Science.gov

Sample records for blood gas analyzers

  1. Fiber optic multiple blood gas analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademaker, Diane M.; Zimmerman, Donald E.; James, Kenneth A.; Quick, William H.

    1994-07-01

    Blood gas analysis has been shown to be the most critical factor in determining patient survivability in a trauma care environment. Present techniques of non-invasive measurement of blood gases in the trauma care unit such as optical pulse oximetry and transcutaneous electrodes are inadequate due to complexity and inaccuracy. The crux of the solution to this problem is the application of a recent, DOD/NASA developed micro-optic spectrophotometer to perform blood gas analysis via fiber optic transmission. The newly developed blood gas analyzer described here will not only overcome the aforementioned drawbacks but also be highly accurate, durable, and safe in hazardous environments: e.g., oxygen rich environments. This spectrophotometer is driven by a microprocessor based `Kalman filter' algorithm which not only controls the monitoring of all the patients in the care center but also separates the patient's superimposed blood gas spectra into its individual components to allow a number of gases critical for trauma care to be analyzed simultaneously.

  2. Blood Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the 1970's, NASA provided funding for development of an automatic blood analyzer for Skylab at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL devised "dynamic loading," which employed a spinning rotor to load, transfer, and analyze blood samples by centrifugal processing. A refined, commercial version of the system was produced by ABAXIS and is marketed as portable ABAXIS MiniLab MCA. Used in a doctor's office, the equipment can perform 80 to 100 chemical blood tests on a single drop of blood and report results in five minutes. Further development is anticipated.

  3. Are sodium and potassium results on arterial blood gas analyzer equivalent to those on electrolyte analyzer?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shalini; Gupta, Ashwani K.; Singh, Kamaljit; Verma, Minni

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was conducted with the aim to compare the sodium (Na) and  potassium (K) results on arterial blood gas (ABG) and electrolyte analyzers both of which use direct ion selective electrode technology. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study in which data were collected for simultaneous ABG and serum electrolyte samples of a patient received in Biochemistry Laboratory during February to May 2015. The ABG samples received in heparinized syringes were processed on Radiometer ABL80 analyzer immediately. Electrolytes in serum sample were measured on ST-100 Sensa Core analyzer after centrifugation. Data were collected for 112 samples and analyzed with the help of Excel 2010 and  Statistical software for Microsoft excel XLSTAT 2015 software. Results: The mean Na level in serum sample was 139.4 ± 8.2 mmol/L compared to 137.8 ± 10.5 mmol/L in ABG (P < 0.05). The mean difference between the results was 1.6 mmol/L. Mean K level in serum sample was 3.8 ± 0.9 mmol/L as compared to 3.7 ± 0.9 mmol/L in ABG sample (P < 0.05). The mean difference between the results was 0.14 mmol/L. Statistically significant difference was observed in results of two instruments in low Na (<135 mmol/L) and normal K (3.5-5.2 mmol/L) ranges. The 95% limit of agreement for Na and K on both instruments was 9.9 to −13.2 mmol/L and 0.79 to −1.07 mmol/L respectively. Conclusions: The clinicians should be cautious in using the electrolyte results of electrolyte and ABG analyzer in inter exchangeable manner. PMID:27303138

  4. Portable automatic blood analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Analyzer employs chemical-sensing electrodes for determination of blood, gas, and ion concentrations. It is rugged, easily serviced, and comparatively simple to operate. System can analyze up to eight parameters and can be modified to measure other blood constituents including nonionic species, such as urea, glucose, and oxygen.

  5. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The M200 originated in the 1970's under an Ames Research Center/Stanford University contract to develop a small, lightweight gas analyzer for Viking Landers. Although the unit was not used on the spacecraft, it was further developed by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Three researchers from the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. (MTI) to commercialize the analyzer. The original version (Micromonitor 500) was introduced in 1982, and the M200 in 1988. The M200, a more advanced version, features dual gas chromatograph which separate a gaseous mixture into components and measure concentrations of each gas. It is useful for monitoring gas leaks, chemical spills, etc. Many analyses are completed in less than 30 seconds, and a wide range of mixtures can be analyzed.

  6. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph, a system which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentration of the individual gases, was designed for the Viking Lander. The technology was further developed under National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and funded by Ames Research Center/Stanford as a toxic gas leak detection device. Three researchers on the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. to commercialize the product. It is a battery-powered system consisting of a sensing wand connected to a computerized analyzer. Marketed as the Michromonitor 500, it has a wide range of applications.

  7. Portable Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Michromonitor M500 universal gas analyzer contains a series of miniature modules, each of which is a complete gas chromatograph, an instrument which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentrations of each gas in the mixture. The system is manufactured by Microsensor Technology, and is used for environmental analysis, monitoring for gas leaks and chemical spills, compliance with pollution laws, etc. The technology is based on a Viking attempt to detect life on Mars. Ames/Stanford miniaturized the system and NIOSH funded further development. Three Stanford researchers commercialized the technology, which can be operated by unskilled personnel.

  8. Market study: Whole blood analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market survey was conducted to develop findings relative to the commercialization potential and key market factors of the whole blood analyzer which is being developed in conjunction with NASA's Space Shuttle Medical System.

  9. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  10. CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

    1960-02-16

    A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

  11. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  12. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, T. P.; Arango, J.; Wolc, A.; Brady, J. V.; Fulton, J. E.; Rubinoff, I.; Ehr, I. J.; Persia, M. E.; O'Sullivan, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iCa mmol/L), glucose (Glu mg/dl), hematocrit (Hct% Packed Cell Volume [PCV]), pH, partial pressure carbon dioxide (PCO2 mm Hg), partial pressure oxygen (PO2 mm Hg), total concentration carbon dioxide (TCO2 mmol/L), bicarbonate (HCO3 mmol/L), base excess (BE mmol/L), oxygen saturation (sO2%), and hemoglobin (Hb g/dl). Data were analyzed using ANOVA to investigate the effect of production status as categorized by bird age. Trait relationships were evaluated by linear correlation and their spectral decomposition. All traits differed significantly among pullets and mature laying hens in both first and second lay cycles. Levels for K, iCa, Hct, pH, TCO2, HCO3, BE, sO2, and Hb differed significantly between first cycle and second cycle laying hens. Many venous blood gas and chemistry parameters were significantly correlated. The first 3 eigenvalues explained ∼2/3 of total variation. The first 2 principal components (PC) explained 51% of the total variation and indicated acid-balance and relationship between blood O2 and CO2. The third PC explained 16% of variation and seems to be related to blood iCa. Establishing reference ranges for pullet and laying hen blood gas and chemistry with the i-STAT®1 handheld unit provides a mechanism to further investigate pullet and layer physiology, evaluate metabolic disturbances, and may potentially serve as a means to select breeder candidates with optimal blood gas or chemistry levels on-farm. PMID:26706355

  13. Trace Gas Analyzer (TGA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of a breadboard trace gas analyzer (TGA) is documented. The TGA is a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system. The gas chromatograph subsystem employs a recirculating hydrogen carrier gas. The recirculation feature minimizes the requirement for transport and storage of large volumes of carrier gas during a mission. The silver-palladium hydrogen separator which permits the removal of the carrier gas and its reuse also decreases vacuum requirements for the mass spectrometer since the mass spectrometer vacuum system need handle only the very low sample pressure, not sample plus carrier. System performance was evaluated with a representative group of compounds.

  14. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  15. Space Shuttle Trace Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dencker, W.

    1975-01-01

    A Trace Gas Analyzer (TGA) with the ability to detect the presence of toxic contaminants in the Space Shuttle atmosphere within the subparts-per-million range is under development. The design is a modification of the miniaturized Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) developed for the Viking Mars Lander. An ambient air sample is injected onto the GC column from a constant volume sample loop and separated into individual compounds for identification by the MS. The GC-MS interface consists of an effluent divider and a silver-paladium separator, an electrochemical cell which removes more than 99.99% of the hydrogen carrier gas. The hydrogen is reclaimed and repressurized without affecting the separator efficiency, a feature which enables a considerable weight reduction in the carrier gas supply system.

  16. Gas dynamics in residual gas analyzer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Santeler, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers are used for measuring partial flow rates as well as for measuring partial pressures. The required calibration may also be obtained with either known flow rates or known pressures. The calibration and application procedures are straightforward when both are of the same type; however, substantial errors may occur if the two types are mixed. This report develops the basic equations required to convert between partial pressure calibrations and partial flow rate calibrations. It also discusses the question of fractionating and nonfractionating gas flow in various gas inlet and pumping systems.

  17. Multiple-tracer gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

  18. Gas analyzer for dry/dusty kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Navarre, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    A gas analyzer system is described for use in dry and dusty environments, wherein gas samples are withdrawn by the system from within a chamber. The systems consists of: a plurality of gas analyzer cells, a plurality of sources of calibration gases and a source of purge air, the cells and sources being located outside of the chamber environment; a probe support means including a support pipe extending sufficiently far into the chamber to substantially avoid the effect of tramp air on the measurements, the support pipe having a free end in the chamber; a probe chamber fixed near the free end of the support pipe; an isolation tube means fixed to the probe chamber to bring sample gas into the probe chamber and a filter means within the probe chamber to filter the gas samples; a first pipe means, to selectively pressurize the system, which conducts gas and air from the sources of calibration gas and source of purge air to the probe filter, the first pipe means being laid for a substantial extent of its length within the support pipe; a second pipe means laid for a substantial extent of its length within the support pipe to conduct calibration gases and purge air from the sources to the probe chamber; and a sample tube means laid for a substantial extent of its length within the support pipe to conduct gas samples from the filter to the gas analyzer cells.

  19. LED-based NDIR natural gas analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanchenko, Sergey; Baranov, Alexander; Savkin, Alexey; Sleptsov, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    A new generation of the light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and photodiodes (PDs) was used recently to develop an open path non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) methane analyzer. The first open path detector prototype was constructed using LEDs for measurement and reference channels, accordingly, and first measurements for methane gas have been performed using optical paths of the order of several meters [3]. The natural gas consists of several first alkanes, mainly methane, and it is important to have a possibility of measuring all of them. In the present work we report the results of NDIR measurements for propane-butane mixture and new measurements of methane using LEDs for measurement and reference channels at 2300 and 1700 nm wavelengths, accordingly. The necessity of the double beam scheme is demonstrated and obtained results for methane and propane-butane mixture are compared.

  20. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  4. Studies of deionization and impedance spectroscopy for blood analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Charlotte C.; Li, Nan; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2005-11-01

    Blood analysis provides vital information for health conditions. For instance, typical infection response is correlated to an elevated White Blood Cell (WBC) count, while low Red Blood Cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin and hematocrit are caused by anemia or internal bleeding. We are developing two essential modules, deionization (DI) chip and microfluidic cytometer with impedance spectroscopy flow, for enabling the realization of a single platform miniaturized blood analyzer. In the proposed analyzer, blood cells are preliminarily sorted by Dielectrophoretic (DEP) means into sub-groups, differentiated and counted by impedance spectroscopy in a flow cytometer. DEP techniques have been demonstrated to stretch DNA, align Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) and trap cells successfully. However, DEP manipulation does not function in biological media with high conductivity. The DI module is designed to account for this challenge. H Filter will serve as an ion extraction platform in a microchamber. Sample and buffer do not mix well in micro scale allowing the ions being extracted by diffusion without increasing the volume. This can keep the downstream processing time short. Micro scale hydrodynamic focusing is employed to place single cell passing along the central plane of the flow cytometer module. By applying an AC electrical field, suspended cells are polarized, membrane capacitance C m, cytoplasm conductivity σ c, and cytoplasm permittivity ɛ c will vary as functions of frequency. Tracing back the monitored current, the numbers of individual cell species can be evaluated.

  5. Point-of-care, portable microfluidic blood analyzer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Teimour; Fricke, Todd; Quesenberry, J. T.; Todd, Paul W.; Leary, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in MEMS technology have provided an opportunity to develop microfluidic devices with enormous potential for portable, point-of-care, low-cost medical diagnostic tools. Hand-held flow cytometers will soon be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. Despite much interest in miniaturizing commercially available cytometers, they remain costly, bulky, and require expert operation. In this article, we report progress on the development of a battery-powered handheld blood analyzer that will quickly and automatically process a drop of whole human blood by real-time, on-chip magnetic separation of white blood cells (WBCs), fluorescence analysis of labeled WBC subsets, and counting a reproducible fraction of the red blood cells (RBCs) by light scattering. The whole blood (WB) analyzer is composed of a micro-mixer, a special branching/separation system, an optical detection system, and electronic readout circuitry. A droplet of un-processed blood is mixed with the reagents, i.e. magnetic beads and fluorescent stain in the micro-mixer. Valve-less sorting is achieved by magnetic deflection of magnetic microparticle-labeled WBC. LED excitation in combination with an avalanche photodiode (APD) detection system is used for counting fluorescent WBC subsets using several colors of immune-Qdots, while counting a reproducible fraction of red blood cells (RBC) is performed using a laser light scatting measurement with a photodiode. Optimized branching/channel width is achieved using Comsol Multi-Physics™ simulation. To accommodate full portability, all required power supplies (40v, +/-10V, and +3V) are provided via step-up voltage converters from one battery. A simple onboard lock-in amplifier is used to increase the sensitivity/resolution of the pulse counting circuitry.

  6. Development of an Infrared Fluorescent Gas Analyzer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClatchie, E. A.

    A prototype model low level carbon monoxide analyzer was developed using fluorescent cell and negative chopping techniques to achieve a device superior to state of art NDIR (Nondispersive infrared) analyzers in stability and cross-sensitivity to other gaseous species. It is clear that this type of analyzer has that capacity. The prototype…

  7. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1500 Enflurane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An enflurane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1620 Halothane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A halothane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1620 Halothane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A halothane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1500 Enflurane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An enflurane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  8. 21 CFR § 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2015-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2015-04-01 2015-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. § 868.1690 Section § 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  19. Performance of a blood chemistry analyzer during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, Brian S.; Claassen, Dale E.; Guikema, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of the Vision System Blood Analyzer during parabolic flight on a KC-135 aircraft (NASA 930) has been tested. This fully automated instrument performed flawlessly in these trials, demonstrating its potential for efficient, reliable use in a microgravity environment. In addition to instrument capability, it is demonstrated that investigators could readily fill specially modified test packs with fluid during zero gravity, and that filled test packs could be easily loaded into VISION during an episode of microgravity.

  20. Expert Assistant For A Clinical Hematology Blood Cell Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Carole; Navlakha, Jainendra K.

    1989-03-01

    The COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments are automated clinical hematology blood cell analyzers which measure the count, volume and population distribution of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, and hemoglobin from patient blood samples. In the clinical laboratory environment, instrument startup consists of a number of component and system checks to assure proper operation and calibration to insure reliable results are produced on patient samples. If a startup check fails, troubleshooting procedures are provided to assist the operator in determining the cause of the error. Troubleshooting requires expertise in instrument operation, troubleshooting procedures and evaluation of the data produced. This expert system is designed and developed to assist the startup diagnostics of COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments. The system reads data produced by the instrument and validates it against expected values. If the values are not all correct, then the troubleshooting starts. Troubleshooting is handled for the most common subsystem problems and those which the operator has the equipment and knowledge to handle, problems that are cheapest to fix and problems that are quickest to fix. The expert system restarts the startup sequence whenever troubleshooting has been successful or recommends calling Customer Service when unsuccessful.

  1. 46 CFR 148.415 - Toxic gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toxic gas analyzers. 148.415 Section 148.415 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.415 Toxic gas analyzers. When... vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas...

  2. 46 CFR 148.420 - Flammable gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable gas analyzers. 148.420 Section 148.420... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.420 Flammable gas analyzers..., each vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas...

  3. 46 CFR 148.415 - Toxic gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toxic gas analyzers. 148.415 Section 148.415 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.415 Toxic gas analyzers. When... vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas...

  4. 46 CFR 148.415 - Toxic gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toxic gas analyzers. 148.415 Section 148.415 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.415 Toxic gas analyzers. When... vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas...

  5. 46 CFR 148.420 - Flammable gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable gas analyzers. 148.420 Section 148.420... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.420 Flammable gas analyzers..., each vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas...

  6. 46 CFR 148.420 - Flammable gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable gas analyzers. 148.420 Section 148.420... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.420 Flammable gas analyzers..., each vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas...

  7. 46 CFR 148.415 - Toxic gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toxic gas analyzers. 148.415 Section 148.415 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.415 Toxic gas analyzers. When... vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas...

  8. The use of mass spectrometry to analyze dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michel; Tonoli, David; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) typically consist in the deposition of small volumes of capillary blood onto dedicated paper cards. Comparatively to whole blood or plasma samples, their benefits rely in the fact that sample collection is easier and that logistic aspects related to sample storage and shipment can be relatively limited, respectively, without the need of a refrigerator or dry ice. Originally, this approach has been developed in the sixties to support the analysis of phenylalanine for the detection of phenylketonuria in newborns using bacterial inhibition test. In the nineties tandem mass spectrometry was established as the detection technique for phenylalanine and tyrosine. DBS became rapidly recognized for their clinical value: they were widely implemented in pediatric settings with mass spectrometric detection, and were closely associated to the debut of newborn screening (NBS) programs, as a part of public health policies. Since then, sample collection on paper cards has been explored with various analytical techniques in other areas more or less successfully regarding large-scale applications. Moreover, in the last 5 years a regain of interest for DBS was observed and originated from the bioanalytical community to support drug development (e.g., PK studies) or therapeutic drug monitoring mainly. Those recent applications were essentially driven by improved sensitivity of triple quadrupole mass spectrometers. This review presents an overall view of all instrumental and methodological developments for DBS analysis with mass spectrometric detection, with and without separation techniques. A general introduction to DBS will describe their advantages and historical aspects of their emergence. A second section will focus on blood collection, with a strong emphasis on specific parameters that can impact quantitative analysis, including chromatographic effects, hematocrit effects, blood effects, and analyte stability. A third part of the review is dedicated to

  9. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1620 Halothane gas analyzer....

  11. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  12. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1500 Enflurane gas analyzer....

  14. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer....

  15. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1620 Halothane gas analyzer....

  17. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1500 Enflurane gas analyzer....

  19. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer....

  20. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1620 Halothane gas analyzer....

  1. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1500 Enflurane gas analyzer....

  2. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer....

  4. Sensor gas analyzer for acetone determination in expired air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Vitaly V.

    2001-05-01

    Diseases and changes in the way of life change the concentration and composition of the expired air. Our adaptable gas analyzer is intended for the selective analysis of expired air and can be adapted for the solution of current diagnostic and analytical tasks by the user (a physician or a patient). Having analyzed the existing trends in the development of noninvasive diagnostics we have chosen the method of noninvasive acetone detection in expired air, where the acetone concentration correlates with blood and urine glucose concentrations. The appearance of acetone in expired air is indicative of disorders that may be caused not only by diabetes but also be wrong diet, incorrect sportsmen training etc. To control the disorders one should know the acetone concentration in the human body. This knowledge allows one to judge upon the state of the patient, choose a correct diet that will not cause damage to the patient's health, determine sportsmen training efficiency and results and solve the artificial pancreas problem. Our device provide highly accurate analysis, rapid diagnostics and authentic acetone quantification in the patient's body at any time aimed at prediction of the patient's state and assessing the efficiency of the therapy used. Clinical implementation of the device will improve the health and save lives of many thousands of diabetes sufferers.

  5. Colorimetric blood-gas monitoring sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Keith J.; Seifert, George P.

    1993-05-01

    Colorimetric fiber optic sensors have been developed for measuring the pH and pCO2 of blood. These sensors are fabricated using a single 125 micrometers diameter optical fiber. Located at the distal end of the fiber is a capsule that contains a pH sensitive dye. The pCO2 sensor is fabricated from a pH sensor with the addition of a salt, bicarbonate, and the encapsulation with an ion impermeable gas permeable membrane. The distal end of the capsule is terminated with a reflective surface. The reflective surface can either be a polished metallic surface or, in this case, a TiO2 impregnated epoxy. The disposable sensor mates with an optical connector that contains two optical fibers of the same size as the disposable sensor. The two fibers within the optical cable provide a light path for both the antegrade and retrograde optical signals. These fibers are terminated at either the LED source or the detector. A prototype sensor assembly that incorporates the measurement of three physiological parameters (pH, pCO2, and sO2) has been demonstrated to fit within a standard 20 gauge arterial catheter, typically used for radial artery blood pressure monitoring, without significant damping of the blood pressure waveform. The pH sensor has a range of 6.9 - 7.8 with a precision of 0.01 pH units and the pCO2 sensor has a range of 15 - 95 mm Hg with a precision of 3 mm Hg. The long term drift pH drift is less than 0.01 pH unit per 8 hours and the pCO2 drift is less than 1 mm Hg per 8 hours. Sensor performance in the canine has demonstrated that the pH sensor is accurate to within +/- 0.03 pH units and the pCO2 sensor is accurate to within +/- 3 mm Hg when compared to a typical blood gas analyzer.

  6. The invention and development of blood gas analysis apparatus.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2002-07-01

    In 1953, the doctor draft interrupted Dr. Severinghaus' anesthesia and physiology training and sent him to the National Institutes of Health as director of anesthesia research at the newly opened Clinical Center. He developed precise laboratory partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO(2)) and pH analysis to investigate lung blood gas exchange during hypothermia. Constants for carbon dioxide solubility and pK' were more accurately determined. In August 1954, he heard Richard Stow describe invention of a carbon dioxide electrode and immediately built one, improved its stability, and tested its response characteristics. In April 1956, he also heard Leland Clark reveal his invention of an oxygen electrode. Dr. Severinghaus obtained one and constructed a stirred cuvette in which blood partial pressure of oxygen (PO(2)) could be accurately measured. Technician Bradley and Dr. Severinghaus combined these, making the first blood gas analysis system in 1957 and 1958, and shortly thereafter, they added a pH electrode. Blood gas analyzers rapidly developed commercially. Dr. Severinghaus collaborated with Astrup and other Danes on the Haldane and Bohr effects and their concepts of base excess during two sabbaticals in Copenhagen. Work with both Astrup and Roughton on the oxygen dissociation curve led Dr. Severinghaus to devise a modified Hill equation that closely fit their new, better human oxygen dissociation curve and a blood gas slide rule that solved oxygen dissociation curve, PCO(2), pH, and acid-base questions. Blood gas analysis revolutionized both clinical medicine and cardiorespiratory and metabolic physiology. PMID:12131126

  7. Early Blood Gas Abnormalities and the Preterm Brain

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth; Kuban, Karl C. K.; Dammann, Olaf; O'Shea, T. Michael; Hirtz, Deborah; Schreiber, Michael D.; Paneth, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored associations between blood gas abnormalities in more than 1,000 preterm infants during the first postnatal days and indicators of neonatal brain damage. During 2002–2004, women delivering infants before 28 weeks’ gestation at one of 14 participating institutions in 5 US states were asked to enroll in the study. The authors compared infants with blood gas values in the highest or lowest quintile for gestational age and postnatal day (extreme value) on at least 1 of the first 3 postnatal days with the remainder of the subjects, with separate analyses for blood gas abnormalities on multiple days and for partial pressure of oxygen in the alveolar gas of <35. Outcomes analyzed were ventriculomegaly and an echolucent lesion on an ultrasound scan in the neonatal intensive care unit, and cerebral palsy, microcephaly, and a low score on a Bayley Scale of Infant Development at 24 months. Every blood gas derangement (hypoxemia, hyperoxemia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and acidosis) was associated with multiple indicators of brain damage. However, for some, the associations were seen with only 1 day of exposure; others were evident with 2 or more days’ exposure. Findings suggest that individual blood gas derangements do not increase brain damage risk. Rather, the multiple derangements associated with indicators of brain damage might be indicators of immaturity/vulnerability and illness severity. PMID:20807736

  8. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... blood-gas studies. (a) Blood-gas studies are performed to detect an impairment in the process of... either at rest or during exercise. No blood-gas study shall be performed if medically contraindicated....

  9. Raman gas analyzer applicability to monitoring of gaseous air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, D. V.; Matrosov, I. I.; Tikhomirov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    It is shown that the main problem, arising when designing a stationary Raman gas analyzer intended to monitor gaseous air pollutions, is to get SRS signals of sufficient intensity. The engineering solutions are presented that provide the required sensitivity (~ 50-100 ppb). It is achieved by compressing a gas medium under analysis and gaining intensity of the exciting laser radiation.

  10. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... ambient air drawn into the probe. Select span gases for the species being continuously combined, other... air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify multiple analyzers at...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... ambient air drawn into the probe. Select span gases for the species being continuously combined, other... air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify multiple analyzers at...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... ambient air drawn into the probe. Select span gases for the species being continuously combined, other... air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify multiple analyzers at...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... ambient air drawn into the probe. Select span gases for the species being continuously combined, other... air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify multiple analyzers at...

  14. Multicomponent gas analyzers based on tunable diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, E.V.; Zyrianov, P.V.; Khusnutdinov, A.N.; Kouznetsov, A.I.; Ponurovskii, Y.Ya.

    1996-12-31

    A family of multicomponent gas analyzers based on tunable diode lasers (TDL) are presented including: an open optical path 3-component gas analyzer for monitoring atmosphere pollution; a 4-gas component analyzer with a multipass cell, a multichannel TDL system with multipass cell and MIR fiber optics delivery, and a multichannel TDL analyzer for breath content gas analysis. A4B6 tunable diode lasers of different spectral region from 4 to 12 micron were used in every channel of the analyzers to obtain atmospheric transmission spectra and to measure concentration of studied gases. Main gaseous atmospheric pollutants like CO, NO, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, etc. and some of breath gases could be measured at ppb concentration level in real time with these systems depending on customers requirements. The analyzers are driven by IBM compatible PC. The first results on field monitoring tests as well as on their application to human exhalation content analysis and human exposure monitoring are presented.

  15. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on IR absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiaoli

    2004-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas analyzer can be widely used in many fields. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on infrared ray (IR) absorption is presented sufficiently in this paper. Applying Lambert-Beer Law, a novel space-double-beam optical structure is established successfully. The optical structure includes an IR source, a gas cell, a bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 4.26 μm, another bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 3.9 μm, and two IR detectors. Based on Redial Basic Function (RBF) artificial neural network, the measuring model of IR CO 2 analyzer is established with a high accuracy. A dynamic compensation filter is effectively designed to improve the dynamic characteristic of the IR CO 2 analyzer without gas pump. The IR CO 2 analyzer possesses the advantages of high accuracy and mechanical reliability with small volume, lightweight, and low-power consumption. Therefore, it can be used in such relevant fields as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  16. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  1. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  2. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1120 - Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... concentration analyzer is a photoelectric device used to measure, in vivo, the oxygen-carrying capacity of... approved PMA or declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  13. 21 CFR 868.1120 - Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... concentration analyzer is a photoelectric device used to measure, in vivo, the oxygen-carrying capacity of... approved PMA or declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  14. 21 CFR 868.1120 - Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... concentration analyzer is a photoelectric device used to measure, in vivo, the oxygen-carrying capacity of... approved PMA or declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  15. Field emitter based extractor gauges and residual gas analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Changkun Dong; G. Rao Myneni

    1999-04-01

    Attempts at using the Spindt-type molybdenum field emitter arrays in the extractor gauges and a residual gas analyzer are presented in this article. The sensitivity of the fuel emitter gauge is as high as 11 Torr{sup -1}. The departure from linearity of the pressure versus ion current measurements did not exceed 10% over the pressure range of 10{sup -10} - 10{sup -6} Torr. Stable sensitivities for nitrogen, helium, and hydrogen were achieved below 10{sup -7} Torr with the field emitter residual gas analyzer. The slightly reduced emission current and sensitivity, after long-term operation, are of concern and need to be addressed. Residual gas spectra indicate that when using field emitters, the electron stimulated desorption ions (O{sup +}, F{sup +}, and Cl{sup +}) are reduced as compared to those made using a hot filament source.

  16. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105 Arterial blood-gas studies. (a) Blood-gas studies are performed to detect an impairment in the process of...

  17. Characteristics and performance of several mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The operation and properties of various mass-spectrometer residual gas analyzers for use in vacuum measurements were analyzed in terms of efficiencies of ion extraction, ion separation and transmission, and ion collection. Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results presented include absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to 10 gases, and cracking patterns for these gases. It is shown that the properties are strongly dependent on instrument range, resolution, and the particular voltages, currents, or field intensities used to control the instrument.

  18. Polarized 3He Gas Circulating Technologies for Neutron Analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, David; Hersman, Bill

    2014-12-10

    We describe the development of an integrated system for quasi-continuous operation of a large volume neutron analyzer. The system consists of a non-magnetic diaphragm compressor, a prototype large volume helium polarizer, a surrogate neutron analyzer, a non-depolarizing gas storage reservoir, a non-ferrous valve manifold for handling gas distribution, a custom rubidium-vapor gas return purifier, and wire-wound transfer lines, all of which are immersed in a two-meter external magnetic field. Over the Phase II period we focused on three major tasks required for the successful deployment of these types of systems: 1) design and implementation of gas handling hardware, 2) automation for long-term operation, and 3) improvements in polarizer performance, specifically fabrication of aluminosilicate optical pumping cells. In this report we describe the design, implementation, and testing of the gas handling hardware. We describe improved polarizer performance resulting from improved cell materials and fabrication methods. These improvements yielded valved 8.5 liter cells with relaxation times greater than 12 hours. Pumping this cell with 1500W laser power with 1.25nm linewidth yielded peak polarizations of 60%, measured both inside and outside the polarizer. Fully narrowing this laser to 0.25nm, demonstrated separately on one stack of the four, would have allowed 70% polarization with this cell. We demonstrated the removal of 5 liters of polarized helium from the polarizer with no measured loss of polarization. We circulated the gas through a titanium-clad compressor with polarization loss below 3% per pass. We also prepared for the next phase of development by refining the design of the polarizer so that it can be engineer-certified for pressurized operation. The performance of our system far exceeds comparable efforts elsewhere.

  19. Gas Reactor Plant Analyzer and Simulator for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-01-01

    This software is used to study and analyze various configurations of plant equipment for gas cooled nuclear reactor applications. The user of this software would likely be interested in optimizing the economic, safety, and operating performance of this type of reactor. The code provides the capability for the user through his input to configure networks of nuclear reactor components. The components available include turbine, compressor, heat exchanger, reactor core, coolers, bypass valves, and control systems.

  20. Stack gas analyzer and thermal oxidation device therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, A.

    1980-07-08

    A stack gas analyzer is described for connection from a recovery stack, said stack gas analyzer comprising: first means including a first outlet for producing a flow of a dehydrated mixture of the gases flowing in said recovery stck, said dehydrated mixture including sulfur dioxide, total reduced sulfur (TRS), and oxygen remaining after combustion utilizing an oxygen rate a few percent in excess of the stoichiometric rate; a scrubber having an inlet and an outlet to receive said dehydrated mixture, said scrubber having a composition to remove sulfur dioxide from said dehydrated mixture without removing the said TRS, said scrubber outlet having a flow therethrough of a trs sample mixture the same as said dehydrated mixture except for the removal of sulfur dioxide therefrom and including at least some of said oxygen; a coulometric titrator having a cell including an inlet and an outlet, and having second means to produce an electrical output signal proportional to the concentration of sulfur dioxide in an oxidized gas mixture passing through said cell from said cell inlet to said cell outlet; a conduit connected from said scrubber outlet to said cell inlet, saidaconduit having a flow of said TRS sample therein; and third means to heat said TRS sample in said conduit to a pedetermined temperature such that said trs is oxidized to sulfur dioxide.

  1. Graphic Three-Axes Presentation of Residual Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Levi, Alejandro G.

    1997-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers (RGA) are commonly used to measure the composition of residual gases in thermal-vacuum test chambers. Measurements from RGA's are often used to identify and quantify outgassing contaminants from a test article during thermal-vacuum testing. RGA data is typically displayed as snapshots in time, showing instantaneous concentrations of ions from ionized residual gas molecules at different atomic masses. This ion concentration information can be interpreted to be representative of the composition of the residual gas in the chamber at the instant of analysis. Typically, test personnel are most interested in tracking the time history of changes in the composition of chamber residual gas to determine the relative cleanliness and the clean-up rate of the test article under vacuum. However, displays of instantaneous RGA data cannot provide test personnel with the preferred time history information. In order to gain an understanding of gas composition trends, a series of plots of individual data snapshots must be analyzed. This analysis is cumbersome and still does not provide a very satisfactory view of residual gas composition trends. A method was devised by the authors to present RCA data in a three-axis format, plotting Atomic Mass Unit (AMU), the Ionization Signal Response (ISR) as amps/torr as a function of AMU, and Time, to provide a clear graphic visualization of trends of changes in ISR with respect to time and AMU (representative of residual gas composition). This graphic visualization method provides a valuable analytical tool to interpret test article outgassing rates during thermal vacuum tests. Raw RGA data was extracted from a series of delimited ASCII files and then converted to a data array in a spreadsheet. Consequently, using the 3-D plotting functionality provided by the spreadsheet program, 3-D plots were produced. After devising the data format conversion process, the authors began developing a program to provide real-time 3-D

  2. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER.

    PubMed

    Younkin, T R; Biewer, T M; Klepper, C C; Marcus, C

    2014-11-01

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations. PMID:25430381

  3. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITERa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-01

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  4. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-15

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  5. Intercomparison of gas analyzers for methane flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapanala, S.; Rinne, J.; Vesala, T.

    2010-12-01

    Four gas analyzers, capable of measuring methane concentration at a response time necessary for eddy covariance flux measurements, were operated in parallel for about six months between March and August 2010. Their reliability, need of maintenance, user friendliness, data coverage, and data quality were evaluated. The primary aim of this campaign was to provide an instrumentation suggestion for the European Research Infrastructure ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observation System). The instruments used were TGA100A (Campbell Scientific Inc.), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research Inc.) , G1301-f (Picarro Inc.), and LI-7700 (Li-Cor Inc.). The last one, LI-7700, was a prototype of a later commercialized open path analyzer. The other instruments were closed path analyzers. The measurement site is an oligotrophic open fen Siikaneva, located in southern Finland. The site provides spatially quite uniform methane flux within the footprint. The methane flux rises in the spring, peaks in early August and falls down during the autumn. This provides excellent opportunity to study the performance of the analyzers at different CH4 flux levels from near zero up to about 5 mg m-2 h-1. The preliminary results show great similarity among the instruments in both concentrations and fluxes. Detailed numbers of the measurement characteristics will be provided later. The reliability and need of maintenance are difficult to evaluate quantitatively during that short period.

  6. User's guide to the Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Artman, S.A.

    1988-08-04

    The Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA), a Model 100C UTI quadrupole mass spectrometer, measures the concentrations of selected masses in the Fusion Energy Division's (FED) Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The RGA software is a VAX FORTRAN computer program which controls the experimental apparatus, records the raw data, performs data reduction, and plots the data. The RGA program allows data to be collected from an RGA on ATF or from either of two RGAs in the laboratory. In the laboratory, the RGA diagnostic plays an important role in outgassing studied on various candidate materials for fusion experiments. One such material, graphite, is being used more often in fusion experiments due to its ability to withstand high power loads. One of the functions of the RGA diagnostic is aid in the determination of the best grade of graphite to be used in these experiments and to study the procedures used to condition it. A procedure of particular interest involves baking the graphite sample in order to remove impurities that may be present in it. These impurities can be studied while in the ATF plasma or while being baked and outgassed in the laboratory. The Residual Gas Analyzer is a quadrupole mass spectrometer capable of scanning masses ranging in size from 1 atomic mass unit (amu) to 300 amu while under computer control. The procedure for collecting data for a particular mass is outlined.

  7. Blood gas analysis and cooximetry in retired racing Greyhounds

    PubMed Central

    Zaldivar-Lopez, Sara; Chisnell, Hope K.; Guillermo Couto, C.; Westendorf-Stingle, Nicole; Marin, Liliana M.; Iazbik, Maria C.; Cooper, Edward S.; Wellman, Maxey L.; Muir, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to evaluate the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin (Hb) in healthy retired racing Greyhounds via cooximetry, and to establish reference intervals for blood gases and cooximetry in this breed. Design Prospective clinical study. Setting University Teaching Hospital. Animals Fifty-seven Greyhounds and 30 non-Greyhound dogs. Interventions Venous blood samples were collected from the jugular vein and placed into heparinized tubes. The samples were analyzed within 30 minutes of collection using a blood gas analyzer equipped with a cooximeter. Measurements and Main Results Greyhounds had significantly higher pH, PO2, oxygen saturation, oxyhemoglobin, total Hb, oxygen content, and oxygen capacity and significantly lower deoxyhemoglobin and P50 when compared with non-Greyhound dogs. Conclusion These findings support the fact that this breed is able to carry a higher concentration of total oxygen in the blood. As reported previously, this breed also has lower P50 and, therefore, high oxygen affinity. In light of recent findings suggesting that in certain tissues a high affinity for oxygen is beneficial, this adaptation may be of benefit during strenuous exercise. PMID:21288290

  8. INGAS: Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System for radioxenon measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doost-Mohammadi, V.; Afarideh, H.; Etaati, G. R.; Safari, M. J.; Rouhi, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System (INGAS) will be introduced. This system is based on beta-gamma coincidence technique and consists of a well-type NaI(Tl) as gamma or X radiation detector and a cylindrical plastic scintillator to detect beta or conversion electron. Standard NIM modules were utilized to detect coincidence events of detectors. Both the beta and gamma detectors were appropriately calibrated. The efficiency curve of gamma detector for volume geometry was obtained by comparing the results of gamma point sources measurements and simulations of GATE V7.0 Monte Carlo code. The performance of detection system was checked by injection of 222Rn and 131mXe gaseous source in the detection cell. The minimum detectable activity of the system for 133Xe is 1.240±0.024 mBq for 24 h measurement time.

  9. Stochastic PArallel Rarefied-gas Time-accurate Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gallis, Steve Plimpton

    2014-01-24

    The SPARTA package is software for simulating low-density fluids via the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which is a particle-based method for tracking particle trajectories and collisions as a model of a multi-species gas. The main component of SPARTA is a simulation code which allows the user to specify a simulation domain, populate it with particles, embed triangulated surfaces as boundary conditions for the flow, overlay a grid for finding pairs of collision partners, and evolve the system in time via explicit timestepping. The package also includes various pre- and post-processing tools, useful for setting up simulations and analyzing the results. The simulation code runs either in serial on a single processor or desktop machine, or can be run in parallel using the MPI message-passing library, to enable faster performance on large problems.

  10. Stochastic PArallel Rarefied-gas Time-accurate Analyzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-01-24

    The SPARTA package is software for simulating low-density fluids via the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which is a particle-based method for tracking particle trajectories and collisions as a model of a multi-species gas. The main component of SPARTA is a simulation code which allows the user to specify a simulation domain, populate it with particles, embed triangulated surfaces as boundary conditions for the flow, overlay a grid for finding pairs of collision partners,more » and evolve the system in time via explicit timestepping. The package also includes various pre- and post-processing tools, useful for setting up simulations and analyzing the results. The simulation code runs either in serial on a single processor or desktop machine, or can be run in parallel using the MPI message-passing library, to enable faster performance on large problems.« less

  11. Phoenix Mars Mission--the thermal evolved gas analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, John H; Chaney, Roy C; Hammack, Hilton

    2008-10-01

    The Phoenix spacecraft that was launched to Mars in August 2007 landed safely on the Martian northern arctic region on May 25, 2008. It carried six experiments to study the history of water on the planet and search for organic molecules in the icy subsurface Martian soil. The spacecraft is a lander with an arm and scoop designed to dig a trench though the top soil to reach an expected ice layer near the surface. One of the instruments on board is the thermal evolved gas analyzer (TEGA), which consists of two components, a set of eight very small ovens that will heat samples of the ice soil mixtures from the trench to release imbedded gases and mineral decomposition products, and a mass spectrometer that serves as the analysis tool for the evolved gases, and also for measurements of the composition and isotopic ratios of the gases that comprise the atmosphere of Mars. The mass spectrometer is a miniature magnetic sector instrument controlled by microprocessor-driven power supplies. One feature is the gas enrichment cell that will increase the partial pressures of the noble gases in an atmosphere sample by removing all the active gases, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen, to improve the accuracy of their isotopic ratio measurements. PMID:18715800

  12. Analyzing Illumina Gene Expression Microarray Data Obtained From Human Whole Blood Cell and Blood Monocyte Samples.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Schurmann, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Schramm, Katharina; Ziegler, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Microarray profiling of gene expression is widely applied to studies in molecular biology and functional genomics. Experimental and technical variations make not only the statistical analysis of single studies but also meta-analyses of different studies very challenging. Here, we describe the analytical steps required to substantially reduce the variations of gene expression data without affecting true effect sizes. A software pipeline has been established using gene expression data from a total of 3358 whole blood cell and blood monocyte samples, all from three German population-based cohorts, measured on the Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 BeadChip array. In summary, adjustment for a few selected technical factors greatly improved reliability of gene expression analyses. Such adjustments are particularly required for meta-analyses of different studies. PMID:26614070

  13. A modified photo- and magnetoacoustic multigas analyzer applied in gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Clemensen, P; Christensen, P; Norsk, P; Grønlund, J

    1994-06-01

    The feasibility of replacing a conventional mass spectrometer (MS) with a specially modified multicomponent (O2, CO2, Freon 22, and SF6) acoustic infrared and paramagnetic (IR/PM) gas analyzer in inert gas-rebreathing and metabolic gas exchange measurements has been investigated. Rebreathing variables were determined simultaneously with the MS and IR/PM analyzers in duplicate measurements at rest and during submaximal exercise in 10 subjects. The differences (means +/- SD, IR/PM - MS) were 0.028 +/- 0.048 liters [functional residual capacity (FRC)], 0.18 +/- 0.38 l/min [cardiac output (Qc)], -0.006 +/- 0.030 l/min [O2 consumption (VO2)], and -33 +/- 108 ml [combined lung tissue and capillary blood volume (Vti,c)]. The coefficients of variation on repeated estimates were 5.8% (FRC), 5.4% (Qc), 6.2% (VO2), and 17% (Vti,c) with the IR/PM analyzer and 5.9% (FRC), 4.2% (Qc), 5.0% (VO2), and 9.8% (Vti,c) with the MS. The differences (IR/PM - MS) obtained in mixed-expirate measurements were -0.006 +/- 0.020 l/min (VO2) and 0.020 +/- 0.021 l/min (CO2 production). Breath-by-breath estimates of VO2 and CO2 production with the IR/PM analyzer were, on average, 2.4 and 4.4% higher than the MS estimates, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the IR/PM gas analyzer, when appropriately modified, can substitute for a complex MS in a variety of noninvasive pulmonary gas exchange measurements. PMID:7928918

  14. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  15. Laser gas analyzers for studying kinetics of gas exchange between vegetation biosystems and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, B. G.; Kapitanov, V. A.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Vasiliev, V. A.; Karapuzikov, A. I.; Sherstov, I. V.

    2006-11-01

    Specifications and examples of application of laser gas-analyzers of near- and mid-infrared ranges for diagnostics of greenhouse gases (CO II, C IIH 4, and CH 4) emission by vegetation biosystems both under standard conditions and under impacts of natural and anthropogenic stresses are considered in the report. The gas-analyzer complex includes: 1) gas-analyzer with a multipass absorption cell based on the frequency-tunable diode laser (1600-1650 nm) for measuring sub-background methane concentrations (<= 20 ppbV); 2) gas-analyzer based on the wave-guide CO II-laser equipped with the intracavity acoustic detector capable of fast frequency scanning in the 9 and 10 μm generation bands and having the ethylene-sensitivity better than 1 ppbV. The technology of measurements of gas emission by plant stripped leaves and coniferous needles is described and the measurements of CO II and CH 4 emissions are presented.

  16. Laser gas-analyzers for studying kinetics of gas-exchange between vegetation biosystems and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, B. G.; Kapitanov, V. A.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Vasiliev, V. A.; Karapuzikov, A. I.; Sherstov, I. V.

    2006-12-01

    Specifications and examples of application of laser gas-analyzers of near- and mid-infrared ranges for diagnostics of greenhouse gases (C0 II, C IIH 4, and CH 4) emission by vegetation biosystems both under standard conditions and under impacts of natural and anthropogenic stresses are considered in the report. The gas-analyzer complex includes: 1) gas-analyzer with a multipass absorption cell based on the frequency-tunable diode laser (1600-1 650 nm) for measuring sub-background methane concentrations (<=20 ppbV); 2) gas-analyzer based on the wave-guide C0 II-laser equipped with the intracavity acoustic detector capable of fast frequency scanning in the 9 and 10 μm generation bands and having the ethylene-sensitivity better than 1 ppbV. The technology of measurements of gas emission by plant stripped leaves and coniferous needles is described and the measurements of CO II and CH 4 emissions are presented.

  17. Analyzing the influence of combustion gas on a gas turbine by radiation thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Kipngetich, Ketui Daniel

    2015-11-01

    High temperature is the main focus in ongoing development of gas turbines. With increasing turbine inlet temperature, turbine blades undergo complex thermal and structural loading subjecting them to large thermal gradients and, consequently, severe thermal stresses and strain. In order to improve the reliability, safety, and service life of blades, accurate measurement of turbine blade temperature is necessary. A gas turbine can generate high-temperature and high-pressure gas that interferes greatly with radiation from turbine blades. In addition, if the gas along the optical path is not completely transparent, blade temperature measurement is subject to significant measurement error in the gas absorption spectrum. In this study, we analyze gas turbine combustion gases using the κ-distribution method combined with the HITEMP and HITRAN databases to calculate the transmission and emissivity of mixed gases. We propose spectral window methods to analyze the radiation characteristics of high-temperature gas under different spectral ranges, which can be used to select the wavelengths used in multispectral temperature measurement on turbine blades and estimate measurement error in the part of the spectrum with smaller influence (transmission > 0.98).

  18. Aging stability of complete blood count and white blood cell differential parameters analyzed by Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, P; Lehto, T

    2009-02-01

    This study presents the results of an aging stability study of complete blood count (CBC) and leukocyte differential parameters using the Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer. Stability studies showed no substantial change in CBC parameters up to 24-48 h at +23 +/- 2 degrees C (room temperature), except for optical platelet count (PLTo). For specimens aged over 24, the value of impedance platelet count yielded more reliable results than the routine PLTo. White blood cell (WBC) differential parameters, except eosinophils, were stable for up to 48 h at +23 +/- 2 degrees C. CBC parameters were stable for 72 h, except mean platelet volume, which slightly increased between 48 and 72 h, at +4 degrees C. WBC differentials were stable 48-72 h, with a slight decrease observed in absolute neutrophils and lymphocytes at +4 degrees C. PMID:18190587

  19. Detection of atmospheric trace gas species by DOAS gas-analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2014-11-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) gas-analyzer was successfully tested. A high pressure 150-W Xe arc lamp was employed as a light source This system consisted of a coaxial telescope, a spectrometer, an analyzer and retroreflector. In order to record the spectra, a monochrometer with a grating and photodiode array was adopted. Gas analyzer spectral data bank includes more than 30 moleculas absorbed in UV spectral region. The measured absorption spectra were evaluated by using a least-squares fit to determine the average mixing ratio of each species in the atmosphere. A number of air pollutants concentrations: SO2, NO2, O3, etc were trace measured. Minimally detected concentration on pathlength 400 m is the unit of ppb at the time of accumulation of 2 min. The results of the field test measurements of pollutants in Tomsk are presented.

  20. Blood gas analysis as a determinant of occupationally related disability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.K.; Zaldivar, G.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Arterial blood gas analysis is one of the criteria used by the Department of Labor to award total and permanent disability for coal workers' pneumoconiosis (Black Lung). We have observed that Black Lung claimants often undergo several blood gas analyses with widely differing results that sometimes range from complete normality to life-threatening hypoxemia in the same subject. We concluded that blood gas analysis in occupationally related disability determination is unreliable, in that quality control and instrumentation are variable; that severe hypoxemia is rare in coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and that such hypoxemia is nonspecific and correlates poorly with breathlessness.

  1. Low-Power Architecture for an Optical Life Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey; Vakhtin, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Analog and digital electronic control architecture has been combined with an operating methodology for an optical trace gas sensor platform that allows very low power consumption while providing four independent gas measurements in essentially real time, as well as a user interface and digital data storage and output. The implemented design eliminates the cross-talk between the measurement channels while maximizing the sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range for each measured gas. The combination provides for battery operation on a simple camcorder battery for as long as eight hours. The custom, compact, rugged, self-contained design specifically targets applications of optical major constituent and trace gas detection for multiple gases using multiple lasers and photodetectors in an integrated package.

  2. A gas chromatographic air analyzer fabricated on a silicon wafer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terry, S. C.; Jerman, J. H.; Angell, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    A miniature gas analysis system has been built based on the principles of gas chromatography (GC). The major components are fabricated in silicon using photolithography and chemical etching techniques, which allows size reductions of nearly three orders of magnitude compared to conventional laboratory instruments. The chromatography system consists of a sample injection valve and a 1.5-m-long separating capillary column, which are fabricated on a substrate silicon wafer. The output thermal conductivity detector is separately batch fabricated and integrably mounted on the substrate wafer. The theory of gas chromatography has been used to optimize the performance of the sensor so that separations of gaseous hydrocarbon mixtures are performed in less than 10 s. The system is expected to find application in the areas of portable ambient air quality monitors, implanted biological experiments, and planetary probes.

  3. Application of interferometry in analyzing gas flow in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongli; Newport, David; Joseph, Shiju; Brandner, Juergen J.

    2011-11-01

    Interferometry is a noninvasive measurement and based on this technique, the measurement or visualization of changes in physical properties of transparent objects can be achieved by detecting the refractive index changes. Gas pressure and temperature can be related to their refractive index, so interferometry can be used for local measurement of changes of these properties along the channel. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was built with a laser with a wavelength of 633 nm, a high speed camera and two acousto-optic modulators (AOMs). Due to small channel characteristic length and sometimes low gas pressure, the measurement could be much influenced by noise. The AOMs can introduce frequency shifts into the system by acousto-optic effect, which can avoid mechanical noise generally by translating piezoelectric mirrors. The channel sides with optical access are made from crystalline silica (Quartz) that does not show speckle effects and any laser absorbance. For initial tests, the local gas pressure drop distribution along microchannel is studied at room temperature. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (ITN - FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 215504.

  4. Rapid Point of Care Analyzer for the Measurement of Cyanide in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Mishra, Santosh K.; Puanngam, Mahitti; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2011-01-01

    A simple, sensitive optical analyzer for the rapid determination of cyanide in blood in point of care applications is described. HCN is liberated by the addition of 20% H3PO4 and is absorbed by a paper filter impregnated with borate-buffered (pH 9.0) hydroxoaquocobinamide Hereinafter called cobinamide). Cobinamide on the filter changes color from orange (λmax = 510 nm) to violet (λmax = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. This color change is monitored in the transmission mode by a light emitting diode (LED) with a 583 nm emission maximum and a photodiode detector. The observed rate of color change increases 10x when the cobinamide solution for filter impregnation is prepared in borate-buffer rather than in water. The use of a second LED emitting at 653 nm and alternate pulsing of the LEDs improve the limit of detection by 4x to ~ 0.5 μM for a 1 mL blood sample. Blood cyanide levels of imminent concern (≥ 10 μM) can be accurately measured in ~ 2 min. The response is proportional to the mass of cyanide in the sample – smaller sample volumes can be successfully used with proportionate change in the concentration LODs. Bubbling air through the blood-acid mixture was found effective for mixing of the acid with the sample and the liberation of HCN. A small amount of ethanol added to the top of the blood was found to be the most effective means to prevent frothing during aeration. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for repetitive determination of blood samples containing 9 μM CN was 1.09% (n=5). The technique was compared blind with a standard microdiffusion-spectrophotometric method used for the determination of cyanide in rabbit blood. The results showed good correlation (slope 1.05, r2 0.9257); independent calibration standards were used. PMID:21553921

  5. Gas signatures from Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli-inoculated human whole blood

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The gaseous headspace above naïve Escherichia Coli (E. coli) cultures and whole human blood inoculated with E. coli were collected and analyzed for the presence of trace gases that may have the potential to be used as novel, non-invasive markers of infectious disease. Methods The naïve E. coli culture, LB broth, and human whole blood or E. coli inoculated whole blood were incubated in hermetically sealable glass bioreactors at 37°C for 24 hrs. LB broth and whole human blood were used as controls for background volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The headspace gases were collected after incubation and analyzed using a gas chromatographic system with multiple column/detector combinations. Results Six VOCs were observed to be produced by E. coli-infected whole blood while there existed nearly zero to relatively negligible amounts of these gases in the whole blood alone, LB broth, or E. coli-inoculated LB broth. These VOCs included dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon disulfide (CS2), ethanol, acetaldehyde, methyl butanoate, and an unidentified gas S. In contrast, there were several VOCs significantly elevated in the headspace above the E. coli in LB broth, but not present in the E. coli/blood mixture. These VOCs included dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), methyl propanoate, 1-propanol, methylcyclohexane, and unidentified gases R2 and Q. Conclusions This study demonstrates 1) that cultivated E. coli in LB broth produce distinct gas profiles, 2) for the first time, the ability to modify E. coli-specific gas profiles by the addition of whole human blood, and 3) that E. coli-human whole blood interactions present different gas emission profiles that have the potential to be used as non-invasive volatile biomarkers of E. coli infection. PMID:23842518

  6. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... for water removed from the sample done in post-processing according to § 1065.659 (40 CFR 1066.620 for... ambient air drawn into the probe. We recommend you use the final, stabilized analyzer reading as the...

  7. Blood gas strategies and management during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Dee Ann

    2005-01-01

    Blood gas management during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass may be corrected by pH stat or alpha stat strategy. The pH stat philosophy is to maintain the blood pH constant at any temperature. Carbon dioxide must be introduced to the oxygenator in order to maintain the pH and pCO2 during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. Conversely, during alpha stat blood gas management pH is maintained according to 37 degrees C despite the patient temperature. Alpha stat management preserves intracellular pH and autoregulation of cerebral vasculature by following the natural shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve. In-line blood gas analysis is a practical tool in assessing adequate blood gas management, because this technology provides immediate detection for modification of air/oxygen/carbon dioxide parameters. Results from several studies favor the pH stat strategy during neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass. This strategy increases tissue oxygenation and cerebral blood flow while cooling. Data also suggest that pH stat management results in better outcomes with shorter ventilation times and intensive care unit stays after pediatric cardiac surgery. PMID:16322734

  8. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  13. Arterial blood gas tensions and pH.

    PubMed Central

    Flenley, D C

    1980-01-01

    1 The definition of PO2 and its relationship to the oxygen saturation (SO2) by the oxygen dissociation curve (ODC) is described with details of the ligands of the ODC and the effects of haemoglobinopathies on P50 (the position of the ODC) and the slope of the ODC (Hill's 'n'). 2 The definition of PCO2 and description of CO2 transport by blood leads to consideration of the basis of acid base balance. 3 Acid base balance is expressed in terms of arterial blood (H+) (or pH) PCO2 relationship using a non-logarithmic diagram. 4 The measurement of arterial blood gas tensions is described with comments on arterial puncture and available modern automated blood gas electrodes and their calibration. 5 Non-invasive indirect measurements of blood gas tensions, by ear oximetry are described, with calibration figures on the Hewlett-Packard 47021A ear oximeter. End-tidal PO2 and PCO2 measurements by mass spectrometer or infra-red CO2 analyser, and of transcutaneous PO2 measurements by a heated polarographic electrode are described. 6 These measurements are necessary to study the effects of pharmacological agents on the chemical control of breathing, on pulmonary gas exchange, and on acid base balance in humans. The measurements are in everyday use in clinical practice, both to aid diagnosis of respiratory diseases, assess their severity, and to quantiate the effects of therapeutic agents. PMID:7356899

  14. 40 CFR 1065.550 - Gas analyzer range verification and drift verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas analyzer range verification and drift verification. 1065.550 Section 1065.550 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Performing an Emission Test Over Specified Duty Cycles § 1065.550 Gas analyzer...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.550 - Gas analyzer range validation, drift validation, and drift correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas analyzer range validation, drift validation, and drift correction. 1065.550 Section 1065.550 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Over Specified Duty Cycles § 1065.550 Gas analyzer range validation, drift validation, and...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.550 - Gas analyzer range validation, drift validation, and drift correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas analyzer range validation, drift validation, and drift correction. 1065.550 Section 1065.550 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Over Specified Duty Cycles § 1065.550 Gas analyzer range validation, drift validation, and...

  17. [A gas chromatographic method for determining acetaldehyde in cadaver blood].

    PubMed

    Savich, V I; Valladares, Kh A; Gusakov, Iu A; Skachko, Z M

    1990-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic method of acetaldehyde detection in blood of subjects who died of alcoholic intoxication is suggested. Method is simple, does not require additional expenses, can be readily used in medicolegal practice and in difficult cases it may help the expert to make an objective conclusion on the cause of death. PMID:2087747

  18. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section 718.105 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED STANDARDS FOR DETERMINING COAL MINERS' TOTAL DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria...

  19. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section 718.105 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED STANDARDS FOR DETERMINING COAL MINERS' TOTAL DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. Rapid presumptive identification of anaerobes in blood cultures by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Sondag, J E; Ali, M; Murray, P R

    1980-01-01

    Production of volatile and nonvolatile metabolic acids in blood culture broths by aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and obligate anaerobic bacteria was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Anaerobic blood culture isolates were presumptively identified by the qualitative analysis of volatile fatty acids. Isolates, with a characteristic Gram stain reaction and cellular morphology, were identified by the following acid patterns: Bacteriodes fragilis group with acetic and propionic acids; Fusobacterium with acetic, butyric, and usually propionic acids; Veillonella with acetic and propionic acids; gram-positive cocci with acetic and butyric acids; and Clostridium with acetic and butyric acids. PMID:7381002

  6. 28 CFR Appendix B to Part 79 - Blood-Gas Study Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blood-Gas Study Tables B Appendix B to... COMPENSATION ACT Pt. 79, App. B Appendix B to Part 79—Blood-Gas Study Tables For arterial blood-gas studies... mmHg 65 mmHg or below. Above 50 mmHg Any value. For arterial blood-gas studies performed at...

  7. 28 CFR Appendix B to Part 79 - Blood-Gas Study Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blood-Gas Study Tables B Appendix B to... COMPENSATION ACT Pt. 79, App. B Appendix B to Part 79—Blood-Gas Study Tables For arterial blood-gas studies... mmHg 65 mmHg or below. Above 50 mmHg Any value. For arterial blood-gas studies performed at...

  8. 28 CFR Appendix B to Part 79 - Blood-Gas Study Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blood-Gas Study Tables B Appendix B to... COMPENSATION ACT Pt. 79, App. B Appendix B to Part 79—Blood-Gas Study Tables For arterial blood-gas studies... mmHg 65 mmHg or below. Above 50 mmHg Any value. For arterial blood-gas studies performed at...

  9. 28 CFR Appendix B to Part 79 - Blood-Gas Study Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blood-Gas Study Tables B Appendix B to... COMPENSATION ACT Pt. 79, App. B Appendix B to Part 79—Blood-Gas Study Tables For arterial blood-gas studies... mmHg 65 mmHg or below. Above 50 mmHg Any value. For arterial blood-gas studies performed at...

  10. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood-Gas Tables C Appendix C to Part 718... DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Pt. 718, App. C Appendix C to Part 718—Blood-Gas Tables The following tables set... of the following tables are met: (1) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites up to...

  11. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood-Gas Tables C Appendix C to Part 718... DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Pt. 718, App. C Appendix C to Part 718—Blood-Gas Tables The following tables set... of the following tables are met: (1) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites up to...

  12. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood-Gas Tables C Appendix C to Part 718... DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Pt. 718, App. C Appendix C to Part 718—Blood-Gas Tables The following tables set... of the following tables are met: (1) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites up to...

  13. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (LORCA) as red blood cell aggregometer.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, M R; Dobbe, J G; Ince, C

    2001-01-01

    The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (LORCA) is unique in its capacity to measure at least two important hemorheological parameters, i.e., deformability of red blood cells (RBC) as well as their aggregation behaviour. In this communication the main principles and characteristics of the aggregometer mode of this instrument are described. Via syllectometry (i.e., laser backscatter versus time), the method allows the measure of both static and kinetic parameters of the aggregation process, e.g., total extent of aggregation, aggregation half time and a combination of these, defined as aggregation index. When the syllectogram deviates from that representing normal rouleaux formation, e.g., in the case of RBC clump formation, this is signalled by a fit error. Maximal flexibility is obtained by various options like an automated re-iteration procedure (which enables to measure the aggregation tendency and/or the aggregate stability) and aggregation at low shear rate. Experiments dealing with reproducibility, stability and sensitivity of the instrument are described. The latter include a few "classic" methods for inducing subtle changes in RBC aggregation behaviour both regarding cellular factors (heat treatment) and changes in medium constituents (fibrinogen, dextrans).It can be concluded that the aggregometer mode of the LORCA considerably increases the feasibility of this instrument for hemorheological investigations. PMID:11790865

  14. Arterial blood gas reference values for sea level and an altitude of 1,400 meters.

    PubMed

    Crapo, R O; Jensen, R L; Hegewald, M; Tashkin, D P

    1999-11-01

    Blood gas measurements were collected on healthy lifetime nonsmokers at sea level (n = 96) and at an altitude of 1,400 meters (n = 243) to establish reference equations. At each study site, arterial blood samples were analyzed in duplicate on two separate blood gas analyzers and CO-oximeters. Arterial blood gas variables included Pa(O(2)), Pa(CO(2)), pH, and calculated alveolar-arterial PO(2) difference (AaPO(2)). CO-oximeter variables were Hb, COHb, MetHb, and Sa(O(2)). Subjects were 18 to 81 yr of age with 166 male and 173 female. Outlier data were excluded from multiple regression analysis, and reference equations were fitted to the data in two ways: (1) best fit using linear, squared, and cross-product terms; (2) simple equations, including only the variables that explained at least 3% of the variance. Two sets of equations were created: (1) using only the sea level data and (2) using the combined data with barometric pressure as an independent variable. Comparisons with earlier studies revealed small but significant differences; the decline in Pa(O(2)) with age at each altitude was consistent with most previous studies. At sea level, the equation that included barometric pressure predicted Pa(O(2)) slightly better than the sea level specific equation. The inclusion of barometric pressure in the equations allows better prediction of blood gas reference values at sea level and at altitudes as high as 1,400 meters. PMID:10556115

  15. Oxygen tension measurement using an automatic blood gas analyser1

    PubMed Central

    Becket, J; Chakrabarti, M K; Gillies, I D S; Orchard, C; Hall, G M; Bourdillon, P J

    1981-01-01

    Two different methods of assessing the reliability of the oxygen electrode of one model of an automatic blood gas analyser (BGA) have been studied. In the first, a single automatic BGA was assessed by using outdated bank blood which was pumped around a small extracorporeal circuit into which known gas mixtures were passed. Oxygen tension was varied between 2 and 16 kPa. In the second, fresh heparinized blood was tonometered with calibrated gases and submitted to the automatic BGA used in the first part of the study and also to three other identical machines. Each of the machines was between 3 and 4 years old. Eighteen different units of blood were used in the first part of the study. The correlation coefficient between the automatic BGA and the Po2 in the extracorporeal circuit varied between 0.29 and 0.99. 31% of the total of 209 measurements made by the automatic BGA were more than 1.2 kPa from the reference value, 25% of them being between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the reference value. In the second part of the study, the correlation coefficient between this automatic BGA and the tonometered blood was 0.96. The correlation coefficients for the 3 other identical BGAs were 0.84, 0.97 and 0.88, indicating that the BGA used in the first part of the study was no worse than any of the others. It is suggested that although clinicians are likely to ignore readings of an automatic BGA that are more than 4.0 kPa from the true value and are likely to repeat the investigation, readings between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the true value may adversely affect patient management. PMID:7288796

  16. Oxygen tension measurement using an automatic blood gas analyser.

    PubMed

    Becket, J; Orchard, C; Chakrabarti, M K; Hall, G M; Gillies, I D; Bourdillon, P J

    1981-08-01

    Two different methods of assessing the reliability of the oxygen electrode of one model of an automatic blood gas analyser (BGA) have been studied. In the first, a single automatic BGA was assessed by using outdated bank blood which was pumped around a small extracorporeal circuit into which known gas mixtures were passed. Oxygen tension was varied between 2 and 16 kPa. In the second, fresh heparinized blood was tonometered with calibrated gases and submitted to the automatic BGA used in the first part of the study and also to three other identical machines. Each of the machines was between 3 and 4 years old.Eighteen different units of blood were used in the first part of the study. The correlation coefficient between the automatic BGA and the Po(2) in the extracorporeal circuit varied between 0.29 and 0.99. 31% of the total of 209 measurements made by the automatic BGA were more than 1.2 kPa from the reference value, 25% of them being between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the reference value. In the second part of the study, the correlation coefficient between this automatic BGA and the tonometered blood was 0.96. The correlation coefficients for the 3 other identical BGAs were 0.84, 0.97 and 0.88, indicating that the BGA used in the first part of the study was no worse than any of the others.It is suggested that although clinicians are likely to ignore readings of an automatic BGA that are more than 4.0 kPa from the true value and are likely to repeat the investigation, readings between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the true value may adversely affect patient management. PMID:7288796

  17. Method and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1985-08-05

    A rotor and disc assembly for use in a centrifugal fast analyzer. The assembly is designed to process multiple samples of whole blood followed by aliquoting of the resultant serum into precisely measured samples for subsequent chemical analysis. The assembly requires minimal operator involvement with no mechanical pipetting. The system comprises: (1) a whole blood sample disc; (2) a serum sample disc; (3) a sample preparation rotor; and (4) an analytical rotor. The blood sample disc and serum sample disc are designed with a plurality of precision bore capillary tubes arranged in a spoked array. Samples of blood are loaded into the blood sample disc by capillary action and centrifugally discharged into cavities of the sample preparation rotor where separation of serum and solids is accomplished. The serum is loaded into the capillaries of the serum sample disc by capillary action and subsequently centrifugally expelled into cuvettes of the analyticaly rotor for conventional methods. 5 figs.

  18. Comparative usefulness of inflammatory markers to indicate bacterial infection-analyzed according to blood culture results and related clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hirokazu; Shirano, Michinori; Kasamatsu, Yu; Morimura, Ayumi; Iida, Ko; Kishi, Tomomi; Goto, Tetsushi; Okamoto, Saki; Ehara, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    To assess relationships of inflammatory markers and 2 related clinical factors with blood culture results, we retrospectively investigated inpatients' blood culture and blood chemistry findings that were recorded from January to December 2014 using electronic medical records and analyzed the data of 852 subjects (426 culture-positive and 426 culture-negative). Results suggested that the risk of positive blood culture statistically increased as inflammatory marker levels and the number of related factors increased. Concerning the effectiveness of inflammatory markers, when the outcome definition was also changed for C-reactive protein (CRP), the odds ratio had a similar value, whereas when the outcome definition of blood culture positivity was used for procalcitonin (PCT), the greatest effectiveness of that was detected. Therefore, the current results suggest that PCT is more useful than CRP as an auxiliary indication of bacterial infection. PMID:26525643

  19. Method and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, Carl A.; Johnson, Wayne F.; Walker, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A rotor and disc assembly for use in a centrifugal fast analyzer. The assembly is designed to process multiple samples of whole blood followed by aliquoting of the resultant serum into precisely measured samples for subsequent chemical analysis. The assembly requires minimal operator involvement with no mechanical pipetting. The system comprises (1) a whole blood sample disc, (2) a serum sample disc, (3) a sample preparation rotor, and (4) an analytical rotor. The blood sample disc and serum sample disc are designed with a plurality of precision bore capillary tubes arranged in a spoked array. Samples of blood are loaded into the blood sample disc in capillary tubes filled by capillary action and centrifugally discharged into cavities of the sample preparation rotor where separation of serum and solids is accomplished. The serum is loaded into the capillaries of the serum sample disc by capillary action and subsequently centrifugally expelled into cuvettes of the analytical rotor for analysis by conventional methods.

  20. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in human placenta and cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.; Saito, H.; Wakisaka, I.

    1986-10-01

    Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in placenta, maternal blood, cord blood, and milk were carried out. Trichlorobiphenyl, tetrachlorobiphenyl, pentachlorobiphenyls, and hexachlorobiphenyls were identified by the mass chromatogram and the mass spectra. Some minor peaks of PCBs were identified by gas chromatography. The relationship between the PCB concentration in placenta and that in milk is different in each PCB congener. The higher the chlorine content of the PCB congener, the more significant the correlation. No significant but a low negative correlation exists between the concentration of some PCB congeners in the placenta and that in cord blood. On the other hand, a significant linear correlation exists between the concentration of hexachlorobenzene in the placenta and that in cord blood. The transplacental transport of each PCB congener varied depending upon its chemical nature. Trichlorobiphenyl and tetrachlorobiphenyl were more transferable than hexachlorobiphenyls. The results show that the placenta and cord blood are useful human samples to analyze the body burden of environmental pollutants and to estimate their transfer from mother to fetus.

  1. Application to cows and horses of Spotchem, a dry-chemistry blood analyzer for use in veterinary clinics.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, F; Satho, M; Koyama, S; Nakadaka, K; Chiba, M; Ikeda, N; Hakamada, R; Higuchi, S; Kawamura, S

    1994-02-01

    The usefulness of a dry-chemistry blood analyzer, Spotchem SP-4410 (SP-4410) in a veterinary clinic for analysis of bovine and equine blood chemistry was studied. We quantitated total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), total bilirubin (T-Bil), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total cholesterol (T-Cho), glucose (Glu), calcium (Ca), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in bovine sera. Each sample was assayed with both the SP-4410 and an automated blood analyzer which served as a wet-chemistry reference system, and the data were analyzed with regression analysis. The correlation coefficient for AST was 0.997 being the highest for all the parameters, and all the correlation coefficients were 0.93 or higher. The coefficients of variation were lower than 5.0 except in the case of bovine T-Bil where it was 5,756. The ranges of normal reference values measured by SP-4410 were the same as those reported by other investigators in most cases, but those for GGT and CPK were slightly higher. The strongest interference was observed with hemoglobin. It seems that dry-chemical-analysis of blood serum using the SP-4410 is useful for analysis of bovine and equine blood. PMID:8085395

  2. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2013-06-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analyzers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and season-long performance were not assessed. The open-path gas analyzer is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, whereas for G1301-f methane measurements interference from water vapor is straightforward to correct since the instrument measures both gases simultaneously. In any case, if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyzer is needed.

  3. Industrial SO2 emission monitoring through a portable multichannel gas analyzer with an optimized retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Youwen; Liu, Cheng; Xie, Pinhua; Hartl, Andreas; Chan, Kalok; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Wei; Qin, Min; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-03-01

    SO2 variability over a large concentration range and interferences from other gases have been major limitations in industrial SO2 emission monitoring. This study demonstrates accurate industrial SO2 emission monitoring through a portable multichannel gas analyzer with an optimized retrieval algorithm. The proposed analyzer features a large dynamic measurement range and correction of interferences from other coexisting infrared absorbers such as NO, CO, CO2, NO2, CH4, HC, N2O, and H2O. The multichannel gas analyzer measures 11 different wavelength channels simultaneously to correct several major problems of an infrared gas analyzer including system drift, conflict of sensitivity, interferences among different infrared absorbers, and limitation of measurement range. The optimized algorithm uses a third polynomial instead of a constant factor to quantify gas-to-gas interference. Measurement results show good performance in the linear and nonlinear ranges, thereby solving the problem that the conventional interference correction is restricted by the linearity of the intended and interfering channels. The results imply that the measurement range of the developed multichannel analyzer can be extended to the nonlinear absorption region. The measurement range and accuracy are evaluated through experimental laboratory calibration. Excellent agreement was achieved, with a Pearson correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.99977 with a measurement range from approximately 5 to 10 000 ppmv and a measurement error of less than 2 %. The instrument was also deployed for field measurement. Emissions from three different factories were measured. The emissions of these factories have been characterized by different coexisting infrared absorbers, covering a wide range of concentration levels. We compared our measurements with commercial SO2 analyzers. Overall, good agreement was achieved.

  4. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyses at Reduced Pressures: A Mineral Database for the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.; Lin, I.-C.; Morris, R. V.; Boynton, W. V.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile-bearing minerals (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, and sulfates) may be important phases on the surface of Mars. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which was part of the Mars Polar Lander payload, was to detect and identify volatile-bearing phases in the Martian regolith. The TEGA instrument is composed of a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) interfaced with an evolved gas analyzer (EGA). The EGA consists of a Herriott cell of a tunable-diode laser (TDL) spectrometer that determines CO, and H2O abundances. The sample chamber in TEGA operates at about 100 mbar (-76 torr) with a N2 carrier gas flow of 0.4 sccm. Essentially no information exists on the effects of reduced pressure on the thermal properties of volatile-bearing minerals. Here we present a database for the thermal behavior of volatile-bearing phases under reduced pressure conditions.

  5. Blood lead levels of wild Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and black scoters (Melanitta nigra) in Alaska using a portable blood lead analyzer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C.S.; Luebbert, J.; Mulcahy, D.; Schamber, J.; Rosenberg, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Sea duck populations are declining in Alaska. The reasons for the decline are not known; environmental lead exposure is one suspected cause. Thirty wild Steller's eider ducks (Polysticta stelleri) and 40 wild black scoter ducks (Melanitta nigra) were tested for blood lead levels using a portable blood lead analyzer (LeadCare; ESA, Inc., Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01824, USA). Sixty-seven and one-tenth percent of the sea ducks had undetectable blood lead levels, 30.0% had values indicating normal or background lead exposure, and 2.9% had values indicating lead exposure. None of the birds had values indicating lead toxicity, and no birds demonstrated clinical signs of toxicity. Birds in areas with higher human population density had higher blood lead levels than those in less densely populated areas. This is the first time a portable blood lead analyzer has been utilized with sea ducks in a field setting. Because it provides immediate results, it is valuable as a screening tool for investigators carrying out surgical procedures on birds in the field as well as establishing baseline blood lead data on sea ducks. Lead exposure does occur in wild sea ducks, and the study indicates that additional research is needed in order to determine the role environmental lead plays in declining sea duck populations. Copyright 2006 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

  6. VOC SURVEILLANCE USING EPA'S TRACE ATMOSPHERIC GAS ANALYZER (TAGA) AND ASPECT AERIAL PLATFORM FTIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a heavily industrialized area in Southeast Texas, EPA atmospheric scientists recently conducted an inter-comparison study of the EPA mobile Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) and the ASPECT Aerial Platform FTIR. The TAGA is a mobile air sampling device that is capable of d...

  7. Development and Remodeling of the Vertebrate Blood-Gas Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Makanya, Andrew; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; Djonov, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    During vertebrate development, the lung inaugurates as an endodermal bud from the primitive foregut. Dichotomous subdivision of the bud results in arborizing airways that form the prospective gas exchanging chambers, where a thin blood-gas barrier (BGB) is established. In the mammalian lung, this proceeds through conversion of type II cells to type I cells, thinning, and elongation of the cells as well as extrusion of the lamellar bodies. Subsequent diminution of interstitial tissue and apposition of capillaries to the alveolar epithelium establish a thin BGB. In the noncompliant avian lung, attenuation proceeds through cell-cutting processes that result in remarkable thinning of the epithelial layer. A host of morphoregulatory molecules, including transcription factors such as Nkx2.1, GATA, HNF-3, and WNT5a; signaling molecules including FGF, BMP-4, Shh, and TFG-β and extracellular proteins and their receptors have been implicated. During normal physiological function, the BGB may be remodeled in response to alterations in transmural pressures in both blood capillaries and airspaces. Such changes are mitigated through rapid expression of the relevant genes for extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors. While an appreciable amount of information regarding molecular control has been documented in the mammalian lung, very little is available on the avian lung. PMID:23484070

  8. Integrated gas analyzer for complete monitoring of turbine engine test cells.

    PubMed

    Markham, James R; Bush, Patrick M; Bonzani, Peter J; Scire, James J; Zaccardi, Vincent A; Jalbert, Paul A; Bryant, M Denise; Gardner, Donald G

    2004-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is proving to be reliable and economical for the quantification of many gas-phase species during testing and development of gas turbine engines in ground-based facilities such as sea-level test cells and altitude test cells. FT-IR measurement applications include engine-generated exhaust gases, facility air provided as input to engines, and ambient air in and around test cells. Potentially, the traditionally used assembly of many gas-specific single gas analyzers will be eliminated. However, the quest for a single instrument capable of complete gas-phase monitoring at turbine engine test cells has previously suffered since the FT-IR method cannot measure infrared-inactive oxygen molecules, a key operational gas to both air-breathing propulsion systems and test cell personnel. To further the quest, the FT-IR sensor used for the measurements presented in this article was modified by integration of a miniature, solid-state electrochemical oxygen sensor. Embedded in the FT-IR unit at a location near the long-effective-optical-path-length gas sampling cell, the amperometric oxygen sensor provides simultaneous, complementary information to the wealth of spectroscopic data provided by the FT-IR method. PMID:14727730

  9. Effects of SO2 and pH on blood-gas partition coefficients of inert gases.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mori, M; Kawai, A; Asano, K; Takasugi, T; Umeda, A; Yokoyama, T

    1990-01-01

    Potential effects of SO2 and of pH on blood-gas partition coefficients, lambda, for inert gases, including SF6, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane, diethyl ether, acetone and N2, were systematically investigated using human blood. Measurements on lambda were performed at 37 degrees C in conditions of varied SO2 and pH using gas chromatography. Incorporating the experimental data on lambda, multiple inert gas elimination was applied to 18 patients with varied chronic lung diseases, in order to estimate the effects of SO2 and of pH on both inert gas exchange and resultant recovery of VA/Q distribution in the lung. For this purpose, the data obtained by the procedure of multiple inert gas elimination were analyzed with the classical approach but allowance was made for lambda of the indicator gas to vary according to exchange of O2 and of CO2 in the pulmonary capillary. Among the gases studied, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane and diethyl ether showed significantly smaller lambda values in the oxygenated blood than in deoxygenated blood, whereas SF6, acetone and N2 were little dependent on SO2. An increase in lambda was found for ethane and a decrease for halothane with increasing pH in the blood. The other gases were not significantly influenced by pH. In spite of these experimental findings, regional difference of either SO2 or pH in the lung did not exert important influence on the inert gas exchange or on the predicted VA/Q distribution. In conclusion, blood-gas partition coefficients of some inert gases are consistently altered by SO2 and pH, but their possible effects on inert gas exchange seem to be negligible. PMID:1965757

  10. Membrane mediated development of the vertebrate blood-gas-barrier.

    PubMed

    Makanya, Andrew N

    2016-03-01

    During embryonic lung development, establishment of the gas-exchanging units is guided by epithelial tubes lined by columnar cells. Ultimately, a thin blood-gas barrier (BGB) is established and forms the interface for efficient gas exchange. This thin BGB is achieved through processes, which entail lowering of tight junctions, stretching, and thinning in mammals. In birds the processes are termed peremerecytosis, if they involve cell squeezing and constriction, or secarecytosis, if they entail cutting cells to size. In peremerecytosis, cells constrict at a point below the protruding apical part, resulting in fusion of the opposing membranes and discharge of the aposome, or the cell may be squeezed by the more endowed cognate neighbors. Secarecytosis may entail formation of double membranes below the aposome, subsequent unzipping and discharge of the aposome, or vesicles form below the aposome, fuse in a bilateral manner, and release the aposome. These processes occur within limited developmental windows, and are mediated through cell membranes that appear to be of intracellular in origin. In addition, basement membranes (BM) play pivotal roles in differentiation of the epithelial and endothelial layers of the BGB. Laminins found in the BM are particularly important in the signaling pathways that result in formation of squamous pneumocytes and pulmonary capillaries, the two major components of the BGB. Some information exists on the contribution by BM to BGB formation, but little is known regarding the molecules that drive peremerecytosis, or even the origins and composition of the double and vesicular membranes involved in secarecytosis. PMID:26991887

  11. Leptin Integrates Vertebrate Evolution: from Oxygen to the Blood-Gas Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Torday, J.S.; Powell, F.L.; Farmer, C.G.; Orgeig, S.; Nielsen, H.C.; Hall, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The following are the proceedings of a symposium held at the Second International Congress for Respiratory Science in Bad Honnef, Germany. The goals of the symposium were to delineate the blood-gas barrier phenotype across vertebrate species; to delineate the interrelationship between the evolution of the blood-gas barrier, locomotion and metabolism; to introduce the selection pressures for the evolution of the surfactant system as a key to understanding the physiology of the blood-gas barrier; to introduce the lung lipofibroblast and its product, leptin, which coordinately regulates pulmonary surfactant, type IV collagen in the basement membrane and host defense, as the cell-molecular site of selection pressure for the blood-gas barrier; to drill down to the gene regulatory network(s) involved in leptin signaling and the blood-gas barrier phenotype; to extend the relationship between leptin and the blood-gas-barrier to diving mammals. PMID:20096383

  12. Transcutaneous analyte measuring method (TAMM): a reflective, noninvasive, near-infrared blood chemistry analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Ruchti, Timothy L.

    1995-04-01

    TAMM for Transcutaneous Analyte Measuring Method is a near infrared spectroscopic technique for the noninvasive measurement of human blood chemistry. A near infrared indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) photodiode array spectrometer has been developed and tested on over 1,000 patients as a part of an SBIR program sponsored by the Naval Medical Research and Development Command. Nine (9) blood analytes have been measured and evaluated during pre-clinical testing: sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, bicarbonate, BUN, glucose, hematocrit and hemoglobin. A reflective rather than a transmissive invasive approach to measurement has been taken to avoid variations resulting from skin color and sensor positioning. The current status of the instrumentation, neural network pattern recognition algorithms and test results will be discussed.

  13. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (2) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites 3,000 to 5,999 feet above sea level... arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites 6,000 feet or more above sea level: Arterial PCO2 (mm Hg... tables are met: (1) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites up to 2,999 feet above...

  14. An experimental setup with ultrasonic gas analyzers and real time analysis of the composition of a binary gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, V.; Vítek, M.; Doubek, M.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes an automated measuring apparatus with an ultrasonic gas analyzer and realtime analysis of the composition of the gas. The apparatus is designed for preparing binary gas mixtures and making measurements in a wide range of pressures (from 0.8 bara to 15 bara) and temperatures (between -15°C and 80°C). The apparatus was developed to determine the thermophysical properties of fluorocarbon mixtures for potential use in the cooling circuits of several Large Hadron Collider projects at CERN. The design of its control system took into account the safety and reliability o the gas analyzer, and the need to limit the presence of laboratory personnel. The control system was implemented in PVSS-II, the Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition standard chosen for LHC and its experiments at CERN. The second part of the paper describes the implementation and verification of the algorithm for continuous real-time determination of the composition of the refrigerant mixture. The algorithm is based on minimizing the quadratic norm fromthe measured data and from the pre-generated look-up tables acquired from the NIST REFPROP software package.

  15. [Bronchodilator aerosol propellant interferes with an photoacoustic spectrophotometer respiratory gas analyzer].

    PubMed

    Makino, A; Morimoto, Y; Matsumoto, S; Oka, H; Shimizu, K; Miyauchi, Y

    1998-05-01

    A patient with bronchial asthma was scheduled for an operation under nitrous oxide-isoflurane anesthesia. We monitored isoflurane concentrations continuously using an anesthetic gas analyzer (BK 1304). Upon puffing procaterol hydrochloride aerosol for 4 times, the analyzer showed a rapid increase in end-tidal isoflurane concentration. The BK 1304 uses infrared photoacoustic spectrophotometry and it is susceptible to interferences caused by Freon propellants in bronchodilator aerosols. We should take care in monitoring inhalational anesthetics when using aerosols containing Freon propellants. PMID:9621676

  16. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  17. Crowdsourcing Malaria Parasite Quantification: An Online Game for Analyzing Images of Infected Thick Blood Smears

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Asier; Frean, John

    2012-01-01

    Background There are 600,000 new malaria cases daily worldwide. The gold standard for estimating the parasite burden and the corresponding severity of the disease consists in manually counting the number of parasites in blood smears through a microscope, a process that can take more than 20 minutes of an expert microscopist’s time. Objective This research tests the feasibility of a crowdsourced approach to malaria image analysis. In particular, we investigated whether anonymous volunteers with no prior experience would be able to count malaria parasites in digitized images of thick blood smears by playing a Web-based game. Methods The experimental system consisted of a Web-based game where online volunteers were tasked with detecting parasites in digitized blood sample images coupled with a decision algorithm that combined the analyses from several players to produce an improved collective detection outcome. Data were collected through the MalariaSpot website. Random images of thick blood films containing Plasmodium falciparum at medium to low parasitemias, acquired by conventional optical microscopy, were presented to players. In the game, players had to find and tag as many parasites as possible in 1 minute. In the event that players found all the parasites present in the image, they were presented with a new image. In order to combine the choices of different players into a single crowd decision, we implemented an image processing pipeline and a quorum algorithm that judged a parasite tagged when a group of players agreed on its position. Results Over 1 month, anonymous players from 95 countries played more than 12,000 games and generated a database of more than 270,000 clicks on the test images. Results revealed that combining 22 games from nonexpert players achieved a parasite counting accuracy higher than 99%. This performance could be obtained also by combining 13 games from players trained for 1 minute. Exhaustive computations measured the parasite

  18. Sensor-based analyzer for continuous emission monitoring in gas pipeline applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, P.F.; Sheridan, D.R.; Cooper, M.D.; Banchieri, A.J.

    1998-04-01

    Continuous emissions monitoring of gas turbine engines in pipeline service have typically been monitored using either laboratory derived instruments (CEMS), or predicted using data from low cost sensors on the engines and algorithms generated by mapping engine performance (PEMS). A new cost-effective system developed under a program sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (Chicago) combines the advantages of both systems to monitor engine emissions in gas transmission service. This hybrid system is a sensor-based analyzer that uses a sensor array, including a newly developed NO{sub x} sensor, to directly monitor NO{sub x}, CO, and O{sub 2} emissions at the stack. The gases are measured hot and wet. The new systems were installed and tested on a gas-fired Rolls Royce Spey turbine engine and on Ingersoll-Rand KVG-410 and Cooper GMVH-10 reciprocating engines in gas transmission service. These systems passed the Relative Accuracy Test (Part B) required under US EPA regulations (40 CFR 60).

  19. Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Evolved Gas Analysis at Mars Ambient Conditions Using the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, Douglas W.; Quadlander, G.; Kerry, K. E.; Bode, R. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Ward, M. G.; Pathare, A. V.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) combined with evolved gas analysis (EGA) is a well developed technique for the analysis of a wide variety of sample types with broad application in material and soil sciences. However, the use of the technique for samples under conditions of pressure and temperature as found on other planets is one of current C development and cutting edge research. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (MGA), which was designed, built and tested at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Lab (LPL), utilizes DSC/EGA. TEGA, which was sent to Mars on the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander, was to be the first application of DSC/EGA on the surface of Mars as well as the first direct measurement of the volatile-bearing mineralogy in martian soil.

  20. Evaluation of Portable Multi-Gas Analyzers for use by Safety Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, D. E.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Bardel, D. N.

    1998-01-01

    During confined space entry operations as well as Shuttle-safing operations, United Space Alliance (USA)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) safety personnel use a variety of portable instrumentation to monitor for hazardous levels of compounds such as nitrogen dioxide (N%), monomethylhydrazine (NMM), FREON 21, ammonia (NH3), oxygen (O2), and combustibles (as hydrogen (H2)). Except for O2 and H2, each compound is monitored using a single analyzer. In many cases these analyzers are 5 to 10 years old and require frequent maintenance. In addition, they are cumbersome to carry and tend to make the job of personnel monitoring physically taxing. As part of an effort to upgrade the sensor technology background information was requested from a total of 27 manufacturers of portable multi-gas instruments. A set of criteria was established to determine which vendors would be selected for laboratory evaluation. These criteria were based on requests made by USA/NASA Safety personnel in order to meet requirements within their respective areas for confined-space and Shuttle-safing operations. Each of the 27 manufacturers of multi-gas analyzers was sent a copy of the criteria and asked to fill in the appropriate information pertaining to their instrumentation. Based on the results of the sensor criteria worksheets, a total of 9 vendors out of 27 surveyed manufacturers were chosen for evaluation. Each vendor included in the final evaluation process was requested to configure each of two analyzers with NO2, NH3, O2, and combustible sensors. A set of lab tests was designed in order to determine which of the multi-gas instruments under evaluation was best suited for use in both shuttle and confined space operations. These tests included linearity/repeatability, zero/span drift response/recovery, humidity, interference, and maintenance. At the conclusion of lab testing three vendors were selected for additional field testing. Based on the results of both the lab and

  1. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-10-01

    A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This eight quarterly technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two to three additional wells will be selected for remediation for inclusion into the study. The results of the additional remediations will be included in the final report.

  2. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-12-01

    A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This final technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two additional wells were selected for remediation and included into the study. Furthermore, the remediation results of wells that were a part of the study group of wells are also described.

  3. Evaluation of low cost residual gas analyzers for ultrahigh vacuum applications

    SciTech Connect

    M. Rao; D. Dong

    1996-10-01

    In recent years several low cost computer controlled residual gas analyzers (RGAs) have been introduced into the market place. It would be very useful to know the performance characteristics of these RGAs in order to make an informed selection for UHV applications. The UHV applications include extreme sensitivity helium leak detection and monitoring of the residual gas spectra in UHV systems. In this article, the sensitivity and linearity data for nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium are presented in the pressure range 10{sup {minus}8}---10{sup {minus}1} Pa. Further, the relationships between focus voltage and ion currents, relative sensitivity, and fragmentation factor are also included. A direct comparison method is used in obtaining this data. Spinning rotor and extractor gauges are the transfer standard gauges used in Jefferson Lab's vacuum calibration facility, with which all the reported measurements here were carried out.

  4. Method for analyzing the gas jet impinging on a liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordasov, M. M.; Savenkov, A. P.; Chechetov, K. E.

    2016-05-01

    The impingement of a gas jet on a liquid surface in the stable-state regime is analyzed theoretically. We consider the case of the perpendicular jet action. It is found that for describing analytically the processes occurring in this case, it is necessary to employ the balance equation for forces at the interface and not the balance equation for pressures at the lowest point of cavity, which was used in most available publications. Recommendations for experimental studies of a gas jet impinging on a liquid surface are formulated. We report on the results of experiments confirming the correctness of our theoretical analysis and making it possible to determine the empirical value of the shape factor. The experiments were carried out with air and epoxy resin. The cavity formed on the liquid surface had radius R 0 = 1-8 mm and depth h = 0.2-12.5 mm.

  5. Enabling Continuous, Field-Based Isotope and Greenhouse Gas Measurements with WS-CRDS-based Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, C.; van Pelt, A.

    2009-04-01

    When new instrumentation becomes widely available, it has the power to fundamentally change how measurements are made. In particular, technology developments that enable measurements to be done more simply, at lower cost, by a greater number of scientists, moving information-rich, laboratory-quality measurements from the lab out into the field -- these are the innovations that can aid in moving the science forward. Here we describe how the application of a novel cavity-enhanced spectroscopic technique called wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) has been pivotal in developing gas an isotope analyzers capable of being deployed in the field, unattended, for long periods of time. This particular implementation of the traditional cavity ring down technique employs several additional key aspects of control and design to achieve highly sensitive, highly stable measurements. WS-CRDS owes its high sensitivity to an extremely long optical interaction pathlengh, as well as to its complete immunity to laser noise since the laser is actually off during the measurement. To stabilize the spectroscopic line itself, the temperature and pressure of the gas are tightly controlled. The analyzer's optical cavity, gas handling system and analog electronics are themselves also tightly temperature controlled. The heart of the WS-CRDS technique is, however, the wavelength monitor which further ensures the stability of the measurement by continuously measuring and tightly controlling the laser wavelength. A key design aspect of the WS-CRDS analyzer is its three-mirror, traveling-wave cavity which allows optical backreflections to be avoided and further adds to the inherent stability of the optical train. The analyzer owes its ease of use to the design requirement that it be field-deployable, in locations without personnel, with the ability to restart itself and automatically resume collecting data even after a power failure. Beyond the design aspects of the analyzer

  6. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood-Gas Tables C Appendix C to Part 718... DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Pt. 718, App. C Appendix C to Part 718—Blood-Gas Tables The following tables set... rebutting evidence, if the values specified in one of the following tables are met: (1) For arterial...

  7. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This seventh quarterly technical progress report further describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the methodology to analyze the group of wells where recent problems have occurred utilizing the data gathering forms. This report also describes the methodology to select the two wells with the greatest potential for increase and also having the most frequently occurring problem. Finally, this report describes the preliminary results of the remediation applied to the two wells selected. Two wells selected and analyzed from a twenty-four well study group indicated that their current abnormal production decline was attributable to fluid build-up in the wellbore. Subsequent remediation work of putting both wells on pump to reduce fluid build-up in the well bore decreased the flowing bottom hole pressure and increased gas production dramatically.

  8. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA): An Instrument to Characterize the Martian Soil Mineralogy and Atmosphere Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; McKay, David S.; Ming, Douglas; Allen, Carlton C.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry

    2000-01-01

    This abstract describes an instrument and experiment to be proposed for a future Mars surface mission to conduct basic research on environmental characterization. The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) experiment is designed to provide information on Mars surface material properties in preparation for human missions of exploration. The goals of the investigation are: 1) Define and determine surface mineralogy of soil and dust and their effects on humans and machines; and 2) Conduct in-situ investigations aimed at identifying possible evidence of past or present life on Mars.

  9. Cannabichromene and tetrahydrocannabinol determination in mouse blood and brain by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    DeLong, Gerald T; Wolf, Carl E; Poklis, Alphonse; Lichtman, Aron

    2011-09-01

    Cannabichromene (CBC) is a phytocannabinoid, the second most abundant cannabinoid quantitatively in marijuana. CBC has been shown to produce antinociception and anti-inflammatory effects in rodents. This method is validated for the measurement of THC and CBC simultaneously after extraction from mouse blood or brain. Whole brain harvested from mice was homogenized 2:1 (v/w) with normal saline. Fifty nanograms of THC-d₃ was added to 0.5 mL of heparinized mouse blood, brain homogenate, and THC and CBC fortified blood or brain calibrators, then equilibrated overnight at 5 °C. Two milliliters of "ice cold" acetonitrile was added drop-wise while the sample was vortex mixed, and then the sample was centrifuged and stored overnight at -30 °C. The cannabinoids were extracted from the acetonitrile layer with 2 mL of 0.2 N NaOH and 4 mL of hexane/ethyl acetate (9:1). The solvent was isolated and evaporated to dryness. Trimethylsilyl derivatives were prepared and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Linearity in blood and brain of THC and CBC was 2-10,000 ng/mL (ng/g). THC and CBC recovery ranged from 56 to 78% in blood and brain. Precision was demonstrated at 100 ng/mL and 1000 ng/mL with CVs < 15%. The validated method allows for blood and brain concentrations of cannabinoids to be quantificated and correlated with pharmacological effects produced in mice. PMID:21871159

  10. bpshape wk4: a computer program that implements a physiological model for analyzing the shape of blood pressure waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocasio, W. C.; Rigney, D. R.; Clark, K. P.; Mark, R. G.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We describe the theory and computer implementation of a newly-derived mathematical model for analyzing the shape of blood pressure waveforms. Input to the program consists of an ECG signal, plus a single continuous channel of peripheral blood pressure, which is often obtained invasively from an indwelling catheter during intensive-care monitoring or non-invasively from a tonometer. Output from the program includes a set of parameter estimates, made for every heart beat. Parameters of the model can be interpreted in terms of the capacitance of large arteries, the capacitance of peripheral arteries, the inertance of blood flow, the peripheral resistance, and arterial pressure due to basal vascular tone. Aortic flow due to contraction of the left ventricle is represented by a forcing function in the form of a descending ramp, the area under which represents the stroke volume. Differential equations describing the model are solved by the method of Laplace transforms, permitting rapid parameter estimation by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Parameter estimates and their confidence intervals are given in six examples, which are chosen to represent a variety of pressure waveforms that are observed during intensive-care monitoring. The examples demonstrate that some of the parameters may fluctuate markedly from beat to beat. Our program will find application in projects that are intended to correlate the details of the blood pressure waveform with other physiological variables, pathological conditions, and the effects of interventions.

  11. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous... adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the probe. We recommend you use the final... gases diluted in air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify...

  12. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liukang; McDermitt, Dayle; Anderson, Tyler; Riensche, Brad; Komissarov, Anatoly; Howe, Julie

    2012-02-01

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been

  13. Use of the Cell-Dyn Sapphire hematology analyzer for automated counting of blood cells in body fluids.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Dieter; Van Moer, Guy; Martens, Geert A; Nanos, Nikolaos; Smet, Lutgarde; Jochmans, Kristin; De Waele, Marc

    2010-02-01

    The enumeration and identification of blood cells in body fluids offers important information for the diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. Manual microscopic methods (hemacytometer total cell count and cytocentrifuged differential count) have inherent analytic and economic disadvantages but are still considered the "gold standard" methods. We evaluated the analytic and clinical performance of the Cell-Dyn Sapphire hematology analyzer (Abbott Diagnostics Division, Santa Clara, CA) for automated blood cell counting and leukocyte differential counting in cerebrospinal fluid, serous fluid (peritoneal and pleural fluid), and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid, and we compared the performance with the respective manual methods. In the present article, we describe its applicability for the distinct body fluids, and we highlight limitations and caveats. PMID:20093239

  14. Extremely sensitive CWA analyzer based on a novel optical pressure sensor in photoacoustic gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Jyrki K.; Koskinen, Vesa; Uotila, Juho; Kauppinen, Ismo K.

    2004-12-01

    Major improvement into the sensitivity of broadband Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers, used in gas analysis, can be achieved by a photoacoustic detection system, which bases on a recently introduced optical pressure sensor. The sensor is a cantilever-type microphone with interferometric measurement of its free end displacement. By using a preliminary prototype of the photoacoustic gas detector, equipped with the proposed sensor and a black body radiation source, a detection limit in the sub-ppb range was obtained for e.g. methane gas. The limit, obtained in non-resonant operation mode, is very close to the best photoacoustic results achieved with powerfull laser sources and by exploiting the cell resonances. It is also orders of magnitude better than any measurement with a black body radiation source. Furthermore, the ultimate sensitivity leads on to very small detection limits also for several chemical warfare agents (CWA) e.g. sarin, tabun and mustard. The small size of the sensor and its great thermal stability enables the construction of an extremely sensitive portable CWA analyzer in the near future.

  15. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2000-10-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. According to the original proposal, this fourth quarterly technical report was to deliver a procedure guide, a summary report, and a Society of Petroleum Engineers technical paper. However, James Engineering, Inc. was granted a six month, no cost extension to allow the required time to thoroughly investigate and prepare these portions of the study, therefore completion of the current deliverables has been re-scheduled. James Engineering, Inc. did present preliminary results of the study during a panel discussion on Stripper Gas Wells at the Society of Petroleum Engineers' Eastern Regional Meeting held in Morgantown, West Virginia October 19, 2000. No cost to the study was incurred for the preliminary presentation.

  16. Penile rehabilitation with a vacuum erectile device in an animal model is related to an antihypoxic mechanism: blood gas evidence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao-Cheng; Yang, Wen-Li; Zhang, Jun-Lan; Dai, Yu-Tian; Wang, Run

    2013-05-01

    Our previous study showed that vacuum erectile device (VED) therapy has improved erectile function in rats with bilateral cavernous nerve crush (BCNC) injuries. This study was designed to explore the mechanism of VED in penile rehabilitation by analyzing cavernous oxygen saturation (SO2) and to examine the effect of VED therapy on preventing penile shrinkage after BCNC. Thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: group 1, sham surgery; group 2, BCNC; and group 3, BCNC+VED. Penile length and diameter were measured on a weekly basis. After 4 weeks of therapy, the penile blood was extracted by three methods for blood gas analysis (BGA): method 1, cavernous blood was aspirated at the flaccid state; method 2, cavernous blood was aspirated at the traction state; and method 3, cavernous blood was aspirated immediately after applying VED. SO2 values were tested by the blood gas analyzer. The results showed that VED therapy is effective in preventing penile shrinkage induced by BCNC (Penile shortening: BCNC group 1.9±1.1 mm; VED group 0.3±1.0 mm; P<0.01. Penile diameter reduction: BCNC group 0.28±0.14 mm; VED group 0.04±0.14 mm; P<0.01). The mean SO2±s.d. values were increased by VED application (88.25%±4.94%) compared to the flaccid (76.53%±4.16%) or traction groups (78.93%±2.56%) (P<0.05). The calculated blood constructs in the corpus cavernosum right after VED application were 62% arterial and 38% venous blood. These findings suggest that VED therapy can effectively preserve penile size in rats with BCNC injury. The beneficial effect of VED therapy is related to antihypoxia by increasing cavernous blood SO2. PMID:23564044

  17. The physiological basis of pulmonary gas exchange: implications for clinical interpretation of arterial blood gases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    The field of pulmonary gas exchange is mature, with the basic principles developed more than 60 years ago. Arterial blood gas measurements (tensions and concentrations of O₂ and CO₂) constitute a mainstay of clinical care to assess the degree of pulmonary gas exchange abnormality. However, the factors that dictate arterial blood gas values are often multifactorial and complex, with six different causes of hypoxaemia (inspiratory hypoxia, hypoventilation, ventilation/perfusion inequality, diffusion limitation, shunting and reduced mixed venous oxygenation) contributing variably to the arterial O₂ and CO₂ tension in any given patient. Blood gas values are then usually further affected by the body's abilities to compensate for gas exchange disturbances by three tactics (greater O₂ extraction, increasing ventilation and increasing cardiac output). This article explains the basic principles of gas exchange in health, mechanisms of altered gas exchange in disease, how the body compensates for abnormal gas exchange, and based on these principles, the tools available to interpret blood gas data and, quantitatively, to best understand the physiological state of each patient. This understanding is important because therapeutic intervention to improve abnormal gas exchange in any given patient needs to be based on the particular physiological mechanisms affecting gas exchange in that patient. PMID:25323225

  18. Fast Methane Measurements Using a Novel Laser-based Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, D.; Gupta, M.; Owano, T.; Provencal, R.; Ricci, K.; O'Keefe, A.

    2005-12-01

    Methane has increased significantly with human population levels. Pre-1750 ice core data indicates that pre-industrialization levels were ~700 ppbv, while current levels are ~1745 ppbv. In current budget estimates of atmospheric CH4, major contributors include both natural (wetlands) and anthropogenic sources (energy, landfills, ruminants, biomass burning, rice agriculture). The strengths of these sources vary spatially and temporally. Estimates of emissions from wetlands are also uncertain due to the extreme variability of these ecosystems. Because methane lifetime is relatively long (8.4 years), atmospheric variations in concentration are small and accuracy in measurement is important for understanding spatial and temporal variability. We report on the application and independent performance characterization of a novel gas analyzer based on cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy. The Analyzer was used for the measurements of methane in ambient air for eddy correlation flux measurements and for chamber flux measurements. The Analyzer provided continuous measurements at data rates up to 20 Hz and a replicate precision of better than 2 ppbv in a 1 second measurement time.

  19. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the 1998 Mars Polar Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Lorenz, R. D.; Bailey, S. H.; Williams, M. S.; Hamara, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer is an instrument in the MVACS (Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor) payload on the 1998 Mars Polar Lander. It is due to reach the layered terrain at around 70S latitude on Mars in December 1999. The instrument will heat soil samples acquired with a robotic arm to determine their volatile content with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and an evolved gas analyzer (EGA). Instrument Objectives: The instrument aims to measure the volatile content of the martian soil at depth, specifically to determine the water and CO2 content. These greenhouse gases may be present in large quantities as ices and locked chemically in the soil, particularly at high latitudes. Understanding the martian climate history and the future resource potential of Mars requires that we measure the abundance of volatile-bearing material in the soil and the minerals with which they are associated. Secondary objectives include the identification of other minerals and the detection of oxidizing compounds in the soil. Instrument Description: The instrument comprises a set of eight thermal analyzers, each of which will be used only once. Each analyzer has two identical ovens, one for the sample and one (empty) for a reference. The DSC identifies the temperature and enthalpy of phase transitions by carefully determining the difference in the energy required to heat the reference and sample ovens at a controlled rate. The DSC digitally controls the duty cycle of the power to the ovens to maintain each of them at the programmed ramp temperature. The output of the DSC is simply the difference in power required by the two ovens. The EGA analyzes the evolved gases as the ovens are heated to provide knowledge of correlated gas release associated with the phase transitions. The correlated gas release will aid in the identification of the phase responsible for the phase transition. The EGA will determine water and CO, contents via a high-resolution tunable diode laser

  20. Assessment of a continuous blood gas monitoring system in animals during circulatory stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The study was aimed to determine the measurement accuracy of The CDI™ blood parameter monitoring system 500 (Terumo Cardiovascular Systems Corporation, Ann Arbor MI) in the real-time continuous measurement of arterial blood gases under different cardiocirculatory stress conditions Methods Inotropic stimulation (Dobutamine 2.5 and 5 μg/kg/min), vasoconstriction (Arginine-vasopressin 4, 8 and 16 IU/h), hemorrhage (-10%, -20%, -35%, and -50% of the theoretical volemia), and volume resuscitation were induced in ten swine (57.4 ± 10.7 Kg).Intermittent blood gas assessments were carried out using a routine gas analyzer at any experimental phase and compared with values obtained at the same time settings during continuous monitoring with CDI™ 500 system. The Bland-Altman analysis was employed. Results Bias and precision for pO2 were - 0.06 kPa and 0.22 kPa, respectively (r2 = 0.96); pCO2 - 0.02 kPa and 0.15 kPa, respectively; pH -0.001 and 0.01 units, respectively ( r2 = 0.96). The analysis showed very good agreement for SO2 (bias 0.04,precision 0.33, r2 = 0.95), Base excess (bias 0.04,precision 0.28, r2 = 0.98), HCO3 (bias 0.05,precision 0.62, r2 = 0.92),hemoglobin (bias 0.02,precision 0.23, r2 = 0.96) and K+ (bias 0.02, precision 0.27, r2 = 0.93). The sensor was reliable throughout the experiment during hemodynamic variations. Conclusions Continuous blood gas analysis with the CDI™ 500 system was reliable and it might represent a new useful tool to accurately and timely monitor gas exchange in critically ill patients. Nonetheless, our findings need to be confirmed by larger studies to prove its reliability in the clinical setting. PMID:21223536

  1. Determination of paraldehyde by gas chromatography in whole blood from children.

    PubMed

    Githiga, Isaiah M; Muchohi, Simon N; Ogutu, Bernhards R; Newton, Charles R J C; Otieno, Godfrey O; Gitau, Evelyn N; Kokwaro, Gilbert O

    2004-06-15

    A rapid, sensitive and selective gas chromatographic method with flame ionization detection was developed for the determination of paraldehyde in small blood samples taken from children. Whole blood samples (300 microl) collected in a 3 ml Wheaton glass sample vial were spiked with acetone (internal standard: 15 ng) followed by addition of concentrated hydrochloric acid. The mixture was heated in the sealed airtight sample vial in a water bath (96 Celsius; 5 min) to depolymerize paraldehyde to acetaldehyde. A 2 ml aliquot of the headspace was analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector using a stainless steel column (3 m x 4 mm i.d.) packed with 10% Carbowax 20 M/ 2% KOH on 80/100 Chromosorb WAW. Calibration curves were linear from 1.0-20 microg (r2>0.99). The limit of detection was 1.5 microg/ml, while relative mean recoveries at 2 and 18 microg were 105.6 +/- 8.4 and 101.2 +/- 5.9%, respectively (n = 10 for each level). Intra- and inter-assay relative standard deviations at 2, 10 and 18 microg were <15%. There was no interference from other drugs concurrently used in children with severe malaria, such as anticonvulsants (diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbitone), antipyretics/analgesics (paracetamol and salicylate), antibiotics (gentamicin, chloramphenicol, benzyl penicillin) and antimalarials (chloroquine, quinine, proguanil, cycloguanil, pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine). The method was successfully applied for pharmacokinetic studies of paraldehyde in children with convulsions associated with severe malaria. PMID:15135115

  2. Summary of Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Niles, P. B.; Hoffman, J.; Lauer, H. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect evolved volatiles and organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS) that can detect masses in the 2 to 140 dalton range [1]. Five Martian soils were individually heated to 1000 C in the DSC ovens where evolved gases from mineral decompostion products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil.

  3. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous..., the gas concentrations must be adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the... recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in air. You may use a...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous..., the gas concentrations must be adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the... recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in air. You may use a...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous..., the gas concentrations must be adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the... recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in air. You may use a...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous..., the gas concentrations must be adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the... recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in air. You may use a...

  7. A volatile organic analyzer for Space Station: Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ ion mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) is being developed as an essential component of the Space Station's Environmental Health System (EHS) air quality monitoring strategy to provide warning to the crew and ground personnel if volatile organic compounds exceed established exposure limits. The short duration of most Shuttle flights and the relative simplicity of the contaminant removal mechanism have lessened the concern about crew exposure to air contaminants on the Shuttle. However, the longer missions associated with the Space Station, the complex air revitalization system and the proposed number of experiments have led to a desire for real-time monitoring of the contaminants in the Space Station atmosphere. Achieving the performance requirements established for the VOA within the Space Station resource (e.g., power, weight) allocations led to a novel approach that joined a gas chromatograph (GC) to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors of this paper will discuss the rational for selecting the GC/IMS technology as opposed to the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the foundation of the VOA. The data presented from preliminary evaluations will demonstrate the versatile capability of the GC/IMS to analyze the major contaminants expected in the Space Station atmosphere. The favorable GC/IMS characteristics illustrated in this paper included excellent sensitivity, dual-mode operation for selective detection, and mobility drift times to distinguish co-eluting GC peaks. Preliminary studies have shown that the GC/IMS technology can meet surpass the performance requirements of the Space Station VOA.

  8. Status of the design of the Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer System for ITER first plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Devan, B.; Graves, V.; Marcus, C.; Younkin, T.; Andrew, P.; Johnson, D. W.

    2013-10-01

    Among the ITER procurements awarded to the US ITER Domestic Agency, and subsequently to the ORNL Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, is the design and fabrication of the Diagnostc Residual Gas Analyzer (DRGA) system. The DRGA system reached the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) in Spring 2013, and has transitioned into the Final Design phase. As a result of the PDR, and ITER systems design evolutions, several design changes have been incorporated into the DRGA system. The design effort has focused on the vacuum and mechanical interface of the DRGA gas sampling tube with the ITER vacuum vessel and cyrostat. Moreover, R&D tasks to demonstrate the 3-sensor instrumentation design (quadrupole mass spectrometer, ion-trap mass spectrometer, and optical Penning gauge) are maturing through the construction and testing of a DRGA prototype at ORNL. Results will be presented at this poster along with the DRGA design overview. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  9. Perchlorate induced low temperature carbonate decomposition in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R.

    2012-07-01

    Simulated Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) analyses have shown that a CO2 release detected between 400°C and 680°C by the Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument may have been caused by a reaction between calcium carbonate and hydrated magnesium perchlorate. In our experiments a CO2 release beginning at 385 ± 12°C was attributed to calcite reacting with water vapor and HCl gas from the dehydration and thermal decomposition of Mg-perchlorate. The release of CO2 is consistent with the TEGA detection of CO2 released between 400 and 680°C, with the amount of CO2 increasing linearly with added perchlorate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments confirmed CaCl2 formation from the reaction between calcite and HCl. These results have important implications for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Heating soils may cause inorganic release of CO2; therefore, detection of organic fragments, not CO2 alone, should be used as definitive evidence for organics in Martian soils.

  10. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the cases of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be research and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This fifth quarterly technical report describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the development of data gathering forms for tubing plunger wells, casing plunger wells, pumping wells, and swab or flow wells. This report also describes the methodology to select a group of wells for field review utilizing data gathering forms developed during this quarter.

  11. Low cost methodologies to analyze and correct abnormal production decline in stripper gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    James, J.; Huck, G.; Knobloch, T.

    2000-04-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This second quarterly technical report describes the data reduction and methodology to develop data collection forms of pertinent information to assist in analysis of problem wells. The report also describes the procedures to categorize individual well problems. Finally, the report summarizes the frequency of individual well problems.

  12. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-04-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This sixth quarter technical progress report further describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the development of data gathering forms for tubing plunger wells, casing plunger wells, pumping wells, and swab or flow wells. This report also further describes the methodology to select a group of wells for field review utilizing data gathering forms further developed during this quarter.

  13. EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED GAS ANALYZER FOR MEASUREMENTS OF AIR TOXICS IN POLLUTION PREVENTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A portable Fourier transform infrared gas analyzer with a photoacoustic detector performed reliably during pollution prevention research at two industrial facilities. It exhibited good agreement (within approximately 6%) with other analytical instruments (dispersive infrared and ...

  14. Low cost methodologies to analyze and correct abnormal production decline in stripper gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    James, J.; Huck, G.; Knobloch, T.

    2000-07-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This third quarterly technical report was to describe the data reduction and methodologies to develop decision trees, identify cost effective techniques to solve the most frequently experienced problems and then apply the methodology to a group of wells where recent problems have developed. Further, this third quarterly technical report was to describe the data reduction and methodologies to select the two wells with the greatest potential for increase and also having the most frequently occurring problem, and evaluate the results of the methodology and the implemented procedure. However, preparation and analysis of the decision trees is more complex than initially anticipated due to the combination of problems rather than identifiable individual problems. Therefore, this portion of the study is still in progress. We have requested and been granted verbal approval for a six month no cost extension to allow more time to thoroughly investigate this portion of the study. The delivery of the decision trees will be included in future technical reports. Work on the other tasks to be

  15. Development of a Contingency Gas Analyzer for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Bill; Carney, Kenneth; Steiner, George; OHarra, William; Lewis, John

    2010-01-01

    NASA's experience with electrochemical sensors in a hand-held toxic gas monitor serves as a basis for the development of a fixed on-board instrument, the Contingency Gas Analyzer (CGA), for monitoring selected toxic combustion products as well as oxygen and carbon dioxide on the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Oxygen and carbon dioxide are major components of the cabin environment and accurate measurement of these compounds is critical to maintaining a safe working environment for the crew. Fire or thermal degradation events may produce harmful levels of toxic products, including carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and hydrogen chloride (HCl) in the environment. These three components, besides being toxic in their own right, can serve as surrogates for a panoply of hazardous combustion products. On orbit monitoring of these surrogates provides for crew health and safety by indicating the presence of toxic combustion products in the environment before, during and after combustion or thermal degradation events. Issues identified in previous NASA experiences mandate hardening the instrument and components to endure the mechanical and operational stresses of the CEV environment while maintaining high analytical fidelity. Specific functional challenges involve protecting the sensors from various anticipated events- such as rapid pressure changes, low cabin pressures, and extreme vibration/shock exposures- and extending the sensor lifetime and calibration periods far beyond the current state of the art to avoid the need for on-orbit calibration. This paper focuses on lessons learned from the earlier NASA hardware, current testing results, and engineering solutions to the identified problems. Of particular focus will be the means for protecting the sensors, addressing well known cross-sensitivity issues and the efficacy of a novel self monitoring mechanism for extending sensor calibration periods.

  16. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  17. Quantification of red blood cell fragmentation by the automated hematology analyzer XE-2100 in patients with living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Banno, S; Ito, Y; Tanaka, C; Hori, T; Fujimoto, K; Suzuki, T; Hashimoto, T; Ueda, R; Mizokami, M

    2005-10-01

    The fragmented red cell (FRC) is a useful index for diagnosing and determining the severity of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and other similar conditions, as it is found in peripheral blood in patients with these diseases. The FRC expression rate has conventionally been determined by manual methods using smear samples. However, it is difficult to attain accurate quantification by such methods as they are time consuming and prone to a great margin of error. With cases of living donor liver transplantation, the current study examined the possibility of using a multi-parameter automated hematology analyzer, the XE-2100 (Sysmex Corporation) for FRC quantification. While there was a notable correlation between the manual and automated measurements, the manual measurement resulted in higher values. This suggested remarkable variations in judgment by individuals. The FRC values had a significant correlation with the reticulocyte count, red blood cell distribution width (RDW), fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (P-FDP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) among the test parameters, and this finding was consistent with the clinical progression in patients. The automated method can offer precise measurements in a short time without inter-observer differences, meeting the requirement for standardization. The determination of FRC count (%) by the XE-2100 that enables early diagnoses and monitoring of TTP or TMA will be useful in the clinical field. PMID:16178907

  18. Sampling Line Heating Improves Frequency Response of Enclosed Eddy Covariance Gas Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Fratini, G.; Metzger, S.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Trutna, D.; Luo, H.; Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P.

    2015-12-01

    One of the challenges when measuring eddy-covariance fluxes with closed gas analyzers is high frequency attenuation due to the passage of the sampled air through a gas sampling system (GSS). The problem is particularly relevant for gases that undergo strong sorption processes, such as H2O. Recent "enclosed" analyzer designs (e.g. LI-7200, LI-COR Biosciences Inc.) mitigate the problem by allowing a reduced length of the intake tube (<1 m). Further improvements can come from carefully designed filtering and heating systems that reduce hygroscopic particulates and H2O adsorption on GSS surfaces. Because the sorption processes of H2O increase exponentially with air relative humidity (RH), low-pass filtering effects can be reduced by reducing RH inside the GSS, for example by increasing air temperature via heating. In this work, we evaluate the effects of several heating strategies with the aim of optimizing the LI-7200 performance while limiting the implied increase in power consumption. From field tests we found that 4 W of heating applied uniformly to a rain cap-integrated 2 µm particulate filter (FW-series, Swagelok) and a 700 mm stainless steel tube with 4.8 mm inner diameter reduces the occurrence of problematic RH levels (>60%) in the LI-7200 by ≈50%. As a result, the system half-power frequency increased by ≈1 Hz, and the remaining cospectral correction did not exceed 3%, even at very high ambient RH (95%). While little further improvement was found for increased heating powers, it is possible to optimize the sequence of GSS components and their heating: we found that positioning the particulate filter ≈20 cm downstream of the rain cap and concentrating 2/3 of the heat in this first 20 cm, and 1/3 in the remainder of the tube, provides optimal performances. Using model cospectra and a range of realistic measurement and environmental conditions, we estimated H2O spectral corrections to reduce by ≈50-70%, getting very close to those of CO2 in most

  19. A Fast Exhaust-Gas Analyzer for the ITER Fusion Experiment Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Carlson, E. P.; Moschella, J. J.; Hazelton, R C; Keitz, M D; Gardner, Walter L

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a first demonstration of a radio-frequency (RF)-excited optical gas analyzer (RF-OGA) designed to quantitatively measure minority species inside the neutralization region of the ITER fusion experiment divertor. The sensor head, which creates its own plasma excitation and plasma light emission, is designed to operate in a strong magnetic field, and the RF coupling leads to bright light emission. It also allows for operation at low voltages, avoiding the radiation-enhanced breakdowns expected when high voltages are present in the ITER environment. Furthermore, the preferred sensor head features full isolation of the metal RF electrodes from the induced plasma. This "electrodeless" operation will permit long operation without frequent maintenance. The testing of a first experimental RF-OGA with an electrodeless design in a strong (similar to 2-T) magnetic field showed a mostly linear response of the He I-6678 angstrom line emission to the He concentration in a hydrogen background, which would produce a He concentration measurement accurate to within 2% of the helium-to-hydrogen ratio.

  20. A software toolkit for processing and analyzing spectral and trace gas flux data collected via aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Garrity, S. R.; Vierling, L. A.; Martins, D. K.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.

    2006-12-01

    In order to spatially extrapolate trace gas flux measurements made at the scale of individual flux towers to broader regions using spectral approaches, it is helpful to establish new methodologies for sampling and processing these data at scales coarser than one flux tower footprint. To this end, we mounted a dual-channel hyperspectral spectroradiometer capable of collecting spectra at ~3Hz to an experimental twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess instrumented to also measure eddy covariance fluxes of CO2. Experimental flights were conducted over a northern hardwood, deciduous forest between 21 July and 24 July 2006. To analyze these data in ecologically meaningful ways, it was necessary to first develop a software toolkit capable of marrying the spectral and flux data in appropriate spatial and spectral contexts. The toolkit is capable of merging the spectral and flux data streams with the GPS/Inertial Navigation System of the aircraft such that data can be interactively selected according to its timestamp or geographic location and queried to output a variety of preset and/or user defined spectral indices for comparison to collocated flux data. In addition, the toolkit enables the user to interactively plot the spectral target locations on any georectified image to facilitate comparisons among land cover type, topography, surface spectral characteristics, and CO2 fluxes. In this paper, we highlight the capabilities of the software toolkit as well as provide examples of ways in which it can be used to explore correlation among spectral and flux data collected via aircraft.

  1. Analyzing the Impact of Residential Building Attributes, Demographic and Behavioral Factors on Natural Gas Usage

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, Olga V.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2011-03-03

    study attempts to bridge that gap by analyzing behavioral data and investigate the applicability of additive nonparametric regression to this task. This study evaluates the impact of 31 regressors on residential natural gas usage. The regressors include weather, economic variables, demographic and behavioral characteristics, and building attributes related to energy use. In general, most of the regression results were in line with previous engineering and economic studies in this area. There were, however, some counterintuitive results, particularly with regard to thermostat controls and behaviors. There are a number of possible reasons for these counterintuitive results including the inability to control for regional climate variability due to the data sanitization (to prevent identification of respondents), inaccurate data caused by to self-reporting, and the fact that not all relevant behavioral variables were included in the data set, so we were not able to control for them in the study. The results of this analysis could be used as an in-sample prediction for approximating energy demand of a residential building whose characteristics are described by the regressors in this analysis, but a certain combination of their particular values does not exist in the real world. In addition, this study has potential applications for benefit-cost analysis of residential upgrades and retrofits under a fixed budget, because the results of this study contain information on how natural gas consumption might change once a particular characteristic or attribute is altered. Finally, the results of this study can help establish a relationship between natural gas consumption and changes in behavior of occupants.

  2. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S; Livingstone, David M; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry. PMID:24811123

  3. Determination of Natural In Vivo Noble-Gas Concentrations in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Livingstone, David M.; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry. PMID:24811123

  4. Gas chromatographic determination of pentachlorophenol in human blood and urine

    SciTech Connect

    Atuma, S.S.; Okor, D.I.

    1985-09-01

    The extraction, identification and quantification of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in human blood and urine are of great importance for monitoring human exposure to this environmental chemical. Although reports abound in the literature on PCP residues, toxicity and environmental fate, there is hardly any information on its existence in the developing tropical countries, particularly in Nigeria. There is therefore the need to survey the status of PCP in Nigerian environment with a view to establishing the potential health hazards resulting from its bioaccumulation. This paper reports a preliminary survey of the residue levels of PCP in human blood and urine of the general population in Bendel State of Nigeria.

  5. Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer: Differential Scanning Calorimeter and Mass Spectrometer Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Lauer, H. V.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Scout Phoenix lander will land in the north polar region of Mars in May, 2008. One objective of the Phoenix lander is to search for evidence of past life in the form of molecular organics that may be preserved in the subsurface soil. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was developed to detect these organics by coupling a simultaneous differential thermal analyzer (SDTA) with a mass spectrometer. Martian soil will be heated to approx.1000 C and potential organic decomposition products such as CO2, CH4 etc. will be examined for with the MS. TEGA s SDTA will also assess the presence of endothermic and exothermic reactions that are characteristic of soil organics and minerals as the soil is heated. The MS in addition to detecting organic decompositon products, will also assess the levels of soil inorganic volatiles such as H2O, SO2, and CO2. Organic detection has a high priority for this mission; however, TEGA has the ability to provide valuable insight into the mineralogical composition of the soil. The overall goal of this work is to develop a TEGA database of minerals that will serve as a reference for the interpretation of Phoenix-TEGA. Previous databases for the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander (MPL)-TEGA instrument only went to 725 C. Furthermore, the MPL-TEGA could only detect CO2 and H2O while the Phoenix-TEGA MS can examine up to 144 atomic mass units. The higher temperature Phoenix-TEGA SDTA coupled with the more capable MS indicates that a higher temperature database is required for TEGA interpretation. The overall goal of this work is to develop a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) database of minerals along with corresponding MS data of evolved gases that can used to interpret TEGA data during and after mission operations. While SDTA and DSC measurement techniques are slightly different (SDTA does not use a reference pan), the results are fundamentally similar and thus DSC is a useful technique in providing comparative data for the TEGA

  6. Greenhouse gas source identification and flux measurements using an optical remote sensing method and a photoacoustic multi-gas analyzer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil properties such as particle size, soil organic carbon (SOC) and moisture contents, tillage operations and crop management practices influence greenhouse gas emission or consumption patterns from agricultural lands. Greenhouse gas (GG) emissions have been measured on small field plots, although ...

  7. Blood gas analysis of the coronary sinus in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANGHUA; SHAN, CHUNFANG; ZHANG, YU; ZHOU, XIANHUI; LI, JINXIN; LI, YAODONG; XING, QIANG; TANG, BAOPENG

    2015-01-01

    The difference in cardiac oxygen consumption between individuals with normal cardiac function and those with heart failure (HF), and the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac ejection fraction (EF) are poorly understood. By establishing a control group composed of individuals with normal cardiac function, the present study aimed to determine the difference in cardiac oxygen consumption between individuals with normal and abnormal cardiac function, as well as the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac EF. A total of 34 patients with normal cardiac function were enrolled in the control group and 44 patients with HF were enrolled in the experimental group. Blood samples from the aortic root, femoral vein and coronary sinus (CS) were collected from each patient. All the blood samples were subjected to blood gas analysis. The partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen saturation obtained from the peripheral vein and CS of patients with HF were lower than those in patients with normal cardiac function. In each patient with HF, the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac EF was analyzed using multi-linear correlation and regression analyses. Cardiac oxygen consumption negatively correlated with cardiac EF (R=-0.336, P=0.026). Furthermore, linear regression analysis suggested that cardiac EF had a significant effect on cardiac oxygen consumption (y = 82.906–0.483×, P=0.026). In conclusion, myocardial oxygen consumption is greater in individuals with HF compared to those with normal cardiac function. The cardiac EF affects myocardial oxygen consumption in patients with HF. PMID:26137240

  8. Reduction in Red Blood Cell Transfusions Among Preterm Infants: Results of a Randomized Trial With an In-Line Blood Gas and Chemistry Monitor

    PubMed Central

    Widness, John A.; Madan, Ashima; Grindeanu, Ligia A.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Wong, David K.; Stevenson, David K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Critically ill, extremely premature infants develop anemia because of intensive laboratory blood testing and undergo multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in the early weeks of life. To date, researchers have had only limited success in finding ways to reduce transfusions significantly in this patient population. Objective To reduce RBC transfusions for these infants by using a point-of-care bedside monitor that returns analyzed blood to the patient. Design, Setting, and Patients This was a prospective, 2-center, randomized, open, controlled, clinical trial with a 1:1 assignment of extremely low birth weight infants (weighing 500–1000 g at birth) to control or monitor groups and analysis with the intention-to-treat approach. Predefined RBC transfusion criteria were applied uniformly in the 2 groups. Interventions Clinical treatment of study subjects with an in-line, ex vivo, bedside monitor that withdraws blood through an umbilical artery catheter, analyzes blood gases and sodium, potassium, and hematocrit levels, and returns the sample to the patient. Main Outcome Measures The total volume and number of RBC transfusions during the first 2 weeks of life and the total volume of blood removed for laboratory testing. Results The trial was terminated prematurely when one center's NICU changed its standard method of laboratory testing. In the first 2 weeks of life, there was a nonsignificant 17% lower cumulative RBC transfusion volume in the monitor group (n = 46), compared with the control group (n = 47). However, data from the first week only (the period of greater catheter use) demonstrated a significant 33% lower cumulative RBC transfusion volume in the monitor group. Cumulative phlebotomy loss was ~25% less in the monitor group throughout the 2-week study period. There was no difference between groups in neonatal mortality, morbidity, and neurodevelopmental outcome rates at 18 to 24 months. This is the first randomized trial documenting that RBC

  9. Genetic and phenotypic relationships between blood gas parameters and ascites-related traits in broilers.

    PubMed

    Closter, A M; van As, P; Groenen, M A M; Vereijken, A L J; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H

    2009-03-01

    Ascites, also called pulmonary hypertension syndrome, is a metabolic disorder in chickens that have an insufficient pulmonary vascular capacity. The tendency of broilers to develop ascites is heritable, and successful selection against this susceptibility would benefit from good and easy-to-measure indicator traits. Blood gas parameters have been suggested as indicator traits for ascites susceptibility. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to estimate the heritability of blood gas parameters and the genetic and phenotypic correlations between blood gas parameters, heart ratio (postmortem indicator for ascites), and BW at 2 different ages. For this purpose, blood gas parameters, including the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in venous blood (pvCO(2)), the partial pressure of oxygen in venous blood (pvO(2)), and blood oxygen saturation, were measured at an average age of 22 d in nearly 3,000 broilers. To challenge the resistance of the birds to ascites, they were kept under cold conditions. Heritability for heart ratio was 0.43, and the heritability estimates were low: 0.02 for pvCO(2), 0.03 for pvO(2), and 0.07 for blood oxygen saturation. The estimated heritability for pH was 0.15, for bicarbonate was 0.19, and for total carbon dioxide content was 0.19. The genetic correlations between heart ratio and total carbon dioxide content (0.31 +/- 0.15) and between heart ratio and bicarbonate (0.31 +/- 0.15) were moderate and positive. For pvO(2), the genetic correlation with heart ratio was stronger and negative (-0.62 +/- 0.21); however, this correlation could not be estimated accurately because of the low heritability of pvO(2). For pvCO(2), the genetic correlation with the heart ratio was close to zero (-0.04 +/- 0.45). Phenotypic correlations between traits were, in general, similar to the genetic correlations. Heritabilities for blood gas parameters and the genetic correlations between blood gas parameters and the heart ratio estimated in the present study

  10. Open and Closed Endotracheal Suctioning and Arterial Blood Gas Values: A Single-Blind Crossover Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Azam; Khatony, Alireza; Moradi, Gholamreza; Abdi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Aim. This study was aimed at comparing the effects of the open and closed suctioning techniques on the arterial blood gas values in patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Methods. In a clinical trial, we recruited 42 patients after open-heart surgery in an educational hospital. Each patient randomly underwent both open and closed suctioning. ABGs, PaO2, SaO2, PaCO2, were analyzed before and one, five, and fifteen minutes after each suctioning episode. Results. At first the pressure of oxygen in arterial blood increased; however, this increase in the open technique was greater than that of the closed system (P < 0.001). The pressure of oxygen decreased five and fifteen minutes after both suctioning techniques (P < 0.05). The trends of carbon dioxide variations after the open and closed techniques were upward and downward, respectively. Moreover, the decrease in the level of oxygen saturation five and fifteen minutes after the open suctioning was greater than that of the closed suctioning technique (P < 0.05).  Conclusion. Arterial blood gas disturbances in the closed suctioning technique were less than those of the open technique. Therefore, to eliminate the unwanted effects of endotracheal suctioning on the arterial blood gases, the closed suctioning technique is recommended. PMID:26425366