Science.gov

Sample records for block tumor growth

  1. Blocking Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Inhibits Tumor Growth, Lymphangiogenesis, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu-Lahargue, Frédéric; Welm, Alana L.; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Alitalo, Kari; Li, Dean Y.; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor (FGFR) activity plays crucial roles in tumor growth and patient survival. However, FGF (Fibroblast Growth Factor) signaling as a target for cancer therapy has been under-investigated compared to other receptor tyrosine kinases. Here, we studied the effect of FGFR signaling inhibition on tumor growth, metastasis and lymphangiogenesis by expressing a dominant negative FGFR (FGFR-2DN) in an orthotopic mouse mammary 66c14 carcinoma model. We show that FGFR-2DN-expressing 66c14 cells proliferate in vitro slower than controls. 66c14 tumor outgrowth and lung metastatic foci are reduced in mice implanted with FGFR-2DN-expressing cells, which also exhibited better overall survival. We found 66c14 cells in the lumen of tumor lymphatic vessels and in lymph nodes. FGFR-2DN-expressing tumors exhibited a decrease in VEGFR-3 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3) or podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels, an increase in isolated intratumoral lymphatic endothelial cells and a reduction in VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C) mRNA expression. FGFs may act in an autocrine manner as the inhibition of FGFR signaling in tumor cells suppresses VEGF-C expression in a COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) or HIF1-α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α) independent manner. FGFs may also act in a paracrine manner on tumor lymphatics by inducing expression of pro-lymphangiogenic molecules such as VEGFR-3, integrin α9, prox1 and netrin-1. Finally, in vitro lymphangiogenesis is impeded in the presence of FGFR-2DN 66c14 cells. These data confirm that both FGF and VEGF signaling are necessary for the maintenance of vascular morphogenesis and provide evidence that targeting FGFR signaling may be an interesting approach to inhibit tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastatic spread. PMID:22761819

  2. [BETA-III TUBULIN AS A POTENTIAL TARGET FOR BLOCKING INVASIVE GROWTH OF MALIGNANT EPITHELIAL TUMORS].

    PubMed

    Portyanko, A S; Akalovich, S T; Doroshenko, T M

    2015-01-01

    Invasive growth is the first step of metastatic cascade in the growth of malignant tumors. The mobility of cells, which is a necessary factor of the invasive growth of malignant tumors, is closely linked to the dynamic structure of cytoskeleton. An important role in cell motility is played by microtubules and actin microfilaments. Microtubules consist of tubulin--a heterodimer comprising α and β subunits, which can be represented by different isotypes. The appearance of beta-III tubulin in a tumor is essential for chemoresistance and prognosis of some tumors in humans. This study focuses on determining the possibility of using beta-III tubulin as a target molecule for the suppression of invasive growth. It is established that blocking of the beta-III tubulin expression in colorectal cancer cells does not affect their viability, but reduces the cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix by 40% for HT-29 (∂ = 0.0044) and by 15% (p = 0.0436) for HCT 116) and produces a four-fold decrease in the invasive activity (p = 0.0000 and 0.0001, respectively). These facts allow considering beta-III tubulin as a target molecule in the development of antitumor drugs. PMID:26591579

  3. Harnessing high density lipoproteins to block transforming growth factor beta and to inhibit the growth of liver tumor metastases.

    PubMed

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Fioravanti, Jessica; Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Frank, Kathrin; Aranda, Fernando; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Dotor, Javier; Umansky, Viktor; Prieto, Jesús; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a powerful promoter of cancer progression and a key target for antitumor therapy. As cancer cells exhibit active cholesterol metabolism, high density lipoproteins (HDLs) appear as an attractive delivery system for anticancer TGFβ-inhibitory molecules. We constructed a plasmid encoding a potent TGF-β-blocking peptide (P144) linked to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) through a flexible linker (pApoLinkerP144). The ApoLinkerP144 sequence was then incorporated into a hepatotropic adeno-associated vector (AAVApoLinkerP144). The aim was to induce hepatocytes to produce HDLs containing a modified ApoA-I capable of blocking TGF-β. We observed that transduction of the murine liver with pApoLinkerP144 led to the appearance of a fraction of circulating HDL containing the fusion protein. These HDLs were able to attenuate TGF-β signaling in the liver and to enhance IL-12 -mediated IFN-γ production. Treatment of liver metastasis of MC38 colorectal cancer with AAVApoLinkerP144 resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth and enhanced expression of IFN-γ and GM-CSF in cancerous tissue. ApoLinkerP144 also delayed MC38 liver metastasis in Rag2-/-IL2rγ-/- immunodeficient mice. This effect was associated with downregulation of TGF-β target genes essential for metastatic niche conditioning. Finally, in a subset of ret transgenic mice, a model of aggressive spontaneous metastatic melanoma, AAVApoLinkerP144 delayed tumor growth in association with increased CD8+ T cell numbers in regional lymph nodes. In conclusion, modification of HDLs to transport TGF-β-blocking molecules is a novel and promising approach to inhibit the growth of liver metastases by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. PMID:24797128

  4. Harnessing High Density Lipoproteins to Block Transforming Growth Factor Beta and to Inhibit the Growth of Liver Tumor Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Fioravanti, Jessica; Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Frank, Kathrin; Aranda, Fernando; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Dotor, Javier; Umansky, Viktor; Prieto, Jesús; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a powerful promoter of cancer progression and a key target for antitumor therapy. As cancer cells exhibit active cholesterol metabolism, high density lipoproteins (HDLs) appear as an attractive delivery system for anticancer TGFβ-inhibitory molecules. We constructed a plasmid encoding a potent TGF-β-blocking peptide (P144) linked to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) through a flexible linker (pApoLinkerP144). The ApoLinkerP144 sequence was then incorporated into a hepatotropic adeno-associated vector (AAVApoLinkerP144). The aim was to induce hepatocytes to produce HDLs containing a modified ApoA-I capable of blocking TGF-β. We observed that transduction of the murine liver with pApoLinkerP144 led to the appearance of a fraction of circulating HDL containing the fusion protein. These HDLs were able to attenuate TGF-β signaling in the liver and to enhance IL-12 -mediated IFN-γ production. Treatment of liver metastasis of MC38 colorectal cancer with AAVApoLinkerP144 resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth and enhanced expression of IFN-γ and GM-CSF in cancerous tissue. ApoLinkerP144 also delayed MC38 liver metastasis in Rag2−/−IL2rγ−/− immunodeficient mice. This effect was associated with downregulation of TGF-β target genes essential for metastatic niche conditioning. Finally, in a subset of ret transgenic mice, a model of aggressive spontaneous metastatic melanoma, AAVApoLinkerP144 delayed tumor growth in association with increased CD8+ T cell numbers in regional lymph nodes. In conclusion, modification of HDLs to transport TGF-β-blocking molecules is a novel and promising approach to inhibit the growth of liver metastases by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. PMID:24797128

  5. Emodin Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth by Blocking the Tumor-Promoting Feedforward Loop between Cancer Cells and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Hodge, Johnie; Wang, Yuzhen; Yu, Fang; Fan, Daping

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage infiltration correlates with severity in many types of cancer. Tumor cells recruit macrophages and educate them to adopt an M2-like phenotype through the secretion of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP1 and CSF1. Macrophages in turn promote tumor growth through supporting angiogenesis, suppressing antitumor immunity, modulating extracellular matrix remodeling, and promoting tumor cell migration. Thus, tumor cells and macrophages interact to create a feedforward loop supporting tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin, a Chinese herb-derived compound, to inhibit breast cancer growth in mice and examined the underlying mechanisms. Emodin was used to treat mice bearing EO771 or 4T1 breast tumors. It was shown that emodin attenuated tumor growth by inhibiting macrophage infiltration and M2-like polarization, accompanied by increased T-cell activation and reduced angiogenesis in tumors. The tumor inhibitory effects of emodin were lost in tumor-bearing mice with macrophage depletion. Emodin inhibited IRF4, STAT6, and C/EBPβ signaling and increased inhibitory histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27m3) on the promoters of M2-related genes in tumor-associated macrophages. In addition, emodin inhibited tumor cell secretion of MCP1 and CSF1, as well as expression of surface anchoring molecule Thy-1, thus suppressing macrophage migration toward and adhesion to tumor cells. These results suggest that emodin acts on both breast cancer cells and macrophages and effectively blocks the tumor-promoting feedforward loop between the two cell types, thereby inhibiting breast cancer growth and metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1931-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196773

  6. DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF/VEGFR2-activated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyeong Sim; Lee, Kangwook; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Kang Min; Shin, Yong Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth requires a process called angiogenesis, a new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels, as newly formed vessels provide tumor cells with oxygen and nutrition. Danggui-Sayuk-Ga-Osuyu-Saenggang-Tang (DSGOST), one of traditional Chinese medicines, has been widely used in treatment of vessel diseases including Raynaud's syndrome in Northeast Asian countries including China, Japan and Korea. Therefore, we hypothesized that DSGOST might inhibit tumor growth by targeting newly formed vessels on the basis of its historical prescription. Here, we demonstrate that DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by inhibiting VEGF-induced angiogenesis. DSGOST inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenic abilities of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, which resulted from its inhibition of VEGF/VEGFR2 interaction. Furthermore, DSGOST attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in vivo by reducing angiogenic vessel numbers, while not affecting pancreatic tumor cell viability. Thus, our data conclude that DSGOST inhibits VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis, suggesting a new indication for DSGOST in treatment of cancer. PMID:26967562

  7. Oridonin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Anti-Angiogenesis by Blocking the Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjie; Deng, Huayun; Song, Yajuan; Zhai, Dong; Peng, Yi; Lu, Xiaoling; Liu, Mingyao; Zhao, Yongxiang; Yi, Zhengfang

    2014-01-01

    While significant progress has been made in understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of the natural diterpenoid component Oridonin on tumor cells, little is known about its effect on tumor angiogenesis or metastasis and on the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, Oridonin significantly suppressed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation, migration, and apillary-like structure formation in vitro. Using aortic ring assay and mouse corneal angiogenesis model, we found that Oridonin inhibited angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo. In our animal experiments, Oridonin impeded tumor growth and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed that the expression of CD31 and vWF protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased by the Oridonin. Furthermore, Oridonin reinforced endothelial cell-cell junction and impaired breast cancer cell transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, Oridonin not only down-regulated Jagged2 expression and Notch1 activity but also decreased the expression of their target genes. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an original role of Oridonin in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and propose a mechanism. This study also provides new evidence supporting the central role of Notch in tumor angiogenesis and suggests that Oridonin could be a potential drug candidate for angiogenesis related diseases. PMID:25485753

  8. Fulvene-5 potently inhibits NADPH oxidase 4 and blocks the growth of endothelial tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarkar, Sulochana S.; Jaconi, Marisa; Fried, Levi E.; Bonner, Michael Y.; Lefkove, Benjamin; Govindarajan, Baskaran; Perry, Betsy N.; Parhar, Ravi; Mackelfresh, Jamie; Sohn, Allie; Stouffs, Michael; Knaus, Ulla; Yancopoulos, George; Reiss, Yvonne; Benest, Andrew V.; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2009-01-01

    Hemangiomas are the most common type of tumor in infants. As they are endothelial cell–derived neoplasias, their growth can be regulated by the autocrine-acting Tie2 ligand angiopoietin 2 (Ang2). Using an experimental model of human hemangiomas, in which polyoma middle T–transformed brain endothelial (bEnd) cells are grafted subcutaneously into nude mice, we compared hemangioma growth originating from bEnd cells derived from wild-type, Ang2+/–, and Ang2–/– mice. Surprisingly, Ang2-deficient bEnd cells formed endothelial tumors that grew rapidly and were devoid of the typical cavernous architecture of slow-growing Ang2-expressing hemangiomas, while Ang2+/– cells were greatly impaired in their in vivo growth. Gene array analysis identified a strong downregulation of NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) in Ang2+/– cells. Correspondingly, lentiviral silencing of Nox4 in an Ang2-sufficient bEnd cell line decreased Ang2 mRNA levels and greatly impaired hemangioma growth in vivo. Using a structure-based approach, we identified fulvenes as what we believe to be a novel class of Nox inhibitors. We therefore produced and began the initial characterization of fulvenes as potential Nox inhibitors, finding that fulvene-5 efficiently inhibited Nox activity in vitro and potently inhibited hemangioma growth in vivo. In conclusion, the present study establishes Nox4 as a critical regulator of hemangioma growth and identifies fulvenes as a potential class of candidate inhibitor to therapeutically interfere with Nox function. PMID:19620773

  9. Sorafenib inhibits tumor growth and vascularization of rhabdomyosarcoma cells by blocking IGF-1R-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Maruwge, Wessen; D’Arcy, Pádraig; Folin, Annika; Brnjic, Slavica; Wejde, Johan; Davis, Anthony; Erlandsson, Fredrik; Bergh, Jonas; Brodin, Bertha

    2008-01-01

    The growth of many soft tissue sarcomas is dependent on aberrant growth factor signaling, which promotes their proliferation and motility. With this in mind, we evaluated the effect of sorafenib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on cell growth and apoptosis in sarcoma cell lines of various histological subtypes. We found that sorafenib effectively inhibited cell proliferation in rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma and Ewing’s sarcoma with IC50 values <5 μM. Sorafenib effectively induced growth arrest in rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which was concurrent with inhibition of Akt and Erk signaling. Studies of ligand-induced phosphorylation of Erk and Akt in rhabdomyosarcoma cells showed that insulin-like growth factor-1 is a potent activator, which can be blocked by treatment with sorafenib. In vivo sorafenib treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts had a significant inhibitory effect on tumor growth, which was associated with inhibited vascularization and enhanced necrosis in the adjacent tumor stroma. Our results demonstrate that in vitro and in vivo growth of rhabdomyosarcoma can be suppressed by treatment with sorafenib, and suggests the possibilities of using sorafenib as a potential adjuvant therapy for the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:21127754

  10. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopeptidase 2, an effector protein, which plays a role in endothelial cell growth. Overexpression of the domain in mouse endothelial MSS31 cells reduced DNA synthesis, and the corresponding synthetic peptide (named NBD) indeed interacted with S100A4 and inhibited capillary formation in vitro and new blood vessel formation in vivo. Intriguingly, a single intra-tumor administration of the NBD peptide in human prostate cancer xenografts significantly reduced vascularity, resulting in tumor regression. Mechanistically, the NBD peptide enhanced assembly of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments along with Ser1943 phosphorylation, stimulated formation of focal adhesions without phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, and provoked G1/S arrest of the cell cycle. Altogether, the NBD peptide is a potent inhibitor for tumor angiogenesis, and is the first example of an anticancer peptide drug developed on the basis of an endothelial S100A4-targeted strategy. PMID:26029719

  11. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopeptidase 2, an effector protein, which plays a role in endothelial cell growth. Overexpression of the domain in mouse endothelial MSS31 cells reduced DNA synthesis, and the corresponding synthetic peptide (named NBD) indeed interacted with S100A4 and inhibited capillary formation in vitro and new blood vessel formation in vivo. Intriguingly, a single intra-tumor administration of the NBD peptide in human prostate cancer xenografts significantly reduced vascularity, resulting in tumor regression. Mechanistically, the NBD peptide enhanced assembly of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments along with Ser1943 phosphorylation, stimulated formation of focal adhesions without phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, and provoked G1/S arrest of the cell cycle. Altogether, the NBD peptide is a potent inhibitor for tumor angiogenesis, and is the first example of an anticancer peptide drug developed on the basis of an endothelial S100A4-targeted strategy. PMID:26029719

  12. Combined Inhibition of DNMT and HDAC Blocks the Tumorigenicity of Cancer Stem-like Cells and Attenuates Mammary Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Rajneesh; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Mariappan, Gurusamy; Thakur, Priyanka; Shi, Huidong; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Prasad, Puttur D; Sharma, Suash; Lokeshwar, Bal L; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Thangaraju, Muthusamy

    2016-06-01

    Recently, impressive technical advancements have been made in the isolation and validation of mammary stem cells and cancer stem cells (CSC), but the signaling pathways that regulate stem cell self-renewal are largely unknown. Furthermore, CSCs are believed to contribute to chemo- and radioresistance. In this study, we used the MMTV-Neu-Tg mouse mammary tumor model to identify potential new strategies for eliminating CSCs. We found that both luminal progenitor and basal stem cells are susceptible to genetic and epigenetic modifications, which facilitate oncogenic transformation and tumorigenic potential. A combination of the DNMT inhibitor 5-azacytidine and the HDAC inhibitor butyrate markedly reduced CSC abundance and increased the overall survival in this mouse model. RNA-seq analysis of CSCs treated with 5-azacytidine plus butyrate provided evidence that inhibition of chromatin modifiers blocks growth-promoting signaling molecules such as RAD51AP1 and SPC25, which play key roles in DNA damage repair and kinetochore assembly. Moreover, RAD51AP1 and SPC25 were significantly overexpressed in human breast tumor tissues and were associated with reduced overall patient survival. In conclusion, our studies suggest that breast CSCs are intrinsically sensitive to genetic and epigenetic modifications and can therefore be significantly affected by epigenetic-based therapies, warranting further investigation of combined DNMT and HDAC inhibition in refractory or drug-resistant breast cancer. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3224-35. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197203

  13. A KDR-binding peptide (ST100,059) can block angiogenesis, melanoma tumor growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Luca; Valentino, Maria Luisa; Minderman, Melissa Corso; Landin, Judith; Malyankar, Uriel M; Lescoe, Mary K; Kitson, Richard; Brunson, Kenneth; Souan, Lina; Forenza, Salvatore; Goldfarb, Ronald H; Rabbani, Shafaat A

    2011-08-01

    A major goal of treatment strategies for cancer is the development of agents which can block primary tumor growth and development as well as the progression of tumor metastasis without any treatment associated side effects. Using mini peptide display (MPD) technology, we generated peptides that can bind to the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor KDR. These peptides were evaluated for their ability to block angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. A D-amino acid peptide with high serum stability (ST100,059) was found to have the most potent activity in vitro as indicated by inhibition of VEGF stimulation of endothelial cells. It was also found to be the most active of the series in blocking VEGF-mediated activity in vivo, as measured in Matrigel-filled angioreactors implanted in mice. ST100,059 blocks VEGF-induced MAPK phosphorylation, as well as inhibits VEGF-induced changes in gene expression in HUVEC cells. In in vivo studies, treatment of female C57BL/6 mice inoculated with B16 mouse melanoma cells with ST100,059 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in tumor volume and lung metastasis as compared to control groups of animals receiving vehicle alone. These studies demonstrate that by using MPD, peptides can be identified with enhanced affinity relative to those discovered using phage display. Based on these studies we have identified one such peptide ST100,059 which can effectively block tumor growth and metastasis due to its anti-angiogenic effects and ability to block intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor progression. PMID:21567086

  14. EZH2 Inhibition Blocks Multiple Myeloma Cell Growth through Upregulation of Epithelial Tumor Suppressor Genes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Henar; Gelato, Kathy A; Lesche, Ralf; Beckmann, Georg; Koehr, Silke; Otto, Saskia; Steigemann, Patrick; Stresemann, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by marked heterogeneous genomic instability including frequent genetic alterations in epigenetic enzymes. In particular, the histone methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is overexpressed in multiple myeloma. EZH2 is the catalytic component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), a master transcriptional regulator of differentiation. EZH2 catalyzes methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 and its deregulation in cancer has been reported to contribute to silencing of tumor suppressor genes, resulting in a more undifferentiated state, and thereby contributing to the multiple myeloma phenotype. In this study, we propose the use of EZH2 inhibitors as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple myeloma. We demonstrate that EZH2 inhibition causes a global reduction of H3K27me3 in multiple myeloma cells, promoting reexpression of EZH2-repressed tumor suppressor genes in a subset of cell lines. As a result of this transcriptional activation, multiple myeloma cells treated with EZH2 inhibitors become more adherent and less proliferative compared with untreated cells. The antitumor efficacy of EZH2 inhibitors is also confirmed in vivo in a multiple myeloma xenograft model in mice. Together, our data suggest that EZH2 inhibition may provide a new therapy for multiple myeloma treatment and a promising addition to current treatment options. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 287-98. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26590165

  15. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  16. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-09-22

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25250884

  17. Blocking M2 muscarinic receptor signaling inhibits tumor growth and reverses epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qingnan; Gu, Xiajing; Zhang, Chun; Lu, Qin; Chen, Hongzhuan; Xu, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancers express non-neuronal, cholinergic autoparacrine loop, which facilitates tumor growth. Interruption of M3 muscarinic cholinergic signaling has been reported to inhibit small cell lung cancer (SCLC) growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate if blocking autoparacrine muscarinic cholinergic signaling could inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth and possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that PC9 and A549 cells expressed all 5 subtypes of muscarinic receptor (mAChR) and blocking M2 mAChR (M2R) signaling using selective antagonist methoctramine or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with AChR agonists stimulating p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) and Akt phosphorylation, blocking M2R signaling decreased MAPK and Akt phosphorylation, indicating that non-neuronal ACh functions as an autoparacrine growth factor signaling in part through activation of M2R and downstream MAPK and Akt pathways. Importantly, further studies revealed that blocking M2R signaling also reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro and in vivo, indicating that non-neuronal ACh promotes EMT partially through activation of M2R. These findings demonstrate that M2R plays a role in the growth and progression of NSCLC and suggest M2R antagonists may be an efficacious adjuvant therapy for NSCLC. PMID:25778781

  18. Mdm2 and Aurora A inhibitors synergize to block melanoma growth by driving apoptosis and immune clearance of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vilgelm, Anna E.; Pawlikowski, Jeff S.; Liu, Yan; Hawkins, Oriana E.; Davis, Tyler A.; Smith, Jessica; Weller, Kevin P.; Horton, Linda W.; McClain, Colt M.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Turner, David C.; Essaka, David C.; Stewart, Clinton F.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Kelley, Mark C.; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Jeffrey N.; Richmond, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutics that induce cancer cell senescence can block cell proliferation and promote immune rejection. However, the risk of tumor relapse due to senescence escape may remain high due to the long lifespan of senescent cells that are not cleared. Here we show how combining a senescence-inducing inhibitor of the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA) with an MDM2 antagonist activates p53 in senescent tumors harboring wildtype 53. In the model studied, this effect is accompanied proliferation arrest, mitochondrial depolarization, apoptosis and immune clearance of cancer cells by antitumor leukocytes in a manner reliant upon CCL5, CCL1 and CXCL9. The AURKA/MDM2 combination therapy shows adequate bioavailability and low toxicity to the host. Moreover, the prominent response of patient-derived melanoma tumors to co-administered MDM2 and AURKA inhibitors offers a sound rationale for clinical evaluation. Taken together, our work provides a preclinical proof-of-concept for a combination treatment which leverages both senescence and immune surveillance to therapeutic ends. PMID:25398437

  19. Aspirin blocks growth of breast tumor cells and tumor-initiating cells and induces reprogramming factors of mesenchymal to epithelial transition.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Das, Amlan; Banerjee, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2015-07-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), also known as aspirin, a classic, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is widely used to relieve minor aches and pains and to reduce fever. Epidemiological studies and other experimental studies suggest that ASA use reduces the risk of different cancers including breast cancer (BC) and may be used as a chemopreventive agent against BC and other cancers. These studies have raised the tempting possibility that ASA could serve as a preventive medicine for BC. However, lack of in-depth knowledge of the mechanism of action of ASA reshapes the debate of risk and benefit of using ASA in prevention of BC. Our studies, using in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft models, show a strong beneficial effect of ASA in the prevention of breast carcinogenesis. We find that ASA not only prevents breast tumor cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice xenograft model through the induction of apoptosis, but also significantly reduces the self-renewal capacity and growth of breast tumor-initiating cells (BTICs)/breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) and delays the formation of a palpable tumor. Moreover, ASA regulates other pathophysiological events in breast carcinogenesis, such as reprogramming the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and delaying in vitro migration in BC cells. The tumor growth-inhibitory and reprogramming roles of ASA could be mediated through inhibition of TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling pathway that is associated with growth, motility, invasion, and metastasis in advanced BCs. Collectively, ASA has a therapeutic or preventive potential by attacking possible target such as TGF-β in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25867761

  20. A FAK scaffold inhibitor disrupts FAK and VEGFR-3 signaling and blocks melanoma growth by targeting both tumor and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kurenova, Elena; Ucar, Deniz; Liao, Jianqun; Yemma, Michael; Gogate, Priyanka; Bshara, Wiam; Sunar, Ulas; Seshadri, Mukund; Hochwald, Steven N; Cance, William G

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma has the highest mortality rate of all skin cancers and a major cause of treatment failure is drug resistance. Tumors heterogeneity requires novel therapeutic strategies and new drugs targeting multiple pathways. One of the new approaches is targeting the scaffolding function of tumor related proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK is overexpressed in most solid tumors and is involved in multiple protein-protein interactions critical for tumor cell survival, tumor neovascularization, progression and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of the FAK scaffold inhibitor C4, targeted to the FAK-VEGFR-3 complex, against melanomas. We compared C4 inhibitory effects in BRAF mutant vs BRAF wild type melanomas. C4 effectively caused melanoma tumor regression in vivo, when administered alone and sensitized tumors to chemotherapy. The most dramatic effect of C4 was related to reduction of vasculature of both BRAF wild type and V600E mutant xenograft tumors. The in vivo effects of C4 were assessed in xenograft models using non-invasive multimodality imaging in conjunction with histologic and molecular biology methods. C4 inhibited cell viability, adhesion and motility of melanoma and endothelial cells, specifically blocked phosphorylation of VEGFR-3 and FAK and disrupted their complexes. Specificity of in vivo effects for C4 were confirmed by a decrease in tumor FAK and VEGFR-3 phosphorylation, reduction of vasculogenesis and reduced blood flow. Our collective observations provide evidence that a small molecule inhibitor targeted to the FAK protein-protein interaction site successfully inhibits melanoma growth through dual targeting of tumor and endothelial cells and is effective against both BRAF wild type and mutant melanomas. PMID:25486195

  1. Liver tumors escape negative control of proliferation via PI3K/Akt-mediated block of C/EBPα growth inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Li; Iakova, Polina; Wilde, Margie; Awad, Samir; Timchenko, Nikolai A.

    2004-01-01

    Liver tumor cells arise from normal hepatocytes that escape negative control of proliferation. The transcription factor C/EBPα maintains quiescence of hepatocytes through two pathways: inhibition of cdks and repression of E2F. Nevertheless, liver tumors and cultured hepatoma cell lines proliferate in the presence of C/EBPα. In this paper, we present evidence that the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway in liver tumor cells blocks the growth inhibitory activity of C/EBPα through the PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of C/EBPα on Ser 193, leading to a failure of C/EBPα to interact with and inhibit cdks and E2F. Mutation of Ser 193 to Ala also abolishes the ability of C/EBPα to cause growth arrest because of a lack of interactions with cdk2 and E2F–Rb complexes. These data provide a molecular basis for the development of liver tumors in which the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway neutralizes C/EBPα growth inhibitory activity. PMID:15107404

  2. Peripheral Opioid Antagonist Enhances the Effect of Anti-Tumor Drug by Blocking a Cell Growth-Suppressive Pathway In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yumi; Ashikawa, Maho; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Takeshi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Komatsu, Masayuki; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagase, Hiroshi; Kushima, Ryoji; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Takeo; Katai, Hitoshi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Sasaki, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The dormancy of tumor cells is a major problem in chemotherapy, since it limits the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor drugs that only target dividing cells. One potential way to overcome chemo-resistance is to “wake up” these dormant cells. Here we show that the opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX) enhances the effect of docetaxel (Doc) by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway. We found that PENK, which encodes opioid growth factor (OGF) and suppresses cell growth, is predominantly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancers (GCs). The blockade of OGF signaling by MNTX releases cells from their arrest and boosts the effect of Doc. In comparison with the use of Doc alone, the combined use of Doc and MNTX significantly prolongs survival, alleviates abdominal pain, and diminishes Doc-resistant spheroids on the peritoneal membrane in model mice. These results suggest that blockade of the pathways that suppress cell growth may enhance the effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:25853862

  3. Peripheral opioid antagonist enhances the effect of anti-tumor drug by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masami; Chiwaki, Fumiko; Sawada, Yumi; Ashikawa, Maho; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Takeshi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Komatsu, Masayuki; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagase, Hiroshi; Kushima, Ryoji; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Takeo; Katai, Hitoshi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Sasaki, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The dormancy of tumor cells is a major problem in chemotherapy, since it limits the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor drugs that only target dividing cells. One potential way to overcome chemo-resistance is to "wake up" these dormant cells. Here we show that the opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX) enhances the effect of docetaxel (Doc) by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway. We found that PENK, which encodes opioid growth factor (OGF) and suppresses cell growth, is predominantly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancers (GCs). The blockade of OGF signaling by MNTX releases cells from their arrest and boosts the effect of Doc. In comparison with the use of Doc alone, the combined use of Doc and MNTX significantly prolongs survival, alleviates abdominal pain, and diminishes Doc-resistant spheroids on the peritoneal membrane in model mice. These results suggest that blockade of the pathways that suppress cell growth may enhance the effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:25853862

  4. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  5. The inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth by denbinobin is associated with the blocking of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, An-Chi; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Lai, Chin-Yu; Wang, Chih-Ya; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang; Teng, Che-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Denbinobin, which is a phenanthraquinone derivative present in the stems of Ephemerantha lonchophylla, has been demonstrated to display antitumor activity. Recent reports suggest that the enhanced activity of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is closely associated with tumor angiogenesis and growth. This study aims at investigating the roles of denbinobin in suppressing these effects and at further elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. In the present study, we used an in vivo xenograft model antitumor and the Matrigel implant assays to show that denbinobin suppresses lung adenocarcinoma A549 growth and microvessel formation. Additionally, crystal violet and capillary-like tube formation assays indicated that denbinobin selectively inhibits insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-induced proliferation (GI50=1.3×10⁻⁸ M) and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) without influencing the effect of epidermal growth factor; vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Furthermore, denbinobin inhibited the IGF-1-induced migration of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent fashion. Western blotting and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that denbinobin causes more efficient inhibition of IGF-1-induced activation of IGF-1R and its downstream signaling targets, including , extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, 4EBP and cyclin D1. All of our results provide evidences that denbinobin suppresses the activation of IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathway, which leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that denbinobin may be a novel IGF-1R kinase inhibitor and has potential therapeutic abilities for angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer. PMID:20951021

  6. Metformin selectively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth and prolong remission

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Heather A.; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Struhl, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that, unlike most cancer cells within a tumor, cancer stem cells resist chemotherapeutic drugs and can regenerate the various cell types in the tumor, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, drugs that selectively target cancer stem cells offer great promise for cancer treatment, particularly in combination with chemotherapy. Here, we show that low doses of metformin, a standard drug for diabetes, inhibits cellular transformation and selectively kills cancer stem cells in four genetically different types of breast cancer. The combination of metformin and a well-defined chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, kills both cancer stem cells and non-stem cancer cells in culture. Furthermore, this combinatorial therapy reduces tumor mass and prevents relapse much more effectively than either drug alone in a xenograft mouse model. Mice appear to remain tumor-free for at least two months after combinatorial therapy with metformin and doxorubicin is ended. These results provide further evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis, and they provide a rationale and experimental basis for using the combination of metformin and chemotherapeutic drugs to improve treatment of patients with breast (and possibly other) cancers. PMID:19752085

  7. CRM-1 knockdown inhibits extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma tumor growth by blocking the nuclear export of p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Chen, Yongjun; Li, Qiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yanqiong; Lan, Hongzhen

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a deadly disease which responds poorly to surgery and conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the anatomical and biological characteristics of cholangiocarcinoma. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor and in the present study, we found that p27Kip1 expression was suppressed in the nucleus and increased in the cytoplasm in 53 samples of cholangiocarcinoma from patients with highly malignant tumors (poorly-differentiated and tumor-node-metastsis (TNM) stage III-IV) compared with that in samples from 10 patients with chronic cholangitis. The expression of phosphorylated (p-)p27Kip1 (Ser10), one of the phosphorylated forms of p27Kip1, was increased in the patient samples with increasing malignancy and clinical stage. Coincidentally, chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM-1; also referred to as exportin 1 or Xpo1), a critical protein responsible for protein translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, was also overexpressed in the tumor samples which were poorly differentiated and of a higher clinical stage. Through specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRM-1 in the cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939, we identified an elevation of cytoplasmic p27Kip1 and a decrease of nuclear p27Kip1. Furthermore, the viability and colony formation ability of QBC939 cells was largely reduced with G1 arrest. Consistent with the findings of the in vitro experiments, in a xenograft mouse model, the tumors formed in the CRM-1 knockdown group were markedly smaller and weighed less than those in the control group in vivo. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that the interplay between CRM-1 and p27Kip1 may provide potentially potent biomarkers and functional targets for the development of future cholangiocarcinoma treatments. PMID:27279267

  8. CRM-1 knockdown inhibits extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma tumor growth by blocking the nuclear export of p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Chen, Yongjun; Li, Qiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yanqiong; Lan, Hongzhen

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a deadly disease which responds poorly to surgery and conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the anatomical and biological characteristics of cholangiocarcinoma. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and in the present study, we found that p27Kip1 expression was suppressed in the nucleus and increased in the cytoplasm in 53 samples of cholangiocarcinoma from patients with highly malignant tumors (poorly-differentiated and tumor-node-metastsis (TNM) stage III–IV) compared with that in samples from 10 patients with chronic cholangitis. The expression of phosphorylated (p-)p27Kip1 (Ser10), one of the phosphorylated forms of p27Kip1, was increased in the patient samples with increasing malignancy and clinical stage. Coincidentally, chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM-1; also referred to as exportin 1 or Xpo1), a critical protein responsible for protein translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, was also overexpressed in the tumor samples which were poorly differentiated and of a higher clinical stage. Through specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRM-1 in the cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939, we identified an elevation of cytoplasmic p27Kip1 and a decrease of nuclear p27Kip1. Furthermore, the viability and colony formation ability of QBC939 cells was largely reduced with G1 arrest. Consistent with the findings of the in vitro experiments, in a xenograft mouse model, the tumors formed in the CRM-1 knockdown group were markedly smaller and weighed less than those in the control group in vivo. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that the interplay between CRM-1 and p27Kip1 may provide potentially potent biomarkers and functional targets for the development of future cholangiocarcinoma treatments. PMID:27279267

  9. Inhibition of multiple vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) blocks lymph node metastases but inhibition of VEGFR-2 is sufficient to sensitize tumor cells to platinum-based chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sini, Patrizia; Samarzija, Ivana; Baffert, Fabienne; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda; Schnell, Christian; Theuer, Andreas; Christian, Sven; Boos, Anja; Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Foekens, John A; Setyono-Han, Buddy; Wood, Jeanette; Hynes, Nancy E

    2008-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) have important roles in cancer, affecting blood and lymphatic vessel functionality as well as tumor cells themselves. We compared the efficacy of a VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PTK787/ZK222584 (PTK/ZK), which targets the three VEGFRs, with blocking antibodies directed against VEGFR-2 (DC101) or VEGF-A (Pab85618) in a metastatic melanoma model. Although all inhibitors exerted comparable effects on primary tumor growth, only PTK/ZK significantly reduced lymph node metastasis formation. A comparable decrease in lymphatic vessel density following blockade of VEGFR-2 (DC101) or the three VEGFRs (PTK/ZK) was observed in the metastases. However, the functionality of lymphatics surrounding the primary tumor was more significantly disrupted by PTK/ZK, indicating the importance of multiple VEGFRs in the metastatic process. The antimetastatic properties of PTK/ZK were confirmed in a breast carcinoma model. B16/BL6 tumor cells express VEGF ligands and their receptors. Blockade of a VEGFR-1 autocrine loop with PTK/ZK inhibited tumor cell migration. Furthermore, the tumor cells also showed enhanced sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in combination with PTK/ZK, indicating that autocrine VEGFRs are promoting tumor cell migration and survival. In summary, our results suggest that, in addition to blocking angiogenesis, combined inhibition of the three VEGFRs may more efficiently target other aspects of tumor pathophysiology, including lymphatic vessel functionality, tumor cell dissemination, survival pathways, and response to chemotherapeutic compounds. PMID:18316624

  10. A Humanized Anti-VEGF Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Angiogenesis and Blocks Tumor Growth in Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongke; Yu, Qiu; Lee, Jonathan; Li, Mingzhen; Song, Jialiang; Chen, Jungang; Dai, Jihong; Couto, Fernando Jose Rebelo Do; An, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Weimin; Yu, Guo-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit antibodies have been widely used in research and diagnostics due to their high antigen specificity and affinity. Though these properties are also highly desirable for therapeutic applications, rabbit antibodies have remained untapped for human disease therapy. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RabMAbs), we generated a panel of neutralizing RabMAbs against human vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF). These neutralizing RabMAbs are specific to VEGF and do not cross-react to other members of the VEGF protein family. Guided by sequence and lineage analysis of a panel of neutralizing RabMAbs, we humanized the lead candidate by substituting non-critical residues with human residues within both the frameworks and the CDR regions. We showed that the humanized RabMAb retained its parental biological properties and showed potent inhibition of the growth of H460 lung carcinoma and A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts in mice. These studies provide proof of principle for the feasibility of developing humanized RabMAbs as therapeutics. PMID:20140208

  11. SD-208, a Novel Protein Kinase D Inhibitor, Blocks Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth In Vivo by Inducing G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Manuj; Salamoun, Joseph M.; Carder, Evan J.; Farber, Elisa; Xu, Shuping; Deng, Fan; Tang, Hua; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Q. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis and progression, and is an emerging molecular target for the development of anticancer therapy. Despite recent advancement in the development of potent and selective PKD small molecule inhibitors, the availability of in vivo active PKD inhibitors remains sparse. In this study, we describe the discovery of a novel PKD small molecule inhibitor, SD-208, from a targeted kinase inhibitor library screen, and the synthesis of a series of analogs to probe the structure-activity relationship (SAR) vs. PKD1. SD-208 displayed a narrow SAR profile, was an ATP-competitive pan-PKD inhibitor with low nanomolar potency and was cell active. Targeted inhibition of PKD by SD-208 resulted in potent inhibition of cell proliferation, an effect that could be reversed by overexpressed PKD1 or PKD3. SD-208 also blocked prostate cancer cell survival and invasion, and arrested cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Mechanistically, SD-208-induced G2/M arrest was accompanied by an increase in levels of p21 in DU145 and PC3 cells as well as elevated phosphorylation of Cdc2 and Cdc25C in DU145 cells. Most importantly, SD-208 given orally for 24 days significantly abrogated the growth of PC3 subcutaneous tumor xenografts in nude mice, which was accompanied by reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis and decreased expression of PKD biomarkers including survivin and Bcl-xL. Our study has identified SD-208 as a novel efficacious PKD small molecule inhibitor, demonstrating the therapeutic potential of targeted inhibition of PKD for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:25747583

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Gene 3 (EBI3) Blocking Leads to Induce Antitumor Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response and Suppress Tumor Growth in Colorectal Cancer by Bidirectional Reciprocal-Regulation STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yanfang; Chen, Qianqian; Du, Wenjing; Chen, Can; Li, Feifei; Yang, Jingying; Peng, Jianyu; Kang, Dongping; Lin, Bihua; Chai, Xingxing; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) is a member of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) family structural subunit and can form a heterodimer with IL-27p28 and IL-12p35 subunit to build IL-27 and IL-35, respectively. However, IL-27 stimulates whereas IL-35 inhibits antitumor T cell responses. To date, little is known about the role of EBI3 in tumor microenvironment. In this study, firstly we assessed EBI3, IL-27p28, IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 expression with clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues; then we evaluated the antitumor T cell responses and tumor growth with a EBI3 blocking peptide. We found that elevated EBI3 may be associated with IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 to promote CRC progression. EBI3 blocking peptide promoted antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response by inducing Granzyme B, IFN-γ production, and p-STAT3 expression and inhibited CRC cell proliferation and tumor growth to associate with suppressing gp130 and p-STAT3 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that EBI3 may mediate a bidirectional reciprocal-regulation STAT3 signaling pathway to assist the tumor escape immune surveillance in CRC. PMID:27247488

  13. Geometrical approach to tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    Tumor growth has a number of features in common with a physical process known as molecular beam epitaxy. Both growth processes are characterized by the constraint of growth development to the body border, and surface diffusion of cells and particles at the growing edge. However, tumor growth implies an approximate spherical symmetry that makes necessary a geometrical treatment of the growth equations. The basic model was introduced in a former paper [C. Escudero, Phys. Rev. E 73, 020902(R) (2006)], and in the present work we extend our analysis and try to shed light on the possible geometrical principles that drive tumor growth. We present two-dimensional models that reproduce the experimental observations, and analyze the unexplored three-dimensional case, for which interesting conclusions on tumor growth are derived. PMID:17025466

  14. AZD9496: An Oral Estrogen Receptor Inhibitor That Blocks the Growth of ER-Positive and ESR1-Mutant Breast Tumors in Preclinical Models.

    PubMed

    Weir, Hazel M; Bradbury, Robert H; Lawson, Mandy; Rabow, Alfred A; Buttar, David; Callis, Rowena J; Curwen, Jon O; de Almeida, Camila; Ballard, Peter; Hulse, Michael; Donald, Craig S; Feron, Lyman J L; Karoutchi, Galith; MacFaul, Philip; Moss, Thomas; Norman, Richard A; Pearson, Stuart E; Tonge, Michael; Davies, Gareth; Walker, Graeme E; Wilson, Zena; Rowlinson, Rachel; Powell, Steve; Sadler, Claire; Richmond, Graham; Ladd, Brendon; Pazolli, Ermira; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; De Savi, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Fulvestrant is an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist administered to breast cancer patients by monthly intramuscular injection. Given its present limitations of dosing and route of administration, a more flexible orally available compound has been sought to pursue the potential benefits of this drug in patients with advanced metastatic disease. Here we report the identification and characterization of AZD9496, a nonsteroidal small-molecule inhibitor of ERα, which is a potent and selective antagonist and downregulator of ERα in vitro and in vivo in ER-positive models of breast cancer. Significant tumor growth inhibition was observed as low as 0.5 mg/kg dose in the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 xenograft model, where this effect was accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in PR protein levels, demonstrating potent antagonist activity. Combining AZD9496 with PI3K pathway and CDK4/6 inhibitors led to further growth-inhibitory effects compared with monotherapy alone. Tumor regressions were also seen in a long-term estrogen-deprived breast model, where significant downregulation of ERα protein was observed. AZD9496 bound and downregulated clinically relevant ESR1 mutants in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in an ESR1-mutant patient-derived xenograft model that included a D538G mutation. Collectively, the pharmacologic evidence showed that AZD9496 is an oral, nonsteroidal, selective estrogen receptor antagonist and downregulator in ER(+) breast cells that could provide meaningful benefit to ER(+) breast cancer patients. AZD9496 is currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical trial. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3307-18. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020862

  15. Blocking Wnt signaling by SFRP-like molecules inhibits in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in cells carrying active β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Elise; Hendaoui, Ismaïl; Coulouarn, Cédric; Ribault, Catherine; Leseur, Julie; Eliat, Pierre-Antoine; Mebarki, Sihem; Corlu, Anne; Clément, Bruno; Musso, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer results from mutations in pathway components, which frequently coexist with autocrine Wnt signaling or epigenetic silencing of extracellular Wnt antagonists. Among the extracellular Wnt inhibitors, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are decoy receptors that contain soluble Wnt-binding frizzled domains. In addition to SFRPs, other endogenous molecules harboring frizzled motifs bind to and inhibit Wnt signaling. One of such molecules is V3Nter, a soluble SFRP-like frizzled polypeptide that binds to Wnt3a and inhibits Wnt signaling and expression of the β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc. V3Nter is derived from the cell surface extracellular matrix component collagen XVIII. Here, we used HCT116 human colon cancer cells carrying the ΔS45 activating mutation in one of the alleles of β-catenin to show that V3Nter and SFRP-1 decrease baseline and Wnt3a-induced β-catenin stabilization. Consequently, V3Nter reduces the growth of human colorectal cancer xenografts by specifically controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, without affecting angiogenesis or apoptosis, as shown by decreased [3H] thymidine (in vitro) or BrdU (in vivo) incorporation, clonogenesis assays, cell cycle analysis and magnetic resonance imaging in living mice. Additionally, V3Nter switches off the β-catenin target gene expression signature in vivo. Moreover, experiments with β-catenin allele-targeted cells showed that the ΔS45 β-catenin allele hampers, but does not abrogate inhibition of Wnt signaling by SFRP-1 or by the SFRP-like frizzled domain. Finally, neither SFRP-1 nor V3Nter affect β-catenin signaling in SW480 cells carrying non functional APC. Thus, SFRP-1 and the SFRP-like molecule V3Nter can inhibit tumor growth of β-catenin-activated tumor cells in vivo. PMID:20856206

  16. Blocking Wnt signaling by SFRP-like molecules inhibits in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in cells carrying active β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, E; Hendaoui, I; Coulouarn, C; Ribault, C; Leseur, J; Eliat, P-A; Mebarki, S; Corlu, A; Clément, B; Musso, O

    2011-01-27

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer results from mutations in pathway components, which frequently coexist with autocrine Wnt signaling or epigenetic silencing of extracellular Wnt antagonists. Among the extracellular Wnt inhibitors, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are decoy receptors that contain soluble Wnt-binding frizzled domains. In addition to SFRPs, other endogenous molecules harboring frizzled motifs bind to and inhibit Wnt signaling. One of such molecules is V3Nter, a soluble SFRP-like frizzled polypeptide that binds to Wnt3a and inhibits Wnt signaling and expression of the β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc. V3Nter is derived from the cell surface extracellular matrix component collagen XVIII. Here, we used HCT116 human colon cancer cells carrying the ΔS45 activating mutation in one of the alleles of β-catenin to show that V3Nter and SFRP-1 decrease baseline and Wnt3a-induced β-catenin stabilization. Consequently, V3Nter reduces the growth of human colorectal cancer xenografts by specifically controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, without affecting angiogenesis or apoptosis, as shown by decreased [(3)H]-thymidine (in vitro) or BrdU (in vivo) incorporation, clonogenesis assays, cell cycle analysis and magnetic resonance imaging in living mice. Additionally, V3Nter switches off the β-catenin target gene expression signature in vivo. Moreover, experiments with β-catenin allele-targeted cells showed that the ΔS45 β-catenin allele hampers, but does not abrogate, inhibition of Wnt signaling by SFRP-1 or by the SFRP-like frizzled domain. Finally, neither SFRP-1 nor V3Nter affect β-catenin signaling in SW480 cells carrying nonfunctional Adenomatous polyposis coli. Thus, SFRP-1 and the SFRP-like molecule V3Nter can inhibit tumor growth of β-catenin-activated tumor cells in vivo. PMID:20856206

  17. Disruption of focal adhesion kinase and p53 interaction with small molecule compound R2 reactivated p53 and blocked tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a 125 kDa non-receptor kinase that plays a major role in cancer cell survival and metastasis. Methods We performed computer modeling of the p53 peptide containing the site of interaction with FAK, predicted the peptide structure and docked it into the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of FAK involved in the complex with p53. We screened small molecule compounds that targeted the site of the FAK-p53 interaction and identified compounds (called Roslins, or R compounds) docked in silico to this site. Results By different assays in isogenic HCT116p53+/+ and HCT116 p53-/- cells we identified a small molecule compound called Roslin 2 (R2) that bound FAK, disrupted the binding of FAK and p53 and decreased cancer cell viability and clonogenicity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, dual-luciferase assays demonstrated that the R2 compound increased p53 transcriptional activity that was inhibited by FAK using p21, Mdm-2, and Bax-promoter targets. R2 also caused increased expression of p53 targets: p21, Mdm-2 and Bax proteins. Furthermore, R2 significantly decreased tumor growth, disrupted the complex of FAK and p53, and up-regulated p21 in HCT116 p53+/+ but not in HCT116 p53-/- xenografts in vivo. In addition, R2 sensitized HCT116p53+/+ cells to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Conclusions Thus, disruption of the FAK and p53 interaction with a novel small molecule reactivated p53 in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and can be effectively used for development of FAK-p53 targeted cancer therapy approaches. PMID:23841915

  18. Growth of a human mammary tumor cell line is blocked by galangin, a naturally occurring bioflavonoid, and is accompanied by down-regulation of cyclins D3, E, and A

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Tessa J; Yang, Xinhai; Sherr, David H

    2006-01-01

    Introduction This study was designed to determine if and how a non-toxic, naturally occurring bioflavonoid, galangin, affects proliferation of human mammary tumor cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that, in other cell types, galangin is a potent inhibitor of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), an environmental carcinogen-responsive transcription factor implicated in mammary tumor initiation and growth control. Because some current breast cancer therapeutics are ineffective in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors and since the AhR may be involved in breast cancer proliferation, the effects of galangin on the proliferation of an ER-, AhRhigh line, Hs578T, were studied. Methods AhR expression and function in the presence or absence of galangin, a second AhR inhibitor, α-naphthoflavone (α-NF), an AhR agonist, indole-3-carbinol, and a transfected AhR repressor-encoding plasmid (FhAhRR) were studied in Hs578T cells by western blotting for nuclear (for instance, constitutively activated) AhR and by transfection of an AhR-driven reporter construct, pGudLuc. The effects of these agents on cell proliferation were studied by 3H-thymidine incorporation and by flow cytometry. The effects on cyclins implicated in mammary tumorigenesis were evaluated by western blotting. Results Hs578T cells were shown to express high levels of constitutively active AhR. Constitutive and environmental chemical-induced AhR activity was profoundly suppressed by galangin as was cell proliferation. However, the failure of α-NF or FhAhRR transfection to block proliferation indicated that galangin-mediated AhR inhibition was either insufficient or unrelated to its ability to significantly block cell proliferation at therapeutically relevant doses (IC50 = 11 μM). Galangin inhibited transition of cells from the G0/G1 to the S phases of cell growth, likely through the nearly total elimination of cyclin D3. Expression of cyclins A and E was also suppressed. Conclusion Galangin is a strong

  19. Statistical mechanics model of angiogenic tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, António Luis; Lipowska, Dorota; Lipowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    We examine a lattice model of tumor growth where the survival of tumor cells depends on the supplied nutrients. When such a supply is random, the extinction of tumors belongs to the directed percolation universality class. However, when the supply is correlated with the distribution of tumor cells, which as we suggest might mimic the angiogenic growth, the extinction shows different critical behavior. Such a correlation affects also the morphology of the growing tumors and drastically raises tumor-survival probability. PMID:22400505

  20. Tumor growth suppression by the combination of nanobubbles and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Omata, Daiki; Nishiie, Norihito; Koshima, Risa; Shiono, Yasuyuki; Sawaguchi, Yoshikazu; Unga, Johan; Naoi, Tomoyuki; Negishi, Yoichi; Kawakami, Shigeru; Hashida, Mitsuru; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We previously developed novel liposomal nanobubbles (Bubble liposomes [BL]) that oscillate and collapse in an ultrasound field, generating heat and shock waves. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of cancer therapy using the combination of BL and ultrasound. In addition, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanism of this cancer therapy. Colon-26 cells were inoculated into the flank of BALB/c mice to induce tumors. After 8 days, BL or saline was intratumorally injected, followed by transdermal ultrasound exposure of tumor tissue (1 MHz, 0-4 W/cm2 , 2 min). The anti-tumor effects were evaluated by histology (necrosis) and tumor growth. In vivo cell depletion assays were performed to identify the immune cells responsible for anti-tumor effects. Tumor temperatures were significantly higher when treated with BL + ultrasound than ultrasound alone. Intratumoral BL caused extensive tissue necrosis at 3-4 W/cm2 of ultrasound exposure. In addition, BL + ultrasound significantly suppressed tumor growth at 2-4 W/cm2 . In vivo depletion of CD8+ T cells (not NK or CD4+ T cells) completely blocked the effect of BL + ultrasound on tumor growth. These data suggest that CD8+ T cells play a critical role in tumor growth suppression. Finally, we concluded that BL + ultrasound, which can prime the anti-tumor cellular immune system, may be an effective hyperthermia strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:26707839

  1. Blocking EGFR in the liver improves the tumor-to-liver uptake ratio of radiolabeled EGF.

    PubMed

    Kareem, Heewa; Sandström, Karl; Elia, Ronny; Gedda, Lars; Anniko, Matti; Lundqvist, Hans; Nestor, Marika

    2010-04-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in several types of malignant tumors correlates with disease progression. EGFR could, therefore, be an excellent candidate for targeted radionuclide diagnostics. However, the high natural expression of EGFR in the liver may be problematic. The aim of this study was to improve the tumor-to-liver ratio of radiolabeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) by blocking its uptake by the liver with a nonradiolabeled EGFR-targeting molecule in tumor-bearing mice. Intraperitoneally injected nonradiolabeled EGF was first evaluated as a blocking agent, preadministered at various time intervals before intravenous injection of (125)I-labeled EGF. The anti-EGFR Affibody molecule (Z(EGFR:955))(2) was then assessed as a blocking agent of (111)In-labeled EGF in a dual isotope study (50, 100, and 200 microg, preadministered 30 or 60 min before (111)In-EGF). The 30-min preadministration of nonradiolabeled EGF significantly decreased (125)I-EGF uptake in the liver, whereas uptake in the tumor remained unchanged. Furthermore, preadministration of only 50 microg (Z(EGFR:955))(2) as a blocking agent 30 min before the (111)In-EGF decreased the uptake of (111)In-EGF by the liver and increased its uptake by the tumor, thereby increasing the tumor-to-liver ratio sixfold. We conclude that the Affibody molecule (Z(EGFR:955))(2) shows promise as a blocking agent that could enhance the outcome of radionuclide-based EGFR-expressing tumor diagnostics and imaging. PMID:20358420

  2. Endostatin improves radioresponse and blocks tumor revascularization after radiation therapy for A431 xenografts in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Itasaka, Satoshi |; Komaki, Ritsuko; Herbst, Roy S. ||; Shintani, Tomoaki D.D.S.; Hunter, Nancy R. M.S.; Milas, Luka; Onn, Amir |; Bucana, Corazon D.; Ang, K. Kian; O'Reilly, Michael S. |. E-mail: moreilly@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents used alone for advanced malignancy have been disappointing but preclinical studies suggest that the addition of radiation therapy could improve antitumor efficacy. To test the hypothesis that antiangiogenic therapy combined with radiation therapy can overcome the limitations of antiangiogenic monotherapy, we studied the effects of endostatin combined with radiation on the growth and vascularization of A431 human epidermoid carcinomas growing intramuscularly in the legs of mice. Methods and Materials: Mice with established A431 human epidermoid leg tumors were treated with radiation, endostatin, both radiation and endostatin, or vehicle control. The experiment was repeated and mice from each group were killed at 2, 7, and 10 days after irradiation so that tumor tissue could be obtained to further analyze the kinetics of the antitumor, antivascular, and antiangiogenic response to therapy. Results: Endostatin enhanced the antitumor effects of radiation, and prolonged disease-free survival was observed in the combined treatment group. Endothelial cell proliferation was increased in tumors after irradiation but was blocked by the concurrent administration of endostatin, and the combination of endostatin with radiation enhanced endothelial cell apoptosis within 48 h after irradiation. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-8, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were increased in tumors after irradiation, and this increase was blocked by concurrent administration of endostatin. Conclusion: These data indicate that endostatin can block tumor revascularization after radiation therapy and thereby augment radioresponse.

  3. Low doses of PEG-coated gold nanoparticles sensitize solid tumors to cold plasma by blocking the PI3K/AKT-driven signaling axis to suppress cellular transformation by inhibiting growth and EMT.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Yoo, Ki Chun; Uddin, Nizam; Kim, Ju Sung; Lee, Su Jae; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of tumor cell transformation, is often activated during cancer invasion and progression and is associated with poor therapeutic outcomes. The effects of combined treatments that included PEG-coated gold nanoparticles (GNP) and cold plasma on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSC) have not been described so far. Here, we report that co-treatment with GNP and cold plasma inhibited proliferation in cancer cells by abolishing the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling axis. In addition, co-treatment reversed EMT in solid tumor cells by reducing the secretion of a number of proteins, resulting in the upregulation of epithelial markers such as E-cadherin along with down-regulation of N-Cadherin, Slug and Zeb-1. The inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway and the reversal of EMT by co-treatment prevented tumor cells growth in solid tumors. Furthermore, we show that GNP and plasma also suppresses tumor growth by decreasing mesenchymal markers in tumor xenograft mice models. Importantly, co-treatment resulted in a substantial decrease in sphere formation and the self-renewal capacity of glioma-like stem cells. Together, these results indicate a direct link between a decrease of EMT and an increase in cell death in solid tumors following co-treatment with cold plasma and GNP. PMID:26921841

  4. Penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Alok; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors exhibit enhanced autophagy as compared to any other cancer, making it resistant to chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of penfluridol against pancreatic cancer. Penfluridol treatment induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of Panc-1, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1, pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 ranging between 6–7 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by penfluridol treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Punctate LC3B and autophagosomes staining confirmed autophagy. Inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, bafilomycin, 3-methyladenine or LC3BsiRNA, significantly blocked penfluridol-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy lead to apoptosis in our model. Penfluridol treatment suppressed the growth of BxPC-3 tumor xenografts by 48% as compared to 17% when treated in combination with chloroquine. Similarly, penfluridol suppressed the growth of AsPC-1 tumors by 40% versus 16% when given in combination with chloroquine. TUNEL staining and caspase-3 cleavage revealed less apoptosis in the tumors from mice treated with penfluridol and chloroquine as compared to penfluridol alone. Penfluridol treatment also suppressed the growth of orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors by 80% by inducing autophagy-mediated apoptosis in the tumors. These studies established that penfluridol inhibits pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Since penfluridol is already in clinic, positive findings from our study will accelerate its clinical development. PMID:27189859

  5. Biochemomechanical poroelastic theory of avascular tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shi-Lei; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-09-01

    Tumor growth is a complex process involving genetic mutations, biochemical regulations, and mechanical deformations. In this paper, a thermodynamics-based nonlinear poroelastic theory is established to model the coupling among the mechanical, chemical, and biological mechanisms governing avascular tumor growth. A volumetric growth law accounting for mechano-chemo-biological coupled effects is proposed to describe the development of solid tumors. The regulating roles of stresses and nutrient transport in the tumor growth are revealed under different environmental constraints. We show that the mechano-chemo-biological coupling triggers anisotropic and heterogeneous growth, leading to the formation of layered structures in a growing tumor. There exists a steady state in which tumor growth is balanced by resorption. The influence of external confinements on tumor growth is also examined. A phase diagram is constructed to illustrate how the elastic modulus and thickness of the confinements jointly dictate the steady state of tumor volume. Qualitative and quantitative agreements with experimental observations indicate the developed model is capable of capturing the essential features of avascular tumor growth in various environments.

  6. Cancer Progression and Tumor Growth Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, Krastan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wilkerson, Julia; Sprinkhuizen, Sara; Song, Yi-Qiao; Bates, Susan; Rosen, Bruce; Fojo, Tito

    2013-03-01

    We present and analyze tumor growth data from prostate and brain cancer. Scaling the data from different patients shows that early stage prostate tumors show non-exponential growth while advanced prostate and brain tumors enter a stage of exponential growth. The scaling analysis points to the existence of cancer stem cells and/or massive apoptosis in early stage prostate cancer and that late stage cancer growth is not dominated by cancer stem cells. Statistical models of these two growth modes are discussed. Work supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health

  7. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfeng; Li, Lena; Lian, Jihong; Schauer, Silvia; Vesely, Paul W; Kratky, Dagmar; Hoefler, Gerald; Lehner, Richard

    2016-04-12

    The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH) knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh(-/-) tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh(-/-) mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh(-/-) mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth. PMID:27050512

  8. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfeng; Li, Lena; Lian, Jihong; Schauer, Silvia; Vesely, Paul W.; Kratky, Dagmar; Hoefler, Gerald; Lehner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Summary The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH) knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh–/– tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth. PMID:27050512

  9. Inhibition of Vascularization in Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Sansone, B. Capogrosso

    2002-11-01

    The transition to a vascular phase is a prerequisite for fast tumor growth. During the avascular phase, the neoplasm feeds only from the (relatively few) existing nearby blood vessels. During angiogenesis, the number of capillaries surrounding and infiltrating the tumor increases dramatically. A model which includes physical and biological mechanisms of the interactions between the tumor and vascular growth describes the avascular-vascular transition. Numerical results agree with clinical observations and predict the influence of therapies aiming to inhibit the transition.

  10. The Universal Dynamics of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Brú, Antonio; Albertos, Sonia; Luis Subiza, José; García-Asenjo, José López; Brú, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    Scaling techniques were used to analyze the fractal nature of colonies of 15 cell lines growing in vitro as well as of 16 types of tumor developing in vivo. All cell colonies were found to exhibit exactly the same growth dynamics—which correspond to the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) universality class. MBE dynamics are characterized by 1), a linear growth rate, 2), the constraint of cell proliferation to the colony/tumor border, and 3), surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. These characteristics were experimentally verified in the studied colonies. That these should show MBE dynamics is in strong contrast with the currently established concept of tumor growth: the kinetics of this type of proliferation rules out exponential or Gompertzian growth. Rather, a clear linear growth regime is followed. The importance of new cell movements—cell diffusion at the tumor border—lies in the fact that tumor growth must be conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and not for nutrients or other factors. Strong experimental evidence is presented for 16 types of tumor, the growth of which cell surface diffusion may be the main mechanism responsible in vivo. These results explain most of the clinical and biological features of colonies and tumors, offer new theoretical frameworks, and challenge the wisdom of some current clinical strategies. PMID:14581197

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Branching Morphogenesis and Vascular Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huaming

    Feedback regulation of cell lineages is known to play an important role in tissue size control, but the effect in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. We first use a non-spatial model to show that a combination of positive and negative feedback on stem and/or progenitor cell self-renewal leads to bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors and ultrasensitivity to external growth cues. Next, a spatiotemporal model is used to demonstrate spatial patterns such as local budding and branching arise in this setting, and are not consequences of Turing-type instabilities. We next extend the model to a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth to study the effects of angiogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapies. We account for the crosstalk between the vasculature and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and CSC transdifferentiation into vascular endothelial cells (gECs), as observed experimentally. The vasculature stabilizes tumor invasiveness but considerably enhances growth. A gEC network structure forms spontaneously within the hypoxic core, consistent with experimental findings. The model is then used to study cancer therapeutics. We demonstrate that traditional anti-angiogenic therapies decelerate tumor growth, but make the tumor highly invasive. Chemotherapies help to reduce tumor sizes, but cannot control the invasion. Anti-CSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduce tumor invasiveness. However, gECs inherit mutations present in CSCs and are resistant to traditional therapies. We show that anti-gEC treatments block the support on CSCs by gECs, and reduce both tumor size and invasiveness. Our study suggests that therapies targeting the vasculature, CSCs and gECs, when combined, are highly synergistic and are capable of controlling both tumor size and shape.

  12. Myoglobin tames tumor growth and spread.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Dang, Chi V

    2009-04-01

    Tumor growth is accompanied by tissue hypoxia, but does this reduced oxygen availability promote further tumor expansion, resulting in a vicious cycle? In this issue of the JCI, Galluzzo et al. report that increasing oxygen tension in tumor cells by ectopically expressing the oxygen-binding hemoprotein myoglobin indeed affects tumorigenesis (see the related article beginning on page 865). Tumors derived from cells transfected with myoglobin grew more slowly, were less hypoxic, and were less metastatic. These results will spur further mechanistic inquiry into the role of hypoxia in tumor expansion. PMID:19348046

  13. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevertz, Jana L.; Gillies, George T.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-09-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics.

  14. Tumor growth in a defined microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Christofferson, R H; Sköldenberg, E G; Nilsson, B O

    1997-06-01

    The fate of human tumor cells deposited in rat uteri was investigated by light microscopy of histological sections, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy of microvascular corrosion casts. The human colonic tumor cell line LS 174 T was used as graft since it can be detected by CEA immunohistochemistry, and spayed nude rats (PVG rnu/rnu) were used as hosts, subjected to different hormonal regimens (no exogenous hormones, medroxyprogesterone acetate, 17-beta-estradiol, or the last two regimens in combination). Intrauterine deposition of a suspension of 2 x 10(6) tumor cells resulted in tumor take in 72% (21/29) of the nude rats. Endometrial growth was verified in only three animals (14%, 3/21). Extraendometrial growth, however, was found in all animals with tumor take. These observations suggest that the endometrium is comparatively resistant to growth of xenografted human colonic tumor cells. The tumor microcirculation consisted of new vessels, giving morphological evidence that tumor growth is dependent on angiogenesis and not on invasion of preexisting vessels. PMID:9236867

  15. ROLE OF CHEMOKINES IN TUMOR GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Baugher, Paige J.; Thu, Yee Mon; Richmond, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines play a paramount role in the tumor progression. Chronic inflammation promotes tumor formation. Both tumor cells and stromal cells elaborate chemokines and cytokines. These act either by autocrine or paracrine mechanisms to sustain tumor cell growth, induce angiogenesis and facilitate evasion of immune surveillance through immunoediting. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 and its ligands promote tumor angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration into the tumor microenvironment. In harsh acidic and hypoxic microenvironmental conditions tumor cells up-regulate their expression of CXCR4, which equips them to migrate up a gradient of CXCL12 elaborated by carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to a normoxic microenvironment. The CXCL12-CXCR4 axis facilitates metastasis to distant organs and the CCL21-CCR7 chemokine ligand-receptor pair favors metastasis to lymph nodes. These two chemokine ligand-receptor systems are common key mediators of tumor cell metastasis for several malignancies and as such provide key targets for chemotherapy. In this paper, the role of specific chemokines/chemokine receptor interactions in tumor progression, growth and metastasis and the role of chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions in the stromal compartment as related to angiogenesis, metastasis, and immune response to the tumor are reviewed. PMID:17629396

  16. Review of Growth Inhibitory Peptide as a biotherapeutic agent for tumor growth, adhesion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Muehlemann, M; Miller, K D; Dauphinee, M; Mizejewski, G J

    2005-09-01

    This review surveys the biological activities of an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) derived peptide termed the Growth Inhibitory Peptide (GIP), which is a synthetic 34 amino acid segment produced from the full length 590 amino acid AFP molecule. The GIP has been shown to be growth-suppressive in both fetal and tumor cells but not in adult terminally-differentiated cells. The mechanism of action of this peptide has not been fully elucidated; however, GIP is highly interactive at the plasma membrane surface in cellular events such as endocytosis, cell contact inhibition and cytoskeleton-induced cell shape changes. The GIP was shown to be growth-suppressive in nine human tumor types and to suppress the spread of tumor infiltrates and metastases in human and mouse mammary cancers. The AFP-derived peptide and its subfragments were also shown to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and to block platelet aggregation; thus it was expected that the GIP would inhibit cell spreading/migration and metastatic infiltration into host tissues such as lung and pancreas. It was further found that the cyclic versus linear configuration of GIP determined its biological and anti-cancer efficacy. Genbank amino acid sequence identities with a variety of integrin alpha/beta chain proteins supported the GIP's linkage to inhibition of tumor cell adhesion and platelet aggregation. The combined properties of tumor growth suppression, prevention of tumor cell-to-ECM adhesion, and inhibition of platelet aggregation indicate that tumor-to-platelet interactions present promising targets for GIP as an anti-metastatic agent. Finally, based on cholinergic studies, it was proposed that GIP could influence the enzymatic activity of membrane acetylcholinesterases during tumor growth and metastasis. It was concluded that the GIP derived from full-length AFP represents a growth inhibitory motif possessing instrinsic properties that allow it to interfere in cell surface events such

  17. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors. PMID:19845874

  18. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yang, Licong; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  19. Ontogenetic growth of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, C. A.; Menchón, S. A.

    2006-11-01

    In ontogenetic growth models, the basal metabolic rate is usually assumed to depend on the individual mass following a power law. Here it is shown that, in the case of multicellular tumor spheroids, the emergence of a necrotic core invalidates this assumption. The implications of this result for spheroid growth are discussed, and a procedure to determine the growth parameters using macroscopic measurements is proposed.

  20. Autocrine growth factors and solid tumor malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. H.; Karnes, W. E.; Cuttitta, F.; Walker, A.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of malignant cells to escape the constraint that normally regulate cell growth and differentiation has been a primary focus of attention for investigators of cancer cell biology. An outcome of this attention has been the discovery that the protein products of oncogenes play a role in the activation of growth signal pathways. A second outcome, possibly related to abnormal oncogene expression, has been the discovery that malignant cells frequently show an ability to regulate their own growth by the release of autocrine growth modulatory substances. Most important, the growth of certain malignant cell types has been shown to depend on autocrine growth circuits. A malignant tumor whose continued growth depends on the release of an autocrine growth factor may be vulnerable to treatment with specific receptor antagonists or immunoneutralizing antibodies designed to break the autocrine circuit. Information is rapidly emerging concerning autocrine growth factors in selected human solid tissue malignancy. Images PMID:1926844

  1. Direct evidence for block-by-block growth in high-temperature superconductor ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Varela, M; Grogger, W; Arias, D; Sefrioui, Z; León, C; Ballesteros, C; Krishnan, K M; Santamaría, J

    2001-05-28

    Charge neutrality and stoichiometry impose severe restrictions on the mechanisms of epitaxial growth of complex oxides. The fundamental question arises of what is the minimum growth unit when sample thickness is reduced beyond the size of the unit cell. We have investigated the growth mechanism of YBa2Cu3O7 cuprate superconductor, using a consistent approach based on the growth of noninteger numbers of YBa2Cu3O7 layers in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7)/PrBa(2)Cu3O7 superlattices. Ex situ chemical and structural analysis evidence a 2D block-by-block mechanism in which the minimum growth units are complete unit cell blocks, growing coherently over large lateral distances. PMID:11384445

  2. PP2A mediates diosmin p53 activation to block HA22T cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenografted nude mice through PI3K-Akt-MDM2 signaling suppression.

    PubMed

    Dung, Tran Duc; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Binh, Truong Viet; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Su, Cheng-Chuan; Lin, Yueh-Min; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Chen, Li-Mien; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2012-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a common type of cancer with poor prognosis. This study examines the in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of diosmin on human hepato-cellular carcinoma HA22T cell proliferation inhibition. HA22T cells were treated with different diosmin concentrations and analyzed with Western blot analysis, MTT assay, wound healing, flow cytometry, siRNA transfection assays and co-immuno-precipitation assay. The HA22T-implanted xeno-graft nude mice model was applied to confirm the cellular effects. Diosmin showed strong HA22T cell viability inhibition in a dose dependent manner and significantly reduced the cell proliferative proteins as well as inducing cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase through p53 activation and PI3K-Akt-MDM2 signaling pathway inhibition. However, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) siRNA or PP2A inhibitor totally reversed the diosmin effects. The HA22T-implanted nude mice model further confirmed that diosmin inhibited HA22T tumor cell growth and down regulated the PI3K-Akt-MDM2 signaling and cell cycle regulating proteins, as well as activating PP2A and p53 proteins. Our findings indicate that HA22T cell proliferation inhibition and tumor growth suppression by diosmin are mediated through PP2A activation. PMID:22289577

  3. Blood porphyrin luminescence and tumor growth correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrol, Lilia Coronato; Silva, Flávia Rodrigues de Oliveira; Bellini, Maria Helena; Mansano, Ronaldo Domingues; Schor, Nestor; Vieira, Nilson Dias, Jr.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence technique appears very important for the diagnosis of cancer. Fluorescence detection has advantages over other light-based investigation methods: high sensitivity, high speed, and safety. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3% of new cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. Unfortunately many RCC masses remain asymptomatic and nonpalpable until they are advanced. Diagnosis and localization of early carcinoma play an important role in the prevention and curative treatment of RCC. Certain drugs or chemicals such as porphyrin derivatives accumulate substantially more in tumors than normal tissues. The autofluorescence of blood porphyrin of healthy and tumor induced male SCID mice was analyzed using fluorescence and excitation spectroscopy. A significant contrast between normal and tumor blood could be established. Blood porphyrin fluorophore showed enhanced fluorescence band (around 630 nm) in function of the tumor growth. This indicates that either the autofluorescence intensity of the blood fluorescence may provide a good parameter for the "first approximation" characterization of the tumor stage.

  4. Endostatin: an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, M S; Boehm, T; Shing, Y; Fukai, N; Vasios, G; Lane, W S; Flynn, E; Birkhead, J R; Olsen, B R; Folkman, J

    1997-01-24

    We previously identified the angiogenesis inhibitor angiostatin. Using a similar strategy, we have identified endostatin, an angiogenesis inhibitor produced by hemangioendothelioma. Endostatin is a 20 kDa C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII. Endostatin specifically inhibits endothelial proliferation and potently inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. By a novel method of sustained release, E. coli-derived endostatin was administered as a nonrefolded suspension. Primary tumors were regressed to dormant microscopic lesions. Immunohistochemistry revealed blocked angiogenesis accompanied by high proliferation balanced by apoptosis in tumor cells. There was no toxicity. Together with angiostatin data, these findings validate a strategy for identifying endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, suggest a theme of fragments of proteins as angiogenesis inhibitors, and demonstrate dormancy therapy. PMID:9008168

  5. Effects of anatomical constraints on tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capogrosso Sansone, B.; Delsanto, P. P.; Magnano, M.; Scalerandi, M.

    2001-08-01

    Competition for available nutrients and the presence of anatomical barriers are major determinants of tumor growth in vivo. We extend a model recently proposed to simulate the growth of neoplasms in real tissues to include geometrical constraints mimicking pressure effects on the tumor surface induced by the presence of rigid or semirigid structures. Different tissues have different diffusivities for nutrients and cells. Despite the simplicity of the approach, based on a few inherently local mechanisms, the numerical results agree qualitatively with clinical data (computed tomography scans of neoplasms) for the larynx and the oral cavity.

  6. Connective tissue growth factor in tumor pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Key roles for connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) are demonstrated in the wound repair process where it promotes myofibroblast differentiation and angiogenesis. Similar mechanisms are active in tumor-reactive stroma where CTGF is expressed. Other potential roles include prevention of hypoxia-induced apoptosis and promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transistion (EMT). CTGF expression in tumors has been associated to both tumor suppression and progression. For example, CTGF expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, breast, pancreas and gastric cancer correlates to worse prognosis whereas the opposite is true for colorectal, lung and ovarian cancer. This discrepancy is not yet understood. High expression of CTGF is a hallmark of ileal carcinoids, which are well-differentiated endocrine carcinomas with serotonin production originating from the small intestine and proximal colon. These tumors maintain a high grade of differentiation and low proliferation. Despite this, they are malignant and most patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis. These tumors demonstrate several phenotypes potentially related to CTGF function namely: cell migration, absent tumor cell apoptosis, as well as, reactive and well vascularised myofibroblast rich stroma and fibrosis development locally and in distal organs. The presence of CTGF in other endocrine tumors indicates a role in the progression of well-differentiated tumors. PMID:23259759

  7. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    PubMed Central

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25–10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug. PMID:25136960

  8. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Santagiuliana, R.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution.

  9. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2015-01-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution. PMID:25427284

  10. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hwang, Sung Hee; Yang, Jun; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yanru; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Tam, Sarah; Kieran, Mark W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins derived from the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from the cytochrome P450/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway are important eicosanoids that regulate angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors, which block the formation of prostaglandins, suppress tumor growth, whereas sEH inhibitors, which increase endogenous EETs, stimulate primary tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors as probes, we show here that dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH synergistically inhibits primary tumor growth and metastasis by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. COX-2/sEH dual pharmacological inhibitors also potently suppress primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via selective inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical interaction of these two lipid metabolism pathways on tumorigenesis and suggest dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25024195

  11. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  12. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  13. Stochastic model for tumor growth with immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Thomas; Trimper, Steffen

    2009-05-01

    We analyze a stochastic model for tumor cell growth with both multiplicative and additive colored noises as well as nonzero cross correlations in between. Whereas the death rate within the logistic model is altered by a deterministic term characterizing immunization, the birth rate is assumed to be stochastically changed due to biological motivated growth processes leading to a multiplicative internal noise. Moreover, the system is subjected to an external additive noise which mimics the influence of the environment of the tumor. The stationary probability distribution Ps is derived depending on the finite correlation time, the immunization rate, and the strength of the cross correlation. Ps offers a maximum which becomes more pronounced for increasing immunization rate. The mean-first-passage time is also calculated in order to find out under which conditions the tumor can suffer extinction. Its characteristics are again controlled by the degree of immunization and the strength of the cross correlation. The behavior observed can be interpreted in terms of a biological model of tumor evolution.

  14. Histone acetyltransferase inhibitors block neuroblastoma cell growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gajer, J M; Furdas, S D; Gründer, A; Gothwal, M; Heinicke, U; Keller, K; Colland, F; Fulda, S; Pahl, H L; Fichtner, I; Sippl, W; Jung, M

    2015-01-01

    We have previously described novel histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors that block neuroblastoma cell growth in vitro. Here we show that two selected pyridoisothiazolone HAT inhibitors, PU139 and PU141, induce cellular histone hypoacetylation and inhibit growth of several neoplastic cell lines originating from different tissues. Broader in vitro selectivity profiling shows that PU139 blocks the HATs Gcn5, p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), CREB (cAMP response element-binding) protein (CBP) and p300, whereas PU141 is selective toward CBP and p300. The pan-inhibitor PU139 triggers caspase-independent cell death in cell culture. Both inhibitors block growth of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma xenografts in mice and the PU139 was shown to synergize with doxorubicin in vivo. The latter also reduces histone lysine acetylation in vivo at concentrations that block neoplastic xenograft growth. This is one of the very few reports on hypoacetylating agents with in vivo anticancer activity. PMID:25664930

  15. Paracrine expression of a native soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibits tumor growth, metastasis, and mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Corey K.; Kendall, Richard L.; Cabrera, Gustavo; Soroceanu, Liliana; Heike, Yuji; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Siegal, Gene P.; Mao, Xianzhi; Bett, Andrew J.; Huckle, William R.; Thomas, Kenneth A.; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and selective vascular endothelial cell mitogen and angiogenic factor. VEGF expression is elevated in a wide variety of solid tumors and is thought to support their growth by enhancing tumor neovascularization. To block VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, tumor cells were transfected with cDNA encoding the native soluble FLT-1 (sFLT-1) truncated VEGF receptor which can function both by sequestering VEGF and, in a dominant negative fashion, by forming inactive heterodimers with membrane-spanning VEGF receptors. Transient transfection of HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells with a gene encoding sFLT-1 significantly inhibited their implantation and growth in the lungs of nude mice following i.v. injection and their growth as nodules from cells injected s.c. High sFLT-1 expressing stably transfected HT-1080 clones grew even slower as s.c. tumors. Finally, survival was significantly prolonged in mice injected intracranially with human glioblastoma cells stably transfected with the sflt-1 gene. The ability of sFLT-1 protein to inhibit tumor growth is presumably attributable to its paracrine inhibition of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, since it did not affect tumor cell mitogenesis in vitro. These results not only support VEGF receptors as antiangiogenic targets but also demonstrate that sflt-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:9671758

  16. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or “decorating” collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  17. Tumor-secreted miR-214 induces regulatory T cells: a major link between immune evasion and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuan; Cai, Xing; Chen, Xi; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Jing; Wang, Zuoyun; Chen, Xiulan; Zhang, Wen; Yokoyama, Seiji; Wang, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Limin; Hou, Dongxia; Dong, Lei; Xu, Tao; Hiroi, Takachika; Yang, Fuquan; Ji, Hongbin; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2014-10-01

    An increased population of CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor-associated microenvironment plays an important role in cancer immune evasion. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed an increased secretion of miR-214 in various types of human cancers and mouse tumor models. Tumor-secreted miR-214 was sufficiently delivered into recipient T cells by microvesicles (MVs). In targeted mouse peripheral CD4(+) T cells, tumor-derived miR-214 efficiently downregulated phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and promoted Treg expansion. The miR-214-induced Tregs secreted higher levels of IL-10 and promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, in vivo studies indicated that Treg expansion mediated by cancer cell-secreted miR-214 resulted in enhanced immune suppression and tumor implantation/growth in mice. The MV delivery of anti-miR-214 antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) into mice implanted with tumors blocked Treg expansion and tumor growth. Our study reveals a novel mechanism through which cancer cell actively manipulates immune response via promoting Treg expansion. PMID:25223704

  18. Tumor-secreted miR-214 induces regulatory T cells: a major link between immune evasion and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuan; Cai, Xing; Chen, Xi; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Jing; Wang, Zuoyun; Chen, Xiulan; Zhang, Wen; Yokoyama, Seiji; Wang, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Limin; Hou, Dongxia; Dong, Lei; Xu, Tao; Hiroi, Takachika; Yang, Fuquan; Ji, Hongbin; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2014-01-01

    An increased population of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor-associated microenvironment plays an important role in cancer immune evasion. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed an increased secretion of miR-214 in various types of human cancers and mouse tumor models. Tumor-secreted miR-214 was sufficiently delivered into recipient T cells by microvesicles (MVs). In targeted mouse peripheral CD4+ T cells, tumor-derived miR-214 efficiently downregulated phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and promoted Treg expansion. The miR-214-induced Tregs secreted higher levels of IL-10 and promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, in vivo studies indicated that Treg expansion mediated by cancer cell-secreted miR-214 resulted in enhanced immune suppression and tumor implantation/growth in mice. The MV delivery of anti-miR-214 antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) into mice implanted with tumors blocked Treg expansion and tumor growth. Our study reveals a novel mechanism through which cancer cell actively manipulates immune response via promoting Treg expansion. PMID:25223704

  19. Destruction of tumor vasculature and abated tumor growth upon VEGF blockade is driven by proapoptotic protein Bim in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Naik, Edwina; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse; Merino, Delphine; Lin, Ann; Cook, Michele; Coultas, Leigh; Bouillet, Philippe; Adams, Jerry M; Strasser, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    For malignant growth, solid cancers must stimulate the formation of new blood vessels by producing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), which is required for the survival of tumor-associated vessels. Novel anticancer agents that block VEGF-A signaling trigger endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis and vascular regression preferentially within tumors, but how the ECs die is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that VEGF-A deprivation, provoked either by drug-induced tumor shrinkage or direct VEGF-A blockade, up-regulates the proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3)-only Bcl-2 family member Bim in ECs. Importantly, the tumor growth inhibitory activity of a VEGF-A antagonist required Bim-induced apoptosis of ECs. These findings thus reveal the mechanism by which VEGF-A blockade induces EC apoptosis and impairs tumor growth. They also indicate that drugs mimicking BH3-only proteins may be exploited to kill tumor cells not only directly but also indirectly by ablating the tumor vasculature. PMID:21646395

  20. AZD1480 blocks growth and tumorigenesis of RET- activated thyroid cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Couto, Joana P; Almeida, Ana; Daly, Laura; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Bromberg, Jacqueline F; Soares, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Persistent RET activation is a frequent event in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In these cancers, RET activates the ERK/MAPK, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and the JAK/STAT3 pathways. Here, we tested the efficacy of a JAK1/2- inhibitor, AZD1480, in the in vitro and in vivo growth of thyroid cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic RET. Thyroid cancer cell lines harboring RET/PTC1 (TPC-1), RET M918T (MZ-CRC1) and RET C634W (TT) alterations, as well as TPC-1 xenografts, were treated with JAK inhibitor, AZD1480. This inhibitor led to growth inhibition and/or apoptosis of the thyroid cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as to tumor regression of TPC-1 xenografts, where it efficiently blocked STAT3 activation in tumor and stromal cells. This inhibition was associated with decreased proliferation, decreased blood vessel density, coupled with increased necrosis. However, AZD1480 repressed the growth of STAT3- deficient TPC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating that its effects in this cell line were independent of STAT3 in the tumor cells. In all cell lines, the JAK inhibitor reduced phospho-Y1062 RET levels, and mTOR effector phospho-S6, while JAK1/2 downregulation by siRNA did not affect cell growth nor RET and S6 activation. In conclusion, AZD1480 effectively blocks proliferation and tumor growth of activated RET- thyroid cancer cell lines, likely through direct RET inhibition in cancer cells as well as by modulation of the microenvironment (e.g. via JAK/phospho-STAT3 inhibition in endothelial cells). Thus, AZD1480 should be considered as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of RET- activated thyroid cancers. PMID:23056499

  1. Squalamine inhibits angiogenesis and solid tumor growth in vivo and perturbs embryonic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Sills, A K; Williams, J I; Tyler, B M; Epstein, D S; Sipos, E P; Davis, J D; McLane, M P; Pitchford, S; Cheshire, K; Gannon, F H; Kinney, W A; Chao, T L; Donowitz, M; Laterra, J; Zasloff, M; Brem, H

    1998-07-01

    The novel aminosterol, squalamine, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in multiple animal models. This effect is mediated, at least in part, by blocking mitogen-induced proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, thus preventing neovascularization of the tumor. Squalamine has no observable effect on unstimulated endothelial cells, is not directly cytotoxic to tumor cells, does not alter mitogen production by tumor cells, and has no obvious effects on the growth of newborn vertebrates. Squalamine was also found to have remarkable effects on the primitive vascular bed of the chick chorioallantoic membrane, which has striking similarities to tumor capillaries. Squalamine may thus be well suited for treatment of tumors and other diseases characterized by neovascularization in humans. PMID:9661892

  2. Constructing Tumor Vaccines Targeting for Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) by DNA Shuffling.

    PubMed

    Bie, Nana; Zhao, Xiuyun; Li, Zhitao; Qi, Gaofu

    2016-09-01

    Most of tumor antigens are self-proteins with poor antigenicity because of immune tolerance. Here, we describe DNA shuffling for overcoming the tolerance of tumor antigens such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a growth factor associated with tumor angiogenesis. VEGF genes from mouse, rat, human, and chicken were randomly assembled to chimeric genes by DNA shuffling for constructing an expression library, then screened by PCR, SDS-PAGE, and immunization. A chimeric protein named as No. 46 was selected from the library with the strongest immunotherapy effects on mouse H22 hepatocellular carcinoma, which could induce long-lasted and high level of antibodies recognizing VEGF in mice. Immunization with this chimeric protein could significantly inhibit tumor angiogenesis, slow down tumor growth, increase the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice, and inhibit the lung metastases of tumor in mouse. Treatment with the anti-VEGF IgG induced by this chimeric protein also significantly inhibited tumor growth and improved the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice, by blocking the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 pathway of VEGF-VEGFR interaction. Our study provides an efficient approach to overcome the immune tolerance of self-antigens for developing novel tumor vaccines. PMID:27428264

  3. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  4. Cellular Potts Modeling of Tumor Growth, Tumor Invasion, and Tumor Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Merks, Roeland M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a growing wealth of available molecular data, the growth of tumors, invasion of tumors into healthy tissue, and response of tumors to therapies are still poorly understood. Although genetic mutations are in general the first step in the development of a cancer, for the mutated cell to persist in a tissue, it must compete against the other, healthy or diseased cells, for example by becoming more motile, adhesive, or multiplying faster. Thus, the cellular phenotype determines the success of a cancer cell in competition with its neighbors, irrespective of the genetic mutations or physiological alterations that gave rise to the altered phenotype. What phenotypes can make a cell “successful” in an environment of healthy and cancerous cells, and how? A widely used tool for getting more insight into that question is cell-based modeling. Cell-based models constitute a class of computational, agent-based models that mimic biophysical and molecular interactions between cells. One of the most widely used cell-based modeling formalisms is the cellular Potts model (CPM), a lattice-based, multi particle cell-based modeling approach. The CPM has become a popular and accessible method for modeling mechanisms of multicellular processes including cell sorting, gastrulation, or angiogenesis. The CPM accounts for biophysical cellular properties, including cell proliferation, cell motility, and cell adhesion, which play a key role in cancer. Multiscale models are constructed by extending the agents with intracellular processes including metabolism, growth, and signaling. Here we review the use of the CPM for modeling tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor progression. We argue that the accessibility and flexibility of the CPM, and its accurate, yet coarse-grained and computationally efficient representation of cell and tissue biophysics, make the CPM the method of choice for modeling cellular processes in tumor development. PMID:23596570

  5. Tumor-host interactions in the gallbladder suppress distal angiogenesis and tumor growth: involvement of transforming growth factor beta1.

    PubMed

    Gohongi, T; Fukumura, D; Boucher, Y; Yun, C O; Soff, G A; Compton, C; Todoroki, T; Jain, R K

    1999-10-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors produced by a primary tumor can create a systemic anti-angiogenic environment and maintain metastatic tumor cells in a state of dormancy. We show here that the gallbladder microenvironment modulates the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, a multifunctional cytokine that functions as an endogenous anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor factor in a cranial window preparation. We found that a wide variety of human gallbladder tumors express TGF-beta1 irrespective of histologic type. We implanted a gel impregnated with basic fibroblast growth factor or Mz-ChA-2 tumor in the cranial windows of mice without tumors or mice with subcutaneous or gallbladder tumors to study angiogenesis and tumor growth at a secondary site. Angiogenesis, leukocyte-endothelial interaction in vessels and tumor growth in the cranial window were substantially inhibited in mice with gallbladder tumors. The concentration of TGF-beta1 in the plasma of mice with gallbladder tumors was 300% higher than that in the plasma of mice without tumors or with subcutaneous tumors. In contrast, there was no difference in the plasma levels of other anti- and pro-angiogenic factors. Treatment with neutralizing antibody against TGF-beta1 reversed both angiogenesis suppression and inhibition of leukocyte rolling induced by gallbladder tumors. TGF-beta1 also inhibited Mz-ChA-2 tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the production of anti-angiogenesis/proliferation factors is regulated by tumor-host interactions. PMID:10502827

  6. Cathepsin S from both tumor and tumor-associated cells promote cancer growth and neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Small, Donna M; Burden, Roberta E; Jaworski, Jakub; Hegarty, Shauna M; Spence, Shaun; Burrows, James F; McFarlane, Cheryl; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; McCarthy, Helen O; Johnston, James A; Walker, Brian; Scott, Christopher J

    2013-11-01

    Recent murine studies have demonstrated that tumor-associated macrophages in the tumor microenvironment are a key source of the pro-tumorigenic cysteine protease, cathepsin S. We now show in a syngeneic colorectal carcinoma murine model that both tumor and tumor-associated cells contribute cathepsin S to promote neovascularization and tumor growth. Cathepsin S depleted and control colorectal MC38 tumor cell lines were propagated in both wild type C57Bl/6 and cathepsin S null mice to provide stratified depletion of the protease from either the tumor, tumor-associated host cells, or both. Parallel analysis of these conditions showed that deletion of cathepsin S inhibited tumor growth and development, and revealed a clear contribution of both tumor and tumor-associated cell derived cathepsin S. The most significant impact on tumor development was obtained when the protease was depleted from both sources. Further characterization revealed that the loss of cathepsin S led to impaired tumor vascularization, which was complemented by a reduction in proliferation and increased apoptosis, consistent with reduced tumor growth. Analysis of cell types showed that in addition to the tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and endothelial cells can produce cathepsin S within the microenvironment. Taken together, these findings clearly highlight a manner by which tumor-associated cells can positively contribute to developing tumors and highlight cathepsin S as a therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:23629809

  7. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  8. Anti-tumor effect of SLPI on mammary but not colon tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Amiano, Nicolás O; Costa, María J; Reiteri, R Macarena; Payés, Cristian; Guerrieri, Diego; Tateosian, Nancy L; Sánchez, Mercedes L; Maffia, Paulo C; Diament, Miriam; Karas, Romina; Orqueda, Andrés; Rizzo, Miguel; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Klein, Slobodanka; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Chuluyan, H Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a serine protease inhibitor that was related to cancer development and metastasis dissemination on several types of tumors. However, it is not known the effect of SLPI on mammary and colon tumors. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of SLPI on mammary and colon tumor growth. The effect of SLPI was tested on in vitro cell apoptosis and in vivo tumor growth experiments. SLPI over-expressing human and murine mammary and colon tumor cells were generated by gene transfection. The administration of murine mammary tumor cells over-expressing high levels of SLPI did not develop tumors in mice. On the contrary, the administration of murine colon tumor cells over-expressing SLPI, developed faster tumors than control cells. Intratumoral, but not intraperitoneal administration of SLPI, delayed the growth of tumors and increased the survival of mammary but not colon tumor bearing mice. In vitro culture of mammary tumor cell lines treated with SLPI, and SLPI producer clones were more prone to apoptosis than control cells, mainly under serum deprivation culture conditions. Herein we demonstrated that SLPI induces the apoptosis of mammary tumor cells in vitro and decreases the mammary but not colon tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, SLPI may be a new potential therapeutic tool for certain tumors, such as mammary tumors. PMID:22767220

  9. Plasmodium falciparum: growth response to potassium channel blocking compounds.

    PubMed

    Waller, Karena L; Kim, Kami; McDonald, Thomas V

    2008-11-01

    Potassium channels are essential for cell survival and regulate the cell membrane potential and electrochemical gradient. During its lifecycle, Plasmodium falciparum parasites must rapidly adapt to dramatically variant ionic conditions within the mosquito mid-gut, the hepatocyte and red blood cell (RBC) cytosols, and the human circulatory system. To probe the participation of K(+) channels in parasite viability, growth response assays were performed in which asexual stage P. falciparum parasites were cultured in the presence of various Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. These data describe the novel anti-malarial effects of bicuculline methiodide and tubocurarine chloride and the novel lack of effect of apamine and verruculogen. Taken together, the data herein imply the presence of K(+) channels, or other parasite-specific targets, in P. falciparum-infected RBCs that are sensitive to blockade with Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. PMID:18703053

  10. Does nutrition support stimulate tumor growth in humans?

    PubMed

    Bossola, Maurizio; Pacelli, Fabio; Rosa, Fausto; Tortorelli, Antonio; Doglietto, Giovan Battista

    2011-04-01

    Many studies have been conducted to ascertain if nutrition support (NS), either as parenteral nutrition (PN) or enteral nutrition (EN), stimulates tumor growth and causes cancer progression, but after almost 30 years, the question remains at least in part unresolved. In this study, previous studies were reviewed to evaluate the effect of NS on tumor growth, tumor proliferation, tumor apoptosis, and cancer-related survival in humans. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using combinations of the following keywords: PN, EN, tumor growth, tumor proliferation, tumor apoptosis, arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and glutamine. Unfortunately, the effect of nutrition support on tumor growth has been assessed only in terms of tumor proliferation, whereas the interferences on tumor apoptosis have never been determined. Overall, the results seem conflicting and inconclusive. Similarly, it remains unknown if PN or EN enriched with specific nutrients such as arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and glutamine can affect tumor growth in humans. It is hoped that further studies will elucidate if NS with conventional or specific nutrients stimulates tumor proliferation, interferes with tumor apoptosis, and causes cancer progression. PMID:21447771

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor Cell Growth and Immune System Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.; Safan, Muntaser; Abdeen, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Rahman, Duaa H.

    In this paper, we provide a family of ordinary and delay differential equations to describe the dynamics of tumor-growth and immunotherapy interactions. We explore the effects of adoptive cellular immunotherapy on the model and describe under what circumstances the tumor can be eliminated. The possibility of clearing the tumor, with a strategy, is based on two parameters in the model: the rate of influx of the effector cells, and the rate of influx of IL2. The critical tumor-growth rate, below which endemic tumor does not exist, has been found. One can use the model to make predictions about tumor-dormancy.

  12. Tumor cell-derived placental growth factor sensitizes antiangiogenic and antitumor effects of anti-VEGF drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Eva-Maria Eleonora; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yin; Yang, Yunlong; Shibuya, Masabumi; Zhong, Weide; Sun, Baocun; Liu, Yizhi; Hosaka, Kayoko; Cao, Yihai

    2013-01-01

    The role of placental growth factor (PlGF) in modulation of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth remains an enigma. Furthermore, anti-PlGF therapy in tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth remains controversial in preclinical tumor models. Here we show that in both human and mouse tumors, PlGF induced the formation of dilated and normalized vascular networks that were hypersensitive to anti-VEGF and anti–VEGFR-2 therapy, leading to dormancy of a substantial number of avascular tumors. Loss-of-function using plgf shRNA in a human choriocarcinoma significantly accelerated tumor growth rates and acquired resistance to anti-VEGF drugs, whereas gain-of-function of PlGF in a mouse tumor increased anti-VEGF sensitivity. Further, we show that VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-1 blocking antibodies displayed opposing effects on tumor angiogenesis. VEGFR-1 blockade and genetic deletion of the tyrosine kinase domain of VEGFR-1 resulted in enhanced tumor angiogenesis. These findings demonstrate that tumor-derived PlGF negatively modulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth and may potentially serve as a predictive marker of anti-VEGF cancer therapy. PMID:23267058

  13. The Role of Complement in Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Corrales, Leticia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a central part of the immune system that has developed as a first defense against non-self cells. Neoplastic transformation is accompanied by an increased capacity of the malignant cells to activate complement. In fact, clinical data demonstrate complement activation in cancer patients. On the basis of the use of protective mechanisms by malignant cells, complement activation has traditionally been considered part of the body's immunosurveillance against cancer. Inhibitory mechanisms of complement activation allow cancer cells to escape from complement-mediated elimination and hamper the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody–based cancer immunotherapies. To overcome this limitation, many strategies have been developed with the goal of improving complement-mediated effector mechanisms. However, significant work in recent years has identified new and surprising roles for complement activation within the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports suggest that complement elements can promote tumor growth in the context of chronic inflammation. This chapter reviews the data describing the role of complement activation in cancer immunity, which offers insights that may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to control cancer. PMID:24272362

  14. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  15. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  16. Blocking lipid synthesis overcomes tumor regrowth and metastasis after antiangiogenic therapy withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Sounni, Nor Eddine; Cimino, Jonathan; Blacher, Silvia; Primac, Irina; Truong, Alice; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Paye, Alexandra; Calligaris, David; Debois, Delphine; De Tullio, Pascal; Mari, Bernard; De Pauw, Edwin; Noel, Agnes

    2014-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the failure of antiangiogenic therapies and how tumors adapt to these therapies are unclear. Here, we applied transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches to preclinical models and provide evidence for tumor adaptation to vascular endothelial growth factor blockade through a metabolic shift toward carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in tumors. During sunitinib or sorafenib treatment, tumor growth was inhibited and tumors were hypoxic and glycolytic. In sharp contrast, treatment withdrawal led to tumor regrowth, angiogenesis restoration, moderate lactate production, and enhanced lipid synthesis. This metabolic shift was associated with a drastic increase in metastatic dissemination. Interestingly, pharmacological lipogenesis inhibition with orlistat or fatty acid synthase downregulation with shRNA inhibited tumor regrowth and metastases after sunitinib treatment withdrawal. Our data shed light on metabolic alterations that result in cancer adaptation to antiangiogenic treatments and identify key molecules involved in lipid metabolism as putative therapeutic targets. PMID:25017943

  17. Squalamine and cisplatin block angiogenesis and growth of human ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Williams, Jon I; Pietras, Richard J

    2002-04-25

    Angiogenesis is important for growth and progression of ovarian cancers. Squalamine is a natural antiangiogenic sterol, and its potential role in treatment of ovarian cancers with or without standard cisplatin chemotherapy was assessed. Since HER-2 gene overexpression is associated with cisplatin resistance in vitro and promotion of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, the response of ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 gene overexpression to squalamine and cisplatin was evaluated both in tumor xenograft models and in tissue culture. Ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 overexpression were grown as subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. Animals were treated by intraperitoneal injection with control vehicle, cisplatin, squalamine or cisplatin combined with squalamine. At the end of the experiment, tumors were assessed for tumor growth inhibition and for changes in microvessel density and apoptosis. Additional in vitro studies evaluated effects of squalamine on tumor and endothelial cell growth and on signaling pathways in human endothelial cells. Profound growth inhibition was elicited by squalamine alone and by combined treatment with squalamine and cisplatin for both parental and HER-2-overexpressing ovarian tumor xenografts. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tumors revealed decreased microvessel density and increased apoptosis. Although HER-2-overexpressing tumors had more angiogenic and less apoptotic activity than parental cancers, growth of both tumor types was similarly suppressed by treatment with squalamine combined with cisplatin. In in vitro studies, we found that squalamine does not directly affect proliferation of ovarian cells. However, squalamine significantly blocked VEGF-induced activation of MAP kinase and cell proliferation in human vascular endothelial cells. The results suggest that squalamine is anti-angiogenic for ovarian cancer xenografts and appears to enhance cytotoxic effects of cisplatin chemotherapy independent of HER-2 tumor status

  18. A cellular automaton model for tumor growth in heterogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Sal

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is not a single disease: it exhibits heterogeneity on different spatial and temporal scales and strongly interacts with its host environment. Most mathematical modeling of malignant tumor growth has assumed a homogeneous host environment. We have developed a cellular automaton model for tumor growth that explicitly incorporates the structural heterogeneity of the host environment such as tumor stroma. We show that these structural heterogeneities have non-trivial effects on the tumor growth dynamics and prognosis. Y. J. is supported by PSOC, NCI.

  19. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Berridge, Jon Casey; Mallon, Zachary; Kreis, Mark; Athos, Brian; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT) to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth. PMID:26231031

  20. Inhibition of rate of tumor growth by creatine and cyclocreatine.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, E E; Evans, A E; Cohn, M

    1993-01-01

    Growth rate inhibition of subcutaneously implanted tumors results from feeding rats and athymic nude mice diets containing 1% cyclocreatine or 1%, 2%, 5%, or 10% creatine. The tumors studied included rat mammary tumors (Ac33tc in Lewis female rats and 13762A in Fischer 344 female rats), rat sarcoma MCI in Lewis male rats, and tumors resulting from the injection of two human neuroblastoma cell lines, IMR-5 and CHP-134, in athymic nude mice. Inhibition was observed regardless of the time experimental diets were administered, either at the time of tumor implantation or after the appearance of palpable tumors. For mammary tumor Ac33tc, the growth inhibition during 24 days after the implantation was approximately 50% for both 1% cyclocreatine and 1% creatine, and inhibition increased as creatine was increased from 2% to 10% of the diet. For the other rat mammary tumor (13762A), there was approximately 35% inhibition by both 1% cyclocreatine and 2% creatine. In the case of the MCI sarcoma, the inhibitory effect appeared more pronounced at earlier periods of growth, ranging from 26% to 41% for 1% cyclocreatine and from 30% to 53% for 1% creatine; there was no significant difference in growth rate between the tumors in the rats fed 1% and 5% creatine. The growth rate of tumors in athymic nude mice, produced by implantation of the human neuroblastoma IMR-5 cell line, appeared somewhat more effectively inhibited by 1% cyclocreatine than by 1% creatine, and 5% creatine feeding was most effective. For the CHP-134 cell line, 33% inhibition was observed for the 1% cyclocreatine diet and 71% for the 5% creatine diet. In several experiments, a delay in appearance of tumors was observed in animals on the experimental diets. In occasional experiments, neither additive inhibited tumor growth rate for the rat tumors or the athymic mouse tumors. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8475072

  1. Rapid decrease in tumor perfusion following VEGF blockade predicts long-term tumor growth inhibition in preclinical tumor models.

    PubMed

    Eichten, Alexandra; Adler, Alexander P; Cooper, Blerta; Griffith, Jennifer; Wei, Yi; Yancopoulos, George D; Lin, Hsin Chieh; Thurston, Gavin

    2013-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key upstream mediator of tumor angiogenesis, and blockade of VEGF can inhibit tumor angiogenesis and decrease tumor growth. However, not all tumors respond well to anti-VEGF therapy. Despite much effort, identification of early response biomarkers that correlate with long-term efficacy of anti-VEGF therapy has been difficult. These difficulties arise in part because the functional effects of VEGF inhibition on tumor vessels are still unclear. We therefore assessed rapid molecular, morphologic and functional vascular responses following treatment with aflibercept (also known as VEGF Trap or ziv-aflibercept in the United States) in preclinical tumor models with a range of responses to anti-VEGF therapy, including Colo205 human colorectal carcinoma (highly sensitive), C6 rat glioblastoma (moderately sensitive), and HT1080 human fibrosarcoma (resistant), and correlated these changes to long-term tumor growth inhibition. We found that an overall decrease in tumor vessel perfusion, assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US), and increases in tumor hypoxia correlated well with long-term tumor growth inhibition, whereas changes in vascular gene expression and microvessel density did not. Our findings support previous clinical studies showing that decreased tumor perfusion after anti-VEGF therapy (measured by DCE-US) correlated with response. Thus, measuring tumor perfusion changes shortly after treatment with VEGF inhibitors, or possibly other anti-angiogenic therapies, may be useful to predict treatment efficacy. PMID:23238831

  2. Formononetin, a novel FGFR2 inhibitor, potently inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen Feng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jia Yun; Wu, Guan Nan; Yao, Xue Quan; Liu, Fu Kun; Li, Gang; Shen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other potential therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here we identified formononetin as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Formononetin demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, formononetin suppressed FGF2-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of formononetin on different molecular components in treated endothelial cell, and found that formononetin suppressed FGF2-triggered activation of FGFR2 and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, formononetin directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer cell. In vivo, using xenograft models of breast cancer, formononetin showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, formononetin enhanced the effect of VEGFR2 inhibitor sunitinib on tumor growth inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that formononetin targets the FGFR2-mediated Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26575424

  3. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  4. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  5. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Shelton, S; Gray, WG; Miller, CT; Hussain, F; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, BA

    2014-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behaviour of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT). A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TC), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HC); and an interstitial fluid (IF) for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a Finite Element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behaviour: initially, the rapidly growing tumor cells tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable tumor cells whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case – mostly due to the relative adhesion of the tumor and healthy cells to the ECM, and the less favourable transport of nutrients. In particular, for tumor cells adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced

  6. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O M Zack

    2014-12-28

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and anti-inflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  7. Natural history of tumor growth and immune modulation in common spontaneous murine mammary tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren; Slota, Meredith; Koehnlein, Marlese; Treuting, Piper M.; Dang, Yushe; Stanton, Sasha; Disis, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies in patients with breast cancer suggest the immune microenvironment influences response to therapy. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between growth rates of tumors in common spontaneous mammary tumor models and immune biomarkers evaluated in the tumor and blood. Methods TgMMTV-neu and C3(1)-Tag transgenic mice were followed longitudinally from birth, and MPA-DMBA treated mice from the time of carcinogen administration, for the development of mammary tumors. Tumor infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Serum cytokines were evaluated in subsets of mice. Fine needle aspirates of tumors were collected and RNA isolated to determine levels of immune and proliferation markers. Results Age of tumor onset and kinetics of tumor growth were significantly different among the models. Mammary tumors from TgMMTV-neu contained a lower CD8/CD4 ratio than other models (p<0.05). MPA-DMBA induced tumors contained a higher percentage of FOXP3+ CD4+ T-cells (p<0.01) and MDSC (p<0.001) as compared to the other models. Individuals with significantly slower tumor growth demonstrated higher levels of Type I serum cytokines prior to the development of lesions as compared to those with rapid tumor growth. Moreover, the tumors of animals with more rapid tumor growth demonstrated a significant increase in expression of genes associated with Type II immunity than those with slower progressing tumors. Conclusions These data provide a foundation for the development of in vivo models to explore the relationship between endogenous immunity and response to standard therapies for breast cancer. PMID:25395320

  8. Radiation-guided drug delivery to tumor blood vessels results in improved tumor growth delay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ling; Osusky, Katherine; Konjeti, Sekhar; Fu, Allie; Hallahan, Dennis

    2004-10-19

    Tumor blood vessels are biological targets for cancer therapy. In this study, a tumor vasculature targeting system that consisted of liposomes and lectin (WGA) was built. Liposomes were used to carry a number of liposome-friendly anti-tumoral agents along with WGA, a lectin which posseses a specific affinity for binding to inflamed endothelial cells. In order to target tumor vasculature, inflammation of endothelial cells was induced by radiation. Because ionizing radiation induces an inflammatory response in tumor vasculature, lectin-conjugates were utilized to determine whether radiation can be used to target drug delivery to tumor vessels. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is one such lectin that binds to inflamed microvasculature. WGA was conjugated to liposomes containing cisplatin and administered to tumor bearing mice. Tumor growth delay was used to analyze the efficacy of cytotoxicity. FITC-conjugated WGA accumulated within irradiated tumor microvasculature. WGA was conjugated to liposomes and labeled with 111In. This demonstrated radiation-inducible tumor-selective binding. WGA-liposome-conjugates were loaded with Cisplatin and administered to mice bearing irradiated tumors. Tumors treated with a combination of liposome encapsulated cisplatin together with radiation showed a significant increase in tumor growth delay as compared to radiation alone. These findings demonstrate that ionizing radiation can be used to guide drug delivery to tumor microvasculature. PMID:15451595

  9. Melanoma Cell-Intrinsic PD-1 Receptor Functions Promote Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Kleffel, Sonja; Posch, Christian; Barthel, Steven R; Mueller, Hansgeorg; Schlapbach, Christoph; Guenova, Emmanuella; Elco, Christopher P; Lee, Nayoung; Juneja, Vikram R; Zhan, Qian; Lian, Christine G; Thomi, Rahel; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Cozzio, Antonio; Dummer, Reinhard; Mihm, Martin C; Flaherty, Keith T; Frank, Markus H; Murphy, George F; Sharpe, Arlene H; Kupper, Thomas S; Schatton, Tobias

    2015-09-10

    Therapeutic antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) activate tumor-specific immunity and have shown remarkable efficacy in the treatment of melanoma. Yet, little is known about tumor cell-intrinsic PD-1 pathway effects. Here, we show that murine and human melanomas contain PD-1-expressing cancer subpopulations and demonstrate that melanoma cell-intrinsic PD-1 promotes tumorigenesis, even in mice lacking adaptive immunity. PD-1 inhibition on melanoma cells by RNAi, blocking antibodies, or mutagenesis of melanoma-PD-1 signaling motifs suppresses tumor growth in immunocompetent, immunocompromised, and PD-1-deficient tumor graft recipient mice. Conversely, melanoma-specific PD-1 overexpression enhances tumorigenicity, as does engagement of melanoma-PD-1 by its ligand, PD-L1, whereas melanoma-PD-L1 inhibition or knockout of host-PD-L1 attenuate growth of PD-1-positive melanomas. Mechanistically, the melanoma-PD-1 receptor modulates downstream effectors of mTOR signaling. Our results identify melanoma cell-intrinsic functions of the PD-1:PD-L1 axis in tumor growth and suggest that blocking melanoma-PD-1 might contribute to the striking clinical efficacy of anti-PD-1 therapy. PMID:26359984

  10. Identification of tumor specimens by DNA analysis in a case of histocytological paraffin tissue block swapping

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Anupuma; Yadav, Bhuvnesh; Ali, Sher; Das Dogra, Tirath

    2011-01-01

    We report on a patient who was diagnosed with high-grade breast carcinoma by all the pre-surgery clinical evidence of malignancy, but histopathological reports did not reveal any such tumor residue in the post-surgical tissue block. This raised a suspicion that either exchange of block, labeling error, or a technical error took place during gross examination of the tissue. The mastectomy residue was unprocurable to sort out the problem. So, two doubtful paraffin blocks were sent for DNA fingerprinting analysis. The partial DNA profiles (8-9/15 loci) were obtained from histocytological blocks. The random matching probability for both the paraffin blocks and the patient’s blood were found to be 1 in 4.43E4, 1.89E6, and 8.83E13, respectively for Asian population. Multiplex short tandem repeat analysis applied in this case determined that the cause of tumor absence was an error in gross examination of the post-surgical tissue. Moreover, the analysis helped in justifying the therapy given to the patient. Thus, with DNA fingerprinting technique, it was concluded that there was no exchange of the blocks between the two patients operated on the same day and the treatment given to the concerned patient was in the right direction. PMID:21674839

  11. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  12. A two-phase mixture model of avascular tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Deniz; Burcin Unlu, M.; Yonucu, Sirin; Cetiner, Ugur

    2012-02-01

    Interactions with biological environment surrounding a growing tumor have major influence on tumor invasion. By recognizing that mechanical behavior of tumor cells could be described by biophysical laws, the research on physical oncology aims to investigate the inner workings of cancer invasion. In this study, we introduce a mathematical model of avascular tumor growth using the continuum theory of mixtures. Mechanical behavior of the tumor and physical interactions between the tumor and host tissue are represented by biophysically founded relationships. In this model, a solid tumor is embedded in inviscid interstitial fluid. The tumor has viscous mechanical properties. Interstitial fluid exhibits properties of flow through porous medium. Associated with the mixture saturation constraint, we introduce a Lagrange multiplier which represents hydrostatic pressure of the interstitial fluid. We solved the equations using Finite Element Method in two-dimensions. As a result, we have introduced a two-phase mixture model of avascular tumor growth that provided a flexible mathematical framework to include cells' response to mechanical aspects of the tumor microenvironment. The model could be extended to capture tumor-ECM interactions which would have profound influence on tumor invasion.

  13. Automatic block-matching registration to improve lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott Patrick

    To improve relatively poor outcomes for locally-advanced lung cancer patients, many current efforts are dedicated to minimizing uncertainties in radiotherapy. This enables the isotoxic delivery of escalated tumor doses, leading to better local tumor control. The current dissertation specifically addresses inter-fractional uncertainties resulting from patient setup variability. An automatic block-matching registration (BMR) algorithm is implemented and evaluated for the purpose of directly localizing advanced-stage lung tumors during image-guided radiation therapy. In this algorithm, small image sub-volumes, termed "blocks", are automatically identified on the tumor surface in an initial planning computed tomography (CT) image. Each block is independently and automatically registered to daily images acquired immediately prior to each treatment fraction. To improve the accuracy and robustness of BMR, this algorithm incorporates multi-resolution pyramid registration, regularization with a median filter, and a new multiple-candidate-registrations technique. The result of block-matching is a sparse displacement vector field that models local tissue deformations near the tumor surface. The distribution of displacement vectors is aggregated to obtain the final tumor registration, corresponding to the treatment couch shift for patient setup correction. Compared to existing rigid and deformable registration algorithms, the final BMR algorithm significantly improves the overlap between target volumes from the planning CT and registered daily images. Furthermore, BMR results in the smallest treatment margins for the given study population. However, despite these improvements, large residual target localization errors were noted, indicating that purely rigid couch shifts cannot correct for all sources of inter-fractional variability. Further reductions in treatment uncertainties may require the combination of high-quality target localization and adaptive radiotherapy.

  14. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  15. BMP4/Thrombospondin-1 loop paracrinically inhibits tumor angiogenesis and suppresses the growth of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, R; Osawa, T; Wang, F; Nishii, R; Das, B; Tsuchida, S; Muramatsu, M; Takahashi, T; Inoue, T; Wada, Y; Minami, T; Yuasa, Y; Shibuya, M

    2014-07-17

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has potential as an anticancer agent. Recent studies have suggested that BMP4 inhibits the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs) of neural and colon cancers. Here, we showed that BMP4 paracrinically inhibited tumor angiogenesis via the induction of Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), and consequently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Although HeLa (human cervical cancer), HCI-H460-LNM35 (highly metastatic human lung cancer) and B16 (murine melanoma) cells did not respond to the BMP4 treatment in vitro, the growth of xeno- and allografts of these cells was suppressed via reductions in tumor angiogenesis after intraperitoneal treatment with BMP4. When we assessed the mRNA expression of major angiogenesis-related factors in grafted tumors, we found that the expression of TSP1 was significantly upregulated by BMP4 administration. We then confirmed that BMP4 was less effective in suppressing the tumor growth of TSP1-knockdown cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that BMP4 reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vivo in a TSP1-dependent manner, which indicates that BMP4 interfered with the stabilization of tumor angiogenesis. In conclusion, the BMP4/TSP1 loop paracrinically suppressed tumor angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment, which subsequently reduced the growth of tumors. BMP4 may become an antitumor agent and open a new field of antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:24013228

  16. Tumor-Derived CXCL1 Promotes Lung Cancer Growth via Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ha; Xu, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils have a traditional role in inflammatory process and act as the first line of defense against infections. Although their contribution to tumorigenesis and progression is still controversial, accumulating evidence recently has demonstrated that tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) play a key role in multiple aspects of cancer biology. Here, we detected that chemokine CXCL1 was dramatically elevated in serum from 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, 3LL cells constitutively expressed and secreted higher level of CXCL1. Furthermore, knocking down CXCL1 expression in 3LL cells significantly hindered tumor growth by inhibiting recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into tumor tissues. Additionally, tumor-infiltrated neutrophils expressed higher levels of MPO and Fas/FasL, which may be involved in TAN-mediated inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results demonstrate that tumor-derived CXCL1 contributes to TANs infiltration in lung cancer which promotes tumor growth. PMID:27446967

  17. Modeling of Tumor Growth Based on Adomian Decomposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahiddin, Norhasimah; Ali, Siti Aishah Hashim

    2008-01-01

    Modeling of a growing tumor over time is extremely difficult. This is due to the complex biological phenomena underlying cancer growth. Existing models mostly based on numerical methods and could describe spherically-shaped avascular tumors but they cannot match the highly heterogeneous and complex shaped tumors seen in cancer patients. We propose a new technique based on decomposition method to solve analytically cancer model.

  18. A Mathematical Model Coupling Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for vascular tumor growth. We use phase fields to model cellular growth and reaction-diffusion equations for the dynamics of angiogenic factors and nutrients. The model naturally predicts the shift from avascular to vascular growth at realistic scales. Our computations indicate that the negative regulation of the Delta-like ligand 4 signaling pathway slows down tumor growth by producing a larger density of non-functional capillaries. Our results show good quantitative agreement with experiments. PMID:26891163

  19. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  20. Motif mimetic of epsin perturbs tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Hao; Rahman, H.N. Ashiqur; Liu, Yanjun; Pasula, Satish; Tessneer, Kandice L.; Cai, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaolei; Chang, Baojun; McManus, John; Hahn, Scott; Dong, Jiali; Brophy, Megan L.; Yu, Lili; Song, Kai; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Saunders, Debra; Njoku, Charity; Song, Hoogeun; Mehta-D’Souza, Padmaja; Towner, Rheal; Lupu, Florea; McEver, Rodger P.; Xia, Lijun; Boerboom, Derek; Srinivasan, R. Sathish; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical for cancer progression. In multiple murine models, endothelium-specific epsin deficiency abrogates tumor progression by shifting the balance of VEGFR2 signaling toward uncontrolled tumor angiogenesis, resulting in dysfunctional tumor vasculature. Here, we designed a tumor endothelium–targeting chimeric peptide (UPI) for the purpose of inhibiting endogenous tumor endothelial epsins by competitively binding activated VEGFR2. We determined that the UPI peptide specifically targets tumor endothelial VEGFR2 through an unconventional binding mechanism that is driven by unique residues present only in the epsin ubiquitin–interacting motif (UIM) and the VEGFR2 kinase domain. In murine models of neoangiogenesis, UPI peptide increased VEGF-driven angiogenesis and neovascularization but spared quiescent vascular beds. Further, in tumor-bearing mice, UPI peptide markedly impaired functional tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis, resulting in a notable increase in survival. Coadministration of UPI peptide with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics further sustained tumor inhibition. Equipped with localized tumor endothelium–specific targeting, our UPI peptide provides potential for an effective and alternative cancer therapy. PMID:26571402

  1. Novel Antitumor Strategy Utilizing a Plasmid Expressing a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen as a “Danger Signal” to Block Immune Escape of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Yoshihara, Chieko; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape of tumor cells is one of the main obstacles hindering the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We developed a novel strategy to block immune escape by transfecting tumor cells in vivo with genes of pathogenic antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). This induces presentation of the TB antigen on tumor cell surfaces, which can be recognized by antigen presenting cells (APCs) as a “danger signal” to stimulate antitumor immune response. This strategy is also expected to amplify the immune response against tumor-associated antigens, and block immune escape of the tumor. DNA/PEI/chondroitin sulfate ternary complex is a highly effective non-viral gene vector system for in vivo transfection. A therapeutic complex was prepared using a plasmid encoding the TB antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). This was injected intratumorally into syngeneic tumor-bearing mice, and induced significant tumor growth suppression comparable to or higher than similar complexes expressing cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Co-transfection of the cytokine-genes and the ESAT-6-gene enhanced the antitumor efficacy of either treatment alone. In addition, complete tumor regression was achieved with the combination of ESAT-6 and IL-2 genes. PMID:26213962

  2. Novel Antitumor Strategy Utilizing a Plasmid Expressing a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen as a "Danger Signal" to Block Immune Escape of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Yoshihara, Chieko; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape of tumor cells is one of the main obstacles hindering the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We developed a novel strategy to block immune escape by transfecting tumor cells in vivo with genes of pathogenic antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). This induces presentation of the TB antigen on tumor cell surfaces, which can be recognized by antigen presenting cells (APCs) as a "danger signal" to stimulate antitumor immune response. This strategy is also expected to amplify the immune response against tumor-associated antigens, and block immune escape of the tumor. DNA/PEI/chondroitin sulfate ternary complex is a highly effective non-viral gene vector system for in vivo transfection. A therapeutic complex was prepared using a plasmid encoding the TB antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). This was injected intratumorally into syngeneic tumor-bearing mice, and induced significant tumor growth suppression comparable to or higher than similar complexes expressing cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Co-transfection of the cytokine-genes and the ESAT-6-gene enhanced the antitumor efficacy of either treatment alone. In addition, complete tumor regression was achieved with the combination of ESAT-6 and IL-2 genes. PMID:26213962

  3. Evaluation of ornithine decarboxylase activity as a marker for tumor growth rate in malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Westin, T; Edström, S; Lundholm, K; Gustafsson, B

    1991-10-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of polyamines. Polyamines regulate DNA synthesis by a mechanism that is not fully understood. High levels of polyamines and ODC activity are associated with rapid cell growth, particularly in tumor tissues. The aim of this study was to determine whether ODC activity as a marker for rapid alterations in tumor growth could be used to investigate whether nutritional support in cancer patients stimulates tumor cell proliferation. Weight-losing head and neck cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice (MCG 101, C57/BL) were studied during different feeding regimens. The ODC activity in tumor tissue was investigated in relation to the following variables: (1) histopathologic differentiation; (2) DNA content; and (3) bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation into DNA. After the animals were starved for 24 hours, a significant reduction of tumor growth was demonstrated in the experimental tumor along with a reduction of ODC activity, an accumulation of cells in the G0G1 phase, and a reduction of cells incorporating BrdUrd into DNA. Refeeding after 24 hours generated a response by all variables. Tumor biopsy specimens from patients with head and neck cancer malignancies demonstrated aneuploidy in the cells of 70% of the patients. High ODC activity in tumor tissue was demonstrated mainly among poorly differentiated tumors, and ODC activity was correlated with the compartment size of aneuploidic cells in the tumor. High ODC activity indicated a poor short-term survival (1 year). It was concluded that experimental tumor growth is highly dependent on host feeding. However, there was no evidence supporting the claim that nutritional support to cancer patients stimulates tumor cell proliferation. Determination of ODC activity may be used to monitor rapid changes in DNA synthesis and may have prognostic significance for survival. PMID:1951878

  4. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis. PMID:26452220

  5. Is grid therapy useful for all tumors and every grid block design?

    PubMed

    Gholami, Somayeh; Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Longo, Francesco; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Wright, Stacey; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Grid therapy is a treatment technique that has been introduced for patients with advanced bulky tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the radia-tion sensitivity of the tumors and the design of the grid blocks on the clinical response of grid therapy. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is used to determine the dose distribution through a grid block that was used for a Varian 2100C linear accelerator. From the simulated dose profiles, the therapeutic ratio (TR) and the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for different types of tumors with respect to their radiation sensitivities were calculated. These calculations were performed using the linear quadratic (LQ) and the Hug-Kellerer (H-K) models. The results of these calculations have been validated by comparison with the clinical responses of 232 patients from different publications, who were treated with grid therapy. These published results for different tumor types were used to examine the correlation between tumor radiosensitivity and the clinical response of grid therapy. Moreover, the influence of grid design on their clinical responses was investigated by using Monte Carlo simulations of grid blocks with different hole diameters and different center-to-center spacing. The results of the theoretical models and clinical data indicated higher clinical responses for the grid therapy on the patients with more radioresistant tumors. The differences between TR values for radioresistant cells and radiosensitive cells at 20 Gy and 10 Gy doses were up to 50% and 30%, respectively. Interestingly, the differences between the TR values with LQ model and H-K model were less than 4%. Moreover, the results from the Monte Carlo studies showed that grid blocks with a hole diameters of 1.0 cm and 1.25 cm may lead to about 19% higher TR relative to the grids with hole diameters smaller than 1.0 cm or larger than 1.25 cm (with 95% confidence interval). In sum-mary, the results of this study indicate that

  6. Tie2-dependent deletion of α6 integrin subunit in mice reduces tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouvard, Claire; Segaoula, Zacharie; De Arcangelis, Adèle; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Mauge, Laetitia; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Helley, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The α6 integrin subunit (α6) has been implicated in cancer cell migration and in the progression of several malignancies, but its role in tumor angiogenesis is unclear. In mice, anti-α6 blocking antibodies reduce tumor angiogenesis, whereas Tie1-dependent α6 gene deletion enhances neovessel formation in melanoma and lung carcinoma. To clarify the discrepancy in these results we used the cre-lox system to generate a mouse line, α6fl/fl‑Tie2Cre(+), with α6 gene deletion specifically in Tie2-lineage cells: endothelial cells, pericytes, subsets of hematopoietic stem cells, and Tie2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEMs), known for their proangiogenic properties. Loss of α6 expression in α6fl/fl‑Tie2Cre(+) mice reduced tumor growth in a murine B16F10 melanoma model. Immunohistological analysis of the tumors showed that Tie2-dependent α6 gene deletion was associated with reduced tumor vascularization and with reduced infiltration of proangiogenic Tie2-expressing macrophages. These findings demonstrate that α6 integrin subunit plays a major role in tumor angiogenesis and TEM infiltration. Targeting α6 could be used as a strategy to reduce tumor growth. PMID:25176420

  7. Endothelial progenitor cells promote tumor growth and progression by enhancing new vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Huan-Qiu; Li, Ji; Liu, Xiao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth and progression require new blood vessel formation to deliver nutrients and oxygen for further cell proliferation and to create a neovascular network exit for tumor cell metastasis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cell population that circulates in the peripheral circulation and homes to the tumor bed to participate in new blood vessel formation. In addition to structural support to nascent vessels, these cells can also regulate the angiogenic process by paracrine secretion of a number of proangiogenic growth factors and cytokines, thus playing a crucial role in tumor neovascularization and development. Inhibition of EPC-mediated new vessel formation may be a promising therapeutic strategy in tumor treatment. EPC-mediated neovascularization is a complex process that includes multiple steps and requires a series of cytokines and modulators, thus understanding the underlying mechanisms may provide anti-neovasculogenesis targets that may be blocked for the prevention of tumor development. The present review stresses the process and contribution of EPCs to the formation of new blood vessels in solid tumors, in an attempt to gain an improved understanding of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms involved, and to provide a potential effective therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:27446353

  8. [Role of proteins of the macroglobulin family in regulation of tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Zorin, N A; Zorina, V N; Zorina, R M

    2006-01-01

    Proteins of the macroglobulin family are an ancient and evolutionarily conservative link of the immune system, which is actively involved in both inhibition of tumor growth cells and proliferation of tumor cells. Two basically different binding sites and a great conformational plasticity of all representatives of the macroglobulin family, as well as the presence of two to four representatives of the family in the blood of most species allow them to transport diverse substances and exert various regulatory influences on both the tumor and the entire organism. For example, the capacity of macroglobulins for binding hydrolases makes it possible to inhibit enzyme mediated tumor invasion. At the same time, an excess of macroglobulin/hydrolase complexes can activate apoptosis. The tumor is able of using macroglobulins, especially pregnancy-associated proteins, for its own protection. Specifically, pregnancy-associated alpha2-glycoprotein, which is actively produced by human tumor cells, blocks the histocompatibility complex antigens. On the contrary, the capacity of binding zinc stimulates the thymulin-dependent activation of natural killer cells. Nevertheless, the actively growing tumor expresses many receptors to macroglobulins, which are the main carriers of some cytokines and growth factors essential for proliferation. PMID:16523653

  9. Abrogation of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jonathan D; Valianou, Matthildi; Canutescu, Adrian A; Jaffe, Eileen K; Lee, Hyung-Ok; Wang, Hao; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W; Weiner, Louis M

    2005-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts are functionally and phenotypically distinct from normal fibroblasts that are not in the tumor microenvironment. Fibroblast activation protein is a 95 kDa cell surface glycoprotein expressed by tumor stromal fibroblasts, and has been shown to have dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis at the catalytic site of fibroblast activation protein, Ser624 --> Ala624, resulted in an approximately 100,000-fold loss of fibroblast activation protein dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) activity. HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type fibroblast activation protein, enzymatic mutant (S624A) fibroblast activation protein, or vector alone, were inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mouse to assess the contribution of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity to tumor growth. Overexpression of wild-type fibroblast activation protein showed growth potentiation and enhanced tumorigenicity compared with both fibroblast activation protein S624A and vector-transfected HEK293 xenografts. HEK293 cells transfected with fibroblast activation protein S624A showed tumor growth rates and tumorigenicity potential similar only to vector-transfected HEK293. In vivo assessment of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity of these tumors showed enhanced enzymatic activity of wild-type fibroblast activation protein, with only baseline levels of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity in either fibroblast activation protein S624A or vector-only xenografts. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein is necessary for fibroblast activation protein-driven tumor growth in the HEK293 xenograft model system. This establishes the proof-of-principle that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein plays an important role in the promotion of tumor growth, and provides an attractive target for therapeutics designed to alter fibroblast activation protein-induced tumor growth by targeting

  10. Modulation of the Leptin Receptor Mediates Tumor Growth and Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chalfant, Madeleine C.; Gorden, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration. PMID:25919692

  11. The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 potently blocks Stat3 signaling and oncogenesis in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hedvat, Michael; Huszar, Dennis; Herrmann, Andreas; Gozgit, Joseph M; Schroeder, Anne; Sheehy, Adam; Buettner, Ralf; Proia, David; Kowolik, Claudia M; Xin, Hong; Armstrong, Brian; Bebernitz, Geraldine; Weng, Shaobu; Wang, Lin; Ye, Minwei; McEachern, Kristen; Chen, Huawei; Morosini, Deborah; Bell, Kirsten; Alimzhanov, Marat; Ioannidis, Stephanos; McCoon, Patricia; Cao, Zhu A; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard; Zinda, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Persistent activation of Stat3 is oncogenic and is prevalent in a wide variety of human cancers. Chronic cytokine stimulation is associated with Stat3 activation in some tumors, implicating cytokine receptor-associated Jak family kinases. Using Jak2 inhibitors, we demonstrate a central role of Jaks in modulating basal and cytokine-induced Stat3 activation in human solid tumor cell lines. Inhibition of Jak2 activity is associated with abrogation of Stat3 nuclear translocation and tumorigenesis. The Jak2 inhibitor AZD1480 suppresses the growth of human solid tumor xenografts harboring persistent Stat3 activity. We demonstrate the essential role of Stat3 downstream of Jaks by inhibition of tumor growth using short hairpin RNA targeting Stat3. Our data support a key role of Jak kinase activity in Stat3-dependent tumorigenesis. PMID:19962667

  12. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-03-30

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1-5 μg/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-κB inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25730901

  13. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm3), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%; p < 0.001). Left

  14. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm{sup 3}), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%;p < 0

  15. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  16. Near-criticality underlies the behavior of early tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remy, Guillaume; Cluzel, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The controlling factors that underlie the growth of tumors have often been hard to identify because of the presence in this system of a large number of intracellular biochemical parameters. Here, we propose a simplifying framework to identify the key physical parameters that govern the early growth of tumors. We model growth by means of branching processes where cells of different types can divide and differentiate. First, using this process that has only one controlling parameter, we study a one cell type model and compute the probability for tumor survival and the time of tumor extinction. Second, we show that when cell death and cell division are perfectly balanced, stochastic effects dominate the growth dynamics and the system exhibits a near-critical behavior that resembles a second-order phase transition. We show, in this near-critical regime, that the time interval before tumor extinction is power-law distributed. Finally, we apply this branching formalism to infer, from experimental growth data, the number of different cell types present in the observed tumor.

  17. Near-criticality underlies the behavior of early tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Remy, Guillaume; Cluzel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The controlling factors that underlie the growth of tumors have often been hard to identify because of the presence in this system of a large number of intracellular biochemical parameters. Here, we propose a simplifying framework to identify the key physical parameters that govern the early growth of tumors. We model growth by means of branching processes where cells of different types can divide and differentiate. First, using this process that has only one controlling parameter, we study a one cell type model and compute the probability for tumor survival and the time of tumor extinction. Second, we show that when cell death and cell division are perfectly balanced, stochastic effects dominate the growth dynamics and the system exhibits a near-critical behavior that resembles a second-order phase transition. We show, in this near-critical regime, that the time interval before tumor extinction is power-law distributed. Finally, we apply this branching formalism to infer, from experimental growth data, the number of different cell types present in the observed tumor. PMID:27043180

  18. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Shelton, S.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behavior of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory. A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TCs), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HCs); and an interstitial fluid for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a finite element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behavior: initially, the rapidly growing TCs tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable TCs whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case—mostly due to the relative adhesion of the TCs and HCs to the ECM, and the less favorable transport of nutrients. In particular, for HCs adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas TC

  19. Improving fascin inhibitors to block tumor cell migration and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Han, Shaoqin; Huang, Jianyun; Liu, Bingqian; Xing, Bowen; Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Li, Wenxin; Zhang, J Jillian; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Tumor metastasis is the major cause of mortality of cancer patients, being responsible for ∼90% of all cancer deaths. One of the key steps during tumor metastasis is tumor cell migration which requires actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Among the critical actin cytoskeletal protrusion structures are antenna-like filopodia. Fascin protein is the main actin-bundling protein in filopodia. Here we report the development of fascin-specific small-molecules that inhibit the interaction between fascin and actin. These inhibitors block the in vitro actin-binding and actin-bundling activities of fascin, tumor cell migration and tumor metastasis in mouse models. Mechanistically, these inhibitors likely occupy one of the actin-binding sites, reduce the binding of actin filaments, and thus lead to the inhibition of the bundling activity of fascin. At the cellular level, these inhibitors impair actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Our data indicate that target-specific anti-fascin agents will have great potential for treating metastatic tumors. PMID:27071719

  20. Thymidine Phosphorylase is Angiogenic and Promotes Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Amir; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Fan, Tai-Ping D.; Hu, De-En; Lees, Vivien C.; Turley, Helen; Fox, Stephen B.; Gatter, Kevin C.; Harris, Adrian L.; Bicknell, Roy

    1995-02-01

    Platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor was previously identified as the sole angiogenic activity present in platelets; it is now known to be thymidine phosphorylase (TP). The effect of TP on [methyl-^3H]thymidine uptake does not arise from de novo DNA synthesis and the molecule is not a growth factor. Despite this, TP is strongly angiogenic in a rat sponge and freeze-injured skin graft model. Neutralizing antibodies and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the enzyme activity of TP is a condition for its angiogenic activity. The level of TP was found to be elevated in human breast tumors compared to normal breast tissue (P < 0.001). Overexpression of TP in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells had no effect on growth in vitro but markedly enhanced tumor growth in vivo. These data and the correlation of expression in tumors with malignancy identify TP as a target for antitumor strategies.

  1. Drugs Which Inhibit Osteoclast Function Suppress Tumor Growth through Calcium Reduction in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liao, Jinhui; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Sadler, William D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rosol, Thomas J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    , vossicles and endogenous bones and serum biochemistry were performed. Antiresorptive administration was associated with decreased serum TRAP5b and reduced osteoclast numbers, increased tibia and vossicle bone areas. ZA significantly decreased bone marrow calcium concentrations without affecting serum calcium. ZA and OPG-Fc significantly inhibited tumor growth in bone but not in collagen implants. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of ZA or OPG-Fc on prostate tumor growth in bone are mediated via blocking bone resorption and calcium release from bone. PMID:21419883

  2. Combinatorial targeting of FGF and ErbB receptors blocks growth and metastatic spread of breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) with kinase inhibitors is a clinically validated anti-cancer approach. However, blocking one signaling pathway is often not sufficient to cause tumor regression and the effectiveness of individual inhibitors is often short-lived. As alterations in fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activity have been implicated in breast cancer, we examined in breast cancer models with autocrine FGFR activity the impact of targeting FGFRs in vivo with a selective kinase inhibitor in combination with an inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR or with a pan-ErbB inhibitor. Methods Using 4T1 or 67NR models of basal-like breast cancer, tumor growth was measured in mice treated with an FGFR inhibitor (dovitinib/TKI258), a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor (NVP-BEZ235) or a pan-ErbB inhibitor (AEE788) individually or in combination. To uncover mechanisms underlying inhibitor action, signaling pathway activity was examined in tumor lysates and transcriptome analysis carried out to identify pathways upregulated by FGFR inhibition. Anti-phosphotyrosine receptor antibody arrays (P-Tyr RTK) were also used to screen 4T1 tumors. Results The combination of dovitinib + NVP-BEZ235 causes tumor stasis and strong down-regulation of the FRS2/Erk and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. P-Tyr RTK arrays identified high levels of P-EGFR and P-ErbB2 in 4T1 tumors. Testing AEE788 in the tumor models revealed that the combination of dovitinib + AEE788 resulted in blockade of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, prolonged tumor stasis and in the 4T1 model, a significant decrease in lung metastasis. The results show that in vivo these breast cancer models become dependent upon co-activation of FGFR and ErbB receptors for PI3K pathway activity. Conclusions The work presented here shows that in the breast cancer models examined, the combination of dovitinib + NVP-BEZ235 or dovitinib + AEE788 results in strong inhibition of tumor growth and a block in metastatic spread. Only these

  3. Reducing the serine availability complements the inhibition of the glutamine metabolism to block leukemia cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Polet, Florence; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Rubio, Laila Illan; Martherus, Ruben; Bol, Vanesa; Drozak, Xavier; Grégoire, Vincent; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are described as a prototype of glucose-consuming cells with a high turnover rate. The role of glutamine in fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle of leukemia cells was however recently identified confirming its status of major anaplerotic precursor in solid tumors. Here we examined whether glutamine metabolism could represent a therapeutic target in leukemia cells and whether resistance to this strategy could arise. We found that glutamine deprivation inhibited leukemia cell growth but also led to a glucose-independent adaptation maintaining cell survival. A proteomic study revealed that glutamine withdrawal induced the upregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), two enzymes of the serine pathway. We further documented that both exogenous and endogenous serine were critical for leukemia cell growth and contributed to cell regrowth following glutamine deprivation. Increase in oxidative stress upon inhibition of glutamine metabolism was identified as the trigger of the upregulation of PHGDH. Finally, we showed that PHGDH silencing in vitro and the use of serine-free diet in vivo inhibited leukemia cell growth, an effect further increased when glutamine metabolism was blocked. In conclusion, this study identified serine as a key pro-survival actor that needs to be handled to sensitize leukemia cells to glutamine-targeting modalities. PMID:26625201

  4. Heparanase 2 Attenuates Head and Neck Tumor Vascularity and Growth.

    PubMed

    Gross-Cohen, Miriam; Feld, Sari; Doweck, Ilana; Neufeld, Gera; Hasson, Peleg; Arvatz, Gil; Barash, Uri; Naroditsky, Inna; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2016-05-01

    The endoglycosidase heparanase specifically cleaves the heparan sulfate (HS) side chains on proteoglycans, an activity that has been implicated strongly in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Heparanase-2 (Hpa2) is a close homolog of heparanase that lacks intrinsic HS-degrading activity but retains the capacity to bind HS with high affinity. In head and neck cancer patients, Hpa2 expression was markedly elevated, correlating with prolonged time to disease recurrence and inversely correlating with tumor cell dissemination to regional lymph nodes, suggesting that Hpa2 functions as a tumor suppressor. The molecular mechanism associated with favorable prognosis following Hpa2 induction is unclear. Here we provide evidence that Hpa2 overexpression in head and neck cancer cells markedly reduces tumor growth. Restrained tumor growth was associated with a prominent decrease in tumor vascularity (blood and lymph vessels), likely due to reduced Id1 expression, a transcription factor highly implicated in VEGF-A and VEGF-C gene regulation. We also noted that tumors produced by Hpa2-overexpressing cells are abundantly decorated with stromal cells and collagen deposition, correlating with a marked increase in lysyl oxidase expression. Notably, heparanase enzymatic activity was unimpaired in cells overexpressing Hpa2, suggesting that reduced tumor growth is not caused by heparanase regulation. Moreover, growth of tumor xenografts by Hpa2-overexpressing cells was unaffected by administration of a mAb that targets the heparin-binding domain of Hpa2, implying that Hpa2 function does not rely on heparanase or heparan sulfate. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2791-801. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013193

  5. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer. PMID:27237321

  6. Mammary tumor growth and metastasis are reduced in c-Kit mutant Sash mice.

    PubMed

    He, Licai; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Shang; Wang, Yongping; Gu, Haihua

    2016-06-01

    Besides its well-known function in allergic response, mast cell, one of the key immune cells present in tumor microenvironment, plays important roles in cancer progression. However, the functional role of mast cells in breast cancer development and metastasis is not well understood. To test the involvement of mast cells in breast cancer, we examined the effects of loss of mast cells on mammary tumor development by crossing the well-known mast cell deficient mouse strain sash (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) ) with the mammary tumor transgenic mouse strain MMTV-Polyoma Middle T antigen (PyMT). Although mammary tumor onset was not affected in the absence of mast cells, mammary growth and metastasis were reduced in PyMT/Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice compared with PyMT/wild-type mice (WT). Histological and immunofluorescent analyses showed that tumors from PyMT/Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice showed largely differentiated morphology with reduced angiogenesis compared with MMTV-PyMT/WT mice. Our results suggest that mast cells may promote breast cancer growth and metastasis. Agents that can block mast cells growth are potential new therapies to treat metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26992445

  7. Endothelial Cords Promote Tumor Initial Growth prior to Vascular Function through a Paracrine Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chengjian; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yuwei; Yang, Yun; Luo, Hui; Ji, Gaili; Dong, E; Deng, Hongxing; Lin, Shuo; Wei, Yuquan; Yang, Hanshuo

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic switch is an important oncogenic step that determines whether microtumors remain dormant or progresses further. It has been generally perceived that the primary function of this tumorgenic event is to supply oxygen and nutrients through blood circulation. Using in vivo imaging of zebrafish and mouse tumor models, we showed that endothelial cords aggressively penetrated into microtumors and remained non-circulatory for several days before undergoing vascular blood perfusion. Unexpectedly, we found that initial tumor growth in both models was significantly reduced if endothelial cords were removed by blocking VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling or using a vascular deficient zebrafish mutant. It was further shown that soluble factors including IL-8, secreted by endothelial cells (ECs) were responsible for stimulating tumor cells proliferation. These findings establish that tumor angiogenesis play a much earlier and broader role in promoting tumor growth, which is independent of vascular circulation. Understanding this novel mechanism of angiogenic tumor progression offers new entry points for cancer therapeutics. PMID:26762853

  8. FEM-Based 3-D Tumor Growth Prediction for Kidney Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    It is important to predict the tumor growth so that appropriate treatment can be planned in the early stage. In this letter, we propose a finite-element method (FEM)-based 3-D tumor growth prediction system using longitudinal kidney tumor images. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first kidney tumor growth prediction system. The kidney tissues are classified into three types: renal cortex, renal medulla, and renal pelvis. The reaction–diffusion model is applied as the tumor growth model. Different diffusion properties are considered in the model: the diffusion for renal medulla is considered as anisotropic, while those of renal cortex and renal pelvis are considered as isotropic. The FEM is employed to solve the diffusion model. Themodel parameters are estimated by the optimization of an objective function of overlap accuracy using a hybrid optimization parallel search package. The proposed method was tested on two longitudinal studies with seven time points on five tumors. The average true positive volume fraction and false positive volume fraction on all tumors is 91.4% and 4.0%, respectively. The experimental results showed the feasibility and efficacy of the proposed method. PMID:21342810

  9. Metastases and Colon Cancer Tumor Growth Display Divergent Responses to Modulation of Canonical WNT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Chandan; Ruiz i Altaba, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Human colon cancers commonly harbor loss of function mutations in APC, a repressor of the canonical WNT pathway, thus leading to hyperactive WNT-TCF signaling. Re-establishment of Apc function in mice, engineered to conditionally repress Apc through RNAi, resolve the intestinal tumors formed due to hyperactivated Wnt-Tcf signaling. These and other results have prompted the search for specific WNT pathway antagonists as therapeutics for clinically problematic human colon cancers and associated metastases, which remain largely incurable. This widely accepted view seems at odds with a number of findings using patient-derived material: Canonical TCF targets are repressed, instead of being hyperactivated, in advanced colon cancers, and repression of TCF function does not generally result in tumor regression in xenografts. The results of a number of genetic mouse studies have also suggested that canonical WNT-TCF signaling drives metastases, but direct in vivo tests are lacking, and, surprisingly, TCF repression can enhance directly seeded metastatic growth. Here we have addressed the abilities of enhanced and blocked WNT-TCF signaling to alter tumor growth and distant metastases using xenografts of advanced human colon cancers in mice. We find that endogenous WNT-TCF signaling is mostly anti-metastatic since downregulation of TCF function with dnTCF generally enhances metastatic spread. Consistently, elevating the level of WNT signaling, by increasing the levels of WNT ligands, is not generally pro-metastatic. Our present and previous data reveal a heterogeneous response to modulating WNT-TCF signaling in human cancer cells. Nevertheless, the findings that a fraction of colon cancers tested require WNT-TCF signaling for tumor growth but all respond to repressed signaling by increasing metastases beg for a reevaluation of the goal of blocking WNT-TCF signaling to universally treat colon cancers. Our data suggest that WNT-TCF blockade may be effective in inhibiting tumor

  10. Paracrine activation of WNT/β-catenin pathway in uterine leiomyoma stem cells promotes tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masanori; Yin, Ping; Navarro, Antonia; Moravek, Molly B.; Coon, John S.; Druschitz, Stacy A.; Serna, Vanida Ann; Qiang, Wenan; Brooks, David C.; Malpani, Saurabh S.; Ma, Jiajia; Ercan, Cihangir Mutlu; Mittal, Navdha; Monsivais, Diana; Dyson, Matthew T.; Yemelyanov, Alex; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Kim, J. Julie; Kurita, Takeshi; Gottardi, Cara J.; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2013-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are extremely common estrogen and progesterone-dependent tumors of the myometrium and cause irregular uterine bleeding, severe anemia, and recurrent pregnancy loss in 15–30% of reproductive-age women. Each leiomyoma is thought to arise from a single mutated myometrial smooth muscle stem cell. Leiomyoma side-population (LMSP) cells comprising 1% of all tumor cells and displaying tumor-initiating stem cell characteristics are essential for estrogen- and progesterone-dependent in vivo growth of tumors, although they have remarkably lower estrogen/progesterone receptor levels than mature myometrial or leiomyoma cells. However, how estrogen/progesterone regulates the growth of LMSP cells via mature neighboring cells is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a critical paracrine role of the wingless-type (WNT)/β-catenin pathway in estrogen/progesterone-dependent tumorigenesis, involving LMSP and differentiated myometrial or leiomyoma cells. Estrogen/progesterone treatment of mature myometrial cells induced expression of WNT11 and WNT16, which remained constitutively elevated in leiomyoma tissues. In LMSP cells cocultured with mature myometrial cells, estrogen-progesterone selectively induced nuclear translocation of β-catenin and induced transcriptional activity of its heterodimeric partner T-cell factor and their target gene AXIN2, leading to the proliferation of LMSP cells. This effect could be blocked by a WNT antagonist. Ectopic expression of inhibitor of β-catenin and T-cell factor 4 in LMSP cells, but not in mature leiomyoma cells, blocked the estrogen/progesterone-dependent growth of human tumors in vivo. We uncovered a paracrine role of the WNT/β-catenin pathway that enables mature myometrial or leiomyoma cells to send mitogenic signals to neighboring tissue stem cells in response to estrogen and progesterone, leading to the growth of uterine leiomyomas. PMID:24082114

  11. The Role of Oxygen in Avascular Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, David Robert; Kannan, Pavitra; McIntyre, Alan; Kavanagh, Anthony; Siddiky, Abul; Wigfield, Simon; Harris, Adrian; Partridge, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen status of a tumor has significant clinical implications for treatment prognosis, with well-oxygenated subvolumes responding markedly better to radiotherapy than poorly supplied regions. Oxygen is essential for tumor growth, yet estimation of local oxygen distribution can be difficult to ascertain in situ, due to chaotic patterns of vasculature. It is possible to avoid this confounding influence by using avascular tumor models, such as tumor spheroids, a much better approximation of realistic tumor dynamics than monolayers, where oxygen supply can be described by diffusion alone. Similar to in situ tumours, spheroids exhibit an approximately sigmoidal growth curve, often approximated and fitted by logistic and Gompertzian sigmoid functions. These describe the basic rate of growth well, but do not offer an explicitly mechanistic explanation. This work examines the oxygen dynamics of spheroids and demonstrates that this growth can be derived mechanistically with cellular doubling time and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) being key parameters. The model is fitted to growth curves for a range of cell lines and derived values of OCR are validated using clinical measurement. Finally, we illustrate how changes in OCR due to gemcitabine treatment can be directly inferred using this model. PMID:27088720

  12. The Role of Oxygen in Avascular Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert; Kannan, Pavitra; McIntyre, Alan; Kavanagh, Anthony; Siddiky, Abul; Wigfield, Simon; Harris, Adrian; Partridge, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen status of a tumor has significant clinical implications for treatment prognosis, with well-oxygenated subvolumes responding markedly better to radiotherapy than poorly supplied regions. Oxygen is essential for tumor growth, yet estimation of local oxygen distribution can be difficult to ascertain in situ, due to chaotic patterns of vasculature. It is possible to avoid this confounding influence by using avascular tumor models, such as tumor spheroids, a much better approximation of realistic tumor dynamics than monolayers, where oxygen supply can be described by diffusion alone. Similar to in situ tumours, spheroids exhibit an approximately sigmoidal growth curve, often approximated and fitted by logistic and Gompertzian sigmoid functions. These describe the basic rate of growth well, but do not offer an explicitly mechanistic explanation. This work examines the oxygen dynamics of spheroids and demonstrates that this growth can be derived mechanistically with cellular doubling time and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) being key parameters. The model is fitted to growth curves for a range of cell lines and derived values of OCR are validated using clinical measurement. Finally, we illustrate how changes in OCR due to gemcitabine treatment can be directly inferred using this model. PMID:27088720

  13. New mechanism for dislocation blocking in strained layer epitaxial growth

    PubMed

    Stach; Schwarz; Hull; Ross; Tromp

    2000-01-31

    Dislocation interactions play a critical role in plasticity and heteroepitaxial strain relaxation. We use real time transmission electron microscopy observations of the interaction between threading and misfit dislocations in SiGe heterostructures to investigate interactions quantitatively. In addition to the expected long-range blocking of threading segments, we observe a new short-range mechanism which is significantly more effective. Simulations show that this reactive blocking occurs when two dislocations with the same Burgers vector reconnect. PMID:11017412

  14. New mechanism for dislocation blocking in strained layer epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Stach, E.A.; Schwarz, K.W.; Hull, R.; Ross, F.M.; Tromp, R.M.

    1999-09-14

    Dislocation interactions play a critical role in plasticity and heteroepitaxial strain relaxation. We use real time transmission electron microscopy observations of the interaction between threading and misfit dislocations in SiGe heterostructures to investigate interactions quantitatively. In addition to the expected long range blocking of threading segments, we observe a new short range mechanism which is significantly more effective. Simulations show that this reactive blocking occurs when two dislocations with the same Burgers vector reconnect.

  15. Second hand smoke stimulates tumor angiogenesis and growth.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo-qing; Heeschen, Christopher; Sievers, Richard E; Karliner, Joel S; Parmley, William W; Glantz, Stanton A; Cooke, John P

    2003-09-01

    Exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) is believed to cause lung cancer. Pathological angiogenesis is a requisite for tumor growth. Lewis lung cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into mice, which were then exposed to sidestream smoke (SHS) or clean room air and administered vehicle, cerivastatin, or mecamylamine. SHS significantly increased tumor size, weight, capillary density, VEGF and MCP-1 levels, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Cerivastatin (an inhibitor of HMG-coA reductase) or mecamylamine (an inhibitor of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) suppressed the effect of SHS to increase tumor size and capillary density. Cerivastatin reduced MCP-1 levels, whereas mecamylamine reduced VEGF levels and EPC. These studies reveal that SHS promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth. These effects of SHS are associated with increases in plasma VEGF and MCP-1 levels, and EPC, mediated in part by isoprenylation and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:14522253

  16. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  17. Hybrid models of cell and tissue dynamics in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Othmer, Hans G

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid models of tumor growth, in which some regions are described at the cell level and others at the continuum level, provide a flexible description that allows alterations of cell-level properties and detailed descriptions of the interaction with the tumor environment, yet retain the computational advantages of continuum models where appropriate. We review aspects of the general approach and discuss applications to breast cancer and glioblastoma. PMID:26775860

  18. Molecular Cochaperones: Tumor Growth and Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular chaperones play important roles in all cellular organisms by maintaining the proteome in an optimally folded state. They appear to be at a premium in cancer cells whose evolution along the malignant pathways requires the fostering of cohorts of mutant proteins that are employed to overcome tumor suppressive regulation. To function at significant rates in cells, HSPs interact with cochaperones, proteins that assist in catalyzing individual steps in molecular chaperoning as well as in posttranslational modification and intracellular localization. We review current knowledge regarding the roles of chaperones such as heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and Hsp70 and their cochaperones in cancer. Cochaperones are potential targets for cancer therapy in themselves and can be used to assess the likely prognosis of individual malignancies. Hsp70 cochaperones Bag1, Bag3, and Hop play significant roles in the etiology of some cancers as do Hsp90 cochaperones Aha1, p23, Cdc37, and FKBP1. Others such as the J domain protein family, HspBP1, TTC4, and FKBPL appear to be associated with more benign tumor phenotypes. The key importance of cochaperones for many pathways of protein folding in cancer suggests high promise for the future development of novel pharmaceutical agents. PMID:24278769

  19. Semiautomatic growth analysis of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Bjoern; Hirschhaeuser, Franziska; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are routinely employed as three-dimensional in vitro models to study tumor biology. Cultivation of MCTS in spinner flasks provides better growing conditions, especially with regard to the availability of nutrients and oxygen, when compared with microtiter plates. The main endpoint of drug response experiments is spheroid size. It is common practice to analyze spheroid size manually with a microscope and an ocular micrometer. This requires removal of some spheroids from the flask, which entails major limitations such as loss of MCTS and the risk of contamination. With this new approach, the authors present an efficient and highly reproducible method to analyze the size of complete MCTS populations in culture containers with transparent, flat bottoms. MCTS sediments are digitally scanned and spheroid volumes are calculated by computerized image analysis. The equipment includes regular office hardware (personal computer, flatbed scanner) and software (Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Excel, ImageJ). The accuracy and precision of the method were tested using industrial precision steel beads with known diameter. In summary, in comparison with other methods, this approach provides benefits in terms of semiautomation, noninvasiveness, and low costs. PMID:21908797

  20. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  1. Directional entropy based model for diffusivity-driven tumor growth.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcelo E; Neto, Luiz M G

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present and investigate a multiscale model to simulate 3D growth of glioblastomas (GBMs) that incorporates features of the tumor microenvironment and derives macroscopic growth laws from microscopic tissue structure information. We propose a normalized version of the Shannon entropy as an alternative measure of the directional anisotropy for an estimation of the diffusivity tensor in cases where the latter is unknown. In our formulation, the tumor aggressiveness and morphological behavior is tissue-type dependent, i.e. alterations in white and gray matter regions (which can e.g. be induced by normal aging in healthy individuals or neurodegenerative diseases) affect both tumor growth rates and their morphology. The feasibility of this new conceptual approach is supported by previous observations that the fractal dimension, which correlates with the Shannon entropy we calculate, is a quantitative parameter that characterizes the variability of brain tissue, thus, justifying the further evaluation of this new conceptual approach. PMID:27105991

  2. Key roles of necroptotic factors in promoting tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjian; Zhou, Min; Mei, Ling; Ruan, Jiaying; Hu, Qian; Peng, Jing; Su, Hang; Liao, Hong; Liu, Shanling; Liu, WeiPing; Wang, He; Huang, Qian; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Necroptotic factors are generally assumed to play a positive role in tumor therapy by eliminating damaged tumor cells. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, necroptotic factors RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL promote tumor growth. We demonstrate that genetic knockout of necroptotic genes RIPK1, RIPK3, or MLKL in cancer cells significantly attenuated their abilities to grow in an anchorage-independent manner. In addition, they exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity. The knockout cells also showed greatly reduced ability to form tumors in mice. Moreover, necrosulfonamide (NSA), a previously identified chemical inhibitor of necroptosis, could significantly delay tumor growth in a xenograft model. Mechanistically, we show that necroptoic factors play a significant role in maintaining the activity of NF-κB. Finally, we found that high levels of phosphorylated MLKL in human esophageal and colon cancers are associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, we conclude that pro-necroptic factors such as RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL may play a role in supporting tumor growth, and MLKL may be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26959742

  3. Key roles of necroptotic factors in promoting tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Zhou, Min; Mei, Ling; Ruan, Jiaying; Hu, Qian; Peng, Jing; Su, Hang; Liao, Hong; Liu, Shanling; Liu, WeiPing; Wang, He; Huang, Qian; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-04-19

    Necroptotic factors are generally assumed to play a positive role in tumor therapy by eliminating damaged tumor cells. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, necroptotic factors RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL promote tumor growth. We demonstrate that genetic knockout of necroptotic genes RIPK1, RIPK3, or MLKL in cancer cells significantly attenuated their abilities to grow in an anchorage-independent manner. In addition, they exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity. The knockout cells also showed greatly reduced ability to form tumors in mice. Moreover, necrosulfonamide (NSA), a previously identified chemical inhibitor of necroptosis, could significantly delay tumor growth in a xenograft model. Mechanistically, we show that necroptoic factors play a significant role in maintaining the activity of NF-κB. Finally, we found that high levels of phosphorylated MLKL in human esophageal and colon cancers are associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, we conclude that pro-necroptic factors such as RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL may play a role in supporting tumor growth, and MLKL may be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26959742

  4. The Influence of Liver Resection on Intrahepatic Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Hannes H; Nißler, Valérie; Croner, Roland S

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of tumor recurrence after resection of metastatic liver lesions remains an unsolved problem. Small tumor cell deposits, which are not detectable by routine clinical imaging, may be stimulated by hepatic regeneration factors after liver resection. It is not entirely clear, however, which factors are crucial for tumor recurrence. The presented mouse model may be useful to explore the mechanisms that play a role in the development of recurrent malignant lesions after liver resection. The model combines the easy-to-perform and reproducible techniques of defined amounts of liver tissue removal and tumor induction (by injection) in mice. The animals were treated with either a single laparotomy, a 30% liver resection, or a 70% liver resection. All animals subsequently received a tumor cell injection into the remaining liver tissue. After two weeks of observation, the livers and tumors were evaluated for size and weight and examined by immunohistochemistry. After a 70% liver resection, the tumor volume and weight were significantly increased compared to a laparotomy alone (p <0.05). In addition, immunohistochemistry (Ki67) showed an increased tumor proliferation rate in the resection group (p <0.05). These findings demonstrate the influence of hepatic regeneration mechanisms on intrahepatic tumor growth. Combined with methods like histological workup or RNA analysis, the described mouse model could serve as foundation for a close examination of different factors involved in tumor growth and metastatic disease recurrence within the liver. A considerable number of variables like the length of postoperative observation, the cell line used for injection or the timing of injection and liver resection offer multiple angles when exploring a specific question in the context of post-hepatectomy metastases. The limitations of this procedure are the authorization to perform the procedure on animals, access to an appropriate animal testing facility and acquisition

  5. Neuropilin-1 stimulates tumor growth by increasing fibronectin fibril assembly in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Yaqoob, Usman; Cao, Sheng; Shergill, Uday; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Geng, Zhimin; Yin, Meng; de Assuncao, Thiago M; Cao, Ying; Szabolcs, Anna; Thorgeirsson, Snorri; Schwartz, Martin; Yang, Ju Dong; Ehman, Richard; Roberts, Lewis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Shah, Vijay H.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal myofibroblasts and associated matrix proteins, regulates cancer cell invasion and proliferation. Here we report that neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) orchestrates communications between myofibroblasts and soluble fibronectin (FN) that promote α5β1 integrin-dependent FN fibril assembly, matrix stiffness, and tumor growth. Tumor growth and FN fibril assembly was reduced by genetic depletion or antibody neutralization of NRP-1 from stromal myofibroblasts in vivo. Mechanistically, the increase in FN fibril assembly required glycosylation of serine 612 of the extracellular domain of NRP-1, an intact intracellular NRP-1 SEA domain, and intracellular associations between NRP-1, the scaffold protein GIPC, and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl, that augmented α5β1 FN fibril assembly activity. Analysis of human cancer specimens established an association between tumoral NRP-1 levels and clinical outcome. Our findings indicate that NRP-1 activates the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting tumor growth. These results not only identify new molecular mechanisms of FN fibril assembly but also have important implications for therapeutic targeting of the myofibroblast in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22738912

  6. Heparanase-neutralizing antibodies attenuate lymphoma tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Marina; Arvatz, Gil; Horowitz, Netanel; Feld, Sari; Naroditsky, Inna; Zhang, Yi; Ng, Mary; Hammond, Edward; Nevo, Eviatar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans, resulting in disassembly of the extracellular matrix underlying endothelial and epithelial cells and associating with enhanced cell invasion and metastasis. Heparanase expression is induced in carcinomas and sarcomas, often associating with enhanced tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. In contrast, the function of heparanase in hematological malignancies (except myeloma) was not investigated in depth. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase is expressed by human follicular and diffused non-Hodgkin's B-lymphomas, and that heparanase inhibitors restrain the growth of tumor xenografts produced by lymphoma cell lines. Furthermore, we describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the development and characterization of heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that inhibit cell invasion and tumor metastasis, the hallmark of heparanase activity. Using luciferase-labeled Raji lymphoma cells, we show that the heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies profoundly inhibit tumor load in the mouse bones, associating with reduced cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Notably, we found that Raji cells lack intrinsic heparanase activity, but tumor xenografts produced by this cell line exhibit typical heparanase activity, likely contributed by host cells composing the tumor microenvironment. Thus, the neutralizing monoclonal antibodies attenuate lymphoma growth by targeting heparanase in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26729870

  7. Effect of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated colored noises with colored cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Ibrahim Mu'awiyya; Abu Bakar, Mohd Rizam

    2016-07-01

    The effect of non-immunogenic tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated additive and multiplicative colored noises is investigated. Using the Novikov theorem, Fox approach and Ansatz of Hanggi, an approximate Fokker-Planck equation for the system is obtained and analytic expression for the steady state distribution Pst(x) is derived. Based on the numerical results, we find that fluctuations of microenvironmental factors within the tumor site with parameter θ have a diffusive effect on the tumor growth dynamics, and the tumor response to the microenvironmental factors with parameter α inhibits growth at weak correlation time τ. Moreover, at increasing correlation time τ the inhibitive effect of tumor response α is suppressed and instead a systematic growth promotion is noticed. The result also reveals that the strength of the correlation time τ has a strong influence on the growth effects exerted by the non-immunogenic component of tumor microenvironment on tumor growth.

  8. Olig2-Dependent Reciprocal Shift in PDGF and EGF Receptor Signaling Regulates Tumor Phenotype and Mitotic Growth in Malignant Glioma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fanghui; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Chuntao; Wang, Haibo; He, Danyang; Xu, Lingli; Wang, Jincheng; He, Xuelian; Deng, Yaqi; Lu, Ellen E; Liu, Xue; Verma, Ravinder; Bu, Hong; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Burns, Dennis; Xin, Mei; Rubin, Joshua B; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Canoll, Peter; Holland, Eric C; Lu, Q Richard

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas exhibit extensive heterogeneity and poor prognosis. Here we identify mitotic Olig2-expressing cells as tumor-propagating cells in proneural gliomas, elimination of which blocks tumor initiation and progression. Intriguingly, deletion of Olig2 resulted in tumors that grow, albeit at a decelerated rate. Genome occupancy and expression profiling analyses reveal that Olig2 directly activates cell-proliferation machinery to promote tumorigenesis. Olig2 deletion causes a tumor phenotypic shift from an oligodendrocyte precursor-correlated proneural toward an astroglia-associated gene expression pattern, manifest in downregulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and reciprocal upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Olig2 deletion further sensitizes glioma cells to EGFR inhibitors and extends the lifespan of animals. Thus, Olig2-orchestrated receptor signaling drives mitotic growth and regulates glioma phenotypic plasticity. Targeting Olig2 may circumvent resistance to EGFR-targeted drugs. PMID:27165742

  9. Inhibition of Receptor Signaling and of Glioblastoma-derived Tumor Growth by a Novel PDGFRβ Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Esposito, Carla L; Rienzo, Anna; Catuogno, Silvia; Iaboni, Margherita; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Cerchia, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) is a cell-surface tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. It represents a compelling therapeutic target in many human tumors, including glioma. A number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors under development as antitumor agents have been found to inhibit PDGFRβ. However, they are not selective as they present multiple tyrosine kinase targets. Here, we report a novel PDGFRβ-specific antagonist represented by a nuclease-resistant RNA-aptamer, named Gint4.T. This aptamer is able to specifically bind to the human PDGFRβ ectodomain (Kd: 9.6 nmol/l) causing a strong inhibition of ligand-dependent receptor activation and of downstream signaling in cell lines and primary cultures of human glioblastoma cells. Moreover, Gint4.T aptamer drastically inhibits cell migration and proliferation, induces differentiation, and blocks tumor growth in vivo. In addition, Gint4.T aptamer prevents PDGFRβ heterodimerization with and resultant transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. As a result, the combination of Gint4.T and an epidermal growth factor receptor–targeted aptamer is better at slowing tumor growth than either single aptamer alone. These findings reveal Gint4.T as a PDGFRβ-drug candidate with translational potential. PMID:24566984

  10. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  11. Promotion of lung tumor growth by interleukin-17

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Beibei; Guenther, James F.; Pociask, Derek A.; Wang, Yu; Kolls, Jay K.; You, Zongbing; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Shan, Bin; Sullivan, Deborah E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that inhaled cigarette smoke, the predominant lung carcinogen, elicits a T helper 17 (Th17) inflammatory phenotype. Interleukin-17A (IL-17), the hallmark cytokine of Th17 inflammation, displays pro- and antitumorigenic properties in a manner that varies according to tumor type and assay system. To investigate the role of IL-17 in lung tumor growth, we used an autochthonous tumor model (K-RasLA1 mice) with lung delivery of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses IL-17A. Virus-mediated expression of IL-17A in K-RasLA1 mice at 8–10 wk of age doubled lung tumor growth in 3 wk relative to littermates that received a green fluorescent protein-expressing control adenovirus. IL-17 induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in vivo and in vitro. In accord with this finding, selective and specific inhibitors of MMP-9 repressed the increased motility and invasiveness of IL-17-treated lung tumor cells in culture. Knockdown or mutation of p53 promoted the motility of murine lung tumor cells and abrogated the promigratory role of IL-17. Coexpression of siRNA-resistant wild-type, but not mutant, human p53 rescued both IL-17-mediated migration and MMP-9 mRNA induction in p53 knockdown lung tumor cells. IL-17 increased MMP-9 mRNA stability by reducing interaction with the mRNA destabilizing serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1). Taken together, our results indicate that IL-17 stimulates lung tumor growth and regulates MMP-9 mRNA levels in a p53- and SRSF1-dependent manner. PMID:25038189

  12. Inhibition of tumor growth, vascularization, and collagenolysis in the rabbit cornea by medroxyprogesterone.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J; Azizkhan, R G; Biswas, C; Bruns, R R; Hsieh, D S; Folkman, J

    1981-01-01

    Medroxyprogesterone, dexamethasone, or cortisone, locally applied in sustained release polymer to rabbit V2 carcinoma implanted in the rabbit cornea, blocked neovascularization and three-dimensional growth of the tumor. These hormones similarly prevented the vascular proliferative response to implants in the rabbit cornea of mouse B-16 melanoma and also the response to implants of polymer containing tumor extract with angiogenesis activity. The inhibitory responses were accompanied by considerable reduction in collagenolytic activity released into culture medium by explants of the two tumors and of the corneal region containing angiogenic hepatoma extract. Morphologic studies revealed extensive three-dimensional disruption of the compact laminated collagenous structure of the cornea by untreated V2 carcinoma. In the presence of hormone the tumor grew slowly as a noninvasive two-dimensional plaque limited to the narrow region of the insertion pocket in the cornea, with no obvious disturbance of structure elsewhere. Cortisone was much les effective than medroxyprogesterone or dexamethasone. Testosterone and estradiol had no effect on the three measured properties. The data suggest that local hormonal interference with neovascularization, collagenase production, and tumor growth can prevent neoplastic invasion and destruction of a dense collagenous connective tissue. Images PMID:6262756

  13. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) inhibits human colon tumor growth by promoting apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuguang; Li, Bingji; Liu, Jie; He, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently been suggested in several epithelial cancers, either pro-tumor or anti-tumor. However, the role of TSLP in colon cancer remains unknown. We here found significantly decreased TSLP levels in tumor tissues compared with tumor-surrounding tissues of patients with colon cancer and TSLP levels negatively correlated with the clinical staging score of colon cancer. TSLPR, the receptor of TSLP, was expressed in all three colon cancer cell lines investigated and colon tumor tissues. The addition of TSLP significantly enhanced apoptosis of colon cancer cells in a TSLPR-dependent manner. Interestingly, TSLP selectively induced the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, but not normal colonic epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TSLP induced JNK and p38 activation and initiated apoptosis mainly through the extrinsic pathway, as caspase-8 inhibitor significantly reversed the apoptosis-promoting effect of TSLP. Finally, using a xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that peritumoral administration of TSLP greatly reduced tumor growth accompanied with extensive tumor apoptotic response, which was abolished by tumor cell-specific knockdown of TSLPR. Collectively, our study reveals a novel anti-tumor effect of TSLP via direct promotion of the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, and suggests that TSLP could be of value in treating colon cancer. PMID:26919238

  14. [Effect of soy products on graft tumor growth in rats].

    PubMed

    Zalietok, S P; Orlovs'kyĭ, O A; Hohol', S V; Klenov, O A; Samoĭlenko, O A; Anisimova, Iu M; Borovs'kyĭ, V P; Chekhun, V F

    2006-01-01

    Moderate consumption of a curd-like product made of thermally-treated soy (SPT) led to the retardation of hormone-dependent (Walker W 256 carcinosarcoma in females) and some less hormone-independent (Guerin's carcinoma in males) tumor growth in rats. Excessive (ad libitum) consumption of the same product led to accelaration of W 256 tumor growth. A similar product made of raw soy (SPR) accelerated the growth of W-256 carcinosarcoma and made not any effect on the growth of Guerin's carcinoma. Moderate SPT consumption corrected erythropoesis, decreased lipids peroxidation, retarded peritumoral inflammation, decreased or not changed the content of direct bilirubin in blood serum. SPRconsumption did not lead to those positive effects but sometimes deteriorated those indices. Our experiments have also shown the express-test validity based on dynamical variant of cancerolysis reaction to be practical for evaluation of food quality for cancer patients. PMID:17312888

  15. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaylani, Samer Z.; Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Kopelovich, Levy; Pressey, Joseph G.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  16. Progesterone-induced blocking factor differentially regulates trophoblast and tumor invasion by altering matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Melinda; Polgar, Beata; Berta, Gergely; Czimbalek, Livia; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Invasiveness is a common feature of trophoblast and tumors; however, while tumor invasion is uncontrolled, trophoblast invasion is strictly regulated. Both trophoblast and tumor cells express high levels of the immunomodulatory progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), therefore, we aimed to test the possibility that PIBF might be involved in invasion. To this aim, we used PIBF-silenced or PIBF-treated trophoblast (HTR8/Svneo, and primary trophoblast) and tumor (HT-1080, A549, HCT116, PC3) cell lines. Silencing of PIBF increased invasiveness as well as MMP-2,-9 secretion of HTR8/SVneo, and decreased those of HT-1080 cells. PIBF induced immediate STAT6 activation in both cell lines. Silencing of IL-4Rα abrogated all the above effects of PIBF, suggesting that invasion-related signaling by PIBF is initiated through the IL-4Rα/PIBF-receptor complex. In HTR-8/SVneo, PIBF induced fast, but transient Akt and ERK phosphorylation, whereas in tumor cells, PIBF triggered sustained Akt, ERK, and late STAT3 activation. The late signaling events might be due to indirect action of PIBF. PIBF induced the expression of EGF and HB-EGF in HT-1080 cells. The STAT3-activating effect of PIBF was reduced in HB-EGF-deficient HT-1080 cells, suggesting that PIBF-induced HB-EGF contributes to late STAT3 activation. PIBF binds to the promoters of IL-6, EGF, and HB-EGF; however, the protein profile of the protein/DNA complex is different in the two cell lines. We conclude that in tumor cells, PIBF induces proteins, which activate invasion signaling, while-based on our previous data-PIBF might control trophoblast invasion by suppressing proinvasive genes. PMID:23807209

  17. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  18. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by photoimmunotherapy targeting tumor-associated macrophage in a sorafenib-resistant tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Liquan; Cai, Yuehong; Liu, Hao; Gao, Duo; Lai, Jianhao; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor invasion and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. Clinical evidence suggests that TAM levels are correlated with local tumor relapse, distant metastasis, and poor prognosis in patients. In this study, we synthesized a TAM-targeted probe (IRD-αCD206) by conjugating a monoclonal anti-CD206 antibody with a near-infrared phthalocyanine dye. We then investigated the potential application of the IRD-αCD206 probe to near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of tumors resistant to treatment with the kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment had no effect on tumor growth in a 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer, but induced M2 macrophage polarization in tumors. M2 macrophage recruitment by sorafenib-treated 4T1 tumors was noninvasively visualized by in vivo NIRF imaging of IRD-αCD206. Small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and intratumoral microdistribution analysis indicated TAM-specific localization of the IRD-αCD206 probe in 4T1 tumors after several rounds of sorafenib treatment. Upon light irradiation, IRD-αCD206 suppressed the growth of sorafenib-resistant tumors. In vivo CT imaging and ex vivo histological analysis confirmed the inhibition of lung metastasis in mice by IRD-αCD206 PIT. These results demonstrate the utility of the IRD-αCD206 probe for TAM-targeted diagnostic imaging and treatment of tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutics. PMID:26803407

  19. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  20. A soluble form of GAS1 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in a triple negative breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Adriana; López-Ornelas, Adolfo; Estudillo, Enrique; González-Mariscal, Lorenza; González, Rosa O; Segovia, José

    2014-10-01

    We previously demonstrated the capacity of GAS1 (Growth Arrest Specific 1) to inhibit the growth of gliomas by blocking the GDNF-RET signaling pathway. Here, we show that a soluble form of GAS1 (tGAS1), decreases the number of viable MDA MB 231 human breast cancer cells, acting in both autocrine and paracrine manners when secreted from producing cells. Moreover, tGAS1 inhibits the growth of tumors implanted in female nu/nu mice through a RET-independent mechanism which involves interfering with the Artemin (ARTN)-GFRα3-(GDNF Family Receptor alpha 3) mediated intracellular signaling and the activation of ERK. In addition, we observed that the presence of tGAS1 reduces the vascularization of implanted tumors, by preventing the migration of endothelial cells. The present results support a potential adjuvant role for tGAS1 in the treatment of breast cancer, by detaining tumor growth and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:24992044

  1. Joint fitting reveals hidden interactions in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Barberis, L; Pasquale, M A; Condat, C A

    2015-01-21

    Tumor growth is often the result of the simultaneous development of two or more cancer cell populations. Crucial to the system evolution are the interactions between these populations. To obtain information about these interactions we apply the recently developed vector universality (VUN) formalism to various instances of competition between tumor populations. The formalism allows us (a) to quantify the growth mechanisms of a HeLa cell colony, describing the phenotype switching responsible for its fast expansion, (b) to reliably reconstruct the evolution of the necrotic and viable fractions in both in vitro and in vivo tumors using data for the time dependences of the total masses alone, and (c) to show how the shedding of cells leading to subspheroid formation is beneficial to both the spheroid and subspheroid populations, suggesting that shedding is a strong positive influence on cancer dissemination. PMID:25451531

  2. Development, Selection, and Validation of Tumor Growth Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Lima, Ernesto; Oden, J. Tinsley

    In recent years, a multitude of different mathematical approaches have been taken to develop multiscale models of solid tumor growth. Prime successful examples include the lattice-based, agent-based (off-lattice), and phase-field approaches, or a hybrid of these models applied to multiple scales of tumor, from subcellular to tissue level. Of overriding importance is the predictive power of these models, particularly in the presence of uncertainties. This presentation describes our attempt at developing lattice-based, agent-based and phase-field models of tumor growth and assessing their predictive power through new adaptive algorithms for model selection and model validation embodied in the Occam Plausibility Algorithm (OPAL), that brings together model calibration, determination of sensitivities of outputs to parameter variances, and calculation of model plausibilities for model selection. Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences.

  3. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  4. Tumoral expression of IL-33 inhibits tumor growth and modifies the tumor microenvironment through CD8+ T and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuefeng; Yang, Qianting; Zhao, Xin; Wen, Wen; Li, Gang; Lu, Junfeng; Qin, Wenxin; Qi, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping; Zhang, Xueguang; Chen, Xinchun; Turnquist, Heth; Zhu, Yibei; Lu, Binfeng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has shown great promise as a new standard cancer therapeutic modality. However, the response rates are limited for current approach that depends on enhancing spontaneous antitumor immune responses. Therefore, increasing tumor immunogenicity by expressing appropriate cytokines should further improve the current immunotherapy. IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and is released by necrotic epithelial cells or activated innate immune cells and is thus considered a "danger" signal. The role of IL-33 in promoting type 2 immune responses and tissue inflammation has been well established. However, whether IL-33 drives antitumor immune responses is controversial. Our previous work established that IL-33 promoted the function of CD8(+) T cells. In this study, we showed that the expression of IL-33 in two types of cancer cells potently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Mechanistically, IL-33 increased numbers and IFN-γ production by CD8(+) T and NK cells in tumor tissues, thereby inducing a tumor microenvironment favoring tumor eradication. Importantly, IL-33 greatly increased tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, both NK and CD8(+) T cells were required for the antitumor effect of IL-33. Moreover, depletion of regulatory T cells worked synergistically with IL-33 expression for tumor elimination. Our studies established "alarmin" IL-33 as a promising new cytokine for tumor immunotherapy through promoting cancer-eradicating type 1 immune responses. PMID:25429071

  5. Tumoral expression of IL-33 inhibits tumor growth and modifies the tumor microenvironment through CD8+ T and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuefeng; Yang, Qianting; Zhao, Xin; Wen, Wen; Li, Gang; Lu, Junfeng; Qin, Wenxin; Qi, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping; Zhang, Xueguang; Chen, Xinchun; Turnquist, Heth; Zhu, Yibei; Lu, Binfeng

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has shown great promise as a new standard cancer therapeutic modality. However, the response rates are limited for current approach that depends on enhancing spontaneous antitumor immune responses. Therefore, increasing tumor immunogenicity by expressing appropriate cytokines should further improve the current immunotherapy. Interleukin-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and is released by necrotic epithelial cells or activated innate immune cells and is thus considered a “danger” signal. The role of IL-33 in promoting type 2 immune responses and tissue inflammation has been well established. However, whether IL-33 drives antitumor immune responses is controversial. Our previous work established that IL-33 promoted the function of CD8+ T cells. Here, we showed that the expression of IL-33 in two types of cancer cells potently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Mechanistically, IL-33 increased numbers and IFNγ production by CD8+ T and NK cells in tumor tissues, thereby inducing a tumor microenvironment favoring tumor eradication. Importantly, IL-33 greatly increased tumor-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, both NK and CD8+ T cells were required for the antitumor effect of IL-33. Moreover, depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) worked synergistically with IL-33 expression for tumor elimination. Our studies established “alarmin” IL-33 as a promising new cytokine for tumor immunotherapy through promoting cancer-eradicating type 1 immune responses. PMID:25429071

  6. Pancreatic Tumor Growth Prediction with Multiplicative Growth and Image-Derived Motion.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken C L; Summers, Ronald M; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are abnormal growths of hormone-producing cells in the pancreas. Different from the brain in the skull, the pancreas in the abdomen can be largely deformed by the body posture and the surrounding organs. In consequence, both tumor growth and pancreatic motion attribute to the tumor shape difference observable from images. As images at different time points are used to personalize the tumor growth model, the prediction accuracy may be reduced if such motion is ignored. Therefore, we incorporate the image-derived pancreatic motion to tumor growth personalization. For realistic mechanical interactions, the multiplicative growth decomposition is used with a hyperelastic constitutive law to model tumor mass effect, which allows growth modeling without compromising the mechanical accuracy. With also the FDG-PET and contrast-enhanced CT images, the functional, structural, and motion data are combined for a more patient-specific model. Experiments on synthetic and clinical data show the importance of image-derived motion on estimating physiologically plausible mechanical properties and the promising performance of our framework. From six patient data sets, the recall, precision, Dice coefficient, relative volume difference, and average surface distance were 89.8 ± 3.5%, 85.6 ± 7.5%, 87.4 ± 3.6%, 9.7 ± 7.2%, and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm, respectively. PMID:26221698

  7. RALBP1/RLIP76 depletion in mice suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting tumor neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghyung; Wurtzel, Jeremy G.T.; Singhal, Sharad S.; Awasthi, Sanjay; Goldfinger, Lawrence E.

    2012-01-01

    RalBP1/RLIP76 is a widely expressed multifunctional protein that binds the Ral and R-Ras small GTPases. In the mouse, RLIP76 is non-essential but its depletion or blockade promotes tumorigenesis and heightens the sensitivity of normal and tumor cells to radiation and cytotoxic drugs. However, its pathobiological functions which support tumorigenesis are not well understood. Here we show that RLIP76 is required for angiogenesis and for efficient neovascularization of primary solid tumors. Tumor growth from implanted melanoma or carcinoma cells was blunted in RLIP76−/− mice. An X-ray microCT-based method to model tumor vascular structures revealed defects in both the extent and form of tumor angiogenesis in RLIP76−/− mice. Specifically, tumor vascular volumes were diminished and vessels were fewer in number, shorter, and narrower in RLIP76−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Moreover, we found that angiogenesis was blunted in mutant mice in the absence of tumor cells, with endothelial cells isolated from these animals exhibiting defects in migration, proliferation and cord formation in vitro. Taken together, our results establish that RLIP76 is required for efficient endothelial cell function and angiogenesis in solid tumors. PMID:22902412

  8. Bioassay and Attributes of a Growth Factor Associated with Crown Gall Tumors 1

    PubMed Central

    Lippincott, Barbara B.; Lippincott, James A.

    1970-01-01

    An improved bioassay is described for a factor that promotes tumor growth which was first obtained from extracts of pinto bean leaves with crown gall tumors. Sixteen primary pinto bean leaves per sample are inoculated with sufficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens to initiate about 5 to 10 tumors per leaf and treated with tumor growth factor at day 3 after inoculation. The diameters of 30 to 48 round tumors (no more than 3 randomly selected per leaf) are measured per test sample at day 6. Mean tumor diameter increased linearly with the logarithm of the concentration of tumor growth factor applied. The tumor growth factor was separated by column chromatography from an ultraviolet light-absorbing compound previously reported to be associated with fractions having maximal tumor growth factor activity. Partly purified tumor growth factor showed no activity in a cytokinin bioassay or an auxin bioassay, and negligible activity in gibberellin bioassays. Representatives of these three classes of growth factors did not promote tumor growth. Extracts from crown gall tumors on primary pinto bean leaves, primary castor bean leaves, Bryophyllum leaves, carrot root slices, and tobacco stems showed tumor growth factor activity, whereas extracts from healthy control tissues did not. Extracts from actively growing parts of healthy pinto beans, Bryophyllum, and tobacco, however, showed tumor growth factor activity. Tumor growth factor is proposed to be a normal plant growth factor associated with rapidly growing tissues. Its synthesis may be activated in nongrowing tissues by infection with Agrobacterium sp. PMID:16657534

  9. Ultrasound-Mediated Tumor Imaging and Nanotherapy using Drug Loaded, Block Copolymer Stabilized Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Natalya; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Gupta, Roohi; Gao, Zhongao; Mohan, Praveena; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Liu, Xin; Kim, Taeho; Shea, Jill; Scaife, Courtney; Parker, Dennis L.; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Kennedy, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions can deliver lipophilic therapeutic agents to solid tumors and simultaneously provide for monitoring nanocarrier biodistribution via ultrasonography and/or 19F MRI. In the first generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions, perfluoropentane (PFP) was used as the droplet forming compound. Although manifesting excellent therapeutic and ultrasound imaging properties, PFP nanoemulsions were unstable at storage, difficult to handle, and underwent hard to control phenomenon of irreversible droplet-to-bubble transition upon injection. To solve the above problems, perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE) was used as a core forming compound in the second generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. PFCE nanodroplets manifest both ultrasound and fluorine (19F) MR contrast properties, which allows using multimodal imaging and 19F MR spectroscopy for monitoring nanodroplet pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. In the present paper, acoustic, imaging, and therapeutic properties of unloaded and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded PFCE nanoemulsions are reported. As manifested by the 19F MR spectroscopy, PFCE nanodroplets are long circulating, with about 50% of the injected dose remaining in circulation two hours after the systemic injection. Sonication with 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound triggered reversible droplet-to-bubble transition in PFCE nanoemulsions. Microbubbles formed by acoustic vaporization of nanodroplets underwent stable cavitation. The nanodroplet size (200 nm to 350 nm depending on a type of the shell and conditions of emulsification) as well as long residence in circulation favored their passive accumulation in tumor tissue that was confirmed by ultrasonography. In the breast and pancreatic cancer animal models, ultrasound-mediated therapy with paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanoemulsions showed excellent therapeutic properties characterized by tumor regression and suppression of metastasis. Anticipated

  10. ING1 and 5-Azacytidine Act Synergistically to Block Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Satbir; Feng, Xiaolan; Qiao Shi, Zhong; Ganapathy, Amudha; Kumar Mishra, Manoj; Atadja, Peter; Morris, Don; Riabowol, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins are epigenetic “readers” that recognize trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me3) and target histone acetyl transferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) complexes to chromatin. Methods and Principal Findings Here we asked whether dysregulating two epigenetic pathways with chemical inhibitors showed synergistic effects on breast cancer cell line killing. We also tested whether ING1 could synergize better with chemotherapeutics that target the same epigenetic mechanism such as the HDAC inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat) or a different epigenetic mechanism such as 5-azacytidine (5azaC), which inhibits DNA methyl transferases. Simultaneous treatment of breast cancer cell lines with LBH589 and 5azaC did not show significant synergy in killing cells. However, combination treatment of ING1 with either LBH589 or 5azaC did show synergy. The combination of ING1b with 5azaC, which targets two distinct epigenetic mechanisms, was more effective at lower doses and enhanced apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). ING1b plus 5azaC also acted synergistically to increase γH2AX staining indicating significant levels of DNA damage were induced. Adenoviral delivery of ING1b with 5azaC also inhibited cancer cell growth in a murine xenograft model and led to tumor regression when viral concentration was optimized in vivo. Conclusions These data show that targeting distinct epigenetic pathways can be more effective in blocking cancer cell line growth than targeting the same pathway with multiple agents, and that using viral delivery of epigenetic regulators can be more effective in synergizing with a chemical agent than using two chemotherapeutic agents. This study also indicates that the ING1 epigenetic regulator may have additional activities in the cell when expressed at high levels. PMID:22916295

  11. HDAC6 inhibition restores ciliary expression and decreases tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Gradilone, Sergio A; Radtke, Brynn N; Bogert, Pamela S; Huang, Bing Q; Gajdos, Gabriella B; LaRusso, Nicholas F

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia are multisensory organelles recently found to be absent in some tumor cells, but the mechanisms of deciliation and the role of cilia in tumor biology remain unclear. Cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining the biliary tree, normally express primary cilia and their interaction with bile components regulates multiple processes, including proliferation and transport. Utilizing cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as a model, we found primary cilia are reduced in CCA by a mechanism involving histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). The experimental deciliation of normal cholangiocyte cells increased the proliferation rate and induced anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, deciliation induced the activation of MAPK and Hedgehog signaling, two important pathways involved in CCA development. We found HDAC6 is overexpressed in CCA and overexpression of HDAC6 in normal cholangiocytes induced deciliation, and increased both proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. To evaluate the effect of cilia restoration on tumor cells, we targeted HDAC6 by shRNA or by the pharmacologic inhibitor, tubastatin-A. Both approaches restored the expression of primary cilia in CCA cell lines and decreased cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. The effects of tubastatin-A were abolished when CCA cells were rendered unable to regenerate cilia by stable transfection of IFT88-shRNA. Finally, inhibition of HDAC6 by tubastatin-A also induced a significant decrease in tumor growth in a CCA animal model. Our data support a key role for primary cilia in malignant transformation, provide a plausible mechanism for their involvement, and suggest that restoration of primary cilia in tumor cells by HDAC6 targeting may be a potential therapeutic approach for CCA. PMID:23370327

  12. Dietary rice component, Oryzanol, inhibits tumor growth in tumor-bearing Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scope: We investigated the effects of rice bran and components on tumor growth in mice. Methods and results: Mice fed standard diets supplemented with rice bran, '-oryzanol, Ricetrienol®, ferulic acid, or phytic acid for 2 weeks were inoculated with CT-26 colon cancer cells and fed the same diet fo...

  13. Involvement of estrogen-related receptors in transcriptional response to hypoxia and growth of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Ao, Ada; Wang, Heiman; Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Lu, Jianrong

    2008-06-01

    The development of intratumoral hypoxia is a universal hallmark of rapidly growing solid tumors. Adaptation to the hypoxic environment, which is critical for tumor cell survival and growth, is mediated primarily through a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent transcriptional program. HIF activates genes that facilitate crucial adaptive mechanisms including increased glucose uptake and glycolysis and tumor angiogenesis, making it an important therapeutic target. However, the HIF-dependent transcriptional mechanism remains incompletely understood, and targeting HIF is a difficult endeavor. Here, we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) physically interact with HIF and stimulate HIF-induced transcription. Importantly, ERRs appear to be essential for HIF's function. Transcriptional activation of hypoxic genes in cells cultured under hypoxia is largely blocked by suppression of ERRs through expression of a dominant negative form of ERR or treatment with a pharmacological ERR inhibitor, diethylstilbestrol. Systematic administration of diethylstilbestrol severely diminished growth and angiogenesis of tumor xenografts in vivo. Because nuclear receptors are outstanding targets for drug discovery, the findings not only may offer mechanistic insights into HIF-mediated transcription but also may open new avenues for targeting the HIF pathway for cancer therapy. PMID:18509053

  14. Non-diffeomorphic registration of brain tumor images by simulating tissue loss and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zacharaki, Evangelia I; Hogea, Cosmina S; Shen, Dinggang; Biros, George; Davatzikos, Christos

    2009-07-01

    Although a variety of diffeomorphic deformable registration methods exist in the literature, application of these methods in the presence of space-occupying lesions is not straightforward. The motivation of this work is spatial normalization of MR images from patients with brain tumors in a common stereotaxic space, aiming to pool data from different patients into a common space in order to perform group analyses. Additionally, transfer of structural and functional information from neuroanatomical brain atlases into the individual patient's space can be achieved via the inverse mapping, for the purpose of segmenting brains and facilitating surgical or radiotherapy treatment planning. A method that estimates the brain tissue loss and replacement by tumor is applied for achieving equivalent image content between an atlas and a patient's scan, based on a biomechanical model of tumor growth. Automated estimation of the parameters modeling brain tissue loss and displacement is performed via optimization of an objective function reflecting feature-based similarity and elastic stretching energy, which is optimized in parallel via APPSPACK (Asynchronous Parallel Pattern Search). The results of the method, applied to 21 brain tumor patients, indicate that the registration accuracy is relatively high in areas around the tumor, as well as in the healthy portion of the brain. Also, the calculated deformation in the vicinity of the tumor is shown to correlate highly with expert-defined visual scores indicating the tumor mass effect, thereby potentially leading to an objective approach to quantification of mass effect, which is commonly used in diagnosis. PMID:19408350

  15. Metformin and trametinib have synergistic effects on cell viability and tumor growth in NRAS mutant cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vujic, Igor; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Posch, Christian; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Yen, Adam J.; Kwong, Andrew; Tsumura, Aaron; Murphy, Ryan; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Attempts to directly block the mutant neuroblastoma rat sarcoma oncogene (NRAS) protein, a driving mutation in many cancer types, have been unsuccessful. Current treatments focus on inhibition of different components of NRAS' two main downstream cascades: PI3K/AKT/mTOR and MAPK. Here we test a novel dual therapy combination of metformin and trametinib on a panel of 16 NRAS mutant cell lines, including melanoma cells, melanoma cells with acquired trametinib resistance, lung cancer and neuroblastoma cells. We show that both of the main downstream cascades of NRAS can be blocked by this combination: metformin indirectly inhibits the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and trametinib directly impedes the MAPK pathway. This dual therapy synergistically reduced cell viability in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. We conclude that metformin and trametinib combinations are effective in preclinical models and may be a possible option for treatment of NRAS mutant cancers. PMID:25504439

  16. Resorbing bone stimulates tumor cell growth. A role for the host microenvironment in bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Manishen, W J; Sivananthan, K; Orr, F W

    1986-04-01

    Demineralized extracts of bone matrix and conditioned media from cultured fetal rat calvaria have been reported to contain growth stimulatory activity for bone cells. To investigate the potential role of these local bone growth factors in the development of bone metastases, we chose the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma, a rat mammary tumor which causes osteolytic bone metastases and hypercalcemia. 45Ca-labeled, 19-day fetal Sprague-Dawley rat calvaria were cultured for 96 hours in BGJb medium. Walker cells from ascites tumors or cultures were grown in unconditioned media or in conditioned media harvested from the bone cultures, in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. Media were changed every 2 days, cells were counted daily for 5 days, and 3H-thymidine uptake into acid insoluble residues was measured. The growth of tumor cells was 5-6-fold greater in conditioned media than in unconditioned media and the effect was dose dependent. Cells cultured in conditioned media demonstrated a approximately 3-fold enhancement of 3H-thymidine incorporation. Generation of growth stimulatory activity correlated with the extent of bone resorption, measured by release of 45Ca from the fetal parietal bones (r = 0.85; P less than 0.001). Conditioned media from bones cultured with 10(-7) M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contained greater amounts of growth stimulatory activity than untreated conditioned media, but PGE2 itself did not stimulate tumor cell growth. Addition of 3.5 mM PO4 to bone cultures blocked bone resorption and the generation of growth factors. Growth stimulatory activity was stable to heat (56 C for 30 minutes) and trypsin digestion, with an apparent molecular weight of less than 17,000 daltons by high-performance liquid chromatography. Conditioned medium also stimulated the growth of 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells, MB-MDA-231 human breast carcinoma cells, TE-85 osteosarcoma cells, a murine fibrosarcoma and rat embryonic fibroblasts, with the most potent effects noted for

  17. Immunoglobulin Fc-fused, neuropilin-1-specific peptide shows efficient tumor tissue penetration and inhibits tumor growth via anti-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Jin; Bae, Jeomil; Shin, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Se Hun; Jeong, Moonkyoung; Han, Yunho; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-10-28

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor, involved in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis, is targeted by peptides that bind to its VEGF-binding site. However, these peptides also cross-react with the structurally related receptor, NRP2. Here, we describe an immunoglobulin Fc-fused peptide, Fc-TPP11, which specifically binds to the VEGF-binding site of NRP1 with approximately 2nM affinity, but negligibly to that of NRP2. Fc-TPP11 triggered NRP1-dependent signaling, enhanced vascular permeability via vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin downregulation, and increased paracellular permeability via E-cadherin downregulation in tumor tissues. Fc-TPP11 also significantly enhanced the tumor penetration of co-injected anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, leading to the improved in vivo anti-tumor efficacy. Fc-TPP11 was easily adapted to the full-length anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (mAb) cetuximab (Erbitux), cetuximab-TPP11, exhibiting more than 2-fold improved tumor penetration than the parent cetuximab. Fc-TPP11 exhibited a similar whole-body half-life to that of intact Fc in tumor bearing mice. In addition to the tumor-penetrating activity, Fc-TPP11 suppressed VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by blocking VEGF binding to NRP1, thereby inhibiting tumor growth without promoting metastasis in the mouse model. Our results show that NRP1-specific, high-affinity binding of Fc-TPP11, is useful to validate NRP1 signaling, independent of NRP2. Thus, Fc-TPP11 can be used as a tumor penetration-promoting agent with anti-angiogenic activity or directly adapted to mAb-TPP11 format for more potent anti-cancer antibody therapy. PMID:26260451

  18. Blocking c-Met-mediated PARP1 phosphorylation enhances anti-tumor effects of PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Wei, Yongkun; Hsu, Jennifer L.; Wang, Hung-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Chi; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Leonard, Paul G.; Lee, Gilbert R.; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Nakai, Katsuya; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Chen, Chun-Te; Sun, Ye; Wu, Yun; Chang, Wei-Chao; Huang, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chien-Liang; Chang, Yuan-Ching; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Park, Morag; Jones, Philip; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have emerged as promising therapeutics for many diseases, including cancer, in clinical trials1. One PARP inhibitor, olaparib (Lynparza™, AstraZeneca), was recently approved by the FDA to treat ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations. BRCA1 and BRCA2 play essential roles in repairing DNA double strand breaks, and a deficiency of BRCA proteins sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibition2,3. Here we show that receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met associates with and phosphorylates PARP1 at Tyr907. Phosphorylation of PARP1 Tyr907 increases PARP1 enzymatic activity and reduces binding to a PARP inhibitor, thereby rendering cancer cells resistant to PARP inhibition. Combining c-Met and PARP1 inhibitors synergized to suppress growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and xenograft tumor models. Similar synergistic effects were observed in a lung cancer xenograft tumor model. These results suggest that PARP1 pTyr907 abundance may predict tumor resistance to PARP inhibitors, and that treatment with a combination of c-Met and PARP inhibitors may benefit patients bearing tumors with high c-Met expression who do not respond to PARP inhibition alone. PMID:26779812

  19. Blocking c-Met-mediated PARP1 phosphorylation enhances anti-tumor effects of PARP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Wei, Yongkun; Hsu, Jennifer L; Wang, Hung-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Chi; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Leonard, Paul G; Lee, Gilbert R; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Nakai, Katsuya; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Chen, Chun-Te; Sun, Ye; Wu, Yun; Chang, Wei-Chao; Huang, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chien-Liang; Chang, Yuan-Ching; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Park, Morag; Jones, Philip; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-02-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have emerged as promising therapeutics for many diseases, including cancer, in clinical trials. One PARP inhibitor, olaparib (Lynparza, AstraZeneca), was recently approved by the FDA to treat ovarian cancer with mutations in BRCA genes. BRCA1 and BRCA2 have essential roles in repairing DNA double-strand breaks, and a deficiency of BRCA proteins sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibition. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met associates with and phosphorylates PARP1 at Tyr907 (PARP1 pTyr907 or pY907). PARP1 pY907 increases PARP1 enzymatic activity and reduces binding to a PARP inhibitor, thereby rendering cancer cells resistant to PARP inhibition. The combination of c-Met and PARP1 inhibitors synergized to suppress the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and xenograft tumor models, and we observed similar synergistic effects in a lung cancer xenograft tumor model. These results suggest that the abundance of PARP1 pY907 may predict tumor resistance to PARP inhibitors, and that treatment with a combination of c-Met and PARP inhibitors may benefit patients whose tumors show high c-Met expression and who do not respond to PARP inhibition alone. PMID:26779812

  20. Macroautophagy is dispensable for growth of KRAS mutant tumors and chloroquine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Eng, Christina H; Wang, Zuncai; Tkach, Diane; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Ugwonali, Savuth; Liu, Shanming; Fitzgerald, Stephanie L; George, Elizabeth; Frias, Elizabeth; Cochran, Nadire; De Jesus, Rowena; McAllister, Gregory; Hoffman, Gregory R; Bray, Kevin; Lemon, LuAnna; Lucas, Judy; Fantin, Valeria R; Abraham, Robert T; Murphy, Leon O; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a key stress-response pathway that can suppress or promote tumorigenesis depending on the cellular context. Notably, Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS)-driven tumors have been reported to rely on macroautophagy for growth and survival, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach of using autophagy inhibitors based on genetic stratification. In this study, we evaluated whether KRAS mutation status can predict the efficacy to macroautophagy inhibition. By profiling 47 cell lines with pharmacological and genetic loss-of-function tools, we were unable to confirm that KRAS-driven tumor lines require macroautophagy for growth. Deletion of autophagy-related 7 (ATG7) by genome editing completely blocked macroautophagy in several tumor lines with oncogenic mutations in KRAS but did not inhibit cell proliferation in vitro or tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, ATG7 knockout did not sensitize cells to irradiation or to several anticancer agents tested. Interestingly, ATG7-deficient and -proficient cells were equally sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of chloroquine, a lysosomotropic agent often used as a pharmacological tool to evaluate the response to macroautophagy inhibition. Moreover, both cell types manifested synergistic growth inhibition when treated with chloroquine plus the tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib or sunitinib, suggesting that the antiproliferative effects of chloroquine are independent of its suppressive actions on autophagy. PMID:26677873

  1. Macroautophagy is dispensable for growth of KRAS mutant tumors and chloroquine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Christina H.; Wang, Zuncai; Tkach, Diane; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Ugwonali, Savuth; Liu, Shanming; Fitzgerald, Stephanie L.; George, Elizabeth; Frias, Elizabeth; Cochran, Nadire; De Jesus, Rowena; McAllister, Gregory; Hoffman, Gregory R.; Bray, Kevin; Lemon, LuAnna; Lucas, Judy; Fantin, Valeria R.; Abraham, Robert T.; Murphy, Leon O.; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a key stress-response pathway that can suppress or promote tumorigenesis depending on the cellular context. Notably, Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS)-driven tumors have been reported to rely on macroautophagy for growth and survival, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach of using autophagy inhibitors based on genetic stratification. In this study, we evaluated whether KRAS mutation status can predict the efficacy to macroautophagy inhibition. By profiling 47 cell lines with pharmacological and genetic loss-of-function tools, we were unable to confirm that KRAS-driven tumor lines require macroautophagy for growth. Deletion of autophagy-related 7 (ATG7) by genome editing completely blocked macroautophagy in several tumor lines with oncogenic mutations in KRAS but did not inhibit cell proliferation in vitro or tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, ATG7 knockout did not sensitize cells to irradiation or to several anticancer agents tested. Interestingly, ATG7-deficient and -proficient cells were equally sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of chloroquine, a lysosomotropic agent often used as a pharmacological tool to evaluate the response to macroautophagy inhibition. Moreover, both cell types manifested synergistic growth inhibition when treated with chloroquine plus the tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib or sunitinib, suggesting that the antiproliferative effects of chloroquine are independent of its suppressive actions on autophagy. PMID:26677873

  2. The role of mechanical forces in tumor growth and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Martin, John D.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2014-01-01

    Tumors generate physical forces during growth and progression. These physical forces are able to compress blood and lymphatic vessels, reducing perfusion rates and creating hypoxia. When exerted directly on cancer cells, they can increase their invasive and metastatic potential. Tumor vessels - while nourishing the tumor - are usually leaky and tortuous, which further decreases perfusion. Hypo-perfusion and hypoxia contribute to immune-evasion, promote malignant progression and metastasis, and reduce the efficacy of a number of therapies, including radiation. In parallel, vessel leakiness together with vessel compression cause a uniformly elevated interstitial fluid pressure that hinders delivery of blood-borne therapeutic agents, lowering the efficacy of chemo- and nano-therapies. In addition, shear stresses exerted by flowing blood and interstitial fluid modulate the behavior of cancer and a variety of host cells. Taming these physical forces can improve therapeutic outcomes in many cancers. PMID:25014786

  3. Liver-Tumor Hybrid Organoids for Modeling Tumor Growth and Drug Response In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Aleksander; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Rodman, Christopher; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay

    2015-01-01

    Current in vitro models for tumor growth and metastasis are poor facsimiles of in vivo cancer physiology and thus, are not optimal for anti-cancer drug development. Three dimensional (3D) tissue organoid systems, which utilize human cells in a tailored microenvironment, have the potential to recapitulate in vivo conditions and address the drawbacks of current tissue culture dish 2D models. In this study, we created liver-based cell organoids in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor. The organoids were further inoculated with colon carcinoma cells in order to create liver-tumor organoids for in vitro modeling of liver metastasis. Immunofluorescent staining revealed notable phenotypic differences between tumor cells in 2D and inside the organoids. In 2D they displayed an epithelial phenotype, and only after transition to the organoids did the cells present with a mesenchymal phenotype. The cell surface marker expression results suggested that WNT pathway might be involved in the phenotypic changes observed between cells in 2D and organoid conditions, and may lead to changes in cell proliferation. Manipulating the WNT pathway with an agonist and antagonist showed significant changes in sensitivity to the anti-proliferative drug 5-fluoruracil. Collectively, the results show the potential of in vitro 3D liver-tumor organoids to serve as a model for metastasis growth and for testing the response of tumor cells to current and newly discovered drugs. PMID:25777294

  4. Dietary selenium supplementation modifies breast tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Prabhu, K Sandeep; Das, Arunangshu; Mastro, Andrea M

    2013-11-01

    The survival rate for breast cancer drops dramatically once the disease progresses to the metastatic stage. Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient credited with having high anticancer and chemopreventive properties. In our study, we investigated if dietary Se supplementation modified breast cancer development in vivo. Three diets supplemented with sodium selenite, methylseleninic acid (MSA) or selenomethionine (SeMet), as well as a Se-deficient and a Se-adequate diet were fed to mice before mammary gland inoculation of 4T1.2 cells. The primary tumor growth, the numbers of cancer cells present in lungs, hearts, livers, kidneys and femurs and several proinflammatory cytokines were measured. We found that inorganic selenite supplementation provided only short-term delay of tumor growth, whereas the two organic SeMet and MSA supplements provided more potent growth inhibition. These diets also affected cancer metastasis differently. Mice fed selenite developed the most extensive metastasis and had an increased incidence of kidney and bone metastasis. On the other hand, mice fed the SeMet diet showed the least amount of cancer growth at metastatic sites. The MSA diet also provided some protection against breast cancer metastasis although the effects were less significant than those of SeMet. The cytokine profiles indicated that serum levels of interlukin-2, interleukin-6, interferon γ and vascular endothelial growth factor were elevated in SeMet-supplemented mice. There was no significant difference in tumor growth and the patterns of metastasis between the Se-deficient and Se-adequate groups. Our data suggest that organic Se supplementation may reduce/delay breast cancer metastasis, while selenite may exacerbate it. PMID:23613334

  5. [Inhibitory effect of tumor growth by methionine-enkephalin].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, G; Quirico-Santos, T

    1992-03-01

    Methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk) is an endogenous opioid pentapeptide derived from the prohormone proenkephalin A, present in neuroendocrine and hematopoietic cells. Enkephalins are known to play an important role on the processes of induction, activation and control of immunomodulatory events. Met-Enk has been considered a potent antitumoral agent. The present study shows that Met-Enk exerts an inhibitory effect on the growth of a macrophage derived fibrous histiocytoma (MC-II) inoculated intradermally into BALB/cJ mice. Such effect was mainly influenced by the protocol, route of administration and concentration of Met-Enk used for treatment. Neither higher doses of Met-Enk injected intracerebrally or subcutaneously, nor the use of various protocols of treatment, did modify the process of tumorigenesis. In contrast, low dose (0.25 mg/kg) of Met-Enk injected intracerebrally together with tumor inoculation, significantly reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival rate. PMID:1339154

  6. Tumor growth and its effect on Magnetic Resonance Imaging signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, Homero; Colon, Jorge; Ramos, Elio; Zypman, Fredy

    2000-03-01

    The goal of this project is twofold. On one hand, we have developed computer code based on simple probabilistic rules to model the growth (or shrinking) of cancerigenous tissue. We assume that initially there exists a differentiated cell, which has a time- dependent probability of reproducing. If it did reproduce, then we assume that it has a finite probability of dying before reproducing again. This simple model falls into the Eden-type kind, and presents appropriate bulk growth characteristics, as it follows Gompert observational law. We propose new methods of geometrical characterization of the tumor. Besides its total mass, we also consider higher multipolar order of mass distribution and surface fractal dimension. In addition, we study how the geometrical properties of the tumor affect the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) signal. To this end, we consider a human brain in the presence of radiofrequency fields. We calculate the MRI image of this object. Then, we introduce a tumor in the white-gray matter region and reobtain the MRI image. We associate the signal changes with the geometrical properties of the tumor.

  7. The role of the microenvironment in tumor growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yangjin; Stolarska, Magdalena A.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computational analysis are essential for understanding the dynamics of the complex gene networks that control normal development and homeostasis, and can help to understand how circumvention of that control leads to abnormal outcomes such as cancer. Our objectives here are to discuss the different mechanisms by which the local biochemical and mechanical microenvironment, which is comprised of various signaling molecules, cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM), affects the progression of potentially-cancerous cells, and to present new results on two aspects of these effects. We first deal with the major processes involved in the progression from a normal cell to a cancerous cell at a level accessible to a general scientific readership, and we then outline a number of mathematical and computational issues that arise in cancer modeling. In Section 2 we present results from a model that deals with the effects of the mechanical properties of the environment on tumor growth, and in Section 3 we report results from a model of the signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment (TME), and how their interactions affect the development of breast cancer. The results emphasize anew the complexities of the interactions within the TME and their effect on tumor growth, and show that tumor progression is not solely determined by the presence of a clone of mutated immortal cells, but rather that it can be ‘community-controlled’. It Takes a Village – Hilary Clinton PMID:21736894

  8. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  9. Energy balance modulates colon tumor growth: Interactive roles of insulin and estrogen.

    PubMed

    Rondini, Elizabeth A; Harvey, Alison E; Steibel, Juan P; Hursting, Stephen D; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2011-05-01

    Obesity increases colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and progression. However, the impact of obesity on CRC in women is dependent on ovarian hormone status. The purpose of this study was to determine the interactive roles of obesity and ovarian hormones on serum markers of inflammation, cell signaling, and transplanted colon tumor growth. Female C57BL/6 mice (6 wk) were either ovariectomized (OVX) or ovaries left intact (nonovariectomized, NOVX) and randomized to receive a (1) control, (2) 30% calorie-restricted (CR), or (3) diet-induced obese (DIO) diet regimen for 20 wk to induce differing levels of adiposity. Serum was collected and inflammatory and metabolic markers were measured using an antibody array (62 proteins) and ELISAs. Mice were subcutaneously injected with syngeneic MC38 colon cancer cells after 20 wk and sacrificed 4 wk later. CR mice had the smallest tumors irrespective of hormone status, whereas the largest tumors were observed in DIO-OVX mice. Glucose tolerance was impaired in OVX mice, being most severe in the DIO-OVX group. Cytokine arrays suggested that in CR animals, inhibition of tumor growth paralleled insulin sensitivity and associated changes in leptin, adiponectin, and IGF-BPs. Conversely, in DIO-OVX animals, tumor growth was associated with insulin and leptin resistance as well as higher levels of pro-inflammatory proteins. In vitro, leptin and adiponectin had no effect, whereas insulin induced MC38 cell proliferation and MAPK activation. Co-treatment with estrogen blocked the stimulatory effects of insulin. Thus, our in vitro and in vivo data indicate female reproductive hormones have a modulating effect on obesity-induced insulin resistance and inflammation, which may directly or indirectly influence CRC progression. PMID:21480390

  10. Recombinant TIMP-1-GPI inhibits growth of fibrosarcoma and enhances tumor sensitivity to doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Bao, Q; Niess, H; Djafarzadeh, R; Zhao, Y; Schwarz, B; Angele, M K; Jauch, K-W; Nelson, P J; Bruns, C J

    2014-09-01

    Fibrosarcomas show a high incidence of recurrence and general resistance to apoptosis. Limiting tumor regrowth and increasing their sensitivity to chemotherapy and apoptosis represent key issues in developing more effective treatments of these tumors. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) broadly blocks matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and can moderate tumor growth and metastasis. We previously described generation of a recombinant fusion protein linking TIMP-1 to glycosylphophatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (TIMP-1-GPI) that efficiently directs the inhibitor to cell surfaces. In the present report, we examined the effect of TIMP-1-GPI treatment on fibrosarcoma biology. Exogenously applied TIMP-1-GPI efficiently incorporated into surface membranes of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. It inhibited their proliferation, migration, suppressed cancer cell clone formation, and enhanced apoptosis. Doxorubicin, the standard chemotherapeutic drug for fibrosarcoma, was tested alone or in combination with TIMP-1-GPI. In parallel, the influence of treatment on HT1080 side population cells (exhibiting tumor stem cell-like characteristics) was investigated using Hoechst 33342 staining. The sequential combination of TIMP-1-GPI and doxorubicin showed more than additive effects on apoptosis, while TIMP-1-GPI treatment alone effectively decreased "stem-cell like" side population cells of HT1080. TIMP-1-GPI treatment was validated using HT1080 fibrosarcoma murine xenografts. Growing tumors treated with repeated local injections of TIMP-1-GPI showed dramatically inhibited fibrosarcoma growth and reduced angiogenesis. Intraoperative peritumoral application of GPI-anchored TIMP-1 as an adjuvant to surgery may help maintain tumor control by targeting microscopic residual fibrosarcoma cells and increasing their sensitivity to chemotherapy. PMID:23934106

  11. A novel tankyrase small-molecule inhibitor suppresses APC mutation-driven colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ted; Chan, Emily; Callow, Marinella; Waaler, Jo; Boggs, Jason; Blake, Robert A; Magnuson, Steven; Sambrone, Amy; Schutten, Melissa; Firestein, Ron; Machon, Ondrej; Korinek, Vladimir; Choo, Edna; Diaz, Dolores; Merchant, Mark; Polakis, Paul; Holsworth, Daniel D; Krauss, Stefan; Costa, Mike

    2013-05-15

    Most colorectal cancers (CRC) are initiated by mutations of APC, leading to increased β-catenin-mediated signaling. However, continued requirement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling for tumor progression in the context of acquired KRAS and other mutations is less well-established. To attenuate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in tumors, we have developed potent and specific small-molecule tankyrase inhibitors, G007-LK and G244-LM, that reduce Wnt/β-catenin signaling by preventing poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent AXIN degradation, thereby promoting β-catenin destabilization. We show that novel tankyrase inhibitors completely block ligand-driven Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cell culture and display approximately 50% inhibition of APC mutation-driven signaling in most CRC cell lines. It was previously unknown whether the level of AXIN protein stabilization by tankyrase inhibition is sufficient to impact tumor growth in the absence of normal APC activity. Compound G007-LK displays favorable pharmacokinetic properties and inhibits in vivo tumor growth in a subset of APC-mutant CRC xenograft models. In the xenograft model most sensitive to tankyrase inhibitor, COLO-320DM, G007-LK inhibits cell-cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and induces differentiation, suggesting that β-catenin-dependent maintenance of an undifferentiated state may be blocked by tankyrase inhibition. The full potential of the antitumor activity of G007-LK may be limited by intestinal toxicity associated with inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell proliferation in intestinal crypts. These results establish proof-of-concept antitumor efficacy for tankyrase inhibitors in APC-mutant CRC models and uncover potential diagnostic and safety concerns to be overcome as tankyrase inhibitors are advanced into the clinic. PMID:23539443

  12. Blocking SDF-1α/CXCR4 downregulates PDGF-B and inhibits bone marrow-derived pericyte differentiation and tumor vascular expansion in Ewing tumors.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Randala; Zhou, Zhichao; Kleinerman, Eugenie S

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow cells (BMC) are critical to the expansion of the tumor vessel network that supports Ewing sarcoma growth. BMCs migrate to the tumor and differentiate into endothelial cells and pericytes. We recently demonstrated that stromal-derived growth factor 1α (SDF-1α) regulates platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) and that this pathway plays a critical role in bone marrow-derived pericyte differentiation in vitro. We investigated the role of SDF-1α/PDGF-B in the tumor microenvironment in vivo in promoting bone marrow-derived pericyte differentiation in Ewing tumors. The CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 was used to disrupt the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis in vivo in two xenograft Ewing tumor models. BMCs from GFP(+) transgenic mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated nude mice to track BMC migration to the tumor site. Following BMC engraftment, tumor-bearing mice received daily subcutaneous injections of either PBS or AMD 3100 for 3 weeks. Tumors were resected and tumor sections were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. AMD 3100 inhibited BMC differentiation into desmin(+) and NG2(+) pericytes, affected the morphology of the tumor vasculature, decreased perfusion, and increased tumor cell apoptosis. We observed smaller vessels with tiny lumens and a decrease in the microvessel density. AMD 3100 also inhibited PDGF-B protein expression in vitro and in vivo. SDF-1α in the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in promoting pericyte formation and Ewing sarcoma tumor neovascularization by regulating PDGF-B expression. Interfering with this pathway affects tumor vascular morphology and expansion. PMID:24282276

  13. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Sano, Michael B; Arena, Christopher B; Bittleman, Katelyn R; DeWitt, Matthew R; Cho, Hyung J; Szot, Christopher S; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W; Davalos, Rafael V

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  14. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  15. Cyclooxygenase-Dependent Tumor Growth through Evasion of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zelenay, Santiago; van der Veen, Annemarthe G.; Böttcher, Jan P.; Snelgrove, Kathryn J.; Rogers, Neil; Acton, Sophie E.; Chakravarty, Probir; Girotti, Maria Romina; Marais, Richard; Quezada, Sergio A.; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which melanoma and other cancer cells evade anti-tumor immunity remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the growth of tumors formed by mutant BrafV600E mouse melanoma cells in an immunocompetent host requires their production of prostaglandin E2, which suppresses immunity and fuels tumor-promoting inflammation. Genetic ablation of cyclooxygenases (COX) or prostaglandin E synthases in BrafV600E mouse melanoma cells, as well as in NrasG12D melanoma or in breast or colorectal cancer cells, renders them susceptible to immune control and provokes a shift in the tumor inflammatory profile toward classic anti-cancer immune pathways. This mouse COX-dependent inflammatory signature is remarkably conserved in human cutaneous melanoma biopsies, arguing for COX activity as a driver of immune suppression across species. Pre-clinical data demonstrate that inhibition of COX synergizes with anti-PD-1 blockade in inducing eradication of tumors, implying that COX inhibitors could be useful adjuvants for immune-based therapies in cancer patients. PMID:26343581

  16. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; DeWitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  17. Cyclooxygenase-Dependent Tumor Growth through Evasion of Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zelenay, Santiago; van der Veen, Annemarthe G; Böttcher, Jan P; Snelgrove, Kathryn J; Rogers, Neil; Acton, Sophie E; Chakravarty, Probir; Girotti, Maria Romina; Marais, Richard; Quezada, Sergio A; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-09-10

    The mechanisms by which melanoma and other cancer cells evade anti-tumor immunity remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the growth of tumors formed by mutant Braf(V600E) mouse melanoma cells in an immunocompetent host requires their production of prostaglandin E2, which suppresses immunity and fuels tumor-promoting inflammation. Genetic ablation of cyclooxygenases (COX) or prostaglandin E synthases in Braf(V600E) mouse melanoma cells, as well as in Nras(G12D) melanoma or in breast or colorectal cancer cells, renders them susceptible to immune control and provokes a shift in the tumor inflammatory profile toward classic anti-cancer immune pathways. This mouse COX-dependent inflammatory signature is remarkably conserved in human cutaneous melanoma biopsies, arguing for COX activity as a driver of immune suppression across species. Pre-clinical data demonstrate that inhibition of COX synergizes with anti-PD-1 blockade in inducing eradication of tumors, implying that COX inhibitors could be useful adjuvants for immune-based therapies in cancer patients. PMID:26343581

  18. Dll4 Inhibition plus Aflibercept Markedly Reduces Ovarian Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Hu, Wei; Hu, Limin; Previs, Rebecca A; Dalton, Heather J; Yang, Xiao-Yun; Sun, Yunjie; McGuire, Michael; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Nagaraja, Archana S; Kang, Yu; Liu, Tao; Nick, Alpa M; Jennings, Nicholas B; Coleman, Robert L; Jaffe, Robert B; Sood, Anil K

    2016-06-01

    Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4), one of the Notch ligands, is overexpressed in ovarian cancer, especially in tumors resistant to anti-VEGF therapy. Here, we examined the biologic effects of dual anti-Dll4 and anti-VEGF therapy in ovarian cancer models. Using Dll4-Fc blockade and anti-Dll4 antibodies (murine REGN1035 and human REGN421), we evaluated the biologic effects of Dll4 inhibition combined with aflibercept or chemotherapy in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian cancer. We also examined potential mechanisms by which dual Dll4 and VEGF targeting inhibit tumor growth using immunohistochemical staining for apoptosis and proliferation markers. Reverse-phase protein arrays were used to identify potential downstream targets of Dll4 blockade. Dual targeting of VEGF and Dll4 with murine REGN1035 showed superior antitumor effects in ovarian cancer models compared with either monotherapy. In the A2780 model, REGN1035 (targets murine Dll4) or REGN421 (targets human Dll4) reduced tumor weights by 62% and 82%, respectively; aflibercept alone reduced tumor weights by 90%. Greater therapeutic effects were observed for Dll4 blockade (REGN1035) combined with either aflibercept or docetaxel (P < 0.05 for the combination vs. aflibercept). The superior antitumor effects of REGN1035 and aflibercept were related to increased apoptosis in tumor cells compared with the monotherapy. We also found that GATA3 expression was significantly increased in tumor stroma from the mice treated with REGN1035 combined with docetaxel or aflibercept, suggesting an indirect effect of these combination treatments on the tumor stroma. These findings identify that dual targeting of Dll4 and VEGF is an attractive therapeutic approach. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1344-52. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27009216

  19. Crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 Promotes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cell Growth and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Traer, Elie; Martinez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Anu; Taguchi, Takehiro; Dunlap, Jennifer; Heinrich, Michael C; Corless, Christopher L; Rubin, Brian P; Druker, Brian J; Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-01

    Kinase inhibitors such as imatinib have dramatically improved outcomes for patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), but many patients develop resistance to these treatments. Although in some patients this event corresponds with mutations in the GIST driver oncogenic kinase KIT, other patients develop resistance without KIT mutations. In this study, we address this patient subset in reporting a functional dependence of GIST on the FGF receptor FGFR3 and its crosstalk with KIT in GIST cells. Addition of the FGFR3 ligand FGF2 to GIST cells restored KIT phosphorylation during imatinib treatment, allowing sensitive cells to proliferate in the presence of the drug. FGF2 expression was increased in imatinib-resistant GIST cells, the growth of which was blocked by RNAi-mediated silencing of FGFR3. Moreover, combining KIT and FGFR3 inhibitors synergized to block the growth of imatinib-resistant cells. Signaling crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 activated the MAPK pathway to promote resistance to imatinib. Clinically, an IHC analysis of tumor specimens from imatinib-resistant GIST patients revealed a relative increase in FGF2 levels, with a trend toward increased expression in imatinib-naïve samples consistent with possible involvement in drug resistance. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate existing FGFR inhibitors and multikinase inhibitors that target FGFR3 as promising strategies to improve treatment of patients with GIST with de novo or acquired resistance to imatinib. PMID:25432174

  20. Interfacial properties in a discrete model for tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and study, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations, a minimal discrete model for avascular tumor growth, which can also be applied for the description of cell cultures in vitro. The interface of the tumor is self-affine and its width can be characterized by the following exponents: (i) the growth exponent β=0.32(2) that governs the early time regime, (ii) the roughness exponent α=0.49(2) related to the fluctuations in the stationary regime, and (iii) the dynamic exponent z=α/β≃1.49(2), which measures the propagation of correlations in the direction parallel to the interface, e.g., ξ∝t1/z, where ξ is the parallel correlation length. Therefore, the interface belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, in agreement with recent experiments of cell cultures in vitro. Furthermore, density profiles of the growing cells are rationalized in terms of traveling waves that are solutions of the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. In this way, we achieved excellent agreement between the simulation results of the discrete model and the continuous description of the growth front of the culture or tumor.

  1. Biodegradable polymeric micelles encapsulated JK184 suppress tumor growth through inhibiting Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Ning; Deng, Senyi; Song, Linjiang; Wu, Qinjie; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Xie, Yongmei; Gong, Changyang

    2015-01-01

    JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in vitro release behavior and had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of HUVECs than free JK184. Furthermore, JK184 micelles had stronger tumor growth inhibiting effects in subcutaneous Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor models. Histological analysis showed that JK184 micelles improved anti-tumor activity by inducing more apoptosis, decreasing microvessel density and reducing expression of CD31, Ki67, and VEGF in tumor tissues. JK184 micelles showed a stronger inhibition of Gli expression in Hh signaling, which played an important role in pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore, circulation time of JK184 in blood was prolonged after entrapment in polymeric micelles. Our results suggested that JK184 micelles are a promising drug candidate for treating pancreatic tumors with a highly inhibitory effect on Hh activity.JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in

  2. Over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor-D promotes tumor growth and invasion in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Qiu, Haifeng; Hu, Weixu; Li, Shaoru; Yu, Jinjin

    2014-01-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D) was demonstrated to be able to promote tumor growth and invasion in human malignancies. However, little is known about its roles in endometrial cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression and functions of PDGF-D in human endometrial cancer. Alterations of PDGF-D mRNA and protein were determined by real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical staining. Up-regulation of PDGF-D was achieved by stably transfecting the pcDNA3-PDGF-D plasmids into ECC-1 cells; and knockdown of PDGF-D was achieved by transient transfection with siRNA-PDGF-D into Ishikawa cells. The MTT assay, colony formation assay and Transwell assay were used to detect the effects of PDGF-D on cellular proliferation and invasion. The xenograft assay was used to investigate the functions of PDGF-D in vivo. Compared to normal endometrium, more than 50% cancer samples showed over-expression of PDGF-D (p < 0.001), and high level of PDGF-D was correlated with late stage (p = 0.003), deep myometrium invasion (p < 0.001) and lympha vascular space invasion (p = 0.006). In vitro, over-expressing PDGF-D in ECC-1 cells significantly accelerated tumor growth and promoted cellular invasion by increasing the level of MMP2 and MMP9; while silencing PDGF-D in Ishikawa cells impaired cell proliferation and inhibited the invasion, through suppressing the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-expressed PDGF-D could induce EMT and knockdown of PDGF-D blocked the EMT transition. Consistently, in xenografts assay, PDGF-D over-expression significantly promoted tumor growth and tumor weights. We demonstrated that PDGF-D was commonly over-expressed in endometrial cancer, which was associated with late stage deep myometrium invasion and lympha vascular space invasion. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed PDGF-D could promote tumor growth and invasion through up-regulating MMP2/9 and inducing EMT. Thus, we propose

  3. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The cultivated T24 cells were coated by the protein antibody and human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma T24 tumor-bearing mice model was established. The tumor cell survival and growth were observed in the antibody coating group and non-coating group. The tumor body size was measured. The immunohistochemical detection showed that Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo 4 were expressed in T24 cells of cancer tissues, paracarcinoma tissues and cultured human uroepithelium carcinoma. The expression of Robo1 was significantly higher than that of Robo4 (P<0.05). The cancer cells could be detected in nodular tumor of mice in each group. The volume of the tumor-bearing mice in the nodular tumor of the non-coating group was larger than that of anti-Robol antibody coating group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in tumor volume between anti-Robo4 antibody coating group and non-coating group (P>0.05); The difference was statistically significant compared with the anti-Robo1 antibody coating group (P<0.01). In conclusion, Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo4 were expressed in human bladder cancer T24 cells. To block Robo4 signal protein had little effect on the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor and to block Robo1 signal protein would seriously affect the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor, suggesting that Robo1 might play an important role in the growth and metastasis of bladder cancer, and might become a

  4. Synergistic inhibition of lung cancer cell invasion, tumor growth and angiogenesis using aptamer-siRNA chimeras.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Yun; Wang, Wei-Ya; Chang, Yi-Chung; Chang, Cheng-Ju; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Peck, Konan

    2014-03-01

    Early metastasis is one of the major causes of mortality among patient with lung cancer. The process of tumor metastasis involves a cascade of events, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor cell migration and invasion, and angiogenesis. To specifically suppress tumor invasion and angiogenesis, two nucleolin aptamer-siRNA chimeras (aptNCL-SLUGsiR and aptNCL-NRP1siR) were used to block key signaling pathways involved in lung cancer metastasis that are pivotal to metastatic tumor cells but not to normal cells under ordinary physiologic conditions. Through nucleolin-mediated endocytosis, the aptNCL-siRNA chimeras specifically and significantly knocked down the expressions of SLUG and NRP1 in nucleolin-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, simultaneous suppression of SLUG and NRP1 expressions by the chimeras synergistically retarded cancer cell motility and invasive ability. The synergistic effect was also observed in a xenograft mouse model, wherein the combined treatment using two chimeras suppressed tumor growth, the invasiveness, circulating tumor cell amount, and angiogenesis in tumor tissue without affecting liver and kidney functions. This study demonstrates that combined treatment of aptNCL-SLUGsiR and aptNCL-NRP1siR can synergistically suppress lung cancer cell invasion, tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer-specific targeting combined with gene-specific silencing. PMID:24397988

  5. Cabozantinib inhibits prostate cancer growth and prevents tumor-induced bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinlu; Zhang, Honglai; Karatsinides, Andreas; Keller, Jill M.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Aftab, Dana T.; Schimmoller, Frauke; Keller, Evan T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cabozantinib, an orally available multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against MET and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), induces resolution of bone scan lesions in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cabozantinib elicited a direct anti-tumor effect, an indirect effect through modulating bone, or both. Experimental Design Using human prostate cancer xenograft studies in mice we determined cabozantinib's impact on tumor growth in soft tissue and bone. In vitro studies with cabozantinib were performed using (1) prostate cancer cell lines to evaluate its impact on cell growth, invasive ability and MET and (2) osteoblast cell lines to evaluate its impact on viability and differentiation and VEGFR2. Results Cabozantinib inhibited progression of multiple prostate cancer cell lines (Ace-1,C4-2B, and LuCaP 35) in bone metastatic and soft tissue murine models of prostate cancer, except for PC-3 prostate cancer cells in which it inhibited only subcutaneous growth. Cabozantinib directly inhibited prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo and inhibited cell invasion in vitro. Cabozantinib had a dose-dependent biphasic effect on osteoblast activity and inhibitory effect on osteoclast production in vitro, that was reflected in vivo. It blocked MET and VEGFR2 phosphorylation in prostate cancer cells and osteoblast-like cells, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate that cabozantinib has direct anti-tumor activity; and that its ability to modulate osteoblast activity may contribute to its anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:24097861

  6. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. Methods In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. Results ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. Conclusions The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor

  7. Proline biosynthesis augments tumor cell growth and aerobic glycolysis: involvement of pyridine nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Hancock, Chad N.; Fischer, Joseph W.; Harman, Meredith; Phang, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of the nonessential amino acid proline contributes to tumor metabolic reprogramming. Previously we showed that MYC increases proline biosynthesis (PB) from glutamine. Here we show MYC increases the expression of the enzymes in PB at both protein and mRNA levels. Blockade of PB decreases tumor cell growth and energy production. Addition of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) or proline reverses the effects of P5C synthase knockdown but not P5C reductases knockdown. Importantly, the reversal effect of proline was blocked by concomitant proline dehydrogenase/oxidase (PRODH/POX) knockdown. These findings suggest that the important regulatory contribution of PB to tumor growth derives from metabolic cycling between proline and P5C rather than product proline or intermediate P5C. We further document the critical role of PB in maintaining pyridine nucleotide levels by connecting the proline cycle to glycolysis and to the oxidative arm of the pentose phosphate pathway. These findings establish a novel function of PB in tumorigenesis, linking the reprogramming of glucose, glutamine and pyridine nucleotides, and may provide a novel target for antitumor therapy. PMID:26598224

  8. Inhibition of BRD4 suppresses tumor growth and enhances iodine uptake in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuemei; Wu, Xinchao; Zhang, Xiao; Hua, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yajing; Maimaiti, Yusufu; Gao, Zairong; Zhang, Yongxue

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of the endocrine system. Although radioiodine (131)I treatment on differentiated thyroid cancer is widely used, many patients still fail to benefit from (131)I therapy. Therefore, exploration of novel targeted therapies to suppress tumor growth and improve radioiodine uptake remains necessary. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important member of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain family that influences transcription of downstream genes by binding to acetylated histones. In the present study, we found that BRD4 was up-regulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of BRD4 in thyroid cancer cells by JQ1 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and enhanced (131)I uptake in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, JQ1 treatment suppressed C-MYC but enhanced NIS expression. We further demonstrated that BRD4 was enriched in the promoter region of C-MYC, which could be markedly blocked by JQ1 treatment. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the aberrant expression of BRD4 in thyroid cancer is possibly involved in tumor progression, and JQ1 is potentially an effective chemotherapeutic agent against human thyroid cancer. PMID:26707881

  9. δ-Catenin Activates Rho GTPase, Promotes Lymphangiogenesis and Growth of Tumor Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, P. Charles

    2015-01-01

    δ-catenin, an adherens junctions protein, is not only involved in early development, cell-cell adhesion and cell motility in neuronal cells, but it also plays an important role in vascular endothelial cell motility and pathological angiogenesis. In this study, we report a new function of δ-catenin in lymphangiogenesis. Consistent with expression of δ-catenin in vascular endothelial cells, we detected expression of the gene in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Ectopic expression of δ-catenin in LECs increased cell motility and lymphatic vascular network formation in vitro and lymphangiogenesis in vivo in a Matrigel plug assay. Conversely, knockdown of δ-catenin in LECs impaired lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical analysis shows that δ-catenin regulates activation of Rho family small GTPases, key mediators in cell motility. δ-catenin activates Rac1 and Cdc42 but inhibits RhoA in LECs. Notably, blocking of Rac1 activation impaired δ-catenin mediated lymphangiogenesis in a Matrigel assay. Consistently, loss of δ-catenin in mice inhibited the growth of tumor metastases. Taken together, these findings identify a new function of δ-catenin in lymphangiogenesis and tumor growth/metastasis, likely through modulation of small Rho GTPase activation. Targeting δ-catenin may offer a new way to control tumor metastasis. PMID:25635825

  10. Differential growth and responsiveness to cancer therapy of tumor cells in different environments.

    PubMed

    Alsaggar, Mohammad; Yao, Qian; Cai, Houjian; Liu, Dexi

    2016-02-01

    Tumor metastasis often confers poor prognosis for cancer patients due to lack of comprehensive strategy in dealing with cells growing in different environment. Current anticancer therapies have incomplete effectiveness because they were designed assuming metastatic tumors behave similarly in different organs. We hypothesize that tumors growing in different sites are biologically heterogeneous in growth potential, as well as in tumor response to anti-cancer therapies. To test this hypothesis, we have developed a multi-organ tumor growth model using the hydrodynamic cell delivery method to establish simultaneous and quantifiable tumor growth in the liver, lungs and kidneys of mice. We demonstrated that growth rate of melanoma tumor in the liver is higher than that of the lungs and kidneys. Tumors in the lungs and kidneys grew minimally at the early stage and aggressively thereafter. Tumors in different organs were also heterogeneous in response to chemotherapy and immune gene therapy using dacarbazine and interferon beta gene, respectively. Lung tumors responded to chemotherapy better than tumors in the liver, but showed minimal response to interferon beta gene therapy, compared to tumors in the liver and kidneys. We also confirmed differential tumor growth of the metastatic colon cancer in mice. Our results point out the importance of a better understanding of the differences in tumor growing in diverse environments. The biological heterogeneity of metastatic tumors demonstrated in this study necessitates establishing new drug screening strategies that take into account the environmental difference at the sites of tumor growth. PMID:26476830

  11. Fibroblast growth factors, old kids on the new block.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Cong; Xiao, Jian; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2016-05-01

    The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of cell intrinsic regulatory peptides that control a broad spectrum of cellular activities. The family includes canonic FGFs that elicit their activities by activating the FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase and non-canonic members that elicit their activities intracellularly and via FGFR-independent mechanisms. The FGF signaling axis is highly complex due to the existence of multiple isoforms of both ligands and receptors, as well as cofactors that include the chemically heterogeneous heparan sulfate (HS) cofactors, and in the case of endocrine FGFs, the Klotho coreceptors. Resident FGF signaling controls embryonic development, maintains tissue homeostasis, promotes wound healing and tissue regeneration, and regulates functions of multiple organs. However, ectopic or aberrant FGF signaling is a culprit for various diseases, including congenital birth defects, metabolic disorder, and cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which the specificity of FGF signaling is achieved remain incompletely understood. Since its application as a druggable target has been gradually recognized by pharmaceutical companies and translational researchers, understanding the determinants of FGF signaling specificity has become even more important in order to get into the position to selectively suppress a particular pathway without affecting others to minimize side effects. PMID:26768548

  12. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  13. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  14. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  15. Imatinib and Dasatinib Inhibit Hemangiosarcoma and Implicate PDGFR-β and Src in Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Erin B; Marley, Kevin; Edris, Wade; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Schalk, Vidya; Macdonald, Valerie; Loriaux, Marc; Druker, Brian J; Helfand, Stuart C

    2013-04-01

    Hemangiosarcoma, a natural model of human angiosarcoma, is an aggressive vascular tumor diagnosed commonly in dogs. The documented expression of several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by these tumors makes them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, we possess limited knowledge of the effects of TKIs on hemangiosarcoma as well as other soft tissue sarcomas. We report here on the use of the TKIs imatinib and dasatinib in canine hemangiosarcoma and their effects on platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β) and Src inhibition. Both TKIs reduced cell viability, but dasatinib was markedly more potent in this regard, mediating cytotoxic effects orders of magnitude greater than imatinib. Dasatinib also inhibited the phosphorylation of the shared PDGFR-β target at a concentration approximately 1000 times less than that needed by imatinib and effectively blocked Src phosphorylation. Both inhibitors augmented the response to doxorubicin, suggesting that clinical responses likely will be improved using both drugs in combination; however, dasatinib was significantly (P < .05) more effective in this context. Despite the higher concentrations needed in cell-based assays, imatinib significantly inhibited tumor growth (P < .05) in a tumor xenograft model, highlighting that disruption of PDGFR-β/PDGF signaling may be important in targeting the angiogenic nature of these tumors. Treatment of a dog with spontaneously occurring hemangiosarcoma established that clinically achievable doses of dasatinib may be realized in dogs and provides a means to investigate the effect of TKIs on soft tissue sarcomas in a large animal model. PMID:23544168

  16. Arsenic trioxide inhibits tumor cell growth in malignant rhabdoid tumors in vitro and in vivo by targeting overexpressed Gli1.

    PubMed

    Kerl, Kornelius; Moreno, Natalia; Holsten, Till; Ahlfeld, Julia; Mertins, Julius; Hotfilder, Marc; Kool, Marcel; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Schleicher, Sabine; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schüller, Ulrich; Meisterernst, Michael; Frühwald, Michael C

    2014-08-15

    Rhabdoid tumors are highly aggressive tumors occurring in infants and very young children. Despite multimodal and intensive therapy prognosis remains poor. Molecular analyses have uncovered several deregulated pathways, among them the CDK4/6-Rb-, the WNT- and the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathways. The SHH pathway is activated in rhabdoid tumors by GLI1 overexpression. Here, we demonstrate that arsenic trioxide (ATO) inhibits tumor cell growth of malignant rhabdoid tumors in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model by suppressing Gli1. Our data uncover ATO as a promising therapeutic approach to improve prognosis for rhabdoid tumor patients. PMID:24420698

  17. Selective inhibition of EZH2 by ZLD1039 blocks H3K27 methylation and leads to potent anti-tumor activity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Gao, Tiantao; Wang, Ningyu; Feng, Qiang; You, Xinyu; Ye, Tinghong; Lei, Qian; Zhu, Yongxia; Xiong, Menghua; Xia, Yong; Yang, Fangfang; Shi, Yaojie; Wei, Yuquan; Zhang, Lidan; Yu, Luoting

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a candidate oncogenic driver due to its prevalent overexpression and aberrant repression of tumor suppressor genes in diverse cancers. Therefore, blocking EZH2 enzyme activity may present a valid therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers with EZH2 overexpression including breast cancers. Here, we described ZLD1039 a potent, highly selective, and orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of EZH2, which inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis. ZLD1039 considerably inhibited EZH2 methyltransferase activity with nanomolar potency, decreased global histone-3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation, and reactivated silenced tumor suppressors connected to increased survival of patients with breast cancer. Comparable to conditional silencing of EZH2, its inhibition by ZLD1039 decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis. Comparably, treatment of xenograft-bearing mice with ZLD1039 led to tumor growth regression and metastasis inhibition. These data confirmed the dependency of breast cancer progression on EZH2 activity and the usefulness of ZLD1039 as a promising treatment for breast cancer. PMID:26868841

  18. Selective inhibition of EZH2 by ZLD1039 blocks H3K27methylation and leads to potent anti-tumor activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuejiao; Gao, Tiantao; Wang, Ningyu; Feng, Qiang; You, Xinyu; Ye, Tinghong; Lei, Qian; Zhu, Yongxia; Xiong, Menghua; Xia, Yong; Yang, Fangfang; Shi, Yaojie; Wei, Yuquan; Zhang, Lidan; Yu, Luoting

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a candidate oncogenic driver due to its prevalent overexpression and aberrant repression of tumor suppressor genes in diverse cancers. Therefore, blocking EZH2 enzyme activity may present a valid therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers with EZH2 overexpression including breast cancers. Here, we described ZLD1039 a potent, highly selective, and orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of EZH2, which inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis. ZLD1039 considerably inhibited EZH2 methyltransferase activity with nanomolar potency, decreased global histone-3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation, and reactivated silenced tumor suppressors connected to increased survival of patients with breast cancer. Comparable to conditional silencing of EZH2, its inhibition by ZLD1039 decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis. Comparably, treatment of xenograft-bearing mice with ZLD1039 led to tumor growth regression and metastasis inhibition. These data confirmed the dependency of breast cancer progression on EZH2 activity and the usefulness of ZLD1039 as a promising treatment for breast cancer. PMID:26868841

  19. Inhibition of tumor growth and vasculature and fluorescence imaging using functionalized ruthenium-thiol protected selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongdong; Liu, Yanan; Yu, Qianqian; Qin, Xiuying; Yang, Licong; Zhou, Yanhui; Chen, Lanmei; Liu, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Here we reported the high tumor targeting efficacy of luminescent Ru(II)-thiols protected selenium nanoparticles (Ru-MUA@Se). We have shown that a dual-target inhibitor Ru-MUA@Se directly suppress the tumor growth but also block blood-vessel growth. We also determined that the nanoparticles entered the cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. In a xenograft HepG2 tumor model, we found that Ru-MUA@Se effectively inhibited tumor angiogenesis and suppressed tumor growth with low side effects using metronomic chemotherapy with Ru-MUA@Se. In vivo investigation of nanoparticles on nude mice bearing HepG2 cancer xenografts confirmed that Ru-MUA@Se nanoparticles possessed high tumor-targeted fluorescence imaging, exhibited enhanced antitumor efficacy and decreased systemic toxicity. Moreover, Ru-MUA@Se not only significantly induced dose-dependent disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells after 24 h treatment, but it also enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our results suggest that the potential application of these Ru-MUA@Se nanoparticles in targeting cancer imaging and chemotherapy. PMID:24268198

  20. Erythropoietin Stimulates Tumor Growth via EphB4.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Sunila; Huang, Jie; Mora, Edna M; Nick, Alpa M; Cho, Min Soon; Wu, Sherry Y; Noh, Kyunghee; Pecot, Chad V; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Stein, Martin A; Brock, Stephan; Wen, Yunfei; Xiong, Chiyi; Gharpure, Kshipra; Hansen, Jean M; Nagaraja, Archana S; Previs, Rebecca A; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo; Han, Hee Dong; Hu, Wei; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Zand, Behrouz; Stagg, Loren J; Ladbury, John E; Ozpolat, Bulent; Alpay, S Neslihan; Nishimura, Masato; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Armaiz-Peña, Guillermo N; Dalton, Heather J; Danes, Christopher; Goodman, Blake; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Kruger, Carola; Schneider, Armin; Haghpeykar, Shyon; Jaladurgam, Padmavathi; Hung, Mien-Chie; Coleman, Robert L; Liu, Jinsong; Li, Chun; Urbauer, Diana; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Jackson, David B; Sood, Anil K

    2015-11-01

    While recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo) has been widely used to treat anemia in cancer patients, concerns about its adverse effects on patient survival have emerged. A lack of correlation between expression of the canonical EpoR and rhEpo's effects on cancer cells prompted us to consider the existence of an alternative Epo receptor. Here, we identified EphB4 as an Epo receptor that triggers downstream signaling via STAT3 and promotes rhEpo-induced tumor growth and progression. In human ovarian and breast cancer samples, expression of EphB4 rather than the canonical EpoR correlated with decreased disease-specific survival in rhEpo-treated patients. These results identify EphB4 as a critical mediator of erythropoietin-induced tumor progression and further provide clinically significant dimension to the biology of erythropoietin. PMID:26481148

  1. Resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carletto, Bruna; Berton, Juliana; Ferreira, Tamara Nascimento; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2016-08-01

    In this study, resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were developed and its antitumor activity tested on a melanoma mice model. These nanocapsules were spherically-shaped and presented suitable size, negative charge and high encapsulation efficiency for their use as a modified-release system of resveratrol. Nanoencapsulation leads to the drug amorphization. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles reduced cell viability of murine melanoma cells. There was a decrease in tumor volume, an increase in the necrotic area and inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma when resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were compared to free resveratrol in treated mice. Nanoencapsulation of resveratrol also prevented metastasis and pulmonary hemorrhage. This modified-release technology containing resveratrol can be used as a feasible approach in order to inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth. PMID:27070053

  2. A Simple Way to Enhance Doxil® Therapy: Drug Release from Liposomes at the Tumor Site by Amphiphilic Block Copolymer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Alakhova, Daria Y.; Kim, Jong Oh; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    The antitumor efficacy of Doxil® is hindered by the poor release of the active drug from the liposome at the tumor sites. This study investigates a possibility to enhance drug release from the liposomes and increase therapeutic efficacy of Doxil® by administering Pluronic block copolymers once the liposomal drug accumulates in the tumor sites. In our study, the fluorescence de-quenching experiments were designed to investigate the drug release from liposome by Pluronic P85. MTT cytotoxicity assay and confocal microscopy images were carried out to determine whether Pluronic P85 could facilitate release of Dox from Doxil®. Anti-tumor growth and distribution of drug were evaluated when Pluronic P85 was injected 1 hr, 48 hrs, or 96 hrs after the Doxil® administration in A2780 human ovarian cancer xenografts. Addition of Pluronic P85 resulted in release of Dox from the liposomes accompanied with significant increases of Dox delivery and cytotoxic effect in cancer cells. The greatest anti-tumor effect of single injection of Doxil® was achieved when Pluronic P85 was administered 48 hrs after Doxil®. The Confocal tile scanning images of tumor section showed that copolymer treatment induced the release of the drug in the tumors from the vessels regions to the bulk of the tumor. No release of the drug remaining in circulation was observed. Our study has demonstrated a simple approach for localized release of Dox from liposome by Pluronic P85 at the tumor site, which was therapeutically beneficial. PMID:23474033

  3. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Zhao, Ying-Nan; Yu, Chang-Hai; Zhao, Yun-Long; Liu, Yang

    2016-07-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1 receptor) is expressed in many cancer cell types as compared to normal counterparts underscoring its potential role in tumor behavior. The aim of present study was to test the role of mGlu1 receptor in experimental non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). First, protein expression of mGlu1 receptor was higher in human NSCLC cell lines, including both adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma subtypes, when compared to normal bronchial epithelial cells. Inhibition of mGlu1 receptor by BAY36-7620 (an mGlu1 receptor-specific inhibitor) inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice with tumors of A549 or H1299. Treatment with BAY36-7620 suppressed AKT phosphorylation in A549 tumors and pre-treatment with BAY36-7620 blocked the L-quisqualate (a potent mGlu1 receptor agonist)-induced AKT phosphorylation in A549 cells. Treatment with BAY36-7620 reduced cellular proliferation of A549 cells. Treatment with BAY36-7620 enhanced cleaved PARP levels and reduced protein expression of bcl-2, HIF-1α, and VEGF. In contrast, treatment with L-quisqualate reduced cleaved PARP levels and enhanced protein expression of bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8, which was reversed by co-incubation with MK2206 (an AKT inhibitor). Pre-treatment with BAY36-7620 blocked the VEGF-induced AKT phosphorylation in HUVECs. Treatment of HUVECs with L-quisqualate resulted in enhancement of capillary tube formation, which was reversed by co-incubation with MK2206. Furthermore, mGlu1 receptor knockdown suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice with tumors of A549 or H1299. Collectively, inhibition of mGlu1 receptor suppressed tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental NSCLC. PMID:27132814

  4. Mediastinal Desmoid Tumor With Remarkably Rapid Growth: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Hyung; Jeong, Jae Seok; Kim, So Ri; Jin, Gong Yong; Chung, Myoung Ja; Kuh, Ja Hong; Lee, Yong Chul

    2015-12-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are a group of rare and benign soft tissue tumors that result from monoclonal proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Since DTs tend to infiltrate and compress adjacent structures, the location of DTs is one of the most crucial factors for determining the severity of the disease. Furthermore, DTs can further complicate the clinical course of patients when the growth is remarkably rapid, especially for DTs occurring in anatomically critical compartments, including the thoracic cavity.The authors report a case of a 71-year-old man with a known mediastinal mass incidentally detected 4 months ago, presenting dyspnea with right-sided atelectasis and massive pleural effusion. Imaging studies revealed a 16.4 × 9.4-cm fibrous mass with high glucose metabolism in the anterior mediastinum. The mass infiltrated into the chest wall and also displaced the mediastinum contralaterally. Interestingly, the tumor had an extremely rapid doubling time of 31.3 days.En bloc resection of the tumor was performed as a curative as well as a diagnostic measure. Histopathologic examination showed spindle cells with low cellularity and high collagen deposition in the stroma. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for nuclear β-catenin. Based on these pathologic findings, the mass was diagnosed as DT. After surgery, there has been no evidence of recurrence of disease in the patient.This patient presents a mediastinal DT with extremely rapid growth. Notably, the doubling time of DT in our case was the shortest among reported cases of DT. Our experience also highlights the benefits of early interventional strategy, especially for rapidly growing DTs in the thoracic cavity. PMID:26717381

  5. Estrogen receptor α inhibitor activates the unfolded protein response, blocks protein synthesis, and induces tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Andruska, Neal D; Zheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Xujuan; Mao, Chengjian; Cherian, Mathew M; Mahapatra, Lily; Helferich, William G; Shapiro, David J

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast and ovarian cancers are often therapy resistant. Using screening and functional validation, we identified BHPI, a potent noncompetitive small molecule ERα biomodulator that selectively blocks proliferation of drug-resistant ERα-positive breast and ovarian cancer cells. In a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer, BHPI induced rapid and substantial tumor regression. Whereas BHPI potently inhibits nuclear estrogen-ERα-regulated gene expression, BHPI is effective because it elicits sustained ERα-dependent activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (EnR) stress sensor, the unfolded protein response (UPR), and persistent inhibition of protein synthesis. BHPI distorts a newly described action of estrogen-ERα: mild and transient UPR activation. In contrast, BHPI elicits massive and sustained UPR activation, converting the UPR from protective to toxic. In ERα(+) cancer cells, BHPI rapidly hyperactivates plasma membrane PLCγ, generating inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), which opens EnR IP3R calcium channels, rapidly depleting EnR Ca(2+) stores. This leads to activation of all three arms of the UPR. Activation of the PERK arm stimulates phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), resulting in rapid inhibition of protein synthesis. The cell attempts to restore EnR Ca(2+) levels, but the open EnR IP3R calcium channel leads to an ATP-depleting futile cycle, resulting in activation of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase and phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). eEF2 phosphorylation inhibits protein synthesis at a second site. BHPI's novel mode of action, high potency, and effectiveness in therapy-resistant tumor cells make it an exceptional candidate for further mechanistic and therapeutic exploration. PMID:25825714

  6. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; Antonosante, Andrea; d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-12-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma. PMID:26540346

  7. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma. PMID:26540346

  8. Dysregulation of MicroRNA-34a Expression in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Promotes Tumor Growth and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bhavna; Yadav, Arti; Lang, James; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Kumar, Pawan

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in cancer development where they can act as oncogenes or as tumor-suppressors. miR-34a is a tumor-suppressor that is frequently downregulated in a number of tumor types. However, little is known about the role of miR-34a in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Results miR-34a expression in tumor samples, HNSCC cell lines and endothelial cells was examined by real time PCR. Lipofectamine-2000 was used to transfect miR-34a in HNSCC cell lines and human endothelial cells. Cell-proliferation, migration and clonogenic survival was examined by MTT, Xcelligence system, scratch assay and colony formation assay. miR-34a effect on tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis was examined by in vivo SCID mouse xenograft model. Our results demonstrate that miR-34a is significantly downregulated in HNSCC tumors and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in HNSCC cell lines significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation, colony formation and migration. miR-34a overexpression also markedly downregulated E2F3 and survivin levels. Rescue experiments using microRNA resistant E2F3 isoforms suggest that miR-34a-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation is predominantly mediated by E2F3a isoform. In addition, tumor samples from HNSCC patients showed an inverse relationship between miR-34a and survivin as well as miR-34a and E2F3 levels. Overexpression of E2F3a completely rescued survivin expression in miR-34a expressing cells, thereby suggesting that miR-34a may be regulating survivin expression via E2F3a. Ectopic expression of miR-34a also significantly inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis in a SCID mouse xenograft model. Interestingly, miR-34a inhibited tumor angiogenesis by blocking VEGF production by tumor cells as well as directly inhibiting endothelial cell functions. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggest that dysregulation of miR-34a

  9. Instantaneous Directional Growth of Block Copolymer Nanowires During Heterogeneous Radical Polymerization (HRP).

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunliang; Urban, Marek W

    2016-04-13

    Polymeric nanowires that consist of ultrahigh molecular weight block copolymers were instantaneously prepared via one-step surfactant-free heterogeneous radical polymerization (HRP). Under heterogeneous reaction and initiator-starvation conditions, the sequential copolymerization of hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers facilitates the formation of amphiphilic ultrahigh molecular weight block copolymers, which instantaneously assemble to polymeric nanowires. As polymerization progresses, initially formed nanoparticles exhibit the directional growth due to localized repulsive forces of hydrophilic blocks and confinement of the hydrophobic blocks that adopt favorable high aspect ratio nanowire morphologies. Using one-step synthetic approach that requires only four ingredients (water as a solvent, two polymerizable monomers (one hydrophilic and one hydrophobic), and water-soluble initiator), block copolymer nanowires ∼70 nm in diameter and hundreds of microns in length are instantaneously grown. For example, when 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and styrene (St) were copolymerized, high aspect ratio nanowires consist of ultrahigh (>10(6) g/mol) molecular weight pDMAEMA-b-St block copolymers and the presence of temperature responsive pDMAEMA blocks facilitates nanowire diameter changes as a function of temperature. These morphologies may serve as structural components of the higher order biological constructs at micro and larger length scales, ranging from single strand nanowires to engineered biomolecular networks capable of responding to diverse and transient environmental signals, and capable of dimensional changes triggered by external stimuli. PMID:27002238

  10. The Ape-1/Ref-1 redox antagonist E3330 inhibits the growth of tumor endothelium and endothelial progenitor cells: therapeutic implications in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Gang-Ming; Karikari, Collins; Kabe, Yasuaki; Handa, Hiroshi; Anders, Robert A; Maitra, Anirban

    2009-04-01

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ape-1/Ref-1) is a multi-functional protein, involved in DNA repair and the activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors. The Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain acts as a cytoprotective element in normal endothelial cells, mitigating the deleterious effects of apoptotic stimuli through induction of survival signals. We explored the role of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain in the maintenance of tumor-associated endothelium, and of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which contribute to tumor angiogenesis. We demonstrate that E3330, a small molecule inhibitor of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain, blocks the in vitro growth of pancreatic cancer-associated endothelial cells (PCECs) and EPCs, which is recapitulated by stable expression of a dominant-negative redox domain mutant. Further, E3330 blocks the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into CD31(+) endothelial progeny. Exposure of PCECs to E3330 results in a reduction of H-ras expression and intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, as well as decreased DNA-binding activity of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF-1alpha. E3330 also reduces secreted and intracellular vascular endothelial growth factor expression by pancreatic cancer cells, while concomitantly downregulating the cognate receptor Flk-1/KDR on PCECs. Inhibition of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain with E3330 or comparable angiogenesis inhibitors might be a potent therapeutic strategy in solid tumors. PMID:19097035