobic Blocks Facilitate Lipid Compatibility and Translocon Recognition of Transmembrane Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity

  10. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  11. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Hempstead, Andrew D.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR. PMID:26598709

  12. Caulimoviridae tubule-guided transport is dictated by movement protein properties.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fajardo, Thor; Zicca, Stefania; Pallás, Vicente; Stavolone, Livia

    2010-04-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata (PD) either as nucleoprotein complexes (NPCs) or as tubule-guided encapsidated particles with the help of movement proteins (MPs). To explore how and why MPs specialize in one mechanism or the other, we tested the exchangeability of MPs encoded by DNA and RNA virus genomes by means of an engineered alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) system. We show that Caulimoviridae (DNA genome virus) MPs are competent for RNA virus particle transport but are unable to mediate NPC movement, and we discuss this restriction in terms of the evolution of DNA virus MPs as a means of mediating DNA viral genome entry into the RNA-trafficking PD pathway. PMID:20130061

  13. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente . E-mail: vpallas@ibmcp.upv.es

    2005-08-15

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  14. The Citrus leaf blotch virus movement protein acts as silencing suppressor.

    PubMed

    Renovell, Águeda; Vives, Mari Carmen; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2012-02-01

    To counteract plant antiviral defense based on RNA silencing, many viruses express proteins that inhibit this mechanism at different levels. The genome of Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV) encodes a 227-kDa protein involved in replication, a 40-kDa movement protein (MP), and a 41-kDa coat protein (CP). To determine if any of these proteins might have RNA silencing suppressor activities, we have used Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays in the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c. Only CLBV MP was able to suppress intracellular GFP silencing induced by expression of either single- or double-stranded (ds) GFP RNA, but not cell-to-cell or long distance spread of the silencing signal. The MP suppressor activity was weak compared to other characterized viral suppressor proteins. Overall our data indicate that MP acts as a suppressor of local silencing probably by interfering in the silencing pathway downstream of the steps of dsRNA and small RNAs generation. PMID:21948005

  15. Protein and phospholipid methylation during chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum and its relationship to calcium movements.

    PubMed Central

    Mato, J M; Marín-Cao, D

    1979-01-01

    Suspensions of cyclic AMP sensitive cells of Dictyostelium discoideum responded to a cyclic AMP pulse with increased methylation of a protein of molecular weight about 120,000 and increased phospholipid demethylation. Protein methylation reached its peak 15-30 sec after cyclic AMP addition. Phospholipid demethylation reached its maximum within 2 min and basal levels were recovered in 3 min. S-Adenosyl-L-methionine is probably the methyl donor. In vitro addition of 0.25 mM and 25 microM S-adenosyl-L-methionine to sonicated D. discoideum cells inhibited ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake by 70% and 25%, respectively. Based on these lines of evidence we propose that protein and phospholipid methylation are involved in D. discoideum chemotaxis probably by regulation of intracellular Ca2+ movements. PMID:230497

  16. Brain delivery of proteins via their fatty acid and block copolymer modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that hydrophobic small molecules penetrate cell membranes better than hydrophilic molecules. Amphiphilic molecules that dissolve both in lipid and aqueous phases are best suited for membrane transport. Transport of biomacromolecules across physiological barriers, e.g. the blood-brain barrier, is greatly complicated by the unique structure and function of such barriers. Two decades ago we adopted a simple philosophy that to increase protein delivery to the brain one needs to modify this protein with hydrophobic moieties. With this general idea we began modifying proteins (antibodies, enzymes, hormones, etc.) with either hydrophobic fatty acid residues or amphiphilic block copolymer moieties, such as poy(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (pluronics or poloxamers) and more recently, poly(2-oxasolines). This simple approach has resulted in impressive successes in CNS drug delivery. We present a retrospective overview of these works initiated in the Soviet Union in 1980s, and then continued in the United States and other countries. Notably some of the early findings were later corroborated by brain pharmacokinetic data. Industrial development of several drug candidates employing these strategies has followed. Overall modification by hydrophobic fatty acids residues or amphiphilic block copolymers represents a promising and relatively safe strategy to deliver proteins to the brain. PMID:24160902

  17. UvrD controls the access of recombination proteins to blocked replication forks.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Roxane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2007-08-22

    Blocked replication forks often need to be processed by recombination proteins prior to replication restart. In Escherichia coli, the UvrD repair helicase was recently shown to act at inactivated replication forks, where it counteracts a deleterious action of RecA. Using two mutants affected for different subunits of the polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol IIIh), we show here that the anti-RecA action of UvrD at blocked forks reflects two different activities of this enzyme. A defective UvrD mutant is able to antagonize RecA in cells affected for the Pol IIIh catalytic subunit DnaE. In this mutant, RecA action at blocked forks specifically requires the protein RarA (MgsA). We propose that UvrD prevents RecA binding, possibly by counteracting RarA. In contrast, at forks affected for the Pol IIIh clamp (DnaN), RarA is not required for RecA binding and the ATPase function of UvrD is essential to counteract RecA, supporting the idea that UvrD removes RecA from DNA. UvrD action on RecA is conserved in evolution as it can be performed in E. coli by the UvrD homologue from Bacillus subtilis, PcrA. PMID:17641684

  18. UvrD controls the access of recombination proteins to blocked replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Lestini, Roxane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2007-01-01

    Blocked replication forks often need to be processed by recombination proteins prior to replication restart. In Escherichia coli, the UvrD repair helicase was recently shown to act at inactivated replication forks, where it counteracts a deleterious action of RecA. Using two mutants affected for different subunits of the polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol IIIh), we show here that the anti-RecA action of UvrD at blocked forks reflects two different activities of this enzyme. A defective UvrD mutant is able to antagonize RecA in cells affected for the Pol IIIh catalytic subunit DnaE. In this mutant, RecA action at blocked forks specifically requires the protein RarA (MgsA). We propose that UvrD prevents RecA binding, possibly by counteracting RarA. In contrast, at forks affected for the Pol IIIh clamp (DnaN), RarA is not required for RecA binding and the ATPase function of UvrD is essential to counteract RecA, supporting the idea that UvrD removes RecA from DNA. UvrD action on RecA is conserved in evolution as it can be performed in E. coli by the UvrD homologue from Bacillus subtilis, PcrA. PMID:17641684

  19. The Formation of the Bicoid Morphogen Gradient Requires Protein Movement from Anteriorly Localized mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kneeland, Thomas B.; Wieschaus, Eric F.; Gregor, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The Bicoid morphogen gradient directs the patterning of cell fates along the anterior-posterior axis of the syncytial Drosophila embryo and serves as a paradigm of morphogen-mediated patterning. The simplest models of gradient formation rely on constant protein synthesis and diffusion from anteriorly localized source mRNA, coupled with uniform protein degradation. However, currently such models cannot account for all known gradient characteristics. Recent work has proposed that bicoid mRNA spatial distribution is sufficient to produce the observed protein gradient, minimizing the role of protein transport. Here, we adapt a novel method of fluorescent in situ hybridization to quantify the global spatio-temporal dynamics of bicoid mRNA particles. We determine that >90% of all bicoid mRNA is continuously present within the anterior 20% of the embryo. bicoid mRNA distribution along the body axis remains nearly unchanged despite dynamic mRNA translocation from the embryo core to the cortex. To evaluate the impact of mRNA distribution on protein gradient dynamics, we provide detailed quantitative measurements of nuclear Bicoid levels during the formation of the protein gradient. We find that gradient establishment begins 45 minutes after fertilization and that the gradient requires about 50 minutes to reach peak levels. In numerical simulations of gradient formation, we find that incorporating the actual bicoid mRNA distribution yields a closer prediction of the observed protein dynamics compared to modeling protein production from a point source at the anterior pole. We conclude that the spatial distribution of bicoid mRNA contributes to, but cannot account for, protein gradient formation, and therefore that protein movement, either active or passive, is required for gradient formation. PMID:21390295

  20. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. PMID:26210077

  1. Mapping the structure and conformational movements of proteins with transition metal ion FRET

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.; Puljung, Michael C.; Olivier, Nelson B.; Flynn, Galen E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Visualizing conformational dynamics in proteins has been difficult, and the atomic-scale motions responsible for the behavior of most allosteric proteins are unknown. Here, we report that FRET between a small fluorescent dye and a nickel ion bound to a di-histidine motif can be used to monitor small structural rearrangements in proteins. This method provides several key advantages over classical FRET including the ability to measure the dynamics of close range interactions, the use of small probes with short linkers, a low orientation dependence, and the ability to add and remove unique tunable acceptors. We used this ‘transition metal ion FRET’ approach along with x-ray crystallography to determine the structural changes of the gating-ring of the mouse hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel HCN2. Binding of cAMP to the isolated carboxyl-terminal region of HCN2 caused a structural rearrangement involving a movement of the C-helix towards the β-roll of the cAMP-binding domain and a movement of the F′ helix of the C-linker, along with a stabilization of the secondary structure of the helices. Our results suggest a general model for the conformational switch in the cyclic nucleotide-binding site of cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels. PMID:19525958

  2. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Triggered by a Plant Viral Movement Protein1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Changming; Dickman, Martin B.; Whitham, Steven A.; Payton, Mark; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Potato virus X (PVX) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants leads to increased transcript levels of several stress-related host genes, including basic-region leucine zipper 60 (bZIP60), SKP1, ER luminal binding protein (BiP), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), calreticulin (CRT), and calmodulin (CAM). bZIP60 is a key transcription factor that responds to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induces the expression of ER-resident chaperones (BiP, PDI, CRT, and CAM). SKP1 is a component of SCF (for SKP1-Cullin-F box protein) ubiquitin ligase complexes that target proteins for proteasomal degradation. Expression of PVX TGBp3 from a heterologous vector induces the same set of genes in N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Virus-induced gene silencing was employed to knock down the expression of bZIP60 and SKP1, and the number of infection foci on inoculated leaves was reduced and systemic PVX accumulation was altered. Silencing bZIP60 led to the suppression of BiP and SKP1 transcript levels, suggesting that bZIP60 might be an upstream signal transducer. Overexpression of TGBp3 led to localized necrosis, but coexpression of TGBp3 with BiP abrogated necrosis, demonstrating that the unfolded protein response alleviates ER stress-related cell death. Steady-state levels of PVX replicase and TGBp2 (which reside in the ER) proteins were unaltered by the presence of TGBp3, suggesting that TGBp3 does not contribute to their turnover. Taken together, PVX TGBp3-induced ER stress leads to up-regulation of bZIP60 and unfolded protein response-related gene expression, which may be important to regulate cellular cytotoxicity that could otherwise lead to cell death if viral proteins reach high levels in the ER. PMID:21474436

  3. Blocking of TRPV-1 in the parodontium relieves orthodontic pain by inhibiting the expression of TRPV-1 in the trigeminal ganglion during experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunan; Liu, Yingfei; Zhu, Kun; Zhang, Zhichao; Qiao, Hu; Lu, Zhen; Zhong, Tianyu; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Hong

    2016-08-15

    Orthodontic pain has confused the orthodontics for a long time, and recent research demonstrated that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) had crucial functions in transduction of painful stimuli. The present research investigated the analgesia effects of the blocking TRPV1 on orthodontic pain during experimental tooth movement. Under challenge with experimental tooth movement, the expression of TRPV1 in the parodontium was increased in a time-dependent and force-dependent manner. And treatment with selective TRPV1 antagonist AMG-9810 in the parodontium reduced the expression of TRPV1 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and decreased the secretion of IL-1β in the gingival crevicular fluid. Furthermore, AMG-9810 could relieve orthodontic pain arising from experimental tooth movement in rats. We suggest that TRPV1 both in the parodontium and trigeminal ganglion are involved in orthodontic pain, and TRPV1 in the parodontium influence on orthodontic pain through reducing the expression of TRPV1 in trigeminal ganglion. Our finding may help to develop strategies for relieving orthodontic pain after orthodontics. PMID:27267133

  4. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  5. Identification of distinct steps during tubule formation by the movement protein of Cowpea mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Pouwels, Jeroen; Kornet, Noortje; van Bers, Nikkie; Guighelaar, Teun; van Lent, Jan; Bisseling, Ton; Wellink, Joan

    2003-12-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) forms tubules through plasmodesmata in infected plants thus enabling virus particles to move from cell to cell. Localization studies of mutant MPs fused to GFP in protoplasts and plants identified several functional domains within the MP that are involved in distinct steps during tubule formation. Coinoculation experiments and the observation that one of the C-terminal deletion mutants accumulated uniformly in the plasma membrane suggest that dimeric or multimeric MP is first targeted to the plasma membrane. At the plasma membrane the MP quickly accumulates in peripheral punctuate spots, from which tubule formation is initiated. One of the mutant MPs formed tubules containing virus particles on protoplasts, but could not support cell-to-cell movement in plants. The observations that this mutant MP accumulated to a higher level in the cell than wt MP and did not accumulate in the cell wall opposite infected cells suggest that breakdown or disassembly of tubules in neighbouring, uninfected cells is required for cell-to-cell movement. PMID:14645930

  6. Production in Pichia pastoris of protein-based polymers with small heterodimer-forming blocks.

    PubMed

    Domeradzka, Natalia E; Werten, Marc W T; de Vries, Renko; de Wolf, Frits A

    2016-05-01

    Some combinations of leucine zipper peptides are capable of forming α-helical heterodimeric coiled coils with very high affinity. These can be used as physical cross-linkers in the design of protein-based polymers that form supramolecular structures, for example hydrogels, upon mixing solutions containing the complementary blocks. Such two-component physical networks are of interest for many applications in biomedicine, pharmaceutics, and diagnostics. This article describes the efficient secretory production of A and B type leucine zipper peptides fused to protein-based polymers in Pichia pastoris. By adjusting the fermentation conditions, we were able to significantly reduce undesirable proteolytic degradation. The formation of A-B heterodimers in mixtures of the purified products was confirmed by size exclusion chromatography. Our results demonstrate that protein-based polymers incorporating functional heterodimer-forming blocks can be produced with P. pastoris in sufficient quantities for use in future supramolecular self-assembly studies and in various applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 953-960. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26479855

  7. Patellins 3 and 6, two members of the Plant Patellin family, interact with the movement protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus and interfere with viral movement.

    PubMed

    Peiro, Ana; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana Cristina; Sanchez-Navarro, Jesus Angel; Pallas, Vicente; Mulet, Jose Miguel; Aparicio, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Movement proteins (MPs) encoded by plant viruses interact with host proteins to facilitate or interfere with intra- and/or intercellular viral movement. Using yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, we herein present in vivo evidence for the interaction between Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) MP and Arabidopsis Patellin 3 (atPATL3) and Patellin 6 (atPATL6), two proteins containing a Sec14 domain. Proteins with Sec14 domains are implicated in membrane trafficking, cytoskeleton dynamics, lipid metabolism and lipid-mediated regulatory functions. Interestingly, the overexpression of atPATL3 and/or atPATL6 interfered with the plasmodesmata targeting of AMV MP and correlated with reduced infection foci size. Consistently, the viral RNA levels increased in the single and double Arabidopsis knockout mutants for atPATL3 and atPATL6. Our results indicate that, in general, MP-PATL interactions interfere with the correct subcellular targeting of MP, thus rendering the intracellular transport of viral MP-containing complexes less efficient and diminishing cell-to-cell movement. PMID:24751128

  8. Histone H3 Interacts and Colocalizes with the Nuclear Shuttle Protein and the Movement Protein of a Geminivirus ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Rojas, Maria R.; Park, Mi-Ri; Seo, Young-Su; Lucas, William J.; Gilbertson, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses are plant-infecting viruses with small circular single-stranded DNA genomes. These viruses utilize nuclear shuttle proteins (NSPs) and movement proteins (MPs) for trafficking of infectious DNA through the nuclear pore complex and plasmodesmata, respectively. Here, a biochemical approach was used to identify host factors interacting with the NSP and MP of the geminivirus Bean dwarf mosaic virus (BDMV). Based on these studies, we identified and characterized a host nucleoprotein, histone H3, which interacts with both the NSP and MP. The specific nature of the interaction of histone H3 with these viral proteins was established by gel overlay and in vitro and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays. The NSP and MP interaction domains were mapped to the N-terminal region of histone H3. These experiments also revealed a direct interaction between the BDMV NSP and MP, as well as interactions between histone H3 and the capsid proteins of various geminiviruses. Transient-expression assays revealed the colocalization of histone H3 and NSP in the nucleus and nucleolus and of histone H3 and MP in the cell periphery and plasmodesmata. Finally, using in vivo co-IP assays with a Myc-tagged histone H3, a complex composed of histone H3, NSP, MP, and viral DNA was recovered. Taken together, these findings implicate the host factor histone H3 in the process by which an infectious geminiviral DNA complex forms within the nucleus for export to the cell periphery and cell-to-cell movement through plasmodesmata. PMID:21900168

  9. Self-Assembly of Protein Nanofibrils Orchestrates Calcite Step Movement through Selective Nonchiral Interactions.

    PubMed

    So, Christopher R; Liu, Jinny; Fears, Kenan P; Leary, Dagmar H; Golden, Joel P; Wahl, Kathryn J

    2015-06-23

    The recognition of atomically distinct surface features by adsorbed biomolecules is central to the formation of surface-templated peptide or protein nanostructures. On mineral surfaces such as calcite, biomolecular recognition of, and self-assembly on, distinct atomic kinks and steps could additionally orchestrate changes to the overall shape and symmetry of a bulk crystal. In this work, we show through in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that an acidic 20 kDa cement protein from the barnacle Megabalanus rosa (MRCP20) binds specifically to step edge atoms on {101̅4} calcite surfaces, remains bound and further assembles over time to form one-dimensional nanofibrils. Protein nanofibrils are continuous and organized at the nanoscale, exhibiting striations with a period of ca. 45 nm. These fibrils, templated by surface steps of a preferred geometry, in turn selectively dissolve underlying calcite features displaying the same atomic arrangement. To demonstrate this, we expose the protein solution to bare and fibril-associated rhombohedral etch pits to reveal that nanofibrils accelerate only the movement of fibril-forming steps when compared to undecorated steps exposed to the same solution conditions. Calcite mineralized in the presence of MRCP20 results in asymmetric crystals defined by frustrated faces with shared mirror symmetry, suggesting a similar step-selective behavior by MRCP20 in crystal growth. As shown here, selective surface interactions with step edge atoms lead to a cooperative regime of calcite modification, where templated long-range protein nanostructures shape crystals. PMID:25970003

  10. An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C.C.; Topisirovic, I.; Djavani, M.; Borden, K.L.B.; Damonte, E.B.; Salvato, M.S.

    2010-03-19

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

  11. Paleomagnetic evidence for the continuity and independent movement of a distinct major crustal block in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Ellwood, B.B.

    1982-07-10

    The magnetization of 22 granitic and gneissic southern Appalachian rock units, with estimated cooling ages of 415--250 m.y., has been determined. Included are 842 samples from 114 sites within 19 granites (100 sites) and 3 gneisses (14 sites) located in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Data for units which cooled to temperatures <300 /sup 0/C between 350--240 m.y., a period of apparently only slight North American plate motion, can be divided into two groups. A mean paleopole calculated for the first of these groups, group A (derived from six granites and gneisses 365--325 m.y. in age), located in the vicinity of Atlanta, Ga., is coincident with well-defined Lower Carboniferous North American paleopoles. Site paleolatitude is estimated to be approx.11/sup 0/S. Group B granites (six units) range in age from 350--250 m.y., are located to the SE of an arc drawn from Columbia, S.C., through Athens, Ga., to Macon, Ga., are apparently anomalous, and lie in a crustal block >20,000 km/sup 2/ in size. A mean paleopole for this group, with corrections for maximum tilt estimates, exhibits good precision but has a paleosite latitude of approx.10/sup 0/N. Without tilt correction the paleopole for group B still exhibits an anomalous paleosite latitude of approx.4/sup 0/N. These data indicate that the group B block (Elberton-Sparta Crustal Block) lying to the SE has an apparent paleosite latitude corresponding to magnetization at a location to the north of the zone containing group A units.

  12. Nitric oxide blocks cellular heme insertion into a broad range of heme proteins

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Syed Mohsin; Ghosh, Arnab; Chakravarti, Ritu; Biswas, Ashis; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Panda, Koustubh; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Although heme insertion into proteins enables their function in bioenergetics, metabolism, and signaling, the mechanisms and regulation of this process is not fully understood. We developed a means to study cellular heme insertion into apo-protein targets over a 3 h time period, and then investigated how nitric oxide (NO) released from a chemical donor (NOC-18) might influence heme (protoporphyrin IX) insertion into seven targets that present a range of protein structure, heme ligation, and function (three NO synthases, two cytochrome P450’s, catalase, and hemoglobin). NO blocked cellular heme insertion into all seven apo-protein targets. The inhibition occurred at relatively low (nM/min) fluxes of NO, was reversible, and did not involve changes in intracellular heme level, activation of guanylate cyclase, or inhibition of mitochondrial ATP production. These aspects and the range of protein targets suggest that NO can act as a global inhibitor of heme insertion, possibly by inhibiting a common step in the process. PMID:20211245

  13. Biomimetic block copolymer particles with gated nanopores and ultrahigh protein sorption capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haizhou; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Nunes, Suzana P.; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The design of micro- or nanoparticles that can encapsulate sensitive molecules such as drugs, hormones, proteins or peptides is of increasing importance for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Examples are micelles, liposomes and vesicles. The tiny and, in most cases, hollow spheres are used as vehicles for transport and controlled administration of pharmaceutical drugs or nutrients. Here we report a simple strategy to fabricate microspheres by block copolymer self-assembly. The microsphere particles have monodispersed nanopores that can act as pH-responsive gates. They contain a highly porous internal structure, which is analogous to the Schwarz P structure. The internal porosity of the particles contributes to their high sorption capacity and sustained release behaviour. We successfully separated similarly sized proteins using these particles. The ease of particle fabrication by macrophase separation and self-assembly, and the robustness of the particles makes them ideal for sorption, separation, transport and sustained delivery of pharmaceutical substances.

  14. Nanoporous membrane based on block copolymer thin film for protein drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung Yun; Yang, Jeong-A.; Kim, Eung-Sam; Jeon, Gumhye; Oh, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jin Kon

    2010-03-01

    We studied long term and controlled release of protein drugs by using nanoporous membranes with various pore sizes. Nanoporous membrane consists of the separation layer prepared by polystyrene-block-poly(methylmethacrylate) copolymer thin film and conventional microfiltration membrane as a support. We demonstrate a long-term constant in vitro release of bovine serum albumin (BSA)and human growth hormone ) (hGH) without their denaturation up to 2 months. A nearly constant serum concentration of hGH was maintained up to 3 weeks in SD rats. The long-term constant delivery based on this membrane for protein drugs within the therapeutic range can be highly appreciated for the patients with hormone- deficiency.

  15. Biomimetic block copolymer particles with gated nanopores and ultrahigh protein sorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haizhou; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Nunes, Suzana P; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2014-01-01

    The design of micro- or nanoparticles that can encapsulate sensitive molecules such as drugs, hormones, proteins or peptides is of increasing importance for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Examples are micelles, liposomes and vesicles. The tiny and, in most cases, hollow spheres are used as vehicles for transport and controlled administration of pharmaceutical drugs or nutrients. Here we report a simple strategy to fabricate microspheres by block copolymer self-assembly. The microsphere particles have monodispersed nanopores that can act as pH-responsive gates. They contain a highly porous internal structure, which is analogous to the Schwarz P structure. The internal porosity of the particles contributes to their high sorption capacity and sustained release behaviour. We successfully separated similarly sized proteins using these particles. The ease of particle fabrication by macrophase separation and self-assembly, and the robustness of the particles makes them ideal for sorption, separation, transport and sustained delivery of pharmaceutical substances. PMID:24934665

  16. The Capsid Protein of Turnip Crinkle Virus Overcomes two Separate Defense Barriers to Facilitate Viral Systemic Movement in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The capsid protein (CP) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is a multi-functional protein needed for virus assembly, suppression of RNA silencing-based antiviral defense, and long distance movement in infected plants. In this report, we have examined genetic requirements for the different functions of TCV...

  17. The "tobacco mosaic virus" 126-kDa protein associated with virus replication and movement suppresses RNA silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic symptoms induced on "Nicotiana tabacum" cv. Xanthi by "Tobacco mosaic virus" (TMV) are modulated by one or both amino-coterminal viral 126- and 183-kDa proteins, proteins involved in virus replication and cell-to-cell movement. Here we compare the systemic accumulation and gene silencing c...

  18. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Citovsky, V.; Knorr, D.; Zambryski, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 35S RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. The authors propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex.

  19. Heterogeneous patterns on block copolymer thin film via solvent annealing: Effect on protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Zhu, Jintao; Liang, Haojun

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneous patterns consisting of nanometer-scaled hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains were generated by self-assembly of poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PHEMA) block copolymer thin film. The effect of the heterogeneity of the polymer film surface on the nonspecific adsorption of the protein human plasma fibrinogen (FBN, 5.0 × 5.0 × 47.5 nm3) was investigated. The kinetics of the FBN adsorption varies from a single-component Langmuir model on homogeneous hydrophilic PHEMA to a two-stage spreading relaxation model on homogeneous hydrophobic PS surface. On a heterogeneous PS-b-PHEMA surface with majority PS part, the initial FBN adsorption rate remains the same as that on the homogeneous PS surface. However, hydrophilic PHEMA microdomains on the heterogeneous surface slow down the second spreading stage of the FBN adsorption process, leading to a surface excess of adsorbed FBN molecules less than the presumed one simply calculated as adsorption onto multiple domains. Importantly, when the PS-b-PHEMA surface is annealed to form minority domelike PS domains (diameter: ˜50-100 nm) surrounded by a majority PHEMA matrix, such surface morphology proves to be strongly protein-repulsive. These interesting findings can be attributed to the enhancement of the spread FBN molecule in a mobile state by the heterogeneity of polymer film surface before irreversible adsorption occurs.

  20. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses. PMID:26976570

  1. Selective separation of similarly sized proteins with tunable nanoporous block copolymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Haizhou; Karunakaran, Madhavan; Pradeep, Neelakanda; Nunes, Suzana P; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2013-01-22

    An integral asymmetric membrane was fabricated in a fast and one-step process by combining the self-assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer (PS-b-P4VP) with nonsolvent-induced phase separation. The structure was found to be composed of a thin layer of densely packed highly ordered cylindrical channels with uniform pore sizes perpendicular to the surface on top of a nonordered sponge-like layer. The as-assembled membrane obtained a water flux of more than 3200 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), which was at least an order of magnitude higher than the water fluxes of commercially available membranes with comparable pore sizes, making this membrane particularly well suited to size-selective and charge-based separation of biomolecules. To test the performance of the membrane, we conducted diffusion experiments at the physiological pH of 7.4 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and globulin-γ, two proteins with different diameters but too close in size (2-fold difference in molecular mass) to be efficiently separated via conventional dialysis membrane processes. The diffusion rate differed by a factor of 87, the highest value reported to date. We also analyzed charge-based diffusive transport and separation of two proteins of similar molecular weight (BSA and bovine hemoglobin (BHb)) through the membrane as a function of external pH. The membrane achieved a selectivity of about 10 at pH 4.7, the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA. We then positively charged the membrane to improve the separation selectivity. With the modified membrane BSA was completely blocked when the pH was 7.0, the pI of BHb, while BHb was completely blocked at pH 4.7. Our results demonstrate the potential of our asymmetric membrane to efficiently separate biological substances/pharmaceuticals in bioscience, biotechnology, and biomedicine applications. PMID:23252799

  2. Newcastle Disease Virus V Protein Targets Phosphorylated STAT1 to Block IFN-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xusheng; Fu, Qiang; Meng, Chunchun; Yu, Shengqing; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Luna; Song, Cuiping; Sun, Yingjie; Tan, Lei; Hu, Shunlin; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan; Ding, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) V protein is considered as an effector for IFN antagonism, however, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, the expression of STAT1 and phospho-STAT1 in cells infected with NDV or transfected with V protein-expressing plasmids were analyzed. Our results showed that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 reduction in the cells depends on the stimulation of IFN-α. In addition, a V-deficient genotype VII recombinant NDV strain rZJ1-VS was constructed using reverse genetic technique to confirm the results. The rZJ1-VS lost the ability to reduce phospho-STAT1 and induced higher expression of IFN-responsive genes in infected cells. Furthermore, treatment with an ubiquitin E1 inhibitor PYR-41 demonstrated that phospho-STAT1 reduction was caused by degradation, but not de-phosphorylation. We conclude that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 degradation to block IFN-α signaling, which adds novel knowledge to the strategies used by paramyxoviruses to evade IFN. PMID:26859759

  3. Interaction of Sesbania Mosaic Virus Movement Protein with VPg and P10: Implication to Specificity of Genome Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Soumya; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2011-01-01

    Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) is a single strand positive-sense RNA plant virus that belongs to the genus Sobemovirus. The mechanism of cell-to-cell movement in sobemoviruses has not been well studied. With a view to identify the viral encoded ancillary proteins of SeMV that may assist in cell-to-cell movement of the virus, all the proteins encoded by SeMV genome were cloned into yeast Matchmaker system 3 and interaction studies were performed. Two proteins namely, viral protein genome linked (VPg) and a 10-kDa protein (P10) c v gft encoded by OFR 2a, were identified as possible interacting partners in addition to the viral coat protein (CP). Further characterization of these interactions revealed that the movement protein (MP) recognizes cognate RNA through interaction with VPg, which is covalently linked to the 5′ end of the RNA. Analysis of the deletion mutants delineated the domains of MP involved in the interaction with VPg and P10. This study implicates for the first time that VPg might play an important role in specific recognition of viral genome by MP in SeMV and shed light on the possible role of P10 in the viral movement. PMID:21246040

  4. Manipulation of Plant Host Susceptibility: An Emerging Role for Viral Movement Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Khalid; Vazquez, Franck; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing, a major antiviral defense response in plants. Recent studies indicate a role of virus-derived siRNAs in manipulating the expression of specific host genes and that certain plant viral movement proteins (MPs) can act as viral enhancers of RNA silencing (VERs) by stimulating the spread of silencing between cells. This suggests that viruses have evolved complex responses capable to efficiently hijack the host RNA silencing machinery to their own advantage. We draw here a dynamic model of the interaction of plant viruses with the silencing machinery during invasion of the host. The model proposes that cells at the spreading front of infection, where infection starts from zero and the VSR levels are supposedly low, represent potential sites for viral manipulation of host gene expression by using virus- and host-derived small RNAs. Viral MPs may facilitate the spread of silencing to produce a wave of small RNA-mediated gene expression changes ahead of the infection to increase host susceptibility. When experimentally ascertained, this hypothetical model will call for re-defining viral movement and the function of viral MPs. PMID:22639637

  5. Hitching a ride on vesicles: cauliflower mosaic virus movement protein trafficking in the endomembrane system.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Anna Vittoria; Zicca, Stefania; Stavolone, Livia

    2014-03-01

    The transport of a viral genome from cell to cell is enabled by movement proteins (MPs) targeting the cell periphery to mediate the gating of plasmodesmata. Given their essential role in the development of viral infection, understanding the regulation of MPs is of great importance. Here, we show that cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) MP contains three tyrosine-based sorting signals that interact with an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) μA-adaptin subunit. Fluorophore-tagged MP is incorporated into vesicles labeled with the endocytic tracer N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(6-(4-(diethylamino)phenyl)hexatrienyl)pyridinium dibromide. The presence of at least one of the three endocytosis motifs is essential for internalization of the protein from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, for tubule formation, and for CaMV infection. In addition, we show that MP colocalizes in vesicles with the Rab GTPase AtRAB-F2b, which is resident in prevacuolar late endosomal compartments that deliver proteins to the vacuole for degradation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that CaMV MP traffics in the endocytic pathway and that virus viability depends on functional host endomembranes. PMID:24477592

  6. Intercellular signaling through secreted proteins induces free-energy gradient-directed cell movement.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Sutherland, Alex; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2016-05-17

    Controlling cell migration is important in tissue engineering and medicine. Cell motility depends on factors such as nutrient concentration gradients and soluble factor signaling. In particular, cell-cell signaling can depend on cell-cell separation distance and can influence cellular arrangements in bulk cultures. Here, we seek a physical-based approach, which identifies a potential governed by cell-cell signaling that induces a directed cell-cell motion. A single-cell barcode chip (SCBC) was used to experimentally interrogate secreted proteins in hundreds of isolated glioblastoma brain cancer cell pairs and to monitor their relative motions over time. We used these trajectories to identify a range of cell-cell separation distances where the signaling was most stable. We then used a thermodynamics-motivated analysis of secreted protein levels to characterize free-energy changes for different cell-cell distances. We show that glioblastoma cell-cell movement can be described as Brownian motion biased by cell-cell potential. To demonstrate that the free-energy potential as determined by the signaling is the driver of motion, we inhibited two proteins most involved in maintaining the free-energy gradient. Following inhibition, cell pairs showed an essentially random Brownian motion, similar to the case for untreated, isolated single cells. PMID:27140641

  7. Force-dependent switch in protein unfolding pathways and transition-state movements.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Pavel I; Hinczewski, Michael; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Marqusee, Susan; Thirumalai, D

    2016-02-01

    Although it is known that single-domain proteins fold and unfold by parallel pathways, demonstration of this expectation has been difficult to establish in experiments. Unfolding rate, [Formula: see text], as a function of force f, obtained in single-molecule pulling experiments on src SH3 domain, exhibits upward curvature on a [Formula: see text] plot. Similar observations were reported for other proteins for the unfolding rate [Formula: see text]. These findings imply unfolding in these single-domain proteins involves a switch in the pathway as f or [Formula: see text] is increased from a low to a high value. We provide a unified theory demonstrating that if [Formula: see text] as a function of a perturbation (f or [Formula: see text]) exhibits upward curvature then the underlying energy landscape must be strongly multidimensional. Using molecular simulations we provide a structural basis for the switch in the pathways and dramatic shifts in the transition-state ensemble (TSE) in src SH3 domain as f is increased. We show that a single-point mutation shifts the upward curvature in [Formula: see text] to a lower force, thus establishing the malleability of the underlying folding landscape. Our theory, applicable to any perturbation that affects the free energy of the protein linearly, readily explains movement in the TSE in a β-sandwich (I27) protein and single-chain monellin as the denaturant concentration is varied. We predict that in the force range accessible in laser optical tweezer experiments there should be a switch in the unfolding pathways in I27 or its mutants. PMID:26818842

  8. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Mushegian, Arcady R.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  9. Selective inhibition of farnesyl-protein transferase blocks ras processing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, J B; Pompliano, D L; Mosser, S D; Rands, E; Lingham, R B; Singh, S B; Scolnick, E M; Kohl, N E; Oliff, A

    1993-04-15

    The ras oncogene product, Ras, is synthesized in vivo as a precursor protein that requires post-translational processing to become biologically active and to be capable of transforming mammalian cells. Farnesylation appears to be a critical modification of Ras, and thus inhibitors of the farnesyl-protein transferase (FPTase) that catalyzes this reaction may block ras-dependent tumorigenesis. Three structural classes of FPTase inhibitors were identified: (alpha-hydroxyfarnesyl)phosphonic acid, chaetomellic acids, and zaragozic acids. By comparison, these compounds were weaker inhibitors of geranylgeranyl-protein transferases. Each of these inhibitors was competitive with respect to farnesyl diphosphate in the FPTase reaction. All compounds were assayed for inhibition of Ras processing in Ha-ras-transformed NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Ras processing was inhibited by 1 microM (alpha-hydroxyfarnesyl)phosphonic acid. Neither chaetomellic acid nor zaragozic acid were active in this assay. These results are the first demonstration that a small organic chemical selected for inhibition of FPTase can inhibit Ras processing in vivo. PMID:8463291

  10. Blocking rapid ice crystal growth through nonbasal plane adsorption of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Olijve, Luuk L C; Meister, Konrad; DeVries, Arthur L; Duman, John G; Guo, Shuaiqi; Bakker, Huib J; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-04-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that bind to growing ice crystal surfaces and arrest further ice growth. AFPs have gained a large interest for their use in antifreeze formulations for water-based materials, such as foods, waterborne paints, and organ transplants. Instead of commonly used colligative antifreezes such as salts and alcohols, the advantage of using AFPs as an additive is that they do not alter the physicochemical properties of the water-based material. Here, we report the first comprehensive evaluation of thermal hysteresis (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity of all major classes of AFPs using cryoscopy, sonocrystallization, and recrystallization assays. The results show that TH activities determined by cryoscopy and sonocrystallization differ markedly, and that TH and IRI activities are not correlated. The absence of a distinct correlation in antifreeze activity points to a mechanistic difference in ice growth inhibition by the different classes of AFPs: blocking fast ice growth requires rapid nonbasal plane adsorption, whereas basal plane adsorption is only relevant at long annealing times and at small undercooling. These findings clearly demonstrate that biomimetic analogs of antifreeze (glyco)proteins should be tailored to the specific requirements of the targeted application. PMID:26936953

  11. Blocking rapid ice crystal growth through nonbasal plane adsorption of antifreeze proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Meister, Konrad; DeVries, Arthur L.; Duman, John G.; Guo, Shuaiqi; Bakker, Huib J.; Voets, Ilja K.

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that bind to growing ice crystal surfaces and arrest further ice growth. AFPs have gained a large interest for their use in antifreeze formulations for water-based materials, such as foods, waterborne paints, and organ transplants. Instead of commonly used colligative antifreezes such as salts and alcohols, the advantage of using AFPs as an additive is that they do not alter the physicochemical properties of the water-based material. Here, we report the first comprehensive evaluation of thermal hysteresis (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity of all major classes of AFPs using cryoscopy, sonocrystallization, and recrystallization assays. The results show that TH activities determined by cryoscopy and sonocrystallization differ markedly, and that TH and IRI activities are not correlated. The absence of a distinct correlation in antifreeze activity points to a mechanistic difference in ice growth inhibition by the different classes of AFPs: blocking fast ice growth requires rapid nonbasal plane adsorption, whereas basal plane adsorption is only relevant at long annealing times and at small undercooling. These findings clearly demonstrate that biomimetic analogs of antifreeze (glyco)proteins should be tailored to the specific requirements of the targeted application. PMID:26936953

  12. Spinophilin directs Protein Phosphatase 1 specificity by blocking substrate binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Michael J.; Dancheck, Barbara; Critton, David A.; Nairn, Angus C.; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The serine/threonine Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) dephosphorylates hundreds of key biological targets. PP1 associates with ≥200 regulatory proteins to form highly specific holoenzymes. These regulatory proteins target PP1 to its point of action within the cell and prime its enzymatic specificity for particular substrates. However, how they direct PP1’s specificity is not understood. Here we show that spinophilin, a neuronal PP1 regulator, is entirely unstructured in its unbound form and binds PP1, through a folding-upon-binding mechanism, in an elongated fashion, blocking one of PP1’s three putative substrate binding sites, without altering its active site. This mode of binding is sufficient for spinophilin to restrict PP1’s activity toward a model substrate in vitro, without affecting its ability to dephosphorylate its neuronal substrate GluR1. Thus, our work provides the molecular basis for the ability of spinophilin to dictate PP1 substrate specificity. PMID:20305656

  13. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  14. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M.; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C.; Wade, Rebecca C.; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  15. A plastid-targeted heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein interacts with the Abutilon mosaic virus movement protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krenz, Bjoern; Windeisen, Volker; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger; Kleinow, Tatjana

    2010-05-25

    The movement protein (MP) of bipartite geminiviruses facilitates cell-to-cell as well as long-distance transport within plants and influences viral pathogenicity. Yeast two-hybrid assays identified a chaperone, the nuclear-encoded and plastid-targeted heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein (cpHSC70-1) of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a potential binding partner for the Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) MP. In planta, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis showed cpHSC70-1/MP complexes and MP homooligomers at the cell periphery and co-localized with chloroplasts. BiFC revealed cpHSC70-1 oligomers associated with chloroplasts, but also distributed at the cellular margin and in filaments arising from plastids reminiscent of stromules. Silencing the cpHSC70 gene of Nicotiana benthamiana using an AbMV DNA A-derived gene silencing vector induced minute white leaf areas, which indicate an effect on chloroplast stability. Although AbMV DNA accumulated within chlorotic spots, a spatial restriction of these occurred, suggesting a functional relevance of the MP-chaperone interaction for viral transport and symptom induction.

  16. Phosphorylation of coat protein by protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-to-cell movement of Bamboo mosaic virus through modulating RNA binding.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Jen; Huang, Ying-Wen; Liou, Ming-Ru; Lee, Ya-Chien; Lin, Na-Sheng; Meng, Menghsiao; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Hu, Chung-Chi; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the fine regulation of cell-to-cell movement of Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV). We report that the coat protein (CP) of BaMV is phosphorylated in planta at position serine 241 (S241), in a process involving Nicotiana benthamiana casein kinase 2α (NbCK2α). BaMV CP and NbCK2α colocalize at the plasmodesmata, suggesting that phosphorylation of BaMV may be involved in its movement. S241 was mutated to examine the effects of temporal and spatial dysregulation of phosphorylation on i) the interactions between CP and viral RNA and ii) the regulation of cell-to-cell movement. Replacement of S241 with alanine did not affect RNA binding affinity but moderately impaired cell-to-cell movement. A negative charge at position 241 reduced the ability of CP to bind RNA and severely interfered with cell-to-cell movement. Deletion of residues 240 to 242 increased the affinity of CP to viral RNA and dramatically impaired cell-to-cell movement. A threonine at position 241 changed the binding preference of CP toward genomic RNA and inhibited cell-to-cell movement. Together, these results reveal a fine regulatory mechanism for the cell-to-cell movement of BaMV, which involves the modulation of RNA binding affinity through appropriate phosphorylation of CP by NbCK2α. PMID:25025779

  17. Role of microtubules in the intracellular distribution of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Mas, P; Beachy, R N

    2000-10-24

    Despite its central role in virus infection, little is known about the mechanisms of intracellular trafficking of virus components within infected cells. In this study, we followed the dynamics of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein (MP) distribution in living protoplasts after disruption of microtubules (MTs) by cold treatment and subsequent rewarming to 29 degrees C. At early stages of infection, cold treatment (4 degrees C) caused the accumulation of MP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in large virus replication bodies that localized in perinuclear positions, whereas at midstages of infection, the association of MP:GFP with MTs was disrupted. Rewarming the protoplasts to 29 degrees C reestablished the association of MTs with the replication bodies that subsequently spread throughout the cytoplasm and to the periphery of the cell. The role of MTs in the intracellular distribution of the MP also was analyzed by examining the distribution pattern of a nonfunctional mutant of MP (TAD5). Like MP:GFP, TAD5:GFP interacted with the endoplasmic reticulum membranes and colocalized with its viral RNA but did not colocalize with MTs. The involvement of MTs in the intracellular distribution of tobacco mosaic virus MP is discussed. PMID:11050252

  18. Two homologous host proteins interact with potato virus X RNAs and CPs and affect viral replication and movement

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoseong; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Because viruses encode only a small number of proteins, all steps of virus infection rely on specific interactions between viruses and hosts. We previously screened several Nicotiana benthamiana (Nb) proteins that interact with the stem-loop 1 (SL1) RNA structure located at the 5′ end of the potato virus X (PVX) genome. In this study, we characterized two of these proteins (NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b), which are homologous and are induced upon PVX infection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed that both proteins bind to either SL1(+) or SL1(−) RNAs of PVX. The two proteins also interact with the PVX capsid protein (CP) in planta. Overexpression of NbCPIP2a positively regulated systemic movement of PVX in N. benthamiana, whereas NbCPIP2b overexpression did not affect systemic movement of PVX. Transient overexpression and silencing experiments demonstrated that NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b are positive regulators of PVX replication and that the effect on replication was greater for NbCPIP2a than for NbCPIP2b. Although these two host proteins are associated with plasma membranes, PVX infection did not affect their subcellular localization. Taken together, these results indicate that NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b specifically bind to PVX SL1 RNAs as well as to CP and enhance PVX replication and movement. PMID:27353522

  19. Surface array proteins of Campylobacter fetus block lectin-mediated binding to type A lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, G C; Yang, L Y; Wang, E; Blaser, M J

    1990-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus strains with type A lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a surface array protein layer (S+) have been found to be pathogenic in humans and animals. Spontaneous laboratory mutants that lack surface array proteins (S-) are sensitive to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum. The ability of lectins to determine the presence of the S-layer and differentiate LPS type was assessed. We screened 14 lectins and found 3 (wheat germ agglutinin, Bandeiraea simplicifolia II, and Helix pomatia agglutinin) that agglutinated S- C. fetus strains with type A LPS but not S- strains with type B or type C LPS or S+ strains. However, the S+ type A strains were agglutinated after sequential water extraction, heat, or pronase treatment, all of which remove the S-layer, whereas there was no effect on the control strains. Specific carbohydrates for each lectin and purified LPS from a type A C. fetus strain specifically inhibited agglutination of an S- type A strain. In a direct enzyme-linked lectin assay, binding to the S- type A LPS strain was significantly greater than binding to the S+ strain (P = 0.01) or to a Campylobacter jejuni strain (P = 0.008). Consequently, these results indicate that the three lectins bind to the O side chains of C. fetus type A LPS but that the presence of the S-layer on intact cells blocks binding. Images PMID:2387622

  20. Cowpox virus protein CPXV012 eludes CTLs by blocking ATP binding to TAP.

    PubMed

    Luteijn, Rutger D; Hoelen, Hanneke; Kruse, Elisabeth; van Leeuwen, Wouter F; Grootens, Jennine; Horst, Daniëlle; Koorengevel, Martijn; Drijfhout, Jan W; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Früh, Klaus; Neefjes, Jacques J; Killian, Antoinette; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Ressing, Maaike E; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2014-08-15

    CD8(+) CTLs detect virus-infected cells through recognition of virus-derived peptides presented at the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. The cowpox virus protein CPXV012 deprives the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen of peptides for loading onto newly synthesized MHC class I molecules by inhibiting the transporter associated with Ag processing (TAP). This evasion strategy allows the virus to avoid detection by the immune system. In this article, we show that CPXV012, a 9-kDa type II transmembrane protein, prevents peptide transport by inhibiting ATP binding to TAP. We identified a segment within the ER-luminal domain of CPXV012 that imposes the block in peptide transport by TAP. Biophysical studies show that this domain has a strong affinity for phospholipids that are also abundant in the ER membrane. We discuss these findings in an evolutionary context and show that a frameshift deletion in the CPXV012 gene in an ancestral cowpox virus created the current form of CPXV012 that is capable of inhibiting TAP. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the ER-luminal domain of CPXV012 inserts into the ER membrane, where it interacts with TAP. CPXV012 presumably induces a conformational arrest that precludes ATP binding to TAP and, thus, activity of TAP, thereby preventing the presentation of viral peptides to CTLs. PMID:25024387

  1. Lithium blocks ethanol-induced modulation of protein kinases in the developing brain

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Saito, Mitsuo; Mao, Rui-Fen; Wang, Ray; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mariko

    2008-03-14

    Lithium has been shown to be neuroprotective against various insults including ethanol exposure. We previously reported that ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the postnatal day 7 (P7) mice is associated with decreases in phosphorylation levels of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and alteration in lipid profiles in the brain. Here, P7 mice were injected with ethanol and lithium, and the effects of lithium on ethanol-induced alterations in phosphorylation levels of protein kinases and lipid profiles in the brain were examined. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses showed that lithium significantly blocked ethanol-induced caspase-3 activation and reduction in phosphorylation levels of Akt, GSK-3{beta}, and AMPK. Further, lithium inhibited accumulation of cholesterol ester (ChE) and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) triggered by ethanol in the brain. These results suggest that Akt, GSK-3{beta}, and AMPK are involved in ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and the neuroprotective effects of lithium by modulating both apoptotic and survival pathways.

  2. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins Physically Interact with and Block Apoptosis Induced by Drosophila Proteins HID and GRIM

    PubMed Central

    Vucic, Domagoj; Kaiser, William J.; Miller, Lois K.

    1998-01-01

    Reaper (RPR), HID, and GRIM activate apoptosis in cells programmed to die during Drosophila development. We have previously shown that transient overexpression of RPR in the lepidopteran SF-21 cell line induces apoptosis and that members of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family of antiapoptotic proteins can inhibit RPR-induced apoptosis and physically interact with RPR through their BIR motifs (D. Vucic, W. J. Kaiser, A. J. Harvey, and L. K. Miller, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94:10183–10188, 1997). In this study, we found that transient overexpression of HID and GRIM also induced apoptosis in the SF-21 cell line. Baculovirus and Drosophila IAPs blocked HID- and GRIM-induced apoptosis and also physically interacted with them through the BIR motifs of the IAPs. The region of sequence similarity shared by RPR, HID, and GRIM, the N-terminal 14 amino acids of each protein, was required for the induction of apoptosis by HID and its binding to IAPs. When stably overexpressed by fusion to an unrelated, nonapoptotic polypeptide, the N-terminal 37 amino acids of HID and GRIM were sufficient to induce apoptosis and confer IAP binding activity. However, GRIM was more complex than HID since the C-terminal 124 amino acids of GRIM retained apoptosis-inducing and IAP binding activity, suggesting the presence of two independent apoptotic motifs within GRIM. Coexpression of IAPs with HID stabilized HID levels and resulted in the accumulation of HID in punctate perinuclear locations which coincided with IAP localization. The physical interaction of IAPs with RPR, HID, and GRIM provides a common molecular mechanism for IAP inhibition of these Drosophila proapoptotic proteins. PMID:9584170

  3. Identification of domains of the Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein involved in tubule formation, movement and symptomatology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deletion and alanine-substitution mutants of the Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein were generated to identify domains involved in tubule formation, movement and symptomatology, using a heterologous expression system derived from Tobacco mosaic virus. Two regions of NSm were required for both tub...

  4. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  5. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth. PMID:24773089

  6. Identification of domains of the Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein involved in tubule formation, movement and symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Li, Weimin; Lewandowski, Dennis J; Hilf, Mark E; Adkins, Scott

    2009-07-20

    Deletion and alanine-substitution mutants of the Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein were generated to identify domains involved in tubule formation, movement and symptomatology using a heterologous Tobacco mosaic virus expression system. Two regions of NSm, G(19)-S(159) and G(209)-V(283), were required for both tubule formation in protoplasts and cell-to-cell movement in plants, indicating a correlation between these activities. Three amino acid groups, D(154), EYKK(205-208) and EEEEE(284-288) were linked with long-distance movement in Nicotiana benthamiana. EEEEE(284-288) was essential for NSm-mediated long-distance movement, whereas D(154) was essential for tubule formation and cell-to-cell movement; indicating separate genetic controls for cell-to-cell and long-distance movement. The region I(57)-N(100) was identified as the determinant of foliar necrosis in Nicotiana benthamiana, and mutagenesis of HH(93-94) greatly reduced necrosis. These findings are likely applicable to other tospovirus species, especially those within the 'New World' group as NSm sequences are highly conserved. PMID:19481775

  7. The Potato virus X TGBp3 protein associates with the ER network for virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Heppler, Marty; Mitra, Ruchira; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp3 is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Cell-to-cell movement of TGBp3 was studied using biolistic bombardment of plasmids expressing GFP:TGBp3. TGBp3 moves between cells in Nicotiana benthamiana, but requires TGBp1 to move in N. tabacum leaves. In tobacco leaves GFP:TGBp3 accumulated in a pattern resembling the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To determine if the ER network is important for GFP:TGBp3 and for PVX cell-to-cell movement, a single mutation inhibiting membrane binding of TGBp3 was introduced into GFP:TGBp3 and into PVX. This mutation disrupted movement of GFP:TGBp3 and PVX. Brefeldin A, which disrupts the ER network, also inhibited GFP:TGBp3 movement in both Nicotiana species. Two deletion mutations, that do not affect membrane binding, hindered GFP:TGBp3 and PVX cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP:TGBp2 and GFP:TGBp3 were bombarded to several other PVX hosts and neither protein moved between adjacent cells. In most hosts, TGBp2 or TGBp3 cannot move cell-to-cell.

  8. Blocking c-Met signaling enhances bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Kitano, Sachie; Karasaki, Miki; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sano, Hajime; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that blocking hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor/c-Met signaling inhibited arthritis and articular bone destruction in mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the present study, we investigated the role of c-Met signaling in osteoblast differentiation using the C2C12 myoblast cell line derived from murine satellite cells and the MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblast cell line. Osteoblast differentiation was induced by treatment with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 or osteoblast-inducer reagent in the presence or absence of either HGF antagonist (NK4) or c-Met inhibitor (SU11274). Osteoblast differentiation was confirmed by Runx2 expression, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin production by the cells. Production of ALP, osteocalcin and HGF was verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Runx2 expression was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR analysis. The phosphorylation status of ERK1/2, AKT, and Smads was determined by Western blot analysis. Both NK4 and SU11274 enhanced Runx2 expression, and ALP and osteocalcin production but suppressed HGF production in BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells. SU11274 also enhanced ALP and osteocalcin production in osteoblast-inducer reagent-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells. SU11274 inhibited ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation in HGF-stimulated C2C12 cells. This result suggested that ERK and AKT were functional downstream of the c-Met signaling pathway. However, both mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor suppressed osteocalcin and HGF production in BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells. Furthermore, SU11274, MEK, and PI3K inhibitor suppressed Smad phosphorylation in BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells. These results indicate that although the c-Met-MEK-ERK-Smad and c-Met-PI3K-AKT-Smad signaling pathways positively regulate osteoblast differentiation, c-Met signaling negatively regulates osteoblast differentiation, independent of the MEK-ERK-Smad and PI3

  9. Blocking c-Met signaling enhances bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Kitano, Sachie; Karasaki, Miki; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sano, Hajime; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that blocking hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor/c-Met signaling inhibited arthritis and articular bone destruction in mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the present study, we investigated the role of c-Met signaling in osteoblast differentiation using the C2C12 myoblast cell line derived from murine satellite cells and the MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblast cell line. Osteoblast differentiation was induced by treatment with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 or osteoblast-inducer reagent in the presence or absence of either HGF antagonist (NK4) or c-Met inhibitor (SU11274). Osteoblast differentiation was confirmed by Runx2 expression, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin production by the cells. Production of ALP, osteocalcin and HGF was verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Runx2 expression was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR analysis. The phosphorylation status of ERK1/2, AKT, and Smads was determined by Western blot analysis. Both NK4 and SU11274 enhanced Runx2 expression, and ALP and osteocalcin production but suppressed HGF production in BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells. SU11274 also enhanced ALP and osteocalcin production in osteoblast-inducer reagent-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells. SU11274 inhibited ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation in HGF-stimulated C2C12 cells. This result suggested that ERK and AKT were functional downstream of the c-Met signaling pathway. However, both mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor suppressed osteocalcin and HGF production in BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells. Furthermore, SU11274, MEK, and PI3K inhibitor suppressed Smad phosphorylation in BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells. These results indicate that although the c-Met-MEK-ERK-Smad and c-Met-PI3K-AKT-Smad signaling pathways positively regulate osteoblast differentiation, c-Met signaling negatively regulates osteoblast differentiation, independent of the MEK-ERK-Smad and PI3

  10. RVMAB: Using the Relevance Vector Machine Model Combined with Average Blocks to Predict the Interactions of Proteins from Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    An, Ji-Yong; You, Zhu-Hong; Meng, Fan-Rong; Xu, Shu-Juan; Wang, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play essential roles in most cellular processes. Knowledge of PPIs is becoming increasingly more important, which has prompted the development of technologies that are capable of discovering large-scale PPIs. Although many high-throughput biological technologies have been proposed to detect PPIs, there are unavoidable shortcomings, including cost, time intensity, and inherently high false positive and false negative rates. For the sake of these reasons, in silico methods are attracting much attention due to their good performances in predicting PPIs. In this paper, we propose a novel computational method known as RVM-AB that combines the Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) model and Average Blocks (AB) to predict PPIs from protein sequences. The main improvements are the results of representing protein sequences using the AB feature representation on a Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), reducing the influence of noise using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and using a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) based classifier. We performed five-fold cross-validation experiments on yeast and Helicobacter pylori datasets, and achieved very high accuracies of 92.98% and 95.58% respectively, which is significantly better than previous works. In addition, we also obtained good prediction accuracies of 88.31%, 89.46%, 91.08%, 91.55%, and 94.81% on other five independent datasets C. elegans, M. musculus, H. sapiens, H. pylori, and E. coli for cross-species prediction. To further evaluate the proposed method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier on the yeast dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that our RVM-AB method is obviously better than the SVM-based method. The promising experimental results show the efficiency and simplicity of the proposed method, which can be an automatic decision support tool. To facilitate extensive studies for future proteomics research, we developed a freely

  11. RVMAB: Using the Relevance Vector Machine Model Combined with Average Blocks to Predict the Interactions of Proteins from Protein Sequences.

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Yong; You, Zhu-Hong; Meng, Fan-Rong; Xu, Shu-Juan; Wang, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play essential roles in most cellular processes. Knowledge of PPIs is becoming increasingly more important, which has prompted the development of technologies that are capable of discovering large-scale PPIs. Although many high-throughput biological technologies have been proposed to detect PPIs, there are unavoidable shortcomings, including cost, time intensity, and inherently high false positive and false negative rates. For the sake of these reasons, in silico methods are attracting much attention due to their good performances in predicting PPIs. In this paper, we propose a novel computational method known as RVM-AB that combines the Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) model and Average Blocks (AB) to predict PPIs from protein sequences. The main improvements are the results of representing protein sequences using the AB feature representation on a Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), reducing the influence of noise using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and using a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) based classifier. We performed five-fold cross-validation experiments on yeast and Helicobacter pylori datasets, and achieved very high accuracies of 92.98% and 95.58% respectively, which is significantly better than previous works. In addition, we also obtained good prediction accuracies of 88.31%, 89.46%, 91.08%, 91.55%, and 94.81% on other five independent datasets C. elegans, M. musculus, H. sapiens, H. pylori, and E. coli for cross-species prediction. To further evaluate the proposed method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier on the yeast dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that our RVM-AB method is obviously better than the SVM-based method. The promising experimental results show the efficiency and simplicity of the proposed method, which can be an automatic decision support tool. To facilitate extensive studies for future proteomics research, we developed a freely

  12. Phthalocyanines as Molecular Scaffolds to Block Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Miotto, Marco C; Chesta, María E; Lombardo, Verónica; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2016-05-17

    amyloidogenic proteins. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship in phthalocyanines revealed that their anti-amyloid activity is highly dependent on the type of metal ion coordinated to the tetrapyrrolic system but is not sensitive to the number of peripheral charged substituents. The tendency of phthalocyanines to oligomerize (self-association) via aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions correlates precisely with their binding capabilities to target proteins and, more importantly, determines their efficiency as anti-amyloid agents. The ability to block different types of disease-associated protein aggregation raises the possibility that these cyclic tetrapyrrole compounds have a common mechanism of action to impair the formation of a variety of pathological aggregates. Because the structural and molecular basis for the anti-amyloid effects of these molecules is starting to emerge, combined efforts from the fields of structural, cellular, and animal biology will result critical for the rational design and discovery of new drugs for the treatment of amyloid related neurological disorders. PMID:27136297

  13. Purification of scatter factor, a fibroblast-derived basic protein that modulates epithelial interactions and movement.

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, E; Gray, J; Stoker, M; Perryman, M; Furlong, R

    1989-01-01

    Scatter factor is a fibroblast-derived protein that causes separation of contiguous epithelial cells and increased local mobility of unanchored cells. Highly purified scatter factor has been obtained by a combination of ion-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography from serum-free medium conditioned by a ras-transformed clone (D4) of mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Under nonreducing conditions scatter factor has a pI of approximately 9.5 and migrates in SDS/polyacrylamide gels as a single band at approximately 62 kDa from which epithelial scatter activity can be recovered. Treatment with reducing agents destroys biological activity and is associated with the appearance of two major bands at approximately 57 and approximately 30 kDa. Whether both the 57-kDa and 30-kDa polypeptides are required for biological activity remains to be established. All the activities observed in crude medium conditioned by cells producing scatter factor are retained by highly purified preparations of scatter factor. These include (i) increased local movement, modulation of morphology, and inhibition of junction formation by single epithelial cells and (ii) disruption of epithelial interactions and cell scattering from preformed epithelial sheets. These changes occur with picomolar concentrations of purified scatter factor and without an effect on cell growth. Images PMID:2527367

  14. Cell-to-Cell Trafficking of Macromolecules through Plasmodesmata Potentiated by the Red Clover Necrotic Mosaic Virus Movement Protein.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T.; Giesman-Cookmeyer, D.; Ding, B.; Lommel, S. A.; Lucas, W. J.

    1993-12-01

    Direct evidence is presented for cell-to-cell trafficking of macromolecules via plasmodesmata in higher plants. The fluorescently labeled 35-kD movement protein of red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) trafficked rapidly from cell to cell when microinjected into cowpea leaf mesophyll cells. Furthermore, this protein potentiated rapid cell-to-cell trafficking of RCNMV RNA, but not DNA. Electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the 35-kD movement protein does not unfold the RCNMV RNA molecules. Thus, if unfolding of RNA is necessary for cell-to-cell trafficking, it may well involve participation of endogenous cellular factors. These findings support the hypothesis that trafficking of macromolecules is a normal plasmodesmal function, which has been usurped by plant viruses for their cell-to-cell spread. PMID:12271056

  15. A hybrid plant RNA virus made by transferring the noncapsid movement protein from a rod-shaped to an icosahedral virus is competent for systemic infection.

    PubMed

    De Jong, W; Ahlquist, P

    1992-08-01

    For many plant RNA viruses, multiple viral gene products, including noncapsid movement proteins and capsid proteins, contribute to the spread of infection within plants. The extent to which these factors interact to support infection spread is not known, but, for movement protein mutants of certain viruses, the inability of coinoculated "helper" viruses to complement defective movement has suggested a possible requirement for coadaptation between noncapsid movement proteins and other virus factors. To test directly for required coadaptation, the 3a movement protein gene of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, an icosahedral bromovirus, was replaced with the nonhomologous 30-kDa movement protein gene of sunn-hemp mosaic virus, a rod-shaped, cowpea-adapted tobamovirus. The resulting hybrid virus is competent for systemic infection of cowpea, with systemic infection dependent upon expression of the 30-kDa gene. In view of the dramatic differences between cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and sunn-hemp mosaic virus in genetic organization and particle morphology, the ability of the hybrid to systemically infect cowpea implies that the tobamovirus 30-kDa movement protein functions independently of sequence-specific interactions with other viral components or sequences. Similarly, the required contribution of bromovirus capsid protein to infection movement appears to be independent of specific interaction with the natural 3a movement protein. In addition to other implications concerning movement protein and coat protein function, the results are consistent with the possibility that two or more distinguishable transfer processes may be involved in crossing different tissue barriers to achieve full systemic spread of infection. PMID:1495969

  16. Forebrain deletion of the dystonia protein torsinA causes dystonic-like movements and loss of striatal cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Samuel S; Darr, Katherine; Holley, Sandra M; Cepeda, Carlos; Mabrouk, Omar S; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; LeWitt, Tessa M; Paudel, Reema; Houlden, Henry; Kennedy, Robert T; Levine, Michael S; Dauer, William T

    2015-01-01

    Striatal dysfunction plays an important role in dystonia, but the striatal cell types that contribute to abnormal movements are poorly defined. We demonstrate that conditional deletion of the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA in embryonic progenitors of forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic neurons causes dystonic-like twisting movements that emerge during juvenile CNS maturation. The onset of these movements coincides with selective degeneration of dorsal striatal large cholinergic interneurons (LCI), and surviving LCI exhibit morphological, electrophysiological, and connectivity abnormalities. Consistent with the importance of this LCI pathology, murine dystonic-like movements are reduced significantly with an antimuscarinic agent used clinically, and we identify cholinergic abnormalities in postmortem striatal tissue from DYT1 dystonia patients. These findings demonstrate that dorsal LCI have a unique requirement for torsinA function during striatal maturation, and link abnormalities of these cells to dystonic-like movements in an overtly symptomatic animal model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08352.001 PMID:26052670

  17. AtTCTP2 mRNA and protein movement correlates with formation of adventitious roots in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Toscano-Morales, Roberto; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Martínez-Navarro, Angélica Concepción; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Proteins, or TCTP, is a superfamily of exclusively eukaryotic proteins essential in the regulation of proliferation and general growth. However, it is clear that these are multifunctional proteins given (1) the pleiotropic effects of its mutations, and (2), the multiple processes in which this protein is involved. TCTP function in general is conserved, since Arabidopsis AtTCTP1 can rescue a Drosophila mutant, and vice versa. It has become clear, however, that these proteins may have "taxon-specific" functions. In the case of plants, mRNA and/or proteins have been found in the phloem translocation stream of different species, suggesting a role in long-distance signaling. We have found that a second Arabidopsis TCTP gene, AtTCTP2, codes for a protein that moves long-distance through a graft union in tobacco. Interestingly, the mRNA is also transported long-distance. Both mRNA and protein move long-distance; interestingly, the movement, while more efficient from source to sink tissues, also occurs in the opposite direction. The protein reaches the nuclei of parenchyma cells and adventitious roots. Furthermore, it is clear that the long-distance delivery of AtTCTP2 protein and mRNA is required for the induction of adventitious roots. A model is presented that accounts for these observations. PMID:26237533

  18. AtTCTP2 mRNA and protein movement correlates with formation of adventitious roots in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Toscano-Morales, Roberto; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Martínez-Navarro, Angélica Concepción; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Proteins, or TCTP, is a superfamily of exclusively eukaryotic proteins essential in the regulation of proliferation and general growth. However, it is clear that these are multifunctional proteins given (1) the pleiotropic effects of its mutations, and (2), the multiple processes in which this protein is involved. TCTP function in general is conserved, since Arabidopsis AtTCTP1 can rescue a Drosophila mutant, and vice versa. It has become clear, however, that these proteins may have “taxon-specific” functions. In the case of plants, mRNA and/or proteins have been found in the phloem translocation stream of different species, suggesting a role in long-distance signaling. We have found that a second Arabidopsis TCTP gene, AtTCTP2, codes for a protein that moves long-distance through a graft union in tobacco. Interestingly, the mRNA is also transported long-distance. Both mRNA and protein move long-distance; interestingly, the movement, while more efficient from source to sink tissues, also occurs in the opposite direction. The protein reaches the nuclei of parenchyma cells and adventitious roots. Furthermore, it is clear that the long-distance delivery of AtTCTP2 protein and mRNA is required for the induction of adventitious roots. A model is presented that accounts for these observations. PMID:26237533

  19. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana fluorescent marker lines provides enhanced definition of protein localization, movement and interactions in planta.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen; Kopperud, Kristin; Chakrabarty, Romit; Banerjee, Rituparna; Brooks, Robert; Goodin, Michael M

    2009-07-01

    Here, we report on the construction of a novel series of Gateway-compatible plant transformation vectors containing genes encoding autofluorescent proteins, including Cerulean, Dendra2, DRONPA, TagRFP and Venus, for the expression of protein fusions in plant cells. To assist users in the selection of vectors, we have determined the relative in planta photostability and brightness of nine autofluorescent proteins (AFPs), and have compared the use of DRONPA and Dendra2 in photoactivation and photoconversion experiments. Additionally, we have generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana lines that express fluorescent protein markers targeted to nuclei, endoplasmic reticulum or actin filaments. We show that conducting bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays in plants that constitutively express cyan fluorescent protein fused to histone 2B provides enhanced data quality and content over assays conducted without the benefit of a subcellular marker. In addition to testing protein interactions, we demonstrate that our transgenic lines that express red fluorescent protein markers offer exceptional support in experiments aimed at defining nuclear or endomembrane localization. Taken together, the new combination of pSITE-BiFC and pSITEII vectors for studying intracellular protein interaction, localization and movement, in conjunction with our transgenic marker lines, constitute powerful tools for the plant biology community. PMID:19309457

  20. Lens proteins block the copper-mediated formation of reactive oxygen species during glycation reactions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ortwerth, B J; James, H L

    1999-06-16

    The formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) from glucose in vitro requires both oxygen and a transition metal ion, usually copper. These elements combine to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) which degrade glucose to AGE-forming compounds. We measured the ability of Cu(2+) to accelerate ROS formation, and the effect of added lens proteins on these reactions. Increasing levels of Cu(2+) accelerated the formation of superoxide anion with glucose and fructosyl-lysine, but the addition of 2.0 mg/ml calf lens proteins completely blocked superoxide formation up to 100 microM of added Cu(2+). Lens proteins, however, had no effect on superoxide generated by the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system. The oxidation of ascorbic acid was increased 170-fold by the addition of 10 microM Cu(2+), but was also completely prevented by added lens proteins. Hydroxyl radical formation, as measured by the conversion of benzoate to salicylate, was increased to 30 nmoles/ml after 18 h by the addition of 100 microM Cu(2+) and 2.5 mM H2O2. This increase was also blocked by the addition of lens proteins. However, hydroxyl radical formation, as estimated by the crosslinking and fragmentation of lens proteins, was observed in the presence of 100 microM Cu(2+), likely at the sites of Cu(2+) binding. Since the ratio of lens proteins to Cu(2+) in human lens is at least 1000-fold higher than those used here, the data argue that Cu(2+) in the lens would be tightly bound to protein, preventing ROS-mediated AGE formation from glucose in vivo. PMID:10364483

  1. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-01

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  2. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-28

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  3. Identification of a Functional Plasmodesmal Localization Signal in a Plant Viral Cell-To-Cell-Movement Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Cheng; Lazarowitz, Sondra G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our fundamental knowledge of the protein-sorting pathways required for plant cell-to-cell trafficking and communication via the intercellular connections termed plasmodesmata has been severely limited by the paucity of plasmodesmal targeting sequences that have been identified to date. To address this limitation, we have identified the plasmodesmal localization signal (PLS) in the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) cell-to-cell-movement protein (MP), which has emerged as the paradigm for dissecting the molecular details of cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. We report here the identification of a bona fide functional TMV MP PLS, which encompasses amino acid residues between positions 1 and 50, with residues Val-4 and Phe-14 potentially representing critical sites for PLS function that most likely affect protein conformation or protein interactions. We then demonstrated that this PLS is both necessary and sufficient for protein targeting to plasmodesmata. Importantly, as TMV MP traffics to plasmodesmata by a mechanism that is distinct from those of the three plant cell proteins in which PLSs have been reported, our findings provide important new insights to expand our understanding of protein-sorting pathways to plasmodesmata. PMID:26787834

  4. Chemically-blocked Antibody Microarray for Multiplexed High-throughput Profiling of Specific Protein Glycosylation in Complex Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Wonsidler, Joshua L.; Li, Jianwei; Du, Yanming; Block, Timothy; Haab, Brian; Chen, Songming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we describe an effective protocol for use in a multiplexed high-throughput antibody microarray with glycan binding protein detection that allows for the glycosylation profiling of specific proteins. Glycosylation of proteins is the most prevalent post-translational modification found on proteins, and leads diversified modifications of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of proteins. Because the glycosylation machinery is particularly susceptible to disease progression and malignant transformation, aberrant glycosylation has been recognized as early detection biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. However, current methods to study protein glycosylation typically are too complicated or expensive for use in most normal laboratory or clinical settings and a more practical method to study protein glycosylation is needed. The new protocol described in this study makes use of a chemically blocked antibody microarray with glycan-binding protein (GBP) detection and significantly reduces the time, cost, and lab equipment requirements needed to study protein glycosylation. In this method, multiple immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are printed directly onto the microarray slides and the N-glycans on the antibodies are blocked. The blocked, immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are able to capture and isolate glycoproteins from a complex sample that is applied directly onto the microarray slides. Glycan detection then can be performed by the application of biotinylated lectins and other GBPs to the microarray slide, while binding levels can be determined using Dylight 549-Streptavidin. Through the use of an antibody panel and probing with multiple biotinylated lectins, this method allows for an effective glycosylation profile of the different proteins found in a given human or animal sample to be developed. Introduction Glycosylation of protein, which is the most ubiquitous post-translational modification on proteins, modifies

  5. Effect of liver fatty acid binding protein on fatty acid movement between liposomes and rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, M; Brecher, P

    1987-01-01

    Although movement of fatty acids between bilayers can occur spontaneously, it has been postulated that intracellular movement is facilitated by a class of proteins named fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). In this study we have incorporated long chain fatty acids into multilamellar liposomes made of phosphatidylcholine, incubated them with rat liver microsomes containing an active acyl-CoA synthetase, and measured formation of acyl-CoA in the absence or presence of FABP purified from rat liver. FABP increased about 2-fold the accumulation of acyl-CoA when liposomes were the fatty acid donor. Using fatty acid incorporated into liposomes made either of egg yolk lecithin or of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, it was found that the temperature dependence of acyl-CoA accumulation in the presence of FABP correlated with both the physical state of phospholipid molecules in the liposomes and the binding of fatty acid to FABP, suggesting that fatty acid must first desorb from the liposomes before FABP can have an effect. An FABP-fatty acid complex incubated with microsomes, in the absence of liposomes, resulted in greater acyl-CoA formation than when liposomes were present, suggesting that desorption of fatty acid from the membrane is rate-limiting in the accumulation of acyl-CoA by this system. Finally, an equilibrium dialysis cell separating liposomes from microsomes on opposite sides of a Nuclepore filter was used to show that liver FABP was required for the movement and activation of fatty acid between the compartments. These studies show that liver FABP interacts with fatty acid that desorbs from phospholipid bilayers, and promotes movement to a membrane-bound enzyme, suggesting that FABP may act intracellularly by increasing net desorption of fatty acid from cell membranes. PMID:3446187

  6. Tracking Pollinator Movement with Protein Markers to Enhance Gene Flow Evaluations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tracking polinator movement is an important component of gene flow. In recent years, understanding pollen-mediated gene flow has received much attention in the development of strategies to manage gene flow between transgenic and conventional crops. Using a modified Mark-Recapture technique, foragin...

  7. Interaction of the Trans-Frame Potyvirus Protein P3N-PIPO with Host Protein PCaP1 Facilitates Potyvirus Movement

    PubMed Central

    Vijayapalani, Paramasivan; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Nagasaki-Takekuchi, Nahoko; Miller, W. Allen

    2012-01-01

    A small open reading frame (ORF), pipo, overlaps with the P3 coding region of the potyviral polyprotein ORF. Previous evidence suggested a requirement for pipo for efficient viral cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide immunoblotting evidence that the protein PIPO is expressed as a trans-frame protein consisting of the amino-terminal half of P3 fused to PIPO (P3N-PIPO). P3N-PIPO of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) fused to GFP facilitates its own cell-to-cell movement. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, we found that P3N-PIPO interacts with host protein PCaP1, a cation-binding protein that attaches to the plasma membrane via myristoylation. BiFC revealed that it is the PIPO domain of P3N-PIPO that binds PCaP1 and that myristoylation of PCaP1 is unnecessary for interaction with P3N-PIPO. In PCaP1 knockout mutants (pcap1) of Arabidopsis, accumulation of TuMV harboring a GFP gene (TuMV-GFP) was drastically reduced relative to the virus level in wild-type plants, only small localized spots of GFP were visible, and the plants showed few symptoms. In contrast, TuMV-GFP infection in wild-type Arabidopsis yielded large green fluorescent patches, and caused severe stunting. However, viral RNA accumulated to high level in protoplasts from pcap1 plants indicating that PCaP1 is not required for TuMV RNA synthesis. In contrast to TuMV, the tobamovirus Oilseed rape mosaic virus did not require PCaP1 to infect Arabidopsis plants. We conclude that potyviral P3N-PIPO interacts specifically with the host plasma membrane protein PCaP1 to participate in cell-to-cell movement. We speculate that PCaP1 links a complex of viral proteins and genomic RNA to the plasma membrane by binding P3N-PIPO, enabling localization to the plasmodesmata and cell-to-cell movement. The PCaP1 knockout may contribute to a new strategy for recessive resistance to potyviruses. PMID:22511869

  8. DEVELOPMENTALLY REGULATED PLASMA MEMBRANE PROTEIN of Nicotiana benthamiana Contributes to Potyvirus Movement and Transports to Plasmodesmata via the Early Secretory Pathway and the Actomyosin System1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Chao; Cong, Qian-Qian; Li, Xiang-Dong; Mou, An-Li; Gao, Rui; Liu, Jin-Liang; Tian, Yan-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The intercellular movement of plant viruses requires both viral and host proteins. Previous studies have demonstrated that the frame-shift protein P3N-PIPO (for the protein encoded by the open reading frame [ORF] containing 5′-terminus of P3 and a +2 frame-shift ORF called Pretty Interesting Potyviridae ORF and embedded in the P3) and CYLINDRICAL INCLUSION (CI) proteins were required for potyvirus cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide genetic evidence showing that a Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV; genus Potyvirus) mutant carrying a truncated PIPO domain of 58 amino acid residues could move between cells and induce systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants; mutants carrying a PIPO domain of seven, 20, or 43 amino acid residues failed to move between cells and cause systemic infection in this host plant. Interestingly, the movement-defective mutants produced progeny that eliminated the previously introduced stop codons and thus restored their systemic movement ability. We also present evidence showing that a developmentally regulated plasma membrane protein of N. benthamiana (referred to as NbDREPP) interacted with both P3N-PIPO and CI of the movement-competent TVBMV. The knockdown of NbDREPP gene expression in N. benthamiana impeded the cell-to-cell movement of TVBMV. NbDREPP was shown to colocalize with TVBMV P3N-PIPO and CI at plasmodesmata (PD) and traffic to PD via the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system. We also show that myosin XI-2 is specially required for transporting NbDREPP to PD. In conclusion, NbDREPP is a key host protein within the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system that interacts with two movement proteins and influences virus movement. PMID:25540331

  9. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT. PMID:26454079

  10. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  11. Inhibitory and blocking monoclonal antibody epitopes on merozoite surface protein 1 of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Uthaipibull, C; Aufiero, B; Syed, S E; Hansen, B; Guevara Patiño, J A; Angov, E; Ling, I T; Fegeding, K; Morgan, W D; Ockenhouse, C; Birdsall, B; Feeney, J; Lyon, J A; Holder, A A

    2001-04-13

    Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) is a precursor to major antigens on the surface of Plasmodium spp. merozoites, which are involved in erythrocyte binding and invasion. MSP-1 is initially processed into smaller fragments; and at the time of erythrocyte invasion one of these of 42 kDa (MSP-1(42)) is subjected to a second processing, producing 33 kDa and 19 kDa fragments (MSP-1(33) and MSP-1(19)). Certain MSP-1-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) react with conformational epitopes contained within the two epidermal growth factor domains that comprise MSP-1(19), and are classified as either inhibitory (inhibit processing of MSP-1(42) and erythrocyte invasion), blocking (block the binding and function of the inhibitory mAb), or neutral (neither inhibitory nor blocking). We have mapped the epitopes for inhibitory mAbs 12.8 and 12.10, and blocking mAbs such as 1E1 and 7.5 by using site-directed mutagenesis to change specific amino acid residues in MSP-1(19) and abolish antibody binding, and by using PEPSCAN to measure the reaction of the antibodies with every octapeptide within MSP-1(42). Twenty-six individual amino acid residue changes were made and the effect of each on the binding of mAbs was assessed by Western blotting and BIAcore analysis. Individual changes had either no effect, or reduced, or completely abolished the binding of individual mAbs. No two antibodies had an identical pattern of reactivity with the modified proteins. Using PEPSCAN each mAb reacted with a number of octapeptides, most of which were derived from within the first epidermal growth factor domain, although 1E1 also reacted with peptides spanning the processing site. When the single amino acid changes and the reactive peptides were mapped onto the three-dimensional structure of MSP-1(19), it was apparent that the epitopes for the mAbs could be defined more fully by using a combination of both mutagenesis and PEPSCAN than by either method alone, and differences in the fine specificity of

  12. Limitations on geminivirus genome size imposed by plasmodesmata and virus-encoded movement protein: insights into DNA trafficking.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Robert L; Sudarshana, Mysore; Jiang, Hao; Rojas, Maria R; Lucas, William J

    2003-11-01

    Animals and plants evolved systems to permit non-cell-autonomous trafficking of RNA, whereas DNA plays a cell-autonomous role. In plants, plasmodesmata serve as the conduit for this phenomenon, and viruses have evolved to use this pathway for the spread of infectious nucleic acids. In this study, a plant DNA virus was used to explore the constraints imposed on the movement of DNA through this endogenous RNA trafficking pathway. The combined properties of the geminivirus-encoded movement protein and plasmodesmata were shown to impose a strict limitation on the size of the viral genome at the level of cell-to-cell movement. Size-increased viral genome components underwent homologous and nonhomologous recombination to overcome this strict limitation. Our results provide insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie viral evolution and provide a likely explanation for why relatively few types of plant DNA viruses have evolved: they would have had to overcome the constraints imposed by an endogenous system operating to ensure that DNA acts in a cell-autonomous manner. PMID:14555695

  13. Limitations on Geminivirus Genome Size Imposed by Plasmodesmata and Virus-Encoded Movement Protein: Insights into DNA Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Robert L.; Sudarshana, Mysore; Jiang, Hao; Rojas, Maria R.; Lucas, William J.

    2003-01-01

    Animals and plants evolved systems to permit non-cell-autonomous trafficking of RNA, whereas DNA plays a cell-autonomous role. In plants, plasmodesmata serve as the conduit for this phenomenon, and viruses have evolved to use this pathway for the spread of infectious nucleic acids. In this study, a plant DNA virus was used to explore the constraints imposed on the movement of DNA through this endogenous RNA trafficking pathway. The combined properties of the geminivirus-encoded movement protein and plasmodesmata were shown to impose a strict limitation on the size of the viral genome at the level of cell-to-cell movement. Size-increased viral genome components underwent homologous and nonhomologous recombination to overcome this strict limitation. Our results provide insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie viral evolution and provide a likely explanation for why relatively few types of plant DNA viruses have evolved: they would have had to overcome the constraints imposed by an endogenous system operating to ensure that DNA acts in a cell-autonomous manner. PMID:14555695

  14. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The cultivated T24 cells were coated by the protein antibody and human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma T24 tumor-bearing mice model was established. The tumor cell survival and growth were observed in the antibody coating group and non-coating group. The tumor body size was measured. The immunohistochemical detection showed that Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo 4 were expressed in T24 cells of cancer tissues, paracarcinoma tissues and cultured human uroepithelium carcinoma. The expression of Robo1 was significantly higher than that of Robo4 (P<0.05). The cancer cells could be detected in nodular tumor of mice in each group. The volume of the tumor-bearing mice in the nodular tumor of the non-coating group was larger than that of anti-Robol antibody coating group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in tumor volume between anti-Robo4 antibody coating group and non-coating group (P>0.05); The difference was statistically significant compared with the anti-Robo1 antibody coating group (P<0.01). In conclusion, Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo4 were expressed in human bladder cancer T24 cells. To block Robo4 signal protein had little effect on the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor and to block Robo1 signal protein would seriously affect the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor, suggesting that Robo1 might play an important role in the growth and metastasis of bladder cancer, and might become a

  15. Equine Tetherin Blocks Retrovirus Release and Its Activity Is Antagonized by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xin; Hu, Zhe; Gu, Qinyong; Wu, Xingliang; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Wei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Human tetherin is a host restriction factor that inhibits replication of enveloped viruses by blocking viral release. Tetherin has an unusual topology that includes an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a single transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Tetherin is not well conserved across species, so it inhibits viral replication in a species-specific manner. Thus, studies of tetherin activities from different species provide an important tool for understanding its antiviral mechanism. Here, we report cloning of equine tetherin and characterization of its antiviral activity. Equine tetherin shares 53%, 40%, 36%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with feline, human, simian, and murine tetherins, respectively. Like the feline tetherin, equine tetherin has a shorter N-terminal domain than human tetherin. Equine tetherin is localized on the cell surface and strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) release from virus-producing cells. The antiviral activity of equine tetherin is neutralized by EIAV envelope protein, but not by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which is a human tetherin antagonist, and EIAV envelope protein does not counteract human tetherin. These results shed new light on our understanding of the species-specific tetherin antiviral mechanism. PMID:24227834

  16. Isolation of high quality protein samples from punches of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue blocks.

    PubMed

    Kroll, J; Becker, K F; Kuphal, S; Hein, R; Hofstädter, F; Bosserhoff, A K

    2008-04-01

    In general, it is believed that the extraction of proteins from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples is not feasible. However, recently a new technique was developed, presenting the extraction of non-degraded, full length proteins from formalin fixed tissues, usable for western blotting and protein arrays. In the study presented here, we applied this technique to punch biopsies of formalin fixed tissues embedded in paraffin to reduce heterogeneity of the tissue represented in sections, and to ensure analysing mainly defined cellular material. Successful extraction was achieved even from very small samples (0.7 mm(3)). Additionally, we were able to detect highly glycosylated proteins and protein modification, such as phosphorylation. Interestingly, with this technique it is feasible to extract high quality proteins from 14 year old samples. In summary, the new technique makes a great pool of material now usable for molecular analysis with high throughput tools. PMID:18228195

  17. Nanoporous Gyroid-Structured Epoxy from Block Copolymer Templates for High Protein Adsorbability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Bo; Lin, Tze-Chung; Hsueh, Han-Yu; Lin, Shih-Chieh; He, Xiao-Dong; Ho, Rong-Ming

    2016-06-28

    Nanoporous epoxy with gyroid texture is fabricated by using a nanoporous polymer with gyroid-forming nanochannels as a template for polymerization of epoxy. The nanoporous polymer template is obtained from the self-assembly of degradable block copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA), followed by hydrolysis of PLLA blocks. Templated polymerization can be conducted under ambient conditions to create well-defined, bicontinuous epoxy networks in a PS matrix. By taking advantage of multistep curing of epoxy, well-ordered robust nanoporous epoxy can be obtained after removal of PS template, giving robust porous materials. The through-hole nanoporous epoxy in the film state can be used as a coated layer to enhance the adsorbability for both lysozyme and bovine serum albumin. PMID:27245380

  18. Cathepsin D-mediated yolk protein degradation is blocked by acid phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Eliane; Nakamura, Angelica; Juliano, Luiz; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Silva-Neto, Mário A C

    2005-04-15

    Vitellin (VT) is a lipoglycophosphoprotein stored inside the eggs of every oviparous organism during oogenesis. In the blood-sucking bug Rhodnius prolixus, VT is deposited inside growing oocytes together with two acid hydrolases: acid phosphatase (AP) and cathepsin D (CD). Egg fertilization triggers AP activity and VT proteolysis in vivo [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 2002 (32) 847]. Here, we show that CD is the main protease targeting VT proteolysis during egg development. CD activity in total egg homogenates is blocked by the classical aspartyl protease inhibitor, pepstatin A. Surprisingly, AP inhibitors such as NaF, Na+/K+ tartrate, and inorganic phosphate also block VT proteolysis, whereas this effect is not observed when tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors such as vanadate and phenylarsine oxide or an inhibitor of alkaline phosphatases such as levamisole are used in a VT proteolysis assay. NaF concentrations that block isolated AP activity do not affect the activity of partially purified CD. Therefore, a specific repressor of VT proteolysis must be dephosphorylated by AP in vivo. In conclusion, these results demonstrate for the first time that acid hydrolases act cooperatively to promote yolk degradation during egg development in arthropods. PMID:15797237

  19. Self-Assembling Nano-Architectures Created from a Protein Nano-Building Block Using an Intermolecularly Folded Dimeric de Novo Protein.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Yanase, Keiichi; Sato, Takaaki; Unzai, Satoru; Hecht, Michael H; Arai, Ryoichi

    2015-09-01

    The design of novel proteins that self-assemble into supramolecular complexes is an important step in the development of synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Recently, we described the three-dimensional structure of WA20, a de novo protein that forms an intermolecularly folded dimeric 4-helix bundle (PDB code 3VJF ). To harness the unusual intertwined structure of WA20 for the self-assembly of supramolecular nanostructures, we created a protein nanobuilding block (PN-Block), called WA20-foldon, by fusing the dimeric structure of WA20 to the trimeric foldon domain of fibritin from bacteriophage T4. The WA20-foldon fusion protein was expressed in the soluble fraction in Escherichia coli, purified, and shown to form several homooligomeric forms. The stable oligomeric forms were further purified and characterized by a range of biophysical techniques. Size exclusion chromatography, multiangle light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses indicate that the small (S form), middle (M form), and large (L form) forms of the WA20-foldon oligomers exist as hexamer (6-mer), dodecamer (12-mer), and octadecamer (18-mer), respectively. These findings suggest that the oligomers in multiples of 6-mer are stably formed by fusing the interdigitated dimer of WA20 with the trimer of foldon domain. Pair-distance distribution functions obtained from the Fourier inversion of the SAXS data suggest that the S and M forms have barrel- and tetrahedron-like shapes, respectively. These results demonstrate that the de novo WA20-foldon is an effective building block for the creation of self-assembling artificial nanoarchitectures. PMID:26120734

  20. The Tobamovirus Turnip Vein Clearing Virus 30-Kilodalton Movement Protein Localizes to Novel Nuclear Filaments To Enhance Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant viruses overcome the barrier of the plant cell wall by encoding cell-to-cell movement proteins (MPs), which direct newly replicated viral genomes to, and across, the wall. The paradigm for how a single MP regulates and coordinates these activities is the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) 30-kDa protein (MPTMV). Detailed studies demonstrate that TMV multiplies exclusively in the cytoplasm and have documented associations of MPTMV with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, microtubules, and plasmodesmata throughout the course of infection. As TMV poorly infects Arabidopsis thaliana, Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV) is the tobamovirus of choice for studies in this model plant. A key problem, which has contributed to confusion in the field, is the unproven assumption that the TVCV and TMV life cycles are identical. We engineered an infectious TVCV replicon that expressed a functional fluorescence-tagged MPTVCV and report here the unexpected discovery that MPTVCV, beyond localizing to ER membrane and plasmodesmata, targeted to the nucleus in a nuclear localization signal (NLS)-dependent manner, where it localized to novel F-actin-containing filaments that associated with chromatin. The MPTVCV NLS appeared to be conserved in the subgroup 3 tobamoviruses, and our mutational analyses showed that nuclear localization of MPTVCV was necessary for efficient TVCV cell-to-cell movement and systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our studies identify a novel nuclear stage in TVCV infection and suggest that nuclear MP encoded by TVCV and other subgroup 3 tobamoviruses interacts with F-actin and chromatin to modulate host defenses or cellular physiology to favor virus movement and infection. PMID:23536678

  1. Protein Modification with Amphiphilic Block Copoly(2-oxazoline)s as a New Platform for Enhanced Cellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Luxenhofer, Robert; Yi, Xiang; Jordan, Rainer; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    Several homo-, random and block copolymers based on poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx) were synthesized and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using biodegradable and non-biodegradable linkers. These conjugates were characterized by amino group titration, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), isoelectric focusing, enzymatic activity assay and conformation analysis. The conjugates contained on average from about one to two polymer chains per enzyme. From 70% to 90% of enzymatic activity was retained in most cases. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis revealed that HRP modification affected the secondary structure of the apoprotein but did not affect the tertiary structure and heme environment. Enhanced cellular uptake was found in the conjugates of two block copolymers using both MDCK cells and Caco-2 cells, but not in the conjugates of random copolymer and homopolymer. Conjugation with a block copolymer of 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and 2-butyl-2-oxazoline led to the highest cellular uptake as compared to other conjugates. Our data indicates that modification with amphiphilic POx has the potential to modulate and enhance cellular delivery of proteins. PMID:20550191

  2. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the protein α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-11-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory effect on α-synuclein aggregation, while not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation.

  3. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins. PMID:26517887

  4. "Pinning strategy": a novel approach for predicting the backbone structure in terms of protein blocks from sequence.

    PubMed

    De Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Benros, C; Hazout, S

    2007-01-01

    The description of protein 3D structures can be performed through a library of 3D fragments, named a structural alphabet. Our structural alphabet is composed of 16 small protein fragments of 5 C alpha in length, called protein blocks (PBs). It allows an efficient approximation of the 3D protein structures and a correct prediction of the local structure. The 72 most frequent series of 5 consecutive PBs, called structural words (SWs)are able to cover more than 90% of the 3D structures. PBs are highly conditioned by the presence of a limited number of transitions between them. In this study, we propose a new method called "pinning strategy" that used this specific feature to predict long protein fragments. Its goal is to define highly probable successions of PBs. It starts from the most probable SW and is then extended with overlapping SWs. Starting from an initial prediction rate of 34.4%, the use of the SWs instead of the PBs allows a gain of 4.5%. The pinning strategy simply applied to the SWs increases the prediction accuracy to 39.9%. In a second step, the sequence-structure relationship is optimized, the prediction accuracy reaches 43.6%. PMID:17426380

  5. E1A Blocks Hyperphosphorylation of p130 and p107 without Affecting the Phosphorylation Status of the Retinoblastoma Protein

    PubMed Central

    Parreño, Matilde; Garriga, Judit; Limón, Ana; Mayol, Xavier; Beck, George R.; Moran, Elizabeth; Graña, Xavier

    2000-01-01

    The phosphorylation status of the pRB family of growth suppressor proteins is regulated in a cell cycle entry-, progression-, and exit-dependent manner in normal cells. We have shown previously that p130, a member of this family, exhibits patterns of phosphorylated forms associated with various cell growth and differentiation stages. However, human 293 cells, which are transformed cells that express the adenoviral oncoproteins E1A and E1B, exhibit an abnormal pattern of p130 phosphorylated forms. Here we report that, unlike pRB, the phosphorylation status of both p130 and p107 is not modulated during the cell cycle in 293 cells as it is in other cells. Conditional overexpression of individual G1/S cyclins in 293 cells does not alter the phosphorylation status of p130, suggesting that the expression of E1A and/or E1B blocks hyperphosphorylation of p130. In agreement with these observations, transient cotransfection of vectors expressing E1A 12S, but not E1B, in combination with pocket proteins into U-2 OS cells blocks hyperphosphorylation of both p130 and p107. However, the phosphorylation status of pRB is not altered by cotransfection of E1A 12S vectors. Moreover, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts stably expressing E1A 12S also exhibit a block in hyperphosphorylation of endogenous p130 and p107. Direct binding of E1A to p130 and p107 is not required for the phosphorylation block since E1A 12S mutants defective in binding to the pRB family also block hyperphosphorylation of p130 and p107. Our data reported here identify a novel function of E1A, which affects p130 and p107 but does not affect pRB. Since E1A does not bind the hyperphosphorylated forms of p130, this function of E1A might prevent the existence of “free” hyperphosphorylated p130, which could act as a CDK inhibitor. PMID:10708433

  6. RING finger protein PLR-1 blocks Wnt signaling by altering trafficking of Wnt Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ryan E.

    Secreted Wnt proteins control a wide range of essential developmental processes, including axon guidance and establishment of anteroposterior neuronal polarity. We identified a transmembrane RING finger protein, PLR-1, that governs the response to Wnts by reducing the cell surface levels of Wnt receptors Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are normally enriched at the plasma membrane where they are capable of detecting and responding to extracellular Wnts. However, when PLR-1 is expressed Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are no longer detected at the cell surface and instead colocalize with PLR-1 in endosomes and Golgi. PLR-1 is related to a broad family of transmembrane proteins that contain a lumenal protease associated domain and a cytosolic RING finger. The RING finger is a hallmark of one type of E3 ubiquitin ligase and monoubiquitination is commonly used to regulate protein trafficking. Protease associated domains are largely thought to mediate interactions between proteins. To identify the domains responsible for PLR-1 regulation of Frizzled from the cell surface we utilized a series of fluorescently tagged fusion proteins and protein truncations containing various domains from PLR-1 and Frizzled. Our data suggests that PLR-1 and Frizzled interact and form a complex via their respective extracellular/lumenal domains, and that ubiqiuitination of Frizzled by PLR-1 targets the Frizzled/PLR-1 complex to the endosome.

  7. Intersubunit movement is required for ribosomal translocation

    PubMed Central

    Horan, Lucas H.; Noller, Harry F.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of tRNA and mRNA during protein synthesis is believed to be coupled to structural changes in the ribosome. The “ratchet model,” based on cryo-EM reconstructions of ribosome complexes, invokes relative movement of the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits in this process; however, evidence that directly demonstrates a requirement for intersubunit movement during translocation is lacking. To address this problem, we created an intersubunit disulfide cross-link to restrict potential movement. The cross-linked ribosomes were unable to carry out polypeptide synthesis; this inhibition was completely reversed upon reduction of the disulfide bridge. In vitro assays showed that the cross-linked ribosomes were specifically blocked in elongation factor G-dependent translocation. These findings show that intersubunit movement is required for ribosomal translocation, accounting for the universal two-subunit architecture of ribosomes. PMID:17360328

  8. A subset of yeast vacuolar protein sorting mutants is blocked in one branch of the exocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harsay, Edina; Schekman, Randy

    2002-01-21

    Exocytic vesicles that accumulate in a temperature-sensitive sec6 mutant at a restrictive temperature can be separated into at least two populations with different buoyant densities and unique cargo molecules. Using a sec6 mutant background to isolate vesicles, we have found that vacuolar protein sorting mutants that block an endosome-mediated route to the vacuole, including vps1, pep12, vps4, and a temperature-sensitive clathrin mutant, missort cargo normally transported by dense exocytic vesicles, such as invertase, into light exocytic vesicles, whereas transport of cargo specific to the light exocytic vesicles appears unaffected. Immunoisolation experiments confirm that missorting, rather than a changed property of the normally dense vesicles, is responsible for the altered density gradient fractionation profile. The vps41Delta and apl6Delta mutants, which block transport of only the subset of vacuolar proteins that bypasses endosomes, sort exocytic cargo normally. Furthermore, a vps10Delta sec6 mutant, which lacks the sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y (CPY), accumulates both invertase and CPY in dense vesicles. These results suggest that at least one branch of the yeast exocytic pathway transits through endosomes before reaching the cell surface. Consistent with this possibility, we show that immunoisolated clathrin-coated vesicles contain invertase. PMID:11807092

  9. Synthesis of histone proteins by CPE ligation using a recombinant peptide as the C-terminal building block.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Toru; Yoshikawa, Ryo; Fujiyoshi, Yuki; Mishima, Yuichi; Hojo, Hironobu; Tajima, Shoji; Suetake, Isao

    2015-11-01

    The post-translational modification of histones plays an important role in gene expression. We report herein on a method for synthesizing such modified histones by ligating chemically prepared N-terminal peptides and C-terminal recombinant peptide building blocks. Based on their chemical synthesis, core histones can be categorized as two types; histones H2A, H2B and H4 which contain no Cys residues, and histone H3 which contains a Cys residue(s) in the C-terminal region. A combination of native chemical ligation and desulphurization can be simply used to prepare histones without Cys residues. For the synthesis of histone H3, the endogenous Cys residue(s) must be selectively protected, while keeping the N-terminal Cys residue of the C-terminal building block that is introduced for purposes of chemical ligation unprotected. To this end, a phenacyl group was successfully utilized to protect endogenous Cys residue(s), and the recombinant peptide was ligated with a peptide containing a Cys-Pro ester (CPE) sequence as a thioester precursor. Using this approach it was possible to prepare all of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 with any modifications. The resulting proteins could then be used to prepare a core histone library of proteins that have been post-translationally modified. PMID:26002961

  10. Visualizing Protein Movement on DNA at the Single-molecule Level using DNA Curtains

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Timothy D.; Gibb, Bryan; Greene, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental feature of many nucleic-acid binding proteins is their ability to move along DNA either by diffusion-based mechanisms or by ATP-hydrolysis driven translocation. For example, most site-specific DNA-binding proteins must diffuse to some extent along DNA to either find their target sites, or to otherwise fulfill their biological roles. Similarly, nucleic-acid translocases such as helicases and polymerases must move along DNA to fulfill their functions. In both instances, the proteins must also be capable of moving in crowded environments while navigating through DNA-bound obstacles. These types of behaviors can be challenging to analyze by bulk biochemical methods because of the transient nature of the interactions, and/or heterogeneity of the reaction intermediates. The advent of single-molecule methodologies has overcome some of these problems, and has led to many new insights into the mechanisms that contribute to protein motion along DNA. We have developed DNA curtains as a tool to facilitate single molecule observations of protein-nucleic acid interactions, and we have applied these new research tools to systems involving both diffusive-based motion as well as ATP directed translocation. Here we highlight these studies by first discussing how diffusion contributes to target searches by proteins involved in post-replicative mismatch repair. We then discuss DNA curtain assays of two different DNA translocases, RecBCD and FtsK, which participate in homologous DNA recombination and site-specific DNA recombination, respectively. PMID:24598576

  11. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone fusion protein vaccines block estrous cycle activity in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J D; Sosa, J M; deAvila, D M; Oatley, J M; Bertrand, K P; Gaskins, C T; Reeves, J J

    2005-01-01

    Two LHRH fusion proteins, thioredoxin and ovalbumin, each containing seven LHRH inserts were tested for their ability to inhibit estrous cycle activity. The objective was to evaluate immune and biological responses from alternating the two fusion proteins in an immunization schedule. One hundred ten heifers were divided equally into 11 groups. Two control groups consisted of either spayed or intact, untreated heifers. Heifers in the other nine groups were immunized on wk 0, 4, and 9. Treatments were immunizations of the same protein throughout or alternating the proteins in different booster sequences. Blood was collected weekly for 22 wk, and serum was assayed for concentrations of progesterone and titers of anti-LHRH. At slaughter, reproductive tracts were removed from each heifer and weighed. Heifers with >or=1 ng/mL of progesterone were considered to have a functional corpus luteum and thus to have estrous cycle activity. All LHRH-immunized groups of heifers had a smaller (P < 0.05) proportion of heifers showing estrous cycle activity after 6 wk than the intact, untreated control group. There was no difference in number of heifers cycling between the immunized groups and the spayed heifers during wk 9 to 22. Anti-LHRH did not differ among immunized groups during wk 1 to 9. Starting at wk 10 and continuing through the conclusion of the study, there was an overall difference among treatment groups for anti-LHRH (P < 0.05). Uterine weights differed among treatments (P < 0.05), with intact control animals having heavier uteri than all other groups (P < 0.05). Uterine weights were negatively correlated with maximum LHRH antibody binding (r = -0.44). In summary, the LHRH fusion proteins were as effective as surgical spaying in suppression of estrous cycle activity, but alternating the two proteins in an immunization schedule did not enhance the immunological or biological effectiveness of the vaccine. PMID:15583055

  12. Isolation of carboxyl-termini and blocked amino-termini of viral proteins by high-performance cation-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gorman, J J; Shiell, B J

    1993-08-27

    The strong cation-exchanger, PolySulfoethyl Aspartamide, has been assessed as a medium for isolation of carboxyl-terminal and blocked amino-terminal peptides from tryptic digests of small quantities of viral proteins. Peptides with a single positive charge, the blocked amino-terminal peptides of ovalbumin and the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) matrix protein and carboxyl-terminal peptides of ovalbumin and the NDV nucleocapsid protein, eluted in early ion-exchange fractions and were readily isolated in homogeneous form by subsequent reversed-phase HPLC. Some early ion-exchange fractions also contained singly charged peptides derived by "chymotryptic-like" cleavage, whilst other peptides eluted in these fractions due to their highly acidic character. Terminal sequences with additional basic residues were isolated from later eluting ion-exchange fractions. Peptides with this property included the blocked amino-terminus of the NDV nucleocapsid protein and a portion of the carboxyl-terminus of the NDV matrix protein. Hitherto undescribed polymorphism in the amino-terminal region of ovalbumin was revealed in this study. Truncated peptides from the carboxyl-terminus of the NDV matrix protein were also detected. The presence of these peptides could be a reflection of carboxyl-terminal processing of the matrix protein. The strategy described herein should be of general utility for selective microisolation of carboxyl-terminal peptides and blocked amino-terminal peptides from tryptic digests of proteins. PMID:8408428

  13. Influenza virus NS1 protein inhibits pre-mRNA splicing and blocks mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, P; Beloso, A; Ortín, J

    1994-01-01

    The influenza virus RNA segment 8 encodes two proteins, NS1 and NS2, by differential splicing. The collinear transcript acts as mRNA for NS1 protein, while the spliced mRNA encodes NS2 protein. The splicing of NS1 mRNA was studied in cells transfected with a recombinant plasmid that has the cDNA of RNA segment 8 cloned under the SV40 late promoter and polyadenylation signals. As described for influenza virus-infected cells, NS1 mRNA was poorly spliced to yield NS2 mRNA. However, inactivation of the NS1 gene, but not the NS2 gene, led to a substantial increase in the splicing efficiency, as shown by the relative accumulations of NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. This effect was not specific for NS1 mRNA, since the splicing of the endogenous SV40 early transcript was altered in such a way that t-Ag mRNA was almost eliminated. These changes in the splicing pattern coincided with a strong inhibition of the mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport. Both NS1 and NS2 mRNAs were retained in the nucleus of cells expressing NS1 protein, but no effect was observed when only NS2 protein was expressed. Furthermore, other mRNAs tested, such as T-Ag mRNA and the non-spliceable nucleoprotein transcript, were also retained in the nucleus upon expression of NS1 protein, suggesting that it induced a generalized block of mRNA export from the nucleus. Images PMID:8313914

  14. Molecular modeling of the elastomeric properties of repeating units and building blocks of resilin, a disordered elastic protein.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A; Bevan, David R

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the properties of disordered elastomeric proteins are not well known. To better understand the relationship between elastomeric behavior and amino acid sequence, we investigated resilin, a disordered rubber-like protein, found in specialized regions of the cuticle of insects. Resilin of Drosophila melanogaster contains Gly-rich repetitive motifs comprised of the amino acids, PSSSYGAPGGGNGGR, which confer elastic properties to resilin. The repetitive motifs of insect resilin can be divided into smaller partially conserved building blocks: PSS, SYGAP, GGGN and GGR. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the relative roles of SYGAP, and its less common variants SYSAP and TYGAP, on the elastomeric properties of resilin. Results showed that SYGAP adopts a bent structure that is one-half to one-third the end-to-end length of the other motifs having an equal number of amino acids but containing SYSAP or TYGAP substituted for SYGAP. The bent structure of SYGAP forms due to conformational freedom of glycine, and hydrogen bonding within the motif apparently plays a role in maintaining this conformation. These structural features of SYGAP result in higher extensibility compared to other motifs, which may contribute to elastic properties at the macroscopic level. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the SYGAP building block in the elastomeric properties of these disordered proteins. What we learned from simulating the repetitive motifs of resilin may be applicable to the biology and mechanics of other elastomeric biomaterials, and may provide us the deeper understanding of their unique properties. PMID:26851528

  15. Polyclonal antibody against conserved sequences of mce1A protein blocks MTB infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Sasikala; Namasivayam, Nalini; Chellam, Rajamanickam

    2012-03-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is largely due to its ability to enter and survive within human macrophages. It is suggested that a specific protein namely mammalian cell entry protein is involved in the pathogenesis and the specific gene for this protein mce1A has been identified in several pathogenic organisms such as Rickettsia, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter, Streptomyces, Klebsiella, Vibrio, Neisseria, Rhodococcus, Nocardioides, Saccharopolyspora erthyrae, and Pseudomonas. Analysis of mce1 operons in the above mentioned organisms through bioinformatics tools has revealed the presence of unique sequences (conserved regions) suggesting that these sequences may be involved in the process of infection. Presently, the mce1A full-length (1,365 bp) region from Mycobacterium bovis and its conserved regions (303 bp) were cloned in to an expression vector and the purified expressed proteins of molecular weight ~47 and ~11 kDa, respectively, were injected to rabbits to raise the polyclonal antibodies. The purified polyclonal antibodies were checked for their ability to inhibit the Mycobacterium infection in cultured human macrophages. In macrophage invasion assay, when antibody added at high concentration, decrease in viable counts was observed in all cell cultures within the first 5 days after infection, where the intracellular bacterial CFU obtained from the infected MTB increased by the 3rd day at low concentration of antibody. The macrophage invasion assay has indicated that the purified antibodies of mce1A conserved region can inhibit the infection of Mycobacterium. PMID:22159737

  16. Exploration of Gated Ligand Binding Recognizes an Allosteric Site for Blocking FABP4-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Xiang; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), reversibly binding to fatty acids and other lipids with high affinities, is a potential target for treatment of cancers. The binding site of FABP4 is buried in an interior cavity and thereby ligand binding/unbinding is coupled with opening/closing of FABP4. It is a difficult task both experimentally and computationally to illuminate the entry or exit pathway, especially with the conformational gating. In this report we combine extensive computer simulations, clustering analysis, and Markov state model to investigate the binding mechanism of FABP4 and troglitazone. Our simulations capture spontaneous binding and unbinding events as well as the conformational transition of FABP4 between the open and closed states. An allosteric binding site on the protein surface is recognized for development of novel FABP4 inhibitors. The binding affinity is calculated and compared with the experimental value. The kinetic analysis suggests that ligand residence on the protein surface may delay the binding process. Overall, our results provide a comprehensive picture of ligand diffusion on the protein surface, ligand migration into the buried cavity, and the conformational change of FABP4 at an atomic level. PMID:26580122

  17. Nature's favorite building block: Deciphering folding and capsid assembly of proteins with the HK97-fold.

    PubMed

    Suhanovsky, Margaret M; Teschke, Carolyn M

    2015-05-01

    For many (if not all) bacterial and archaeal tailed viruses and eukaryotic Herpesvirdae the HK97-fold serves as the major architectural element in icosahedral capsid formation while still enabling the conformational flexibility required during assembly and maturation. Auxiliary proteins or Δ-domains strictly control assembly of multiple, identical, HK97-like subunits into procapsids with specific icosahedral symmetries, rather than aberrant non-icosahedral structures. Procapsids are precursor structures that mature into capsids in a process involving release of auxiliary proteins (or cleavage of Δ-domains), dsDNA packaging, and conformational rearrangement of the HK97-like subunits. Some coat proteins built on the ubiquitous HK97-fold also have accessory domains or loops that impart specific functions, such as increased monomer, procapsid, or capsid stability. In this review, we analyze the numerous HK97-like coat protein structures that are emerging in the literature (over 40 at time of writing) by comparing their topology, additional domains, and their assembly and misassembly reactions. PMID:25864106

  18. Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein domains involved in tubule formation,movement and symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct demonstration of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) gene function has been slowed by the absence of a reliable reverse genetics system. A Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based expression system was previously used by us to demonstrate that the TSWV NSm protein is able to support cell-to-cell movemen...

  19. Hitching a Ride on Vesicles: Cauliflower Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Trafficking in the Endomembrane System1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carluccio, Anna Vittoria; Zicca, Stefania; Stavolone, Livia

    2014-01-01

    The transport of a viral genome from cell to cell is enabled by movement proteins (MPs) targeting the cell periphery to mediate the gating of plasmodesmata. Given their essential role in the development of viral infection, understanding the regulation of MPs is of great importance. Here, we show that cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) MP contains three tyrosine-based sorting signals that interact with an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) μA-adaptin subunit. Fluorophore-tagged MP is incorporated into vesicles labeled with the endocytic tracer N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(6-(4-(diethylamino)phenyl)hexatrienyl)pyridinium dibromide. The presence of at least one of the three endocytosis motifs is essential for internalization of the protein from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, for tubule formation, and for CaMV infection. In addition, we show that MP colocalizes in vesicles with the Rab GTPase AtRAB-F2b, which is resident in prevacuolar late endosomal compartments that deliver proteins to the vacuole for degradation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that CaMV MP traffics in the endocytic pathway and that virus viability depends on functional host endomembranes. PMID:24477592

  20. To gate, or not to gate: regulatory mechanisms for intercellular protein transport and virus movement in plants.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Shoko; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2011-09-01

    Cell-to-cell signal transduction is vital for orchestrating the whole-body physiology of multi-cellular organisms, and many endogenous macromolecules, proteins, and nucleic acids function as such transported signals. In plants, many of these molecules are transported through plasmodesmata (Pd), the cell wall-spanning channel structures that interconnect plant cells. Furthermore, Pd also act as conduits for cell-to-cell movement of most plant viruses that have evolved to pirate these channels to spread the infection. Pd transport is presumed to be highly selective, and only a limited repertoire of molecules is transported through these channels. Recent studies have begun to unravel mechanisms that actively regulate the opening of the Pd channel to allow traffic. This macromolecular transport between cells comprises two consecutive steps: intracellular targeting to Pd and translocation through the channel to the adjacent cell. Here, we review the current knowledge of molecular species that are transported though Pd and the mechanisms that control this traffic. Generally, Pd traffic can occur by passive diffusion through the trans-Pd cytoplasm or through the membrane/lumen of the trans-Pd ER, or by active transport that includes protein-protein interactions. It is this latter mode of Pd transport that is involved in intercellular traffic of most signal molecules and is regulated by distinct and sometimes interdependent mechanisms, which represent the focus of this article. PMID:21746703

  1. Efficient plant male fertility depends on vegetative nuclear movement mediated by two families of plant outer nuclear membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Meier, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nuclear migration is important for eukaryotic development. Although nuclear migration is conserved in plants, its importance for plant development has not yet been established. The most extraordinary plant nuclear migration events involve plant fertilization, which is starkly different from that of animals. Instead of evolving self-propelled sperm cells (SCs), plants use pollen tubes to deliver SCs, in which the pollen vegetative nucleus (VN) and the SCs migrate as a unit toward the ovules, a fundamental but barely understood process. Here, we report that WPP domain-interacting proteins (WIPs) and their binding partners the WPP domain-interacting tail-anchored proteins (WITs) are essential for pollen nuclear migration. Loss-of-function mutations in WIT and/or WIP gene families resulted in impaired VN movement, inefficient SC delivery, and defects in pollen tube reception. WIPs are Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 Homology (KASH) analogs in plants. KASH proteins are key players in animal nuclear migration. Thus, this study not only reveals an important nuclear migration mechanism in plant fertilization but also, suggests that similar nuclear migration machinery is conserved between plants and animals. PMID:25074908

  2. Willed-movement training reduces brain damage and enhances synaptic plasticity related proteins synthesis after focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaosu; Tang, Qingping; Shen, Qin; Li, Simin

    2016-01-01

    It has been wildly accepted that willed movement(WM) training promotes neurological rehabilitation in patients with stroke. However, it was not clear whether the effect of WM is better than other forms of exercise. The purpose of this study is to assess different effects of WM and other forms of exercise on rats with focal ischemia. The subjects are all had right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery and randomly allocated to three groups of training and one control group with no training. Infarct volume by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) dye, expression of PICK1 and synaptophysin in cerebral cortex and striatum of injured side by western blotting and immunofluorescence performed are analyzed. Exercise has done respectively on rats in each group for 15 days and 30 days. Compared with the control group, the brain damage is reduced in other groups after 15 days exercise. The protein expressions levels of synaptophysin and PICK1 are upregulated after exercise. Concentration of PICK1 protein in WM is greater than other exercise groups, and the expression of synaptophysin in WM and SM groups are higher than EM groups. The number of PICK1 positive cells, synaptophysin and PICK1 co-positive cells are increased by exercise. Synaptophysin is widely distributed in cortex surrounding the injury area in WM and EM. It is indicated in our result that willed-movement training is the most effective intervention in enhancing the PICK1-mediated synaptic plasticity in the area adjacent to the damage region of ischemic rats. PMID:26556240

  3. Absolute Hydration Free Energies of Blocked Amino Acids: Implications for Protein Solvation and Stability

    PubMed Central

    König, Gerhard; Bruckner, Stefan; Boresch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Most proteins perform their function in aqueous solution. The interactions with water determine the stability of proteins and the desolvation costs of ligand binding or membrane insertion. However, because of experimental restrictions, absolute solvation free energies of proteins or amino acids are not available. Instead, solvation free energies are estimated based on side chain analog data. This approach implies that the contributions to free energy differences are additive, and it has often been employed for estimating folding or binding free energies. However, it is not clear how much the additivity assumption affects the reliability of the resulting data. Here, we use molecular dynamics–based free energy simulations to calculate absolute hydration free energies for 15 N-acetyl-methylamide amino acids with neutral side chains. By comparing our results with solvation free energies for side chain analogs, we demonstrate that estimates of solvation free energies of full amino acids based on group-additive methods are systematically too negative and completely overestimate the hydrophobicity of glycine. The largest deviation of additive protocols using side chain analog data was 6.7 kcal/mol; on average, the deviation was 4 kcal/mol. We briefly discuss a simple way to alleviate the errors incurred by using side chain analog data and point out the implications of our findings for the field of biophysics and implicit solvent models. To support our results and conclusions, we calculate relative protein stabilities for selected point mutations, yielding a root-mean-square deviation from experimental results of 0.8 kcal/mol. PMID:23442867

  4. Protein Conformational Plasticity: the 'off-on' Switching Movement in Cdk5

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli, Andrea; Recanatini, Maurizio; Berteotti, Anna; Branduardi, Davide; Gervasio, Francesco L.; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-12-26

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are mostly known for their role in the cell cycle regulation. The activation mechanism of all CDKs involves the association with a regulatory protein, generally a cyclin, that binds to the kinase unit and stabilizes a catalytically active conformation. Active and inactive conformations of CDKs are characterized by the different spatial localization of two typical elements, namely the activation loop and an {open_square}-helix, whose amino-acid composition varies throughout the family.

  5. Surveillance-Activated Defenses Block the ROS–Induced Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Runkel, Eva D.; Liu, Shu; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance of cellular functions results in the activation of stress-signaling pathways that aim at restoring homeostasis. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify components of the signal transduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) to a nuclear chaperone promoter. We used the ROS generating complex I inhibitor paraquat to induce the UPRmt, and we employed RNAi exposure post-embryonically to allow testing genes whose knockdown results in embryonic lethality. We identified 54 novel regulators of the ROS–induced UPRmt. Activation of the UPRmt, but not of other stress-signaling pathways, failed when homeostasis of basic cellular mechanisms such as translation and protein transport were impaired. These mechanisms are monitored by a recently discovered surveillance system that interprets interruption of these processes as pathogen attack and depends on signaling through the JNK-like MAP-kinase KGB-1. Mutation of kgb-1 abrogated the inhibition of ROS–induced UPRmt, suggesting that surveillance-activated defenses specifically inhibit the UPRmt but do not compromise activation of the heat shock response, the UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum, or the SKN-1/Nrf2 mediated response to cytosolic stress. In addition, we identified PIFK-1, the orthologue of the Drosophila PI 4-kinase four wheel drive (FWD), and found that it is the only known factor so far that is essential for the unfolded protein responses of both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. This suggests that both UPRs may share a common membrane associated mechanism. PMID:23516373

  6. HLA and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies: Building blocks in RA.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, Diane; Catrina, Anca I

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPAs) are specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ACPA-positive RA is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting from the complex interaction between genetic (mainly HLA class II genes) and environmental factors (mainly smoking). Recent findings have offered new insights into where, when and how anti-citrulline immunity develops. Some studies have found that a mucosal site, such as the lungs, may function as the initiating site for the immune response against citrullinated proteins, in line with the known association between smoking and ACPA. Other studies, focusing rather on the HLA associations, have suggested that cross-reactivity between microbial sequences and citrullinated self-proteins may lead to ACPA formation. Once ACPAs have developed, they can circulate throughout the body and upon reaching the joints exert direct pathogenic effects themselves. ACPAs can target first the bone compartment of the joints to activate osteoclasts and release interleukin (IL)-8 that in turn will promote bone loss and pain-like behaviour. In the current review, we will present the current understanding of the genetic associations in RA contributing to ACPA occurrence and offer insight in the latest findings explaining how and why autoimmunity generated in the lungs of genetically susceptible hosts might lead to chronic inflammation in the joints. PMID:27107507

  7. Inhibition of protein synthesis but not β-adrenergic receptors blocks reconsolidation of a cocaine-associated cue memory.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Amber B; Taylor, Jane R

    2016-08-01

    Previously consolidated memories have the potential to enter a state of lability upon memory recall, during which time the memory can be altered before undergoing an additional consolidation-like process and being stored again as a long-term memory. Blocking reconsolidation of aberrant memories has been proposed as a potential treatment for psychiatric disorders including addiction. Here we investigated of the effect of systemically administering the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide or the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol on reconsolidation. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, during which each lever press resulted in the presentation of a cue paired with an intravenous infusion of cocaine. After undergoing lever press extinction to reduce operant responding, the cue memory was reactivated and rats were administered systemic injections of propranolol, cycloheximide, or vehicle. Post-reactivation cycloheximide, but not propranolol, resulted in a reactivation-dependent decrease in cue-induced reinstatement, indicative of reconsolidation blockade by protein synthesis inhibition. The present data indicate that systemically targeting protein synthesis as opposed to the β-adrenergic system may more effectively attenuate the reconsolidation of a drug-related memory and decrease drug-seeking behavior. PMID:27421890

  8. ANK, a Host Cytoplasmic Receptor for the Tobacco mosaic virus Cell-to-Cell Movement Protein, Facilitates Intercellular Transport through Plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Shoko; Spektor, Roman; Natale, Danielle M.; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodesma (PD) is a channel structure that spans the cell wall and provides symplastic connection between adjacent cells. Various macromolecules are known to be transported through PD in a highly regulated manner, and plant viruses utilize their movement proteins (MPs) to gate the PD to spread cell-to-cell. The mechanism by which MP modifies PD to enable intercelluar traffic remains obscure, due to the lack of knowledge about the host factors that mediate the process. Here, we describe the functional interaction between Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) MP and a plant factor, an ankyrin repeat containing protein (ANK), during the viral cell-to-cell movement. We utilized a reverse genetics approach to gain insight into the possible involvement of ANK in viral movement. To this end, ANK overexpressor and suppressor lines were generated, and the movement of MP was tested. MP movement was facilitated in the ANK-overexpressing plants, and reduced in the ANK-suppressing plants, demonstrating that ANK is a host factor that facilitates MP cell-to-cell movement. Also, the TMV local infection was largely delayed in the ANK-suppressing lines, while enhanced in the ANK-overexpressing lines, showing that ANK is crucially involved in the infection process. Importantly, MP interacted with ANK at PD. Finally, simultaneous expression of MP and ANK markedly decreased the PD levels of callose, β-1,3-glucan, which is known to act as a molecular sphincter for PD. Thus, the MP-ANK interaction results in the downregulation of callose and increased cell-to-cell movement of the viral protein. These findings suggest that ANK represents a host cellular receptor exploited by MP to aid viral movement by gating PD through relaxation of their callose sphincters. PMID:21124937

  9. Blocking of iron uptake by monoclonal antibodies specific for the Neisseria meningitidis transferrin-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Pintor, M; Ferrón, L; Gómez, J A; Gorringe, A; Criado, M T; Ferreirós, C M

    1996-10-01

    The existence of epitopes common to different strains in the Neisseria meningitidis transferrin (Tf)-binding protein 2 (TBP2), combined with the ability of polyclonal anti-TBP2 antibodies to inhibit Tf binding and block iron uptake in this species, led to this study on the effect of anti-TBP1+2 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to determine the presence of epitopes inside the Tf-binding region. All MAbs used reacted exclusively with the homologous strain when tested by dot-blots of outer membrane vesicles, with the reaction being specific for TBP2 after SDS-PAGE and electroblotting. In contrast, ELISA and iron-uptake blocking assays were also positive with heterologous strains belonging to Rokbi's group II (high mol.wt TBP2). The results confirmed the two group classification proposed by Rokbi and, in contrast to other studies, indicated the existence of epitopes in the Tf-binding region that are common only to strains of Rokbi's group II. These epitopes may become denatured after drying for dot-blot assays or after SDS-PAGE and electroblotting. PMID:8849698

  10. Genetic diversity in the block 2 region of the merozoite surface protein-1 of Plasmodium falciparum in central India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria continues to be a significant health problem in India. Several of the intended Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidate antigens are highly polymorphic. The genetic diversity of P. falciparum merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) has been extensively studied from various parts of the world. However, limited data are available from India. The aim of the present study was a molecular characterization of block 2 region of MSP-1 gene from the tribal-dominated, forested region of Madhya Pradesh. Methods DNA sequencing analysis was carried out in 71 field isolates collected between July 2005 to November 2005 and in 98 field isolates collected from July 2009 to December 2009. Alleles identified by DNA sequencing were aligned with the strain 3D7 and polymorphism analysis was done by using Edit Sequence tool (DNASTAR). Results The malaria positivity was 26% in 2005, which rose to 29% in 2009 and P. falciparum prevalence was also increased from 72% in 2005 to 81% in 2009. The overall allelic prevalence was higher in K1 (51%) followed by MAD20 (28%) and RO33 (21%) in 2005 while in 2009, RO33 was highest (40%) followed by K1 (36%) and MAD20 (24%). Conclusions The present study reports extensive genetic variations and dynamic evolution of block 2 region of MSP-1 in central India. Characterization of antigenic diversity in vaccine candidate antigens are valuable for future vaccine trials as well as understanding the population dynamics of P. falciparum parasites in this area. PMID:22439658

  11. Targeting Multiple Conformations Leads to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the uPAR·uPA Protein-Protein Interaction that Block Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, May; Wang, Fang; Jo, Inha; Knabe, W. Eric; Wilson, Sarah M.; Li, Liwei; Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Li, Jing; Sledge, George; Khanna, Rajesh; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of the urokinase receptor (uPAR) with its binding partners including the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) at the cell surface triggers a series of proteolytic and signaling events that promote invasion and metastasis. Here, we report the discovery of a small molecule (IPR-456) and its derivatives that inhibit the tight uPAR·uPA protein-protein interaction. IPR-456 was discovered by virtual screening against multiple conformations of uPAR sampled from explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations. Biochemical characterization reveal that the compound binds to uPAR with sub-micromolar affinity (Kd = 310 nM) and inhibits the tight protein-protein interaction with an IC50 of 10 μM. Free energy calculations based on explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations suggested the importance of a carboxylate moiety on IPR-456, which was confirmed by the activity of several derivatives including IPR-803. Immunofluorescence imaging showed that IPR-456 inhibited uPA binding to uPAR of breast MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with an IC50 of 8 μM. The compounds blocked MDA-MB-231 cell invasion, but IPR-456 showed little effect on MDA-MB-231 migration, and no effect on adhesion, suggesting that uPAR mediates these processes through its other binding partners. PMID:21875078

  12. Potent Neutralization of Influenza A Virus by a Single-Domain Antibody Blocking M2 Ion Channel Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guowei; Meng, Weixu; Guo, Haijiang; Pan, Weiqi; Liu, Jinsong; Peng, Tao; Chen, Ling; Chen, Chang-You

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus poses serious health threat to humans. Neutralizing antibodies against the highly conserved M2 ion channel is thought to offer broad protection against influenza A viruses. Here, we screened synthetic Camel single-domain antibody (VHH) libraries against native M2 ion channel protein. One of the isolated VHHs, M2-7A, specifically bound to M2-expressed cell membrane as well as influenza A virion, inhibited replication of both amantadine-sensitive and resistant influenza A viruses in vitro, and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, M2-7A showed blocking activity for proton influx through M2 ion channel. These pieces of evidence collectively demonstrate for the first time that a neutralizing antibody against M2 with broad specificity is achievable, and M2-7A may have potential for cross protection against a number of variants and subtypes of influenza A viruses. PMID:22164266

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone metabolites poison human topoisomerase IIalpha: altering enzyme function by blocking the N-terminal protein gate.

    PubMed

    Bender, Ryan P; Lehmler, Hans J; Robertson, Larry W; Ludewig, Gabriele; Osheroff, Neil

    2006-08-22

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are associated with a broad spectrum of human health problems and cause cancer in rodents. In addition, these compounds cause chromosomal aberrations in humans and treated human cells. Although the underlying basis for the chromosomal damage induced by PCBs is not understood, it is believed that these compounds act through a series of phenolic and quinone-based metabolites. Recent studies indicate that several quinones that promote chromosomal damage also act as topoisomerase II poisons. Therefore, the effects of PCB quinone metabolites (including mono and dichlorinated compounds and p- and o-quinones) on the activity of human topoisomerase IIalpha were examined. Results indicate that these compounds are potent topoisomerase IIalpha poisons in vitro and act by adducting the enzyme. They also increase DNA cleavage by topoisomerase IIalpha in cultured human cells. In contrast, incubation of topoisomerase IIalpha with PCB metabolites in the absence of DNA leads to a rapid loss of enzyme activity. On the basis of (1) the differential ability of quinone-treated enzyme to bind circular and linear DNA molecules and (2) the generation of salt-stable noncovalent complexes between topoisomerase IIalpha and circular plasmids in the presence of PCB quinones, it appears that these compounds alter enzyme function (at least in part) by blocking the N-terminal gate of the protein. Finally, exposure to quinones generates a protein species with a molecular mass approximately twice that of a monomeric topoisomerase IIalpha protomer. This finding suggests that PCB quinones block the N-terminal gate by cross-linking the protomer subunits of topoisomerase IIalpha. PMID:16906772

  14. The V protein of Tioman virus is incapable of blocking type I interferon signaling in human cells.

    PubMed

    Caignard, Grégory; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Dhondt, Kevin P; Labernardière, Jean-Louis; Petit, Thierry; Jacob, Yves; Horvat, Branka; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of a virus to cross species barriers is determined by the development of bona fide interactions with cellular components of new hosts, and in particular its ability to block IFN-α/β antiviral signaling. Tioman virus (TioV), a close relative of mumps virus (MuV), has been isolated in giant fruit bats in Southeast Asia. Nipah and Hendra viruses, which are present in the same bat colonies, are highly pathogenic in human. Despite serological evidences of close contacts between TioV and human populations, whether TioV is associated to some human pathology remains undetermined. Here we show that in contrast to the V protein of MuV, the V protein of TioV (TioV-V) hardly interacts with human STAT2, does not degrade STAT1, and cannot block IFN-α/β signaling in human cells. In contrast, TioV-V properly binds to human STAT3 and MDA5, and thus interferes with IL-6 signaling and IFN-β promoter induction in human cells. Because STAT2 binding was previously identified as a host restriction factor for some Paramyxoviridae, we established STAT2 sequence from giant fruit bats, and binding to TioV-V was tested. Surprisingly, TioV-V interaction with STAT2 from giant fruit bats is also extremely weak and barely detectable. Altogether, our observations question the capacity of TioV to appropriately control IFN-α/β signaling in both human and giant fruit bats that are considered as its natural host. PMID:23342031

  15. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Brown, R. Lane; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  16. RNF17 blocks promiscuous activity of PIWI proteins in mouse testes

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Kaja A.; Tam, Oliver H.; Knott, Simon R.; Falciatori, Ilaria; Hammell, Molly; Vagin, Vasily V.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    PIWI proteins and their associated piRNAs protect germ cells from the activity of mobile genetic elements. Two classes of piRNAs—primary and secondary—are defined by their mechanisms of biogenesis. Primary piRNAs are processed directly from transcripts of piRNA cluster loci, whereas secondary piRNAs are generated in an adaptive amplification loop, termed the ping-pong cycle. In mammals, piRNA populations are dynamic, shifting as male germ cells develop. Embryonic piRNAs consist of both primary and secondary species and are mainly directed toward transposons. In meiotic cells, the piRNA population is transposon-poor and largely restricted to primary piRNAs derived from pachytene piRNA clusters. The transition from the embryonic to the adult piRNA pathway is not well understood. Here we show that RNF17 shapes adult meiotic piRNA content by suppressing the production of secondary piRNAs. In the absence of RNF17, ping-pong occurs inappropriately in meiotic cells. Ping-pong initiates piRNA responses against not only transposons but also protein-coding genes and long noncoding RNAs, including genes essential for germ cell development. Thus, the sterility of Rnf17 mutants may be a manifestation of a small RNA-based autoimmune reaction. PMID:26115953

  17. Protein-engineered block-copolymers as stem cell delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilshorn, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases and injuries; however, current delivery protocols are inadequate. Transplantation by direct injection, which is clinically preferred for its minimal invasiveness, commonly results in less than 5% cell viability, greatly inhibiting clinical outcomes. We demonstrate that mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we show that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. Building on these fundamental studies, we have designed a reproducible, bio-resorbable, customizable hydrogel using protein-engineering technology. In our Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH), network assembly is driven by specific and stoichiometric peptide-peptide binding interactions. By integrating protein science methodologies with simple polymer physics models, we manipulate the polypeptide chain interactions and demonstrate the direct ability to tune the network crosslinking density, sol-gel phase behavior, and gel mechanics. This is in contrast to many other physical hydrogels, where predictable tuning of bulk mechanics from the molecular level remains elusive due to the reliance on non-specific and non-stoichiometric chain interactions for network formation. Furthermore, the hydrogel network can be easily modified to deliver a variety of bioactive payloads including growth factors, peptide drugs, and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that these materials may significantly improve transplanted stem cell retention and function.

  18. Tobamoviral movement protein transiently expressed in a single epidermal cell functions beyond multiple plasmodesmata and spreads multicellularly in an infection-coupled manner.

    PubMed

    Tamai, A; Meshi, T

    2001-02-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of a plant virus requires expression of the movement protein (MP). It has not been fully elucidated, however, how the MP functions in primary infected cells. With the use of a microprojectile bombardment-mediated DNA infection system for Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), we found that the cotransfected ToMV MP gene exerts its effects in the initially infected cells and in their surrounding cells to achieve multicellular spread of movement-defective ToMV. Five other tobamoviral MPs examined also transcomplemented the movement-defective phenotype of ToMV, but the Cucumber mosaic virus 3a MP did not. Together with the cell-to-cell movement of the mutant virus, a fusion between the MP and an enhanced green fluorescent protein variant (EGFP) expressed in trans was distributed multicellularly and localized primarily in plasmodesmata between infected cells. In contrast, in noninfected sites the MP-EGFP fusion accumulated predominantly inside the bombarded cells as irregularly shaped aggregates, and only a minute amount of the fusion was found in plasmodesmata. Thus, the behavior of ToMV MP is greatly modulated in the presence of a replicating virus and it is highly likely that the MP spreads in the infection sites, coordinating with the cell-to-cell movement of the viral genome. PMID:11204775

  19. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 6 (RGS6) Protein Ensures Coordination of Motor Movement by Modulating GABAB Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; Yang, Jianqi; Loo, Lipin; Sheff, David; Shepherd, Andrew J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2012-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons located within the cerebellar cortex limits the extent of neuronal excitation in part through activation of metabotropic GABAB receptors. Stimulation of these receptors triggers a number of downstream signaling events, including activation of GIRK channels by the Gβγ dimer resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and inhibition of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic sites. Here, we identify RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins, as a key regulator of GABABR signaling in cerebellum. RGS6 is enriched in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum along with neuronal GIRK channel subunits 1 and 2 where RGS6 forms a complex with known binding partners Gβ5 and R7BP. Mice lacking RGS6 exhibit abnormal gait and ataxia characterized by impaired rotarod performance improved by treatment with a GABABR antagonist. RGS6−/− mice administered baclofen also showed exaggerated motor coordination deficits compared with their wild-type counterparts. Isolated cerebellar neurons natively expressed RGS6, GABABR, and GIRK channel subunits, and cerebellar granule neurons from RGS6−/− mice showed a significant delay in the deactivation kinetics of baclofen-induced GIRK channel currents. These results establish RGS6 as a key component of GABABR signaling and represent the first demonstration of an essential role for modulatory actions of RGS proteins in adult cerebellum. Dysregulation of RGS6 expression in human patients could potentially contribute to loss of motor coordination and, thus, pharmacological manipulation of RGS6 levels might represent a viable means to treat patients with ataxias of cerebellar origin. PMID:22179605

  20. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6) protein ensures coordination of motor movement by modulating GABAB receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; Yang, Jianqi; Loo, Lipin; Sheff, David; Shepherd, Andrew J; Mohapatra, Durga P; Fisher, Rory A

    2012-02-10

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons located within the cerebellar cortex limits the extent of neuronal excitation in part through activation of metabotropic GABA(B) receptors. Stimulation of these receptors triggers a number of downstream signaling events, including activation of GIRK channels by the Gβγ dimer resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and inhibition of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic sites. Here, we identify RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins, as a key regulator of GABA(B)R signaling in cerebellum. RGS6 is enriched in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum along with neuronal GIRK channel subunits 1 and 2 where RGS6 forms a complex with known binding partners Gβ(5) and R7BP. Mice lacking RGS6 exhibit abnormal gait and ataxia characterized by impaired rotarod performance improved by treatment with a GABA(B)R antagonist. RGS6(-/-) mice administered baclofen also showed exaggerated motor coordination deficits compared with their wild-type counterparts. Isolated cerebellar neurons natively expressed RGS6, GABA(B)R, and GIRK channel subunits, and cerebellar granule neurons from RGS6(-/-) mice showed a significant delay in the deactivation kinetics of baclofen-induced GIRK channel currents. These results establish RGS6 as a key component of GABA(B)R signaling and represent the first demonstration of an essential role for modulatory actions of RGS proteins in adult cerebellum. Dysregulation of RGS6 expression in human patients could potentially contribute to loss of motor coordination and, thus, pharmacological manipulation of RGS6 levels might represent a viable means to treat patients with ataxias of cerebellar origin. PMID:22179605

  1. Cucumber Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Severs Actin Filaments to Increase the Plasmodesmal Size Exclusion Limit in Tobacco[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shengzhong; Liu, Zhaohui; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xu; Zhu, Lei; Miao, Long; Wang, Xue-Chen; Yuan, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Plant viral movement proteins (MPs) enable viruses to pass through cell walls by increasing the size exclusion limit (SEL) of plasmodesmata (PD). Here, we report that the ability of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) MP to increase the SEL of the PD could be inhibited by treatment with the actin filament (F-actin)–stabilizing agent phalloidin but not by treatment with the F-actin–destabilizing agent latrunculin A. In vitro studies showed that CMV MP bound globular and F-actin, inhibited actin polymerization, severed F-actin, and participated in plus end capping of F-actin. Analyses of two CMV MP mutants, one with and one without F-actin severing activities, demonstrated that the F-actin severing ability was required to increase the PD SEL. Furthermore, the Tobacco mosaic virus MP also exhibited F-actin severing activity, and its ability to increase the PD SEL was inhibited by treatment with phalloidin. Our data provide evidence to support the hypothesis that F-actin severing is required for MP-induced increase in the SEL of PD. This may have broad implications in the study of the mechanisms of actin dynamics that regulate cell-to-cell transport of viral and endogenous proteins. PMID:20435906

  2. Augmentation of CAR T-cell Trafficking and Antitumor Efficacy by Blocking Protein Kinase A Localization.

    PubMed

    Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Sun, Jing; Kapoor, Veena; Maceyko, Steven; Lo, Albert; Puré, Ellen; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Antitumor treatments based on the infusion of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR T cells) are still relatively ineffective for solid tumors, due to the presence of immunosuppressive mediators [such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and adenosine] and poor T-cell trafficking. PGE2 and adenosine activate protein kinase A (PKA), which then inhibits T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This inhibition process requires PKA to localize to the immune synapse via binding to the membrane protein ezrin. We generated CAR T cells that expressed a small peptide called the "regulatory subunit I anchoring disruptor" (RIAD) that inhibits the association of PKA with ezrin, thus blunting the negative effects of PKA on TCR activation. After exposure to PGE2 or adenosine in vitro, CAR-RIAD T cells showed increased TCR signaling, released more cytokines, and showed enhanced killing of tumor cells compared with CAR T cells. When injected into tumor-bearing mice, the antitumor efficacy of murine and human CAR-RIAD T cells was enhanced compared with that of CAR T cells, due to resistance to tumor-induced hypofunction and increased T-cell infiltration of established tumors. Subsequent in vitro assays showed that both mouse and human CAR-RIAD cells migrated more efficiently than CAR cells did in response to the chemokine CXCL10 and also had better adhesion to various matrices. Thus, the intracellular addition of the RIAD peptide to adoptively transferred CAR T cells augments their efficacy by increasing their effector function and by improving trafficking into tumor sites. This treatment strategy, therefore, shows potential clinical application for treating solid tumors. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 541-51. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27045023

  3. Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  4. Plasmodesmata-located protein overexpression negatively impacts the manifestation of systemic acquired resistance and the long-distance movement of Defective in Induced Resistance1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Carella, P; Isaacs, M; Cameron, R K

    2015-03-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defence response that provides immunity to distant uninfected leaves after an initial localised infection. The lipid transfer protein (LTP) Defective in Induced Resistance1 (DIR1) is an essential component of SAR that moves from induced to distant leaves following a SAR-inducing local infection. To understand how DIR1 is transported to distant leaves during SAR, we analysed DIR1 movement in transgenic Arabidopsis lines with reduced cell-to-cell movement caused by the overexpression of Plasmodesmata-Located Proteins PDLP1 and PDLP5. These PDLP-overexpressing lines were defective for SAR, and DIR1 antibody signals were not observed in phloem sap-enriched petiole exudates collected from distant leaves. Our data support the idea that cell-to-cell movement of DIR1 through plasmodesmata is important during long-distance SAR signalling in Arabidopsis. PMID:25296648

  5. Blocking the Interactions between Calcium-Bound S100A12 Protein and the V Domain of RAGE Using Tranilast.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Jian Wei; Fu, Brian; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor in the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in several inflammatory processes. RAGE induces cellular signaling pathways upon binding with various ligands, such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), β-amyloids, and S100 proteins. The solution structure of S100A12 and the V ligand-binding region of RAGE have been reported previously. Using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to conduct 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) titration experiments, we identified and mapped the binding interface between S100A12 and the V domain of RAGE. The NMR chemical shift data were used as the constraints for the High Ambiguity Driven biomolecular DOCKing (HADDOCK) calculation to generate a structural model of the S100A12-V domain complex. In addition, tranilast (an anti-allergic drug) showed strong interaction with S100A12 in the 1H-15N HSQC titration, fluorescence experiments, and WST-1 assay. The results also indicated that tranilast was located at the binding site between S100A12 and the V domain, blocking interaction between these two proteins. Our results provide the mechanistic details for a structural model and reveal a potential precursor for an inhibitor for pro-inflammatory diseases, which could be useful for the development of new drugs. PMID:27598566

  6. Blocking of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 during Tubulointerstitial Nephritis Resulted in Delayed Neutrophil Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Xia, Yiyang; Wu, Wei; Gersch, Christine; Park, Pyong Woo; Truong, Luan; Wilson, Curtis B.; Johnson, Richard; Feng, Lili

    2005-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 has been implicated in the monocyte/macrophage infiltration that occurs during tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN). We investigated the role of MCP-1 in rats with TIN by administering a neutralizing anti-MCP-1 antibody (Ab). We observed significantly reduced macrophage infiltration and delayed neutrophil clearance in the kidneys of TIN model rats treated with the anti-MCP-1 Ab. To exclude the possibility that an observed immune complex could affect the resolution of apoptotic neutrophils via the Fc receptor, TIN model rats were treated with a peptide-based MCP-1 receptor antagonist (RA). The MCP-1 RA had effects similar to those of the anti-MCP-1 Ab. In addition, MCP-1 did not affect macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of neutrophils in vitro. Deposition of the anti-MCP-1 Ab in rat kidneys resulted from its binding to heparan sulfate-immobilized MCP-1, as demonstrated by the detection of MCP-1 in both pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that induction of chemokines, specifically MCP-1, in TIN corresponds with leukocyte infiltration and that the anti-MCP-1 Ab formed an immune complex with heparan sulfate-immobilized MCP-1 in the kidney. Antagonism of MCP-1 in TIN by Ab or RA may alter the pathological process, most likely through delayed removal of apoptotic neutrophils in the inflammatory loci. PMID:16127145

  7. Treatment with the matricellular protein CCN3 blocks and/or reverses fibrosis development in obesity with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Riser, Bruce L; Najmabadi, Feridoon; Garchow, Kendra; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Darryl R; Sukowski, Ernest J

    2014-11-01

    Fibrosis is at the core of the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with the complications of diabetes and obesity, including diabetic nephropathy (DN), without any US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with this specific target. We recently provided the first evidence that the matricellular protein CCN3 (official symbol NOV) functions in a reciprocal manner, acting on the profibrotic family member CCN2 to inhibit fibrosis in a mesangial cell model of DN. Herein, we used the BT/BR ob/ob mouse as a best model of human obesity and DN progression to determine whether recombinant human CCN3 could be used therapeutically, and the mechanisms involved. Eight weeks of thrice-weekly i.p. injections (0.604 and 6.04 μg/kg of recombinant human CCN3) beginning in early-stage DN completely blocked and/or reversed the up-regulation of mRNA expression of kidney cortex fibrosis genes (CCN2, Col1a2, TGF-β1, and PAI-1) seen in placebo-treated diabetic mice. The treatment completely blocked glomerular fibrosis, as determined by altered mesangial expansion and deposition of laminin. Furthermore, it protected against, or reversed, podocyte loss and kidney function reduction (rise in plasma creatinine concentration); albuminuria was also greatly reduced. This study demonstrates the potential efficacy of recombinant human CCN3 treatment in DN and points to mechanisms operating at multiple levels or pathways, upstream (eg, protecting against cell injury) and downstream (eg, regulating CCN2 activity and extracellular matrix metabolism). PMID:25193594

  8. Developmental Block and Programmed Cell Death in Bos indicus Embryos: Effects of Protein Supplementation Source and Developmental Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sheila Merlo; Marinho, Luciana Simões Rafagnin; Lunardelli, Paula Alvares; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if the protein source of the medium influences zebu embryo development and if developmental kinetics, developmental block and programmed cell death are related. The culture medium was supplemented with either fetal calf serum or bovine serum albumin. The embryos were classified as Fast (n = 1,235) or Slow (n = 485) based on the time required to reach the fourth cell cycle (48 h and 90 h post insemination - hpi -, respectively). The Slow group was further separated into two groups: those presenting exactly 4 cells at 48 hpi (Slow/4 cells) and those that reached the fourth cell cycle at 90 hpi (Slow). Blastocyst quality, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial membrane potential and signs of apoptosis or necrosis were evaluated. The Slow group had higher incidence of developmental block than the Fast group. The embryos supplemented with fetal calf serum had lower quality. DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential were absent in embryos at 48 hpi but present at 90 hpi. Early signs of apoptosis were more frequent in the Slow and Slow/4 cell groups than in the Fast group. We concluded that fetal calf serum reduces blastocyst development and quality, but the mechanism appears to be independent of DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic cells detected at 48 hpi reveal a possible mechanism of programmed cell death activation prior to genome activation. The apoptotic cells observed in the slow-developing embryos suggested a relationship between programmed cell death and embryonic developmental kinetics in zebu in vitro-produced embryos. PMID:25760989

  9. Muscle protein synthesis, mTORC1/MAPK/Hippo signaling, and capillary density are altered by blocking of myostatin and activins.

    PubMed

    Hulmi, Juha J; Oliveira, Bernardo M; Silvennoinen, Mika; Hoogaars, Willem M H; Ma, Hongqiang; Pierre, Philippe; Pasternack, Arja; Kainulainen, Heikki; Ritvos, Olli

    2013-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass and function occurs in various diseases. Myostatin blocking can attenuate muscle loss, but downstream signaling is not well known. Therefore, to elucidate associated signaling pathways, we used the soluble activin receptor IIb (sActRIIB-Fc) to block myostatin and activins in mice. Within 2 wk, the treatment rapidly increased muscle size as expected but decreased capillary density per area. sActRIIB-Fc increased muscle protein synthesis 1-2 days after the treatment correlating with enhanced mTORC1 signaling (phosphorylated rpS6 and S6K1, r = 0.8). Concurrently, increased REDD1 and eIF2Bε protein contents and phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AMPK was observed. In contrast, proangiogenic MAPK signaling and VEGF-A protein decreased. Hippo signaling has been characterized recently as a regulator of organ size and an important regulator of myogenesis in vitro. The phosphorylation of YAP (Yes-associated protein), a readout of activated Hippo signaling, increased after short- and longer-term myostatin and activin blocking and in exercised muscle. Moreover, dystrophic mdx mice had elevated phosphorylated and especially total YAP protein content. These results show that the blocking of myostatin and activins induce rapid skeletal muscle growth. This is associated with increased protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling but decreased capillary density and proangiogenic signaling. It is also shown for the first time that Hippo signaling is activated in skeletal muscle after myostatin blocking and exercise and also in dystrophic muscle. This suggests that Hippo signaling may have a role in skeletal muscle in various circumstances. PMID:23115080

  10. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  11. The Role of Microtubule Association in Plasmodesmal Targeting of Potato mop-top virus Movement Protein TGBp1

    PubMed Central

    Shemyakina, Elena A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Leonova, Olga G; Popenko, Vladimir I; Schiemann, Joachim; Morozov, Sergey Yu

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) is mediated by three virus-encoded ‘triple gene block’ (TGB) proteins termed TGBp1, TGBp2 and TGBp3. TGBp1 binds virus RNAs to form viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), the transport form of viral genome. TGBp2 and TGBp3 are necessary for intracellular delivery of TGBp1-containing vRNPs to plasmodesmata. To analyze subcellular localization and transport of TGBp1 we used a single binary vector for agrobacterium-mediated co-expression of PMTV TGBp1 fused to green fluorescent protein and TGBp2/TGBp3. At two days post infiltration (dpi) TGBp1 was found in the nucleus and in association with microtubules (MTs). Similar localization pattern was revealed in cells expressing GFP-TGBp1 alone after particle bombardment. At 3 dpi, in addition to the nucleus and MTs, TGBp1 was detected in numerous granular bodies located both along the MTs and at the cell wall. The latter structures co-localized with plasmodesmata-associated callose depositions. At 4 dpi, GFP-TGBp1 was detected in cell wall-associated bodies and also in residual MTs, the nucleoplasm and large perinuclear inclusions resembling aggresomes. Therefore GFP-TGBp1 association with MTs preceded to its localization to plasmodesmata. Disassembly of cell MTs by colchicine prevented GFP-TGBp1 targeting to plasmodesmata and the MT-dependent aggresome formation. Deletion analysis also revealed a correlation between TGBp1 microtubule association and plasmodesmata targeting. We propose that TGBp1 interaction with MTs may be important for the formation of vRNP bodies destined for the transport to plasmodesmata as well as degradation of the excessive TGBp1. PMID:21660184

  12. The PriA Replication Restart Protein Blocks Replicase Access Prior to Helicase Assembly and Directs Template Specificity through Its ATPase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Manhart, Carol M.; McHenry, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    The PriA protein serves as an initiator for the restart of DNA replication on stalled replication forks and as a checkpoint protein that prevents the replicase from advancing in a strand displacement reaction on forks that do not contain a functional replicative helicase. We have developed a primosomal protein-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay using a minimal fork substrate composed of synthetic oligonucleotides. We demonstrate that a self-loading reaction, which proceeds at high helicase concentrations, occurs by threading of a preassembled helicase over free 5′-ends, an event that can be blocked by attaching a steric block to the 5′-end or coating DNA with single-stranded DNA binding protein. The specificity of PriA for replication forks is regulated by its intrinsic ATPase. ATPase-defective PriA K230R shows a strong preference for substrates that contain no gap between the leading strand and the duplex portion of the fork, as demonstrated previously. Wild-type PriA prefers substrates with larger gaps, showing maximal activity on substrates on which PriA K230R is inactive. We demonstrate that PriA blocks replicase function on forks by blocking its binding. PMID:23264623

  13. The immunohistochemical detection of mismatch repair gene proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2): practical aspects in antigen retrieval and biotin blocking protocols.

    PubMed

    Manavis, Jim; Gilham, Peter; Davies, Ruth; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew

    2003-03-01

    The immunohistochemical detection of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins is used as a screening test with microsatellite instability for the detection of hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC). The authors describe a simple and cost-effective method using a pressure cooker and microwave oven for antigen retrieval and a modified method for applying a commercial biotin blocking kit. Colorectal tumors of 20 patients of the HNPCC spectrum were included in this study. Eighty paraffin sections were cut and submitted for immunohistochemical analysis using a routine protocol and a pressure cooker protocol. Parallel sections for biotin blocking were also run, including the modified biotin block for each protocol. The sections were incubated with the following antibodies: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. All cases examined exhibited a normal expression of the MMR proteins in the nucleus and adjacent nonneoplastic tissue elements and consequently defined as having a normal expression of these proteins. Cases with tumor that exhibited a loss of the nuclear staining with the MMR proteins with a concurrent staining of the adjacent nonneoplastic cells were classified as abnormal MMR expression. The series of 20 cases using pressure cooker antigen retrieval produced superior results to the routine immunohistochemical protocol used previously in our laboratory. The modified biotin block also gave consistent results. The reproducibility and consistency of this procedure has resulted it in being used routinely for suspected HNPCC cases, both current and archival. PMID:12610360

  14. A putative Rab-GTPase activation protein from Nicotiana benthamiana is important for Bamboo mosaic virus intercellular movement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ping; Chen, Jao-Shien; Hsu, Yau-Huei; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu

    2013-12-01

    The cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism technique was applied to isolate the differentially expressed genes during Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) infection on Nicotiana benthamiana plants. One of the upregulated genes was cloned and predicted to contain a TBC domain designated as NbRabGAP1 (Rab GTPase activation protein 1). No significant difference was observed in BaMV accumulation in the NbRabGAP1-knockdown and the control protoplasts. However, BaMV accumulation was 50% and 2% in the inoculated and systemic leaves, respectively, of the knockdown plants to those of the control plants. By measuring the spreading area of BaMV infection foci in the inoculated leaves, we found that BaMV moved less efficiently in the NbRabGAP1-knockdown plants than in the control plants. Transient expression of the wild type NbRabGAP1 significantly increases BaMV accumulation in N. benthamiana. These results suggest that NbRabGAP1 with a functional Rab-GAP activity is involved in virus movement. PMID:24210126

  15. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol. PMID:26962873

  16. Epstein-Barr Viral BNLF2a Protein Hijacks the Tail-anchored Protein Insertion Machinery to Block Antigen Processing by the Transport Complex TAP*

    PubMed Central

    Wycisk, Agnes I.; Lin, Jiacheng; Loch, Sandra; Hobohm, Kathleen; Funke, Jessica; Wieneke, Ralph; Koch, Joachim; Skach, William R.; Mayerhofer, Peter U.; Tampé, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Virus-infected cells are eliminated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which recognize viral epitopes displayed on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules at the cell surface. Herpesviruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to escape this immune surveillance. During the lytic phase of EBV infection, the viral factor BNLF2a interferes with antigen processing by preventing peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Here we reveal details of the inhibition mechanism of this EBV protein. We demonstrate that BNLF2a acts as a tail-anchored protein, exploiting the mammalian Asna-1/WRB (Get3/Get1) machinery for posttranslational insertion into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, where it subsequently blocks antigen translocation by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). BNLF2a binds directly to the core TAP complex arresting the ATP-binding cassette transporter in a transport-incompetent conformation. The inhibition mechanism of EBV BNLF2a is distinct and mutually exclusive of other viral TAP inhibitors. PMID:21984826

  17. Expression dynamics and ultrastructural localization of epitope-tagged Abutilon mosaic virus nuclear shuttle and movement proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinow, Tatjana; Tanwir, Fariha; Kocher, Cornelia; Krenz, Bjoern; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger

    2009-09-01

    The geminivirus Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) encodes two proteins which are essential for viral spread within plants. The nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) transfers viral DNA between the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas the movement protein (MP) facilitates transport between cells through plasmodesmata and long-distance via phloem. An inducible overexpression system for epitope-tagged NSP and MP in plants yielded unprecedented amounts of both proteins. Western blots revealed extensive posttranslational modification and truncation for MP, but not for NSP. Ultrastructural examination of Nicotiana benthamiana tissues showed characteristic nucleopathic alterations, including fibrillar rings, when epitope-tagged NSP and MP were simultaneously expressed in leaves locally infected with an AbMV DNA A in which the coat protein gene was replaced by a green fluorescent protein encoding gene. Immunogold labelling localized NSP in the nucleoplasm and in the fibrillar rings. MP appeared at the cell periphery, probably the plasma membrane, and plasmodesmata.

  18. Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa reverses acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis through blocking sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 maturation.

    PubMed

    Lian, Li-Hua; Wu, Yan-Ling; Song, Shun-Zong; Wan, Ying; Xie, Wen-Xue; Li, Xin; Bai, Ting; Ouyang, Bing-Qing; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2010-12-22

    This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) on acute alcohol-induced fatty liver. Mice were treated with ethanol (5 g/kg of body weight) by gavage every 12 h for a total of three doses to induce acute fatty liver. Methanol extract of GM (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) or silymarin (100 mg/kg) was gavaged simultaneously with ethanol for three doses. GM administration significantly reduced the increases in serum ALT and AST levels, the serum and hepatic triglyceride levels, at 4 h after the last ethanol administration. GM was also found to prevent ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and necrosis, as indicated by liver histopathological studies. Additionally, GM suppressed the elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, restored the glutathione (GSH) levels, and enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities. The concurrent administration of GM efficaciously abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. Moreover, GM significantly reduced the nuclear translocation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (nSREBP-1) in ethanol-treated mice. These data indicated that GM possessed the ability to prevent ethanol-induced acute liver steatosis, possibly through blocking CYP2E1-mediated free radical scavenging effects and SREBP-1-regulated fatty acid synthesis. Especially, GM may be developed as a potential therapeutic candidate for ethanol-induced oxidative damage in liver. PMID:21105651

  19. Perturbing microtubule integrity blocks AMP-activated protein kinase-induced meiotic resumption in cultured mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ya, Ru; Downs, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    The oocyte meiotic spindle is comprised of microtubules (MT) that bind chromatin and regulate both metaphase plate formation and karyokinesis during meiotic maturation; however, little information is known about their role in meiosis reinitiation. This study was conducted to determine if microtubule integrity is required for meiotic induction and to ascertain how it affects activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important participant in the meiotic induction process. Treatment with microtubule-disrupting agents nocodazole and vinblastine suppressed meiotic resumption in a dose-dependent manner in both arrested cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) stimulated with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and arrested denuded oocytes (DO) stimulated with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR). This effect coincided with suppression of AMPK activation as determined by western blotting and germinal vesicle immunostaining. Treatment with the MT stabilizer paclitaxel also suppressed meiotic induction. Targeting actin filament polymerization had only a marginal effect on meiotic induction. Immunolocalization experiments revealed that active AMPK colocalized with γ-tubulin during metaphase I and II stages, while it localized at the spindle midzone during anaphase. This discrete localization pattern was dependent on MT integrity. Treatment with nocodazole led to disruption of proper spindle pole localization of active AMPK, while paclitaxel induced excessive polymerization of spindle MT and formation of ectopic asters with accentuated AMPK colocalization. Although stimulation of AMPK increased the rate of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB), spindle formation and polar body (PB) extrusion, the kinase had no effect on peripheral movement of the spindle. These data suggest that the meiosis-inducing action and localization of AMPK are regulated by MT spindle integrity during mouse oocyte maturation. PMID:23199370

  20. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to the movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus: influence of subcellular MP localization and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tyulkina, Lidia G; Karger, Elena M; Sheveleva, Anna A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2010-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to recombinant movement protein (MP(REC)) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were used to reveal the dependence of MP epitope accessibility to mAbs on subcellular MP localization and post-translational MP phosphorylation. Leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana or N. tabacum were inoculated mechanically with TMV or agroinjected with an MP expression vector. At different time post-inoculation, ER membrane- and cell wall-enriched fractions (ER-MP and CW-MP, respectively) were isolated and analysed. The N-terminal region (residues 1-30) as well as regions 186-222 and 223-257 of MP from the CW and ER fractions were accessible for interaction with mAbs. By contrast, the MP regions including residues 76-89 and 98-129 were not accessible. The C-terminal TMV MP region (residues 258-268) was inaccessible to mAbs not only in CW-MP, but also in ER-MP fractions. Evidence is presented that phosphorylation of the majority of TMV MP C-terminal sites occurred on ER membranes at an early stage of virus infection, i.e. not after, but before reaching the cell wall. C-terminal phosphorylation of purified MP(REC) abolished recognition of C-proximal residues 258-268 by specific mAbs, which could be restored by MP dephosphorylation. Likewise, accessibility to mAbs of the C-terminal MP epitope in ER-MP and CW-MP leaf fractions was restored by dephosphorylation. Substitution of three or four C-terminal Ser/Thr residues with non-phosphorylatable Ala also resulted in abolition of interaction of mAbs with MP. PMID:20164264

  1. Alanine Scanning of Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) 2B Protein Identifies Different Positions for Cell-To-Cell Movement and Gene Silencing Suppressor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Katalin; Gellért, Ákos; Balázs, Ervin; Salánki, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional 2b protein of CMV has a role in the long distance and local movement of the virus, in symptom formation, in evasion of defense mediated by salicylic acid as well as in suppression of RNA silencing. The role of conserved amino acid sequence domains were analyzed previously in the protein function, but comprehensive analysis of this protein was not carried out until recently. We have analyzed all over the 2b protein by alanine scanning mutagenesis changing three consecutive amino acids (aa) to alanine. We have identified eight aa triplets as key determinants of the 2b protein function in virus infection. Four of them (KKQ/22-24/AAA, QNR/31-33/AAA, RER/34-36/AAA, SPS/40-42/AAA) overlap with previously determined regions indispensable in gene silencing suppressor function. We have identified two additional triplets necessary for the suppressor function of the 2b protein (LPF/55-57/AAA, NVE/10-12/AAA), and two other positions were required for cell-to-cell movement of the virus (MEL/1-3/AAA, RHV/70-72/AAA), which are not essential for suppressor activity. PMID:25380036

  2. Systemic transport of Alfalfa mosaic virus can be mediated by the movement proteins of several viruses assigned to five genera of the 30K family.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Thor V M; Peiró, Ana; Pallás, Vicente; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús

    2013-03-01

    We previously showed that the movement protein (MP) gene of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is functionally exchangeable for the cell-to-cell transport of the corresponding genes of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Brome mosaic virus, Prunus necrotic ringspot virus, Cucumber mosaic virus and Cowpea mosaic virus. We have analysed the capacity of the heterologous MPs to systemically transport the corresponding chimeric AMV genome. All MPs were competent in systemic transport but required the fusion at their C terminus of the coat protein-interacting C-terminal 44 aa (A44) of the AMV MP. Except for the TMV MP, the presence of the hybrid virus in upper leaves correlated with the capacity to move locally. These results suggest that all the MPs assigned to the 30K superfamily should be exchangeable not only for local virus movement but also for systemic transport when the A44 fragment is present. PMID:23136366

  3. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  4. Cell-to-cell movement of Alfalfa mosaic virus can be mediated by the movement proteins of Ilar-, bromo-, cucumo-, tobamo- and comoviruses and does not require virion formation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A; Carmen Herranz, María; Pallás, Vicente

    2006-03-01

    RNA 3 of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) encodes the movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP). Chimeric RNA 3 with the AMV MP gene replaced by the corresponding MP gene of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus, Brome mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus or Cowpea mosaic virus efficiently moved from cell-to-cell only when the expressed MP was extended at its C-terminus with the C-terminal 44 amino acids of AMV MP. MP of Tobacco mosaic virus supported the movement of the chimeric RNA 3 whether or not the MP was extended with the C-terminal AMV MP sequence. The replacement of the CP gene in RNA 3 by a mutant gene encoding a CP defective in virion formation did not affect cell-to-cell transport of the chimera's with a functional MP. A GST pull-down technique was used to demonstrate for the first time that the C-terminal 44 amino acids of the MP of a virus belonging to the family Bromoviridae interact specifically with AMV virus particles. Together, these results demonstrate that AMV RNA 3 can be transported from cell-to-cell by both tubule-forming and non-tubule-forming MPs if a specific MP-CP interaction occurs. PMID:16316673

  5. Blocks database and its applications.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, J G; Henikoff, S

    1996-01-01

    Protein blocks consist of multiply aligned sequence segments without gaps that represent the most highly conserved regions of protein families. A database of blocks has been constructed by successive application of the fully automated PROTOMAT system to lists of protein family members obtained from Prosite documentation. Currently, Blocks 8.0 based on protein families documented in Prosite 12 consists of 2884 blocks representing 770 families. Searches of the Blocks Database are carried out using protein or DNA sequence queries, and results are returned with measures of significance for both single and multiple block hits. The databse has also proved useful for derivation of amino acid substitution matrices (the Blosum series) and other sets of parameters. WWW and E-mail servers provide access to the database and associated functions, including a block maker for sequences provided by the user. PMID:8743679

  6. The kappa opioid receptor agonist U-50488 blocks Ca2+ channels in a voltage-and G protein-independent manner in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Bassil; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Kappa opioid receptor (κ-OR) activation is known to play a role in analgesia and central sedation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of the κ-OR agonist, U-50488 (an arylacetamide), on Ca2+ channel currents and the signaling proteins involved in acutely isolated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons expressing the putative promoter region of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na+ channel (NaV 1.8) that is known to be involved in pain transmission. Methods Acutely isolated rat DRG neurons were transfected with cDNA coding for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), whose expression is driven by the Nav 1.8 promoter region. Thereafter, the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique was employed to record Ca2+ channel currents in neurons expressing EGFP. Results Exposure of EGFP-expressing DRG neurons to U-50488 (0.3 to 40 μM) led to voltage-independent inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents. The modulation of the Ca2+ currents did not appear to be mediated by the Gα protein subfamilies: Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq/11, Gα14 and Gαz. Furthermore, dialysis of the hydrolysis-resistant GDP analog, GDP-β-S (1 mM), did not affect the U-50488-mediated blocking effect, ruling out involvement of other G protein subunits. Finally, U-50488 (20 μM) blocked Ca2+ channels heterologously expressed in HeLa cells that do not express κ-OR. Conclusion These results suggest that the antinociceptive actions mediated by U-50488 are likely due to both a direct block of Ca2+ channels in sensory neurons as well as G protein modulation of Ca2+ currents via κ-OR-expressing neurons. PMID:23222359

  7. Dual stimuli-responsive coating designed through layer-by-layer assembly of PAA-b-PNIPAM block copolymers for the control of protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Osypova, A; Magnin, D; Sibret, P; Aqil, A; Jérôme, C; Dupont-Gillain, C; Pradier, C-M; Demoustier-Champagne, S; Landoulsi, J

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the successful construction, characteristics and interaction with proteins of stimuli-responsive thin nanostructured films prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) sequential assembly of PNIPAM-containing polyelectrolytes and PAH. PAA-b-PNIPAM block copolymers were synthesized in order to benefit from (i) the ionizable properties of PAA, to be involved in the LbL assembly, and (ii) the sensitivity of PNIPAM to temperature stimulus. The impact of parameters related to the structure and size of the macromolecules (their molecular weight and the relative degree of polymerization of PAA and PNIPAM), and the interaction with proteins under physico-chemical stimuli, such as pH and temperature, are carefully investigated. The incorporation of PAA-b-PNIPAM into multilayered films is shown to be successful whatever the block copolymer used, resulting in slightly thicker films than the corresponding (PAA/PAH)n film. Importantly, the protein adsorption studies demonstrate that it is possible to alter the adsorption behavior of proteins on (PAA-b-PNIPAM/PAH)n surfaces by varying the temperature and/or the pH of the medium, which seems to be intimately related to two key factors: (i) the ability of PNIPAM units to undergo conformational changes and (ii) the structural changes of the film made of weak polyelectrolytes. The simplicity of construction of these PNIPAM block copolymer-based LbL coatings on a large range of substrates, combined with their highly tunable features, make them ideal candidates to be employed for various biomedical applications requiring the control of protein adsorption. PMID:26338028

  8. Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus Coat Protein Is Essential for Cell-to-Cell and Long-Distance Movement but Not for Viral RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shengniao; Gil-Salas, Francisco M.; Tewary, Sunil Kumar; Samales, Ashwin Kuppusamy; Johnson, John; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP) functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G) in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G) in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G) were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G) was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G) inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro. PMID:25402344

  9. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out ... rectum and anus. Another name for stool is feces. It is made of what is left after ...

  10. Organic solvent-free low temperature method of preparation for self assembled amphiphilic poly(ϵ-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer based nanocarriers for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Payyappilly, Sanal Sebastian; Panja, Sudipta; Mandal, Pijush; Dhara, Santanu; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2015-11-01

    Degradation and denaturation of labile biomolecules during preparation of micelles by organic solvent at high temperature are some of the limitations for fabrication of advanced polymer based protein delivery systems. In this paper, effectiveness of heat-chill method for preparation of micelles containing large labile biomolecules was investigated using insulin as a model protein molecule. Micelles (average size, <120 nm) were prepared using amphiphilic diblock and triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL). Micelles were prepared by heating PEG-PCL block copolymers with distilled water at 60 °C followed by sudden chilling in an ice-water bath. Effects of molecular architecture on morphology, stability and protein loading capacity of micelles were investigated. Micelles prepared using high molecular weight block copolymers exhibited good colloidal stability, encapsulation efficiency and insulin release characteristics. Insulin retained its secondary structure after micelles preparation as confirmed by CD spectroscopic study. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity test suggested that the prepared micellar nanoparticles possessed biocompatibility. In a nut shell, heat-chill method of micellar nanoparticles preparation is well suited for encapsulating labile proteins and other allied biomolecules which degrade in presence of toxic organic solvents and at elevated temperatures. PMID:26291587

  11. AltMV TGB1 nucleolar localization requires homologous interaction and correlates with cell wall localization associated with cell-to-cell movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus has multifunctional triple gene block (TGB) proteins, among which our studies have focused on the properties of the TGB1 protein. The TGB1 of AltMV has functions including RNA binding, RNA silencing suppression, and cell-to-cell movement, and is known to for...

  12. The Plant-Specific Actin Binding Protein SCAB1 Stabilizes Actin Filaments and Regulates Stomatal Movement in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Shuangshuang; Mao, Tonglin; Qu, Xiaolu; Cao, Wanhong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wei; He, Liu; Li, Sidi; Ren, Sulin; Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhu, Guoli; Huang, Shanjin; Ye, Keqiong; Yuan, Ming; Guo, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Microfilament dynamics play a critical role in regulating stomatal movement; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. We report here the identification and characterization of STOMATAL CLOSURE-RELATED ACTIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (SCAB1), an Arabidopsis thaliana actin binding protein. Plants lacking SCAB1 were hypersensitive to drought stress and exhibited reduced abscisic acid-, H2O2-, and CaCl2-regulated stomatal movement. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that SCAB1 binds, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments. SCAB1 shares sequence similarity only with plant proteins and contains a previously undiscovered actin binding domain. During stomatal closure, actin filaments switched from a radial orientation in open stomata to a longitudinal orientation in closed stomata. This switch took longer in scab1 plants than in wild-type plants and was correlated with the delay in stomatal closure seen in scab1 mutants in response to drought stress. Our results suggest that SCAB1 is required for the precise regulation of actin filament reorganization during stomatal closure. PMID:21719691

  13. Measles virus V protein blocks Jak1-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 to escape IFN-{alpha}/{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Caignard, Gregory; Guerbois, Mathilde; Labernardiere, Jean-Louis; Jacob, Yves; Jones, Louis M.; Wild, Fabian; Tangy, Frederic Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2007-11-25

    Viruses have evolved various strategies to escape the antiviral activity of type I interferons (IFN-{alpha}/{beta}). For measles virus, this function is carried by the polycistronic gene P that encodes, by an unusual editing strategy, for the phosphoprotein P and the virulence factor V (MV-V). MV-V prevents STAT1 nuclear translocation by either sequestration or phosphorylation inhibition, thereby blocking IFN-{alpha}/{beta} pathway. We show that both the N- and C-terminal domains of MV-V (PNT and VCT) contribute to the inhibition of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} signaling. Using the two-hybrid system and co-affinity purification experiments, we identified STAT1 and Jak1 as interactors of MV-V and demonstrate that MV-V can block the direct phosphorylation of STAT1 by Jak1. A deleterious mutation within the PNT domain of MV-V (Y110H) impaired its ability to interact and block STAT1 phosphorylation. Thus, MV-V interacts with at least two components of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} receptor complex to block downstream signaling.

  14. Cauliflower mosaic virus gene VI product N-terminus contains regions involved in resistance-breakage, self-association and interactions with movement protein

    PubMed Central

    Hapiak, Michael; Li, Yongzhong; Agama, Keli; Swade, Shaddy; Okenka, Genevieve; Falk, Jessica; Khandekar, Sushant; Raikhy, Gaurav; Anderson, Alisha; Pollock, Justin; Zellner, Wendy; Schoelz, James; Leisner, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI encodes a multifunctional protein (P6) involved in the translation of viral RNA, the formation of inclusion bodies, and the determination of host range. Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Tsu-0 prevents the systemic spread of most CaMV isolates, including CM1841. However, CaMV isolate W260 overcomes this resistance. In this paper, the N-terminal 110 amino acids of P6 (termed D1) were identified as the resistance-breaking region. D1 also bound full-length P6. Furthermore, binding of W260 D1 to P6 induced higher β-galactosidase activity and better leucine-independent growth in the yeast two-hybrid system than its CM1841 counterpart. Thus, W260 may evade Tsu-0 resistance by mediating P6 self-association in a manner different from that of CM1841. Because Tsu-0 resistance prevents virus movement, interaction of P6 with P1 (CaMV movement protein) was investigated. Both yeast two-hybrid analyses and maltose-binding protein pull-down experiments show that P6 interacts with P1. Although neither half of P1 interacts with P6, the N-terminus of P6 binds P1. Interestingly, D1 by itself does not interact with P1, indicating that different portions of the P6 N-terminus are involved in different activities. The P1-P6 interactions suggest a role for P6 in virus transport, possibly by regulating P1 tubule formation or the assembly of movement complexes. PMID:18851998

  15. The capsid protein of Turnip crinkle virus overcomes two separate defense barriers to facilitate systemic movement of the virus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingxia; Ye, Xiaohong; Willie, Kristen; Lin, Junyan; Zhang, Xiuchun; Redinbaugh, Margaret G; Simon, Anne E; Morris, T Jack; Qu, Feng

    2010-08-01

    The capsid protein (CP) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is a multifunctional protein needed for virus assembly, suppression of RNA silencing-based antiviral defense, and long-distance movement in infected plants. In this report, we have examined genetic requirements for the different functions of TCV CP and evaluated the interdependence of these functions. A series of TCV mutants containing alterations in the CP coding region were generated. These alterations range from single-amino-acid substitutions and domain truncations to knockouts of CP translation. The latter category also contained two constructs in which the CP coding region was replaced by either the cDNA of a silencing suppressor of a different virus or that of green fluorescent protein. These mutants were used to infect Arabidopsis plants with diminished antiviral silencing capability (dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 plants). There was a strong correlation between the ability of mutants to reach systemic leaves and the silencing suppressor activity of mutant CP. Virus particles were not essential for entry of the viral genome into vascular bundles in the inoculated leaves in the absence of antiviral silencing. However, virus particles were necessary for egress of the viral genome from the vasculature of systemic leaves. Our experiments demonstrate that TCV CP not only allows the viral genome to access the systemic movement channel through silencing suppression but also ensures its smooth egress by way of assembled virus particles. These results illustrate that efficient long-distance movement of TCV requires both functions afforded by the CP. PMID:20504923

  16. Temporal and spatial distribution of Fos protein in the parabrachial nucleus neurons during experimental tooth movement of the rat molar.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, K; Maeda, T; Hanada, K; Wakisaka, S

    2001-07-27

    The present study was undertaken to reveal spatio-temporal changes in the distribution of Fos-like immunoreactive (-IR) neurons in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), one of the important relay nuclei for processing autonomic and somatosensory information from the oro-facial regions, following the induction of experimental tooth movement in rat upper molars. The experimental tooth movement was induced by the insertion of elastic rubber between the first and second upper molars. In normal animals, the PBN contained a smaller number of Fos-IR neurons. Following experimental tooth movement, the Fos-IR neurons increased in number significantly on both the ipsilateral and contralateral PBN, reaching a maximum at 4 h (about 10 times that of normal animals), and then decreased gradually. However, a significant number of Fos-IR neurons remained at 24 h post-operation. Remarkable side-by-side differences in the number of Fos-IR neurons were recognized at 1 to 4 h following the experimental tooth movement. Their number returned to normal (basal) levels at 5 days post. All subnuclei of PBN showed similar temporal changes in the number of Fos-IR neurons, this being particularly apparent in lateral PBN. Administrations of morphine (3 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) drastically reduced the induction of Fos-IR neurons in all subnuclei of both the ipsilateral and contralateral PBN in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was antagonized by pretreatment with naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.). The reduction of Fos-IR neurons by morphine pretreatment suggests that the appearance of Fos-IR neurons in the PBN may be partly due to the noxious stimulation and/or stress arising from tooth movement. The bilateral expression of Fos-IR neurons in the PBN indicates that the experimental tooth movement causes the activation of PBN neurons for the processing of somatosensory as well as autonomic information. The prolonged expression of Fos-IR neurons in all the subnuclei of bilateral PBN reflects clinical features of

  17. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  18. [Tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dakang; An, Xinye; Ji, Bing; Cheng, Yanli; Gao, Honglian; Tian, Mingming

    2016-06-01

    Objective To examine whether tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) is colocalized with micronuclei and investigate the influence on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis. Methods The eukaryotic expression vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed, identified and then transfected into HEK293T cells. With 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole 2HCI (DAPI) staining, the colocalization between TRIM34 and micronuclei was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Moreover, MitoTracker(R)Deep Red was used to identify the colocalization between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria under a confocal microscope. Finally, the effect of TRIM34 on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis was examined. Results DNA sequencing confirmed that the vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed successfully. A fluorescence microscope revealed that TRIM34 could be colocalized with micronuclei in HEK293T cells transfected with TRIM34-pEGFP-N3. In the same manner, a confocal microscope distinctly showed that TRIM34 was colocalized with micronuclei similarly in appearance. However, there was no distinguished colocalization relationship between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria. Interestingly, the micronuclei chromosome conjugated with TRIM34 was hardly transferred to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis. Conclusion TRIM34 is colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate in mitosis. PMID:27371841

  19. Drug-induced long QT syndrome: hERG K+ channel block and disruption of protein trafficking by fluoxetine and norfluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, S; Eckhardt, L L; Valdivia, C R; Klemens, C A; Gillman, B M; Anderson, C L; Holzem, K M; Delisle, B P; Anson, B D; Makielski, J C; January, C T

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Fluoxetine (Prozac®) is a widely prescribed drug in adults and children, and it has an active metabolite, norfluoxetine, with a prolonged elimination time. Although uncommon, Prozac causes QT interval prolongation and arrhythmias; a patient who took an overdose of Prozac exhibited a prolonged QT interval (QTc 625 msec). We looked for possible mechanisms underlying this clinical finding by analysing the effects of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine on ion channels in vitro. Experimental approach: We studied the effects of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine on the electrophysiology and cellular trafficking of hERG K+ and SCN5A Na+ channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Key results: Voltage clamp analyses employing square pulse or ventricular action potential waveform protocols showed that fluoxetine and norfluoxetine caused direct, concentration-dependent, block of hERG current (IhERG). Biochemical studies showed that both compounds also caused concentration-dependent reductions in the trafficking of hERG channel protein into the cell surface membrane. Fluoxetine had no effect on SCN5A channel or HEK293 cell endogenous current. Mutations in the hERG channel drug binding domain reduced fluoxetine block of IhERG but did not alter fluoxetine's effect on hERG channel protein trafficking. Conclusions and implications: Our findings show that both fluoxetine and norfluoxetine at similar concentrations selectively reduce IhERG by two mechanisms, (1) direct channel block, and (2) indirectly by disrupting channel protein trafficking. These two effects are not mediated by a single drug binding site. Our findings add complexity to understanding the mechanisms that cause drug-induced long QT syndrome. PMID:16967046

  20. Genetic screen of a mutant poxvirus library identifies an ankyrin repeat protein involved in blocking induction of avian type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, Stephen M; Robey, Rebecca; Davies, Marc; Giotis, Efstathios S; Ross, Craig; Buttigieg, Karen; Goodbourn, Stephen; Skinner, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Mammalian poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VACV), have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade the host type I interferon (IFN) responses at different levels, with viral proteins targeting IFN induction, signaling, and antiviral effector functions. Avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses), which have been developed as recombinant vaccine vectors for permissive (i.e., poultry) and nonpermissive (i.e., mammals, including humans) species, encode no obvious equivalents of any of these proteins. We show that fowlpox virus (FWPV) fails to induce chicken beta IFN (ChIFN2) and is able to block its induction by transfected poly(I·C), an analog of cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). A broad-scale loss-of-function genetic screen was used to find FWPV-encoded modulators of poly(I·C)-mediated ChIFN2 induction. It identified fpv012, a member of a family of poxvirus genes highly expanded in the avipoxviruses (31 in FWPV; 51 in canarypox virus [CNPV], representing 15% of the total gene complement), encoding proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. Under ectopic expression, the first ANK of fpv012 is dispensable for inhibitory activity and the CNPV ortholog is also able to inhibit induction of ChIFN2. FWPV defective in fpv012 replicates well in culture and barely induces ChIFN2 during infection, suggesting that other factors are involved in blocking IFN induction and resisting the antiviral effectors. Nevertheless, unlike parental and revertant viruses, the mutants induce moderate levels of expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), suggesting either that there is sufficient ChIFN2 expression to partially induce the ISGs or the involvement of alternative, IFN-independent pathways that are also normally blocked by fpv012. PMID:23427153

  1. Genetic Screen of a Mutant Poxvirus Library Identifies an Ankyrin Repeat Protein Involved in Blocking Induction of Avian Type I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Robey, Rebecca; Davies, Marc; Giotis, Efstathios S.; Ross, Craig; Buttigieg, Karen; Goodbourn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VACV), have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade the host type I interferon (IFN) responses at different levels, with viral proteins targeting IFN induction, signaling, and antiviral effector functions. Avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses), which have been developed as recombinant vaccine vectors for permissive (i.e., poultry) and nonpermissive (i.e., mammals, including humans) species, encode no obvious equivalents of any of these proteins. We show that fowlpox virus (FWPV) fails to induce chicken beta IFN (ChIFN2) and is able to block its induction by transfected poly(I·C), an analog of cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). A broad-scale loss-of-function genetic screen was used to find FWPV-encoded modulators of poly(I·C)-mediated ChIFN2 induction. It identified fpv012, a member of a family of poxvirus genes highly expanded in the avipoxviruses (31 in FWPV; 51 in canarypox virus [CNPV], representing 15% of the total gene complement), encoding proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. Under ectopic expression, the first ANK of fpv012 is dispensable for inhibitory activity and the CNPV ortholog is also able to inhibit induction of ChIFN2. FWPV defective in fpv012 replicates well in culture and barely induces ChIFN2 during infection, suggesting that other factors are involved in blocking IFN induction and resisting the antiviral effectors. Nevertheless, unlike parental and revertant viruses, the mutants induce moderate levels of expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), suggesting either that there is sufficient ChIFN2 expression to partially induce the ISGs or the involvement of alternative, IFN-independent pathways that are also normally blocked by fpv012. PMID:23427153

  2. Get3 is a holdase chaperone and moves to deposition sites for aggregated proteins when membrane targeting is blocked

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Katie; Schrul, Bianca; Tienson, Heather; Gostimskaya, Irina; Breker, Michal; High, Stephen; Schuldiner, Maya; Jakob, Ursula; Schwappach, Blanche

    2013-01-01

    Summary The endomembrane system of yeast contains different tail-anchored proteins that are post-translationally targeted to membranes via their C-terminal transmembrane domain. This hydrophobic segment could be hazardous in the cytosol if membrane insertion fails, resulting in the need for energy-dependent chaperoning and the degradation of aggregated tail-anchored proteins. A cascade of GET proteins cooperates in a conserved pathway to accept newly synthesized tail-anchored proteins from ribosomes and guide them to a receptor at the endoplasmic reticulum, where membrane integration takes place. It is, however, unclear how the GET system reacts to conditions of energy depletion that might prevent membrane insertion and hence lead to the accumulation of hydrophobic proteins in the cytosol. Here we show that the ATPase Get3, which accommodates the hydrophobic tail anchor of clients, has a dual function: promoting tail-anchored protein insertion when glucose is abundant and serving as an ATP-independent holdase chaperone during energy depletion. Like the generic chaperones Hsp42, Ssa2, Sis1 and Hsp104, we found that Get3 moves reversibly to deposition sites for protein aggregates, hence supporting the sequestration of tail-anchored proteins under conditions that prevent tail-anchored protein insertion. Our findings support a ubiquitous role for the cytosolic GET complex as a triaging platform involved in cellular proteostasis. PMID:23203805

  3. G protein-gated IKACh channels as therapeutic targets for treatment of sick sinus syndrome and heart block

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Bidaud, Isabelle; Briec, François; Evain, Stéphane; Torrente, Angelo G.; Le Quang, Khai; Leoni, Anne-Laure; Baudot, Matthias; Marger, Laurine; Chung You Chong, Antony; Nargeot, Joël; Striessnig, Joerg; Wickman, Kevin; Charpentier, Flavien; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of pacemaker activity in the sinoatrial node (SAN) underlies “sick sinus” syndrome (SSS), a common clinical condition characterized by abnormally low heart rate (bradycardia). If untreated, SSS carries potentially life-threatening symptoms, such as syncope and end-stage organ hypoperfusion. The only currently available therapy for SSS consists of electronic pacemaker implantation. Mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 Ca2+ channels (Cav1.3−/−) recapitulate several symptoms of SSS in humans, including bradycardia and atrioventricular (AV) dysfunction (heart block). Here, we tested whether genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of the muscarinic-gated K+ channel (IKACh) could rescue SSS and heart block in Cav1.3−/− mice. We found that genetic inactivation of IKACh abolished SSS symptoms in Cav1.3−/− mice without reducing the relative degree of heart rate regulation. Rescuing of SAN and AV dysfunction could be obtained also by pharmacological inhibition of IKACh either in Cav1.3−/− mice or following selective inhibition of Cav1.3-mediated L-type Ca2+ (ICa,L) current in vivo. Ablation of IKACh prevented dysfunction of SAN pacemaker activity by allowing net inward current to flow during the diastolic depolarization phase under cholinergic activation. Our data suggest that patients affected by SSS and heart block may benefit from IKACh suppression achieved by gene therapy or selective pharmacological inhibition. PMID:26831068

  4. Antibodies Directed against Shiga-Toxin Producing Escherichia coli Serotype O103 Type III Secreted Proteins Block Adherence of Heterologous STEC Serotypes to HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Desin, Taseen S.; Townsend, Hugh G.; Potter, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O103 is a zoonotic pathogen that is capable of causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. The main animal reservoir for STEC is ruminants and hence reducing the levels of this pathogen in cattle could ultimately lower the risk of STEC infection in humans. During the process of infection, STECO103 uses a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) to secrete effector proteins (T3SPs) that result in the formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions. Vaccination of cattle with STEC serotype O157 T3SPs has previously been shown to be effective in reducing shedding of STECO157 in a serotype-specific manner. In this study, we tested the ability of rabbit polyclonal sera against individual STECO103 T3SPs to block adherence of the organism to HEp-2 cells. Our results demonstrate that pooled sera against EspA, EspB, EspF, NleA and Tir significantly lowered the adherence of STECO103 relative to pre-immune sera. Likewise, pooled anti-STECO103 sera were also able to block adherence by STECO157. Vaccination of mice with STECO103 recombinant proteins induced strong IgG antibody responses against EspA, EspB, NleA and Tir but not against EspF. However, the vaccine did not affect fecal shedding of STECO103 compared to the PBS vaccinated group over the duration of the experiment. Cross reactivity studies using sera against STECO103 recombinant proteins revealed a high degree of cross reactivity with STECO26 and STECO111 proteins implying that sera against STECO103 proteins could potentially provide neutralization of attachment to epithelial cells by heterologous STEC serotypes. PMID:26451946

  5. Antibodies Directed against Shiga-Toxin Producing Escherichia coli Serotype O103 Type III Secreted Proteins Block Adherence of Heterologous STEC Serotypes to HEp-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Desin, Taseen S; Townsend, Hugh G; Potter, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O103 is a zoonotic pathogen that is capable of causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. The main animal reservoir for STEC is ruminants and hence reducing the levels of this pathogen in cattle could ultimately lower the risk of STEC infection in humans. During the process of infection, STECO103 uses a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) to secrete effector proteins (T3SPs) that result in the formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions. Vaccination of cattle with STEC serotype O157 T3SPs has previously been shown to be effective in reducing shedding of STECO157 in a serotype-specific manner. In this study, we tested the ability of rabbit polyclonal sera against individual STECO103 T3SPs to block adherence of the organism to HEp-2 cells. Our results demonstrate that pooled sera against EspA, EspB, EspF, NleA and Tir significantly lowered the adherence of STECO103 relative to pre-immune sera. Likewise, pooled anti-STECO103 sera were also able to block adherence by STECO157. Vaccination of mice with STECO103 recombinant proteins induced strong IgG antibody responses against EspA, EspB, NleA and Tir but not against EspF. However, the vaccine did not affect fecal shedding of STECO103 compared to the PBS vaccinated group over the duration of the experiment. Cross reactivity studies using sera against STECO103 recombinant proteins revealed a high degree of cross reactivity with STECO26 and STECO111 proteins implying that sera against STECO103 proteins could potentially provide neutralization of attachment to epithelial cells by heterologous STEC serotypes. PMID:26451946

  6. Movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Stoessl, A Jon; Mckeown, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders can be hypokinetic (e.g., parkinsonism), hyperkinetic, or dystonic in nature and commonly arise from altered function in nuclei of the basal ganglia or their connections. As obvious structural changes are often limited, standard imaging plays less of a role than in other neurologic disorders. However, structural imaging is indicated where clinical presentation is atypical, particularly if the disorder is abrupt in onset or remains strictly unilateral. More recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may allow for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and atypical forms of parkinsonism. Functional imaging can assess regional cerebral blood flow (functional MRI (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)), cerebral glucose metabolism (PET), neurochemical and neuroreceptor status (PET and SPECT), and pathologic processes such as inflammation or abnormal protein deposition (PET) (Table 49.1). Cerebral blood flow can be assessed at rest, during the performance of motor or cognitive tasks, or in response to a variety of stimuli. In appropriate situations, the correct imaging modality and/or combination of modalities can be used to detect early disease or even preclinical disease, and to monitor disease progression and the effects of disease-modifying interventions. Various approaches are reviewed here. PMID:27430452

  7. The movement protein (NSm) of Tomato spotted wilt virus is the avirulence determinant in the tomato Sw-5 gene-based resistance.

    PubMed

    Peiró, Ana; Cañizares, M Carmen; Rubio, Luis; López, Carmelo; Moriones, Enrique; Aramburu, José; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The avirulence determinant triggering the resistance conferred by the tomato gene Sw-5 against Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Sequence comparison showed two substitutions (C118Y and T120N) in the movement protein NSm present only in TSWV resistance-breaking (RB) isolates. In this work, transient expression of NSm of three TSWV isolates [RB1 (T120N), RB2 (C118Y) and non-resistance-breaking (NRB)] in Nicotiana benthamiana expressing Sw-5 showed a hypersensitive response (HR) only with NRB. Exchange of the movement protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) with NSm supported cell-to-cell and systemic transport of the chimeric AMV RNAs into N. tabacum with or without Sw-5, except for the constructs with NBR when Sw-5 was expressed, although RB2 showed reduced cell-to-cell transport. Mutational analysis revealed that N120 was sufficient to avoid the HR, but the substitution V130I was required for systemic transport. Finally, co-inoculation of RB and NRB AMV chimeric constructs showed different prevalence of RB or NBR depending on the presence or absence of Sw-5. These results indicate that NSm is the avirulence determinant for Sw-5 resistance, and mutations C118Y and T120N are responsible for resistance breakdown and have a fitness penalty in the context of the heterologous AMV system. PMID:24690181

  8. Escherichia coli cytolethal distending toxin blocks the HeLa cell cycle at the G2/M transition by preventing cdc2 protein kinase dephosphorylation and activation.

    PubMed Central

    Comayras, C; Tasca, C; Pérès, S Y; Ducommun, B; Oswald, E; De Rycke, J

    1997-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDT) constitute an emerging heterogeneous family of bacterial toxins whose common biological property is to inhibit the proliferation of cells in culture by blocking their cycle at G2/M phase. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the block caused by CDT from Escherichia coli on synchronized HeLa cell cultures. To this end, we studied specifically the behavior of the two subunits of the complex that determines entry into mitosis, i.e., cyclin B1, the regulatory unit, and cdc2 protein kinase, the catalytic unit. We thus demonstrate that CDT causes cell accumulation in G2 and not in M, that it does not slow the progression of cells through S phase, and that it does not affect the normal increase of cyclin B1 from late S to G2. On the other hand, we show that CDT inhibits the kinase activity of cdc2 by preventing its dephosphorylation, an event which, in normal cells, triggers mitosis. This inhibitory activity was demonstrated for the three partially related CDTs so far described for E. coli. Moreover, we provide evidence that cells exposed to CDT during G2 and M phases are blocked only at the subsequent G2 phase. This observation means that the toxin triggers a mechanism of cell arrest that is initiated in S phase and therefore possibly related to the DNA damage checkpoint system. PMID:9393800

  9. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the Parkinson’s disease associated protein α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating-protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson’s disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically-relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory-effect on α-synuclein aggregation, whilst not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation. PMID:26492012

  10. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roehrig, John T.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M.; Bennett, Susan L.; Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  11. G Protein Beta 5 Is Targeted to D2-Dopamine Receptor-Containing Biochemical Compartments and Blocks Dopamine-Dependent Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Octeau, J. Christopher; Schrader, Joseph M.; Masuho, Ikuo; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aiudi, Christopher; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kovoor, Abraham; Celver, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    G beta 5 (Gbeta5, Gβ5) is a unique G protein β subunit that is thought to be expressed as an obligate heterodimer with R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins instead of with G gamma (Gγ) subunits. We found that D2-dopamine receptor (D2R) coexpression enhances the expression of Gβ5, but not that of the G beta 1 (Gβ1) subunit, in HEK293 cells, and that the enhancement of expression occurs through a stabilization of Gβ5 protein. We had previously demonstrated that the vast majority of D2R either expressed endogenously in the brain or exogenously in cell lines segregates into detergent-resistant biochemical fractions. We report that when expressed alone in HEK293 cells, Gβ5 is highly soluble, but is retargeted to the detergent-resistant fraction after D2R coexpression. Furthermore, an in-cell biotin transfer proximity assay indicated that D2R and Gβ5 segregating into the detergent-resistant fraction specifically interacted in intact living cell membranes. Dopamine-induced D2R internalization was blocked by coexpression of Gβ5, but not Gβ1. However, the same Gβ5 coexpression levels had no effect on agonist-induced internalization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR), cell surface D2R levels, dopamine-mediated recruitment of β-arrestin to D2R, the amplitude of D2R-G protein coupling, or the deactivation kinetics of D2R-activated G protein signals. The latter data suggest that the interactions between D2R and Gβ5 are not mediated by endogenously expressed R7 RGS proteins. PMID:25162404

  12. G protein beta 5 is targeted to D2-dopamine receptor-containing biochemical compartments and blocks dopamine-dependent receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Octeau, J Christopher; Schrader, Joseph M; Masuho, Ikuo; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aiudi, Christopher; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kovoor, Abraham; Celver, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    G beta 5 (Gbeta5, Gβ5) is a unique G protein β subunit that is thought to be expressed as an obligate heterodimer with R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins instead of with G gamma (Gγ) subunits. We found that D2-dopamine receptor (D2R) coexpression enhances the expression of Gβ5, but not that of the G beta 1 (Gβ1) subunit, in HEK293 cells, and that the enhancement of expression occurs through a stabilization of Gβ5 protein. We had previously demonstrated that the vast majority of D2R either expressed endogenously in the brain or exogenously in cell lines segregates into detergent-resistant biochemical fractions. We report that when expressed alone in HEK293 cells, Gβ5 is highly soluble, but is retargeted to the detergent-resistant fraction after D2R coexpression. Furthermore, an in-cell biotin transfer proximity assay indicated that D2R and Gβ5 segregating into the detergent-resistant fraction specifically interacted in intact living cell membranes. Dopamine-induced D2R internalization was blocked by coexpression of Gβ5, but not Gβ1. However, the same Gβ5 coexpression levels had no effect on agonist-induced internalization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR), cell surface D2R levels, dopamine-mediated recruitment of β-arrestin to D2R, the amplitude of D2R-G protein coupling, or the deactivation kinetics of D2R-activated G protein signals. The latter data suggest that the interactions between D2R and Gβ5 are not mediated by endogenously expressed R7 RGS proteins. PMID:25162404

  13. F-actin asymmetry and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated TCC-1 protein contribute to stereotypic spindle movements in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Berends, Christian W H; Muñoz, Javier; Portegijs, Vincent; Schmidt, Ruben; Grigoriev, Ilya; Boxem, Mike; Akhmanova, Anna; Heck, Albert J R; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2013-07-01

    The microtubule spindle apparatus dictates the plane of cell cleavage in animal cells. During development, dividing cells control the position of the spindle to determine the size, location, and fate of daughter cells. Spindle positioning depends on pulling forces that act between the cell periphery and astral microtubules. This involves dynein recruitment to the cell cortex by a heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit in complex with a TPR-GoLoco motif protein (GPR-1/2, Pins, LGN) and coiled-coil protein (LIN-5, Mud, NuMA). In this study, we searched for additional factors that contribute to spindle positioning in the one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. We show that cortical actin is not needed for Gα-GPR-LIN-5 localization and pulling force generation. Instead, actin accumulation in the anterior actually reduces pulling forces, possibly by increasing cortical rigidity. Examining membrane-associated proteins that copurified with GOA-1 Gα, we found that the transmembrane and coiled-coil domain protein 1 (TCC-1) contributes to proper spindle movements. TCC-1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and interacts with UNC-116 kinesin-1 heavy chain in yeast two-hybrid assays. RNA interference of tcc-1 and unc-116 causes similar defects in meiotic spindle positioning, supporting the concept of TCC-1 acting with kinesin-1 in vivo. These results emphasize the contribution of membrane-associated and cortical proteins other than Gα-GPR-LIN-5 in balancing the pulling forces that position the spindle during asymmetric cell division. PMID:23699393

  14. F-actin asymmetry and the endoplasmic reticulum–associated TCC-1 protein contribute to stereotypic spindle movements in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo

    PubMed Central

    Berends, Christian W. H.; Muñoz, Javier; Portegijs, Vincent; Schmidt, Ruben; Grigoriev, Ilya; Boxem, Mike; Akhmanova, Anna; Heck, Albert J. R.; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule spindle apparatus dictates the plane of cell cleavage in animal cells. During development, dividing cells control the position of the spindle to determine the size, location, and fate of daughter cells. Spindle positioning depends on pulling forces that act between the cell periphery and astral microtubules. This involves dynein recruitment to the cell cortex by a heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit in complex with a TPR-GoLoco motif protein (GPR-1/2, Pins, LGN) and coiled-coil protein (LIN-5, Mud, NuMA). In this study, we searched for additional factors that contribute to spindle positioning in the one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. We show that cortical actin is not needed for Gα–GPR–LIN-5 localization and pulling force generation. Instead, actin accumulation in the anterior actually reduces pulling forces, possibly by increasing cortical rigidity. Examining membrane-associated proteins that copurified with GOA-1 Gα, we found that the transmembrane and coiled-coil domain protein 1 (TCC-1) contributes to proper spindle movements. TCC-1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and interacts with UNC-116 kinesin-1 heavy chain in yeast two-hybrid assays. RNA interference of tcc-1 and unc-116 causes similar defects in meiotic spindle positioning, supporting the concept of TCC-1 acting with kinesin-1 in vivo. These results emphasize the contribution of membrane-associated and cortical proteins other than Gα–GPR–LIN-5 in balancing the pulling forces that position the spindle during asymmetric cell division. PMID:23699393

  15. Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte S.; Thomsen, Rasmus P.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Christensen, Niels Johan; Kjems, Jørgen; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Wengel, Jesper; Jensen, Knud J.

    2016-07-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain formation have never been realized for de novo protein design. Here, we show the applicability of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates for self-assembly of higher-ordered protein-like structures. The resulting nano-assemblies were characterized by ultraviolet-melting, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed the formation of the desired triple helix and coiled coil domains at low concentrations, while a dimer of trimers was dominating at high concentration. CD spectroscopy showed an extraordinarily high degree of α-helicity for the peptide moieties in the assemblies. The results validate the use of orthogonal self-assembly principles as a paradigm for de novo protein design.

  16. Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic.

    PubMed

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Madsen, Charlotte S; Thomsen, Rasmus P; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Christensen, Niels Johan; Kjems, Jørgen; Thulstrup, Peter W; Wengel, Jesper; Jensen, Knud J

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain formation have never been realized for de novo protein design. Here, we show the applicability of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates for self-assembly of higher-ordered protein-like structures. The resulting nano-assemblies were characterized by ultraviolet-melting, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed the formation of the desired triple helix and coiled coil domains at low concentrations, while a dimer of trimers was dominating at high concentration. CD spectroscopy showed an extraordinarily high degree of α-helicity for the peptide moieties in the assemblies. The results validate the use of orthogonal self-assembly principles as a paradigm for de novo protein design. PMID:27464951

  17. Peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte S.; Thomsen, Rasmus P.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Christensen, Niels Johan; Kjems, Jørgen; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Wengel, Jesper; Jensen, Knud J.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain formation have never been realized for de novo protein design. Here, we show the applicability of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates for self-assembly of higher-ordered protein-like structures. The resulting nano-assemblies were characterized by ultraviolet-melting, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed the formation of the desired triple helix and coiled coil domains at low concentrations, while a dimer of trimers was dominating at high concentration. CD spectroscopy showed an extraordinarily high degree of α-helicity for the peptide moieties in the assemblies. The results validate the use of orthogonal self-assembly principles as a paradigm for de novo protein design. PMID:27464951

  18. A protein kinase inhibitor, H-7, blocks naloxone-precipitated changes in dopamine and its metabolites in the brains of opioid-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, S; Ho, I K; Yamamoto, T

    2000-07-15

    The influence of an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C, H-7 [1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine], on naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist)-precipitated withdrawal signs and changes in levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites in morphine- or butorphanol-dependent rats was investigated. Animals were infused continuously with morphine (a mu-opioid receptor agonist) or butorphanol (a mu/delta/kappa mixed opioid receptor agonist) for 3 days. Naloxone precipitated withdrawal syndrome and decreased the levels of DA in the cortex, striatum, and midbrain; 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the cortex, striatum, limbic areas, and midbrain; and homovanilic acid (HVA) in the striatum, limbic areas, and midbrain regions. In animals rendered dependent on butorphanol, the results obtained were similar to those of morphine-dependent rats except for the changes in DOPAC levels. Concomitant infusion of H-7 and opioid blocked both the expression of withdrawal signs and the decreases in DA, DOPAC, and HVA levels in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the enhancement of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and/or protein kinase C activity accompanying the increase of DA neuron activity during continuous infusion of opioids leads to an abrupt reduction in levels of DA and its metabolites precipitated by naloxone, which is intimately involved in the expression of physical dependence on opioids. PMID:10922515

  19. Loss of the Sec1/Munc18-family proteins VPS-33.2 and VPS-33.1 bypasses a block in endosome maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Solinger, Jachen A.; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The end of the life of a transport vesicle requires a complex series of tethering, docking, and fusion events. Tethering complexes play a crucial role in the recognition of membrane entities and bringing them into close opposition, thereby coordinating and controlling cellular trafficking events. Here we provide a comprehensive RNA interference analysis of the CORVET and HOPS tethering complexes in metazoans. Knockdown of CORVET components promoted RAB-7 recruitment to subapical membranes, whereas in HOPS knockdowns, RAB-5 was found also on membrane structures close to the cell center, indicating the RAB conversion might be impaired in the absence of these tethering complexes. Unlike in yeast, metazoans have two VPS33 homologues, which are Sec1/Munc18 (SM)-family proteins involved in the regulation of membrane fusion. We assume that in wild type, each tethering complex contains a specific SM protein but that they may be able to substitute for each other in case of absence of the other. Of importance, knockdown of both SM proteins allowed bypass of the endosome maturation block in sand-1 mutants. We propose a model in which the SM proteins in tethering complexes are required for coordinated flux of material through the endosomal system. PMID:25273556

  20. BET protein Brd4 activates transcription in neurons and BET inhibitor Jq1 blocks memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Erica; Herre, Margo; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Darnell, Robert B.; Allis, C. David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Precise regulation of transcription is crucial for the cellular mechanisms underlying memory formation. However, the link between neuronal stimulation and the proteins that directly interact with histone modifications to activate transcription in neurons remains unclear. Brd4 is a member of the BET protein family, which binds acetylated histones and has a critical role in numerous cell types in regulating transcription, including in the response to external cues. Small molecule BET inhibitors are in clinical trials, yet almost nothing is known about Brd4 function in the brain. Here we show that Brd4 is a key player in neuronal function and mediates the transcriptional regulation underlying learning and memory. The loss of Brd4 function affects critical synaptic proteins, which results in memory deficits in mice but also decreases seizure susceptibility. Thus, Brd4 provides a critical, and previously uncharacterized, link between neuronal activation and the transcriptional responses that occur during memory formation. PMID:26301327

  1. The Potato Virus X TGBp2 Movement Protein Associates with Endoplasmic Reticulum-Derived Vesicles during Virus Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ho-Jong; Samuels, Timmy D.; Wang, Yuh-Shuh; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2005-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was fused to the potato virus X (PVX) TGBp2 gene, inserted into either the PVX infectious clone or pRTL2 plasmids, and used to study protein subcellular targeting. In protoplasts and plants inoculated with PVX-GFP:TGBp2 or transfected with pRTL2-GFP:TGBp2, fluorescence was mainly in vesicles and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During late stages of virus infection, fluorescence became increasingly cytosolic and nuclear. Protoplasts transfected with PVX-GFP:TGBp2 or pRTL2-GFP:TGBp2 were treated with cycloheximide and the decline of GFP fluorescence was greater in virus-infected protoplasts than in pRTL2-GFP:TGBp2-transfected protoplasts. Thus, protein instability is enhanced in virus-infected protoplasts, which may account for the cytosolic and nuclear fluorescence during late stages of infection. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy were used to further characterize the GFP:TGBp2-induced vesicles. Label was associated with the ER and vesicles, but not the Golgi apparatus. The TGBp2-induced vesicles appeared to be ER derived. For comparison, plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp3 were transfected to protoplasts, bombarded to tobacco leaves, and studied in transgenic leaves. The GFP:TGBp3 proteins were associated mainly with the ER and did not cause obvious changes in the endomembrane architecture, suggesting that the vesicles reported in GFP:TGBp2 studies were induced by the PVX TGBp2 protein. In double-labeling studies using confocal microscopy, fluorescence was associated with actin filaments, but not with Golgi vesicles. We propose a model in which reorganization of the ER and increased protein degradation is linked to plasmodesmata gating. PMID:16055678

  2. Stomatal development and movement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Kun; Liu, Yu-Bo; Zhang, Mao-Ying

    2010-01-01

    Stomata are epidermal pores on plant surface used for gas exchange with the atmosphere. Stomatal development and movement are regulated by environmental and internal signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are universal transducers of extracellular signals among all eukaryotes. In plant, MAPK cascades regulate diverse cellular processes occurring during the whole ontogenetic plant life and ranging from normal cell proliferation to stress-inducing plant-to-environment interactions. Recent reports reveal that MAPK signaling is involved in both stomatal development and movement. This mini-review summarizes the roles of MAPK signaling in stomatal development and movement. How MAPK specificity is maintained in stomatal development and movement is also discussed. PMID:20855958

  3. Augmented DNA-binding activity of p53 protein encoded by a carboxyl-terminal alternatively spliced mRNA is blocked by p53 protein encoded by the regularly spliced form.

    PubMed Central

    Wolkowicz, R; Peled, A; Elkind, N B; Rotter, V

    1995-01-01

    DNA-binding activity of the wild-type p53 is central to its function in vivo. However, recombinant or in vitro translated wild-type p53 proteins, unless modified, are poor DNA binders. The fact that the in vitro produced protein gains DNA-binding activity upon modification at the C terminus raises the possibility that similar mechanisms may exist in the cell. Data presented here show that a C-terminal alternatively spliced wild-type p53 (ASp53) mRNA expressed by bacteria or transcribed in vitro codes for a p53 protein that efficiently binds DNA. Our results support the conclusion that the augmented DNA binding activity of an ASp53 protein is probably due to attenuation of the negative effect residing at the C terminus of the wild-type p53 protein encoded by the regularly spliced mRNA (RSp53) rather than acquisition of additional functionality by the alternatively spliced C' terminus. In addition, we found that ASp53 forms a complex with the non-DNA-binding RSp53, which in turn blocks the DNA-binding activity of ASp53. Interaction between these two wild-type p53 proteins may underline a mechanism that controls the activity of the wild-type p53 protein in the cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624329

  4. Blocking of G1/S transition and cell death in the regenerating liver of Hepatitis B virus X protein transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, B.-K.; Li, C.-C.; Chen, H.-J.; Chang, J.-L.; Jeng, K.-S.; Chou, C.-K.; Hsu, M.-T.; Tsai, T.-F. . E-mail: tftsai@ym.edu.tw

    2006-02-17

    The Hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein has been strongly implicated in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, effects of the HBx protein on cell proliferation and cell death are controversial. This study investigates the effects of the HBx protein on liver regeneration in two independent lines of HBx transgenic mice, which developed HCC at around 14 to 16 months of age. High mortality, lower liver mass restoration, and impaired liver regeneration were found in the HBx transgenic mice post-hepatectomy. The levels of alanine aminotransferase and {alpha}-fetoprotein detected post-hepatectomy increased significantly in the HBx transgenic livers, indicating that they were more susceptible to damage during the regenerative process. Prolonged activation of the immediate-early genes in the HBx transgenic livers suggested that the HBx protein creates a strong effect by promoting the transition of the quiescent hepatocytes from G0 to G1 phase. However, impaired DNA synthesis and mitosis, as well as inhibited activation of G1, S, and G2/M markers, were detected. These results indicated that HBx protein exerted strong growth arrest on hepatocytes and imbalanced cell-cycle progression resulting in the abnormal cell death; this was accompanied by severe fat accumulation and impaired glycogen storage in the HBx transgenic livers. In conclusion, this study provides First physiological evidence that HBx protein blocks G1/S transition of the hepatocyte cell-cycle progression and causes both a failure of liver functionality and cell death in the regenerating liver of the HBx transgenic mice.

  5. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  6. Rapamycin blocks leucine-induced protein synthesis by suppressing mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle in the neonate grows at a rapid rate due in part to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine (Leu). To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Leu stimulates protein synthesis in neonatal muscle, overnight fasted 7-day-old piglets were...

  7. Nature’s favorite building block: Deciphering folding and capsid assembly of proteins with the HK97-fold

    PubMed Central

    Suhanovsky, Margaret M.; Teschke, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary For many (if not all) bacterial and archaeal tailed viruses and eukaryotic Herpesvirdae the HK97-fold serves as the major architectural element in icosahedral capsid formation while still enabling the conformational flexibility required during assembly and maturation. Auxiliary proteins or Δ-domains strictly control assembly of multiple, identical, HK97-like subunits into procapsids with specific icosahedral symmetries, rather than aberrant non-icosahedral structures. Procapsids are precursor structures that mature into capsids in a process involving release of auxiliary proteins (or cleavage of Δ-domains), dsDNA packaging, and conformational rearrangement of the HK97-like subunits. Some coat proteins built on the ubiquitous HK97-fold also have accessory domains or loops that impart specific functions, such as increased monomer, procapsid, or capsid stability. In this review, we analyze the numerous HK97-like coat protein structures that are emerging in the literature (over 40 at time of writing) by comparing their topology, additional domains, and their assembly and misassembly reactions. PMID:25864106

  8. Identification of a heparin-binding protein using monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to porcine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, W A; Granzow, C A; Getts, L A; Thomas, S C; Zotter, L M; Gunzel, K A; Lowe-Krentz, L J

    1995-01-01

    The binding of heparin or heparan sulphate to a variety of cell types results in specific changes in cell function. Endothelial cells treated with heparin alter their synthesis of heparan sulphate proteoglycans and extracellular matrix proteins. In order to identify a putative endothelial cell heparin receptor that could be involved in heparin signalling, anti-(endothelial cell) monoclonal antibodies that significantly inhibit heparin binding to endothelial cells were prepared. Four of these antibodies were employed in affinity-chromatographic isolation of a heparin-binding protein from detergent-solubilized endothelial cells. The heparin-binding protein isolated from porcine aortic endothelial cells using four different monoclonal antibodies has an M(r) of 45,000 assessed by SDS/PAGE. The 45,000-M(r) heparin-binding polypeptide is isolated as a multimer. The antibody-isolated protein binds to heparin-affinity columns as does the pure 45,000-M(r) polypeptide, consistent with its identification as a putative endothelial heparin receptor. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487882

  9. Localized Movement and Levels of 53BP1 Protein Are Changed by γ-irradiation in PML Deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Malyšková, Barbora; Küntziger, Thomas; Collas, Philippe; Cmarko, Dušan; Raška, Ivan; Sorokin, Dmitry V; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva

    2016-11-01

    We studied epigenetics, distribution pattern, kinetics, and diffusion of proteins recruited to spontaneous and γ-radiation-induced DNA lesions. We showed that PML deficiency leads to an increased number of DNA lesions, which was accompanied by changes in histone signature. In PML wt cells, we observed two mobile fractions of 53BP1 protein with distinct diffusion in spontaneous lesions. These protein fractions were not detected in PML-deficient cells, characterized by slow-diffusion of 53BP1. Single particle tracking analysis revealed limited local motion of 53BP1 foci in PML double null cells and local motion 53BP1 foci was even more reduced after γ-irradiation. However, radiation did not change co-localization between 53BP1 nuclear bodies and interchromatin granule-associated zones (IGAZs), nuclear speckles, or chromocenters. This newly observed interaction pattern imply that 53BP1 protein could be a part of not only DNA repair, but also process mediated via components accumulated in IGAZs, nuclear speckles, or paraspeckles. Together, PML deficiency affected local motion of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and changed composition and a number of irradiation-induced foci. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2583-2596, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27526954

  10. Identification of distinct functions of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virion assembly and virus movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The WSMV coat protein (CP) was subjected to point and deletion mutation analyses. WSMV mutants changing aspartic acid residues at amino acid (aa) positions 289, 290, 326, 333, and 334 to alanine elic...

  11. Immediate Protein Dietary Effects on Movement and the Generalised Immunocompetence of Migrating Mormon Crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Mormon crickets form large migratory bands that march over rangeland in the western United States seeking salt and protein. Immune defense is particularly relevant to survival in migratory bands, but little is known about the role of nutrition in insect immunocompetence. We hypothesized that imm...

  12. Psychogenic Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... also look for marked improvement in symptoms following psychotherapy, use of a placebo (a medicine with no ... multi-therapy approach to treating psychogenic movement includes psychotherapy, placebo, or suggestion; antidepressants for symptoms related to ...

  13. Movement - uncoordinated

    MedlinePlus

    Lack of coordination; Loss of coordination; Coordination impairment; Ataxia; Clumsiness; Uncoordinated movement ... are passed through families (such as congenital cerebellar ataxia, Friedreich ataxia , ataxia - telangiectasia , or Wilson disease ) Multiple ...

  14. Inhibition of protein synthesis or mTOR in the basolateral amygdala blocks retrieval-induced memory strengthening.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Thiago R; Jobim, Paulo F C; Carvalho, Leonardo M; Christoff, Raissa R; Maurmann, Natasha; Reolon, Gustavo K; Werenicz, Aline; Roesler, Rafael

    2013-11-01

    Fear memory retrieval can lead to either reconsolidation (accompanied or not by strengthening of the memory trace) or extinction. Here, we show that non-reinforced retrieval of inhibitory avoidance (IA) conditioning can induce memory strengthening assessed in a subsequent retention test trial. Infusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide or the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin into the rat basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) after a reactivation (retrieval) session impaired retrieval-induced strengthening. Intra-BLA infusion of the mRNA synthesis inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) after retrieval had no effect. These findings provide the first evidence suggesting that non-reinforced IA retrieval can lead to memory strengthening through a mechanism dependent on protein synthesis and mTOR activity in the BLA. PMID:23649124

  15. Analysis of parainfluenza virus-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein mutants that are blocked in internalization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Robach, Jessica G.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-10-25

    The PIV-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein is a multifunctional protein with sialic acid binding, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activity. HN is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and degraded. HN lacks internalization signals in its cytoplasmic tail but a single glutamic acid present at residue 37 at the putative transmembrane/ectodomain boundary is critical. We rescued rPIV-5 with mutations E37D or E37K, which have been shown to impair or abolish HN internalization, respectively. These viruses exhibited growth properties similar to wild-type (wt) virus but are impaired for fitness in tissue culture. Biochemical analysis of HN activities showed differences between HN E37D and HN E37K in fusion promotion and incorporation of HN and F into virions. Furthermore, oligomeric analyses indicate that HN E37 mutants perturb the tetrameric organization of HN, probably by destabilizing the dimer-of-dimers interface.

  16. Luteolin exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by blocking the activity of heat shock protein 90 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Bi, Aijing; Dong, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Yi; Rui, Bing; Liu, Jinjiao; Yin, Zhimin; Luo, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Septic diseases represent the prevalent complications in intensive care units. Luteolin, a plant flavonoid, has potent anti-inflammatory properties; however, the molecular mechanism beneath luteolin mediated immune modulation remains unclear. Here in vitro investigations showed that luteolin dose-dependently inhibited LPS-triggered secretion and relocation of high mobility group B-1 (HMGB1) and LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) in macrophages. The mechanism analysis demonstrated that luteolin reduced the release of HMGB1 through destabilizing c-Jun and suppressed HMGB1-induced aggravation of inflammatory cascade through reducing Akt protein level. As an inhibitor of Hsp90, luteolin destabilized Hsp90 client protein c-Jun and Akt. In vivo investigations showed that luteolin effectively protected mice from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethality. In conclusion, the present study suggested that luteolin may act as a potential therapeutic reagent for treating septic diseases. PMID:24321097

  17. The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein of Bacillus subtilis regulates translation of the tryptophan transport gene trpP (yhaG) by blocking ribosome binding.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Helen; Zhang, Hong; Yakhnin, Alexander V; Babitzke, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis tryptophan biosynthetic genes (trpEDCFBA and pabA [trpG]) is regulated in response to tryptophan by TRAP, the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein. TRAP-mediated regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes includes a transcription attenuation and two distinct translation control mechanisms. TRAP also regulates translation of trpP (yhaG), a single-gene operon that encodes a putative tryptophan transporter. Its translation initiation region contains triplet repeats typical of TRAP-regulated mRNAs. We found that regulation of trpP and pabA is unaltered in a rho mutant strain. Results from filter binding and gel mobility shift assays demonstrated that TRAP binds specifically to a segment of the trpP transcript that includes the untranslated leader and translation initiation region. While the affinities of TRAP for the trpP and pabA transcripts are similar, TRAP-mediated translation control of trpP is much more extensive than for pabA. RNA footprinting revealed that the trpP TRAP binding site consists of nine triplet repeats (five GAG, three UAG, and one AAG) that surround and overlap the trpP Shine-Dalgarno (S-D) sequence and translation start codon. Results from toeprint and RNA-directed cell-free translation experiments indicated that tryptophan-activated TRAP inhibits TrpP synthesis by preventing binding of a 30S ribosomal subunit. Taken together, our results establish that TRAP regulates translation of trpP by blocking ribosome binding. Thus, TRAP coordinately regulates tryptophan synthesis and transport by three distinct mechanisms: attenuation transcription of the trpEDCFBA operon, promoting formation of the trpE S-D blocking hairpin, and blocking ribosome binding to the pabA and trpP transcripts. PMID:14702295

  18. P2X7R large pore is partially blocked by pore forming proteins antagonists in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Faria, Robson X; Reis, Ricardo A M; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Cezar-de-Mello, Paula F T; Moraes, Milton O

    2016-06-01

    The ATP-gated P2X7R (P2X7R) is a channel, which is involved in events, such as inflammation, cell death, and pain. The most intriguing event concerning P2X7R functions is the phenomenon of pore dilation. Once P2X7R is activated, the permeability of the plasma membrane becomes higher, leading to the permeation of 1000 Da-weight solutes. The mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Nevertheless, this event is not exclusively through P2X7R, as other proteins may form large pores in the plasma membrane. Recent evidence concerning pore formation reveals putative P2X7R and other pores-associated protein complexes, revealing cross-interactive pharmacological and biophysical issues. In this work, we showed results that corroborated with cross-interactive aspects with P2X7R and pores in astrocytes. These cells expressed most of the pores, including P2X7R. We discovered that different pore types open with peculiar characteristics, as both anionic and cationic charged solutes permeate the plasma membrane, following P2X7R activation. Moreover, we showed that both synergic and additive relationships are found within P2X7, cationic, and anionic large pores. Therefore, our data suggest that other protein-related pores are assembled following the formation of P2X7R pore. PMID:26830892

  19. Ask1 Gene Deletion Blocks Maternal Diabetes–Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Developing Embryo by Disrupting the Unfolded Protein Response Signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Yanqing; Gu, Hui; Reece, E. Albert; Fang, Shengyun; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Aberdeen, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis signal–regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is activated by various stresses. The link between ASK1 activation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, two causal events in diabetic embryopathy, has not been determined. We sought to investigate whether ASK1 is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) that leads to ER stress. Deleting Ask1 abrogated diabetes-induced UPR by suppressing phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) blocked the mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members and ER stress. ASK1 participated in the IRE1α signalosome, and removing ASK1 abrogated the proapoptotic kinase activity of IRE1α. Ask1 deletion suppressed diabetes-induced IRE1α endoriboneclease activities, which led to X-box binding protein 1 mRNA cleavage, an ER stress marker, decreased expression of microRNAs, and increased expression of a miR-17 target, thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), a thioredoxin binding protein, which enhanced ASK1 activation by disrupting the thioredoxin-ASK1 complexes. ASK1 is essential for the assembly and function of the IRE1α signalosome, which forms a positive feedback loop with ASK1 through Txnip. ASK1 knockdown in C17.2 neural stem cells diminished high glucose– or tunicamycin-induced IRE1α activation, which further supports our hypothesis that ASK1 plays a causal role in diabetes-induced ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:25249581

  20. DNMT3A R882 mutants interact with polycomb proteins to block haematopoietic stem and leukaemic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Junji; Kataoka, Keisuke; Sato, Tomohiko; Bando, Masashige; Kato, Yuki; Tsuruta-Kishino, Takako; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Narukawa, Kensuke; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical impact of DNMT3A mutation on acute myeloid leukaemia, the molecular mechanisms regarding how this mutation causes leukaemogenesis in vivo are largely unknown. Here we show that, in murine transplantation experiments, recipients transplanted with DNMT3A mutant-transduced cells exhibit aberrant haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) accumulation. Differentiation-associated genes are downregulated without accompanying changes in methylation status of their promoter-associated CpG islands in DNMT3A mutant-transduced stem/progenitor cells, representing a DNA methylation-independent role of mutated DNMT3A. DNMT3A R882H also promotes monoblastic transformation in vitro in combination with HOXA9. Molecularly, the DNMT3A mutant interacts with polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), causing transcriptional silencing, revealing a DNA methylation-independent role of DNMT3A mutation. Suppression of PRC1 impairs aberrant HSC accumulation and monoblastic transformation. From our data, it is shown that DNMT3A mutants can block the differentiation of HSCs and leukaemic cells via PRC1. This interaction could be targetable in DNMT3A-mutated leukaemias. PMID:27010239

  1. Dominant-negative cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein E2-C/UbcH10 blocks cells in metaphase

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Fiona M.; Aristarkhov, Alexander; Beck, Sharon; Hershko, Avram; Ruderman, Joan V.

    1997-01-01

    Destruction of mitotic cyclins by ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is required for cells to complete mitosis and enter interphase of the next cell cycle. In clam eggs, this process is catalyzed by a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein, E2-C, and the cyclosome/anaphase promoting complex (APC), a 20S particle containing cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity. Here we report cloning a human homolog of E2-C, UbcH10, which shares 61% amino acid identity with clam E2-C and can substitute for clam E2-C in vitro. Dominant-negative clam E2-C and human UbcH10 proteins, created by altering the catalytic cysteine to serine, inhibit the in vitro ubiquitination and destruction of cyclin B in clam oocyte extracts. When transfected into mammalian cells, mutant UbcH10 inhibits the destruction of both cyclin A and B, arrests cells in M phase, and inhibits the onset of anaphase, presumably by blocking the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of proteins responsible for sister chromatid separation. Thus, E2-C/UbcH10-mediated ubiquitination is involved in both cdc2 inactivation and sister chromatid separation, processes that are normally coordinated during exit from mitosis. PMID:9122200

  2. Certain Metal Ions are Inhibitors of Cytochrome b (6) f Complex 'Rieske' Iron-Sulfur Protein Domain Movements

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Arthur G.; Bowman, Michael K.; Kramer, David M.

    2002-03-26

    1Abbreviations: cyt, cytochrome; cyt bL, low potential b cytochrome; cyt bH, high potential b cytochrome; DBMIB, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropylbenzoquinone; DMSO, dimethylsulfoxide; DNP-INT, 2'-iodo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-2',4,4'-trinitrodiphenylether; EPR, electron paramagnetic resonance; HEPES, n-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-n'-(2-ethanesulfonic acid); NQNO, 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline n-oxide; ISP, iron-sulfur protein; MOA, E-b-methoxyacrylate; pmf, proton motive force; PC, plastocyanin; PQ, plastoquinone; PQH2, plastoquinol; PS, photosystem; Qi, quinol reductase; Qo, quinol oxidase; UHDBT, 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole.

  3. Azurin-like protein blocks invasion of Toxoplasma gondii through potential interactions with parasite surface antigen SAG1.

    PubMed

    Naguleswaran, Arunasalam; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chaudhari, Anita; Hong, Chang Soo; Chakrabarty, Ananda M; Sullivan, William J

    2008-02-01

    Some pathogenic bacteria produce factors that have evolved a capacity to neutralize competing microbes. The cupredoxin family protein azurin, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, exhibits a remarkable ability to impede invasion of a number of diverse intracellular pathogens, including the human AIDS virus human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum (which causes malaria). Here we report that azurin and an azurin-like protein (Laz) from gonococci/meningococci have activity against Toxoplasma, an apicomplexan parasite that causes opportunistic infection in immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate that the mechanism of action for Laz involves interfering with the ability of Toxoplasma to adhere to host cells. Computer structural analysis reveals that azurin shares structural features with the predominant surface antigen SAG1, which is known to play an important role in parasite attachment. Interestingly, azurin also has structural similarities to a monoclonal antibody to SAG1. Surface plasmon resonance binding studies validate that SAG1 interacts strongly with Laz and, to lesser extent, azurin. Moreover, Toxoplasma mutants lacking SAG1 are not as susceptible to the growth-inhibitory effects of Laz. Collectively, our data show that Toxoplasma adhesion can be significantly impaired by Laz, and to some extent by azurin, via interactions with SAG1. These observations indicate that Laz can serve as an important tool in the study of host-pathogen interactions and is worthy of further study for development into potential therapeutic agents. PMID:18070964

  4. Protein Kinase C and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Regulate Movement, Attachment, Pairing and Egg Release in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Ressurreição, Margarida; De Saram, Paulu; Kirk, Ruth S.; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M.; Page, Nigel M.; Davies, Angela J.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases C (PKCs) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using ‘smart’ antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated) throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance. PMID:24921927

  5. Mononuclear phagocyte system depletion blocks interstitial tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C expression and induces salt-sensitive hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Machnik, Agnes; Dahlmann, Anke; Kopp, Christoph; Goss, Jennifer; Wagner, Hubertus; van Rooijen, Nico; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Müller, Dominik N; Park, Joon-Keun; Luft, Friedrich C; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Titze, Jens

    2010-03-01

    We showed recently that mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) cells provide a buffering mechanism for salt-sensitive hypertension by driving interstitial lymphangiogenesis, modulating interstitial Na(+) clearance, and increasing endothelial NO synthase protein expression in response to very high dietary salt via a tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C regulatory mechanism. We now tested whether isotonic saline and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment leads to a similar regulatory response in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male rats were fed a low-salt diet and received tap water (low-salt diet LSD), 1.0% saline (high-salt diet HSD), or DOCA+1.0% saline (DOCA-HSD). To test the regulatory role of interstitial MPS cells, we further depleted MPS cells with clodronate liposomes. HSD and DOCA-HSD led to Na(+) accumulation in the skin, MPS-driven tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C-mediated hyperplasia of interstitial lymph capillaries, and increased endothelial NO synthase protein expression in skin interstitium. Clodronate liposome MPS cell depletion blocked MPS infiltration in the skin interstitium, resulting in unchanged tonicity-responsive enhance binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C levels and absent hyperplasia of the lymph capillary network. Moreover, no increased skin endothelial NO synthase protein expression occurred in either clodronate liposome-treated HSD or DOCA-salt rats. Thus, absence of the MPS-cell regulatory response converted a salt-resistant blood-pressure state to a salt-sensitive state in HSD rats. Furthermore, salt-sensitive hypertension in DOCA-salt rats was aggravated. We conclude that MPS cells act as onsite controllers of interstitial volume and blood pressure homeostasis, providing a local regulatory salt-sensitive tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C-mediated mechanism in the skin to maintain

  6. Plant Translation Elongation Factor 1Bβ Facilitates Potato Virus X (PVX) Infection and Interacts with PVX Triple Gene Block Protein 1.

    PubMed

    Hwang, JeeNa; Lee, Seonhee; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Kang, Jin-Ho; Kang, Min-Young; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (eEF1) has two components: the G-protein eEF1A and the nucleotide exchange factor eEF1B. In plants, eEF1B is itself composed of a structural protein (eEF1Bγ) and two nucleotide exchange subunits (eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ). To test the effects of elongation factors on virus infection, we isolated eEF1A and eEF1B genes from pepper (Capsicum annuum) and suppressed their homologs in Nicotiana benthamiana using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The accumulation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Potato virus X (PVX) was significantly reduced in the eEF1Bβ- or eEF1Bɣ-silenced plants as well as in eEF1A-silenced plants. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ interacted with eEF1A and that eEF1A and eEF1Bβ interacted with triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) of PVX. These results suggest that both eEF1A and eEF1Bβ play essential roles in the multiplication of PVX by physically interacting with TGBp1. Furthermore, using eEF1Bβ deletion constructs, we found that both N- (1-64 amino acids) and C-terminal (150-195 amino acids) domains of eEF1Bβ are important for the interaction with PVX TGBp1 and that the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bβ is involved in the interaction with eEF1A. These results suggest that eEF1Bβ could be a potential target for engineering virus-resistant plants. PMID:26020533

  7. Tranilast Blocks the Interaction between the Protein S100A11 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) V Domain and Inhibits Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Kai; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-07-01

    The human S100 calcium-binding protein A11 (S100A11) is a member of the S100 protein family. Once S100A11 proteins bind to calcium ions at EF-hand motifs, S100A11 changes its conformation, promoting interaction with target proteins. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) consists of three extracellular domains, including the V domain, C1 domain, and C2 domain. In this case, the V domain is the target for mutant S100A11 (mS100A11) binding. RAGE binds to the ligands, resulting in cell proliferation, cell growth, and several signal transduction cascades. We used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to demonstrate the interactions between mS100A11and RAGE V domain. The tranilast molecule is a drug used for treating allergic disorders. We discovered that the RAGE V domain and tranilast would interact with mS100A11 by using (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR titrations. According to the results, we obtained two binary complex models from the HADDOCK program, S100A11-RAGE V domain and S100A11-tranilast, respectively. We overlapped two binary complex models with the same orientation of S100A11 homodimer and demonstrated that tranilast would block the binding site between S100A11 and the RAGE V domain. We further utilized a water-soluble tetrazolium-1 assay to confirm this result. We think that the results will be potentially useful in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27226584

  8. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes motor function recovery and downregulates phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase expression in ischemic brain tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; He, Qiang; Li, Ying-ying; Li, Ce; Bai, Yu-long; Hu, Yong-shan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Motor function impairment is a common outcome of stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) involving intensive use of the impaired limb while restraining the unaffected limb is widely used to overcome the effects of ‘learned non-use’ and improve limb function after stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of CIMT remains unclear. In the present study, rats were randomly divided into a middle cerebral artery occlusion (model) group, a CIMT + model (CIMT) group, or a sham group. Restriction of the affected limb by plaster cast was performed in the CIMT and sham groups. Compared with the model group, CIMT significantly improved the forelimb functional performance in rats. By western blot assay, the expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi of cerebral ischemic rats in the CIMT group was significantly lower than that in the model group, and was similar to sham group levels. These data suggest that functional recovery after CIMT may be related to decreased expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi. PMID:26889190

  9. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes motor function recovery and downregulates phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase expression in ischemic brain tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; He, Qiang; Li, Ying-Ying; Li, Ce; Bai, Yu-Long; Hu, Yong-Shan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Motor function impairment is a common outcome of stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) involving intensive use of the impaired limb while restraining the unaffected limb is widely used to overcome the effects of 'learned non-use' and improve limb function after stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of CIMT remains unclear. In the present study, rats were randomly divided into a middle cerebral artery occlusion (model) group, a CIMT + model (CIMT) group, or a sham group. Restriction of the affected limb by plaster cast was performed in the CIMT and sham groups. Compared with the model group, CIMT significantly improved the forelimb functional performance in rats. By western blot assay, the expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi of cerebral ischemic rats in the CIMT group was significantly lower than that in the model group, and was similar to sham group levels. These data suggest that functional recovery after CIMT may be related to decreased expression of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase in the bilateral cortex and hippocampi. PMID:26889190

  10. Changing patterns of localization of the tobacco mosaic virus movement protein and replicase to the endoplasmic reticulum and microtubules during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Heinlein, M; Padgett, H S; Gens, J S; Pickard, B G; Casper, S J; Epel, B L; Beachy, R N

    1998-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) derivatives that encode movement protein (MP) as a fusion to the green fluorescent protein (MP:GFP) were used in combination with antibody staining to identify host cell components to which MP and replicase accumulate in cells of infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and in infected BY-2 protoplasts. MP:GFP and replicase colocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER; especially the cortical ER) and were present in large, irregularly shaped, ER-derived structures that may represent "viral factories." The ER-derived structures required an intact cytoskeleton, and microtubules appeared to redistribute MP:GFP from these sites during late stages of infection. In leaves, MP:GFP accumulated in plasmodesmata, whereas in protoplasts, the MP:GFP was targeted to distinct, punctate sites near the plasma membrane. Treating protoplasts with cytochalasin D and brefeldin A at the time of inoculation prevented the accumulation of MP:GFP at these sites. It is proposed that the punctate sites anchor the cortical ER to plasma membrane and are related to sites at which plasmodesmata form in walled cells. Hairlike structures containing MP:GFP appeared on the surface of some of the infected protoplasts and are reminiscent of similar structures induced by other plant viruses. We present a model that postulates the role of the ER and cytoskeleton in targeting the MP and viral ribonucleoprotein from sites of virus synthesis to the plasmodesmata through which infection is spread. PMID:9668131

  11. Changing patterns of localization of the tobacco mosaic virus movement protein and replicase to the endoplasmic reticulum and microtubules during infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinlein, M.; Padgett, H. S.; Gens, J. S.; Pickard, B. G.; Casper, S. J.; Epel, B. L.; Beachy, R. N.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) derivatives that encode movement protein (MP) as a fusion to the green fluorescent protein (MP:GFP) were used in combination with antibody staining to identify host cell components to which MP and replicase accumulate in cells of infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and in infected BY-2 protoplasts. MP:GFP and replicase colocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER; especially the cortical ER) and were present in large, irregularly shaped, ER-derived structures that may represent "viral factories." The ER-derived structures required an intact cytoskeleton, and microtubules appeared to redistribute MP:GFP from these sites during late stages of infection. In leaves, MP:GFP accumulated in plasmodesmata, whereas in protoplasts, the MP:GFP was targeted to distinct, punctate sites near the plasma membrane. Treating protoplasts with cytochalasin D and brefeldin A at the time of inoculation prevented the accumulation of MP:GFP at these sites. It is proposed that the punctate sites anchor the cortical ER to plasma membrane and are related to sites at which plasmodesmata form in walled cells. Hairlike structures containing MP:GFP appeared on the surface of some of the infected protoplasts and are reminiscent of similar structures induced by other plant viruses. We present a model that postulates the role of the ER and cytoskeleton in targeting the MP and viral ribonucleoprotein from sites of virus synthesis to the plasmodesmata through which infection is spread.

  12. A single amino acid difference between the intracellular domains of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid-like precursor protein 2 enables induction of synaptic depression and block of long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Trillaud-Doppia, Emilie; Paradis-Isler, Nicolas; Boehm, Jannic

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is initially characterized as a disease of the synapse that affects synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. While amyloid-beta and tau have been traditionally implicated in causing AD, recent studies suggest that other factors, such as the intracellular domain of the amyloid-precursor protein (APP-ICD), can also play a role in the development of AD. Here, we show that the expression of APP-ICD induces synaptic depression, while the intracellular domain of its homolog amyloid-like precursor protein 2 (APLP2-ICD) does not. We are able to show that this effect by APP-ICD is due to a single alanine vs. proline difference between APP-ICD and APLP2-ICD. The alanine in APP-ICD and the proline in APLP2-ICD lie directly behind a conserved caspase cleavage site. Inhibition of caspase cleavage of APP-ICD prevents the induction of synaptic depression. Finally, we show that the expression of APP-ICD increases and facilitates long-term depression and blocks induction of long-term potentiation. The block in long-term potentiation can be overcome by mutating the aforementioned alanine in APP-ICD to the proline of APLP2. Based on our results, we propose the emergence of a new APP critical domain for the regulation of synaptic plasticity and in consequence for the development of AD. PMID:26921470

  13. Acidosis Blocks CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein Homologous Protein (CHOP)- and c-Jun-Mediated Induction of p53-Upregulated Mediator of Apoptosis (PUMA) during Amino Acid Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Christopher B.; McColl, Karen; Distelhorst, Clark W.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells must avoid succumbing to a variety of noxious conditions within their surroundings. Acidosis is one such prominent feature of the tumor microenvironment that surprisingly promotes tumor survival and progression. We recently reported that acidosis prevents apoptosis of starved or stressed lymphoma cells through regulation of several Bcl-2 family members (Ryder et al., JBC, 2012). Mechanistic studies in that work focused on the acid-mediated upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, while additionally showing inhibition of glutamine starvation-induced expression of pro-apoptotic PUMA by acidosis. Herein we report that amino acid (AA) starvation elevates PUMA, an effect that is blocked by extracellular acidity. Knockdown studies confirm that PUMA induction during AA starvation requires expression of both CHOP and c-Jun. Interestingly, acidosis strongly attenuates AA starvation-mediated c-Jun expression, which correlates with PUMA repression. As c-Jun exerts a tumor suppressive function in this and other contexts, its inhibition by acidosis has broader implications for survival of cancer cells in the acidic tumor milieu. PMID:23261451

  14. Blocking protein phosphatase 2A signaling prevents endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis: a peptide-based drug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuanjun; Guo, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zeng, Rui; Ning, Yong; Pei, Guangchang; Li, Yueqiang; Chen, Meixue; Guo, Shuiming; Li, Xiaoqing; Han, Min; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) contributes to the emergence of fibroblasts and plays a significant role in renal interstitial fibrosis. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase in eukaryotic cells and regulates many signaling pathways. However, the significance of PP2A in EndMT is poorly understood. In present study, the role of PP2A in EndMT was evaluated. We demonstrated that PP2A activated in endothelial cells (EC) during their EndMT phenotype acquisition and in the mouse model of obstructive nephropathy (i.e., UUO). Inhibition of PP2A activity by its specific inhibitor prevented EC undergoing EndMT. Importantly, PP2A activation was dependent on tyrosine nitration at 127 in the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac). Our renal-protective strategy was to block tyrosine127 nitration to inhibit PP2A activation by using a mimic peptide derived from PP2Ac conjugating a cell penetrating peptide (CPP: TAT), termed TAT-Y127WT. Pretreatment withTAT-Y127WT was able to prevent TGF-β1-induced EndMT. Administration of the peptide to UUO mice significantly ameliorated renal EndMT level, with preserved density of peritubular capillaries and reduction in extracellular matrix deposition. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibiting PP2Ac nitration using a mimic peptide is a potential preventive strategy for EndMT in renal fibrosis.

  15. Protein Kinase Cδ Blocks Immediate-Early Gene Expression in Senescent Cells by Inactivating Serum Response Factor

    PubMed Central

    Wheaton, Keith; Riabowol, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblasts lose the ability to replicate in response to growth factors and become unable to express growth-associated immediate-early genes, including c-fos and egr-1, as they become senescent. The serum response factor (SRF), a major transcriptional activator of immediate-early gene promoters, loses the ability to bind to the serum response element (SRE) and becomes hyperphosphorylated in senescent cells. We identify protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) as the kinase responsible for inactivation of SRF both in vitro and endogenously in senescent cells. This is due to a higher level of PKCδ activity as cells age, production of the PKCδ catalytic fragment, and its nuclear localization in senescent but not in low-passage-number cells. The phosphorylation of T160 of SRF by PKCδ in vitro and in vivo led to loss of SRF DNA binding activity. Both the PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin and ectopic expression of a dominant negative form of PKCδ independently restored SRE-dependent transcription and immediate-early gene expression in senescent cells. Modulation of PKCδ activity in vivo with rottlerin or bistratene A altered senescent- and young-cell morphology, respectively. These observations support the idea that the coordinate transcriptional inhibition of several growth-associated genes by PKCδ contributes to the senescent phenotype. PMID:15282327

  16. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase 1 activity and blocking the binding of cytosolic and membrane-bound proteins by honokiol inhibit migratory potential of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ram; Kappes, John C; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2016-02-16

    Overexpression of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) in melanoma cells is often associated with increased migration/metastasis rate. To develop effective treatment options, we have examined the effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia plant, on the migratory potential of human melanoma cell lines (A375, Hs294t, SK-Mel119 and SK-Mel28) and assessed whether Nox1 is the target. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we observed that treatment of different melanoma cell lines with honokiol for 24 h resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell migration that was associated with reduction in Nox1 expression and reduced levels of oxidative stress. Treatment of cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an anti-oxidant, also inhibited the migration of melanoma cells. Treatment of cells with diphenyleneiodonium chloride, an inhibitor of Nox1, significantly decreased the migration ability of Hs294t and SK-Mel28 cells. Further, we examined the effect of honokiol on the levels of core proteins (p22phox and p47phox) of the NADPH oxidase complex. Treatment of Hs294t and SK-Mel28 cells with honokiol resulted in accumulation of the cytosolic p47phox protein and decreased levels of the membrane-bound p22phox protein, thus blocking their interaction and inhibiting Nox1 activation. Our in vivo bioluminescence imaging data indicate that oral administration of honokiol inhibited the migration/extravasation and growth of intravenously injected melanoma cells in internal body organs, such as liver, lung and kidney in nude mice, and that this was associated with an inhibitory effect on Nox1 activity in these internal organs/tissues. PMID:26760964

  17. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase 1 activity and blocking the binding of cytosolic and membrane-bound proteins by honokiol inhibit migratory potential of melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ram; Kappes, John C.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) in melanoma cells is often associated with increased migration/metastasis rate. To develop effective treatment options, we have examined the effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia plant, on the migratory potential of human melanoma cell lines (A375, Hs294t, SK-Mel119 and SK-Mel28) and assessed whether Nox1 is the target. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we observed that treatment of different melanoma cell lines with honokiol for 24 h resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell migration that was associated with reduction in Nox1 expression and reduced levels of oxidative stress. Treatment of cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an anti-oxidant, also inhibited the migration of melanoma cells. Treatment of cells with diphenyleneiodonium chloride, an inhibitor of Nox1, significantly decreased the migration ability of Hs294t and SK-Mel28 cells. Further, we examined the effect of honokiol on the levels of core proteins (p22phox and p47phox) of the NADPH oxidase complex. Treatment of Hs294t and SK-Mel28 cells with honokiol resulted in accumulation of the cytosolic p47phox protein and decreased levels of the membrane-bound p22phox protein, thus blocking their interaction and inhibiting Nox1 activation. Our in vivo bioluminescence imaging data indicate that oral administration of honokiol inhibited the migration/extravasation and growth of intravenously injected melanoma cells in internal body organs, such as liver, lung and kidney in nude mice, and that this was associated with an inhibitory effect on Nox1 activity in these internal organs/tissues. PMID:26760964

  18. Endometrial expression of progesterone-induced blocking factor and galectins-1, -3, -9, and -3 binding protein in the luteal phase and early pregnancy in cattle.

    PubMed

    Okumu, L A; Fair, T; Szekeres-Bartho, J; O'Doherty, A M; Crowe, M A; Roche, J F; Lonergan, P; Forde, N

    2011-07-27

    Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) and galectins modulate the maternal immune response during pregnancy. We hypothesized that the relative transcript abundance of the above genes would be different during the luteal phase/early pregnancy and would be affected by progesterone supplementation. To further test this, hypothesis protein expression analyses were carried out to evaluate the abundance and localization of LGALS9 and PIBF. Following estrus synchronization, heifers were inseminated (n = 140) or not (n = 70). Half the heifers in each status (cyclic or potentially pregnant) were randomly assigned to receive a progesterone-releasing intravaginal device (PRID) on day 3 after estrus, which elevated progesterone concentrations from day 3.5 to 8 (P < 0.05), resulting in four treatment groups: cyclic and pregnant heifers, each with normal and high progesterone. After confirmation of pregnancy status in inseminated animals, uterine tissue was collected on days 5, 7, 13, or 16 of the luteal phase of the cycle/pregnancy. Gene and protein expression was determined using Q-RT-PCR and IHC, respectively, on 5 heifers per treatment per time point (i.e., 80 in total). Progesterone concentrations did not affect expression of any of the genes (P > 0.05). LGALS9 and LGALS3BP were expressed at low levels in both cyclic and pregnant endometria until day 13. On day 16, expression increased only in the pregnant heifers (P < 0.0001). LGALS1 and LGALS3 decreased on day 7 (P < 0.0001) and remained low until day 16. Pregnancy had no effect on the expression of LGALS1, LGALS3, and PIBF. Additionally, LGALS9 and PIBF proteins were expressed in distinct uterine cell types. These results indicate that the galectins may be involved in uterine receptivity and/or implantation in heifers. PMID:21610087

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance the Apoptotic Activity of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 by Blocking PKC-Induced IGFBP-3 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung Hyun; Whang, Young Mi; Min, Hye-Young; Han, Seung Ho; Kang, Ju-Hee; Song, Ki-Hoon; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Kim, Yeul Hong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 induces apoptosis of cancer cells. However, preexisting resistance to IGFBP-3 could limit its antitumor activities. This study characterizes the efficacy and mechanism of the combination of recombinant IGFBP-3 (rIGFBP-3) and HDAC inhibitors to overcome IGFBP-3 resistance in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The effects of the combination of rIGFBP-3 and a number of HDAC inhibitors on cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in vitro and in vivo by using the MTT assay, a flow cytometry-based TUNEL assay, western blot analyses, and the NSCLC xenograft tumor model. Combined treatment with HDAC inhibitors and rIGFBP-3 had synergistic antiproliferative effects accompanied by increased apoptosis rates in a subset of NSCLC and HNSCC cell lines in vitro. Moreover, combined treatment with depsipeptide and rIGFBP-3 completely suppressed tumor growth and increased the apoptosis rate in vivo in H1299 NSCLC xenografts. Evidence suggests that HDAC inhibitors increased the half-life of rIGFBP-3 protein by blocking protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of rIGFBP-3. In addition, combined treatment of IGFBP-3 with an HDAC inhibitor facilitates apoptosis through up-regulation of rIGFBP-3 stability and Akt signaling inhibition. The ability of HDAC inhibitors to decrease PKC activation may enhance apoptotic activities of rIGFBP-3 in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that combined treatment with HDAC inhibitor and rIGFBP-3 could be an effective treatment strategy for NSCLC and HNSCC with highly activated PKC. PMID:22362554

  20. A High-Affinity Protein Binder that Blocks the IL-6/STAT3 Signaling Pathway Effectively Suppresses Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joong-jae; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Chul-Su; Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Choi, Jung-Min; Hwang, Da-Eun; Yuk, Jae-Min; Park, Keunwan; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kim, Dongsup; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune responses for host defense and tumorigenic process. Upregulation of IL-6 is known to constitutively phosphorylate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), leading to activation of multiple oncogene pathways and inflammatory cascade. Here, we present the development of a high-affinity protein binder, termed repebody, which effectively suppresses non–small cell lung cancer in vivo by blocking the IL-6/STAT3 signaling. We selected a repebody that prevents human IL-6 (hIL-6) from binding to its receptor by a competitive immunoassay, and modulated its binding affinity for hIL-6 up to a picomolar range by a modular approach that mimics the combinatorial assembly of diverse modules to form antigen-specific receptors in nature. The resulting repebody was highly specific for hIL-6, effectively inhibiting the STAT3 phosphorylation in a dose- and binding affinity-response manner in vitro. The repebody was shown to have a remarkable suppression effect on the growth of tumors and STAT3 phosphorylation in xenograft mice with non–small cell lung cancer by blocking the hIL-6/STAT3 signaling. Structural analysis of the repebody and IL-6 complex revealed that the repebody binds the site 2a of hIL-6, overlapping a number of epitope residues at site 2a with gp130, and consequently causes a steric hindrance to the formation of IL-6/IL-6Rα complex. Our results suggest that high-affinity repebody targeting the IL-6/STAT3 pathway can be developed as therapeutics for non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:24682171

  1. How Block Scheduling Reform Effects Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William R.; Flinders, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Block scheduling has become an increasingly popular reform movement for schools, school districts, and principals to enact. Much of the decision making as to whether to implement some type of block scheduling has occurred without understanding the implications this type of reform has on teachers and their classroom practices. This paper reports on…

  2. Protein Kinase Cδ-mediated Phosphorylation of Connexin43 Gap Junction Channels Causes Movement within Gap Junctions followed by Vesicle Internalization and Protein Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Angela C.; Cavin, Gabriel; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Hakozaki, Hiroyuki; Wu-Zhang, Alyssa X.; Kunkel, Maya T.; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation of gap junction proteins, connexins, plays a role in global signaling events involving kinases. Connexin43 (Cx43), a ubiquitous and important connexin, has several phosphorylation sites for specific kinases. We appended an imaging reporter tag for the activity of the δ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCδ) to the carboxyl terminus of Cx43. The FRET signal of this reporter is inversely related to the phosphorylation of serine 368 of Cx43. By activating PKC with the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) or a natural stimulant, UTP, time lapse live cell imaging movies indicated phosphorylated Ser-368 Cx43 separated into discrete domains within gap junctions and was internalized in small vesicles, after which it was degraded by lysosomes and proteasomes. Mutation of Ser-368 to an Ala eliminated the response to PDBu and changes in phosphorylation of the reporter. A phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A, does not change this pattern, indicating PKC phosphorylation causes degradation of Cx43 without dephosphorylation, which is in accordance with current hypotheses that cells control their intercellular communication by a fast and constant turnover of connexins, using phosphorylation as part of this mechanism. PMID:24500718

  3. The ER-Membrane Transport System Is Critical for Intercellular Trafficking of the NSm Movement Protein and Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhike; Xue, Fan; Xu, Min; Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Wenyang; Garcia-Murria, Maria J; Mingarro, Ismael; Liu, Yong; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-02-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata to infect new cells. The plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is interconnected among cells via the ER desmotubule in the plasmodesma across the cell wall, forming a continuous ER network throughout the entire plant. This ER continuity is unique to plants and has been postulated to serve as a platform for the intercellular trafficking of macromolecules. In the present study, the contribution of the plant ER membrane transport system to the intercellular trafficking of the NSm movement protein and Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) is investigated. We showed that TSWV NSm is physically associated with the ER membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. An NSm-GFP fusion protein transiently expressed in single leaf cells was trafficked into neighboring cells. Mutations in NSm that impaired its association with the ER or caused its mis-localization to other subcellular sites inhibited cell-to-cell trafficking. Pharmacological disruption of the ER network severely inhibited NSm-GFP trafficking but not GFP diffusion. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant rhd3 with an impaired ER network, NSm-GFP trafficking was significantly reduced, whereas GFP diffusion was not affected. We also showed that the ER-to-Golgi secretion pathway and the cytoskeleton transport systems were not involved in the intercellular trafficking of TSWV NSm. Importantly, TSWV cell-to-cell spread was delayed in the ER-defective rhd3 mutant, and this reduced viral infection was not due to reduced replication. On the basis of robust biochemical, cellular and genetic analysis, we established that the ER membrane transport system serves as an important direct route for intercellular trafficking of NSm and TSWV. PMID:26863622

  4. Identification of an amino acid residue required for differential recognition of a viral movement protein by the Tomato mosaic virus resistance gene Tm-2(2).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michie; Yamamoto-Katou, Ayako; Katou, Shinpei; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ohashi, Yuko; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2011-07-01

    The Tm-2 gene of tomato and its allelic gene, Tm-2(2), confer resistance to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) and encode a member of the coiled-coil/nucleotide binding-ARC/leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein class of plant resistance (R) genes. Despite exhibiting only four amino acid differences between the products of Tm-2 and Tm-2(2), Tm-2(2) confers resistance to ToMV mutant B7, whereas Tm-2 is broken by ToMV-B7. An Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system was used to study the mechanism of differential recognition of the movement proteins (MPs), an avirulence factor for ToMV resistance, of ToMV-B7 by Tm-2 and Tm-2(2). Although resistance induced by Tm-2 and Tm-2(2) is not usually accompanied by hypersensitive response (HR), Tm-2 and Tm-2(2) induced HR-like cell death by co-expression with MP of a wild-type ToMV, a strain that causes resistance for these R genes, and Tm-2(2) but not Tm-2 induced cell death with B7-MP in this system. Site-directed amino acid mutagenesis revealed that Tyr-767 in the LRR of Tm-2(2) is required for the specific recognition of the B7-MP. These results suggest that the Tyr residue in LRR contributes to the recognition of B7-MP, and that Tm-2 and Tm-2(2) are involved in HR cell death. PMID:21310506

  5. The ER-Membrane Transport System Is Critical for Intercellular Trafficking of the NSm Movement Protein and Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhike; Xue, Fan; Xu, Min; Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Wenyang; Garcia-Murria, Maria J.; Mingarro, Ismael; Liu, Yong; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata to infect new cells. The plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is interconnected among cells via the ER desmotubule in the plasmodesma across the cell wall, forming a continuous ER network throughout the entire plant. This ER continuity is unique to plants and has been postulated to serve as a platform for the intercellular trafficking of macromolecules. In the present study, the contribution of the plant ER membrane transport system to the intercellular trafficking of the NSm movement protein and Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) is investigated. We showed that TSWV NSm is physically associated with the ER membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. An NSm-GFP fusion protein transiently expressed in single leaf cells was trafficked into neighboring cells. Mutations in NSm that impaired its association with the ER or caused its mis-localization to other subcellular sites inhibited cell-to-cell trafficking. Pharmacological disruption of the ER network severely inhibited NSm-GFP trafficking but not GFP diffusion. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant rhd3 with an impaired ER network, NSm-GFP trafficking was significantly reduced, whereas GFP diffusion was not affected. We also showed that the ER-to-Golgi secretion pathway and the cytoskeleton transport systems were not involved in the intercellular trafficking of TSWV NSm. Importantly, TSWV cell-to-cell spread was delayed in the ER-defective rhd3 mutant, and this reduced viral infection was not due to reduced replication. On the basis of robust biochemical, cellular and genetic analysis, we established that the ER membrane transport system serves as an important direct route for intercellular trafficking of NSm and TSWV. PMID:26863622

  6. N-terminal basic amino acid residues of Beet black scorch virus capsid protein play a critical role in virion assembly and systemic movement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Beet black scorch virus (BBSV) is a small single-stranded, positive-sense RNA plant virus belonging to the genus Necrovirus, family Tombusviridae. Its capsid protein (CP) contains a 13 amino acid long basic region at the N-terminus, rich in arginine and lysine residues, which is thought to interact with viral RNA to initiate virion assembly. Results In the current study, a series of BBSV mutants containing amino acid substitutions as well as deletions within the N-terminal region were generated and examined for their effects on viral RNA replication, virion assembly, and long distance spread in protoplasts and whole host plants of BBSV. The RNA-binding activities of the mutated CPs were also evaluated in vitro. These experiments allowed us to identify two key basic amino acid residues in this region that are responsible for initiating virus assembly through RNA-binding. Proper assembly of BBSV particles is in turn needed for efficient viral systemic movement. Conclusions We have identified two basic amino acid residues near the N-terminus of the BBSV CP that bind viral RNA with high affinity to initiate virion assembly. We further provide evidence showing that systemic spread of BBSV in infected plants requires intact virions. This study represents the first in-depth investigation of the role of basic amino acid residues within the N-terminus of a necroviral CP. PMID:23786675

  7. The movement protein of barley yellow dwarf virus-GAV self-interacts and forms homodimers in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Cao, Rufei; Sun, Kaile; Zhang, Hua

    2012-07-01

    The 17-kDa movement protein (MP) of the GAV strain of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV-GAV) can bind the viral RNA and target to the nucleus. However, much less is known about the active form of the MP in planta. In this study, the ability of the MP to self-interact was analyzed by yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The BYDV-GAV MP has a strong potential to self-interact in vitro and in vivo, and self-interaction was mediated by the N-terminal domain spanning the second α-helix (residues 17-39). Chemical cross-linking and heterologous MP expression from a pea early browning virus (PEBV) vector further showed that MP self-interacts to form homodimers in vitro and in planta. Interestingly, the N-terminal domain necessary for MP self-interaction has previously been identified as important for nuclear targeting. Based on these findings, a functional link between MP self-interaction and nuclear targeting is discussed. PMID:22437255

  8. Enzymatic hydrolysis studies of arabinogalactan-protein structure from Acacia gum: the self-similarity hypothesis of assembly from a common building block.

    PubMed

    Renard, D; Lavenant-Gourgeon, L; Lapp, A; Nigen, M; Sanchez, C

    2014-11-01

    particles differing in dimensions. The secondary structures content of control and enzyme-treated AGPs were similar, highlighting both the high rigidity of the protein backbone and the overall symmetry of AGP. This conclusion was reinforced by the more compact structures found when AGP was intact compare to the more elongated structures found when AGP was enzymatically cleaved. Finally, the structural similarities found in enzyme-treated AGP together with the theoretical calculations to analytically probe the type of branching would suggest that AGP would be made of a self-similar assembly of two types of building blocks, the second being a five-fold repetition of the first one, for which palindromic amino acid sequence would ensure a self-ordering of carbohydrate moieties along the polypeptide chains. The cleavage would therefore lead to hydrolysed building blocks with similar secondary structures and conformations whatever the enzyme used. PMID:25129794

  9. Blocking protein phosphatase 2A signaling prevents endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis: a peptide-based drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yuanjun; Guo, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zeng, Rui; Ning, Yong; Pei, Guangchang; Li, Yueqiang; Chen, Meixue; Guo, Shuiming; Li, Xiaoqing; Han, Min; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) contributes to the emergence of fibroblasts and plays a significant role in renal interstitial fibrosis. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase in eukaryotic cells and regulates many signaling pathways. However, the significance of PP2A in EndMT is poorly understood. In present study, the role of PP2A in EndMT was evaluated. We demonstrated that PP2A activated in endothelial cells (EC) during their EndMT phenotype acquisition and in the mouse model of obstructive nephropathy (i.e., UUO). Inhibition of PP2A activity by its specific inhibitor prevented EC undergoing EndMT. Importantly, PP2A activation was dependent on tyrosine nitration at 127 in the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac). Our renal-protective strategy was to block tyrosine127 nitration to inhibit PP2A activation by using a mimic peptide derived from PP2Ac conjugating a cell penetrating peptide (CPP: TAT), termed TAT-Y127WT. Pretreatment withTAT-Y127WT was able to prevent TGF-β1-induced EndMT. Administration of the peptide to UUO mice significantly ameliorated renal EndMT level, with preserved density of peritubular capillaries and reduction in extracellular matrix deposition. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibiting PP2Ac nitration using a mimic peptide is a potential preventive strategy for EndMT in renal fibrosis. PMID:26805394

  10. Myrsinane, Premyrsinane, and Cyclomyrsinane Diterpenes from Euphorbia falcata as Potassium Ion Channel Inhibitors with Selective G Protein-Activated Inwardly Rectifying Ion Channel (GIRK) Blocking Effects.

    PubMed

    Vasas, Andrea; Forgo, Peter; Orvos, Péter; Tálosi, László; Csorba, Attila; Pinke, Gyula; Hohmann, Judit

    2016-08-26

    GIRK channels are activated by a large number of G protein-coupled receptors and regulate the electrical activity of neurons, cardiac atrial myocytes, and β-pancreatic cells. Abnormalities in GIRK channel function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, drug addiction, and cardiac arrhythmias. In the heart, GIRK channels are selectively expressed in the atrium, and their activation inhibits pacemaker activity, thereby slowing the heart rate. In the present study, 19 new diterpenes, falcatins A-S (1-19), and the known euphorprolitherin D (20) were isolated from Euphorbia falcata. The compounds were assayed on stable transfected HEK-hERG (Kv11.1) and HEK-GIRK1/4 (Kir3.1 and Kir3.4) cells. Blocking activity on GIRK channels was exerted by 13 compounds (61-83% at 10 μM), and, among them, five possessed low potency on the hERG channel (4-20% at 10 μM). These selective activities suggest that myrsinane-related diterpenes are potential lead compounds for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. PMID:27441737

  11. Interplay of Ca(2+) and Mg (2+) in sodium-calcium exchanger and in other Ca(2+)-binding proteins: magnesium, watchdog that blocks each turn if able.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, Dmitri O; Takahashi, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Sodium-calcium exchange across plasma membrane is regulated by intracellular calcium ions. The sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX1) is activated by successive saturation of numerous Ca(2+)-binding sites located in the intracellular loop of the protein. The progressive saturation of the binding domain CBD12 by Ca(2+) results in a series of conformational changes of CBD12 as well as of entire NCX1 molecule. Like other soluble and membrane Ca(2+)-binding proteins, NCX1 can also be regulated by Mg(2+) that antagonises Ca(2+) at the level of divalent cation-binding sites. This chapter summarises data on Mg(2+) impacts in the cells. Regulatory action of Mg(2+) on intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent processes can be achieved due to changes of its cytoplasmic level, which take place in the range of [Mg(2+)](i) from 0.5 to 3 mM. Under normal conditions, these changes are ensured by activation of plasmalemmal Mg(2+) transport systems and by variations in ATP level in cytoplasm. In heart and in brain, some pathological conditions, such as hypoxia, ischemia and ischemia followed by reperfusion, are associated with an important increase in intracellular Ca(2+). The tissue damage due to Ca(2+) overload may be prevented by Mg(2+). The protective actions of Mg(2+) can be achieved due to its ability to compete with Ca(2+) for the binding sites in a number of proteins responsible for the rise in intracellular free Ca(2+), including NCX1, in case when the reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange becomes predominant. Saturation of CBD12 by Mg(2+) results in important changes of NCX1 conformation. Modulating actions of Mg(2+) on the conformation of NCX1 were detected at a narrow range of Mg(2+) concentration, from 0.5 to 1 mM. These data support an idea that variations of intracellular Mg(2+) could modify transmembrane Ca(2+) movements ensured by NCX1. PMID:23224871

  12. Quantification of Movement and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in a Citrus Orchard Using a Protein Marking Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of plant water stress on Homalodisca vitripennis dispersal and movement was evaluated in citrus orchard during a two-year study. Irrigation treatments included watering at 100%, 80%, and 60% of the crop evapotranspiration (ETc). Movement of H. vitripennis among treatment plots was quantifie...

  13. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment. PMID:27112684

  14. Fluvial entrainment of low density peat blocks (block carbon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Jeff

    2014-05-01

    In many fluvial environments low density materials are transported in significant quantities and these form an important part of the stream load and /or have a distinct impact on sedimentation in these environments. However, there are significant gaps in understanding of how these materials are entrained and transported by streams and rivers. Eroding upland peatland environments in particular, frequently have fluvial systems in which large eroded peat blocks, often exceeding 1 m in length; form an important component of the stream material flux. Transport of this material is significant in determining rates of erosion but also has important impacts in terms of damage to infrastructure and carbon loss. This paper describes a field experiment designed to establish for the first time the conditions under which large peat blocks (c. > 0.1 m b axis) are initially entrained from a rough gravel bed. The field site is Trout Beck, in the North Pennines, Northern England which is an upland wandering river channel with occasional lateral and mid channel bars. Mean low flow stage is typically 0.2 m but during flood can rapidly rise, in one to two hours, to over 1.5 m. To study peat block entrainment a bespoke data acquisition system consisting of two pressure transducers, four release triggers and time lapse camera was set up. The pressure transducers provided a record of local depth and the release triggers were embedded in peat blocks to record initial motion and arranged on the rough stream bed. The time lapse camera provided verification of timing of block entrainment (during daylight hours) and also provided information on the mechanism of initial movement. Peat blocks were cut from a local source and were equidimensional, ranging in size from 0.1 to 0.7 m. The derived entrainment function is related to a critical depth of entrainment. Results demonstrate that peat blocks are entrained when the local depth approximates the height of the peat block. Blocks frequently shift

  15. Rep provides a second motor at the replisome to promote duplication of protein-bound DNA.

    PubMed

    Guy, Colin P; Atkinson, John; Gupta, Milind K; Mahdi, Akeel A; Gwynn, Emma J; Rudolph, Christian J; Moon, Peter B; van Knippenberg, Ingeborg C; Cadman, Chris J; Dillingham, Mark S; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2009-11-25

    Nucleoprotein complexes present challenges to genome stability by acting as potent blocks to replication. One attractive model of how such conflicts are resolved is direct targeting of blocked forks by helicases with the ability to displace the blocking protein-DNA complex. We show that Rep and UvrD each promote movement of E. coli replisomes blocked by nucleoprotein complexes in vitro, that such an activity is required to clear protein blocks (primarily transcription complexes) in vivo, and that a polarity of translocation opposite that of the replicative helicase is critical for this activity. However, these two helicases are not equivalent. Rep but not UvrD interacts physically and functionally with the replicative helicase. In contrast, UvrD likely provides a general means of protein-DNA complex turnover during replication, repair, and recombination. Rep and UvrD therefore provide two contrasting solutions as to how organisms may promote replication of protein-bound DNA. PMID:19941825

  16. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePlus

    ... leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements ... The slow twisting movements of muscles (athetosis) or jerky muscle ... including: Cerebral palsy Drug side effects Encephalitis ...

  17. Estrogen, testosterone, and sequential movement in men.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jessica A; Young, Laura A; Neiss, Michelle B; Samuels, Mary H; Roselli, Charles E; Janowsky, Jeri S

    2008-10-01

    Behavioral and physiological data suggest that the striatal dopaminergic system is important in the production and execution of sequential movements. Striatal function is also modulated by sex hormones, and previous studies show that estradiol is related to sequential movement in women. The authors examined whether sex hormones are involved in the production of sequential movement in healthy older and younger men. Testosterone was modified for a 6-week period such that levels in older men matched those of younger men, the conversion of testosterone to estradiol was blocked, the production of testosterone was blocked, or the men received no treatment (placebo). Sequential movement was measured before and after hormone treatment. Older men were slower and more accurate than younger men on the sequential movement task pre- and posttreatment. Hormone manipulation had no effect on movement speed. Hormone levels were not correlated with sequential movement performance in either older or younger men, suggesting that sex hormones do not modulate sequential movement in men, and hormone replacement may not restore a loss of sequential movement ability in elderly men or men with Parkinson's disease. PMID:18823152

  18. A Novel N-terminal Motif of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-like Proteins Produces Rapid Inactivation of Kv4.2 Channels by a Pore-blocking Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jerng, Henry H.; Dougherty, Kevin; Covarrubias, Manuel; Pfaffinger, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The somatodendritic subthreshold A-type K+ current in neurons (ISA) depends on its kinetic and voltage-dependent properties to regulate membrane excitability, action potential repetitive firing, and signal integration. Key functional properties of the Kv4 channel complex underlying ISA are determined by dipeptidyl peptidase-like proteins known as dipeptidyl peptidase 6 (DPP6) and dipeptidyl peptidase 10 (DPP10). Among the multiple known DPP10 isoforms with alternative N-terminal sequences, DPP10a confers exceptionally fast inactivation to Kv4.2 channels. To elucidate the molecular basis of this fast inactivation, we investigated the structure-function relationship of the DPP10a N-terminal region and its interaction with the Kv4.2 channel. Here, we show that DPP10a shares a conserved N-terminal sequence (MNQTA) with DPP6a (aka DPP6-E), which also induces fast inactivation. Deletion of the NQTA sequence in DPP10a eliminates this dramatic fast inactivation, and perfusion of MNQTA peptide to the cytoplasmic face of inside-out patches inhibits the Kv4.2 current. DPP10a-induced fast inactivation exhibits competitive interactions with internally applied tetraethylammonium (TEA), and elevating the external K+ concentration accelerates recovery from DPP10a-mediated fast inactivation. These results suggest that fast inactivation induced by DPP10a or DPP6a is mediated by a common N-terminal inactivation motif via a pore-blocking mechanism. This mechanism may offer an attractive target for novel pharmacological interventions directed at impairing ISA inactivation and reducing neuronal excitability. PMID:19901547

  19. Coordinate 5′ and 3′ endonucleolytic trimming of terminally blocked blunt DNA double-strand break ends by Artemis nuclease and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yannone, Steven M.; Khan, Imran S.; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; Povirk, Lawrence F.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work showed that, in the presence of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), Artemis slowly trims 3′-phosphoglycolate-terminated blunt ends. To examine the trimming reaction in more detail, long internally labeled DNA substrates were treated with Artemis. In the absence of DNA-PK, Artemis catalyzed extensive 5′→3′ exonucleolytic resection of double-stranded DNA. This resection required a 5′-phosphate, but did not require ATP, and was accompanied by endonucleolytic cleavage of the resulting 3′ overhang. In the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis-mediated trimming was more limited, was ATP-dependent and did not require a 5′-phosphate. For a blunt end with either a 3′-phosphoglycolate or 3′-hydroxyl terminus, endonucleolytic trimming of 2–4 nucleotides from the 3′-terminal strand was accompanied by trimming of 6 nt from the 5′-terminal strand. The results suggest that autophosphorylated DNA-PK suppresses the exonuclease activity of Artemis toward blunt-ended DNA, and promotes slow and limited endonucleolytic trimming of the 5′-terminal strand, resulting in short 3′ overhangs that are trimmed endonucleolytically. Thus, Artemis and DNA-PK can convert terminally blocked DNA ends of diverse geometry and chemical structure to a form suitable for polymerase-mediated patching and ligation, with minimal loss of terminal sequence. Such processing could account for the very small deletions often found at DNA double-strand break repair sites. PMID:18440975

  20. SD-208, a Novel Protein Kinase D Inhibitor, Blocks Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth In Vivo by Inducing G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Manuj; Salamoun, Joseph M.; Carder, Evan J.; Farber, Elisa; Xu, Shuping; Deng, Fan; Tang, Hua; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Q. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis and progression, and is an emerging molecular target for the development of anticancer therapy. Despite recent advancement in the development of potent and selective PKD small molecule inhibitors, the availability of in vivo active PKD inhibitors remains sparse. In this study, we describe the discovery of a novel PKD small molecule inhibitor, SD-208, from a targeted kinase inhibitor library screen, and the synthesis of a series of analogs to probe the structure-activity relationship (SAR) vs. PKD1. SD-208 displayed a narrow SAR profile, was an ATP-competitive pan-PKD inhibitor with low nanomolar potency and was cell active. Targeted inhibition of PKD by SD-208 resulted in potent inhibition of cell proliferation, an effect that could be reversed by overexpressed PKD1 or PKD3. SD-208 also blocked prostate cancer cell survival and invasion, and arrested cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Mechanistically, SD-208-induced G2/M arrest was accompanied by an increase in levels of p21 in DU145 and PC3 cells as well as elevated phosphorylation of Cdc2 and Cdc25C in DU145 cells. Most importantly, SD-208 given orally for 24 days significantly abrogated the growth of PC3 subcutaneous tumor xenografts in nude mice, which was accompanied by reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis and decreased expression of PKD biomarkers including survivin and Bcl-xL. Our study has identified SD-208 as a novel efficacious PKD small molecule inhibitor, demonstrating the therapeutic potential of targeted inhibition of PKD for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:25747583

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus K3 and K5 Proteins Block Distinct Steps in Transendothelial Migration of Effector Memory CD4+ T cells by Targeting Different Endothelial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Thomas D.; Hoer, Simon; Muller, William A.; Lehner, Paul J.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2010-01-01

    K3 and K5 are Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded E3 ubiquitin ligases that differentially reduce surface expression of various proteins in infected cells. Here we describe their effects on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC), a natural target of KSHV infection. TNF-treated HDMEC transduced to express K5 show reduced capacity to capture effector memory (EM) CD4+ T cells under conditions of venular shear stress. K5 but not K3 transduction significantly reduces ICAM-1 expression and the inhibition of T cell capture was phenocopied by siRNA knockdown of ICAM-1 and by anti-ICAM-1 Ab blocking. Co-transduction with an ICAM-1 truncated construct not subject to K5 ubiquitylation restored EM CD4+ T cell capture. K3 transductants effectively capture EM CD4+ T cells, but fail to support their transendothelial migration (TEM) in response to TCR engagement by superantigen presented by the EC, leaving intact chemokine-dependent TEM. K3 but not K5 transduction significantly reduces PECAM-1 expression and the effect on TCR-induced TEM is phenocopied by siRNA knockdown of PECAM-1 and by anti-PECAM-1 Ab blocking. TCR-dependent TEM was restored in K3 transductants co-transduced to express a mutant of PECAM-1 not subject to K3-induced ubiquitylation. EM CD4+ T cells lack any known PECAM-1 counter receptor, but heterophilic engagement of PECAM-1 may involve glycosaminoglycans, and TCR-induced TEM, but not chemokine-induced TEM, appears to involve a heparan- or chondroitin-like molecule on T cells. These results both identify specific roles of K5 and K3 in immune evasion and further differentiate the processes of inflammatory chemokine- versus TCR-dependent recruitment of human EM CD4+ T cells. PMID:20357254

  2. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane-associated, uronide binding phosphoprotein with physical properties similar to viral movement proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, P; Kunz, B; Paul-Pletzer, K; Grimm, R; Eckerskorn, C; Farmer, E E

    1996-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides are structural and regulatory homopolymers from the extracellular pectic matrix of plants. In vitro micromolar concentrations of oligogalacturonates and polygalacturonates were shown previously to stimulate the phosphorylation of a small plasma membrane-associated protein in potato. Immunologically cross-reactive proteins were detected in plasma membrane-enriched fractions from all angiosperm subclasses in the Cronquist system. Polygalacturonate-enhanced phosphorylation of the protein was observed in four of the six dicotyledon subclasses but not in any of the five monocotyledon subclasses. A cDNA for the protein was cloned from potato. The deduced protein is extremely hydrophilic and has a proline-rich N terminus. The C-terminal half of the protein was predicted to be a coiled coil, suggesting that the protein interacts with other macromolecules. The recombinant protein was found to bind both simple and complex galacturonides. The behavior of the protein suggests several parallels with viral proteins involved in intercellular communication. PMID:8989883

  3. Block Matching for Object Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gyaourova, A; Kamath, C; Cheung, S

    2003-10-13

    Models which describe road traffic patterns can be helpful in detection and/or prevention of uncommon and dangerous situations. Such models can be built by the use of motion detection algorithms applied to video data. Block matching is a standard technique for encoding motion in video compression algorithms. We explored the capabilities of the block matching algorithm when applied for object tracking. The goal of our experiments is two-fold: (1) to explore the abilities of the block matching algorithm on low resolution and low frame rate video and (2) to improve the motion detection performance by the use of different search techniques during the process of block matching. Our experiments showed that the block matching algorithm yields good object tracking results and can be used with high success on low resolution and low frame rate video data. We observed that different searching methods have small effect on the final results. In addition, we proposed a technique based on frame history, which successfully overcame false motion caused by small camera movements.

  4. In vivo detection, RNA-binding properties and characterization of the RNA-binding domain of the p7 putative movement protein from carnation mottle carmovirus (CarMV).

    PubMed

    Marcos, J F; Vilar, M; Pérez-Payá, E; Pallás, V

    1999-03-15

    Biochemical and structural characterization studies on the p7 putative movement protein from a Spanish isolate of carnation mottle carmovirus (CarMV) have been conducted. The CarMV p7 gene was fused to a sequence coding for a six-histidine tag and expressed in bacteria, allowing the purification of CarMV p7 and the production of a specific antiserum. This antiserum led to the immunological identification of CarMV p7 in infected leaf tissue from the experimental host Chenopodium quinoa. Putative nucleic acid-binding properties of the CarMV p7 have been explored and demonstrated with both electrophoretic mobility shift and RNA-protein blot in vitro assays using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes. CarMV p7 did not show preferential binding to any of the different regions of the CarMV genomic RNA tested, suggesting that RNA binding was sequence nonspecific. Quantitative analyses of the data allowed calculation of the apparent dissociation constant of the p7-RNA complex (Kd approximately 0.7 microM) and supported a cooperative type of binding. A small 19-amino-acid synthetic peptide whose sequence corresponds to the putative RNA-binding domain of CarMV p7, at the basic central part of the protein, was synthesized, and it was demonstrated that it binds viral RNA probes. Peptide RNA binding was as stable as p7 binding, although data indicated it was not cooperative, thus suggesting that this cooperative binding requires another motif or motifs within the p7 amino acid sequence. The peptide could be induced to fold into an alpha-helix structure in which amino acids that are conserved among carmovirus p7-like proteins are distributed on one side. This alpha-helix motif could define a new and previously uncharacterized RNA-binding domain for plant virus movement proteins. PMID:10069961

  5. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... the P and the R waves on the EKG (electrocardiogram). First-degree heart block may not cause ...

  6. Mutations affecting two adjacent amino acid residues in the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase block transcriptional activation by the bacteriophage P2 Ogr protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, D J; Sunshine, M G; Six, E W; Christie, G E

    1994-01-01

    The bacteriophage P2 ogr gene product is a positive regulator of transcription from P2 late promoters. The ogr gene was originally defined by compensatory mutations that overcame the block to P2 growth imposed by a host mutation, rpoA109, in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase. DNA sequence analysis has confirmed that this mutation affects the C-terminal region of the alpha subunit, changing a leucine residue at position 290 to a histidine (rpoAL290H). We have employed a reporter plasmid system to screen other, previously described, rpoA mutants for effects on activation of a P2 late promoter and have identified a second allele, rpoA155, that blocks P2 late transcription. This mutation lies just upstream of rpoAL290H, changing the leucine residue at position 289 to a phenylalanine (rpoAL289F). The effect of the rpoAL289F mutation is not suppressed by the rpoAL290H-compensatory P2 ogr mutation. P2 ogr mutants that overcome the block imposed by rpoAL289F were isolated and characterized. Our results are consistent with a direct interaction between Ogr and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase and support a model in which transcription factor contact sites within the C terminus of alpha are discrete and tightly clustered. PMID:8002564

  7. 2-Methoxy-4-vinylphenol can induce cell cycle arrest by blocking the hyper-phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein in benzo[a]pyrene-treated NIH3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Jeong, Hyung Jin

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} 2M4VP activated the expression of p21 and p15 protein, and down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E. {yields} 2M4VP inhibited hyper-phosphorylation of Rb protein. {yields} 2M4VP induced cell cycle arrest from G1 to S. {yields} 2M4VP inhibited hyper-proliferation of the cells in BaP-treated cells. {yields} 2M4VP induces growth arrest of BaP-treated cells by blocking hyper-phosphorylation of Rb via regulating the expression of cell cycle-related proteins. -- Abstract: Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is an environment carcinogen that can enhance cell proliferation by disturbing the signal transduction pathways in cell cycle regulation. In this study, the effects of 2M4VP on cell proliferation, cell cycle and cell cycle regulatory proteins were studied in BaP-treated NIH 3T3 cells to establish the molecular mechanisms of 2M4VP as anti-proliferative agents. 2M4VP exerted a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell growth correlated with a G1 arrest. Analysis of G1 cell cycle regulators expression revealed 2M4VP increased expression of CDK inhibitor, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b, decreased expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and inhibited kinase activities of CDK4 and CDK2. However, 2M4VP did not affect the expression of CDK4 and CDK2. Also, 2M4VP inhibited the hyper-phosphorylation of Rb induced by BaP. Our results suggest that 2M4VP induce growth arrest of BaP-treated NIH 3T3 cells by blocking the hyper-phosphorylation of Rb via regulating the expression of cell cycle-related proteins.

  8. Block ground interaction of rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkwein, Axel; Gerber, Werner; Kummer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    During a rockfall the interaction of the falling block with the ground is one of the most important factors that define the evolution of a rockfall trajectory. It steers the rebound, the rotational movement, possibly brake effects, friction losses and damping effects. Therefore, if most reliable rockfall /trajectory simulation software is sought a good understanding of the block ground interaction is necessary. Today's rockfall codes enable the simulation of a fully 3D modelled block within a full 3D surface . However, the details during the contact, i.e. the contact duration, the penetration depth or the dimension of the marks in the ground are usually not part of the simulation. Recent field tests with rocks between 20 and 80 kg have been conducted on a grassy slope in 2014 [1]. A special rockfall sensor [2] within the blocks measured the rotational velocity and the acting accelerations during the tests. External video records and a so-called LocalPositioningSystem deliver information on the travel velocity. With these data not only the flight phases of the trajectories but also the contacts with the ground can be analysed. During the single jumps of a block the flight time, jump length, the velocity, and the rotation are known. During the single impacts their duration and the acting accelerations are visible. Further, the changes of rotational and translational velocity influence the next jump of the block. The change of the rotational velocity over the whole trajectory nicely visualizes the different phases of a rockfall regarding general acceleration and deceleration in respect to the inclination and the topography of the field. References: [1] Volkwein A, Krummenacher B, Gerber W, Lardon J, Gees F, Brügger L, Ott T (2015) Repeated controlled rockfall trajectory testing. [Abstract] Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17: EGU2015-9779. [2] Volkwein A, Klette J (2014) Semi-Automatic Determination of Rockfall Trajectories. Sensors 14: 18187-18210.

  9. Cues to Intention: The Role of Movement Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Luisa; Becchio, Cristina; Castiello, Umberto

    2011-01-01

    Body movement provides a rich source of cues about other people's goals and intentions. In the present research, we investigate how well people can distinguish between different social intentions on the basis of movement information. Participants observed a model reaching toward and grasping a wooden block with the intent to cooperate with a…

  10. Tregs utilize beta-galactoside-binding protein to transiently inhibit PI3K/p21ras activity of human CD8+ T cells to block their TCR-mediated ERK activity and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baatar, Dolgor; Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Wells, Valerie; Indig, Fred E; Mallucci, Livio; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and beta-galactoside-binding protein (betaGBP), a regulatory protein often found expressed at sites of immunological privilege, have similar functions. Their presence affects the outcome of harmful autoimmunity and cancers, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and malignant gliomas. Here we report a novel pathway by which Tregs express and utilize betaGBP to control CD8(+) T cell responses partially activating TCR signaling but blocking PI3K activity. As a result, this leads to a loss of p21(ras), ERK and Akt activities despite activation of TCR proximal signals, such as phosphorylation of CD3zeta, Zap70, Lat and PKCtheta. Although non-processive TCR signaling often leads to cell anergy, Tregs/betaGBP did not affect cell viability. Instead, betaGBP/Tregs transiently prevented activation of CD8(+) T cells with self-antigens, while keeping their responses to xenogeneic antigens unaffected. PMID:19520156

  11. Formation of virions is strictly required for turnip yellows virus long-distance movement in plants.

    PubMed

    Hipper, Clémence; Monsion, Baptiste; Bortolamiol-Bécet, Diane; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2014-02-01

    Viral genomic RNA of the Turnip yellows virus (TuYV; genus Polerovirus; family Luteoviridae) is protected in virions formed by the major capsid protein (CP) and the minor component, the readthrough (RT*) protein. Long-distance transport, used commonly by viruses to systemically infect host plants, occurs in phloem sieve elements and two viral forms of transport have been described: virions and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. With regard to poleroviruses, virions have always been presumed to be the long-distance transport form, but the potential role of RNP complexes has not been investigated. Here, we examined the requirement of virions for polerovirus systemic movement by analysing CP-targeted mutants that were unable to form viral particles. We confirmed that TuYV mutants that cannot encapsidate into virions are not able to reach systemic leaves. To completely discard the possibility that the introduced mutations in CP simply blocked the formation or the movement of RNP complexes, we tested in trans complementation of TuYV CP mutants by providing WT CP expressed in transgenic plants. WT CP was able to facilitate systemic movement of TuYV CP mutants and this observation was always correlated with the formation of virions. This demonstrated clearly that virus particles are essential for polerovirus systemic movement. PMID:24214396

  12. Heat shock protein 70 negatively regulates the heat-shock-induced suppression of the I{kappa}B/NF-{kappa}B cascade by facilitating I{kappa}B kinase renaturation and blocking its further denaturation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Choon-Taek; Kim, Young Whan ||; Han, Sung Koo ||; Shim, Young-Soo ||; Yoo, Chul-Gyu ||. E-mail: cgyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-07-01

    Heat shock (HS) treatment has been previously shown to suppress the I{kappa}B/nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) cascade by denaturing, and thus inactivating I{kappa}B kinase (IKK). HS is characterized by the induction of a group of heat shock proteins (HSPs). However, their role in the HS-induced suppression of the I{kappa}B/NF-{kappa}B cascade is unclear. Adenovirus-mediated HSP70 overexpression was found not to suppress the TNF-{alpha}-induced activation of the I{kappa}B/NF-{kappa}B pathway, thus suggesting that HSP70 is unlikely to suppress this pathway. When TNF-{alpha}-induced activation of the I{kappa}B/NF-{kappa}B pathway was regained 24 h after HS, HSP70 was found to be highly up-regulated. Moreover, blocking HSP70 induction delayed TNF-{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation and the resolubilization of IKK. In addition, HSP70 associated physically with IKK, suggesting that HSP70 is involved in the recovery process via molecular chaperone effect. Adenovirus-mediated HSP70 overexpression prior to HS blocked the I{kappa}B{alpha} stabilizing effect of HS by suppressing IKK insolubilization. Moreover, the up-regulation of endogenous HSP70 by preheating, suppressed this subsequent HS-induced IKK insolubilization, and this effect was abrogated by blocking HSP70 induction. These findings indicate that HSP70 accumulates during HS and negatively regulates the HS-induced suppression of the I{kappa}B/NF-{kappa}B cascade by facilitating the renaturation of IKK and blocking its further denaturation.

  13. MIBSA: Multi Interacting Blocks for Slope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattola, Giuseppe; Crosta, Giovanni; Castellanza, Riccardo; di Prisco, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    As it is well known, the slope instabilities have very important consequences in terms of human lives and activities. So predicting the evolution in time and space of slope mass movements becomes fundamental. This is even more relevant when we consider that the triggering mechanisms are a rising ground water level and the occurrence of earthquakes. Therefore, seasonal rainfall has a direct influence on the triggering of large rock and earthslide with a composite failure surface and causing differential behaviors within the sliding mass. In this contribution, a model describing the slope mass by means of an array of blocks that move on a prefixed failure surface, is defined. A shear band located at the base of each block, whose behavior is modelled via a viscous plastic model based on the Perzyna's approach, controls the slip velocity of the block. The motion of the blocks is obtained by solving the second balance equation in which the normal and tangential interaction forces are obtained by a specific interaction model. The model has been implemented in an original code and it is used to perform a parametric analysis that describes the effects of block interactions under a transient ground water oscillation. The numerical results confirm that the normal and tangential interactions between blocks can inhibit or induce the slope movements. The model is tested against some real case studies. This model is under development to add the dynamic effects generated by earthquake shaking.

  14. Envelope formation is blocked by mutation of a sequence related to the HKD phospholipid metabolism motif in the vaccinia virus F13L protein.

    PubMed

    Roper, R L; Moss, B

    1999-02-01

    The outer envelope of the extracellular form of vaccinia virus is derived from Golgi membranes that have been modified by the insertion of specific viral proteins, of which the major component is the 37-kDa, palmitylated, nonglycosylated product of the F13L gene. The F13L protein contains a variant of the HKD (His-Lys-Asp) motif, which is conserved in numerous enzymes of phospholipid metabolism. Vaccinia virus mutants with a conservative substitution of either the K (K314R) or the D (D319E) residue of the F13L protein formed only tiny plaques similar to those produced by an F13L deletion mutant, were unable to produce extracellular enveloped virions, and failed to mediate low-pH-induced fusion of infected cells. Membrane-wrapped forms of intracellular virus were rarely detected in electron microscopic images of cells infected with either of the mutants. Western blotting and pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the D319E protein was less stable than either the K314R or wild-type F13L protein. Most striking, however, was the failure of either of the two mutated proteins to concentrate in the Golgi compartment. Palmitylation, oleation, and partitioning of the F13L protein in Triton X-114 detergent were unaffected by the K314R substitution. These results indicated that the F13L protein must retain the K314 and D319 for it to localize in the Golgi compartment and function in membrane envelopment of vaccinia virus. PMID:9882312

  15. Peptides from cytomegalovirus UL130 and UL131 proteins induce high titer antibodies that block viral entry into mucosal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccio, Frances M.; Sauer, Anne L.; Cui, Xiaohong; Armstrong, Amy E.; Habib, EL-Sayed E.; Johnson, David C.; Ryckman, Brent J.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Adler, Stuart P.; McVoy, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infections are an important cause of disease for which no licensed vaccine exists. Recent studies have focused on the gH/gL/UL128-131 complex as antibodies to gH/gL/UL128-131 neutralize viral entry into epithelial cells. Prior studies have used cells from the retinal pigment epithelium, while to prevent transmission, vaccine-induced antibodies may need to block viral infection of epithelial cells of the oral or genital mucosa. We found that gH/gL/UL128-131 is necessary for efficient viral entry into epithelial cells derived from oral and genital mucosa, that short peptides from UL130 and UL131 elicit high titer neutralizing antibodies in rabbits, and that such antibodies neutralize viral entry into epithelial cells derived from these relevant tissues. These results suggest that single subunits or peptides may be sufficient to elicit potent epithelial entry neutralizing responses and that secretory antibodies to such neutralizing epitopes have the potential to provide sterilizing immunity by blocking initial mucosal infection. PMID:21310190

  16. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  17. HIV-1 capsids bind and exploit the kinesin-1 adaptor FEZ1 for inward movement to the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Malikov, Viacheslav; da Silva, Eveline Santos; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Bennett, Geoffrey; de Souza Aranha Vieira, Daniel A.; Schulte, Bianca; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Walsh, Derek; Naghavi, Mojgan H.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport of cargos, including many viruses, involves directed movement on microtubules mediated by motor proteins. While a number of viruses bind motors of opposing directionality, how they associate with and control these motors to accomplish directed movement remains poorly understood. Here we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) associates with the kinesin-1 adaptor protein, Fasiculation and Elongation Factor zeta 1 (FEZ1). RNAi-mediated FEZ1 depletion blocks early infection, with virus particles exhibiting bidirectional motility but no net movement to the nucleus. Furthermore, both dynein and kinesin-1 motors are required for HIV-1 trafficking to the nucleus. Finally, the ability of exogenously expressed FEZ1 to promote early HIV-1 infection requires binding to kinesin-1. Our findings demonstrate that opposing motors both contribute to early HIV-1 movement and identify the kinesin-1 adaptor, FEZ1 as a capsid-associated host regulator of this process usurped by HIV-1 to accomplish net inward movement toward the nucleus. PMID:25818806

  18. A search for mosquito larvicidal compounds by blocking the sterol carrying protein, AeSCP-2, through computational screening and docking strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Shanmugapriya, B.; Thiyagesan, K.; Kumar, S. Raj; Xavier, Suresh M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sterol is a very vital compound for most of the insects and mosquitoes to complete their life cycle. Unfortunately mosquitoes cannot synthesize the sterol, it depends on mammals for the same. Mosquitoes take the sterol from the plant decays during their larval stage in the form of phytosterol, which is then converted to cholesterol for further growth and reproduction. This conversion occurs with the help of the sterol carrier protein 2(SCP2). Methods: Mosquito populations are controlled by plant-based inhibitors, which inhibit sterol carrier protein (SCPI-Sterol carrier protein inhibitor) activity. In this article, we explain the methods of inhibiting Aedes aegypti SCP2 by insilico methods including natural inhibitor selection and filtrations by virtual screening and interaction studies. Results: In this study protein-ligand interactions were carried out with various phytochemicals, as a result of virtual screening Alpha-mangostin and Panthenol were found to be good analogs, and were allowed to dock with the mosquito cholesterol carrier protein AeSCP-2. Conclusion: Computational selections of SCPIs are highly reliable and novel methods for discovering new and more effective compounds to control mosquitoes. PMID:21808576

  19. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and "blinded" electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials. PMID:21326826

  20. Preparation of the cortical reaction: maturation-dependent migration of SNARE proteins, clathrin, and complexin to the porcine oocyte's surface blocks membrane traffic until fertilization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Shiue; van Haeften, Theo; Gadella, Bart M

    2011-02-01

    The cortical reaction is a calcium-dependent exocytotic process in which the content of secretory granules is released into the perivitellin space immediately after fertilization, which serves to prevent polyspermic fertilization. In this study, we investigated the involvement and the organization of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins in the docking and fusion of the cortical granule membrane with the oolemma in porcine oocytes. During meiotic maturation, secretory vesicles that were labeled with a granule-specific binding lectin, peanut agglutinin (PNA), migrated toward the oocyte's surface. This surface-orientated redistribution behavior was also observed for the oocyte-specific SNARE proteins SNAP23 and VAMP1 that colocalized with the PNA-labeled structures in the cortex area just under the oolemma and with the exclusive localization area of complexin (a trans-SNARE complex-stabilizing protein). The coming together of these proteins serves to prevent the spontaneous secretion of the docked cortical granules and to prepare the oocyte's surface for the cortical reaction, which should probably be immediately compensated for by a clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In vitro fertilization resulted in the secretion of the cortical granule content and the concomitant release of complexin and clathrin into the oocyte's cytosol, and this is considered to stimulate the observed endocytosis of SNARE-containing membrane vesicles. PMID:20944080

  1. Tanshinone IIA decreases the protein expression of EGFR, and IGFR blocking the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in gastric carcinoma AGS cells both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Su, Chin-Cheng; Chiu, Tsung-Lang

    2016-08-01

    Tan-IIA exerts powerful inhibitory effects in gastric cancer AGS cells. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is one of the most frequently dysregulated kinase cascades in human cancer. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression levels of PI3K, AKT and mTOR in AGS cells treated with Tan-IIA both in vitro and in vivo. The AGS cells were treated with Tan-IIA for different durations in vitro. In the in vivo study, AGS cell xerograft SCID mice were treated with Tan-IIA for 8 weeks. Subsequently, the protein expression of EGFR, IGFR, PI3K, AKT and mTOR was measured by western blotting. The results showed that Tan-IIA was able to decrease the protein expression levels of EGFR, IGFR, PI3K, AKT and mTOR significantly and dose-dependently in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, these findings indicate Tan-IIA could inhibit AGS cells through decreasing the protein expression of EGFR, IGFR and blocking PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27277844

  2. Movement - unpredictable or jerky

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy (chorea gravidarum) Stroke Systemic lupus erythematosus Tardive dyskinesia (a condition that can be caused by medicines ... uncontrolled); Hyperkinetic movements References Jankovic J, Lang AE. Movement disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta ...

  3. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  4. Eye Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  5. Linking Literacy and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  6. Nb is a TIR-NLR innate immune receptor that requires EDS1 for induction of the hypersensitive response to the potato virus X movement protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dominant plant resistance (R)-genes against viruses are needed for protection of major crops from virus diseases. Characterized resistance R-genes and viral effector proteins are needed to understand host resistance mechanisms to optimize plant defense against viruses. Of the many hundreds of resist...

  7. Effect of post-exercise protein-leucine feeding on neutrophil function, immunomodulatory plasma metabolites and cortisol during a 6-day block of intense cycling.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andre R; Jackson, Lara; Clarke, Jim; Stellingwerff, Trent; Broadbent, Suzanne; Rowlands, David S

    2013-09-01

    Whey protein and leucine ingestion following exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and could influence neutrophil function during recovery from prolonged intense exercise. We examined the effects of whey protein and leucine ingestion post-exercise on neutrophil function and immunomodulators during a period of intense cycling. In a randomized double-blind crossover, 12 male cyclists ingested protein/leucine/carbohydrate/fat (LEUPRO 20/7.5/89/22 g h(-1), respectively) or isocaloric carbohydrate/fat control (CON 119/22 g h(-1)) beverages for 1-3 h post-exercise during 6 days of high-intensity training. Blood was taken pre- and post-exercise on days 1, 2, 4 and 6 for phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophil superoxide (O2 (-)) production, immune cell counts, amino acid and lipid metabolism via metabolomics, hormones (cortisol, testosterone) and cytokines (interleukin-6, interleukin-10). During recovery on day 1, LEUPRO ingestion increased mean concentrations of plasma amino acids (glycine, arginine, glutamine, leucine) and myristic acid metabolites (acylcarnitines C14, myristoylcarnitine; and C14:1-OH, hydroxymyristoleylcarnitine) with neutrophil priming capacity, and reduced neutrophil O2 production (15-17 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1) ± 90 % confidence limits 20 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1)). On day 2, LEUPRO increased pre-exercise plasma volume (6.6 ± 3.8 %) but haematological effects were trivial. LEUPRO supplementation did not substantially alter neutrophil elastase, testosterone, or cytokine concentrations. By day 6, however, LEUPRO reduced pre-exercise cortisol 21 % (±15 %) and acylcarnitine C16 (palmitoylcarnitine) during exercise, and increased post-exercise neutrophil O2 (-) (33 ± 20 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1)), relative to control. Altered plasma amino acid and acylcarnitine concentrations with protein-leucine feeding might partly explain the acute post-exercise reduction in neutrophil function and increased exercise-stimulated neutrophil oxidative burst on

  8. A Novel Peptide Derived from Human Pancreatitis-Associated Protein Inhibits Inflammation In Vivo and In Vitro and Blocks NF-Kappa B Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolu; Jin, Huiyi; Liu, Kun; Gu, Qing; Xu, Xun

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) is a pancreatic secretory protein belongs to the group VII of C-type lectin family. Emerging evidence suggests that PAP plays a protective effect in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we newly identified a 16-amino-acid peptide (named PAPep) derived from C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) of human PAP with potent anti-inflammatory activity using both in vivo and in vitro assays. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of PAPep on endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rats and demonstrated that intravitreal pretreatment of PAPep concentration-dependently attenuated clinical manifestation of EIU rats, reduced protein leakage and cell infiltration into the aqueous humor (AqH), suppressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 production in ocular tissues, and improved histopathologic manifestation of EIU. Furthermore, PAPep suppressed the LPS-induced mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in RAW 264.7 cells, inhibited protein expression of ICAM-1 in TNF-α-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as well as U937 cells adhesion to HUVECs. Western blot analysis in ocular tissues and different cell lines revealed that the possible mechanism for this anti-inflammatory effect of PAPep may depend on its ability to inhibit the activation of NF-kB signaling pathway. Conclusions/Significance Our studies provide the first evidence that the sequence of PAPep is within the critically active region for the anti-inflammatory function of PAP and the peptide may be a promising candidate for the management of ocular inflammatory diseases. PMID:22195011

  9. Movement of newly imported light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding protein from unstacked to stacked thylakoid membranes is not affected by light treatment or absence of amino-terminal threonines

    SciTech Connect

    Kohorn, B.D.; Yakir, D. )

    1990-02-05

    In higher plants and algae, the transduction of captured light energy is highly regulated as excess excitation of photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers can be redirected to photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers. Models that attempt to explain this phenomenon involve light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complexes (LHCII) that capture light energy and migrate between PSII and PSI. This report shows that in pea chloroplasts, the major protein component of LHCII, light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding protein (LHCP), can indeed migrate within the thylakoid membrane. We show, however, that although newly imported LHCP inserts into both stacked and unstacked thylakoid membranes, it then moves only from the unstacked, PSI-rich membranes to the stacked, PSII-rich membranes. The observed migration is not affected by light treatment that induces a redistribution of captured light energy (state I-state II transition) that previously was thought to induce LHCP to migrate in the opposite direction, from stacked to unstacked membranes. A mutation that removes the site of LHCP phosphorylation, the proposed trigger of state transitions, also has no effect on the integration and movement of LHCP, but does render LHCP more susceptible to proteolytic degradation. These results are not consistent with current models that deal with the short-term change in the distribution of light energy.

  10. 49 CFR 236.202 - Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal governing movements over hand-operated..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.202 Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch. Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch in the facing direction shall...

  11. 49 CFR 236.202 - Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signal governing movements over hand-operated..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.202 Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch. Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch in the facing direction shall...

  12. 49 CFR 236.202 - Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Signal governing movements over hand-operated..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.202 Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch. Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch in the facing direction shall...

  13. 49 CFR 236.202 - Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signal governing movements over hand-operated..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.202 Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch. Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch in the facing direction shall...

  14. 49 CFR 236.202 - Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Signal governing movements over hand-operated..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.202 Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch. Signal governing movements over hand-operated switch in the facing direction shall...

  15. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants Blocked in the Folding or Subunit Assmbly of the Bacteriophage P22 Tailspike Protein. I. Fine-Structure Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Donna H.; Berget, Peter B.; King, Jonathan

    1980-01-01

    As part of a study of protein folding, we have constructed a fine-structure map of 9 existing and 29 newly isolated UV- and hydroxylamine-induced temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations in gene 9 of Salmonella bacteriophage P22. Gene 9 specifies the polypeptide chain of the multimeric tail spikes, six of which form the cell attachment organelle of the phage. The 38 ts mutants were mapped against deletion lysogens with endpoints in gene 9. They mapped in 10 of the 15 deletion intervals. Two- and three-factor crosses between mutants within each interval indicated that at least 31 ts sites are represented among the 38 mutants. To determine the distribution of ts sites within the physical map, we identified the protein fragments from infection of su- hosts with 10 gene 9 amber mutants. Their molecular weights, ranging from 13,900 to 55,000 daltons, were combined with the genetic data to yield a composite map of gene 9. The 31 ts sites were distributed through most of the gene, but were most densely clustered in the central third.—None of the ts mutant pairs tested exhibited intragenic complementation. Studies of the defective phenotypes of the ts mutants (Goldenberg and King 1981; Smith and King 1981) revealed that most do not affect the thermostability of the mature protein, but instead prevent the folding or subunit assembly of the mutant chains synthesized at restrictive temperature. Thus, many of thes ts mutations identify sites in the polypeptide chain that are critical for the folding or maturation of the tail-spike protein. PMID:7021307

  16. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, ... surgical procedures block activity in all types of neurons. This can cause numbness, paralysis, and other nervous ...

  17. The nuclear localization of the Arabidopsis transcription factor TIP is blocked by its interaction with the coat protein of Turnip crinkle virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Tao; Qu Feng; Morris, T. Jack . E-mail: jmorris@unlnotes.unl.edu

    2005-01-20

    We have previously reported that TIP, an Arabidopsis protein, interacts with the coat protein (CP) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) in yeast cells and that this interaction correlated with the resistance response in the TCV-resistant Arabidopsis ecotype Dijon-17. TIP was also able to activate transcription of reporter genes in yeast cells, suggesting that it is likely a transcription factor. We have now verified the physical interaction between TIP and TCV CP in vitro and showed that CP mutants unable to interact with TIP in yeast cells bind TIP with much lower affinity in vitro. Secondly, we have performed gel shift experiments demonstrating that TIP does not bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The subcellular localization of TIP was also investigated by transiently expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TIP in Nicotiana benthamiana plant cells, which showed that GFP-tagged TIP localizes primarily to nuclei. Significantly, co-expression of TCVCP and GFP-TIP prevented the nuclear localization of TIP. Together, these results suggest that TIP might be a transcription factor involved in regulating the defense response of Arabidopsis to TCV and that its normal role is compromised by interaction with the invading viral CP.

  18. Bacterial AvrRpt2-Like Cysteine Proteases Block Activation of the Arabidopsis Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, MPK4 and MPK111[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Jiang, Xiyuan; Elmore, James Mitch; Mackey, David; Shan, Libo

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, pathogens deliver effectors into host cells to target immune signaling components, including elements of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades. The virulence function of AvrRpt2, one of the first identified Pseudomonas syringae effectors, involves cleavage of the plant defense regulator, RPM1-INTERACTING PROTEIN4 (RIN4), and interference with plant auxin signaling. We show now that AvrRpt2 specifically suppresses the flagellin-induced phosphorylation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MPK4 and MPK11 but not MPK3 or MPK6. This inhibition requires the proteolytic activity of AvrRpt2, is associated with reduced expression of some plant defense genes, and correlates with enhanced pathogen infection in AvrRpt2-expressing transgenic plants. Diverse AvrRpt2-like homologs can be found in some phytopathogens, plant-associated and soil bacteria. Employing these putative bacterial AvrRpt2 homologs and inactive AvrRpt2 variants, we can uncouple the inhibition of MPK4/MPK11 activation from the cleavage of RIN4 and related members from the so-called nitrate-induced family as well as from auxin signaling. Thus, this selective suppression of specific mitogen-activated protein kinases is independent of the previously known AvrRpt2 targets and potentially represents a novel virulence function of AvrRpt2. PMID:27208280

  19. Bacterial AvrRpt2-Like Cysteine Proteases Block Activation of the Arabidopsis Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, MPK4 and MPK11.

    PubMed

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Jiang, Xiyuan; Elmore, James Mitch; Mackey, David; Shan, Libo; Coaker, Gitta; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-07-01

    To establish infection, pathogens deliver effectors into host cells to target immune signaling components, including elements of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades. The virulence function of AvrRpt2, one of the first identified Pseudomonas syringae effectors, involves cleavage of the plant defense regulator, RPM1-INTERACTING PROTEIN4 (RIN4), and interference with plant auxin signaling. We show now that AvrRpt2 specifically suppresses the flagellin-induced phosphorylation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MPK4 and MPK11 but not MPK3 or MPK6. This inhibition requires the proteolytic activity of AvrRpt2, is associated with reduced expression of some plant defense genes, and correlates with enhanced pathogen infection in AvrRpt2-expressing transgenic plants. Diverse AvrRpt2-like homologs can be found in some phytopathogens, plant-associated and soil bacteria. Employing these putative bacterial AvrRpt2 homologs and inactive AvrRpt2 variants, we can uncouple the inhibition of MPK4/MPK11 activation from the cleavage of RIN4 and related members from the so-called nitrate-induced family as well as from auxin signaling. Thus, this selective suppression of specific mitogen-activated protein kinases is independent of the previously known AvrRpt2 targets and potentially represents a novel virulence function of AvrRpt2. PMID:27208280

  20. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.J. . E-mail: sjflint@molbio.princeton.edu; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  1. Myelin-associated proteins block the migration of olfactory ensheathing cells: an in vitro study using single-cell tracking and traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, Sara; Reginensi, Diego; Garcia, Simón; Carulla, Patricia; Moreno-Flores, María Teresa; Wandosell, Francisco; Trepat, Xavier; Bribian, Ana; del Río, José A

    2012-05-01

    Newly generated olfactory receptor axons grow from the peripheral to the central nervous system aided by olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs). Thus, OEC transplantation has emerged as a promising therapy for spinal cord injuries and for other neural diseases. However, these cells do not present a uniform population, but instead a functionally heterogeneous population that exhibits a variety of responses including adhesion, repulsion, and crossover during cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Some studies report that the migratory properties of OECs are compromised by inhibitory molecules and potentiated by chemical gradients. Here, we demonstrated that rodent OECs express all the components of the Nogo receptor complex and that their migration is blocked by myelin. Next, we used cell tracking and traction force microscopy to analyze OEC migration and its mechanical properties over myelin. Our data relate the decrease of traction force of OEC with lower migratory capacity over myelin, which correlates with changes in the F-actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion distribution. Lastly, OEC traction force and migratory capacity is enhanced after cell incubation with the Nogo receptor inhibitor NEP1-40. PMID:22205212

  2. Coordinateendonucleolytic 5' and 3' trimming of terminally blocked blunt DNA double-strand break ends by Artemis nuclease and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Povirk, Lawrence; Yannone, Steven M.; Khan, Imran S.; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; F., Lawrence

    2008-02-18

    Previous work showed that, in the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis slowly trims 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated blunt ends. To examine the trimming reaction in more detail, long internally labeled DNA substrates were treated with Artemis. In the absence of DNA-PK, Artemis catalyzed extensive 5' {yields} 3' exonucleolytic resection of double-stranded DNA. This resection required a 5'-phosphate but did not require ATP, and was accompanied by endonucleolytic cleavage of the resulting 3' overhang. In the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis-mediated trimming was more limited, was ATP-dependent, and did not require a 5'-phosphate. For a blunt end with either a 3'-phosphoglycolate or 3'-hydroxyl terminus, endonucleolytic trimming of 2-4 nucleotides from the 3'-terminal strand was accompanied by trimming of 6 nucleotides from the 5'-terminal strand. The results suggest that autophosphorylated DNA-PK suppresses the exonuclease activity of Artemis toward blunt-ended DNA, and promotes slow and limited endonucleolytic trimming of the 5'-terminal strand, resulting in short 3' overhangs that are trimmed endonucleolytically. Thus, Artemis and DNA-PK can convert terminally blocked DNA ends of diverse geometry and chemical structure to a form suitable for polymerase mediated patching and ligation, with minimal loss of terminal sequence. Such processing could account for the very small deletions often found at DNA double-strand break repair sites.

  3. Block glides offshore Newport Beach, Southern California continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.G.; Clarke, S.H. Jr.; Kennedy, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    The continental slope offshore Newport Beach, California, is characterized by a relatively gentle (approximately 1/sup 0/) grade and is dissected by numerous channels and canyons, of which the most conspicuous is Newport Canyon. An unusual series of block-glide landslides have developed on this lope adjacent to many of these channels. Locally, secondary channels that develop along pull-apart fractures between the slide blocks may service as conduits for downslope sediment movement. A detailed seismic-reflection survey of the area shows that the slope is underlain by soft water-saturated unstable sediment of Quaternary age. The block-glides lie wholly within this sediment; displaced blocks appear to have moved only a short distance downslope and are preserved as intact masses that exhibit downward increasing internal deformation. This deformation reaches a maximum near the front of the displaced mass and in basal beds nearest the slip surface. The morphology of the blocks and their intervening channellike erosional scarps is similar to that of glacial blocks and their associated bergschrunds. The formation of new scarps and the widening of channels formed as pull-aparts by the ongoing process of block movement may contribute to headward erosion and widening of Newport Canyon and its tributaries. Slope failure might be greatly enhanced by strong ground motion associated with nearby earthquakes. The authors suspect that renewed movement occurs on these blocks during major seismic events on the nearby Newport-Inglewood fault (e.g., 1933 M/sub L/ 6.3 event).

  4. The Block Scheduling Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, J. Allen

    Block scheduling encourages increased comprehensive immersion into subject matter, improved teacher-student relationships, and decreased disciplinary problems. While block scheduling may offer many advantages, moving to a block schedule from conventional scheduling can be a major adjustment for both students and teachers. This guide is intended to…

  5. Block Scheduling. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2003-01-01

    What are the effects of block scheduling? Results of transitioning from traditional to block scheduling are mixed. Some studies indicate no change in achievement results, nor change in teachers' opinions about instructional strategies. Other studies show that block scheduling doesn't work well for Advanced Placement or Music courses, that "hard to…

  6. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV. PMID:26436122

  7. Nuclear export of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev is mediated by its activation domain and is blocked by transdominant negative mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Szilvay, A M; Brokstad, K A; Kopperud, R; Haukenes, G; Kalland, K H

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev moves repeatedly between the cytoplasm, a perinuclear zone, the nucleoli, and nucleoplasmic speckles. In this study, we demonstrated by both indirect immunofluorescence and Western immunoblot analysis that nuclear exit of Rev transdominant negative mutants was defective compared with that of wild-type Rev. The basic and activation domains of Rev signal import and export, respectively, of Rev across the nuclear membrane. In cotransfection experiments, mutants containing mutations of Rev inhibited the nuclear egress of wild-type Rev, thus revealing a novel transdominant negative phenotype. PMID:7745679

  8. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morgante, Francesca; Edwards, Mark J.; Espay, Alberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review describes the main clinical features of psychogenic (functional) movement disorders and reports recent advances in diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment. Recent Findings The terminology and definition of patients with psychogenic movement disorders remain subjects of controversy; the term “functional” has been used more frequently in the literature in recent years regarding the neurobiological substrate underpinning these disorders. Correct diagnosis of psychogenic movement disorders should rely not on the exclusion of organic disorders or the sole presence of psychological factors but on the observation or elicitation of clinical features related to the specific movement disorder (ie, a positive or inclusionary rather than exclusionary diagnosis). Sudden onset, spontaneous remissions, and variability over time or during clinical examination are useful “red flags” suggestive of a psychogenic movement disorder. Imaging studies have demonstrated impaired connectivity between limbic and motor areas involved in movement programming and hypoactivity of a brain region that compares expected data with actual sensory data occurring during voluntary movement. Treatment of psychogenic movement disorders begins with ensuring the patient’s acceptance of the diagnosis during the initial debriefing and includes nonpharmacologic (cognitive-behavioral therapy, physiotherapy) and pharmacologic options. Summary Psychogenic movement disorders represent a challenging disorder for neurologists to diagnose and treat. Recent advances have increased understanding of the neurobiological mechanism of psychogenic movement disorders. Treatment with cognitive strategies and physical rehabilitation can benefit some patients. As short duration of disease correlates with better prognosis, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are critical. PMID:24092294

  9. Blocking Delaunay triangulations

    PubMed Central

    Aichholzer, Oswin; Fabila-Monroy, Ruy; Hackl, Thomas; van Kreveld, Marc; Pilz, Alexander; Ramos, Pedro; Vogtenhuber, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Given a set B of n black points in general position, we say that a set of white points W blocks B if in the Delaunay triangulation of B∪W there is no edge connecting two black points. We give the following bounds for the size of the smallest set W blocking B: (i) 3n/2 white points are always sufficient to block a set of n black points, (ii) if B is in convex position, 5n/4 white points are always sufficient to block it, and (iii) at least n−1 white points are always necessary to block a set of n black points. PMID:23483043

  10. Blocking Delaunay triangulations.

    PubMed

    Aichholzer, Oswin; Fabila-Monroy, Ruy; Hackl, Thomas; van Kreveld, Marc; Pilz, Alexander; Ramos, Pedro; Vogtenhuber, Birgit

    2013-02-01

    Given a set B of n black points in general position, we say that a set of white points W blocks B if in the Delaunay triangulation of [Formula: see text] there is no edge connecting two black points. We give the following bounds for the size of the smallest set W blocking B: (i) [Formula: see text] white points are always sufficient to block a set of n black points, (ii) if B is in convex position, [Formula: see text] white points are always sufficient to block it, and (iii) at least [Formula: see text] white points are always necessary to block a set of n black points. PMID:23483043

  11. Inactivation of a putative flagellar motor switch protein FliG1 prevents Borrelia burgdorferi from swimming in highly viscous media and blocks its infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhao; Xu, Hongbin; Zhang, Kai; Liang, Fang Ting

    2015-01-01

    Summary The flagellar motor switch complex protein FliG plays an essential role in flagella biosynthesis and motility. In most motile bacteria, only one fliG homologue is present in the genome. However, several spirochete species have two putative fliG genes (referred to as fliG1 and fliG2) and their roles in flagella assembly and motility remain unknown. In this report, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi was used as a genetic model to investigate the roles of these two fliG homologues. It was found that fliG2 encodes a typical motor switch complex protein that is required for the flagellation and motility of B. burgdorferi. In contrast, the function of fliG1 is quite unique. Disruption of fliG1 did not affect flagellation and the mutant was still motile but failed to translate in highly viscous media. GFP-fusion and motion tracking analyses revealed that FliG1 asymmetrically locates at one end of cells and the loss of fliG1 somehow impacted one bundle of flagella rotation. In addition, animal studies demonstrated that the fliG1− mutant was quickly cleared after inoculation into the murine host, which highlights the importance of the ability to swim in highly viscous media in the infectivity of B. burgdorferi and probably other pathogenic spirochetes. PMID:20180908

  12. Okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, blocks calcium changes, gene expression, and cell death induced by gibberellin in wheat aleurone cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, A; Cappelluti, S; Cervantes-Cervantes, M; Rodriguez, M; Bush, D S

    1996-01-01

    The cereal aleurone functions during germination by secreting hydrolases, mainly alpha-amylase, into the starchy endosperm. Multiple signal transduction pathways exist in cereal aleurone cells that enable them to modulate hydrolase production in response to both hormonal and environmental stimuli. Gibberellic acid (GA) promotes hydrolase production, whereas abscisic acid (ABA), hypoxia, and osmotic stress reduce amylase production. In an effort to identify the components of transduction pathways in aleurone cells, we have investigated the effect of okadaic acid (OA), a protein phosphatase inhibitor, on stimulus-response coupling for GA, ABA, and hypoxia. We found that OA (100 nM) completely inhibited all the GA responses that we measured, from rapid changes in cytosolic Ca2+ through changes in gene expression and accelerated cell death. OA (100 nM) partially inhibited ABA responses, as measured by changes in the level of PHAV1, a cDNA for an ABA-induced mRNA in barley. In contrast, OA had no effect on the response to hypoxia, as measured by changes in cytosolic Ca2+ and by changes in enzyme activity and RNA levels of alcohol dehydrogenase. Our data indicate that OA-sensitive protein phosphatases act early in the transduction pathway of GA but are not involved in the response to hypoxia. These data provide a basis for a model of multiple transduction pathways in which the level of cytosolic Ca2+ is a key point of convergence controlling changes in stimulus-response coupling. PMID:8742711

  13. Block LU factorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, James W.; Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the currently popular 'block algorithms' are scalar algorithms in which the operations have been grouped and reordered into matrix operations. One genuine block algorithm in practical use is block LU factorization, and this has recently been shown by Demmel and Higham to be unstable in general. It is shown here that block LU factorization is stable if A is block diagonally dominant by columns. Moreover, for a general matrix the level of instability in block LU factorization can be founded in terms of the condition number kappa(A) and the growth factor for Gaussian elimination without pivoting. A consequence is that block LU factorization is stable for a matrix A that is symmetric positive definite or point diagonally dominant by rows or columns as long as A is well-conditioned.

  14. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD. PMID:26065126

  15. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  16. Concurrent visual feedback and spatial accuracy in continuous aiming movements.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, David E; Rothman, Kelly K

    2011-12-01

    The effect of concurrent visual feedback (CVF) on continuous aiming movements was investigated in the preferred hand of participants of college age (ns = 12 men, 8 women). Participants made continuous rapid reversal movements with a lightweight lever in the sagittal plane. Participants attempted to reach a short target (20 degrees) and a long target (60 degrees) in separate constant practice conditions, but alternated between the two targets in a variable practice condition. Four blocks of practice trials were provided in each condition, with 40 movements made in each. CVF of the position-time trace was provided for the first 20 movements of each block, but was removed for the remaining 20 movements in each block. Movements were more accurate and consistent during constant practice compared to variable practice where the short target was overshot and the long target was undershot. CVF reduced errors in all conditions, compared to movements without CVF, particularly for the short target during variable practice. The results suggest that the interference generated by alternating targets can be modulated by providing visual feedback, but once the visual feedback was removed, errors increased markedly. PMID:22403928

  17. Molecular requirements for bi-directional movement of phagosomes along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Blocker, A; Severin, F F; Burkhardt, J K; Bingham, J B; Yu, H; Olivo, J C; Schroer, T A; Hyman, A A; Griffiths, G

    1997-04-01

    Microtubules facilitate the maturation of phagosomes by favoring their interactions with endocytic compartments. Here, we show that phagosomes move within cells along tracks of several microns centrifugally and centripetally in a pH- and microtubule-dependent manner. Phagosome movement was reconstituted in vitro and required energy, cytosol and membrane proteins of this organelle. The activity or presence of these phagosome proteins was regulated as the organelle matured, with "late" phagosomes moving threefold more frequently than "early" ones. The majority of moving phagosomes were minus-end directed; the remainder moved towards microtubule plus-ends and a small subset moved bi-directionally. Minus-end movement showed pharmacological characteristics expected for dyneins, was inhibited by immunodepletion of cytoplasmic dynein and could be restored by addition of cytoplasmic dynein. Plus-end movement displayed pharmacological properties of kinesin, was inhibited partially by immunodepletion of kinesin and fully by addition of an anti-kinesin IgG. Immunodepletion of dynactin, a dynein-activating complex, inhibited only minus-end directed motility. Evidence is provided for a dynactin-associated kinase required for dynein-mediated vesicle transport. Movement in both directions was inhibited by peptide fragments from kinectin (a putative kinesin membrane receptor), derived from the region to which a motility-blocking antibody binds. Polypeptide subunits from these microtubule-based motility factors were detected on phagosomes by immunoblotting or immunoelectron microscopy. This is the first study using a single in vitro system that describes the roles played by kinesin, kinectin, cytoplasmic dynein, and dynactin in the microtubule-mediated movement of a purified membrane organelle. PMID:9105041

  18. The mathematics of movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  19. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    PubMed

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  20. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  1. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  2. Evidence for the existence of a sulfonylurea-receptor-like protein in plants: Modulation of stomatal movements and guard cell potassium channels by sulfonylureas and potassium channel openers

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Nathalie; Marin, Elena; Vavasseur, Alain; Forestier, Cyrille

    1997-01-01

    Limitation of water loss and control of gas exchange is accomplished in plant leaves via stomatal guard cells. Stomata open in response to light when an increase in guard cell turgor is triggered by ions and water influx across the plasma membrane. Recent evidence demonstrating the existence of ATP-binding cassette proteins in plants led us to analyze the effect of compounds known for their ability to modulate ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATP) in animal cells. By using epidermal strip bioassays and whole-cell patch-clamp experiments with Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts, we describe a pharmacological profile that is specific for the outward K+ channel and very similar to the one described for ATP-sensitive potassium channels in mammalian cells. Tolbutamide and glibenclamide induced stomatal opening in bioassays and in patch-clamp experiments, a specific inhibition of the outward K+ channel by these compounds was observed. Conversely, application of potassium channel openers such as cromakalim or RP49356 triggered stomatal closure. An apparent competition between sulfonylureas and potassium channel openers occurred in bioassays, and outward potassium currents, previously inhibited by glibenclamide, were partially recovered after application of cromakalim. By using an expressed sequence tag clone from an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of the sulfonylurea receptor, a 7-kb transcript was detected by Northern blot analysis in guard cells and other tissues. Beside the molecular evidence recently obtained for the expression of ATP-binding cassette protein transcripts in plants, these results give pharmacological support to the presence of a sulfonylurea-receptor-like protein in the guard-cell plasma membrane tightly involved in the outward potassium channel regulation during stomatal movements. PMID:9391169

  3. Bipart: Learning Block Structure for Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Lo, Henry Z.; Ding, Wei; Amaral, Kevin; Crouter, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity consists complex behavior, typically structured in bouts which can consist of one continuous movement (e.g. exercise) or many sporadic movements (e.g. household chores). Each bout can be represented as a block of feature vectors corresponding to the same activity type. This paper introduces a general distance metric technique to use this block representation to first predict activity type, and then uses the predicted activity to estimate energy expenditure within a novel framework. This distance metric, dubbed Bipart, learns block-level information from both training and test sets, combining both to form a projection space which materializes block-level constraints. Thus, Bipart provides a space which can improve the bout classification performance of all classifiers. We also propose an energy expenditure estimation framework which leverages activity classification in order to improve estimates. Comprehensive experiments on waist-mounted accelerometer data, comparing Bipart against many similar methods as well as other classifiers, demonstrate the superior activity recognition of Bipart, especially in low-information experimental settings. PMID:25328361

  4. Bigelovii A Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Blocking NF-κB and CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein δ Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunguang; Guan, Fuqin; Shen, Yanfei; Tang, Huifang; Yuan, Dong; Gao, Hongwei; Feng, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Optimal methods are applied to acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the mortality rate is still high. Accordingly, further studies dedicated to identify novel therapeutic approaches to ALI are urgently needed. Bigelovii A is a new natural product and may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. Therefore, we sought to investigate its effect on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced ALI and the underlying mechanisms. We found that LPS-induced ALI was significantly alleviated by Bigelovii A treatment, characterized by reduction of proinflammatory mediator production, neutrophil infiltration, and lung permeability. Furthermore, Bigelovii A also downregulated LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediator expressions in vitro. Moreover, both NF-κB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ) activation were obviously attenuated by Bigelovii A treatment. Additionally, phosphorylation of both p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 (upstream signals of C/EBPδ activation) in response to LPS challenge was also inhibited by Bigelovii A. Therefore, Bigelovii A could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation by suppression of NF-κB, inflammatory mediators, and p38 MAPK/ERK1/2-C/EBPδ, inflammatory mediators signaling pathways, which provide a novel theoretical basis for the possible application of Bigelovii A in clinic. PMID:27194827

  5. Cordycepin Suppresses Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Expression via Blocking Caspase-1 and Receptor-Interacting Protein 2 Signaling Pathways in Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoou, Myoung-schook; Jin, Mu Hyun; Lee, So Young; Lee, Sang Hwa; Kim, Byunghyun; Roh, Seok Seon; Choi, In Hwa; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine) is one of the active components isolated from Cordyceps militaris, and has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-aging, and anti-cancer effects. Mast cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammatory reactions. Here, we investigated the regulatory effect and mechanisms of cordycepin on the expression of TSLP in the human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells, and in the human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT cells. Cordycepin significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of TSLP through the inhibition of caspase-1 and nuclear factor-κB activation. Cordycepin also significantly reduced the phosphorylation of receptor-interacting protein 2 and inhibitory kappa B (IκB) kinase β. Cordycepin significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in activated HMC-1 cells. Moreover, cordycepin significantly decreased the levels of TSLP in activated HaCaT cells. Our studies suggest that cordycepin can be applied to the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases exacerbated by TSLP. PMID:26725432

  6. Non-Dioxin-Like Polychlorinated Biphenyls Inhibit G-Protein Coupled Receptor-Mediated Ca2+ Signaling by Blocking Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yurim; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Jo, Su-Hyun; Chung, Sungkwon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous pollutants which accumulate in the food chain. Recently, several molecular mechanisms by which non-dioxin-like (NDL) PCBs mediate neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral toxicity have been elucidated. However, although the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) is a significant target for neurobehavioral disturbance, our understanding of the effects of PCBs on GPCR signaling remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NDL-PCBs on GPCR-mediated Ca2+ signaling in PC12 cells. We found that ortho-substituted 2,2’,6-trichlorinated biphenyl (PCB19) caused a rapid decline in the Ca2+ signaling of bradykinin, a typical Gq- and phospholipase Cβ-coupled GPCR, without any effect on its inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production. PCB19 reduced thapsigargin-induced sustained cytosolic Ca2+ levels, suggesting that PCB19 inhibits SOCE. The abilities of other NDL-PCBs to inhibit store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) were also examined and found to be of similar potencies to that of PCB19. PCB19 also showed a manner equivalent to that of known SOCE inhibitors. PCB19-mediated SOCE inhibition was confirmed by demonstrating the ability of PCB19 to inhibit the SOCE current and thapsigargin-induced Mn2+ influx. These results imply that one of the molecular mechanism by which NDL-PCBs cause neurobehavioral disturbances involves NDL-PCB-mediated inhibition of SOCE, thereby interfering with GPCR-mediated Ca2+ signaling. PMID:26963511

  7. Bigelovii A Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Blocking NF-κB and CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein δ Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunguang; Guan, Fuqin; Shen, Yanfei; Tang, Huifang; Yuan, Dong; Gao, Hongwei; Feng, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Optimal methods are applied to acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the mortality rate is still high. Accordingly, further studies dedicated to identify novel therapeutic approaches to ALI are urgently needed. Bigelovii A is a new natural product and may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. Therefore, we sought to investigate its effect on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced ALI and the underlying mechanisms. We found that LPS-induced ALI was significantly alleviated by Bigelovii A treatment, characterized by reduction of proinflammatory mediator production, neutrophil infiltration, and lung permeability. Furthermore, Bigelovii A also downregulated LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediator expressions in vitro. Moreover, both NF-κB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ) activation were obviously attenuated by Bigelovii A treatment. Additionally, phosphorylation of both p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 (upstream signals of C/EBPδ activation) in response to LPS challenge was also inhibited by Bigelovii A. Therefore, Bigelovii A could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation by suppression of NF-κB, inflammatory mediators, and p38 MAPK/ERK1/2—C/EBPδ, inflammatory mediators signaling pathways, which provide a novel theoretical basis for the possible application of Bigelovii A in clinic. PMID:27194827

  8. Silencing of WIPK and SIPK mitogen-activated protein kinases reduces tobacco mosaic virus accumulation but permits systemic viral movement in tobacco possessing the N resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michie; Seo, Shigemi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto-Katou, Ayako; Katou, Shinpei; Seto, Hideharu; Meshi, Tetsuo; Mitsuhara, Ichiro; Ohashi, Yuko

    2010-08-01

    Infection of tobacco cultivars possessing the N resistance gene with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) results in confinement of the virus by necrotic lesions at the infection site. Although the mitogen-activated protein kinases WIPK and SIPK have been implicated in TMV resistance, evidence linking them directly to disease resistance is, as yet, insufficient. Viral multiplication was reduced slightly in WIPK- or SIPK-silenced plants but substantially in WIPK/SIPK-silenced plants, and was correlated with an increase in salicylic acid (SA) and a decrease in jasmonic acid (JA). Silencing of WIPK and SIPK in a tobacco cultivar lacking the N gene did not inhibit viral accumulation. The reduction in viral accumulation was attenuated by expressing a gene for an SA-degrading enzyme or by exogenously applying JA. Inoculation of lower leaves resulted in the systemic spread of TMV and formation of necrotic lesions in uninoculated upper leaves. These results suggested that WIPK and SIPK function to negatively regulate local resistance to TMV accumulation, partially through modulating accumulation of SA and JA in an N-dependent manner, but positively regulate systemic resistance. PMID:20615114

  9. The Human Potential Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    The advent of the human potential movement has generated the expectation that educators unleash the intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual talents of students. This movement is characterized by its focus on (1) the person as a total being, (2) the needs and concerns of students, (3) phenomenology, (4) personal values and goals, and (5)…

  10. Research for a Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchfield, Randy G.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the new era of the Religious Education Association (REA) and how it may be seen to function as a "movement" with purposes, scope, and connectivity that bring together diverse groups. The author contends that religious education as a movement needs: (1) Research that describes patterns and uniquenesses in the religious…

  11. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  12. National CARES Mentoring Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Harsh and cruel experiences have led many of our young to believe that they are alone in the world and that no one cares. In this article, Martin L Mitchell introduces us to the "National CARES Mentoring Movement" founded by Susan L.Taylor. This movement provides young people with role models who help shape their positive development.…

  13. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  14. The single N-glycan deletion mutant of soluble ErbB3 protein attenuates heregulin β1-induced tumor progression by blocking of the HIF-1 and Nrf2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Takamiya, Rina Takahashi, Motoko; Uehara, Yasuaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Hashimoto, Jiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • The sErbB3 N418Q mutant blocks heregulin β1 induced nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. • The sErbB3 N418Q mutant attenuates cancer cell migration induced by heregulin β1. • The sErbB3 N418Q mutant blocks heregulin β1 induced nuclear accumulation of Nrf2. • The sErbB3 N418Q mutant may be a potential therapeutic application for tumor. - Abstract: It has been well documented that activation of the ErbB3–PI3K–Akt pathway is implicated in tumor survival and progression. We previously demonstrated that the single N-glycan deletion mutant of soluble ErbB3 protein (sErbB3 N418Q) attenuates heregulin β1-induced ErbB3 signaling. The active PI3K–Akt pathway augments the nuclear accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, which activates the transcription of many target genes and drives cancer progression. In this study, we focused on the effects of sErbB3 N418Q mutant on nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. Pretreatment with the sErbB3 N418Q mutant suppressed heregulin β1-induced HIF-1α activation in MCF7 cells. Similar results were also obtained in other breast cancer cell lines, T47D and BT474. Interestingly, these suppressive effects were not observed with the sErbB3 wild type. In addition, pretreatment with the sErbB3 N418Q mutant suppressed the cell migration of MCF7 cells induced by heregulin β1. Furthermore, incubation with heregulin β1 also induced the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, and this effect was also reduced by the sErbB3 N418Q mutant, but not the sErbB3 wild type. These findings indicated that the sErbB3 N418Q mutant suppressed malignant formation of cancer cells by blocking of the HIF-1α and Nrf2 pathways.

  15. Geo-botanical evidence of Late Quaternary mass wasting in block field areas of Virginia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of block fields at Massanutten Mountain, Virginia, document and provide information on the magnitude and frequency of mass movement on these coarse-grained slopes. Although Pleistocene periglacial climate may have facilitated original formation of block fields, some block fields now continue to spread downslope during intense runoff events. Present block-field mass wasting may be the principal erosional process in these areas of resistant rock.-from Author

  16. Discovery of a Small Non-AUG-Initiated ORF in Poleroviruses and Luteoviruses That Is Required for Long-Distance Movement

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Ekaterina; Firth, Andrew E.; Miller, W. Allen; Scheidecker, Danièle; Brault, Véronique; Reinbold, Catherine; Rakotondrafara, Aurélie M.; Chung, Betty Y.-W.; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Viruses in the family Luteoviridae have positive-sense RNA genomes of around 5.2 to 6.3 kb, and they are limited to the phloem in infected plants. The Luteovirus and Polerovirus genera include all but one virus in the Luteoviridae. They share a common gene block, which encodes the coat protein (ORF3), a movement protein (ORF4), and a carboxy-terminal extension to the coat protein (ORF5). These three proteins all have been reported to participate in the phloem-specific movement of the virus in plants. All three are translated from one subgenomic RNA, sgRNA1. Here, we report the discovery of a novel short ORF, termed ORF3a, encoded near the 5’ end of sgRNA1. Initially, this ORF was predicted by statistical analysis of sequence variation in large sets of aligned viral sequences. ORF3a is positioned upstream of ORF3 and its translation initiates at a non-AUG codon. Functional analysis of the ORF3a protein, P3a, was conducted with Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a polerovirus, for which translation of ORF3a begins at an ACG codon. ORF3a was translated from a transcript corresponding to sgRNA1 in vitro, and immunodetection assays confirmed expression of P3a in infected protoplasts and in agroinoculated plants. Mutations that prevent expression of P3a, or which overexpress P3a, did not affect TuYV replication in protoplasts or inoculated Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, but prevented virus systemic infection (long-distance movement) in plants. Expression of P3a from a separate viral or plasmid vector complemented movement of a TuYV mutant lacking ORF3a. Subcellular localization studies with fluorescent protein fusions revealed that P3a is targeted to the Golgi apparatus and plasmodesmata, supporting an essential role for P3a in viral movement. PMID:25946037

  17. Discovery of a Small Non-AUG-Initiated ORF in Poleroviruses and Luteoviruses That Is Required for Long-Distance Movement.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Ekaterina; Firth, Andrew E; Miller, W Allen; Scheidecker, Danièle; Brault, Véronique; Reinbold, Catherine; Rakotondrafara, Aurélie M; Chung, Betty Y-W; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique

    2015-05-01

    Viruses in the family Luteoviridae have positive-sense RNA genomes of around 5.2 to 6.3 kb, and they are limited to the phloem in infected plants. The Luteovirus and Polerovirus genera include all but one virus in the Luteoviridae. They share a common gene block, which encodes the coat protein (ORF3), a movement protein (ORF4), and a carboxy-terminal extension to the coat protein (ORF5). These three proteins all have been reported to participate in the phloem-specific movement of the virus in plants. All three are translated from one subgenomic RNA, sgRNA1. Here, we report the discovery of a novel short ORF, termed ORF3a, encoded near the 5' end of sgRNA1. Initially, this ORF was predicted by statistical analysis of sequence variation in large sets of aligned viral sequences. ORF3a is positioned upstream of ORF3 and its translation initiates at a non-AUG codon. Functional analysis of the ORF3a protein, P3a, was conducted with Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a polerovirus, for which translation of ORF3a begins at an ACG codon. ORF3a was translated from a transcript corresponding to sgRNA1 in vitro, and immunodetection assays confirmed expression of P3a in infected protoplasts and in agroinoculated plants. Mutations that prevent expression of P3a, or which overexpress P3a, did not affect TuYV replication in protoplasts or inoculated Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, but prevented virus systemic infection (long-distance movement) in plants. Expression of P3a from a separate viral or plasmid vector complemented movement of a TuYV mutant lacking ORF3a. Subcellular localization studies with fluorescent protein fusions revealed that P3a is targeted to the Golgi apparatus and plasmodesmata, supporting an essential role for P3a in viral movement. PMID:25946037

  18. The block structure and Quaternary strike-slip block rotation of central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaori, Yuji; Kawakami, Shin-Ichi; Yairi, Kenji

    1992-02-01

    Central Japan is situated on the inflection point of the bow-shaped Japanese islands. Numerous NW-SE trending active faults, arranged in parallel at intervals of 20 to 80 km are found in this area. These active faults are more than 30 km long with shattered zones from 30 to 300 m wide. Several active faults constitute a given block boundary, which serves as the dividing line for one of the four blocks that make up central Japan. The block boundaries require careful study since numerous historical earth-quakes have occurred along these lines. Offset measurements of basement rocks, created during the Quaternary period due to left-lateral faulting, amount to 1 to 7 km. Gravity lineaments, which link points of sudden change and saddles of Bouguer anomalies, are clearly found along the block boundaries. The NW-SE trending active faults appearing on the ground surface are associated with motions of the block boundaries. Block rotational movement, caused by left-lateral faulting, plays an important role in the crustal deformation of central Japan. Rotational angles of the blocks calculated from the amount of displacement of basement rocks, initiated during the Quaternary period, are estimated to be 3° to 7° in a clockwise manner.

  19. High Relief Block Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Explains a method of block printing using styrofoam shapes to make high relief. Describes the creation of the block design as well as the actual printing process. Uses a range of paper types for printing so children can see the results of using different media. (LS)

  20. Surviving Block Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Marjorie

    A discussion of block scheduling for second language instruction looks at the advantages and disadvantages and offers some suggestions for classroom management and course organization. It is argued that block scheduling may offer a potential solution to large classes, insufficient time for labs, too little individualized instruction; few…

  1. Block Scheduling Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, J. Allen

    2000-01-01

    Successful block scheduling depends on provision of initial and ongoing instructional training. Teaching strategies should vary and include cooperative learning, the case method, the socratic seminar, synectics, concept attainment, the inquiry method, and simulations. Recommendations for maximizing block scheduling are outlined. (Contains 52…

  2. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  3. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins. PMID:26467664

  4. The Development of Coordinated Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanaro, Silvana Quattrocchi

    2002-01-01

    Discusses stages of movement in the first 3 years of life with a philosophical dimension regarding evolutionary aspects of movement as first manifestation of "will." Describes how the early childhood environment is prepared to allow for movement and the connection between movement and brain development. Discusses the contribution of movement to…

  5. Upregulation of cAMP-specific PDE-4 activity following ligation of the TCR complex on thymocytes is blocked by selective inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosyl kinases.

    PubMed

    Michie, A M; Rena, G; Harnett, M M; Houslay, M D

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that the major cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms present in murine thymocytes are the cGMP-stimulated PDE activity (PDE-2) and the cAMP-specific PDE activity (PDE-4), and that these isoforms are differentially regulated following ligation of the TCR (Michie, A.M., Lobban, M. D., Mueller, T., Harnett, M. M., and Houslay, M.D. [1996] Cell. Signalling 8, 97-110). We show here that the anti-CD3-stimulated elevation in PDE-4 activity in murine thymocytes is dependent on protein tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated signals as the TCR-coupled increase in PDE-4 activity can be abrogated by both the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and the PKC selective inhibitors chelerythrine and staurosporine. Moreover, the PKC-activating phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) caused an increase in PDE-4 activity, similar to that observed in cells challenged with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies and which was not additive with cochallenge using anti-CD3 antibodies. Both the PMA- and the anti-CD3 antibody-mediated increases in PDE-4 activity were blocked by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Despite the upregulation of PDE-4 activity consequent to TCR ligation, intracellular cAMP levels increased on challenge of thymocytes with anti-CD3 antibody, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity was also increased by TCR ligation. It is suggested that the anti-CD3-mediated increase in PDE-4 activity was owing to a rapid PKC-dependent induction of PDE-4 activity following crosslinking of the TCR complex. This identifies "crosstalk" occurring between the PKA and PKC signaling pathways initiated by ligation of the antigen receptor in murine thymocytes. That both adenylate cyclase and PDE-4 activities were increased may indicate the presence of compartmentalized cAMP responses present in these cells. PMID:9515165

  6. Movement Coordination during Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V.; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S.; Munhall, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers’ perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  7. The Treponema denticola FhbB Protein Is a Dominant Early Antigen That Elicits FhbB Variant-Specific Antibodies That Block Factor H Binding and Cleavage by Dentilisin.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel P; Oliver, Lee D; Tegels, Brittney K; Reed, Lucas A; O'Bier, Nathaniel S; Kurniyati, Kurni; Faust, Lindsay A; Lawson, Christine K; Allard, Anna M; Caimano, Melissa J; Marconi, Richard T

    2016-07-01

    The Treponema denticola FhbB protein contributes to immune evasion by binding factor H (FH). Cleavage of FH by the T. denticola protease, dentilisin, may contribute to the local immune dysregulation that is characteristic of periodontal disease (PD). Although three FhbB phyletic types have been defined (FhbB1, FhbB2, and FhbB3), the in vivo expression patterns and antigenic heterogeneity of FhbB have not been assessed. Here, we demonstrate that FhbB is a dominant early antigen that elicits FhbB type-specific antibody (Ab) responses. Using the murine skin abscess model, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of FhbB or dentilisin significantly influences Ab responses to infection and skin abscess formation. Competitive binding analyses revealed that α-FhbB Ab can compete with FH for binding to T. denticola and block dentilisin-mediated FH cleavage. Lastly, we demonstrate that dentilisin cleavage sites reside within critical functional domains of FH, including the complement regulatory domain formed by CCPs 1 to 4. Analysis of the FH cleavage products revealed that they lack cofactor activity. The data presented here provide insight into the in vivo significance of dentilisin, FhbB and its antigenic diversity, and the potential impact of FH cleavage on the regulation of complement activation. PMID:27113359

  8. Quantification of Plasmodium falciparum malaria from complex infections in the Peruvian Amazon using quantitative PCR of the merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2): in vitro dynamics reveal density-dependent interactions.

    PubMed

    Zervos, Thomas M; Hernandez, Jean N; Sutton, Patrick L; Branch, Oralee H

    2012-05-01

    The majority of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates are defined as complex infections because they contain multiple genetically distinct clones. Studying interactions between clones in complex infections in vivo and in vitro could elucidate important phenomena in malaria infection, transmission and treatment. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) of the P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2), we provide a sensitive and efficient genotyping method. This is important for epidemiological studies because it makes it possible to study genotype-specific growth dynamics. We compared 3 PfMSP1-B2 genotyping methods by analysing 79 field isolates from the Peruvian Amazon. In vivo observations from other studies using these techniques led to the hypothesis that clones within complex infections interact. By co-culturing clones with different PfMSP1-B2 genotypes, and measuring parasitaemia using qPCR, we found that suppression of clonal expansion was a factor of the collective density of all clones present in a culture. PfMSP1-B2 qPCR enabled us to find in vitro evidence for parasite-parasite interactions and could facilitate future investigations of growth trends in naturally occurring complex infections. PMID:22339946

  9. Diaphanous-Related Formin 2 and Profilin I Are Required for Gastrulation Cell Movements

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Lei; Chan, Tun-Hao; Lin, Meng-Ju; Huang, Wei-Pang; Lou, Show-Wan; Lee, Shyh-Jye

    2008-01-01

    Intensive cellular movements occur during gastrulation. These cellular movements rely heavily on dynamic actin assembly. Rho with its associated proteins, including the Rho-activated formin, Diaphanous, are key regulators of actin assembly in cellular protrusion and migration. However, the function of Diaphanous in gastrulation cell movements remains unclear. To study the role of Diaphanous in gastrulation, we isolated a partial zebrafish diaphanous-related formin 2 (zdia2) clone with its N-terminal regulatory domains. The GTPase binding domain of zDia2 is highly conserved compared to its mammalian homologues. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we showed that zDia2 interacts with constitutively-active RhoA and Cdc42. The zdia2 mRNAs were ubiquitously expressed during early embryonic development in zebrafish as determined by RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses. Knockdown of zdia2 by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) blocked epiboly formation and convergent extension in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ectopic expression of a human mdia gene partially rescued these defects. Time-lapse recording further showed that bleb-like cellular processes of blastoderm marginal deep marginal cells and pseudopod-/filopod-like processes of prechordal plate cells and lateral cells were abolished in the zdia2 morphants. Furthermore, zDia2 acts cell-autonomously since transplanted zdia2-knockdown cells exhibited low protrusive activity with aberrant migration in wild type host embryos. Lastly, co-injection of antisense MOs of zdia2 and zebrafish profilin I (zpfn 1), but not zebrafish profilin II, resulted in a synergistic inhibition of gastrulation cell movements. These results suggest that zDia2 in conjunction with zPfn 1 are required for gastrulation cell movements in zebrafish. PMID:18941507

  10. Blocking Abeta42 accumulation delays the onset and progression of tau pathology via the C terminus of heat shock protein70-interacting protein: a mechanistic link between Abeta and tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Salvatore; Caccamo, Antonella; Tseng, Bert; Cheng, David; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Cribbs, David H; LaFerla, Frank M

    2008-11-19

    The molecular alterations that induce tau pathology in Alzheimer disease (AD) are not known, particularly whether this is an amyloid-beta (Abeta)-dependent or -independent event. We addressed this issue in the 3xTg-AD mice using both genetic and immunological approaches and show that a selective decrease in Abeta(42) markedly delays the progression of tau pathology. The mechanism underlying this effect involves alterations in the levels of C terminus of heat shock protein70-interacting protein (CHIP) as we show that Abeta accumulation decreases CHIP expression and increases tau levels. We show that the Abeta-induced effects on tau were rescued by restoring CHIP levels. Our findings have profound clinical implications as they indicate that preventing Abeta accumulation will significantly alter AD progression. These data highlight the critical role CHIP plays as a link between Abeta and tau and identify CHIP as a new potential target not only for AD but for other neurodegenerative disorders characterized by tau accumulation. PMID:19020010

  11. Contribution of host intracellular transport machineries to intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Agbeci, Maxime; Grangeon, Romain; Nelson, Richard S; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of different host cell transport systems in the intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was investigated. To discriminate between primary infections and secondary infections associated with the virus intercellular movement, a gene cassette expressing GFP-HDEL was inserted adjacent to a TuMV infectious cassette expressing 6K₂:mCherry, both within the T-DNA borders of the binary vector pCambia. In this system, both gene cassettes were delivered to the same cell by a single binary vector and primary infection foci emitted green and red fluorescence while secondarily infected cells emitted only red fluorescence. Intercellular movement was measured at 72 hours post infiltration and was estimated to proceed at an average rate of one cell being infected every three hours over an observation period of 17 hours. To determine if the secretory pathway were important for TuMV intercellular movement, chemical and protein inhibitors that blocked both early and late secretory pathways were used. Treatment with Brefeldin A or Concanamycin A or expression of ARF1 or RAB-E1d dominant negative mutants, all of which inhibit pre- or post-Golgi transport, reduced intercellular movement by the virus. These treatments, however, did not inhibit virus replication in primary infected cells. Pharmacological interference assays using Tyrphostin A23 or Wortmannin showed that endocytosis was not important for TuMV intercellular movement. Lack of co-localization by endocytosed FM4-64 and Ara7 (AtRabF2b) with TuMV-induced 6K₂-tagged vesicles further supported this conclusion. Microfilament depolymerizing drugs and silencing expression of myosin XI-2 gene, but not myosin VIII genes, also inhibited TuMV intercellular movement. Expression of dominant negative myosin mutants confirmed the role played by myosin XI-2 as well as by myosin XI-K in TuMV intercellular movement. Using this dual gene cassette expression system and transport inhibitors, components of the

  12. Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from cell block two into the "Death Row" exercise yard - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and southwest guard tower, looking from cell block eight roof - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. Blocked tear duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby may have an eye infection called conjunctivitis . ... increase the chance of other infections, such as conjunctivitis. ... be prevented. Proper treatment of nasal infections and conjunctivitis may reduce the risk of having a blocked ...

  15. RX for Writer's Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Gail E.; Camp, Donna J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes four prewriting techniques that elementary and middle grade students can use to gather and organize ideas for writing, and by so doing, cure writer's block. Techniques discussed are: (1) brainstorming; (2) clustering; (3) freewriting; and (4) cubing.

  16. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  17. Block copolymer battery separator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  18. An Analysis of the Women's Movement as a Social Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budenstein, Mary Jane

    The paper analyzes the development of the women's movement, indicating how this particular movement empirically documents the theoretical suppositions of a sociologically defined social movement. A social movement is defined as "a group venture extended beyond a local community or a single event and involving a systematic effort to inaugurate…

  19. Design of a Digital Library for Human Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Arie, Jezekiel; Pandit, Purvin; Rajaram, ShyamSundar

    This paper is focused on a central aspect in the design of a planned digital library for human movement, i.e. on the aspect of representation and recognition of human activity from video data. The method of representation is important since it has a major impact on the design of all the other building blocks of the system such as the user…

  20. Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauzlis, Rich; Stone, Leland; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    When viewing objects, primates use a combination of saccadic and pursuit eye movements to stabilize the retinal image of the object of regard within the high-acuity region near the fovea. Although these movements involve widespread regions of the nervous system, they mix seamlessly in normal behavior. Saccades are discrete movements that quickly direct the eyes toward a visual target, thereby translating the image of the target from an eccentric retinal location to the fovea. In contrast, pursuit is a continuous movement that slowly rotates the eyes to compensate for the motion of the visual target, minimizing the blur that can compromise visual acuity. While other mammalian species can generate smooth optokinetic eye movements - which track the motion of the entire visual surround - only primates can smoothly pursue a single small element within a complex visual scene, regardless of the motion elsewhere on the retina. This ability likely reflects the greater ability of primates to segment the visual scene, to identify individual visual objects, and to select a target of interest.

  1. Psychostimulants and Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Asser, Andres; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances with their main psychomotor effects resembling those of amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, or cathinone. Due to their potential as drugs of abuse, recreational use of most of these substances is illegal since 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances. In recent years, new psychoactive substances have emerged mainly as synthetic cathinones with new molecules frequently complementing the list. Psychostimulant related movement disorders are a known entity often seen in emergency rooms around the world. These admissions are becoming more frequent as are fatalities associated with drug abuse. Still the legal constraints of the novel synthetic molecules are bypassed. At the same time, chronic and permanent movement disorders are much less frequently encountered. These disorders frequently manifest as a combination of movement disorders. The more common symptoms include agitation, tremor, hyperkinetic and stereotypical movements, cognitive impairment, and also hyperthermia and cardiovascular dysfunction. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind the clinical manifestations have been researched for decades. The common denominator is the monoaminergic signaling. Dopamine has received the most attention but further research has demonstrated involvement of other pathways. Common mechanisms linking psychostimulant use and several movement disorders exist. PMID:25941511

  2. Movement as utopia.

    PubMed

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination. PMID:20027697

  3. Correcting Slightly Less Simple Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aivar, M. P.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J. B. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have analysed how goal directed movements are corrected in response to changes in the properties of the target. However, only simple movements to single targets have been used in those studies, so little is known about movement corrections under more complex situations. Evidence from studies that ask for movements to several targets…

  4. Combining modules for movement.

    PubMed

    Bizzi, E; Cheung, V C K; d'Avella, A; Saltiel, P; Tresch, M

    2008-01-01

    We review experiments supporting the hypothesis that the vertebrate motor system produces movements by combining a small number of units of motor output. Using a variety of approaches such as microstimulation of the spinal cord, NMDA iontophoresis, and an examination of natural behaviors in intact and deafferented animals we have provided evidence for a modular organization of the spinal cord. A module is a functional unit in the spinal cord that generates a specific motor output by imposing a specific pattern of muscle activation. Such an organization might help to simplify the production of movements by reducing the degrees of freedom that need to be specified. PMID:18029291

  5. Paroxysmal movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Waln, Olga; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Paroxysmal dyskinesias represent a group of episodic abnormal involuntary movements manifested by recurrent attacks of dystonia, chorea, athetosis, or a combination of these disorders. Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia, paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia, paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia, and paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia are distinguished clinically by precipitating factors, duration and frequency of attacks, and response to medication. Primary paroxysmal dyskinesias are usually autosomal dominant genetic conditions. Secondary paroxysmal dyskinesias can be the symptoms of different neurologic and medical disorders. This review summarizes the updates on etiology, pathophysiology, genetics, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and treatment of paroxysmal dyskinesias and other episodic movement disorders. PMID:25432727

  6. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  7. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Ran; Getz, Wayne M; Revilla, Eloy; Holyoak, Marcel; Kadmon, Ronen; Saltz, David; Smouse, Peter E

    2008-12-01

    Movement of individual organisms is fundamental to life, quilting our planet in a rich tapestry of phenomena with diverse implications for ecosystems and humans. Movement research is both plentiful and insightful, and recent methodological advances facilitate obtaining a detailed view of individual movement. Yet, we lack a general unifying paradigm, derived from first principles, which can place movement studies within a common context and advance the development of a mature scientific discipline. This introductory article to the Movement Ecology Special Feature proposes a paradigm that integrates conceptual, theoretical, methodological, and empirical frameworks for studying movement of all organisms, from microbes to trees to elephants. We introduce a conceptual framework depicting the interplay among four basic mechanistic components of organismal movement: the internal state (why move?), motion (how to move?), and navigation (when and where to move?) capacities of the individual and the external factors affecting movement. We demonstrate how the proposed framework aids the study of various taxa and movement types; promotes the formulation of hypotheses about movement; and complements existing biomechanical, cognitive, random, and optimality paradigms of movement. The proposed framework integrates eclectic research on movement into a structured paradigm and aims at providing a basis for hypothesis generation and a vehicle facilitating the understanding of the causes, mechanisms, and spatiotemporal patterns of movement and their role in various ecological and evolutionary processes. "Now we must consider in general the common reason for moving with any movement whatever." (Aristotle, De Motu Animalium, 4th century B.C.). PMID:19060196

  8. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Ran; Getz, Wayne M.; Revilla, Eloy; Holyoak, Marcel; Kadmon, Ronen; Saltz, David; Smouse, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Movement of individual organisms is fundamental to life, quilting our planet in a rich tapestry of phenomena with diverse implications for ecosystems and humans. Movement research is both plentiful and insightful, and recent methodological advances facilitate obtaining a detailed view of individual movement. Yet, we lack a general unifying paradigm, derived from first principles, which can place movement studies within a common context and advance the development of a mature scientific discipline. This introductory article to the Movement Ecology Special Feature proposes a paradigm that integrates conceptual, theoretical, methodological, and empirical frameworks for studying movement of all organisms, from microbes to trees to elephants. We introduce a conceptual framework depicting the interplay among four basic mechanistic components of organismal movement: the internal state (why move?), motion (how to move?), and navigation (when and where to move?) capacities of the individual and the external factors affecting movement. We demonstrate how the proposed framework aids the study of various taxa and movement types; promotes the formulation of hypotheses about movement; and complements existing biomechanical, cognitive, random, and optimality paradigms of movement. The proposed framework integrates eclectic research on movement into a structured paradigm and aims at providing a basis for hypothesis generation and a vehicle facilitating the understanding of the causes, mechanisms, and spatiotemporal patterns of movement and their role in various ecological and evolutionary processes. ”Now we must consider in general the common reason for moving with any movement whatever.“ (Aristotle, De Motu Animalium, 4th century B.C.) PMID:19060196

  9. Physical constraints for pathogen movement.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-10-01

    In this pedagogical review, we discuss the physical constraints that pathogens experience when they move in their host environment. Due to their small size, pathogens are living in a low Reynolds number world dominated by viscosity. For swimming pathogens, the so-called scallop theorem determines which kinds of shape changes can lead to productive motility. For crawling or gliding cells, the main resistance to movement comes from protein friction at the cell-environment interface. Viruses and pathogenic bacteria can also exploit intracellular host processes such as actin polymerization and motor-based transport, if they present the appropriate factors on their surfaces. Similar to cancer cells that also tend to cross various barriers, pathogens often combine several of these strategies in order to increase their motility and therefore their chances to replicate and spread. PMID:26456297

  10. Protein Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sam K. C.

    Proteins are an abundant component in all cells, and almost all except storage proteins are important for biological functions and cell structure. Food proteins are very complex. Many have been purified and characterized. Proteins vary in molecular mass, ranging from approximately 5000 to more than a million Daltons. They are composed of elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Twenty α-amino acids are the building blocks of proteins; the amino acid residues in a protein are linked by peptide bonds. Nitrogen is the most distinguishing element present in proteins. However, nitrogen content in various food proteins ranges from 13.4 to 19.1% (1) due to the variation in the specific amino acid composition of proteins. Generally, proteins rich in basic amino acids contain more nitrogen.

  11. Movement - unpredictable or jerky

    MedlinePlus

    The doctor will perform a physical exam. This may include a detailed examination of the nervous and muscle systems. The doctor will ask about your medical history and symptoms, including: What kind of movement occurs? What part of the body is ...

  12. Managing Movement as Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrell, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    The associate director of education at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago recounts her learning and teaching through managing the Movement as Partnership program. Included are detailed descriptions of encounters with teachers and students as they create choreography reflective of their inquiry into integrating dance and literacy arts curriculum in the…

  13. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  14. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  15. Teaching the Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jamal Eric

    2012-01-01

    Every January, Charles Cobb Jr. makes the 1,100-mile trek from sunny Jacksonville, Florida, to chilly Providence, Rhode Island. For the past eight years, Cobb--a veteran of the civil rights movement who in the 1960s served as a field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Mississippi--becomes a visiting professor of…

  16. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  17. Posture and Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TP3 includes short reports on: (1) Modification of Goal-Directed Arm Movements During Inflight Adaptation to Microgravity; (2) Quantitative Analysis of Motion control in Long Term Microgravity; (3) Does the Centre of Gravity Remain the Stabilised Reference during Complex Human Postural Equilibrium Tasks in Weightlessness?; and (4) Arm End-Point Trajectories Under Normal and Microgravity Environments.

  18. Bactericidal block copolymer micelles.

    PubMed

    Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo

    2011-05-12

    Block copolymer micelles with bactericidal properties were designed to deactivate pathogens such as E. coli bacteria. The micelles of PS-b-PAA and PS-b-P4VP block copolymers were loaded with biocides TCMTB or TCN up to 20 or 30 wt.-%, depending on the type of antibacterial agent. Bacteria were exposed to loaded micelles and bacterial deactivation was evaluated. The micelles loaded with TCN are bactericidal; bacteria are killed in less than two minutes of exposure. The most likely interpretation of the data is that the biocide is transferred to the bacteria by repeated micelle/bacteria contacts, and not via the solution. PMID:21275041

  19. 21 CFR 520.905e - Fenbendazole blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905e Fenbendazole blocks. (a... protein block contains 750 milligrams of fenbendazole. (b) Sponsor. See 000061 in § 510.600(c) of...

  20. 21 CFR 520.905e - Fenbendazole blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905e Fenbendazole blocks. (a... protein block contains 750 milligrams of fenbendazole. (b) Sponsor. See 000061 in § 510.600(c) of...

  1. 21 CFR 520.905e - Fenbendazole blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905e Fenbendazole blocks. (a... protein block contains 750 milligrams of fenbendazole. (b) Sponsor. See 000061 in § 510.600(c) of...

  2. 21 CFR 520.905e - Fenbendazole blocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905e Fenbendazole blocks. (a... protein block contains 750 milligrams of fenbendazole. (b) Sponsor. See 000061 in § 510.600(c) of...

  3. A Place for Block Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of block play--including its contributions to perceptual, fine motor, and cognitive development--and components of a good preschool block play area. Recommends unit blocks complemented by stacking blocks, toys, beads, cubes, and Brio wooden toys. Makes recommendations for space, size, locations and connections to other…

  4. 2000 CENSUS BLOCK BOUNDARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a polygon shapefile of the boundaries of Census Blocks in New England derived from U.S. Census Bureau 2000 TIGER/Line data. Numerous attributes pertaining to population are included. TIGER, TIGER/Line, and Census TIGER are registered trademarks of the Bureau o...

  5. Confinement of block copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The following were studied: confinement of block copolymers, free surface confinement, effects of substrate interactions, random copolymers at homopolymer interfaces, phase separation in thin film polymer mixtures, buffing of polymer surfaces, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  6. A Fluid Block Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubben, Gerald C.

    1976-01-01

    Achieving flexibility without losing student accountability is a challenge that faces every school. With a fluid block schedule, as described here, accountability is maintained without inhibiting flexibility. An additional advantage is that three levels of schedule decision making take some of the pressure off the principal. (Editor)

  7. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  8. Surgical Methods for the Acceleration of the Orthodontic Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Almpani, Konstantinia; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2016-01-01

    Surgical techniques for the acceleration of the orthodontic tooth movement have been tested for more than 100 years in clinical practice. Since original methods have been extremely invasive and have been associated with increased tooth morbidity and various other gaps, the research in this field has always followed an episodic trend. Modern approaches represent a well-refined strategy where the concept of the bony block has been abandoned and only a cortical plate around the orthodontic tooth movement has been desired. Selective alveolar decortication has been a reproducible gold standard to this end. Its proposed mechanism has been the induction of rapid orthodontic tooth movement through the involvement of the periodontal ligament. More recent techniques included further refinement of this procedure through less invasive techniques such as the use of piezoelectricity and corticision. This chapter focuses on the evolution of the surgical approaches and the mechanistic concepts underlying the biological process during the surgically accelerated orthodontic tooth movement. PMID:26599122

  9. [Masquerading bundle branch block].

    PubMed

    Kukla, Piotr; Baranchuk, Adrian; Jastrzębski, Marek; Bryniarski, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    We here describe a surface 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) of a 72-year-old female with a prior history of breast cancer and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy. An echocardiogram revealed left ventricular dysfunction, ejection fraction of 23%, with mild enlarged left ventricle. The 12-lead ECG showed atrial fibrillation with a mean heart rate of about 100 bpm, QRS duration 160 ms, QT interval 400 ms, right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). The combination of RBBB features in the precordial leads and LAFB features in the limb leads is known as ''masquerading bundle branch block''. In most cases of RBBB and LAFB, the QRS axis deviation is located between - 80 to -120 degrees. Rarely, when predominant left ventricular forces are present, the QRS axis deviation is near about -90 degrees, turning the pattern into an atypical form. In a situation of RBBB associated with LAFB, the S wave can be absent or very small in lead I. Such a situation is the result of not only purely LAFB but also with left ventricular hypertrophy and/or focal block due to scar (extensive anterior myocardial infarction) or fibrosis (cardiomyopathy). Sometimes, this specific ECG pattern is mistaken for LBBB. RBBB with LAFB may imitate LBBB either in the limb leads (known as 'standard masquerading' - absence of S wave in lead I), or in the precordial leads (called 'precordial masquerading' - absence of S wave in leads V₅ and V₆). Our ECG showed both these types of masquerading bundle branch block - absence of S wave in lead I and in leads V₅ and V₆. PMID:24469750

  10. Stick-slip statistics of a physical slider block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckl, Ewald; Lederbauer, Stefan; Mertl, Stefan; Roch, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    An exhibition concerning the various scientific, technical, and social aspects of earthquakes has been organized as an Austrian contribution to IYPE - International Year of Planet Earth. In order to support the understanding of the elastic rebound theory a physical slider block model has been constructed. This model consists of a granite base plate and a granite slider block, connected to a lever by a leaf spring. The lever is driven parallel to the base plate with a constant speed in the range of 1 - 10 mm/s. The lever can move about 1 m in one direction. Thereafter the polarity of displacement is changed automatically. Opto-electronic distance measuring modules measure the displacement of the constantly moving lever and the stick-slip movement of the slider block. A geophone mounted on the slider block receives the vibrations of the slider block during the slip. From theory a periodic slip has to be expected. However, because of slight spatial changes of friction between the base plate and the slider block, individual slip distances vary in the range of 2 - 20 mm. Besides the speed of the lever further parameters of the physical slider block model can be varied: normal force between base plate and slider block, grain size and thickness of quartz sand simulating fault gouge, and stiffness of the leave spring. The stick slip statistics and derived quantities (e.g., stress release) will be shown and the influence of the variable parameters on the stick slip behaviour analyzed.

  11. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  12. On quantifying insect movements

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, J.A.; Crist, T.O. ); Milne, B.T. )

    1993-08-01

    We elaborate on methods described by Turchin, Odendaal Rausher for quantifying insect movement pathways. We note the need to scale measurement resolution to the study insects and the questions being asked, and we discuss the use of surveying instrumentation for recording sequential positions of individuals on pathways. We itemize several measures that may be used to characterize movement pathways and illustrate these by comparisons among several Eleodes beetles occurring in shortgrass steppe. The fractal dimension of pathways may provide insights not available from absolute measures of pathway configuration. Finally, we describe a renormalization procedure that may be used to remove sequential interdependence among locations of moving individuals while preserving the basic attributes of the pathway.

  13. Cortical Activation During Levitation and Tentacular Movements of Corticobasal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Caulo, Massimo; Onofrj, Valeria; Thomas, Astrid; Tartaro, Armando; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2015-11-01

    Levitation and tentacular movements (LTM) are considered specific, yet rare (30%), features of Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS), and are erroneously classified as alien hand. Our study focuses on these typical involuntary movements and aims to highlight possible neural correlates.LTM were recognizable during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 4 of 19 CBS patients. FMRI activity was evaluated with an activation recognition program for movements, during LTM, consisting of levitaton and finger writhing, and compared with the absence of movement (rest) and voluntary movements (VM), similar to LTM, of affected and unaffected arm-hand. FMRI acquisition blocks were balanced in order to match LTM blocks with rest and VM conditions. In 1 of the 4 patients, fMRI was acquired only during LTM and with a different equipment.Despite variable intensity and range of involuntary movements, evidenced by videos, fMRI showed, during LTM, a significant (P<0.05-0.001) activation only of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1). Voluntary movements of the affected and unaffected arm elicited the known network including frontal, supplementary, sensory-motor cortex, and cerebellum. Willed movements of the LTM-affected arm induced higher and wider activation of contralateral M1 compared with the unaffected arm.The isolated activation of M1 suggests that LTM is a cortical disinhibition symptom, not involving a network. Higher activation of M1 during VM confirms that M1 excitability changes occur in CBS. Our study calls, finally, attention to the necessity to separate LTM from other alien hand phenomena. PMID:26559277

  14. Cortical Activation During Levitation and Tentacular Movements of Corticobasal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Pizzi, Stefano Delli; Caulo, Massimo; Onofrj, Valeria; Thomas, Astrid; Tartaro, Armando; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Levitation and tentacular movements (LTM) are considered specific, yet rare (30%), features of Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS), and are erroneously classified as alien hand. Our study focuses on these typical involuntary movements and aims to highlight possible neural correlates. LTM were recognizable during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 4 of 19 CBS patients. FMRI activity was evaluated with an activation recognition program for movements, during LTM, consisting of levitaton and finger writhing, and compared with the absence of movement (rest) and voluntary movements (VM), similar to LTM, of affected and unaffected arm-hand. FMRI acquisition blocks were balanced in order to match LTM blocks with rest and VM conditions. In 1 of the 4 patients, fMRI was acquired only during LTM and with a different equipment. Despite variable intensity and range of involuntary movements, evidenced by videos, fMRI showed, during LTM, a significant (P<0.05–0.001) activation only of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1). Voluntary movements of the affected and unaffected arm elicited the known network including frontal, supplementary, sensory-motor cortex, and cerebellum. Willed movements of the LTM-affected arm induced higher and wider activation of contralateral M1 compared with the unaffected arm. The isolated activation of M1 suggests that LTM is a cortical disinhibition symptom, not involving a network. Higher activation of M1 during VM confirms that M1 excitability changes occur in CBS. Our study calls, finally, attention to the necessity to separate LTM from other alien hand phenomena. PMID:26559277

  15. Movement Education: The Place of Movement in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Megan M.

    This document is directed to physical education teachers who teach movement education in elementary and secondary schools. Its purpose is to define movement, discuss its place in the education program and the educational life of the school, and provide guidance in the presentation, subsequent development, and progression of movement education for…

  16. Ca2+ release by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is blocked by the K(+)-channel blockers apamin and tetrapentylammonium ion, and a monoclonal antibody to a 63 kDa membrane protein: reversal of blockade by K+ ionophores nigericin and valinomycin and purification of the 63 kDa antibody-binding protein.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, F; Soons, K; Flaumenhauft, R; Watras, J; Baio-Larue, C; Matthews, E; Feinstein, M B

    1994-06-15

    Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced Ca2+ release from platelet membrane vesicles was blocked by apamin, a selective inhibitor of low-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels, and by tetrapentylammonium ion, and was weakly inhibited by tetraethylammonium ion. Other K(+)-channel blockers, i.e. charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridine and glybenclamide were ineffective. A monoclonal antibody (mAb 213-21) obtained by immunizing mice with the InsP3-sensitive membrane fraction from platelets also blocked Ca2+ release by InsP3 from membrane vesicles obtained from platelets, cerebellum, aortic smooth muscle, HEL cells and sea-urchin eggs. ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake and binding of [3H]InsP3 to platelet membranes was unaffected by either K(+)-channel blockers or mAb 213-21. Blockade of Ca2+ release by apamin, tetrapentylammonium and mAb 213-21 was not affected by the Na+/H+ carrier monensin or the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), but could be completely reversed by the K+/H+ ionophore nigericin and partially reversed by the K+ carrier valinomycin. The antibody-binding protein (ABP) solubilized from platelets, cerebellum, and smooth muscle chromatographed identically on gel filtration, anion-exchange and heparin-TSK h.p.l.c. ABP was purified to apparent homogeneity from platelets and aortic smooth muscle as a 63 kDa protein by immunoaffinity chromatography on mAb 213-21-agarose. These results suggest that optimal Ca2+ release by InsP3 from platelet membrane vesicles may require the tandem function of a K+ channel. A counterflow of K+ ions could prevent the build-up of a membrane potential (inside negative) that would tend to oppose Ca2+ release. The 63 kDa protein may function to regulate K+ permeability that is coupled to the Ca2+ efflux via the InsP3 receptor. PMID:8010949

  17. Islamist Movements in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    When the United States invaded Iraq in March 2003, one of its stated intentions was to inaugurate an era of Iraqi politics in which new kinds of democratic parties would emerge. However, one of the most dramatic effects of the U.S. invasion has been the boost it has given to the Islamist parties and movements that were banned under Saddam Hussein.…

  18. Evaluation of In Vivo Osteogenic Potential of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2-Overexpressing Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Combined with Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Block Scaffolds in a Critical-Size Bone Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Yi, TacGhee; Jun, Choong-Man; Kim, Su Jin; Yun, Jeong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) are considered potential cellular carriers for gene delivery in the field of tissue regeneration. This study tested the osseoregenerative potential of hPDLSCs transduced with replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (rAd) containing the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2; hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2) in both in vivo and in vitro osteogenic environments. After the optimal condition for rAd-mediated transduction was determined, hPDLSCs were transduced to express BMP2. In vivo bone formation was evaluated in a critical-size rat calvarial bone defect model that more closely mimics the harsher in vivo milieu for bone regeneration than subcutaneous transplantation model. As support materials for bone regeneration, block-type biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds were combined with hPDLSCs and/or BMP2 and transplanted into critical-size bone defects in rats. Experimental groups were as follows: BCP scaffold control (group 1 [Gr1]), scaffold containing recombinant human BMP2 (rhBMP2; group 2 [Gr2]), scaffold loaded with normal hPDLSCs (group 3 [Gr3]), scaffold combined with both normal hPDLSCs and rhBMP2 (group 4 [Gr4]), and scaffold loaded with hPDLSCs transduced with rAd-BMP2 (hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2; group 5 [Gr5]). Our data showed that new bone formation was highest in Gr2. Less mineralization was observed in Gr3, Gr4, and Gr5 in which hPDLSCs were transplanted. In vitro transwell assay demonstrated that hPDLSCs exert an inhibitory activity on BMP2-induced osteogenic differentiation. Our findings suggest that the in vivo bone regenerative potential of BMP2-overexpressing hPDLSCs could be compromised in a critical-size rat calvarial bone defect model. Thus, further investigations are required to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and to develop efficient techniques for improved tissue regeneration. PMID:26825430

  19. NCCN Evidence Blocks.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Jonasch, Eric

    2016-05-01

    NCCN has developed a series of Evidence Blocks: graphics that provide ratings for each recommended treatment regimen in terms of efficacy, toxicity, quality and consistency of the supporting data, and affordability. The NCCN Evidence Blocks are currently available in 10 tumor types within the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines). At a glance, patients and providers can understand how a given treatment was assessed by the NCCN Guidelines Panel and get a sense of how a given treatment may match individual needs and preferences. Robert W. Carlson, MD, CEO of NCCN, described the reasoning behind this new feature and how the tool is used, and Eric Jonasch, MD, Professor of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Vice Chair of the NCCN Kidney Cancer Panel, described its applicability in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27226499

  20. Yahak Movement in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Sik

    2004-01-01

    "Yahak" means "night school" in Korean and its history can be traced back to the 1920s when Korea was under Japanese colonial rule. This paper will focus on the yahak movement during the years from 1960 to the 1990s. Yahak played an important role in raising workers' consciousness during this democratic movement. Yahak started as a movement trying…

  1. Educators Assess "Open Content" Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the open-content movement in education. A small but growing movement of K-12 educators is latching on to educational resources that are "open," or free for others to use, change, and republish on web sites that promote sharing. The open-content movement is fueled partly by digital creation tools that make it easy to create…

  2. Recognizing People from Their Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loula, Fani; Prasad, Sapna; Harber, Kent; Shiffrar, Maggie

    2005-01-01

    Human observers demonstrate impressive visual sensitivity to human movement. What defines this sensitivity? If motor experience influences the visual analysis of action, then observers should be most sensitive to their own movements. If view-dependent visual experience determines visual sensitivity to human movement, then observers should be most…

  3. Intraocular radiation blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, P.T.; Ho, T.K.; Fastenberg, D.M.; Hyman, R.A.; Stroh, E.M.; Packer, S.; Perry, H.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Iodine-based liquid radiographic contrast agents were placed in normal and tumor-bearing (Greene strain) rabbit eyes to evaluate their ability to block iodine-125 radiation. This experiment required the procedures of tumor implantation, vitrectomy, air-fluid exchange, and 125I plaque and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chip implantation. The authors quantified the amount of radiation attenuation provided by intraocularly placed contrast agents with in vivo dosimetry. After intraocular insertion of a blocking agent or sham blocker (saline) insertion, episcleral 125I plaques were placed across the eye from episcleral TLD dosimeters. This showed that radiation attenuation occurred after blocker insertion compared with the saline controls. Then computed tomographic imaging techniques were used to describe the relatively rapid transit time of the aqueous-based iohexol compared with the slow transit time of the oil-like iophendylate. Lastly, seven nontumor-bearing eyes were primarily examined for blocking agent-related ocular toxicity. Although it was noted that iophendylate induced intraocular inflammation and retinal degeneration, all iohexol-treated eyes were similar to the control eyes at 7 and 31 days of follow-up. Although our study suggests that intraocular radiopaque materials can be used to shield normal ocular structures during 125I plaque irradiation, a mechanism to keep these materials from exiting the eye must be devised before clinical application.

  4. Coordination of oral cavity and laryngeal movements during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Gay, T; Rendell, J K; Spiro, J; Mosier, K; Lurie, A G

    1994-07-01

    In this study, dynamic imaging was used to track the movements of oral cavity and laryngeal structures during swallowing in 10 normal adults subjects. The movements of tiny lead pellet markers attached to the lips, tongue, mandible, and soft palate, as well as anatomic landmarks on the hyoid bone, were measured in relation to a reference pellet affixed to the upper central incisors. Sagittal views of the oral cavity were obtained using standard videofluorography. Each subject produced 10 swallows of 12 ml of tap water followed by 5 swallows with a bite block placed between the molars. The recorded video images were input to a microcomputer where the x- and y-coordinates of the pellets were measured. Results of the analyses revealed considerable temporal overlap in the timing of oral cavity and laryngeal movements, widespread individual variability in coordination patterns and movement trajectories, and selective effects of the bite block. These data suggest the existence of individual adaptive strategies in the programming and control of swallowing movements. PMID:7961257

  5. Mass movements on Venus - Preliminary results from Magellan cycle 1 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of mass movements and their geomorphic characteristics as determined from visual inspection of Magellan cycle 1 synthetic aperture radar images is described. The primary data set was a catalog of over 200 ten-inch square photographic prints of full-resolution mosaic image data records. Venus exhibits unambiguous evidence of mass movements at a variety of scales. Mass movements appear mostly in the form of block and rock movements; there is little evidence of regolith and sediment movements. Unique Venusian conditions may play a role in the creation of some mass movement features. Dark (smooth) surfaces surrounding many rockslide avalanches are probably fine materials emplaced as part of the mass movement process, as airfall, surface-hugging density flows, or coarse-depleted debris flows. The size and efficiency of emplacement of landslide deposits on Venus are comparable to those seen on Mars, which in turn generally resemble terrestrial occurrences.

  6. Block 3. This photograph depicts the northern view of Block ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. This photograph depicts the northern view of Block 2 towards the May D & F Tower from the main path along the western facades - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  7. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 510.301 Blocked...

  8. View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are used to support ship when it is repositioned to paint inaccessible areas masked by original support blocks. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Carpentry Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Motor Learning and Movement Performance: Older versus Younger Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Fatemeh; Abdollahi, Iraj; Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad Ali; Zahiri, Nahid; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Motor skills play an important role during life span, and older adults need to learn or relearn these skills. The purpose of this study was to investigate how aging affects induction of improved movement performance by motor training. Methods: Serial Reaction Time Test (SRTT) was used to assess movement performance during 8 blocks of motor training. Participants were tested in two separate dates, 48 hours apart. First session included 8 blocks of training (blocks 1–8) and second session comprised 2 blocks (blocks 9, 10). Results: Analyses of data showed that reaction times in both online and offline learning were significantly shorter in older adults compared to younger adults (P<0.001). Young adults demonstrated both online and offline learning (P<0.001), but older adults only showed online learning (P<0.001) without offline learning (P=0.24). Discussion: The result of the current study provides evidence that the healthy older adults are able to improve their performance with practice and learn motor skill successfully in the form of online learning. PMID:26649161

  10. Orofacial Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, Glenn T; Ram, Saravanan

    2016-08-01

    Orofacial movement disorders (OMDs) include dystonia, dyskinesia, drug-induced extrapyramidal reactions, and bruxism. The definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, and management are detailed. OMDs are often disabling and affect patients' overall quality of life with pain, difficulty chewing food, speech difficulty, drooling, and social embarrassment. Management involves medications, botulinum toxin injections, and peripheral or central surgery. Botulinum toxin injections are the most effective management, often used in conjunction with medications. Surgery is the last resort for patients who fail to respond to medications or develop resistance to botulinum toxin type A. PMID:27475514

  11. Cucumovirus- and bromovirus-encoded movement functions potentiate cell-to-cell movement of tobamo- and potexviruses.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Atsushi; Kubota, Kenji; Nagano, Hideaki; Yoshii, Motoyasu; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2003-10-10

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, a cucumovirus) and Brome mosaic virus (BMV, a bromovirus) require the coat protein (CP) in addition to the 3a movement protein (MP) for cell-to-cell movement, while Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV, a bromovirus) does not. Using bombardment-mediated transcomplementation assays, we investigated whether the movement functions encoded by these viruses potentiate cell-to-cell movement of movement-defective Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, a tobamovirus) and Potato virus X (PVX, a potexvirus) mutants in Nicotiana benthamiana. Coexpression of CMV 3a and CP, but neither protein alone, complemented the defective movement of ToMV and PVX. A C-terminal deletion in CMV 3a (3a Delta C33) abolished the requirement of CP in transporting the ToMV genome. The action of 3a Delta C33 was inhibited by coexpression of wild-type 3a. These findings were confirmed in tobacco with ToMV-CMV chimeric viruses. Either BMV 3a or CCMV 3a alone efficiently complemented the movement-defective phenotype of the ToMV mutant. Therefore, every 3a protein examined intrinsically possesses the activity required to act as MP. In transcomplementation of the PVX mutant, the activities of BMV 3a, CCMV 3a, and CMV 3a Delta C33 were very low. The activities of the bromovirus 3a proteins were enhanced by coexpression of the cognate CP but the activity of CMV 3a Delta C33 was not. Based on these results, possible roles of cucumo- and bromovirus CPs in cell-to-cell movement are discussed. PMID:14592759

  12. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    High altitudes and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... you are going up or coming down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are changing ...

  13. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. PMID:25577484

  14. Biopolymers Containing Unnatural Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-06-30

    Although the main chain structure of polymers has a profound effect on their materials properties, the side groups can also have dramatic effects on their properties including conductivity, liquid crystallinity, hydrophobicity, elasticity and biodegradability. Unfortunately control over the side chain structure of polymers remains a challenge – it is difficult to control the sequence of chain elongation when mixtures of monomers are polymerized, and postpolymerization side chain modification is made difficult by polymer effects on side chain reactivity. In contrast, the mRNA templated synthesis of polypeptides on the ribosome affords absolute control over the primary sequence of the twenty amino acid monomers. Moreover, the length of the biopolymer is precisely controlled as are sites of crosslinking. However, whereas synthetic polymers can be synthesized from monomers with a wide range of chemically defined structures, ribosomal biosynthesis is largely limited to the 20 canonical amino acids. For many applications in material sciences, additional building blocks would be desirable, for example, amino acids containing metallocene, photoactive, and halogenated side chains. To overcome this natural constraint we have developed a method that allows unnatural amino acids, beyond the common twenty, to be genetically encoded in response to nonsense or frameshift codons in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells with high fidelity and good yields. Here we have developed methods that allow identical or distinct noncanonical amino acids to be incorporated at multiple sites in a polypeptide chain, potentially leading to a new class of templated biopolymers. We have also developed improved methods for genetically encoding unnatural amino acids. In addition, we have genetically encoded new amino acids with novel physical and chemical properties that allow selective modification of proteins with synthetic agents. Finally, we have evolved new metal-ion binding sites in proteins

  15. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  16. Using Attribute Blocks with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntsberger, John P.

    1978-01-01

    The classroom use of attribute blocks to develop thinking skills is defended in this article. Divergent-productive thinking is identified as an important skill that can be developed by using these blocks. However, teacher commitment and involvement in the program is considered necessary. Suggestions for using these blocks are included. (MA)

  17. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  18. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  19. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  20. XIer2 is required for convergent extension movements during Xenopus development

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Kook; Tanegashima, Kosuke; Dawid, Igor B.

    2011-01-01

    Immediate early response 2 (Ier2) is a downstream target of FGF signaling. In zebrafish, Ier2 is involved in left-right asymmetry establishment and in convergent extension movements. We isolated the Xenopus ier2 gene based on sequence similarity searches using multiple vertebrate species. Xenopus Ier2 has high homology in the N-terminal region to other vertebrate Ier2 proteins, and Xier2 transcripts were observed from oocytes through larval stages. Except for the maternal expression of xier2, the expression of this gene in the marginal region at gastrulation and in somites and the notochord at later stages is similar to the expression pattern of zebrafish ier2. XIer2 knockdown using antisense morpholinos resulted in defects of convergent extension leading to severe neural tube defects; overexpression of Ier2 showed similar albeit milder phenotypes. Assays in animal cap explants likewise showed inhibition of elongation after blocking XIer2 expression. These results indicate that Xenopus Ier2 is essential for the execution of convergent extension movements during early Xenopus development. PMID:22252488