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Sample records for blood leukocyte subsets

  1. Quantitative reconstruction of leukocyte subsets using DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lineage-specific DNA methylation patterns distinguish normal human leukocyte subsets and can be used to detect and quantify these subsets in peripheral blood. We have developed an approach that uses DNA methylation to simultaneously quantify multiple leukocyte subsets, enabling investigation of immune modulations in virtually any blood sample including archived samples previously precluded from such analysis. Here we assess the performance characteristics and validity of this approach. Results Using Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 and VeraCode GoldenGate Methylation Assay microarrays, we measure DNA methylation in leukocyte subsets purified from human whole blood and identify cell lineage-specific DNA methylation signatures that distinguish human T cells, B cells, NK cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and neutrophils. We employ a bioinformatics-based approach to quantify these cell types in complex mixtures, including whole blood, using DNA methylation at as few as 20 CpG loci. A reconstruction experiment confirms that the approach could accurately measure the composition of mixtures of human blood leukocyte subsets. Applying the DNA methylation-based approach to quantify the cellular components of human whole blood, we verify its accuracy by direct comparison to gold standard immune quantification methods that utilize physical, optical and proteomic characteristics of the cells. We also demonstrate that the approach is not affected by storage of blood samples, even under conditions prohibiting the use of gold standard methods. Conclusions Cell mixture distributions within peripheral blood can be assessed accurately and reliably using DNA methylation. Thus, precise immune cell differential estimates can be reconstructed using only DNA rather than whole cells. PMID:24598480

  2. Leukocyte Subset Changes in Response to a 164-km Road Cycle Ride in a Hot Environment

    PubMed Central

    LUK, HUI-YING; MCKENZIE, AMY L.; DUPLANTY, ANTHONY A.; BUDNAR, RONALD G.; LEVITT, DANIELLE; FERNANDEZ, ALEX; LEE, ELAINE C.; ARMSTRONG, LAWRENCE E.; VINGREN, JAKOB L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this observational study was to determine the circulating leukocyte subset response to completing the 2013 Hotter’N Hell Hundred recreational 164-km road cycle event in a hot and humid environmental condition. Twenty-eight men and four women were included in this study. Whole blood samples were obtained 1–2 hours before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) the event. Electronic sizing/sorting and cytometry were used to determine complete blood counts (CBC) including neutrophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte subsets. The concentration of circulating total leukocytes (103·μL−1) increased 134% from PRE to POST with the greatest increase in neutrophils (319%, p<0.0001). Circulating monocytes (including macrophages) increased 24% (p=0.004) and circulating lymphocytes including B and T cells increased 53% (p<0.0001). No association was observed between rolling time or relative intensity and leukocyte subset. Completing the Hotter n′ Hell Hundred (HHH), a 100 mile recreational cycling race in extreme (hot and humid) environmental conditions, induces a substantial increase in total leukocytes in circulation. The contribution of increases in specific immune cell subsets is not equal, with neutrophils increasing to greater than 4-fold starting values from PRE to POST race. It is likely that exercise in stressful environmental conditions affects the complement of circulating immune cells, although activational state and characterization of specific leukocyte subsets remains unclear. The observed increase in circulating cell sub-populations suggests that the circulating immune surveillance system may be acutely affected by exercise in hot and humid conditions. PMID:27293505

  3. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Schnoor, Michael; Alcaide, Pilar; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers. PMID:26568666

  4. Leukocyte subsets and neutrophil function after short-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Sams, C. F.; Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Jones, M. L.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in leukocyte subpopulations and function after spaceflight have been observed but the mechanisms underlying these changes are not well defined. This study investigated the effects of short-term spaceflight (8-15 days) on circulating leukocyte subsets, stress hormones, immunoglobulin levels, and neutrophil function. At landing, a 1.5-fold increase in neutrophils was observed compared with preflight values; lymphocytes were slightly decreased, whereas the results were variable for monocytes. No significant changes were observed in plasma levels of immunoglobulins, cortisol, or adrenocorticotropic hormone. In contrast, urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol were significantly elevated at landing. Band neutrophils were observed in 9 of 16 astronauts. Neutrophil chemotactic assays showed a 10-fold decrease in the optimal dose response after landing. Neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells was increased both before and after spaceflight. At landing, the expression of MAC-1 was significantly decreased while L-selectin was significantly increased. These functional alterations may be of clinical significance on long-duration space missions.

  5. The effect of cell subset isolation method on gene expression in leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    White, Cory; Lada, Steven; Du, Pinyi; Vaida, Florin; Blanco, Julià; Spina, Celsa A.; Woelk, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple scientific disciplines require the isolation of specific subsets of blood cells from patient samples for gene expression analysis by microarray or RNA-sequencing, preserving disease- or treatment-related signatures. However, little is known with respect to the impact of different cell isolation methods on gene expression and the effects of positive selection, negative selection and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) have not previously been assessed in parallel. To address this knowledge gap, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, B cells and monocytes were isolated from blood samples from 5 independent donors using positive immunomagnetic selection, negative immunomagnetic selection and FACS. We hypothesized that positive selection and FACS would yield higher purity but may have an impact on gene expression since both methods utilize antibodies that bind surface receptors of the cell type of interest. Moreover, FACS might upregulate stress response genes due to passage of the cells through the sorter. Microarray gene expression data was generated and subjected to unsupervised clustering and differential gene expression analysis. Surprisingly, these analyses revealed that gene expression signatures were more similar between cells isolated by negative selection and FACS compared to cells isolated by positive selection. Moreover, genes that are involved in the response to stress generally had the highest expression in cells isolated by negative or positive selection and not FACS. Thus, FACS is the recommended method for isolation of leukocyte subsets for gene expression studies since this method results in the purest subset populations and does not appear to induce a stress response. PMID:24115734

  6. Blood leukocyte and spleen lymphocyte immune response of spleen lymphocytes and whole blood leukocytes of hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.A.; Sothmann, M.; Wehrenberg, W.B. )

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic physical activity on the immune response of spleen lymphocytes and whole blood leukocytes of hamsters. Animals were kept sedentary or allowed to exercise spontaneously on running wheels for eight weeks. Physically active animals averaged 12 kilometers per day. The immune response of spleen lymphocytes whole blood leukocytes was evaluated by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation in response to Concanavalin A or lipopolysaccharide. There was no treatment effect between physically active and sedentary hamster in response of spleen lymphocytes. The immune response of whole blood leukocytes to these mitogens was significantly greater in physically active vs. sedentary hamsters. These results demonstrate that chronic physical activity has the capacity to modulate immunoresponses.

  7. Evaluation of Tumor-infiltrating Leukocyte Subsets in a Subcutaneous Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Pachynski, Russell K.; Scholz, Alexander; Monnier, Justin; Butcher, Eugene C.; Zabel, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Specialized immune cells that infiltrate the tumor microenvironment regulate the growth and survival of neoplasia.  Malignant cells must elude or subvert anti-tumor immune responses in order to survive and flourish. Tumors take advantage of a number of different mechanisms of immune “escape,” including the recruitment of tolerogenic DC, immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs), and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) that inhibit cytotoxic anti-tumor responses. Conversely, anti-tumor effector immune cells can slow the growth and expansion of malignancies: immunostimulatory dendritic cells, natural killer cells which harbor innate anti-tumor immunity, and cytotoxic T cells all can participate in tumor suppression. The balance between pro- and anti-tumor leukocytes ultimately determines the behavior and fate of transformed cells; a multitude of human clinical studies have borne this out. Thus, detailed analysis of leukocyte subsets within the tumor microenvironment has become increasingly important. Here, we describe a method for analyzing infiltrating leukocyte subsets present in the tumor microenvironment in a mouse tumor model. Mouse B16 melanoma tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously in C57BL/6 mice. At a specified time, tumors and surrounding skin were resected en bloc and processed into single cell suspensions, which were then stained for multi-color flow cytometry. Using a variety of leukocyte subset markers, we were able to compare the relative percentages of infiltrating leukocyte subsets between control and chemerin-expressing tumors. Investigators may use such a tool to study the immune presence in the tumor microenvironment and when combined with traditional caliper size measurements of tumor growth, will potentially allow them to elucidate the impact of changes in immune composition on tumor growth. Such a technique can be applied to any tumor model in which the tumor and its microenvironment can be resected and processed. PMID:25938949

  8. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND LEUKOCYTE SUBSET RESPONSES TO EXERCISE AND COLD EXPOSURE IN COLD-ACCLIMATIZED SKATERS

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K.; Peake, J.; Ahn, N.; Ogawa, K.; Hong, Ch.; Kim, S.; Lee, I.; Park, J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated physiological responses and changes in circulating immune cells following exercise in cold and thermoneutral conditions. Participants were short track skaters (n=9) who were acclimatized to cold conditions, and inline skaters (n=10) who were not acclimatized. All skaters were young, and skating at a recreational level three days per week for at least one year. Using a cross-over design, study variables were measured during 60 min of submaximal cycling (65% V.O2max) in cold (ambient temperature: 5±1°C, relative humidity: 41±9%) and thermoneutral conditions (ambient temperature: 21±1°C, relative humidity: 35±5%). Heart rate, blood lactate and tympanic temperature were measured at rest, during exercise and recovery. Plasma cortisol, calprotectin and circulating blood cell numbers were measured before and after 60 min of cold or thermoneutral conditions, and during recovery from exercise. Heart rate was lower in both groups during exercise in cold versus thermoneutral conditions (P<0.05). The increase in total leukocytes during recovery was primarily due to an increase in neutrophils in both groups. The cold-acclimatized group activated neutrophils after exercise in cold exposure, whereas the non-acclimatized group activated lymphocyte and cortisol after exercise in cold exposure. Lymphocyte subsets significantly changed in both groups over time during recovery as compared to rest. Immediately after exercise in both groups, CD16+ and CD69+ cells were elevated compared to rest or before exercise in both conditions. Acclimatization to exercise in the cold does not appear to influence exercise-induced immune changes in cold conditions, with the possible exception of neutrophils, lymphocytes and cortisol concentration. PMID:24917688

  9. Margination of leukocytes in blood flow through small tubes.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, H L; Spain, S

    1984-03-01

    Leukocyte margination in the vessels of the microcirculation has been attributed to a flow-dependent interaction with red cells. To determine the extent of this effect, experiments with human blood were done in 100- to 180-micron tubes to detect changes in cell distribution as a function of hematocrit and flow rate. Using a flow visualization technique, the leukocyte concentration distribution was determined in 45% ghost cell suspensions. Migration of cells toward the wall was observed at centerline velocities greater than 1 mm sec-1 and increased with increasing flow rate. The effect was probably due to a more rapid inward migration of ghosts than leukocytes because of fluid inertia and cell density differences. Experiments were therefore carried out in whole blood at hematocrits from 20 to 60%, measuring the number concentration of leukocytes and erythrocytes within the tube, nt, and comparing it to that in the infusing reservoir, no, (Fahraeus effect). At mean tube shear rates G less than 100 sec-1, nt/no less than 1 for both leukocytes and erythrocytes showing net migration of cells away from the wall, although at nearly all hematocrits there was an enrichment of leukocytes relative to erythrocytes in the tubes. At G less than 50 sec-1, nt/no remained less than 1 for erythrocytes but increased to greater than 1 for leukocytes showing migration toward the wall, the increase being greatest at 20% hematocrit in the 100-micron tubes. The nature of the effect was revealed by cine films which showed that, as the flow rate decreased, erythrocytes formed rouleaux which migrated inward creating a core and displacing leukocytes to the periphery. In control experiments using washed blood cells in phosphate buffer-albumin, nt/no less than 1 for both leukocytes and erythrocytes at all G and hematocrits, and leukocytes were now distributed. Cine films of washed blood confirmed that, in the absence of rouleaux, no significant inward migration of erythrocytes occurred. PMID

  10. Influence of delivery on numbers of leukocytes, leukocyte subpopulations, and hematopoietic progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Lim, F T; van Winsen, L; Willemze, R; Kanhai, H H; Falkenburg, J H

    1994-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) may be used as an alternative source of bone marrow repopulating cells in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The quality and quantity of UCB harvests for transplantation is affected by several factors. In this study we analyzed the influence of delivery, in particular stress during delivery, on the numbers of leukocytes and leukocyte subsets in UCB. Four groups of women with different types of deliveries were included in the study, and from each group samples of UCB were analyzed. Blood samples from healthy adults were used as control. In UCB there was a higher absolute number of leukocytes than in peripheral blood (PB). UCB leukocytes were highest after deliveries with a prolonged second stage of labor, which was mainly due to granulocytosis. The percentage of T cells in UCB was lower than in PB, in particular when stress during delivery was higher. In all groups, however, the absolute concentration of T cells per milliliter of UCB was higher than in adult PB. The differences in T cells in stressful deliveries were mainly due to a relative decrease in CD3+/CD4+ cells in UCB. The relative frequency and absolute concentration of the CD56+ cell population in UCB was higher than in PB, which was mostly due to an increase of CD2-/CD56+ cells, in particular in stressful deliveries. The absolute number of CD34+ cells as well as hematopoietic progenitor cells as determined in semisolid medium cultures was high in UCB and was increased in cases of prolonged secondary stage of labor. This study demonstrates that the quality of UCB transplants is influenced by the course of delivery, in particular by stress during delivery. PMID:7749120

  11. Primary Human Leukocyte Subsets Differentially Express Vaccinia Virus Receptors Enriched in Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Hu, Ningjie; Lan, Jie; Hu, Sishun

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VV) and canarypox virus (ALVAC), do not indiscriminately infect all cell types of the primary human leukocytes (PHLs) that they encounter but instead demonstrate an extremely strong bias toward infection of monocytes and monocyte lineage cells. We studied the specific molecular events that determine the VV tropism for major PHL subsets including monocytes, B cells, neutrophils, NK cells, and T cells. We found that VV exhibited an extremely strong bias of cell surface protein-dependent binding to monocytes, B cells, and activated T cells to a similar degree and to neutrophils to a much lesser extent. Resting T cells and resting NK cells exhibited only trace amounts of VV binding. Activated T cells, however, became permissive to VV binding, infection, and replication, while activated NK cells still resisted VV binding. VV binding strongly colocalized with lipid rafts on the surfaces of all VV binding-susceptible PHL subsets, even when lipid rafts were relocated to cell uropods upon cell polarization. Immunosera raised against detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) from monocytes or activated T cells, but not resting T cells, effectively cross-blocked VV binding to and infection of PHL subsets. CD29 and CD98, two lipid raft-associated membrane proteins that had been found to be important for VV entry into HeLa cells, had no effect on VV binding to and infection of primary activated T cells. Our data indicate that PHL subsets express VV protein receptors enriched in lipid rafts and that receptors are cross-presented on all susceptible PHLs. PMID:23785200

  12. Relation of Leukocytes and Its Subsets Counts with the Severity of Stable Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Diabetic Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Song-Hui; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Qing, Ping; Xu, Rui-Xia; Wu, Na-Qiong; Jiang, Li-Xin; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background Both coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with inflammation. However, whether and which leukocytes can predict the presence and extent of CAD in patients with DM has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of leukocyte and its subsets counts with the severity of CAD in patients with DM. Methods and Findings Three hundred and seventy-three diabetic patients who were scheduled for coronary angiography due to typical stable angina pectoris were enrolled in this study. They were classified into the three groups according to tertiles of Gensini score (GS, low group <8, n = 143; intermediate group 8∼28, n = 109; high group >28, n = 121). The relationship between the leukocyte and its subsets counts with the severity of CAD were evaluated. The data indicated that there were significant correlations between leukocyte and neutrophil counts with GS (r = 0.154 and 0.156, respectively, all P<0.003 for Pearson's correlation). Similarly, area under the receivers operating characteristic curve of leukocyte and neutrophil counts were 0.61 and 0.60 respectively (95%CI: 0.55–0.67, all P = 0.001) for predicting high GS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that leukocyte count was an independent predictor for high GS patients with DM (OR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.03–1.39, P = 0.023) after adjusting for conventional risk factors of CAD. Conclusions Compared with its subsets, leukocyte count appeared to be an independent predictor for the severity of CAD and the optimal cut-off value for predicting high GS (>28 points) was 5.0×109 cells/L in diabetic patients. PMID:24599246

  13. Peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Covas, M I; Esquerda, A; García-Rico, A; Mahy, N

    1992-01-01

    Interest in T-lymphocyte subsets has arisen because of their involvement in the autoimmune process. Contradictory results have been published in the literature about the number of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune diseases. In order to investigate the number and distribution of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune thyroid disease, the levels of total T-lymphocytes (CD3), T-helper (CD4) and T-suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8) lymphocytes were determined in 44 patients with Graves' disease (1), multinodular goiter (2) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3). All patients had high levels of antithyroglobulin and thyroid antiperoxidase (antimicrosomal) antibodies. The T subset levels were related to the functional thyroid status, measured as serum free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH). Our data show the existence of a strong influence of functional status on CD3, CD4 and CD8 levels, as reflected in the significant correlations obtained with FT4 (negative) and TSH (positive). A significant decrease in all populations was observed in Graves' disease hyperthyroid patients. A decrease in the CD4/CD8 ratio in Hashimoto's thyroiditis hypothyroid patients was observed, in contrast to an increase in the ratio in autoimmune hyperthyroid patients. This points to the CD4/CD8 ratio as a differential characteristic between the two autoimmune (hypothyroid and hyperthyroid) entities, independent of free thyroxine levels. No significant correlation was found between antithyroid antibody levels and peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets or serum levels of FT4 and TSH. PMID:1342892

  14. Direct immunomagnetic quantification of lymphocyte subsets in blood.

    PubMed Central

    Brinchmann, J E; Vartdal, F; Gaudernack, G; Markussen, G; Funderud, S; Ugelstad, J; Thorsby, E

    1988-01-01

    A method is described where superparamagnetic polymer microspheres coated with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) are used for the direct and fast quantification of the absolute number of cells of various lymphocyte subsets in blood. Blood samples were incubated with microspheres coated with a subset specific MoAb. Using a magnet the microsphere-rosetted cells were isolated and washed. Following lysis of the cell walls to detach the microspheres, the cell nuclei were stained with acridine orange and counted in a haemocytometer using an immunofluorescence microscope. With MoAb specific for CD2, CD4, CD8 and CD19, reproducible absolute counts of the corresponding lymphocyte subsets were obtained which correlated closely with those obtained by an indirect quantification method. PMID:3349645

  15. Leukocyte segmentation and classification in blood-smear images.

    PubMed

    Ramoser, Herbert; Laurain, Vincent; Bischof, Horst; Ecker, Rupert

    2005-01-01

    The detection and classification of leukocytes in blood smear images is a routine task in medical diagnosis. In this paper we present a fully automated approach to leukocyte segmentation that is robust with respect to cell appearance and image quality. A set of features is used to describe cytoplasm and nucleus properties. Pairwise SVM classification is used to discriminate between different cell types. Evaluation on a set of 1166 images (13 classes) resulted in 95% correct segmentations and 75% to 99% correct classification (with reject option). PMID:17280945

  16. Tracking flow of leukocytes in blood for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharat, Arslan; Turner, Wesley; Stephens, Gillian; Badillo, Benjamin; Lumpkin, Rick; Andre, Patrick; Perera, Amitha

    2011-03-01

    Modern microscopy techniques allow imaging of circulating blood components under vascular flow conditions. The resulting video sequences provide unique insights into the behavior of blood cells within the vasculature and can be used as a method to monitor and quantitate the recruitment of inflammatory cells at sites of vascular injury/ inflammation and potentially serve as a pharmacodynamic biomarker, helping screen new therapies and individualize dose and combinations of drugs. However, manual analysis of these video sequences is intractable, requiring hours per 400 second video clip. In this paper, we present an automated technique to analyze the behavior and recruitment of human leukocytes in whole blood under physiological conditions of shear through a simple multi-channel fluorescence microscope in real-time. This technique detects and tracks the recruitment of leukocytes to a bioactive surface coated on a flow chamber. Rolling cells (cells which partially bind to the bioactive matrix) are detected counted, and have their velocity measured and graphed. The challenges here include: high cell density, appearance similarity, and low (1Hz) frame rate. Our approach performs frame differencing based motion segmentation, track initialization and online tracking of individual leukocytes.

  17. Parallel Affinity-Based Isolation of Leukocyte Subsets Using Microfluidics: Application for Stroke Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the design and performance of a polymer microfluidic device that can affinity select multiple types of biological cells simultaneously with sufficient recovery and purity to allow for the expression profiling of mRNA isolated from these cells. The microfluidic device consisted of four independent selection beds with curvilinear channels that were 25 μm wide and 80 μm deep and were modified with antibodies targeting antigens specifically expressed by two different cell types. Bifurcated and Z-configured device geometries were evaluated for cell selection. As an example of the performance of these devices, CD4+ T-cells and neutrophils were selected from whole blood as these cells are known to express genes found in stroke-related expression profiles that can be used for the diagnosis of this disease. CD4+ T-cells and neutrophils were simultaneously isolated with purities >90% using affinity-based capture in cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) devices with a processing time of ∼3 min. In addition, sufficient quantities of the cells could be recovered from a 50 μL whole blood input to allow for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) following cell lysis. The expression of genes from isolated T-cells and neutrophils, such as S100A9, TCRB, and FPR1, was evaluated using RT-PCR. The modification and isolation procedures demonstrated here can also be used to analyze other cell types as well where multiple subsets must be interrogated. PMID:24650222

  18. Immune modulation of blood leukocytes in humans by lactic acid bacteria: criteria for strain selection.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, E J; Brassart, D; Servin, A L; Rochat, F; Donnet-Hughes, A

    1997-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria in food can transiently colonize the intestine and exert beneficial effects (probiotic). Survival during intestinal transit or adhesion to epithelium or both seem to be important for modifying the host's immune reactivity. Because Lactobacillus acidophilus strain La1 is adherent to enterocytes in vitro, we hypothesize that contact with immune cells may occur in vivo. However, Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Bb12, which shows high fecal colonization, is another potential immunomodulator. Twenty-eight volunteers were divided into two groups and given a fermented product containing one of the two strains. Lymphocyte subsets and leukocyte phagocytic activity were studied in blood. No modifications were detected in lymphocyte subsets. In contrast, phagocytosis of Escherichia coli ssp. was enhanced in both groups (P < 0.001 for both). Bacterial adhesion to enterocytes, fecal colonization, or both seem to be valuable selection criteria for immunomodulation. Antiinfective mechanisms of defense can be enhanced after ingestion of specific lactic acid bacteria strains. PMID:9250141

  19. Altered cytokine production by specific human peripheral blood cell subsets immediately following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was used to positively identify the specific lymphocyte subsets exhibiting space flight-induced alterations in cytokine production. Whole blood samples were collected from 27 astronauts at three points (one preflight, two postflight) surrounding four space shuttle missions. Assays performed included serum/urine stress hormones, white blood cell (WBC) phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following space flight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of T cells, whereas percentages of B cells and natural killer (NK) cells remained unchanged after flight. Nearly all the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Assessment of naive (CD45RA+) vs. memory (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was ambiguous, and subjects tended to group within specific missions. Although no significant trend was seen in absolute monocyte levels, a significant decrease in the percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocytes was seen following space flight in all subjects tested. T cell (CD3+) production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly decreased after space flight, as was IL-2 production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered by space flight for the CD8+ cell subset, but there was a significant decrease in IFN-gamma production for the CD4+ T cell subset. Serum and urine stress hormone analysis indicated significant physiologic stresses in astronauts following space flight. Altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, altered serum and urine stress hormone levels, and altered T cell cytokine secretion profiles were all observed postflight. In addition, there appeared to be differential susceptibility to space flight regarding cytokine secretion by T cell subsets. These alterations may be the

  20. Leukocyte recovery from umbilical cord blood by poligeline.

    PubMed

    Perutelli, P; Catellani, S

    1999-02-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) collected at delivery is a source of transplantable stem/progenitor cells; it represents an alternative to bone marrow to restore hematopoiesis in patients affected by malignant and non-malignant disease. Therefore, large-scale UCB banks would be a natural complement to bone marrow donor registries. Storage of unmanipulated whole UCB units requires a great number of liquid nitrogen containers. Separation of leukocytes allows UCB storage in smaller space, thus lowering banking costs; unfortunately, UCB processing may cause significant losses of stem cells. We report about the use of poligeline to remove erythrocytes from UCB units. After erythrocyte sedimentation at 1xg (30' or 40') or 50xg, leukocyte-rich supernatant was collected and centrifuged to recover the leukocyte pool in view of stem cell transplantation. Erythrocyte depletion was always satisfactory, ranging from 82.6% to 88.9%, but 1xg sedimentation for 40' enabled us to achieve the best CD34+ cell recovery (mean value 80.5%). The proposed UCB-processing method allowed us to lower the final sample volume down to 1/10 of the initial one, in this way making UCB banking feasible. Erythrocyte depletion took place directly in the collection bag, thus reducing microbial contamination risk. PMID:10193639

  1. Multicolor flow cytometry analysis of blood cell subsets in patients given total body irradiation before bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Clave, E.; Socie, G.; Carosella, E.

    1995-11-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has often been closely linked with accidental or intentional therapeutical irradiation. In both situations, study of the radiosensitivity of human blood cell subsets is of interest. Using one-color flow cytometry analysis of B lymphocytes, T cell subsets, and natural killer cells, we previously reported that lymphocyte subsets exhibit equal radiosensitivity. Taking advantage of recent developments in the knowledge of leukocyte differentiation antigens and flow cytometry technology we undertook a study of blood cell subsets to search for rare populations exhibiting different radiosensitivity. Thirty patients, who were delivered a 12 Gy fractionated total body irradiation as part of their conditioning regimen before transplantation for malignant disorders, were studied using multicolor flow cytometry. T and B lymphocytes showed a sharp, radiation-induced decrease, with the B lymphocytes (cluster of differentiation (CD) 19+) being the most sensitive. When analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry all major lymphocyte subsets appeared equally sensitive to the in vivo irradiation. Therefore, all major lymphocyte subsets sharing the helper phenotype (naive or memory) and the cytotoxic phenotype appeared equally sensitive to in vivo whole body irradiation. In parallel, the CD34+ cell subset remained basically unchanged after whole body irradiation. Finally, the CD3{minus}, 56+, 16+ natural killer cell subset was relatively radioresistant (91 and 74% of its initial value, after 2 and 4 Gy, respectively) as compared to other lymphocyte subsets. Our study provides evidence that T and B cell subsets seem to be highly radiosensitive in vivo. The CD34+ progenitor/stem cells and NK cells seem to be more radioresistant. This latter result might provide clues to the understanding of the pathophysiogeny of radiation-induced aplasia and of the engrafment/rejection process following bone marrow transplantation. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Effects of spray-dried porcine plasma and plant extracts on intestinal morphology and on leukocyte cell subsets of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Nofrarías, M; Manzanilla, E G; Pujols, J; Gibert, X; Majó, N; Segalés, J; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of a 6% spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) and a plant extracts mixture (XT; 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin) on the productive performance, intestinal morphology, and leukocyte cell subsets of early-weaned pigs compared with a control group. Morphometry of the jejunum, ileum, and colon, and immune cell analysis of blood, ileocolic lymph node (LN), and ileal Peyer's patches were done in 24 weaned pigs (20 +/- 2 d) at 19 or 21 d postweaning. Although SDPP and XT treatments did not increase ADG or ADFI, SDPP improved the G:F ratio (P = 0.024) compared with the control group. Dietary SDPP reduced the percentages of blood monocytes (P = 0.006) and macrophages in ileal Peyer's patches and LN (P = 0.04), of B lymphocytes (P = 0.04) and gammadelta+ T cells in LN (P = 0.009), and of intraepithelial lymphocytes (P = 0.026) as well as the density of lamina propria cells in the colon (P < 0.01). Dietary XT reduced intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers in jejunum (P = 0.034) and the percentages of blood cytotoxic cells (P = 0.07) and B lymphocytes in LN (P = 0.03); however, XT increased blood monocytes (P = 0.038) and the density of lamina propria lymphocytes in the colon (P = 0.003). These results indicate that dietary SDPP and plant extracts can affect intestinal morphology and immune cell subsets of gut tissues and blood in weaned pigs. Furthermore, the effects of SDPP suggest lower activation of the immune system of the piglets. PMID:16971575

  3. Characterization of peripheral blood and pulmonary leukocyte function in healthy foals.

    PubMed

    Flaminio, M J; Rush, B R; Davis, E G; Hennessy, K; Shuman, W; Wilkerson, M J

    2000-03-15

    Studies in infants and foals indicate an age-dependent maturation of peripheral lymphocyte subsets. The age-dependent relationship for maturation of cellular immune responses, such as phagocytosis and lymphocyte responses of the peripheral and pulmonary-derived leukocytes, has not been characterized in foals. Lymphocyte subpopulations, mitogen stimulation response of lymphocytes, lymphokine-activated killing cell activity, phagocytosis and oxidative burst activity, and serum immunoglobulin (Ig) classes G and M concentrations were determined in developing foals. This study illustrates age-dependent changes in immunoglobulin class concentrations, lymphocyte subsets, and EqMHC Class II expression in cells of the peripheral blood and lungs of developing neonatal-to-weanling foals. The increase in peripheral blood and BAL B-lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulins in developing foals suggests expansion of immune cell populations during a time in which environmental pathogen exposure is great. General immune function, mitogenic responses, LAK cell activity, opsonized phagocytosis, and oxidative burst activity of newborns was similar to the adult horse. Total immune-cell numbers, rather than function, seemed to be the limiting factor in the development of the equine neonatal immune system. There was an age-related percent increase in the appearance of pulmonary lymphocytes, but a percent decrease in macrophages. Although development of the respiratory immune system follows changes in the peripheral blood, cellular expansion, activation, and migration may occur at a slower pace, making the respiratory environment susceptible to pathogens prior to optimal immune system maturity. PMID:10713340

  4. A simple rapid method for the removal of leukocytes from human blood.

    PubMed

    Palmer, E; Waldman, F; Dewitt, W

    1974-01-01

    Filtration of human blood cells through lamb's wool columns removed more than 96% of all leukocytes in a series of experiments, while the retention of erythrocytes by the column averaged 6.4%. This method should prove extremely useful for obtaining pure erythrocyte preparations for use in biochemical and physiological studies, and for removing leukocytes from blood prior to transfusion. PMID:4473869

  5. The Activation Pattern of Blood Leukocytes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Is Correlated to Survival

    PubMed Central

    Millrud, Camilla Rydberg; Månsson Kvarnhammar, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Björnsson, Sven; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is known to cause substantial immunosuppression. The present study was designed to characterize blood leukocyte activation in HNSCC and to investigate if the individual activation pattern could be related to tumor progress and survival. The leukocyte activation profile of HNSCC patients and healthy controls was assessed with flow cytometry. HNSCC patients displayed increased numbers of monocytes, neutrophils and total leukocytes as well as an enhanced neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. In addition, patients had a higher percentage of CD69+, CD71+ and CD98+ T cell subsets and NK cells, and a reduced expression of L-selectin in CD14highCD16+ monocytes and neutrophils, when compared to controls. These changes could be correlated to both tumor burden and spread to lymph nodes. Among the cancer patients an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, a low neutrophil and CD14high CD16+ monocyte activation state and an elevated CD4/CD8 ratio were related to poor survival. In contrast, a high percentage of CD98+ Th cells appeared to be associated with a better outcome. Taken together, the present data indicate that HNSCC causes activation of blood leukocytes and that the individual activation pattern can be linked to prognosis. PMID:23251433

  6. The Effect of Hemiscorpius lepturus (Scorpionida: Hemiscorpiidae) Venom on Leukocytes and the Leukocyte Subgroups in Peripheral Blood of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ghafourian, Mehri; Ganjalikhanhakemi, Neda; Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Dehghani, Rouhullah; Kooti, Wesam

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Hemiscorpius lepturus venom on leukocytes and the leukocyte subgroups in peripheral blood of rat. Methods: In this experimental study, sixty N-Mari rats were divided into three groups of 20 rats. Then the rats in each group were divided into four subgroups based on the blood sampling time that was 2, 6, 24 and 48 hours after the venom injection, respectively. The control group did not receive anything, however, the first and the second experimental groups received 0.1 and 0.01mg/kg of venom, subcutaneously. In accordance with a designated four sampling times, the blood sampling was carried out in three groups. After RBC lysis, the leukocytes and leukocyte sub-populations were determined and counted using appropriate hematological standard methods. Results: The leukocyte and the neutrophil count at two (P<0.05), six (P<0.01) and 24 (P<0.05) hours after the venom injection showed a significant decline compared with the control group, this decrease was significant at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg until 48 hours after the venom injection (P<0.05). The lymphocyte count showed a significant decline throughout the all hours of the experiment, compared with the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Leukocytes are probably affected by the cytotoxicity effect of the H. lepturus venom in a dose-dependent manner. This could be a wakeup call for the medical staff to perform quick and accurate treatment in the least time possible. PMID:27308274

  7. Seasonal variation of peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length in Costa Rica: a population based observational study

    PubMed Central

    Rehkopf, David H; Dow, William H; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Lin, Jue; Epel, Elissa S; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length is increasingly being used as a biomarker of aging, but its natural variation in human populations is not well understood. Several other biomarkers show seasonal variation, as do several determinants of leukocyte telomere length. We examined whether there was monthly variation in leukocyte telomere length in Costa Rica, a country with strong seasonal differences in precipitation and infection. Methods We examined a longitudinal population based cohort of 581 Costa Rican adults age 60 and above, from which blood samples were drawn between October 2006 and July 2008. Leukocyte telomere length was assayed from these samples using the quantitative PCR method. Multivariate regression models were used to examine correlations between month of blood draw and leukocyte telomere length. Results Telomere length from peripheral blood leukocytes varied by as much as 200 base pairs depending on month of blood draw, and this difference is not likely to be due to random variation. A moderate proportion of this association is statistically accounted for by month and region specific average rainfall. We found shorter telomere length associated with greater rainfall. Conclusions There are two possible explanations of our findings. First, there could be relatively rapid month-to-month changes in leukocyte telomere length. This conclusion would have implications for understanding the natural population dynamics of telomere length. Second, there could be seasonal differences in constituent cell populations. This conclusion would suggest that future studies of leukocyte telomere length use methods to account for the potential impact of constituent cell type. PMID:24615938

  8. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P; Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N; Matyunin, S N; Nazarov, M M; Cherkasova, O P

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  9. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  10. A Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptor Subset Is a Marker of Antiviral Cytotoxic Cells in Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin B; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Stuge, Tor B; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Bengten, Eva; Wilson, Melanie

    2016-03-15

    Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, leukocyte immune type receptors (LITRs) represent a multigene family that encodes Ig superfamily proteins that mediate activating or inhibitory signaling. In this study, we demonstrate the use of mAb CC41 to monitor viral cytotoxic responses in catfish and determine that CC41 binds to a subset of LITRs on the surface of catfish clonal CTLs. Homozygous gynogenetic catfish were immunized with channel catfish virus (CCV)-infected MHC-matched clonal T cells (G14D-CCV), and PBL were collected at various times after immunization for flow cytometric analyses. The percentage of CC41(+) cells was significantly increased 5 d after primary immunization with G14D-CCV and at 3 d after a booster immunization as compared with control fish only injected with G14D. Moreover, CC41(+) cells magnetically isolated from the PBL specifically killed CCV-infected targets as measured by (51)Cr release assays and expressed messages for CD3γδ, perforin, and at least one of the CD4-like receptors as analyzed by RNA flow cytometry. When MLC effector cells derived from a G14D-CCV-immunized fish were preincubated with CC41 mAb, killing of G14D-CCV targets was reduced by ∼40%, suggesting that at least some LITRs have a role in target cell recognition and/or cytotoxicity. The availability of a LITR-specific mAb has allowed, to our knowledge for the first time, functional characterization of LITRs in an autologous system. In addition, the identification of an LITR subset as a cytotoxic cell marker will allow for more effective monitoring of catfish immune responses to pathogens. PMID:26856701

  11. Phenotypic, ultra-structural and functional characterization of bovine peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are multifunctional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets...

  12. Phytohemagglutinin enhancement of dengue-2 virus replication in nonimmune rhesus monkey peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Marchette, N J; Halstead, S B

    1978-01-01

    Phytohemagglutinin treatment of peripheral blood leukocytes from dengue nonimmune monkeys enhanced dengue-2 virus replication. Enhancement was due primarily to an increase in the number of infected cells. Destruction of mononuclear phagocytes with silica did not significantly inhibit virus replication in phytohemagglutinin-treated cultures. Pokeweed mitogen, concanavalin A, and streptolysin O stimulated increased deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in monkey leukocytes but did not enhance virus replication. None of the mitogens significantly affected virus replication in cultures of dengue-immune monkey peripheral blood leukocytes. PMID:203535

  13. Effects of Hypericum perforatum extract on IgG titer, leukocytes subset and spleen index in rats

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Tahereh; Arshami, Javad; Tahmasbi, Abdol Mansur; Haghparast, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Hypericum perforatum L. is a medicinal plant containing many polyphenolic compounds, ‎including flavonoids and phenolic acids with antidepressant and anti-inflammatory properties. ‎This study was investigated the effects of Hypericum perforatum extract (HPE) on immunity, ‎body weight (BW), and spleen index (SI) in rats.‎ Materials and Methods: A total of 24 Wistar male rats were randomly received 4 different doses (6 rats each) of HPE ‎‎(0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg BW) intraperitoneally for 14 days using a completely ‎randomized design. On days 1 and 7, rats were received 0.5 ml SRBC (10%) injection. Blood ‎samples were collected on day 14 to evaluate IgG titer and leukocyte count. On days 1, 7 and ‎‎14, the BW and on day 14 spleen were weighted for SI. ‎ Results: The IgG titer increased with higher doses of HPE. The HPE increased number of ‎lymphocytes at 200 mg but decreased at 400 mg, number of neutrophils decreased at 200 mg ‎but increased at 400 mg, and number of monocytes increased at 100 mg and 200 mg but ‎decreased at 400 mg (p<0.01). Increasing doses of HPE lowered BW (p<0.01). ‎The HPE increased SI at 100 mg and 200 mg but decreased at 400 mg (p>0.072). ‎ Conclusions: The results showed that HPE slightly improved IgG titer but significantly increased ‎the number of leukocytes and monocytes at 200 mg, and neutrophils at 400 mg. The HPE ‎decreased BW at 100 mg and 200 mg with no damage on spleen. ‎ PMID:25386405

  14. Dynamic properties of blood flow and leukocyte mobilization in infected flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, L.J.; Price, D.C.; Mathes, S.J.; Hohn, D. )

    1990-11-01

    Two aspects of the inflammatory response to infection--blood flow alteration and leukocyte mobilization--are investigated in the canine model. The elevation of paired musculocutaneous (MC) and random pattern (RP) flaps allowed comparison of healing flaps with significant differences in blood flow (lower in random pattern flaps) and resistance to infection (greater in musculocutaneous flaps). Blood flow changes as determined by radioactive xenon washout were compared in normal skin and distal flap skin both after elevation and following bacterial inoculation. Simultaneous use of In-111 labeled leukocytes allowed determination of leukocyte mobilization and subsequent localization in response to flap infection. Blood flow significantly improved in the musculocutaneous flap in response to infection. Although total leukocyte mobilization in the random pattern flap was greater, the leukocytes in the musculocutaneous flap were localized around the site of bacterial inoculation within the dermis. Differences in the dynamic blood flow and leukocyte mobilization may, in part, explain the greater reliability of musculocutaneous flaps when transposed in the presence of infection.

  15. Red blood cells initiate leukocyte rolling in postcapillary expansions: a lattice Boltzmann analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenghai; Migliorini, Cristiano; Munn, Lance L

    2003-07-01

    Leukocyte rolling on the vascular endothelium requires initial contact between leukocytes circulating in the blood and the vessel wall. Although specific adhesion mechanisms are involved in leukocyte-endothelium interactions, adhesion patterns in vivo suggest other rheological mechanisms also play a role. Previous studies have proposed that the abundance of leukocyte rolling in postcapillary venules is due to interactions between red blood cells (RBCs) and leukocytes as they enter postcapillary expansions, but the details of the fluid dynamics have not been elucidated. We have analyzed the interactions of red and white blood cells as they flow from a capillary into a postcapillary venule using a lattice Boltzmann approach. This technique provides the complete solution of the flow field and quantification of the particle-particle forces in a relevant geometry. Our results show that capillary-postcapillary venule diameter ratio, RBC configuration, and RBC shape are critical determinants of the initiation of cell rolling in postcapillary venules. The model predicts that an optimal configuration of the trailing red blood cells is required to drive the white blood cell to the wall. PMID:12829477

  16. Red Blood Cells Initiate Leukocyte Rolling in Postcapillary Expansions: A Lattice Boltzmann Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chenghai; Migliorini, Cristiano; Munn, Lance L.

    2003-01-01

    Leukocyte rolling on the vascular endothelium requires initial contact between leukocytes circulating in the blood and the vessel wall. Although specific adhesion mechanisms are involved in leukocyte-endothelium interactions, adhesion patterns in vivo suggest other rheological mechanisms also play a role. Previous studies have proposed that the abundance of leukocyte rolling in postcapillary venules is due to interactions between red blood cells (RBCs) and leukocytes as they enter postcapillary expansions, but the details of the fluid dynamics have not been elucidated. We have analyzed the interactions of red and white blood cells as they flow from a capillary into a postcapillary venule using a lattice Boltzmann approach. This technique provides the complete solution of the flow field and quantification of the particle-particle forces in a relevant geometry. Our results show that capillary-postcapillary venule diameter ratio, RBC configuration, and RBC shape are critical determinants of the initiation of cell rolling in postcapillary venules. The model predicts that an optimal configuration of the trailing red blood cells is required to drive the white blood cell to the wall. PMID:12829477

  17. Report: Nuclei segmentation of leukocytes in blood smear digital images.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Naveed; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    The Leukocytes are differentiated from each other on the basis of their nuclei, demanded in many Medical studies, especially in all types of Leukemia by the Hematologists to note the disorder caused by specific type of Leukocyte. Leukemia is a life threatening disease. The work for diagnosing is manually carried out by the Hematologists involving much labor, time and human errors. The problems mentioned are easily addressed through computer vision techniques, but still accuracy and efficiency are demanded in terms of the basic and challenging step segmentation of Leukocyte's nuclei. The underlying study proposed better method in terms of accuracy and efficiency by designing a dynamic convolution filter for boosting low intensity values in the separated green channel of an RGB image and suppressing the high values in the same channel. The high values in the green channel become 255 (background) while the nuclei always have low values in the green channel and thus clearly appear as foreground. The proposed technique is tested on 365 images achieving an overall accuracy of 95.89%, while improving the efficiency by 10%. The proposed technique achieved its targets in a realistic way by improving the accuracy as well as the efficiency and both are highly required in the area. PMID:26408877

  18. Expression of beta 2 integrins on blood leukocytes of cows with or without bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cox, E; Mast, J; MacHugh, N; Schwenger, B; Goddeeris, B M

    1997-09-19

    Peripheral blood leukocytes of 11 normal cows, 7 cows heterozygous and 2 heifers homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were analysed by flow cytometry for the intensity of their beta 2 integrin expression (LFA-1(CD11a/CD18), CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18)). BLAD-homozygotes revealed no or a very weak expression of the beta 2 integrins and had a 10-fold and 4- to 5-fold increase in absolute number of neutrophils and monocytes, respectively, whereas the absolute number of lymphocytes remained normal. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the beta 2 integrins (CD18) in heterozygous animals was 56 to 90% of this in the normal cows (MFI between 14 and 512). The difference in the expression level was most pronounced for LFA-1 on the small cluster of lymphocytes with the highest MFI for LFA-1. Repeated analysis and phorbol myristate acetate stimulation revealed that the LFA-1 expression on this high-expressing cell population of the peripheral blood allowed a ready identification of BLAD-heterozygotes by flow cytometry. PMID:9436269

  19. [The effect of bromantane on the erythro- and leukocytic profile of the peripheral blood in rats].

    PubMed

    Bugaeva, L I; Spasov, A A; Morozov, I S

    1999-01-01

    The specific effect of bromantan on blood tissue is demonstrated in rats. In chronic injection in a dose of 30 mg/kg bromantan raised the level of hemoglobin and leukocytes. In doses of 150 and 600 mg/kg it increased at first (3 months) and then reduced the level of erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and leukocytes. Reversible poikilocytosis, granulocytosis, and agranulocytosis were encountered. Hyperchromatosis and hypertrophy of the hepatocytes were found in the tissues of the liver and hemosiderosis was discovered in the spleen. It is suggested that the blood tissue is a "target" in the toxic effect of bromantan. PMID:10513335

  20. Selection of the best features for leukocytes classification in blood smear microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrafzadeh, Omid; Rabbani, Hossein; Talebi, Ardeshir; Banaem, Hossein Usefi

    2014-03-01

    Automatic differential counting of leukocytes provides invaluable information to pathologist for diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The main objective of this paper is to detect leukocytes from a blood smear microscopic image and classify them into their types: Neutrophil, Eosinophil, Basophil, Lymphocyte and Monocyte using features that pathologists consider to differentiate leukocytes. Features contain color, geometric and texture features. Colors of nucleus and cytoplasm vary among the leukocytes. Lymphocytes have single, large, round or oval and Monocytes have singular convoluted shape nucleus. Nucleus of Eosinophils is divided into 2 segments and nucleus of Neutrophils into 2 to 5 segments. Lymphocytes often have no granules, Monocytes have tiny granules, Neutrophils have fine granules and Eosinophils have large granules in cytoplasm. Six color features is extracted from both nucleus and cytoplasm, 6 geometric features only from nucleus and 6 statistical features and 7 moment invariants features only from cytoplasm of leukocytes. These features are fed to support vector machine (SVM) classifiers with one to one architecture. The results obtained by applying the proposed method on blood smear microscopic image of 10 patients including 149 white blood cells (WBCs) indicate that correct rate for all classifiers are above 93% which is in a higher level in comparison with previous literatures.

  1. Long Telomeres in Blood Leukocytes Are Associated with a High Risk of Ascending Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Huusko, Tuija J.; Santaniemi, Merja; Kakko, Sakari; Taskinen, Panu; Ukkola, Olavi; Kesäniemi, Y. Antero; Savolainen, Markku J.; Salonurmi, Tuire

    2012-01-01

    Ascending aortic aneurysm is a connective tissue disorder. Even though multiple novel gene mutations have been identified, risk profiling and diagnosis before rupture still represent a challenge. There are studies demonstrating shorter telomere lengths in the blood leukocytes of abdominal aortic aneurysm patients. The aim of this study was to measure whether relative telomere lengths are changed in the blood leukocytes of ascending aortic aneurysm patients. We also studied the expression of telomerase in aortic tissue samples of ascending aortic aneurysms. Relative lengths of leukocyte telomeres were determined from blood samples of patients with ascending aortic aneurysms and compared with healthy controls. Telomerase expression, both at the level of mRNA and protein, was quantified from the aortic tissue samples. Mean relative telomere length was significantly longer in ascending aortic aneurysm blood samples compared with controls (T/S ratio 0.87 vs. 0.61, p<0.001). Expressions of telomerase mRNA and protein were elevated in the aortic aneurysm samples (p<0.05 and p<0.01). Our study reveals a significant difference in the mean length of blood leukocyte telomeres in ascending aortic aneurysm and controls. Furthermore, expression of telomerase, the main compensating factor for telomere loss, is elevated at both the mRNA and protein level in the samples of aneurysmal aorta. Further studies will be needed to confirm if this change in telomere length can serve as a tool for assessing the risk of ascending aortic aneurysm. PMID:23209831

  2. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases. PMID:27501318

  3. A New Machine Classification Method Applied to Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorvig, Mark E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses pattern classification of images by computer and describes the Two Domain Method in which expert knowledge is acquired using multidimensional scaling of judgments of dissimilarities and linear mapping. An application of the Two Domain Method that tested its power to discriminate two patterns of human blood leukocyte distribution is…

  4. EFFECTS OF THE MAMMARY GLAND ON FUNCTIONAL CAPACITIES OF BLOOD MONOCULEAR LEUKOCYTE POPULATIONS FROM PERIPARTURIENT COWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The composition and functional capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte populations from dairy cows are altered substantially during the peripartal period. These changes are associated with a heightened susceptibility of the mammary gland to infection. It has been postulated that the met...

  5. Expression of peptide YY by human blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Holler, Julia Pia Natascha; Schmitz, Jessica; Roehrig, Rainer; Wilker, Sigrid; Hecker, Andreas; Padberg, Winfried; Grau, Veronika

    2014-08-01

    Peptide YY is produced by L cells in the mucosa of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum and may have systemic and paracrine functions. We hypothesized that peptide YY is expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the expression of peptide YY mRNA and peptide by peripheral blood mononuclear cells and differentiated THP-1 cells after lipopolysaccharide treatment as an in vitro model of inflammation. Blood was drawn by venipuncture from 18- to 63-year-old healthy male blood donors (n=63); peptide YY mRNA expression levels were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all healthy male subjects. In 3 subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured for 3 and 24h and peptide YY was detected in the cell culture supernatant. In human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate to induce differentiation to macrophages, treatment with lipopolysaccharide caused down-regulation of peptide YY mRNA levels. In summary, freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans expressed peptide YY. In vitro data suggested that peptide YY expression is down-regulated by differentiation of monocytes to macrophages and proinflammatory stimuli. PMID:24969624

  6. An epigenomic signature of postprandial hyperglycemia in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Cho, Yoon-Kyung; Hong, Eun-Jung; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2016-03-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia is known to be one of the earliest signs of abnormal glucose homeostasis associated with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to assess clinical significance of a 1-h postprandial glucose level for the development of diabetes, and identify epigenetic biomarkers of postprandial hyperglycemia. We analyzed clinical data from the oral glucose tolerance tests for healthy subjects (n=4502). The ratio (Glu60/Glu0) of 1-h glucose levels to fasting glucose levels was significantly associated with an insulin sensitive index (QUICKI, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index) (β=0.055, P=1.25E-04) as well as a risk of future pre-diabetic and diabetic conversion. Next, DNA methylation profile analyses of 24 matched pairs of the high and low Glu60/Glu0 ratio subjects showed that specific DNA methylation levels in the promoter region of an olfactory receptor gene (olfactory receptor gene family10 member A4, OR10A4) were associated with the Glu60/Glu0 ratios (β=0.337, P=0.03). Moreover, acute oral glucose challenges decreased the DNA methylation levels of OR10A4 but not the global DNA methylation in peripheral leukocytes of healthy subjects (n=7), indicating that OR10A4 is a specific epigenomic target of postprandial hyperglycemia. This work suggests possible relevance of olfactory receptor genes to an earlier molecular biomarker of peripheral hyperglycemia and diabetic conversion. PMID:26632885

  7. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c+, CD141+ and CD16+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141+ DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  8. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) , CD141(+) and CD16(+) myeloid DCs and CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141(+) DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  9. Altered expression of adhesion molecules on peripheral blood leukocytes in feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Vermeulen, Ben L; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-10-25

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, coronavirus-induced systemic disease in domestic and wild felids. The pathology associated with FIP (multifocal granulomatous vasculitis) is considered to be elicited by exaggerated activation and subsequent extravasation of leukocytes. As changes in the expression of adhesion molecules on circulating leukocytes precede their margination and emigration, we reasoned that the expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules may be altered in FIP. In present study, the expression of principal adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte transmigration (CD15s, CD11a, CD11b, CD18, CD49d, and CD54) on peripheral blood leukocytes from cats with naturally occurring FIP (n=15) and controls (n=12) was quantified by flow cytometry using a formaldehyde-based rapid leukocyte preparation technique. T- and B-lymphocytes from FIP patients exhibit higher expression of both subunits (CD11a and CD18) composing the β2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1. In addition, the expression of the α4 subunit (CD49d) of the β1 integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 was elevated on B-lymphocytes from FIP patients. The expression of CD11b and CD18, that combine to form the β2 integrin macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1), was elevated on monocytes, whereas the density of CD49d was reduced on this population in FIP. Granulocytes of FIP cats displayed an increased expression of the α chain of Mac-1 (CD11b). These observations suggest that leukocytes from FIP patients show signs of systemic activation causing them to extravasate into surrounding tissues and ultimately contribute to pyogranuloma formation seen in FIP. PMID:23910523

  10. Laser-induced priming of human blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichuk, Tatyana V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Strashkevich, I. A.; Klebanov, Gennady I.

    1999-12-01

    We investigated the influence of He-Ne ((lambda) equals 632.8 nm) laser irradiation (LI) on a functional activity of human blood leucocytes. The method of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence with the zymosan-activated phagocytes was used. The leucocytes were irradiated without and in the presence of autologic human blood plasma, containing of the endogenous (porphyrins) and/or exogenous (phthalocyanine) photosensitizers. The LI initiated a priming of the leucocytes. Priming revealed itself after the activation of the phagocytes by zymosan. The changes of the calcium concentration in leucocytes cytoplasm were studied too. Fluorimetric method with Fura-2AM was used for this. The laser irradiation initiated the changes of the calcium concentration in the leucocytes cytoplasm. All the investigating parameters depended on the irradiation dose and on the concentration of photosensitizers. The results of this work allowed to formulate the main theses of the free radical mechanism of the low intensive laser irradiation action on human blood leucocytes.

  11. Cellular softening mediates leukocyte demargination and trafficking, thereby increasing clinical blood counts.

    PubMed

    Fay, Meredith E; Myers, David R; Kumar, Amit; Turbyfield, Cory T; Byler, Rebecca; Crawford, Kaci; Mannino, Robert G; Laohapant, Alvin; Tyburski, Erika A; Sakurai, Yumiko; Rosenbluth, Michael J; Switz, Neil A; Sulchek, Todd A; Graham, Michael D; Lam, Wilbur A

    2016-02-23

    Leukocytes normally marginate toward the vascular wall in large vessels and within the microvasculature. Reversal of this process, leukocyte demargination, leads to substantial increases in the clinical white blood cell and granulocyte count and is a well-documented effect of glucocorticoid and catecholamine hormones, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that alterations in granulocyte mechanical properties are the driving force behind glucocorticoid- and catecholamine-induced demargination. First, we found that the proportions of granulocytes from healthy human subjects that traversed and demarginated from microfluidic models of capillary beds and veins, respectively, increased after the subjects ingested glucocorticoids. Also, we show that glucocorticoid and catecholamine exposure reorganizes cellular cortical actin, significantly reducing granulocyte stiffness, as measured with atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, using simple kinetic theory computational modeling, we found that this reduction in stiffness alone is sufficient to cause granulocyte demargination. Taken together, our findings reveal a biomechanical answer to an old hematologic question regarding how glucocorticoids and catecholamines cause leukocyte demargination. In addition, in a broader sense, we have discovered a temporally and energetically efficient mechanism in which the innate immune system can simply alter leukocyte stiffness to fine tune margination/demargination and therefore leukocyte trafficking in general. These observations have broad clinically relevant implications for the inflammatory process overall as well as hematopoietic stem cell mobilization and homing. PMID:26858400

  12. The effect of acupuncture on leukocyte levels in peripheral blood is modified by aspirin.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Vilchis, José Federico; Barrera-Escorcia, Eduardo; Fregoso-Padilla, Martha

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that acupuncture can modify circulating levels of subpopulations of leukocytes. There have been few investigations on the effect of acupuncture on prostaglandins metabolism. Aspirin is capable of inhibiting the metabolism of prostaglandins and to produce several pharmacological effects. The objective of this study was to determine whether prior administration of aspirin could modify the action of acupuncture on levels of circulating leukocytes. Fourteen healthy males (age: 19-23 years) were recruited from a university student population. This study was a placebo-controlled, prospective, cross-over design. Subjects were randomly assigned into A or B groups. Group A received aspirin 500 mg and group B placebo, after 1 week of a washout period, group A received placebo and group B aspirin. Subjects were given acupuncture with manual needling in GV14 (Dazhui) acupoint 2 hr after receiving medication. The needle was stimulated for 10 sec and was kept in place for 5 min. Leukocytes and their subpopulations were quantified in blood samples taken immediately before and 2 hr after acupuncture treatment. In each subject pre-acupuncture values were compared to those post-acupuncture. The results showed that acupuncture significantly increased overall leukocytes (p=0.006) and neutrophils (p<0.001). Aspirin partially inhibited these effects. The data suggest that the effect of acupuncture on leukocytes may be related to levels of prostaglandins. PMID:22128425

  13. Cellular softening mediates leukocyte demargination and trafficking, thereby increasing clinical blood counts

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Meredith E.; Myers, David R.; Kumar, Amit; Turbyfield, Cory T.; Byler, Rebecca; Crawford, Kaci; Mannino, Robert G.; Laohapant, Alvin; Tyburski, Erika A.; Sakurai, Yumiko; Rosenbluth, Michael J.; Switz, Neil A.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes normally marginate toward the vascular wall in large vessels and within the microvasculature. Reversal of this process, leukocyte demargination, leads to substantial increases in the clinical white blood cell and granulocyte count and is a well-documented effect of glucocorticoid and catecholamine hormones, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that alterations in granulocyte mechanical properties are the driving force behind glucocorticoid- and catecholamine-induced demargination. First, we found that the proportions of granulocytes from healthy human subjects that traversed and demarginated from microfluidic models of capillary beds and veins, respectively, increased after the subjects ingested glucocorticoids. Also, we show that glucocorticoid and catecholamine exposure reorganizes cellular cortical actin, significantly reducing granulocyte stiffness, as measured with atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, using simple kinetic theory computational modeling, we found that this reduction in stiffness alone is sufficient to cause granulocyte demargination. Taken together, our findings reveal a biomechanical answer to an old hematologic question regarding how glucocorticoids and catecholamines cause leukocyte demargination. In addition, in a broader sense, we have discovered a temporally and energetically efficient mechanism in which the innate immune system can simply alter leukocyte stiffness to fine tune margination/demargination and therefore leukocyte trafficking in general. These observations have broad clinically relevant implications for the inflammatory process overall as well as hematopoietic stem cell mobilization and homing. PMID:26858400

  14. Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor 1-Expressing Human Natural Killer Cell Subsets Differentially Recognize Isolates of Human Cytomegalovirus through the Viral Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Homolog UL18

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin C.; Banat, Jareer J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immune responses of natural killer (NK) cell are controlled by the balance between activating and inhibitory receptors, but the expression of these receptors varies between cells within an individual. Although NK cells are a component of the innate immune system, particular NK cell subsets expressing Ly49H are positively selected and increase in frequency in response to cytomegalovirus infection in mice. Recent evidence suggests that in humans certain NK subsets also have an increased frequency in the blood of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected individuals. However, whether these subsets differ in their capacity of direct control of HCMV-infected cells remains unclear. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro assay to assess whether human NK cell subsets have differential abilities to inhibit HCMV growth and dissemination. NK cells expressing or lacking NKG2C did not display any differences in controlling viral dissemination. However, when in vitro-expanded NK cells were used, cells expressing or lacking the inhibitory receptor leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 (LIR1) were differentially able to control dissemination. Surprisingly, the ability of LIR1+ NK cells to control virus spread differed between HCMV viral strains, and this phenomenon was dependent on amino acid sequences within the viral ligand UL18. Together, the results here outline an in vitro technique to compare the long-term immune responses of different human NK cell subsets and suggest, for the first time, that phenotypically defined human NK cell subsets may differentially recognize HCMV infections. IMPORTANCE HCMV infection is ubiquitous in most populations; it is not cleared by the host after primary infection but persists for life. The innate and adaptive immune systems control the spread of virus, for which natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role. NK cells can respond to HCMV infection by rapid, short-term, nonspecific innate responses, but evidence from murine

  15. Yogurt: effect on leukocytes and blood coagulation in an acute liver injury model.

    PubMed

    Haro, Cecilia; Lazarte, Sandra; Zelaya, Hortensia; Alvarez, Susana; Agüero, Graciela

    2009-08-01

    This study determined whether cow or goat yogurt administration has a preventive effect on the hepatic damage undergone during an acute liver injury. Acute liver injury was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of d-galactosamine. Groups of mice were fed with cow or goat yogurt for 2 days or 7 days before the d-galactosamine injection. Blood and liver samples were obtained 12 hours after d-galactosamine inoculation. d-Galactosamine induced an increase in serum amino-transaminases, a reduction in the number of blood leukocytes, an enhancement in neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity, a recruitment of leukocytes toward the liver, an increase in cell death, and an alteration in prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogen levels. Treatment with cow or goat yogurt was effective at increasing leukocyte number and decrease myeloperoxidase activity. We also observed a decrease in leukocyte accumulation in the liver and a reduction in cell death. Activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen were normalized, but prothrombin time only showed an improvement without reaching normal values. Cow or goat yogurts were effective at protecting against an experimental acute liver injury, especially when administered for 7 days. PMID:19735179

  16. T-cell Subsets in Peripheral Blood and Tumors of Patients Treated With Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kristian, Taipale; Ilkka, Liikanen; Juuso, Juhila; Aila, Karioja-Kallio; Minna, Oksanen; Riku, Turkki; Nina, Linder; Johan, Lundin; Ari, Ristimäki; Anna, Kanerva; Anniina, Koski; Timo, Joensuu; Markus, Vähä-Koskela; Akseli, Hemminki

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the antitumor immune response is decisive when developing new immunotherapies for cancer. Oncolytic adenoviruses cause a potent immunogenic stimulus and arming them with costimulatory molecules reshapes the immune response further. We evaluated peripheral blood T-cell subsets of 50 patients with refractory solid tumors undergoing treatment with oncolytic adenovirus. These data were compared to changes in antiviral and antitumor T cells, treatment efficacy, overall survival, and T-cell subsets in pre- and post-treatment tumor biopsies. Treatment caused a significant (P < 0.0001) shift in T-cell subsets in blood, characterized by a proportional increase of CD8+ cells, and decrease of CD4+ cells. Concomitant treatment with cyclophosphamide and temozolomide resulted in less CD4+ decrease (P = 0.041) than cyclophosphamide only. Interestingly, we saw a correlation between T-cell changes in peripheral blood and the tumor site. This correlation was positive for CD8+ and inverse for CD4+ cells. These findings give insight to the interconnections between peripheral blood and tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) populations regarding oncolytic virotherapy. In particular, our data suggest that induction of T-cell response is not sufficient for clinical response in the context of immunosuppressive tumors, and that peripheral blood T cells have a complicated and potentially misleading relationship with TILs. PMID:25655312

  17. Phenotypic, Ultra-Structural, and Functional Characterization of Bovine Peripheral Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Ochoa, Amanda S.; Bishop, Elizabeth; Barlow, John W.; Golde, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are multi-functional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets directly ex vivo, without further in vitro manipulation. Multi-color flow cytometric analysis revealed that three DC subsets could be identified. Bovine plasmacytoid DC were phenotypically identified by a unique pattern of cell surface protein expression including CD4, exhibited an extensive endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, efficiently internalized and degraded exogenous antigen, and were the only peripheral blood cells specialized in the production of type I IFN following activation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Conventional DC were identified by expression of a different pattern of cell surface proteins including CD11c, MHC class II, and CD80, among others, the display of extensive dendritic protrusions on their plasma membrane, expression of very high levels of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, efficient internalization and degradation of exogenous antigen, and ready production of detectable levels of TNF-alpha in response to TLR activation. Our investigations also revealed a third novel DC subset that may be a precursor of conventional DC that were MHC class II+ and CD11c−. These cells exhibited a smooth plasma membrane with a rounded nucleus, produced TNF-alpha in response to TLR-activation (albeit lower than CD11c+ DC), and were the least efficient in internalization/degradation of exogenous antigen. These studies define three bovine blood DC subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics which can be analyzed during immune responses to pathogens and vaccinations of cattle. PMID:25295753

  18. A rapid and simple method for the isolation of pure eosinophilic leukocytes from horse blood.

    PubMed

    Jörg, A; Portmann, P; Fellay, G; Dreyer, J L; Meyer, J

    1978-12-15

    An improved and short method is described for the isolation of intact eosinophilic leukocytes from horse blood with high yield (1--1.5 g/20 l). Viability and purity of the preparations were verified by light and electron microscopy and by the trypan blue exclusion test. Isolated eosinophils were 98--100% pure, intact and viable, and they could be shown to phagocytise immune-complexes. PMID:729750

  19. Red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients awaiting kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Silvia Fernandes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Gláucia Maria; da Silva, Sonia Leite; Alves, Tânia Maria de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Ilana Farias; Ribeiro, Thyciana Rodrigues; Cavalcante, Maria do Carmo Serpa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients with chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplantation. Methods In this cross-sectional and prospective study, the serum of 393 chronic kidney disease patients on a transplant waiting list in Ceará, Northeastern Brazil were tested for red cell and leukocyte antibodies. In addition, demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Results The average age in the sample of 393 patients was 34.1 ± 14 years. Slightly more than half (208; 52.9%) were male. The average numbers of transfusions and gestations were 3.1 ± 3.3 and 1.6 ± 6, respectively. One third (33.6%) were alloimmunized: 78% with leukocyte antibodies, 9.1% with red cell antibodies and 12.9% with both. Red cell antibodies were detected in 29 cases (7.4%), 17 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001). The most frequently detected red cell antibodies belonged to the Rh (24.1%) and Kell (13.8%) blood group systems. Leukocyte antibodies were detected in 30.5% of cases, 83 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001) and were more reactive to panel reactive antibodies (p-value < 0.0001). The mean alloreactivity to panel reactive antibodies was 47.7 ± 31.2%. Conclusion Chronic kidney disease patients on the transplant waiting list in Ceará, Brazil, display high rates of red cell (7.4%) and leukocyte (30.5%) alloimmunization. In this sample, alloimmunization was significantly associated with the number of transfusions and gender. PMID:23904808

  20. MicroRNA expression profiling of human blood monocyte subsets highlights functional differences

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Truong-Minh; Wong, Wing-Cheong; Ong, Siew-Min; Li, Peng; Lum, Josephine; Chen, Jinmiao; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Wong, Siew-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Within human blood there are two subsets of monocytes that can be identified by differential expression of CD16. Although numerous phenotypic and functional differences between the subsets have been described, little is known of the mechanisms underlying the distinctive properties of the two subsets. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can regulate gene expression through promoting mRNA degradation or repressing translation, leading to alterations in cellular processes. Their potential influence on the functions of monocyte subsets has not been investigated. In this study, we employed microarray analysis to define the miRNA expression profile of human monocyte subsets. We identified 66 miRNAs that were differentially expressed (DE) between CD16+ and CD16− monocytes. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the predicted targets of the DE miRNAs were predominantly associated with cell death and cellular movement. We validated the functional impacts of selected DE miRNAs in CD16− monocytes, over-expression of miR-432 significantly increases apoptosis, and inhibiting miR-19a significantly reduces cell motility. Furthermore, we found that miR-345, another DE miRNA directly targets the transcription factor RelA in monocytes, which resulted in the differential expression of RelA in monocyte subsets. This implicates miR-345 indirect regulation of many genes downstream of RelA, including important inflammatory mediators. Together, our data show that DE miRNAs could contribute substantially to regulating the functions of human blood monocytes. PMID:25707426

  1. Shorter telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes is associated with childhood autism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongchang; Tang, Jinsong; Li, Hong; Chen, Shan; He, Ying; Liao, Yanhui; Wei, Zhen; Wan, Guobin; Xiang, Xi; Xia, Kun; Chen, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are protective chromosomal structures that play a key role in preserving genomic stability. Epidemiologic studies have shown that the abnormal telomere length in leukocytes is associated with some mental disorders and age-related diseases. However, the association between leukocyte telomere length and autism has not been investigated. Here we investigated the possible association between relative telomere length (RTL) in peripheral blood leukocytes and childhood autism by using an established real-time polymerase chain reaction method. We observed significantly shorter RTL in patients with childhood autism than in controls (p = 0.006). Individuals with shorter RTL had a significantly increased presence of childhood autism compared with those who had long RTL. In patients, we found that family training interventions have a significant effect on telomere length (P = 0.012), but no correlations between RTL and clinical features (paternal age, maternal age, age of onset, illness of duration, CARS score and ABC score) were observed in this study. These results provided the first evidence that shorter leukocytes telomere length is significantly associated with childhood autism. The molecular mechanism underlying telomere length may be implicated in the development of autism. PMID:25399515

  2. Effect of prenatal arsenic exposure on DNA methylation and leukocyte subpopulations in cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Molly L; Houseman, E Andres; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mostofa, Golam; Cardenas, Andres; Wright, Robert O; Christiani, David C

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal arsenic exposure is associated with increased risk of disease in adulthood. This has led to considerable interest in arsenic’s ability to disrupt fetal programming. Many studies report that arsenic exposure alters DNA methylation in whole blood but these studies did not adjust for cell mixture. In this study, we examined the relationship between arsenic in maternal drinking water collected ≤ 16 weeks gestational age and DNA methylation in cord blood (n = 44) adjusting for leukocyte-tagged differentially methylated regions. DNA methylation was quantified using the Infinium HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip array. Recursively partitioned mixture modeling examined the relationship between arsenic and methylation at 473,844 CpG sites. Median arsenic concentration in water was 12 µg/L (range < 1- 510 µg/L). Log10 arsenic was associated with altered DNA methylation across the epigenome (P = 0.002); however, adjusting for leukocyte distributions attenuated this association (P = 0.013). We also observed that arsenic had a strong effect on the distribution of leukocytes in cord blood. In adjusted models, every log10 increase in maternal drinking water arsenic exposure was estimated to increase CD8+ T cells by 7.4% (P = 0.0004) and decrease in CD4+ T cells by 9.2% (P = 0.0002). These results show that prenatal exposure to arsenic had an exposure-dependent effect on specific T cell subpopulations in cord blood and altered DNA methylation in cord blood. Future research is needed to determine if these small changes in DNA methylation alter gene expression or are associated with adverse health effects. PMID:24525453

  3. Effects of repeated social stress on leukocyte distribution in bone marrow, peripheral blood and spleen.

    PubMed

    Engler, Harald; Bailey, Michael T; Engler, Andrea; Sheridan, John F

    2004-03-01

    Leukocyte trafficking between the various body compartments has an important surveillance function that ensures the detection of antigen and enables the immune system to initiate a rapid and effective response. Repeated social defeat of group-housed male mice induced by daily, acute encounters with an aggressive conspecific substantially altered leukocyte trafficking and led to a gradual redistribution of immune cells in bone marrow, peripheral blood and spleen. Recurrent exposure to the stressor over a period of 2, 4 or 6 consecutive days was associated with cell mobilization and increased myelopoiesis in the bone marrow that was paralleled by an accumulation of neutrophils and monocytes in circulation and spleen. Substantial depletion of B cells in bone marrow and blood was associated with an increase in splenic B cells indicating a redirection of this cell type to the spleen. In contrast, T cells were markedly reduced in these immune compartments. The recruitment of CD11b+ leukocytes (i.e., monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils) from the bone marrow to the spleen might play a critical role in the development of functional glucocorticoid resistance in the murine spleen that was reported in context with repeated social defeat. PMID:14975591

  4. Flow cytofluorometric assay of human whole blood leukocyte DNA degradation in response to Yersinia pestis and Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Golovko, Elena M.; Malyukova, Tatyana A.; Lyapin, Mikhail N.; Kostyukova, Tatyana A.; Yezhov, Igor N.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.

    2001-05-01

    Human leukocytes containing less than 2C DNA per cell (damaged or dead cells) were detected and quantified by flow cytometry and DNA-specific staining with ethidium bromide and mithramycin in whole blood infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Addition of live S. aureus to the blood (100 microbe cells per one leukocyte) resulted in rapid degradation of leukocyte DNA within 3 to 6 hours of incubation at 37 degree(s)C. However, only about 50 percent cells were damaged and the leukocytes with the intact genetic apparatus could be found in the blood for a period up to 24 hours. The leukocyte injury was preceded by an increase of DNA per cell content (as compared to the normal one) that was likely to be connected with the active phagocytosis of S. aureus by granulocytes (2C DNA of diploid phagocytes plus the all bacterial DNA absorbed). In response to the same dose of actively growing (at 37 degree(s)C) virulent Y. pestis cells, no increase in DNA content per cell could be observed in the human blood leukocytes. The process of the leukocyte DNA degradation started after a 6-hour incubation, and between 18 to 24 hours of incubation about 90 percent leukocytes (phagocytes and lymphocytes) lost their specific DNA fluorescence. These results demonstrated a high potential of flow cytometry in comparative analysis in vitro of the leukocyte DNA degradation process in human blood in response to bacteria with various pathogenic properties. They agree with the modern idea of an apoptotic mechanism of immunosuppression in plague.

  5. Whole blood leukocyte vs. separated mononuclear cell blastogenesis in calves: time-dependent changes after shipping.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, K W; Osborne, C A; Evermann, J F; Parish, S M; Hinrichs, D J

    1981-01-01

    The blastogenic response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to mitogenic stimulation by concanavalin A was lower (P less than 0.01) after transporting 60 dairy calves 480 km than it was either one or two weeks later. The response was similar for phytohemagglutinin. There was a decrease (P less than 0.05) in the number of peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils two weeks after shipping. The transportation of calves did not affect plasma IgG1 or IgM level. The mitogenic stimulation of peripheral blood leukocytes by both phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A in whole blood cultures was more variable than with the culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Technique variation, which was defined as the coefficient of variation among quadruplicate cultures, was greater than 20% for while blood assays and less than 10% for cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The variation among different calves tested at the same time and the variation within single calves tested at different times were also lower in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures than in whole blood mononuclear cell cultures than in whole blood assays. It is suggested that the variation among replicate cultures be reported in blastogenesis studies. PMID:7340911

  6. Leukocyte-subset counts in idiopathic parkinsonism provide clues to a pathogenic pathway involving small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. A surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Following Helicobacter pylori eradication in idiopathic parkinsonism (IP), hypokinesia improved but flexor-rigidity increased. Small intestinal bacterial-overgrowth (SIBO) is a candidate driver of the rigidity: hydrogen-breath-test-positivity is common in IP and case histories suggest that Helicobacter keeps SIBO at bay. Methods In a surveillance study, we explore relationships of IP-facets to peripheral immune/inflammatory-activation, in light of presence/absence of Helicobacter infection (urea-breath- and/or stool-antigen-test: positivity confirmed by gastric-biopsy) and hydrogen-breath-test status for SIBO (positivity: >20 ppm increment, 2 consecutive 15-min readings, within 2h of 25G lactulose). We question whether any relationships found between facets and blood leukocyte subset counts stand in patients free from anti-parkinsonian drugs, and are robust enough to defy fluctuations in performance consequent on short t½ therapy. Results Of 51 IP-probands, 36 had current or past Helicobacter infection on entry, 25 having undergone successful eradication (median 3.4 years before). Thirty-four were hydrogen-breath-test-positive initially, 42 at sometime (343 tests) during surveillance (2.8 years). Hydrogen-breath-test-positivity was associated inversely with Helicobacter-positivity (OR 0.20 (95% CI 0.04, 0.99), p<0.05). In 38 patients (untreated (17) or on stable long-t½ IP-medication), the higher the natural-killer count, the shorter stride, slower gait and greater flexor-rigidity (by mean 49 (14, 85) mm, 54 (3, 104) mm.s-1, 89 (2, 177) Nm.10-3, per 100 cells.μl-1 increment, p=0.007, 0.04 & 0.04 respectively, adjusted for patient characteristics). T-helper count was inversely associated with flexor-rigidity before (p=0.01) and after adjustment for natural-killer count (-36(-63, -10) Nm.10-3 per 100 cells.μl-1, p=0.007). Neutrophil count was inversely associated with tremor (visual analogue scale, p=0.01). Effect-sizes were independent of IP

  7. Serum biochemical changes and chemiluminescent responses of whole blood in Holstein cattle with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Tanaka, S; Oba, M; Minami, S; Noda, H

    1994-08-01

    Serum biochemical profile and whole blood chemiluminescent (CL) responses in 8 Holstein cattle affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) were evaluated. Concentrations of sodium, chloride and calcium in serum from cattle affected with LAD were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased as compared with controls. The characteristic changes in serum proteins were hypoalbuminemia and hyperglobulinemia, and the concentrations of albumin and gammaglobulin in serum from normal cattle and cattle affected with LAD were significantly (p < 0.01) different. Significantly (p < 0.01) diminished CL indices and prolonged peak time of CL responses in whole blood were detected in cattle affected with LAD. These findings indicate that the CL response associated with iC3b receptor mediated phagocytic activity is impaired in cattle affected with LAD. The whole blood CL assay appeared to be practical and useful for routine evaluation of blood samples from cattle affected with LAD. PMID:7999886

  8. HIV migration between blood plasma and cellular subsets before and after HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun Yong; Chaillon, Antoine; Oh, Jin Ok; Ahn, Jin Young; Ann, Hae Won; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi-Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Ku, Nam Su; Smith, Davey M; Kim, June Myung

    2016-04-01

    The cellular source of HIV RNA circulating in blood plasma remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether sequence analysis of HIV RNA populations circulating before combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and HIV DNA populations in cellular subsets (CS) after cART could identify the cellular sources of circulating HIV RNA. Blood was collected from five subjects at cART initiation and again 6 months later. Naïve CD4+ T cells, resting central memory and effector memory CD4+ T cells, activated CD4+ T cells, monocytes, and natural killer cells were sorted using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. HIV-1 env C2V3 sequences from HIV RNA in blood plasma and HIV DNA in CSs were generated using single genome sequencing. Sequences were evaluated for viral compartmentalization (Fst test) and migration events (MEs; Slatkin Maddison and cladistic measures) between blood plasma and each CS. Viral compartmentalization was observed in 88% of all cellular subset comparisons (range: 77-100% for each subject). Most observed MEs were directed from blood plasma to CSs (52 MEs, 85.2%). In particular, there was only viral movement from plasma to NK cells (15 MEs), monocytes (seven MEs), and naïve cells (five ME). We observed a total of nine MEs from activated CD4 cells (2/9 MEs), central memory T cells (3/9 MEs), and effector memory T cells (4/9 MEs) to blood plasma. Our results revealed that the HIV RNA population in blood plasma plays an important role in seeding various cellular reservoirs and that the cellular source of the HIV RNA population is activated central memory and effector memory T cells. J. Med. Virol. 88:606-613, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26348372

  9. Focal MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity at the blood-brain barrier promotes chemokine-induced leukocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Wu, Chuan; Korpos, Eva; Zhang, Xueli; Agrawal, Smriti M; Wang, Ying; Faber, Cornelius; Schäfers, Michael; Körner, Heinrich; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Hallmann, Rupert; Sorokin, Lydia

    2015-02-24

    Although chemokines are sufficient for chemotaxis of various cells, increasing evidence exists for their fine-tuning by selective proteolytic processing. Using a model of immune cell chemotaxis into the CNS (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis [EAE]) that permits precise localization of immigrating leukocytes at the blood-brain barrier, we show that, whereas chemokines are required for leukocyte migration into the CNS, additional MMP-2/9 activities specifically at the border of the CNS parenchyma strongly enhance this transmigration process. Cytokines derived from infiltrating leukocytes regulate MMP-2/9 activity at the parenchymal border, which in turn promotes astrocyte secretion of chemokines and differentially modulates the activity of different chemokines at the CNS border, thereby promoting leukocyte migration out of the cuff. Hence, cytokines, chemokines, and cytokine-induced MMP-2/9 activity specifically at the inflammatory border collectively act to accelerate leukocyte chemotaxis across the parenchymal border. PMID:25704809

  10. TNF{alpha} release from peripheral blood leukocytes depends on a CRM1-mediated nuclear export

    SciTech Connect

    Miskolci, Veronika; Ghosh, Chandra C.; Rollins, Janet; Romero, Carlos; Vu, Hai-Yen; Robinson, Staci; Davidson, Dennis; Vancurova, Ivana . E-mail: vancuroi@stjohns.edu

    2006-12-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays a major role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders such as septic shock and arthritis, respectively. Leukocytes stimulated with inflammatory signals such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are the predominant producers of TNF{alpha}, and thus control of TNF{alpha} release from stimulated leukocytes represents a potential therapeutic target. Here, we report that leptomycin B (LMB), a specific inhibitor of CRM1-dependent nuclear protein export, inhibits TNF{alpha} release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear cells. In addition, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and immunoblotting analysis indicate that TNF{alpha} is localized in the nucleus of human neutrophils and mononuclear cells. This study demonstrates that the cellular release of TNF{alpha} from stimulated leukocytes is mediated by the CRM1-dependent nuclear export mechanism. Inhibition of CRM1-dependent cellular release of TNF{alpha} could thus provide a novel therapeutic approach for disorders involving excessive TNF{alpha} release.

  11. Toxicogenomic Effects in Rat Blood Leukocytes and Chemoprophylaxis of Radiation-Induced Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S D; Bespalov, V G; Semenov, A L; Kovan'ko, E G; Aleksandrov, V A

    2016-03-01

    Toxicogenomic parameters were studied in the blood of female rats after exposure to ionizing γ-radiation in a dose of 4 Gy and chemoprophylaxis with α-difluoromethylornithine, eleutherococcus or leuzea extracts, which were used in animals with morphological manifestations of tumor growth under conditions of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Life-time evaluation of toxicogenomic effects was carried out by express method for measurements of blood nucleotid DNA - fluorescent indication. The level of hyperaneu/polyploidy increased in the blood leukocytes of control rats 30 days after radiation exposure. A significant decrease of genotoxicity as a result of drug treatment in comparison with the number and multiplicity of tumors in irradiated animals was found only in the endocrine and reproductive organs of rats treated by eleutherococcus extract. PMID:27021083

  12. Age-related methylation profiles of equine blood leukocytes in the RNASEL locus.

    PubMed

    Ząbek, T; Semik, E; Szmatoła, T; Oklejewicz, B; Fornal, A; Bugno-Poniewierska, M

    2016-08-01

    Methylation profiles across three CpG islands of the RNASEL gene were determined in blood leukocyte samples of Anglo-Arabian and Hucul horses. Bisulfite sequencing revealed hypomethylated state of the RNASEL promoter coinciding with methylated CpG island placed inside the gene. Several CpG sites were identified for which the methylation state was influenced by DNA polymorphism. Two of them showed monoallelic methylation. One of the CpG sites revealed functional polymorphism. A number of partially methylated CpG sites have been observed in the promoter area of RNASEL, which were used for the comparison of breed- and age-related effects. Clone bisulfite sequencing of blood leukocyte samples collected at different ages from particular individuals of AA and HC breeds and, also, BSPCR sequencing of 50 samples of juvenile and old AA and HC horses revealed increased methylation in particular CpG sites during aging. The age-related heterogeneity of white blood cells was hypothesized as being one of the potential causes of observed variability of methylation profiles in the RNASEL promoter. PMID:26553552

  13. Neutrophils Are Not Less Sensitive Than Other Blood Leukocytes to the Genomic Effects of Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Gaelle; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Beauchamp, Guy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are generally considered less responsive to glucocorticoids compared to other inflammatory cells. The reported increase in human neutrophil survival mediated by these drugs partly supports this assertion. However, it was recently shown that dexamethasone exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in equine peripheral blood neutrophils. Few comparative studies of glucocorticoid effects in neutrophils and other leukocytes have been reported and a relative insensitivity of neutrophils to these drugs could not be ruled out. Objective We assessed glucocorticoid-responsiveness in equine and human peripheral blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes. Methods Blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes were isolated from 6 healthy horses and 4 human healthy subjects. Cells were incubated for 5 h with or without LPS (100 ng/mL) alone or combined with hydrocortisone, prednisolone or dexamethasone (10−8 M and 10−6 M). IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, glutamine synthetase and GR-α mRNA expression was quantified by qPCR. Equine neutrophils were also incubated for 20 h with or without the three glucocorticoids and cell survival was assessed by flow cytometry and light microscopy on cytospin preparations. Results We found that glucocorticoids down-regulated LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in both cell populations and species. These drugs also significantly increased glutamine synthetase gene expression in both equine cell populations. The magnitude of glucocorticoid response between cell populations was generally similar in both species. We also showed that dexamethasone had a comparable inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory gene expression in both human and equine neutrophils. As reported in other species, glucocorticoids significantly increase the survival in equine neutrophils. Conclusions Glucocorticoids exert genomic effects of similar magnitude on neutrophils and on other blood leukocytes. We speculate that the poor response to

  14. Comparative rheology of the adhesion of platelets and leukocytes from flowing blood: why are platelets so small?

    PubMed

    Watts, Tim; Barigou, Mostafa; Nash, Gerard B

    2013-06-01

    We investigated rheological adaptation of leukocytes and platelets for their adhesive functions in inflammation and hemostasis, respectively. Adhesion and margination of leukocytes or platelets were quantified for blood perfused through capillaries coated with P-selectin or collagen, when flow rate, suspending phase viscosity, red cell aggregation, or rigidity was modified. Independent variation of shear rate and shear stress indicated that the ability of platelets to attach at higher levels than leukocytes was largely attributable to their smaller size, reducing their velocity before attachment, and, especially, drag after attachment. Increasing red cell aggregation increased the number of marginated and adhering leukocytes but inhibited platelet adhesion without effect on the number marginated. Increasing red cell rigidity tended to inhibit leukocyte adhesion but promote platelet adhesion. The effects on platelets may be explained by changes in the depth of the near-wall, red cell-depleted layer; broadening (or narrowing) this layer to greater (or less) than the platelet diameter would decrease (or increase) the normal force applied by red blood cells and make attachment less (or more) efficient. Thus different adhesive capabilities of leukocytes and platelets may arise from their differences in size, both directly because of influence on cell velocity and force experienced at the wall and indirectly through effects of size on margination in the bloodstream and interaction with the cell-free layer. In addition, red cell aggregation (of hitherto uncertain physiological significance) may be useful in promoting leukocyte adhesion in inflamed venules but inhibiting unwanted platelet deposition in veins. PMID:23585130

  15. Modulatory effect of visible light on chemiluminescence of stimulated and nonstimulated blood leukocytes of carp (Cyprinus carpio, L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotsky, Sandro; Avtalion, Ramy R.; Friedmann, Harry; Lubart, Rachel

    1998-12-01

    Irradiation of carp blood leukocytes with a non-laser visible light resulted in a significant inhibition of the spontaneous luminol-dependent chemiluminescence in the cells of a part of the fish. Those leukocytes that were sensitive to the visible light, showed a shorter time-to-peak than the non sensitive, following their stimulation with Ca ionophore. Because a shorter time-to-peak correlates with inflammation, it could be suggested that the visible light susceptible leukocyte reflect a pre-inflammatory state of their donors.

  16. Characteristics of blood chemistry, hematology, and lymphocyte subsets in pregnant rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ling; Gong, Li; Qian, Can; Liang, Zhi-Gang; Zeng, Wen

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the blood chemistry, hematology, and lymphocyte subsets in pregnant rhesus monkeys and provide baseline parameters for future studies of reproductive and developmental toxicity and developmental immunotoxicity. Harem-mating was used in 96 female and 16 male rhesus monkeys. Pregnancy was confirmed on gestation day (GD)18 by ultrasound. The blood samples of rhesus monkeys were collected at various times (20 days before pregnancy and GD20, 100 and 150). The analyses of blood chemistry, hematology, and lymphocyte subsets were performed. Compared with 20 days before pregnancy, Significant decreases (P < 0.05) were observed in HCT and RBC on GD20, GD150 and in HGB on GD150, Significant increases in NEUT and decreases in LYMPH on GD20 were observed. Significant decreases in ALB from GD20 to GD150 were observed, significant decreases in TP was observed on GD100. Significant increases in mean GLU were observed on GD20 and GD150 during pregnancy. Significant decreases (P < 0.05) in CD20(+) subsets on GD100, GD150 and CD4(+)/CD8(+)ratio on GD150 were observed, The significant changes of MCV, MCHC, RDW-SD, MCV, MONO, ALT, AST, GLB, ALP, TBIL, DBIL, IBIL, GGT, CR-S, URIC, TC, TG and CK were observed during the pregnant period, but no biologic change were observed, There were no significant changes in MCH, RDW-CV, MPV, BUN, CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) during pregnancy. These data provide a database for preclinical study in rhesus monkeys. Physiological anemia, hyperglycemia, and immune suppression may occur in pregnant rhesus monkey which is similar to that found in human, and it is essential to distinguish the physiological changes from the pharmacological effects in reproductive and developmental toxicity and developmental immunotoxicity studies of pharmaceuticals. PMID:26073336

  17. Screening of high-risk Gaucher disease patients in Brazil using miniaturized dried blood spots and leukocyte techniques.

    PubMed

    Goldim, Mariana Pereira de Souza; Garcia, Cristina da Silva; de Castilhos, Cristina Dickie; Daitx, Vanessa Vitcoski; Mezzalira, Jamila; Breier, Ana Carolina; Cé, Jaqueline; Mello, Alexandre; Andrade, Carla Vieira; Sartori, Nicole; Coelho, Janice Carneiro

    2012-10-25

    This study investigates the miniaturization of the screening technique using dried blood spots on filter paper (DBS) to measure GBA and CT activities, and GBA and β-galactosidase activities in leukocytes. 274 DBS from individuals with suspected GD were screened for 1.5 years. Of these, we confirmed the diagnosis in 13.5%. The miniaturization of the DBS and leukocyte techniques afforded to reduce costs and sample size appropriate for a reliable diagnosis. PMID:22884741

  18. Poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels promote the release of primary granules from human blood-derived polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Hannah Caitlin; Lieberthal, Tyler Jacob; Kao, W. John

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are recruited to sites of injury and biomaterial implants. Once activated, PMNs can exocytose their granule subsets to recruit monocytes (MCs) and mediate MC/macrophage activation. We investigated the release of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a primary granule marker, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), a tertiary granule marker, from human blood-derived PMNs cultured on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and gelatin-PEG (GP) hydrogels, with and without the presence of the bacterial peptide formyl-Met-Leu-Phe. Supernatants from PMN cultures on PEG-containing hydrogels (i.e., PEG and GP hydrogels) had higher concentrations of MPO than those from PMN cultures on PDMS or TCPS at 2 hours. PMNs on all biomaterials released comparable levels of MMP-9 at 2 hours, indicating that PMNs cultured on PEG-containing hydrogels have different mechanisms of release for primary and tertiary granules. Src family kinases were involved in the release of MPO from PMNs cultured on PEG hydrogels, TCPS and GP hydrogels and in the release of MMP-9 from PMNs cultured on all four materials. The increased release of primary granules from PMNs on PEG-containing hydrogels did not significantly increase MC chemotaxis, indicating that additional co-effectors in the dynamic inflammatory milieu in vivo modulate PMN-mediated MC recruitment. PMID:24497370

  19. rhG-CSF in healthy donors: mobilization of peripheral hemopoietic progenitors and effect on peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Rutella, S; Di Mario, A; Salutari, P; Rumi, C; Ortu la Barbera, E; Etuk, B; Menichella, G; D'Onofrio, G; Leone, G

    1996-08-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) 16 micrograms/kg/day was given to 9 healthy donors to recruit hemopoietic progenitors (HP) for allogeneic transplantation or donor leukocyte infusion. rhG-CSF was administered s.c. for 5 days. No side effects were encountered except for moderate bone pain and lumbago. Mobilization was effective, reaching a peak median value of 187 x 10(3) CD34+ cells/ml (range 51.2-1127) and 2170 x 10(3) colony-forming units-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM)/ml (range 1138-4190). Peak values were obtained at a median of 4 days of rhG-CSF and represented, respectively, a 13-fold and a 37-fold increase from baseline values (p = 0.0007 and p = 0.006). White blood cell (WBC) counts increased 6-fold from baseline values (p < 0.0007) and reached a median peak of 34 x 10(6)/ml (23.5-59). Polymorphonuclear (PMN), and mononuclear (MNC) cells increased 10-fold and 2-fold, respectively (p = 0.0039 and p = 0.0026) and reached a median peak of 32.1 x 10(6)/ml (18.2-52) and 4.42 x 10(6)/ml (3.14-12.42). Absolute lymphocyte and monocyte counts increased at peak day in all donors 1.5-fold and 5.7-fold from baseline values (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0018). In 7 of 9 donors, lymphocyte subsets were analyzed in detail. CD3+ and CD19+ lymphocytes increased 1.5-fold and 3-fold, respectively (p = 0.032 for both). NK and activated T lymphocytes doubled at a median of 4 days of rhG-CSF (p = 0.032 and p = NS, respectively). Similar changes were observed in lymphocytes collected in leukapheresis product. T helper and T suppressor subsets displayed a similar increase. Thus, besides the anticipated priming effect on HP and PMN, rhG-CSF in healthy donors produced an unexpected and still unexplained modification of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood. PMID:8877714

  20. Reconstitution of maturating and regulatory lymphocyte subsets after cord blood and BMT in children.

    PubMed

    Charrier, E; Cordeiro, P; Brito, R-M; Mezziani, S; Herblot, S; Le Deist, F; Duval, M

    2013-03-01

    Some clinical characteristics of cord blood transplantation (CBT) might be explained by specificities in the reconstitution of immune subsets differing by their maturation stage or their implication in GVHD, tolerance or immune responses against tumor or infectious agents. Here, we compare the immune reconstitution of several of these subsets after CBT and BMT. B-cell count recovery was faster after CBT. There was no difference in the recovery of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell counts. There was no difference either in the frequency of several subsets: CD45RO(+) memory, and CD45RA(+) naïve cells within the CD4(+) T-cell compartment, CD27(+) among B cells, CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), and KIR(+) cells among natural killer (NK) cells, CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells and invariant NKT cells. The proportion of the thymic naïve CD31(+)CD45RA(+)CD4(+) T cells was lower after CBT at 6 months post-transplant, and was still below normal at 1 year in both groups. NK-cell expansion was more sustained after CBT, with fewer double-negative NKG2A(-)KIR(-) hyporesponsive cells and more double-positive NKG2A(+)KIR(+) hyper-responsive NK cells. These results, therefore, indicate that further research to improve CBT outcome should try to improve thymopoieisis and take advantage of the sustained NK-cell reconstitution. PMID:23064038

  1. Biochemical and Cellular Changes in Leukocyte-Depleted Red Blood Cells Stored for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Diana; Rocha, Susana; Abreu, Estela; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate biochemical and cellular changes associated with the storage of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells (RBCs). Methods We investigated 10 leukocyte-depleted RBC units, randomly chosen from volunteer donors. Every week an aliquot was collected for laboratorial evaluation, which included complete cell blood count, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity, extracellular sodium, potassium and pH, membrane-bound hemoglobin (MBH), band 3 profile, and quantification of RBC membrane proteins composition. Results We observed an increase in mean cell volume (from 91.86 ± 4.65 fl to 98.10 ± 5.80 fl, day 0 vs. day 21; p < 0.05), red cell distribution width, percentage of macrocytic RBCs, reticulocyte hemoglobin content and a decreased percentage of microcytic RBCs, mean cell volume concentration and G6PD activity. The extracellular concentration of sodium decreased, and that of potassium increased significantly over time. RBC membrane composition revealed an increase in spectrin/ankyrin ratio after 21 days (from 4.84 ± 0.99 to 5.27 ± 0.94, day 0 vs. day 21; p < 0.05). At day 35, a decrease in ankyrin (from 6.44 ± 1.70% to 5.49 ± 1.96%, day 0 vs. day 35; p < 0.05), in protein 4.1/band 3, protein 4.2/band 3, and ankyrin/band 3 ratios and in band 5 was observed. Conclusions Our data show that leukocyte-depleted RBCs present changes in the RBC morphology, membrane protein composition, enzymatic activity, and extracellular electrolyte concentration and pH. PMID:25960715

  2. Splenic Macrophage Subsets and Their Function during Blood-Borne Infections

    PubMed Central

    Borges da Silva, Henrique; Fonseca, Raíssa; Pereira, Rosana Moreira; Cassado, Alexandra dos Anjos; Álvarez, José Maria; D’Império Lima, Maria Regina

    2015-01-01

    The spleen is one of the major immunological sites for maintaining blood homeostasis. Previous studies showed that heterogeneous splenic macrophage populations contribute in complimentary ways to control blood-borne infections and induce effective immune responses. Marginal metallophilic macrophages (MMMΦs) and marginal zone macrophages (MZMΦs) are cells with great ability to internalize blood-borne pathogens such as virus or bacteria. Their localization adjacent to T- and B-cell-rich splenic areas favors the rapid contact between these macrophages and cells from adaptive immunity. Indeed, MMMΦs and MZMΦs are considered important bridges between innate and adaptive immunity. Although red pulp macrophages (RpMΦs) are mainly considered scavengers for senescent erythrocytes, several data indicate a role for RpMΦs in control of infections such as blood-stage malaria as well as in the induction of innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review current data on how different macrophage subsets recognize and help eliminate blood-borne pathogens, and, in turn, how the inflammatory microenvironment in different phases of infection (acute, chronic, and after pathogen clearance) influences macrophage function and survival. PMID:26441984

  3. Effects of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody infusion on blood leukocytes in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gridley, D.S.; Slater, J.M.; Stickney, D.R. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of a single infusion of radiolabelled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) on peripheral blood leukocytes in cancer patients. Eleven patients with disseminated colon cancer, malignant melanoma, or lung adenocarcinoma were infused with 111In-labelled anti-ZCE 025, anti-p97 type 96.5c, or LA 20207 MAb, respectively. Blood samples were obtained before infusion, immediately after infusion (1 hr), and at 4 and 7 days postinfusion. Flow cytometry analysis of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, and CD19+ lymphocytes showed increasing CD4:CD8 ratios in seven patients after infusion. This phenomenon was not restricted to antibody subclass or to type of cancer. Two of the remaining patients exhibited a marked post-infusion increase in CD8+ cells. In all three patients with malignant melanoma, decreasing levels of CD16+ lymphocytes were noted after infusion and natural killer cell cytotoxicity showed fluctuations which paralleled the changes in the CD16+ subpopulation. Oxygen radical production by phagocytic cells was markedly affected in three subjects. These results suggest that a single infusion of radiolabelled murine MAb may alter the balance of critical lymphocyte subpopulations and modulate other leukocyte responses in cancer patients.

  4. Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Subset Counts in Pre-menopausal Women with Iron-Deficiency Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Reza Keramati, Mohammad; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Khajedaluea, Mohammad; Tavasolian, Houman; Borzouei, Anahita

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a major worldwide public health problem. Children and women of reproductive age are especially vulnerable to IDA, and it has been reported that these patients are more prone to infection. This study was done to evaluate alteration of lymphocyte subgroups in IDA. Methods: In this prospective study, we investigated lymphocyte subsets in pre-menopausal women with iron-deficiency anaemia; 50 normal subjects and 50 IDA (hypochromic microcytic) cases were enrolled. Experimental and control anticoagulated blood samples were evaluated using flow cytometry to determine the absolute and relative numbers of various lymphocyte subgroups. Finally, the results of the patient and control groups were compared. Results: Mean (SD) absolute counts of lymphocytes, CD3+ cells, CD3+/CD4+ subsets (T helper) and CD3+/CD8+ subsets (T cytotoxic) in the patient group were 2.08 (0.65) x 109/L, 1.53 (0.53) x 109/L, 0.87 (0.28) x 109/L, and 0.51 (0.24) x 109/L, respectively. The results showed significant differences between case and control groups in mean absolute counts of lymphocytes (P = 0.014), T lymphocytes (P = 0.009), helper T cells (P = 0.004), and cytotoxic T cells (P = 0.043). Conclusion: This study showed that absolute counts of peripheral blood T lymphocytes as a marker of cell-mediated immunity may be decreased in pre-menopausal women with iron-deficiency anaemia, and that these patients may be more prone to infection. PMID:22135572

  5. Multicentre evaluation of stable reference whole blood for enumeration of lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Cherry; Belgrave, Danielle; Janossy, George; Bradley, Nicholas J; Stebbings, Richard; Gaines-Das, Rose; Thorpe, Robin; Sawle, Alex; Arroz, Maria Jorge; Brando, Bruno; Gratama, Jan Willem; Orfao de Matos, Alberto; Papa, Stephano; Papamichail, Michael; Lenkei, Rodica; Rothe, Gregor; Barnett, David

    2005-06-22

    BACKGROUND: Clinical indications for lymphocyte subset enumeration by flow cytometry include monitoring of disease progression and timing of therapeutic intervention in infection with human immunodeficiency virus. Until recently international standardisation has not been possible due to a lack of suitable stable reference material. METHODS: This study consisted of two trials of a stabilised whole blood preparation. Eleven participants were sent two standard protocols for staining plus gating strategy and asked to report absolute counts for lymphocyte subsets. RESULTS: No significant difference was detected between the two methods when results from the two assays and all partners were pooled. Significant differences in results from the different partners were observed. However, representative mean counts were obtained for geometric means, geometric coefficient of variation, and 95% confidence interval for CD3 910 cells/mul, 9%, and 888 to 933, respectively), CD4 (495 cells/mul, 12%, and 483 to 507), and CD8 (408 cells/mul, 13%, and 393 to 422). CONCLUSION: We have introduced a stabilised blood preparation and a well-characterized biological standard. The availability of this reference material greatly simplifies the validation of new techniques for CD4(+) T-cell enumeration and the expansion of external quality assurance programmes for clinical laboratories, including those that operate in resource-restricted environments. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:15973699

  6. Blood Leukocyte Count on Admission Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Dharma, Surya; Hapsari, Rosmarini; Siswanto, Bambang B; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Jukema, J Wouter

    2015-06-01

    We aim to test the hypothesis that blood leukocyte count adds prognostic information in patients with acute non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI). A total of 585 patients with acute non-STEMI (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction risk score ≥ 3) were enrolled in this cohort retrospective study. Blood leukocyte count was measured immediately after admission in the emergency department. The composite of death, reinfarction, urgent revascularization, and stroke during hospitalization were defined as the primary end point of the study. The mean age of the patients was 61 ± 9.6 years and most of them were male (79%). Using multivariate Cox regression analysis involving seven variables (history of smoking, hypertension, heart rate > 100 beats/minute, serum creatinine level > 1.5 mg/dL, blood leukocyte count > 11,000/µL, use of β-blocker, and use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), leukocyte count > 11,000/µL demonstrated to be a strong predictor of the primary end point (hazard ratio = 3.028; 95% confidence interval = 1.69-5.40, p < 0.001). The high blood leukocyte count on admission is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with acute non-STEMI. PMID:26060384

  7. Direct observation of liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo in skin blood vessels using intravital fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Desmettre, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    This study aimed to observe liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes were injected intravenously. The skin microcirculation was observed with an intravital Eclipse E800 Nikon microscope fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for playback analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An acute inflammatory response was obtained by removing one complete layer of skin and the underlying fascia and avascular tissue on the opposing side of the flap corresponding to an area equivalent to the window aperture. Using these model and set-up, leukocyte rolling and adhesion were easily observed and the entry of PEGylated liposomes into hamster blood leukocytes was studied for a period of 6 hours. PEGylated liposomes were clearly identified alone inside the blood flow and inside the leukocytes as soon as the inflammatory reaction appeared. This study shows for the first time that blood leukocytes in their natural milieu of whole blood are capable of interacting with, and taking up liposomes. This observation is in accordance with previous in vitro studies.

  8. Altered Cytokine Production By Specific Human Peripheral Blood Cell Subsets Immediately Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Cubbage, Michael L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we have attempted to combine standard immunological assays with the cellular resolving power of the flow cytometer to positively identify the specific cell types involved in spaceflight-induced immune alterations. We have obtained whole blood samples from 27 astronauts collected at three timepoints (L-10, R+0 and R+3) surrounding four recent space shuttle missions. The duration of these missions ranged from 10 to 18 days. Assays performed included serum/urine cortisol, comprehensive subset phenotyping, assessment of cellular activation markers and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following spaceflight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated trends towards a decreased percentage of T cells and an increased percentage of B cells. Nearly all of the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, which was dramatic in some individuals. Assessment of memory (CD45RA+) vs. naive (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was more ambiguous, with subjects tending to group more as a flight crew. All subjects from one mission demonstrated an increased CD45RA:CD45RO ratio, while all subjects from another Mission demonstrated a decreased ratio. While no significant trend was seen in the monocyte population as defined by scatter, a decreased percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset was seen following spaceflight in all subjects tested. In general, most of the cellular changes described above which were assessed at R+O and compared to L-10 trended to pre-flight levels by R+3. Although no significant differences were seen in the expression of the cellular activation markers CD69 and CD25 following exposure to microgravity, significant alterations were seen in cytokine production in response to mitogenic activation for specific subsets. T cell (CD3+) production of IL-2 was significantly decreased

  9. Underweight Full-Term Indian Neonates Show Differences in Umbilical Cord Blood Leukocyte Phenotype: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Deepak K.; Nair, Deepa; Raza, Saimah; Saini, Savita; Singh, Reeta; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Reva; Ramji, Siddarth; Batra, Aruna; Aggarwal, Kailash C.; Chellani, Harish K.; Arya, Sugandha; Bhatla, Neerja; Paul, Vinod K.; Aggarwal, Ramesh; Agarwal, Nidhi; Mehta, Umesh; Sopory, Shailaja; Natchu, Uma Chandra Mouli; Bhatnagar, Shinjini; Bal, Vineeta; Rath, Satyajit; Wadhwa, Nitya

    2015-01-01

    Background While infections are a major cause of neonatal mortality in India even in full-term neonates, this is an especial problem in the large proportion (~20%) of neonates born underweight (or small-for-gestational-age; SGA). One potential contributory factor for this susceptibility is the possibility that immune system maturation may be affected along with intrauterine growth retardation. Methods In order to examine the possibility that differences in immune status may underlie the susceptibility of SGA neonates to infections, we enumerated the frequencies and concentrations of 22 leukocyte subset populations as well as IgM and IgA levels in umbilical cord blood from full-term SGA neonates and compared them with values from normal-weight (or appropriate-for-gestational-age; AGA) full-term neonates. We eliminated most SGA-associated risk factors in the exclusion criteria so as to ensure that AGA-SGA differences, if any, would be more likely to be associated with the underweight status itself. Results An analysis of 502 such samples, including 50 from SGA neonates, showed that SGA neonates have significantly fewer plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), a higher myeloid DC (mDC) to pDC ratio, more natural killer (NK) cells, and higher IgM levels in cord blood in comparison with AGA neonates. Other differences were also observed such as tendencies to lower CD4:CD8 ratios and greater prominence of inflammatory monocytes, mDCs and neutrophils, but while some of them had substantial differences, they did not quite reach the standard level of statistical significance. Conclusions These differences in cellular lineages of the immune system possibly reflect stress responses in utero associated with growth restriction. Increased susceptibility to infections may thus be linked to complex immune system dysregulation rather than simply retarded immune system maturation. PMID:25898362

  10. Dengue viruses and mononuclear phagocytes. II. Identity of blood and tissue leukocytes supporting in vitro infection.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B; O'Rourke, E J; Allison, A C

    1977-07-01

    Studies were made on the identity of human and monkey mononuclear leukocytes permissive to antibody-enhanced dengue 2 virus (D2V) infection. In cultures of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) inoculated immediately after separation, it was concluded that only mononuclear phagocytes support dengue infection. This is based upon observations that D2V-permissive cells were resistant to 1,200 rads, were both plastic adherent and nonadherent, were removed when passed through nylon wool columns in 10 percent fetal bovine serum or 100 percent autologous serum, and were destroyed by incubation with 100 mug/ml particulate silica. On direct immunofluorescence staining, perinuclear dengue antigen was visualized at 24 h, becoming maximal at 60 h. Antigen-containing cells had ample cytoplasm, ruffled cytoplasmic membrane, and 73 percent were actively phagocytic. As further evidence of the infection of mononuclear phagocytes, antibody-enhanced D2V replication was observed in bone marrow cultures from five of five rhesus monkeys, but not in cell cultures of spleen, thymus, or lymph nodes prepared from the same animals. It is hypothesized that dengue virus complexed with non-neutralizing antibody is internalized by immune phagocytosis in a mononuclear phagocyte with a defective virus-destroying mechanism. Dengue permissiveness may depend upon cellular immaturity since bone marrow leukocytes could be infected even when held for 4 days before infection while PBL held for this time decreased in permissiveness. In vitro antibody-dependent infection of mononuclear phagocytes should prove useful as a model for study of immunopathologic mechanisms in human dengue. PMID:195000

  11. Sildenafil prevents indomethacin-induced gastropathy in rats: role of leukocyte adherence and gastric blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Camila L; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Gomes, Antoniella S; Lemos, Henrique P; Santos, Armênio A; Cunha, Fernando Q; Wallace, John L

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important mediator of gastric mucosal defense. Sildenafil (SILD), a cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, promotes an increase in cGMP concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract. cGMP mediates many of the biological actions of NO.We tested the hypothesis that SILD could increase mucosal defense against indomethacin-induced gastropathy in rats.SILD (1, 4 or 10 mg kg−1, p.o.) pretreatment significantly reduced (P<0.01) the gastric damage and the increase in gastric myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity elicited by indomethacin (20 mg kg−1 p.o.), with the maximal effect at the dose of 10 mg kg−1.L-NAME (3, 10 or 20 mg kg−1, i.p.) dose dependently reversed the protective effects of SILD, an effect not seen when L-arginine (L-ARG) (200 mg kg−1, i.p.) was co-administered with L-NAME.Indomethacin-induced leukocyte adhesion, assessed by intravital microscopy, was decreased (P<0.01) by SILD, and this effect was reversed by L-NAME cotreatment.Indomethacin elicited a decrease in gastric blood flow and in gastric PGE2 levels. SILD was able to prevent the decrease in gastric blood flow (P<0.01), without diminishing the inhibitory effect of indomethacin on prostaglandin synthesis.These results indicate that SILD, acting via NO-dependent mechanisms, prevents indomethacin-induced gastropathy, possibly through a reduction of leukocyte adhesion and maintenance of gastric blood flow. PMID:16113693

  12. Role of nitric oxide in tumor microcirculation. Blood flow, vascular permeability, and leukocyte-endothelial interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, D.; Yuan, F.; Endo, M.; Jain, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to define the role of nitric oxide (NO) in tumor microcirculation, through the direct intravital microcirculatory observations after administration of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor and NO donor both regionally and systemically. More specifically, we tested the following hypotheses: 1) endogenous NO derived from tumor vascular endothelium and/or tumor cells increases and/or maintains tumor blood flow, decreases leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and increases vascular permeability, 2) exogenous NO can increase tumor blood flow via vessel dilatation and decrease leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and 3) NO production and tissue responses to NO are tumor dependent. To this end, a murine mammary adenocarcinoma (MCaIV) and a human colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T) were implanted in the dorsal skinfold chamber in C3H and severe combined immunodeficient mice, respectively, and observed by means of intravital fluorescence microscopy. Both regional and systemic inhibition of endogenous NO by N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 mumol/L superfusion or 10 mg/kg intravenously) significantly decreased vessel diameter and local blood flow rate. The diameter change was dominant on the arteriolar side. Superfusion of NO donor (spermine NO, 100 mumol/L) increased tumor vessel diameter and flow rate, whereas systemic injection of spermine NO (2.62 mg/kg) had no significant effect on these parameters. Rolling and stable adhesion of leukocytes were significantly increased by intravenous injection of L-NAME. In untreated animals, both MCaIV and LS174T tumor vessels were leaky to albumin. Systemic NO inhibition significantly attenuated tumor vascular permeability of MCaIV but not of LS174T tumor. Immunohistochemical studies, using polyclonal antibodies to endothelial NOS and inducible NOS, revealed a diffuse pattern of positive labeling in both MCaIV and LS174T tumors. Nitrite and nitrate levels in tumor interstitial fluid of MCaIV but not of LS

  13. The effect of 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole on lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood of the rat.

    PubMed

    Gobin, S J; Legg, R F; Paine, A J; Phillips, J A

    1989-01-01

    A constituent of Ammonia Caramel, 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI), is known to cause a reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes when fed to rats. In the present study the effect of giving THI 1 mg/kg by gavage daily for 7 days on the numbers of lymphocytes in subsets has been monitored in peripheral blood. Both immunoglobulin light chain-bearing B-cells (MARK-1+) and CD5 marker-bearing T-cells (OX-19+) were reduced in number within 1 day of treatment. Within the pan-T-cell population, Class II MHC reactive helper T-lymphocytes (W3/25-) were more reduced than the Class I MHC reactive cytotoxic/suppressor T cells (OX-8+). The number of null cells (MARK-1-, OX-19-) was not affected; the majority of these cells appeared to be large granular lymphocytes. PMID:2575604

  14. [Changes of Tim-3 and PD-1 on peripheral blood monocyte subsets in patients with chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Zhang, Peixin; Yi, Wenjing; Zhou, Yun; Jia, Zhansheng; Zhang, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution of peripheral blood monocyte subsets of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients and observe the expression of negative regulators T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) on the monocyte subsets. Methods Flow cytometry was employed to determine the distribution of three monocyte subsets as well as Tim-3 and PD-1 expression on the three monocyte subsets. Their correlations with the clinical parameters were analyzed by Spearman test. Results Compared with healthy controls, an increased distribution of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes, especially CD14(++)CD16(+) monocyte subset, was observed in CHC patients. Tim-3 expression was significantly elevated on CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++) subsets in CHC patients. Obviously increased PD-1 expression was found mainly on CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(++)CD16(+) subsets. There were no significant correlations between monocyte subsets, PD-1, Tim-3 and the clinical parameters. Conclusion The levels Tim-3 and PD-1 are different in three monocyte subsets. PMID:27126947

  15. A standardized technique for efficient platelet and leukocyte collection using the Model 30 Blood Processor.

    PubMed

    Aisner, J; Schiffer, C A; Wolff, J H; Wiernik, P H

    1976-01-01

    The Model 30 Blood Processor is a safe and simple means of harvesting blood cell components. Presently cell collection depends on a visual assessment by the operator of the indistinct boundaries of cell fractions. To determine when each cell component could best be harvested, serial samples were taken from the output port at fixed intervals anf the results of counts and differentials were graphed and tabulated. Studies in normal donors were done using acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD), 2 per cent sodium citrate in 6 per cent hydroxyethyl starch (HES), or heparin as anticoagulants. There was considerable overlap between the latter part of the platelet band, the leukocyte band and the rising hematocrit with all three anticoagulants. Normally functional lymphocytes could be harvested efficiently (approximately 80%) using ACD or heparin. Platelets could be harvested from ACD very efficiently (approximately 90%). Granulocytes could not be harvested from ACD (less than 10%) since they were dispersed in the red blood cell (RBC) layer. Using HES, granulocytes could be harvested efficiently (approximately 70%) by extending collection into the RBC layer. Based on these data, a standard technique for cell collection has been devised. The flow rate is slowed to 20 ml/min and collection is carried 30 ml (90 seconds at a rate of 20 ml/min) for platelets. The RBC loss is approximately 6 to 8 and 2 to 3 ml/pass respectively. These studies indicate that the Model 30 is a highly efficient apparatus for blood cell separation, but the volume of blood processed is limited by the intermittent blood flow. PMID:62425

  16. Mitochondrial DNA 4977-base pair common deletion in blood leukocytes and melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Wan, Jie; Huff, Chad; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Zhao, Hua

    2016-05-01

    The 4977-base pair common deletion DmtDNA4977 is the most frequently observed mitochondrial DNA mutation in human tissues. Because mitochondrial DNA mutations are mainly caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and given that oxidative stress plays an important role in melanoma carcinogenesis, the investigation of DmtDNA4977 may be particularly relevant to the development of melanoma. In this study, we compared DmtDNA4977 levels in blood leukocytes from 206 melanoma patients and 219 healthy controls. Overall, melanoma cases had significantly higher levels of DmtDNA4977 than healthy controls (median: 0.60 vs 0.20, P = 0.008). The difference was evident among individuals who were older than 47 yrs, women, and had pigmentation risk factors (e.g., blond or red hair, blue eye, fair skin, light, or none tanning ability after prolonged sun exposure, and freckling in the sun as a child). The difference was also evident among those who had at least one lifetime sunburn with blistering and had no reported use of a sunlamp. Interestingly, among controls, DmtDNA4977 levels differed by phenotypic index and reported use of a sunlamp. In the risk assessment, increased levels of DmtDNA4977 were associated with a 1.23-fold increased risk of melanoma (odds ratio (OR): 1.23, 95% confidence interval (90% CI): 1.01, 1.50). A significant dose-response relationship was observed in quartile analysis (P = 0.001). In summary, our study suggests that high levels of DmtDNA4977 in blood leukocytes are associated with increased risk of melanoma and that association is affected by both pigmentation and personal history of sun exposure. PMID:26988264

  17. [Comparative transcriptome analysis of human aorta atherosclerotic lesions and peripheral blood leukocytes from essential hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A V; Goriunova, L E; Khaspekov, G L; Il'inskaia, O P; Sirotkin, V N; Andreeva, E R; Tararak, E M; Bulkina, O S; Buza, V V; Britareva, V V; Karpov, Iu A; Bibilashvili, R Sh

    2009-01-01

    One of the major cardiovascular risk factor which predisposes to and accelerates atherosclerosis is arterial hypertension (AH). To determine the molecular basis of the crosslink between AH and atherosclerosis for the development of new treatment strategies large-scale transcriptome analysis of the cells implicated in atherogenesis is needed. We used cDNA microarray technique for simultaneous analysis of gene expression in human abdominal aorta normal sites and atherosclerotic lesions of different histological types, as well as in peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with essential hypertension (EH) and donors. The microarray data were verified by quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription coupled with polymerase chain reaction) and immunohistochemical analysis. Differential expression of 40 genes has been found, among which twenty two genes demonstrated up-regulation and 18 genes demonstrated down-regulation in atherosclerotic aorta compared with normal vessel. New gene-candidates, implicated in atherogenesis, have been identified - FPRL2, CD37, CD53, RGS1, LCP1, SPI1, CTSA, EPAS1, FHL1, GEM, RHOB, SPARCL1, ITGA8, PLN, and COL14A1. These genes participate in cell migration and adhesion, phenotypic changes of smooth muscle cells, immune and inflammatory reactions, oxidative processes and extracellular matrix remodeling. We have found increased expression levels of CD53, SPI1, FPRL2, SPP1, CTSD, ACP5, LCP1, CTSA and LIPA genes in peripheral blood leukocytes from EH patients and in atherosclerotic lesions of human aorta. The majority of these genes significantly (p<0.005) positively (r>0.5) correlated with AH stage as well as with histological grading of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:19772500

  18. Age gene expression and coexpression progressive signatures in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Irizar, Haritz; Goñi, Joaquín; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Olascoaga, Javier; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Otaegui, David

    2015-12-01

    Both cellular senescence and organismic aging are known to be dynamic processes that start early in life and progress constantly during the whole life of the individual. In this work, with the objective of identifying signatures of age-related progressive change at the transcriptomic level, we have performed a whole-genome gene expression analysis of peripheral blood leukocytes in a group of healthy individuals with ages ranging from 14 to 93 years. A set of genes with progressively changing gene expression (either increase or decrease with age) has been identified and contextualized in a coexpression network. A modularity analysis has been performed on this network and biological-term and pathway enrichment analyses have been used for biological interpretation of each module. In summary, the results of the present work reveal the existence of a transcriptomic component that shows progressive expression changes associated to age in peripheral blood leukocytes, highlighting both the dynamic nature of the process and the need to complement young vs. elder studies with longitudinal studies that include middle aged individuals. From the transcriptional point of view, immunosenescence seems to be occurring from a relatively early age, at least from the late 20s/early 30s, and the 49-56 year old age-range appears to be critical. In general, the genes that, according to our results, show progressive expression changes with aging are involved in pathogenic/cellular processes that have classically been linked to aging in humans: cancer, immune processes and cellular growth vs. maintenance. PMID:26362218

  19. Methylation of a panel of genes in peripheral blood leukocytes is associated with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiang; Huang, Rong; Sun, Hongru; Liu, Yupeng; Bi, Haoran; Li, Jing; Yu, Hongyuan; Sun, Jiamei; Lin, Shangqun; Cui, Binbin; Zhao, Yashuang

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the DNA methylation status of the CpG islands of multiple genes in blood leukocytes in CRC susceptibility and prognosis, as well as possible interactions with dietary factors on CRC risk are unclear. We carried out a case-control study including 421 CRC patients and 506 controls to examine the associations between six genes (AOX-1, RARB2, RERG, ADAMTS9, IRF4, and FOXE-1), multiple CpG site methylation (MCSM) and susceptibility to CRC. High-level MCSM (MCSM-H) was defined as methylation of greater than or equal to 2 of 5 candidate genes (except for RARB2); low-level MCSM (MCSM-L) was when 1 candidate gene was methylated; non-MCSM was when none of the candidate genes were methylated. Blood cell-derived DNA methylation status was detected using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting analysis. The hypermethylation status of each individual gene was statistically significantly associated with CRC. MCSM status was also associated with CRC (OR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.15-2.05, P = 0.004). We observed interactions between a high level of dietary intake of cereals, pungent food, and stewed fish with brown sauce, age (older than 60 yrs), smoking and hypermethylation on risk of CRC. MCSM in peripheral blood DNA may be an important biomarker for susceptibility to CRC. PMID:27453436

  20. Methylation of a panel of genes in peripheral blood leukocytes is associated with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiang; Huang, Rong; Sun, Hongru; Liu, Yupeng; Bi, Haoran; Li, Jing; Yu, Hongyuan; Sun, Jiamei; Lin, Shangqun; Cui, Binbin; Zhao, Yashuang

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the DNA methylation status of the CpG islands of multiple genes in blood leukocytes in CRC susceptibility and prognosis, as well as possible interactions with dietary factors on CRC risk are unclear. We carried out a case-control study including 421 CRC patients and 506 controls to examine the associations between six genes (AOX-1, RARB2, RERG, ADAMTS9, IRF4, and FOXE-1), multiple CpG site methylation (MCSM) and susceptibility to CRC. High-level MCSM (MCSM-H) was defined as methylation of greater than or equal to 2 of 5 candidate genes (except for RARB2); low-level MCSM (MCSM-L) was when 1 candidate gene was methylated; non-MCSM was when none of the candidate genes were methylated. Blood cell-derived DNA methylation status was detected using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting analysis. The hypermethylation status of each individual gene was statistically significantly associated with CRC. MCSM status was also associated with CRC (OR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.15–2.05, P = 0.004). We observed interactions between a high level of dietary intake of cereals, pungent food, and stewed fish with brown sauce, age (older than 60 yrs), smoking and hypermethylation on risk of CRC. MCSM in peripheral blood DNA may be an important biomarker for susceptibility to CRC. PMID:27453436

  1. Effects of spaceflight on rat peripheral blood leukocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichiki, A. T.; Gibson, L. A.; Jago, T. L.; Strickland, K. M.; Johnson, D. L.; Lange, R. D.; Allebban, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The white blood cell (WBC) elements and the bone marrow myeloid progenitor cell populations were analyzed to ascertain adaptation to micro-gravity and subsequent readaptation to 1 G in rats flown on the 14-day Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) mission. Bone marrow cells were harvested from one group of rats killed inflight (FD13) and blood was drawn from three other groups at various times. The WBC level was normal on FD14 with the exception of neutrophilia. On FD13, numbers of colony-forming units-granulocyte (CFU-G), CFU-GM, and CFU-M from flight animals were decreased compared with ground controls when incubated with recombinant rat interleukin-3 (rrIL-3) alone or in combination with recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo). On recovery (R + 0), flight rats had decreased numbers of total leukocytes and absolute numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes with elevated neutrophils compared with control rats. They had lower numbers of CD4, CD8, CD2, CD3, and B cells in the peripheral blood but no differences in spleen lymphocytes.

  2. Virus-specific antibodies interfere with avian influenza infection in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from young or aged chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) infection was examined in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte cultures (PBMC) that were collected from 1-day-old chicks or from 52-week-old chickens. Virus-specific antibodies were incubated with AIV to model maternal antibody interference in vitro. Interferon-alpha (I...

  3. Relationship between zinc malnutrition and alterations in murine peripheral blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    King, L.E.; Morford, L.A.; Fraker, P.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Studies using a murine model have shown that the immune system responds rapidly and adversely to zinc deficiency. The extent of alteration of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and immunoglobulin levels were investigated in four zinc dietary groups: zinc adequate (ZA); restricted fed zinc adequate (RZA); marginal zinc deficient (MZD, 72-76% of ZA mouse weight); and severely zinc deficient. The peripheral white blood cell count was 3.66 {plus minus} 1.08 {times} 10{sup 6} cells/ml for ZA mice decreasing by 21%, 28% and 54% for RZA, MZD and SZD mice respectively. An equally dramatic change in the flow cytometric light scatter profile was found. ZA mice had 66% lymphocytes and 21% polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) in their peripheral blood while MZD and SZD mice contained 43% and 30% lymphocytes and 40% and 60% PMNs respectively. Analysis of the phenotypic distribution of specific classes of lymphocytes revealed ZA blood contained 25% B-cells and 40% T-cells (CD5{sup +}). B-cells decreased 40-50% for RZA and MZD mice and 60-70% for SZD mice. The decline in CD5{sup +} T-cells was more modest at 30% and 45% for MZD and SZD mice. A nearly 40% decline in both T{sub h} and T{sub c/s} cells was noted for both MZD and SZD mice. Radioimmunoassay of serum for changes in IgM and IgG content revealed no change among dietary groups while serum zinc decreased 10% for RZA mice and 50% for both MZD and SZD mice. The authors conclude that peripheral blood differential counts in concert with total B and T-cell phenotype may serve as indicators of zinc status while serum zinc and Ig will not.

  4. Red blood cells are a sink for interleukin 8, a leukocyte chemotaxin.

    PubMed

    Darbonne, W C; Rice, G C; Mohler, M A; Apple, T; Hébert, C A; Valente, A J; Baker, J B

    1991-10-01

    IL-8 (also known as neutrophil-activating peptide 1) is recognized as a potent effector of neutrophil functions. Several different cell types that contact blood, namely T lymphocytes, monocytes, and endothelial cells, secrete this polypeptide following stimulation by cytokines, or lipopolysaccharide. Here we show that when IL-8 is added to blood it rapidly partitions from the plasma fluid to the blood cells and that erythrocytes account for the vast majority of this binding. Analysis of 125I-IL-8 binding [( ala-IL-8]77 form) to human red cells indicates a single, 5 nM Kd affinity class of binding sites, present at approximately 2,000 per red cell representing approximately 15 nmol of red cell IL-8 binding sites per liter of blood. These sites are protease sensitive. Their binding of IL-8 is rapidly reversible and does not result in receptor internalization, although bound IL-8 is resistant to extraction by pH 3 buffer at 5 degrees C. 125I-IL-8 binding to red cells was not inhibited by epidermal growth factor or interleukin 1, but was inhibited by monocyte chemotactic peptide-1, which is not a neutrophil chemotaxin, but is a member of the same family of polypeptides as IL-8. FACS analysis of IL-8-mediated mobilization of Ca2+ in neutrophils indicates that the IL-8 bound to red cells is incapable of stimulating neutrophils. Thus, red cell absorption of IL-8 may function to limit stimulation of leukocytes by IL-8 released into blood. PMID:1918386

  5. Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood Leukocytes Is Associated with Severity of Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Udomsinprasert, Wanvisa; Poovorawan, Yong; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Vejchapipat, Paisarn; Zhan, Dong; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes with the severity of biliary atresia (BA). Methods One hundred and fourteen BA patients and 114 age-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Relative telomere length (RTL) was assessed using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate RTL as an independent risk factor of BA. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to calculate the accuracy of biomarkers in the prediction of liver cirrhosis. Results BA patients had significantly shorter telomeres than healthy controls (p < 0.0001). The RTL in BA patients with jaundice was considerably lower than that of patients without jaundice (p = 0.005). Moreover, RTL was markedly shorter in patients with cirrhosis (F4), as compared to patients with mild fibrosis (F2) and non-fibrosis (F0-F1, p < 0.0001). Logistic regression analysis indicated that short RTL was associated with a higher risk of liver cirrhosis in BA. Tertile analysis showed a dose-response effect for this association (p trend < 0.0001). Additionally, RTL in BA children revealed a negative correlation with age (r = -0.50, p < 0.001). We noted an association between reduction of RTL and liver stiffness scores, adjusted for age and gender (b = -0.01, p < 0.0001). Short RTL can be employed to distinguish cirrhosis patients from non-cirrhosis patients (AUC = 0.78). Further analysis showed a linear correlation between leukocyte RTL and liver RTL in BA patients (r = 0.83, p < 0.001). Conclusion The findings of this study provide evidence that telomere shortening is associated with an elevated risk of liver cirrhosis in BA. PMID:26230851

  6. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil on human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Caldefie-Chézet, F; Fusillier, C; Jarde, T; Laroye, H; Damez, M; Vasson, M-P; Guillot, J

    2006-05-01

    The fungicidal and bactericidal actions of the essential oil (EO) of Melaleuca alternifolia seem well established, but their anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects remain unclear. This study investigated in vitro the possible role of whole Melaleuca alternifolia EO as a modulator of the inflammatory/non-specific immune response by exploring the chemotaxis and kinetic radical oxygen species (ROS) production of leukocytes and cytokine secretion in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in humans. The influence of Melaleuca alternifolia EO on the chemotaxis under agarose of isolated neutrophils (PMNs) was evaluated. The kinetics of ROS production by stimulated total circulating leukocytes was followed over 2 h by recording the fluorescence intensity of oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123. The effects of this EO on pro-(interleukin IL-2) and anti-(IL-4 and IL10) inflammatory cytokine secretions were determined by ELISA following incubation of PBMCs with the EO for 24 h. Melaleuca alternifolia EO was inefficient on the chemotaxis of PMNs. It exerted an antioxidant effect, reducing ROS production throughout the kinetic study. Melaleuca alternifolia EO inhibited PBMC proliferation, as revealed by a reduction in IL-2 secretion by stimulated lymphocytes. This EO at 0.1% directly increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 compared with IL-4 secretion without EO (18.5 +/- 10.0 vs 3.3 +/- 1, p < 0.05), and also increased IL-10 secretion at 0.01% (94.9 +/- 38.7 vs 44.1 +/- 18, ns). Melaleuca alternifolia EO may not only act as an anti-inflammatory mediator through its antioxidant activity but may also efficiently protect the organism by reducing the proliferation of inflammatory cells without affecting their capacity to secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:16619364

  7. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  8. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and methods: We observed 160 patients with COPD treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Sarajevo during three years :from 2012 to 2014. They were divided into groups and subgroups according to the first registration of BHR in the course of illness and to the number of exacerbations of the disease in one year. The number of blood PMNL was measured in a stable state of disease at the begging and at the end of investigation. Results: The number of blood PMNL was significantly greater in patients with 3 or more exacerbations per one year (p <0.01). Patients with BHR had significantly greater number blood PMNL than patients without BHR (p< 0.05). Patients with 3 exacerbations per year had a statistically significant increase of number of PMNL between first and last examination (p<0.01). Conclusion: There is statistically significant correlation between the number of blood PMNL and the level of BHR in COPD, but future examination need to be done to determine real role and mode of action of PMNL for these processes. PMID:26543311

  9. Quantification of cytomegalovirus DNA in peripheral blood leukocytes by a branched-DNA signal amplification assay.

    PubMed Central

    Chernoff, D N; Miner, R C; Hoo, B S; Shen, L P; Kelso, R J; Jekic-McMullen, D; Lalezari, J P; Chou, S; Drew, W L; Kolberg, J A

    1997-01-01

    Quantification of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in blood may aid in the identification of patients at highest risk for developing CMV disease, the evaluation of new therapeutics, and the prompt recognition of drug-resistant CMV strains. A branched-DNA (bDNA) assay was developed for the reliable quantification of CMV DNA in peripheral blood leukocytes. The bDNA assay allowed for the highly specific and reproducible quantification of CMV DNA in clinical specimens. Furthermore, the bDNA assay was at least as sensitive as culture techniques and displayed a nearly 3 log10 dynamic range in quantification. Changes in CMV DNA levels measured by the bDNA assay in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient undergoing therapy were consistent with CMV culture, antigen, and genotype results and correlated with disease progression and resistance markers. The bDNA assay for the quantification of CMV DNA may provide a useful tool that can be used to aid physicians in monitoring disease progression, evaluating therapeutic regimens, and recognizing viral resistance and drug failure. PMID:9350724

  10. Estimating skin blood saturation by selecting a subset of hyperspectral imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewerlöf, Maria; Salerud, E. Göran; Strömberg, Tomas; Larsson, Marcus

    2015-03-01

    Skin blood haemoglobin saturation (?b) can be estimated with hyperspectral imaging using the wavelength (λ) range of 450-700 nm where haemoglobin absorption displays distinct spectral characteristics. Depending on the image size and photon transport algorithm, computations may be demanding. Therefore, this work aims to evaluate subsets with a reduced number of wavelengths for ?b estimation. White Monte Carlo simulations are performed using a two-layered tissue model with discrete values for epidermal thickness (?epi) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μ's ), mimicking an imaging setup. A detected intensity look-up table is calculated for a range of model parameter values relevant to human skin, adding absorption effects in the post-processing. Skin model parameters, including absorbers, are; μ's (λ), ?epi, haemoglobin saturation (?b), tissue fraction blood (?b) and tissue fraction melanin (?mel). The skin model paired with the look-up table allow spectra to be calculated swiftly. Three inverse models with varying number of free parameters are evaluated: A(?b, ?b), B(?b, ?b, ?mel) and C(all parameters free). Fourteen wavelength candidates are selected by analysing the maximal spectral sensitivity to ?b and minimizing the sensitivity to ?b. All possible combinations of these candidates with three, four and 14 wavelengths, as well as the full spectral range, are evaluated for estimating ?b for 1000 randomly generated evaluation spectra. The results show that the simplified models A and B estimated ?b accurately using four wavelengths (mean error 2.2% for model B). If the number of wavelengths increased, the model complexity needed to be increased to avoid poor estimations.

  11. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Nina S; Lapteva, Nellya Sh; Rubanovich, Alexander V

    2016-04-01

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24-77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19-77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2-51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62-11.76, p=3.9×10(-7)). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10(-5)). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10(-7)). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging and/or with the development

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Blood Brain/Nerve Barrier Dysfunction and Leukocyte Infiltration: Closely Related or Discordant?

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Gesa; Stoll, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Unlike other organs the nervous system is secluded from the rest of the organism by the blood brain barrier (BBB) or blood nerve barrier (BNB) preventing passive influx of fluids from the circulation. Similarly, leukocyte entry to the nervous system is tightly controlled. Breakdown of these barriers and cellular inflammation are hallmarks of inflammatory as well as ischemic neurological diseases and thus represent potential therapeutic targets. The spatiotemporal relationship between BBB/BNB disruption and leukocyte infiltration has been a matter of debate. We here review contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive tool to depict barrier dysfunction and its relation to macrophage infiltration in the central and peripheral nervous system under pathological conditions. Novel experimental contrast agents like Gadofluorine M (Gf) allow more sensitive assessment of BBB dysfunction than conventional Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA enhanced MRI. In addition, Gf facilitates visualization of functional and transient alterations of the BBB remote from lesions. Cellular contrast agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) and perfluorocarbons enable assessment of leukocyte (mainly macrophage) infiltration by MR technology. Combined use of these MR contrast agents disclosed that leukocytes can enter the nervous system independent from a disturbance of the BBB, and vice versa, a dysfunctional BBB/BNB by itself is not sufficient to attract inflammatory cells from the circulation. We will illustrate these basic imaging findings in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia, and traumatic nerve injury and review corresponding findings in patients. PMID:23267343

  13. Expression of Biliverdin Reductase A in Peripheral Blood Leukocytes Is Associated with Treatment Response in HCV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Subhanova, Iva; Muchova, Lucie; Lenicek, Martin; Vreman, Hendrik J.; Luksan, Ondrej; Kubickova, Kristyna; Kreidlova, Miluse; Zima, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with systemic oxidative stress. Since the heme catabolic pathway plays an important role in antioxidant protection, we attempted to assess the gene expression of key enzymes of heme catabolism, heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), heme oxygenase 2 (HMOX2), and biliverdin reductase A (BLVRA) in the liver and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of patients chronically infected with HCV. Methods Gene expressions (HMOX1, HMOX2, BLVRA) and HCV RNA were analyzed in PBL of HCV treatment naïve patients (n = 58) and controls (n = 55), with a subset of HCV patients having data on hepatic gene expression (n = 35). Based upon the therapeutic outcome, HCV patients were classified as either responders (n = 38) or treatment-failure patients (n = 20). Blood samples in HCV patients were collected at day 0, and week 12, 24, 36, and 48 after the initiation of standard antiviral therapy. Results Compared to the controls, substantially increased BLVRA expression was detected in PBL (p<0.001) of therapeutically naïve HCV patients. mRNA levels of BLVRA in PBL closely correlated with those in liver tissue (r2 = 0.347,p = 0.03). A marked difference in BLVRA expression in PBL between the sustained responders and patients with treatment failure was detected at week 0 and during the follow-up (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that BLVRA basal expression in PBL was an independent predictor for sustained virological response (OR 15; 95% CI 1.05–214.2; P = 0.046). HMOX1/2 expression did not have any effect on the treatment outcome. Conclusion Our results suggest that patients with chronic HCV infection significantly upregulate BLVRA expression in PBL. The lack of BLVRA overexpression is associated with non-responsiveness to standard antiviral therapy; whereas, HMOX1/2 does not seem to have any predictive potential. PMID:23536765

  14. Adenovirus-specific T-cell Subsets in Human Peripheral Blood and After IFN-γ Immunomagnetic Selection.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chongsheng; Wang, Yingying; Cai, Huili; Laroye, Caroline; De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Clement, Laurence; Stoltz, Jean-François; Decot, Véronique; Reppel, Loïc; Bensoussan, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive antiviral cellular immunotherapy by infusion of virus-specific T cells (VSTs) is becoming an alternative treatment for viral infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The T memory stem cell (TSCM) subset was recently described as exhibiting self-renewal and multipotency properties which are required for sustained efficacy in vivo. We wondered if such a crucial subset for immunotherapy was present in VSTs. We identified, by flow cytometry, TSCM in adenovirus (ADV)-specific interferon (IFN)-γ+ T cells before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection, and analyzed the distribution of the main T-cell subsets in VSTs: naive T cells (TN), TSCM, T central memory cells (TCM), T effector memory cell (TEM), and effector T cells (TEFF). In this study all of the different T-cell subsets were observed in the blood sample from healthy donor ADV-VSTs, both before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection. As the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system sorts mainly the most differentiated T-cell subsets, we observed that TEM was always the major T-cell subset of ADV-specific T cells after immunomagnetic isolation and especially after expansion in vitro. Comparing T-cell subpopulation profiles before and after in vitro expansion, we observed that in vitro cell culture with interleukin-2 resulted in a significant expansion of TN-like, TCM, TEM, and TEFF subsets in CD4IFN-γ T cells and of TCM and TEM subsets only in CD8IFN-γ T cells. We demonstrated the presence of all T-cell subsets in IFN-γ VSTs including the TSCM subpopulation, although this was weakly selected by the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system. PMID:26641259

  15. Plunder of Human Blood Leukocytes Containing Ingested Material, by Other Leukocytes: Where Is the Fusagen That Allows Preservation of Membrane Integrity and Motile Function?

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, Stephen E.; Chevance de Boisfleury, Anne

    2013-01-01

    In studying phagocytosis of zymosan particles by human blood monocytes in phase-contrast videomicroscopy, we found that monocytes loaded with zymosan particles became chemotactic for polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) which closed on them and purloined their particle content. This despoliation usually occurred in monocytes that had begun to swell—prefiguring their death. The violent seizure of their contents by the aggressing PMN often tore the monocytes apart. However, some apparently healthy monocyte survived the removal of zymosan content by PMN or, more commonly, its removal by another monocyte. PMN—a much hardier cell in slide preparations—that were similarly loaded with zymosan particles, also attracted PMN. The latter could remove zymosan from the target cell without killing it. Thus, leukocytes were sacrificing significant portions of themselves without losing residual membrane integrity and motile function. Their behavior with respect to other particles (e.g., bacteria) will be of interest. We suggest that the membrane fusagen resides in the inner membrane leaflets when they are brought together in an extreme hourglass configuration. This event may be similar to the fragmentation of erythrocytes into intact pieces, the formation of cytokineplasts, the rear extrusion of content by migrating cells on surfaces, and the phagocytic process itself. PMID:23840370

  16. Immunophenotype characteristics of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes of chronic idiopathic urticaria patients.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Jenny V; Zabaleta, Mercedes; Aldrey, Oscar; Rivera, Henry; De Sanctis, Juan B; Bianco, Nicolás E; Blanca, Isaac

    2006-12-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is not completely understood although autoimmunity has been proposed. The aim of the study was to assess the expression of different leukocyte antigens, by flow cytometry, assaying total blood of 29 patients with CIU and of 20 sex and age matched controls. Moreover, we assessed soluble CD154 a marker of immune cell activation, predominantly memory T cells. When patients were divided depending an their response to the autologous serum skin test (ASST), three different groups were encountered: group 1 (n=11): with negative ASST-, group 2 (n=11): positive ASST (ASST+) with normal lymphocyte counts and group 3 (n=7): ASST+ with low lymphocyte counts (< 1500 cells/mm3). A significant increase in CD19+ percentage and not in the absolute count (P < 0.05) was observed in group 1 as compared to controls and to the other groups. In contrast, CD30+, CD45RO+ and CD4+/CD45RO+ percentages and biologically active soluble CD154 levels were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in group 3 as compared to group 1 or to controls. In ASST positive groups, CD45RO+ and CD4+/CD45RO+ positiveness correlates with wheal diameter. In conclusion, memory cells may play a role in these different types of patients and in understanding CIU pathogenesis. PMID:17176904

  17. Dysregulated 14-3-3 Family in Peripheral Blood Leukocytes of Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Sun, Liya; Yang, Chao; Jiang, Jie; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Cui, Donghong; Xu, Yifeng; He, Lin; Han, Dongmei; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family, which is composed of seven distinct members in humans, plays important roles in the cell cycle, apoptosis, synaptic plasticity and neuronal differentiation and migration. Previous genetic and post-mortem gene expression studies have linked this family to schizophrenia. However, the direction of gene expression changes in these studies has been inconsistent, and reports of 14-3-3 gene expression in living schizophrenic patients are still lacking. Here, we assessed 14-3-3 gene and protein expression levels in peripheral blood leukocytes from drug-naïve first-episode schizophrenic patients and matched controls. mRNA and protein expression levels were quantified by qRT-PCR and UPLC-MRM/MS, respectively. Expression analysis revealed four downregulated and one upregulated mRNA transcripts as well as five downregulated protein levels of 14-3-3 isoforms in schizophrenia. Moreover, significant positive correlations between 14-3-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were found in schizophrenia, and we also identified negative correlations between ε, θ and ζ isoform expression levels and positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Our results suggest that gene and protein expression levels for the 14-3-3 family are dysregulated in schizophrenia, perhaps owing to specific regulatory mechanisms, and we also suggest that expression of the 14-3-3ε, θ and ζ isoform genes could be useful indicators of disease severity. PMID:27030512

  18. Identification of CD14 transcript in blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes and functional variation in Holsteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, J M; Wang, X G; Jiang, Q; Sun, Y; Yang, C H; Ju, Z H; Hao, H S; Wang, C F; Zhong, J F; Zhu, H B

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) leukocytes are primary phagocytic cells of the bovine mammary gland and a first line of defense against invading pathogens during bovine mastitis infection. Cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) is mainly expressed in macrophages and neutrophils and acts as a co-receptor that binds bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and recruits PMNs to CD14-LPS complexes in mammary epithelial cells. In this study, we identified a novel splice variant in PMNs, named CD14-SV, characterized by a deleted region from c.143-579 nt compared to the CD14 reference mRNA sequence. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism (c.523 A>G) in exon 2 of CD14 was identified and found to modify the secondary structure and hydrophilicity of the CD14 protein. Association analysis also showed that the milk somatic cell score, an indicator of mastitis, of cows with the GG genotype was lower than that of cows with the AA and AG genotypes. Our findings suggest that the expression of CD14 in bovine blood PMNs is regulated by alternative splicing, and that CD14-SV is a candidate functional marker that may influence mastitis-resistance in dairy cows. PMID:27173290

  19. Extracellular Histones Induce Chemokine Production in Whole Blood Ex Vivo and Leukocyte Recruitment In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Johannes; Papareddy, Praveen; Dahlgren, Madelene W.; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Smeds, Emanuel; Linder, Adam; Mörgelin, Matthias; Johansson-Lindbom, Bengt; Egesten, Arne; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system relies to a great deal on the interaction of pattern recognition receptors with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular pattern molecules. Extracellular histones belong to the latter group and their release has been described to contribute to the induction of systemic inflammatory reactions. However, little is known about their functions in the early immune response to an invading pathogen. Here we show that extracellular histones specifically target monocytes in human blood and this evokes the mobilization of the chemotactic chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 from these cells. The chemokine induction involves the toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex on monocytes, and is under the control of interferon-γ. Consequently, subcutaneous challenge with extracellular histones results in elevated levels of CXCL10 in a murine air pouch model and an influx of leukocytes to the site of injection in a TLR4 dependent manner. When analyzing tissue biopsies from patients with necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, extracellular histone H4 and CXCL10 are immunostained in necrotic, but not healthy tissue. Collectively, these results show for the first time that extracellular histones have an important function as chemoattractants as their local release triggers the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection. PMID:26646682

  20. Establishment of a microplate assay for flow cytometric assessment and it is use for the evaluation of age-related phenotypic changes in canine whole blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Reis, Alexandre B; Carneiro, Cláudia M; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo C; Mayrink, Wilson; Genaro, Odair; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo A

    2005-02-10

    The effectiveness of flow cytometric assays for canine use is still requiring standardization. Despite several studies using purified mononuclear cells, no methodology or reference ranges are available for immunophenotyping of whole blood leukocytes (WBL). Fresh and pre-fixed WBL were used to identify cell-subsets, (Thy-1(+)/CD5(+)/CD4(+)/CD8(+)/CD21(+) and CD14(+)) and measure MHC-II, CD45RA/CD45RB expression. We described here an efficient method for fast quantification of canine-WBL, using pre-fix in a microplate assay, which allows long-term sample storage prior to phenotyping. Decreased percentage of CD5(+)-T-cells within the lymphocyte-gate and increased percentage of CD21(+)-B-cells were observed in young animals, which led to higher T/B cell ratios in middle-aged dogs. Lower numerical counts of Thy-1(+), CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD21(+) lymphocyte were observed when compared to young animals. In addition, we identified an age-related decline of MHC-II/CD45RA expression by lymphocytes. We proposed an improved method for phenotyping of canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that has significant use for researchers and veterinary clinicians. The hematological changes of senescence previously identified on PBMC could be adequately reproduced on features identified by whole blood. Furthermore, this study supplies normal range references as baseline standards for clinical purposes, besides specific immunological parameters to monitor canine aging process. PMID:15621304

  1. Reactions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of camels with monoclonal antibodies against ruminant leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ungar-Waron, H; Yagil, R; Brenner, J; Paz, R; Partosh, N; Van Creveld, C; Lubashevsky, E; Trainin, Z

    2003-03-01

    The particular immune system of the camel has been but little investigated. In this work circulating camel peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were studied by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against ruminant leukocytes were used for the detection of cell surface antigens. Monoclonals to T-cell markers, CD4 (CACT138A) and CD8 (CACT80C), exhibited no reactivity towards camel PBMC in contrast to their reactivity to PBMC of other ruminant species and those of cattle in particular. A relatively high percentage (29.1+/-8.9%) of camel PBMC reacted with a non-immunoglobulin cell surface marker, B-B2, comparable to the reactivity of bovine PBMC. The B-B7 cell marker revealed 22.4+/-10.0% of reactive camel PBMC while the CD45 leukocyte common antigen was identified only on 19.4+/-3.1% of camel PBMC as compared to 74.7+/-4.9% for bovine PBMC. IgM (PIg45A) was detected on 9.1+/-1.4% of camel PBMC and on 46.6+/-19.5% of the bovine PBMC. Double fluorescent labeling with two B-cell markers and an anti-ruminant lambda light-chain mAb revealed 7-9% of cells bearing both B and lambda L-chain markers. Light chain reactivity was also assessed using an anti-goat F(ab')(2) antiserum. The values obtained, 14.3+/-5.8% for the camel and 47.8+/-2.7% for the cattle, are close to the values observed for surface IgM. These data suggest that camels, like other ruminants, possess L-chain bearing cells of the B-cell lineage. However, in the camel, Igs are different in that in addition to regular four chain Igs, about 65% of them possess two heavy chain Igs devoid of light chains. Because different sets of V(H) gene segments are used by four and two chain Igs, it is possible that there might be two lineages of B-cells each secreting a different form of antibodies. PMID:12493494

  2. Cryopreservation of blood mononuclear leukocytes and stem cells suspended in a large fluid volume. A preclinical model for a blood stem cell bank.

    PubMed

    Fliedner, T M; Körbling, M; Calvo, W; Bruch, C; Herbst, E

    1977-09-29

    It was the purpose of this study to establish and evaluate a freezing-and-thawing method for preservation of hemopoietic stem cells from the peripheral blood. Blood leukocytes collected by means of an IBM Blood-Cell-Separator were frozen in plastic bags using 10% DMSO and controlled cooling rates. Thawing was performed rapidly, and DMSO was diluted and removed prior to the in-vitro and in-vivo assays. The mean recovery of mononuclear cells collected from 82 leukaphereses was 86%. To assess the recovery of cryopreserved hemopoietic stem cells, the soft agar culture method adapted for the dog was used. There was no significant difference in the CFUc recovery per 1 X 10(6) mononuclear cells or in per leukapheresis after different cryopreservation times (1--6 and 7--27 months). To evaluate the hemopoietic repopulation capability of cryopreserved blood stem cells, leukapheresis-derived leukocytes were transfused into 1200 R whole body x-irradiated dogs. The hemopoietic repopulation pattern at day 10 after transfusion of comparable numbers of fresh or frozen leukocytes was not significantly different, as measured in bone marrow smears and sections and by granulocyte concentration in the peripheral blood. PMID:912104

  3. Age-Related Changes following In Vitro Stimulation with Rhodococcus equi of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes from Neonatal Foals

    PubMed Central

    Kachroo, Priyanka; Ivanov, Ivan; Seabury, Ashley G.; Liu, Mei; Chowdhary, Bhanu P.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular bacterium primarily known as an equine pathogen that infects young foals causing a pyogranulomatuous pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms mediating the immune response of foals to R. equi are not fully elucidated. Hence, global genomic high-throughput tools like gene expression microarrays might identify age-related gene expression signatures and molecular pathways that contribute to the immune mechanisms underlying the inherent susceptibility of foals to disease caused by R. equi. The objectives of this study were 2-fold: 1) to compare the expression profiles at specific ages of blood leukocytes from foals stimulated with virulent R. equi with those of unstimulated leukocytes; and, 2) to characterize the age-related changes in the gene expression profile associated with blood leukocytes in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi. Peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained from 6 foals within 24 hours (h) of birth (day 1) and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after birth. The samples were split, such that half were stimulated with live virulent R. equi, and the other half served as unstimulated control. RNA was extracted and the generated cDNA was labeled with fluorescent dyes for microarray hybridizations using an equine microarray. Our findings suggest that there is age-related differential expression of genes involved in host immune response and immunity. We found induction of genes critical for host immunity against pathogens (MHC class II) only at the later time-points (compared to birth). While it appears that foals up to 8-weeks of age are able to initiate a protective inflammatory response against the bacteria, relatively decreased expression of various other immune-related genes points toward inherent diminished immune responses closer to birth. These genes and pathways may contribute to disease susceptibility in foals if infected early in life, and might thus be targeted for developing preventative or therapeutic strategies. PMID

  4. LRP5 and plasma cholesterol levels modulate the canonical Wnt pathway in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Borrell-Pages, Maria; Carolina Romero, July; Badimon, Lina

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is triggered after invasion or injury to restore homeostasis. Although the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is one of the first molecular responses to cellular damage, its role in inflammation is still unclear. It was our hypothesis that the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway are modulators of inflammatory mechanisms. Wild-type (WT) and LRP5(-/-) mice were fed a hypercholesterolemic (HC) diet to trigger dislipidemia and chronic inflammation. Diets were supplemented with plant sterol esters (PSEs) to induce LDL cholesterol lowering and the reduction of inflammation. HC WT mice showed increased serum cholesterol levels that correlated with increased Lrp5 and Wnt/β-catenin gene expression while in the HC LRP5(-/-) mice Wnt/β-catenin pathway was shut down. Functionally, HC induced pro-inflammatory gene expression in LRP5(-/-) mice, suggesting an inhibitory role of the Wnt pathway in inflammation. Dietary PSE administration downregulated serum cholesterol levels in WT and LRP5(-/-) mice. Furthermore, in WT mice PSE increased anti-inflammatory genes expression and inhibited Wnt/β-catenin activation. Hepatic gene expression of Vldlr, Lrp2 and Lrp6 was increased after HC feeding in WT mice but not in LRP5(-/-) mice, suggesting a role for these receptors in the clearance of plasmatic lipoproteins. Finally, an antiatherogenic role for LRP5 was demonstrated as HC LRP5(-/-) mice developed larger aortic atherosclerotic lesions than WT mice. Our results show an anti-inflammatory, pro-survival role for LRP5 and the Wnt signaling pathway in peripheral blood leukocytes. PMID:25748163

  5. Leukocyte Populations in Human Preterm and Term Breast Milk Identified by Multicolour Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Trend, Stephanie; de Jong, Emma; Lloyd, Megan L.; Kok, Chooi Heen; Richmond, Peter; Doherty, Dorota A.; Simmer, Karen; Kakulas, Foteini; Strunk, Tobias; Currie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Extremely preterm infants are highly susceptible to bacterial infections but breast milk provides some protection. It is unknown if leukocyte numbers and subsets in milk differ between term and preterm breast milk. This study serially characterised leukocyte populations in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants using multicolour flow cytometry methods for extended differential leukocyte counts in blood. Methods Sixty mothers of extremely preterm (<28 weeks gestational age), very preterm (28–31 wk), and moderately preterm (32–36 wk), as well as term (37–41 wk) infants were recruited. Colostrum (d2–5), transitional (d8–12) and mature milk (d26–30) samples were collected, cells isolated, and leukocyte subsets analysed using flow cytometry. Results The major CD45+ leukocyte populations circulating in blood were also detectable in breast milk but at different frequencies. Progression of lactation was associated with decreasing CD45+ leukocyte concentration, as well as increases in the relative frequencies of neutrophils and immature granulocytes, and decreases in the relative frequencies of eosinophils, myeloid and B cell precursors, and CD16- monocytes. No differences were observed between preterm and term breast milk in leukocyte concentration, though minor differences between preterm groups in some leukocyte frequencies were observed. Conclusions Flow cytometry is a useful tool to identify and quantify leukocyte subsets in breast milk. The stage of lactation is associated with major changes in milk leukocyte composition in this population. Fresh preterm breast milk is not deficient in leukocytes, but shorter gestation may be associated with minor differences in leukocyte subset frequencies in preterm compared to term breast milk. PMID:26288195

  6. Imbalance between subsets of CD8+ peripheral blood T cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Liu, Hong-Ju; Xin, Jian-Bao; Zhang, Jian-Chu; Wu, Jiang-Hua; Meng, Zhao-Ji; Sun, Sheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background. CD8+ T lymphocytes are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, systematic analyses of CD8+ T cell (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc) subsets in COPD patients have yet to be well conducted. Methods. The whole Tc subsets, including Tc1/2/10/17, CD8+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8+α7+ T cells, were quantified by flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 24 stable COPD subjects (SCOPD), 14 patients during acute exacerbations (AECOPD), and 14 healthy nonsmokers (HN). Results. Acute exacerbations of COPD were accompanied by elevated levels of circulating CD8+ T cells. Tc1 cells were increased in both SCOPD and AECOPD patients, whereas the percentage of Tc2 cells was decreased in SCOPD patients but remained normal in AECOPD patients. Tc17 cells were increased only in AECOPD patients, and the percentage of Tc10 cells was reduced in both SCOPD and AECOPD patients. The imbalances of pro/anti-inflammatory Tc subsets observed in COPD may be caused by the lack of Tc10 cells and the impaired anti-inflammatory capacity of CD8+ Tregs. Conclusions. The imbalances between subsets of CD8+ peripheral blood T cells contribute to the immune response dysfunction in COPD pathogenesis. PMID:27547589

  7. Influence of fingolimod on basic lymphocyte subsets frequencies in the peripheral blood of multiple sclerosis patients – preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Julia; Czerwiec, Michał; Siwicka-Gieroba, Dorota; Walankiewicz, Monika; Grafka, Agnieszka; Zgurski, Michał; Surdacka, Agata; Bartosik-Psujek, Halina; Roliński, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background Fingolimod is a drug administered orally to adult patients treated for relapsing remitting course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mode of action of fingolimod is based on intense S1P1 receptor stimulation and “arresting” lymphocytes in lymphatic organs. Objective of the research was to assess changes in the frequencies of basic lymphocyte subsets in patients treated for multiple sclerosis with the use of fingolimod. Material and methods Study group comprised of 25 previously untreated adult patients with MS. Venous blood samples were collected from each patient before and one month, three months and six months after treatment initiation. Peripheral blood lymphocyte immunophenotype was assessed with a set of monoclonal antibodies bounded to appropriate fluorochromes and flow cytometer FACSC alibur. Statistical analysis of the results was conducted using Statistica 9.0 software. Results Before fingolimod administration median of lymphocyte subsets percentage in each patient was in reference range. After 1 month of treatment we noticed significant changes in frequencies of following lymphocyte subsets: NK cells – 51.22% (p = 0.016), T CD4+ cells – 11.58% (p = 0.01), T CD4+:T CD8+ cells ratio – 0.61 (p = 0.005). After 3 and 6 months of treatment there was further increase of deviation from normal state. Conclusions The use of fingolimod is associated with profound changes in lymphocyte subsets distribution, which might bear a risk of the development of cellular immune deficiency symptoms. PMID:26648781

  8. A Comparative Study of the T Cell Stimulatory and Polarizing Capacity of Human Primary Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Simone P.; Bakdash, Ghaith; Weiden, Jorieke; Sköld, Annette E.; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are central players of immune responses; they become activated upon infection or inflammation and migrate to lymph nodes, where they can initiate an antigen-specific immune response by activating naive T cells. Two major types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in peripheral blood, namely, myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Myeloid DCs (mDCs) can be subdivided based on the expression of either CD1c or CD141. These human DC subsets differ in surface marker expression, Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and transcriptional profile, suggesting functional differences between them. Here, we directly compared the capacity of human blood mDCs and pDCs to activate and polarize CD4+ T cells. CD141+ mDCs show an overall more mature phenotype over CD1c+ mDC and pDCs; they produce less IL-10 and more IL-12 than CD1c+ mDCs. Despite these differences, all subsets can induce the production of IFN-γ in naive CD4+ T cells. CD1c+ and CD141+ mDCs especially induce a strong T helper 1 profile. Importantly, naive CD4+ T cells are not polarized towards regulatory T cells by any subset. These findings further establish all three human blood DCs—despite their differences—as promising candidates for immunostimulatory effectors in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27057096

  9. The Difference of Lymphocyte Subsets Including Regulatory T-Cells in Umbilical Cord Blood between AGA Neonates and SGA Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Hee; Hur, Mina; Hwang, Han Sung; Kwon, Han Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare the regulatory T cells in cord blood of appropriate for gestational age (AGA) neonates with those of small for gestational age (SGA) neonates. Materials and Methods Umbilical cord blood was collected upon labor in 108 healthy full-term (between 37 and 41 gestational weeks) neonates, who were born between November 2010 and April 2012. Among them, 77 samples were obtained from AGA neonates, and 31 samples were obtained from SGA neonates. Regulatory T cells and lymphocyte subsets were determined using a flow cytometer. Student's t-test for independent samples was used to compare differences between AGA and SGA neonates. Results Regulatory T cells in cord blood were increased in the SGA group compared with normal controls (p=0.041). However, cytotoxic T cells in cord blood were significantly decreased in the SGA group compared with normal controls (p=0.007). Conclusion This is the first study to compare the distribution of lymphocyte subsets including regulatory T cells in cord blood between AGA neonates and SGA neonates. PMID:25837188

  10. Maitake beta-glucan promotes recovery of leukocytes and myeloid cell function in peripheral blood from paclitaxel hematotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; de Stanchina, Elisa; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Hong, Feng; Seidman, Andrew; Fornier, Monica; Xiao, Wei-Lie; Kennelly, Edward J.; Wesa, Kathleen; Cassileth, Barrie R.

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow myelotoxicity is a major limitation of chemotherapy. While granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment is effective, alternative approaches to support hematopoietic recovery are sought. We previously found that a beta-glucan extract from maitake mushroom Grifola frondosa (MBG) enhanced colony forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM) activity of mouse bone marrow and human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), stimulated G-CSF production and spared HPC from doxorubicin toxicity in vitro. This investigation assessed the effects of MBG on leukocyte recovery and granulocyte/monocyte function in vivo after dose intensive paclitaxel (Ptx) in a normal mouse. After a cumulative dose of Ptx (90–120 mg/kg) given to B6D2F1 mice, daily oral MBG (4 or 6 mg/kg), intravenous G-CSF (80 μg/kg) or Ptx alone were compared for effects on the dynamics of leukocyte recovery in blood, CFU-GM activity in bone marrow and spleen, and granulocyte/monocyte production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Leukocyte counts declined less in Ptx + MBG mice compared to Ptx-alone (p = 0.024) or Ptx + G-CSF treatment (p = 0.031). Lymphocyte levels were higher after Ptx + MBG but not Ptx + G-CSF treatment compared to Ptx alone (p < 0.01). MBG increased CFU-GM activity in bone marrow and spleen (p < 0.001, p = 0.002) 2 days after Ptx. After two additional days (Ptx post-day 4), MBG restored granulocyte/monocyte ROS response to normal levels compared to Ptx-alone and increased ROS response compared to Ptx-alone or Ptx + G-CSF (p < 0.01, both). The studies indicate that oral MBG promoted maturation of HPC to become functionally active myeloid cells and enhanced peripheral blood leukocyte recovery after chemotoxic bone marrow injury. PMID:20140432

  11. Correlation of MLH1 and MGMT methylation levels between peripheral blood leukocytes and colorectal tissue DNA samples in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIA; WANG, YIBAINA; ZHANG, ZUOMING; YAO, XIAOPING; GE, JIE; ZHAO, YASHUANG

    2013-01-01

    CpG island methylation in the promoter regions of the DNA mismatch repair gene mutator L homologue 1 (MLH1) and DNA repair gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) genes has been shown to occur in the leukocytes of peripheral blood and colorectal tissue. However, it is unclear whether the methylation levels in the blood leukocytes and colorectal tissue are correlated. The present study analyzed and compared the levels of MGMT and MLH1 gene methylation in the leukocytes of peripheral blood and colorectal tissues obtained from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The methylation levels of MGMT and MLH1 were examined using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. A total of 44 patients with CRC were selected based on the MLH1 and MGMT gene methylation levels in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood. Corresponding colorectal tumor and normal tissues were obtained from each patient and the DNA methylation levels were determined. The correlation coefficients were evaluated using Spearman’s rank test. Agreement was determined by generalized κ-statistics. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r) for the methylation levels of the MGMT and MLH1 genes in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood and normal colorectal tissue were 0.475 and 0.362, respectively (P=0.001 and 0.016, respectively). The agreement of the MGMT and MLH1 gene methylation levels in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood and normal colorectal tissue were graded as fair and poor (κ=0.299 and 0.126, respectively). The methylation levels of MGMT and MLH1 were moderately and weakly correlated between the patient-matched leukocytes and the normal colorectal tissue, respectively. Blood-derived DNA methylation measurements may not always represent the levels of normal colorectal tissue methylation. PMID:24179526

  12. Defining Mononuclear Phagocyte Subset Homology Across Several Distant Warm-Blooded Vertebrates Through Comparative Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickaël; Moroldo, Marco; Foucras, Gilles; Salmon, Henri; Marty, Hélène; Quéré, Pascale; Bertho, Nicolas; Boudinot, Pierre; Dalod, Marc; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are organized in a complex system of ontogenetically and functionally distinct subsets, that has been best described in mouse and to some extent in human. Identification of homologous mononuclear phagocyte subsets in other vertebrate species of biomedical, economic, and environmental interest is needed to improve our knowledge in physiologic and physio-pathologic processes, and to design intervention strategies against a variety of diseases, including zoonotic infections. We developed a streamlined approach combining refined cell sorting and integrated comparative transcriptomics analyses which revealed conservation of the mononuclear phagocyte organization across human, mouse, sheep, pigs and, in some respect, chicken. This strategy should help democratizing the use of omics analyses for the identification and study of cell types across tissues and species. Moreover, we identified conserved gene signatures that enable robust identification and universal definition of these cell types. We identified new evolutionarily conserved gene candidates and gene interaction networks for the molecular regulation of the development or functions of these cell types, as well as conserved surface candidates for refined subset phenotyping throughout species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologous genes of the conserved signatures exist in teleost fishes and apparently not in Lamprey. PMID:26150816

  13. Defining Mononuclear Phagocyte Subset Homology Across Several Distant Warm-Blooded Vertebrates Through Comparative Transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickaël; Moroldo, Marco; Foucras, Gilles; Salmon, Henri; Marty, Hélène; Quéré, Pascale; Bertho, Nicolas; Boudinot, Pierre; Dalod, Marc; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are organized in a complex system of ontogenetically and functionally distinct subsets, that has been best described in mouse and to some extent in human. Identification of homologous mononuclear phagocyte subsets in other vertebrate species of biomedical, economic, and environmental interest is needed to improve our knowledge in physiologic and physio-pathologic processes, and to design intervention strategies against a variety of diseases, including zoonotic infections. We developed a streamlined approach combining refined cell sorting and integrated comparative transcriptomics analyses which revealed conservation of the mononuclear phagocyte organization across human, mouse, sheep, pigs and, in some respect, chicken. This strategy should help democratizing the use of omics analyses for the identification and study of cell types across tissues and species. Moreover, we identified conserved gene signatures that enable robust identification and universal definition of these cell types. We identified new evolutionarily conserved gene candidates and gene interaction networks for the molecular regulation of the development or functions of these cell types, as well as conserved surface candidates for refined subset phenotyping throughout species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologous genes of the conserved signatures exist in teleost fishes and apparently not in Lamprey. PMID:26150816

  14. Flow cytometric characterizations of leukocyte subpopulations in the peripheral blood of northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, Hong-Yi; ZHANG, Ming-Xu; ZHANG, Lin-Tao; ZHANG, Xiao-Liang; PANG, Wei; LYU, Long-Bao; ZHENG, Yong-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemistrina group) have been extensively used as non-human primate animal models for various human diseases in recent years, notably for AIDS research due to their sensitivity to HIV-1. Northern pig-tailed macaques (M. leonina) are distributed in China and other surrounding Southeast Asia countries. Although northern pig-tailed macaques have been bred on a large scale as experimental animals since 2012, the reference value of normal levels of leukocytes is not available. To obtain such information, 62 blood samples from male and female healthy northern pig-tailed macaques at different ages were collected. The normal range of major leukocyte subpopulations, such as T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, and the expression levels of activation or differentiation related molecules (CD38, HLA-DR, CCR5, CD21, IgD, CD80 and CD86) on lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. The counts of B cells decreased with age, but those of CD8+ T cells and NK cells and the frequency of CD38+HLA-DR+CD4+ T cells were positively correlated with age. The counts of leukocyte subpopulations were higher in males than those in females except for CD4+ T cells. Males also showed higher expression levels of IgD and CD21 within B cells. This study provides basic data about the leukocyte subpopulations of northern pig-tailed macaques and compares this species with commonly used Chinese rhesus macaques (M. mulatta), which is meaningful for the biomedical application of northern pig-tailed macaques. PMID:25465082

  15. Longitudinal Frequencies of Blood Leukocyte Subpopulations Differ between NOD and NOR Mice but Do Not Predict Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Telieps, Tanja; Köhler, Meike; Treise, Irina; Foertsch, Katharina; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H.; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Verschoor, Admar; Adler, Kerstin; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Immune phenotyping provides insight into disease pathogenesis and prognostic markers. Trajectories from age of 4 to 36 weeks were modeled for insulin autoantibodies and for leukocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood from female NOD (n = 58) and NOR (n = 22) mice. NOD mice had higher trajectories of insulin autoantibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, IgD+IgM− B lymphocytes, and NK cells and lower trajectories of CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes, IgM+ B lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes than NOR mice (all p < 0.001). Of these, only the increased IAA trajectory was observed in NOD mice that developed diabetes as compared to NOD mice that remained diabetes-free. Therefore, the profound differences in peripheral blood leukocyte proportions observed between the diabetes-prone NOD mice and the diabetes-resistant mice do not explain the variation in diabetes development within NOD mice and do not provide markers for diabetes prediction in this model. PMID:26966692

  16. The impact of HIV infection on blood leukocyte responsiveness to bacterial stimulation in asymptomatic patients and patients with bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Hoogendijk, Arie J; de Vos, Alex F; Grobusch, Martin P; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV-induced changes in cytokine responses to bacteria may influence susceptibility to bacterial infections and the consequent inflammatory response. Methods We examined the impact of HIV on whole blood responsiveness to bacterial stimulation in asymptomatic subjects and patients with bacterial bloodstream infection (BSI). Whole blood was stimulated ex vivo with two bacterial Toll-like receptor agonists (lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid) and two pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typhoidal Salmonella), which are relevant in HIV-positive patients. Production of interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 was used as a read-out. Results In asymptomatic subjects, HIV infection was associated with reduced interferon-γ, release after stimulation and priming of the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to non-typhoidal Salmonella. In patients with BSI, we found no such priming effect, nor was there evidence for more profound sepsis-induced immunosuppression in BSI patients with HIV co-infection. Conclusions These results suggest a complex effect of HIV on leukocyte responses to bacteria. However, in patients with sepsis, leukocyte responses were equally blunted in patients with and without HIV infection. PMID:27189532

  17. Development of methods to examine the effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zussman, Lisa Ann

    In vitro methods to study the effect of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on leukocyte function using human peripheral blood were developed. These methods were demonstrated using the blood of 1-5 individuals and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) urban PM #1648, diesel PM #1650, silica PM, and a locally collected PM sample (New Jersey PM10). For the blood samples analyzed in this study NIST urban PM and New Jersey PM10 treatment mediated the release of granule contents from peripheral blood leukocytes and induced structural changes associated with degranulation. Flow cytometry revealed PM-induced changes in phagocytosis and cell structure associated with degranulation. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed NIST urban PM-induced cell structure changes were associated with PM internalization. Colorametric and electrophoretic methods showed no PM-induced release of primary granules and a slight PM-induced release of secondary granules associated with only NIST urban PM. Enzyme Immunosorbent Assays detected increased histamine release from basophils treated with NIST urban PM, a locally collected PM, and the soluble and insoluble components of these particles. NIST urban PM was found to be a potent inducer of histamine release in 4 out of 6 individuals tested. Fractionation studies revealed that soluble (aqueous) and insoluble fractions of NIST urban PM contain histamine-releasing activity. This was also demonstrated for the New Jersey PM10 sample for which the soluble fraction exhibited the most activity. Complementary studies with inhibitors of IgE-mediated histamine release conducted on one test subject suggest that PM-induced histamine release was partially mediated by IgE. A new hypothesis has been formed, suggesting that particle toxicity is related to PM-induced histamine release. Due to the bioactive nature of histamine and its association with many cardiopulmonary responses, the PM- mediated release of histamine should be investigated

  18. Effect of Very Low Dose Fast Neutrons on the DNA of Rats' Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Nafee, Sherif S; Saeed, Abdu; Shaheen, Salem A; El Assouli, Sufian M; El Assouli, M-Zaki; Raouf, Gehan A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of very low dose fast neutrons on the chromatin and DNA of rats' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and leukocytes has been studied in the present work using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Fourteen female Wistar rats were used; seven were irradiated with neutrons of 0.9 cGy (Am-Be, 0.02 cGy h(-1)), and seven others were used as control. Second derivative and curve fitting were used to analyze the FTIR spectra. In addition, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to classify the group spectra. Meanwhile, the tail moment and percentage of DNA in the tail were used as indicators to sense the breaking and the level of damage in DNA. The analysis of FTIR spectra of the PBMC of the irradiated group revealed a marked increase in the area of phosphodiesters of nucleic acids and the area ratios of RNA/DNA and phosphodiesters/carbohydrates. A sharp significant increase and decrease in the areas of RNA and DNA ribose were recorded, respectively. In the irradiated group, leukocytes with different tail lengths were observed. The distributions of tail moments and the percentage of DNA in the tail of irradiated groups were heterogeneous. The mean value of the percentages of DNA in the tail at 0.5 h post-irradiation represented low-level damage in the DNA. Therefore, one can conclude that very low dose fast neutrons might cause changes in the DNA of PBMC at the submolecular level. It could cause low-level damage, double-strand break, and chromatin fragmentation of DNA of leukocytes. PMID:26606065

  19. Antibody and blood leukocyte response in Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) tick-infested dogs and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Matias P J; Aoki, Vanessa L; Sanches, Françoise P S; Aquino, Lúcia P T C T; Garcia, Marcos V; Machado, Rosângela Z; Bechara, Gervásio H

    2003-07-10

    The dog is considered to be the natural host of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and is unable to develop appreciable resistance even after repeated feedings. The guinea pig develops strong resistance after one infestation with adult ticks. Antibody (IgG) titres against tick salivary gland antigens (SGAs) and blood leukocyte numbers in dogs and guinea pigs undergoing experimental R. sanguineus tick infestations were measured to detect a possible correlation with susceptibility or resistance of hosts. Since infested dogs develop an immediate hypersensitivity reaction to R. sanguineus antigens, total and anti-R. sanguineus SGA IgE levels were also measured in this host species. IgG and IgE antibody levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) along three consecutive infestations of both hosts. Most dogs and guinea pigs displayed low IgG levels against R. sanguineus SGAs, though marked differences in individual response were observed. Although dog's total serum IgE levels increased significantly after infestations, no change in the amount of anti-salivary gland IgE was detected. Total and differential blood cell counts were determined in dogs and guinea pigs during primary and secondary infestation. In dogs, a tertiary infestation and a subsequent higher infestation level were also evaluated. Infested dogs did not display any alteration in blood leukocyte counts throughout the experiment. Guinea pigs, on the other hand, developed a significant basophilia during primary infestation which increased further during secondary infestation. These data reveal similarities and differences in the reactions of resistant and non-resistant hosts to ticks. They contribute for the understanding of such host-parasite relationships and will hopefully aid in the development of immune control of ticks. PMID:12860067

  20. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Ole-Lars; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Christiansen, Dorte; Fure, Hilde; Castellheim, Albert; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Pharo, Anne; Lindstad, Julie Katrine; Bergseth, Grethe; Leslie, Graham; Lambris, John D; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-09-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant were incubated with whole blood using lepirudin as anticoagulant which has no adverse effects on complement. Bacteria free in plasma, bound to erythrocytes or phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The effects of the C3 inhibitor compstatin, a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRa) and a complement receptor 1 (CR1)-blocking antibody (3D9) were examined. Most bacteria (80%) immediately bound to erythrocytes. The binding gradually declined over time, with a parallel increase in phagocytosis. Complement inhibition with compstatin reduced erythrocyte binding and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had no effect on these processes since similar results were obtained using an LPS-deficient N. meningitidis mutant. In vivo experiments in a pig model of sepsis showed limited binding of bacteria to erythrocytes, consistent with the facts that erythrocyte CR1 receptors are absent in non-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood. PMID:21839519

  1. Long-term impact of puerperal metritis on the profiles of peripheral blood leukocytes in peripartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Magata, Fumie; Kitaoka, Ryuji; Morino, Ikumi; Teramura, Makoto; Kawashima, Chiho; Haneda, Shingo; Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effects of puerperal metritis on the immune response, changes in the differential peripheral blood leukocyte counts were analyzed during the peripartum period in cows with or without metritis. Multiparous Holstein cows were examined for uterine health disorders and classified into two groups: healthy (n = 11) or metritis (n = 5) cows. The lymphocyte and monocyte counts and the proportion of CD8(+) lymphocytes were higher in cows with metritis compared to healthy cows. Moreover, the effects of puerperal metritis on the lymphocyte counts and CD4(+) /CD8(+) ratio persisted weeks after the uterine inflammation had self-resolved. Taken together, the findings of the present study indicate the possible long-term alterations of systemic immune responses in cows with puerperal uterine inflammation. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science. PMID:26387573

  2. The effects of oil exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes and splenic melano-macrophage centers of Gulf of Mexico fishes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmad Omar; Hohn, Claudia; Allen, Peter J; Ford, Lorelei; Dail, Mary Beth; Pruett, Stephen; Petrie-Hanson, Lora

    2014-02-15

    In August and November 2010 we collected and examined peripheral blood and tissues from three species of Gulf of Mexico fish. Findings were compared to non-exposed control fish. The leukocyte counts of exposed alligator gar were not significantly different from controls, while exposed Gulf killifish and sea trout had significantly decreased lymphocyte counts. Liver ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) values from sea trout were significantly greater than control sea trout EROD values, suggesting poly aromatic hydrocarbon exposure. Splenic melano-macrophage centers (MMCs) from exposed sea trout and Gulf killifish showed a significant increase in number compared to non-exposed fish. Sea trout splenic MMCs were also significantly greater in size. These findings suggest that Gulf fish sampled were exposed to crude oil from the Macondo well and were in a lymphopenic or immuno-compromised state. PMID:24405733

  3. Expression of Adiponectin Receptors on Peripheral Blood Leukocytes of Hypertensive Children Is Associated with the Severity of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gackowska, Lidia; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Trojanek, Joanna; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Kubiszewska, Izabela; Niemirska, Anna; Wierzbicka, Aldona; Michalkiewicz, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out whether peripheral blood leukocyte adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (AdipoR1, AdipoR2) protein expression patterns (flow cytometry) differ between the primary hypertension children (n = 57) and healthy controls (n = 19) and if their expression levels are related to selected clinical parameters. The group of 26 patients [AdipoR(−)] showed lower and the group of 31 patients [AdipoR(+)] showed higher AdipoRs protein expression than the control and each other (P < 0.01 for neutrophils, P < 0.05 for monocytes). The AdipoR(+) leukocytes expressed higher AdipoR1 mRNA levels (RT-PCR) than AdipoR(−) ones and controls (P = 0.022 and P = 0.007, resp.). Despite greater BMI, the AdipoR(−) patients had unchanged serum adiponectin levels. In contrast, AdipoR(+) patients had lower serum adiponectin concentrations than the AdipoR(−) ones and controls (P < 0.001). The AdipoR(+) patients had higher blood pressure (P = 0.042) and greater carotid intima-media thickness (P = 0.017) than the AdipoR(−) ones. The stage of hypertension was associated with increased neutrophil but not monocyte AdipoR1 density (AdipoR1 MFI) (P < 0.05). Severe ambulatory hypertension was presented more often in AdipoR(+) patients than in AdipoR(−) ones (51.6% versus 26.9%, resp.; P < 0.01). In conclusion, neutrophil AdipoRs upregulation was associated with early stages of vascular injury, hypertension severity, and low serum levels of adiponectin. PMID:26146630

  4. Effects of doxycycline on haematology, blood chemistry and peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets of healthy dogs and dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, A; García-Sancho, M; Rodríguez-Franco, F; Tesouro, M Á; Sainz, Á

    2015-06-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by Ehrlichia canis, is a vector-borne disease with a worldwide distribution. It has been proposed that the pathogenesis, clinical severity and outcome of disease caused by Ehrlichia spp. can be attributed to the immune response rather than to any direct rickettsial effect. Moreover, doxycycline, the antimicrobial of choice for the treatment of CME, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties associated with blood leukocyte proliferation function, cytokine synthesis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity. In order to assess the potential effects of doxycycline, dependent and independent of its antimicrobial activity, the present study compared changes in haematology, blood chemistry and circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in 12 healthy dogs and 20 dogs with CME after doxycycline therapy. Some changes were recorded only in the CME affected dogs, probably due to the antimicrobial effect of doxycycline. However, increases in mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, platelet count and α2-globulins, and decreased plasma creatinine were observed in both healthy and CME affected dogs. The absolute count of B lymphocytes (CD21(+)) increased initially, but then decreased until the end of the study period in both groups. A potential effect of doxycycline unrelated to its antimicrobial activity against E. canis is suggested, taking into account the results observed both in healthy dogs and in dogs with CME. PMID:25957920

  5. IL-6 blockade reverses the abnormal STAT activation of peripheral blood leukocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M A; Diaz-Torné, C; Hernández, M V; Reina, D; de la Fuente, D; Castellví, I; Moya, P; Ruiz, J M; Corominas, H; Zamora, C; Cantó, E; Sanmartí, R; Juarez, C; Vidal, S

    2015-06-01

    Considering the interplay of multiple STATs in response to cytokines, we investigated how IL-6 and its blocking affect STAT signaling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Leukocytes obtained from RA patients before and after tocilizumab treatment and healthy donors (HDs) were cytokine-stimulated and STAT phosphorylation was analyzed by cytometry. RA patients had significantly fewer pSTAT1+, pSTAT3+, and pSTAT6+ monocytes and pSTAT5+ lymphocytes than HDs. After 24weeks of treatment, percentages of IFNγ-induced pSTAT1+ and IL-10-induced pSTAT3+ monocytes in RA patients increased, reaching levels comparable to HDs. pSTAT1+ and pSTAT3+ cells correlated inversely with RA disease activity index and levels of pSTAT+ cells at baseline were higher in patients with good EULAR response to tocilizumab. IFNγ-induced pSTAT1+ cells correlated inversely with memory T cells and anti-CCP levels. IL-10-induced pSTAT3+ cells correlated with Treg/Teff ratio. Our findings suggest that IL-6 blocking reduces the inflammatory mechanisms through the correction of STAT1 and STAT3 activation status. PMID:25847223

  6. Increased soluble human leukocyte antigen-G levels in peripheral blood from climbers on Mount Everest.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Michel; Yaghi, Layale; Flajollet, Sébastien; Radanne-Krawice, Irène; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Lugrin, Didier; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Carosella, Edgardo D; Moreau, Philippe

    2010-11-01

    Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is involved in maternal-fetal tolerance, transplant acceptance, and tumor escape from immunosurveillance, operating by inhibiting activity of T, antigen presenting cells (APC), and natural killer (NK) cells. HLA-G gene expression is modulated in vitro after hypoxic conditions, a situation evidenced during pregnancy and tumor progression. In extreme altitude, mountaineers are in hypoxic conditions that generate physiologic adaptative responses, some of them giving rise to pathologic signs. We performed measurements of plasma soluble HLA-G in six climbers before departure of the expedition and during their ascent to and descent from summit of Mount Everest, and in 3 Sherpas at 5300-6400 m. We found that HLA-G levels are upregulated during the ascent with a unique pattern in comparison with angiogenic/lymphangiogenic factors. Our data suggest that HLA-G has to be taken into account in the mechanisms participating in adaptation to high altitudes and reinforce hypoxia as an important factor in the regulation of HLA-G expression. PMID:20732367

  7. Autochthonous Bacterial Isolates Successfully Stimulate In vitro Peripheral Blood Leukocytes of the European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Mladineo, Ivona; Bušelić, Ivana; Hrabar, Jerko; Radonić, Ivana; Vrbatović, Anamarija; Jozić, Slaven; Trumbić, Željka

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available probiotics are routinely administered as feed supplements in aquaculture important species. Among them, the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is the most widely reared fish in the Mediterranean, whose rearing systems are highly variable between countries, affecting at some level the sustainability of production. After random isolation of autochthonous gut bacteria of the sea bass, their identification and pathogenicity testing, we have selected three potentially probiotic isolates; Pseudoalteromonas sp., Alteromonas sp., and Enterovibrio coralii. Selected isolates were tested and their immunostimulative efficiency was compared with a commercially available Lactobacillus casei isolate, inferring inflammatory, apoptotic and anti-pathogen response of sea bass' peripheral blood leukocytes. Phagocytic activity, respiratory burst, and expression of lysozyme, Mx protein, caspase 3, TNF-α, IL-10 genes was measured 1, 3, 5, and 12 h post-stimulation by four bacterial isolates to evaluate early kinetics of the responses. Best immunostimulative properties were observed in Pseudoalteromonas-stimulated leukocytes, followed by Alteromonas sp. and L. casei, while Enterovibrio coralii failed to induce significant stimulation. Based on such in vitro assay intestinal autochthonous bacterial isolates showed to have better immunostimulative effect in sea bass compared to aquaculture-widely used L. casei, and further steps need to engage tank and field feeding trials to evaluate long-term prophylactic suitability of the chosen isolates. A panel of biomarkers that represent pro-/anti-inflammatory, pro-/anti-apoptotic, and anti-bacteria/viral responses of the fish should be taken into consideration when evaluating the usefulness of the potential probiotic in aquaculture. PMID:27551281

  8. Autochthonous Bacterial Isolates Successfully Stimulate In vitro Peripheral Blood Leukocytes of the European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    PubMed Central

    Mladineo, Ivona; Bušelić, Ivana; Hrabar, Jerko; Radonić, Ivana; Vrbatović, Anamarija; Jozić, Slaven; Trumbić, Željka

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available probiotics are routinely administered as feed supplements in aquaculture important species. Among them, the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is the most widely reared fish in the Mediterranean, whose rearing systems are highly variable between countries, affecting at some level the sustainability of production. After random isolation of autochthonous gut bacteria of the sea bass, their identification and pathogenicity testing, we have selected three potentially probiotic isolates; Pseudoalteromonas sp., Alteromonas sp., and Enterovibrio coralii. Selected isolates were tested and their immunostimulative efficiency was compared with a commercially available Lactobacillus casei isolate, inferring inflammatory, apoptotic and anti-pathogen response of sea bass’ peripheral blood leukocytes. Phagocytic activity, respiratory burst, and expression of lysozyme, Mx protein, caspase 3, TNF-α, IL-10 genes was measured 1, 3, 5, and 12 h post-stimulation by four bacterial isolates to evaluate early kinetics of the responses. Best immunostimulative properties were observed in Pseudoalteromonas-stimulated leukocytes, followed by Alteromonas sp. and L. casei, while Enterovibrio coralii failed to induce significant stimulation. Based on such in vitro assay intestinal autochthonous bacterial isolates showed to have better immunostimulative effect in sea bass compared to aquaculture-widely used L. casei, and further steps need to engage tank and field feeding trials to evaluate long-term prophylactic suitability of the chosen isolates. A panel of biomarkers that represent pro-/anti-inflammatory, pro-/anti-apoptotic, and anti-bacteria/viral responses of the fish should be taken into consideration when evaluating the usefulness of the potential probiotic in aquaculture. PMID:27551281

  9. Phenotyping of leukocytes and granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity in the peripheral blood and uterus of cows with endometritis.

    PubMed

    Brodzki, P; Kostro, K; Brodzki, A; Lisiecka, U; Kurek, L; Marczuk, J

    2014-08-01

    This study was a comparative evaluation of selected immunological parameters in peripheral blood and uterine wash samples from cows with a normal postpartum period compared with cows with endometritis. We aimed to determine the usefulness of these parameters in monitoring the puerperium. In total, 40 cows were included in the study: 20 had endometritis (experimental group), and 20 did not have uterine inflammation (control group). Animals were chosen on the basis of cytological and bacteriological test results. The tests were conducted 5, 22, and 40 days postpartum. In both groups, flow cytometric analysis of the surface molecules CD4, CD8, CD21, CD25, and CD14 in the peripheral blood and uterine washings was performed. Granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity was determined using a commercial Phagotest kit that was adapted for flow cytometry. The percentage of phagocytic granulocytes and monocytes in both the peripheral blood and the uterine washings was significantly lower for cows in the experimental group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). A significant decrease (P < 0.01) in the percentage of CD4+, CD25+, CD14+, and CD4 + CD25(high) leukocyte subpopulations was also observed in the peripheral blood of cows with endometritis. A significant decrease (P < 0.01) in CD21+ lymphocytes and an increase in CD8+ lymphocytes was detected in uterine washings. The results of this work indicate that cell immunity dysfunction may be the main factor causing advanced inflammation of the uterus in endometritis. Knowledge of the immunological mechanisms observed in cows with endometritis might aid in choosing the correct immunomodulating agent-based adjuvant therapy. PMID:24857644

  10. 76 FR 5386 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Pre-Storage Leukocyte Reduction of Whole Blood and Blood Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... same title dated January 2001 (January 31, 2001, 66 FR 8410). The draft guidance, when finalized, will... blood components intended for transfusion, including recommendations for validation and quality control... for transfusion, including recommendations for validation and quality control monitoring of...

  11. Degeneration and atrophy of the thymus of lethally irradiated dogs, rescued by transfusion of cryopreserved autologous blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Herbst, E.W.; Huegl, E.B.; Boedey, B.

    1987-12-01

    Dogs exposed to a fatal radiation dose of 12 Gy were rescued by transfusion of autologous blood leukocytes. A severe acute and long-lasting damage to the thymus was observed. The acute damage, as observed on the tenth day, consisted of a marked reduction in the number of lymphocytes, degeneration of Hassall's bodies, and hemorrhage. Long-term effects, observed several months after irradiation, were partial to total atrophy of the thymus. Regeneration, when it occurred, was limited to a few small isolated areas in which lymphopoiesis was supported by epithelial reticular cells. In contrast, the lymph nodes of all dogs had abundant cortical lymphopoiesis. The abundant hemopoiesis present in the marrow from the tenth day after irradiation until the end of the observation period should have provided sufficient circulating precursor cells to seed the thymus and regenerate the organ to the same extent as that observed in the other blood-forming organs. The impairment of lymphopoietic regeneration in the thymus seems to be due, therefore, to damage caused by irradiation on the specific stroma of the organ, which is not able to support such activity.

  12. [Use of leukocyte-filtered, cytomegalovirus-antibody negative and irradiated cellular blood products].

    PubMed

    Solheim, B G; Albrechtsen, D H; Evensen, S A; Leivestad, T

    1990-01-10

    This paper presents both quality requirements and indications for use of leucocyte-filtered, cytomegalovirus antibody negative and irradiated cellular blood products at Rikshospitalet. Emphasis is placed on the use of standardized buffycoat depleted red cells or platelet concentrates for filtration, and the selection of leucocyte filters with high capacity and ease of bedside application. Leucocyte counts as low as 1-2 10(5) per unit are recommended after filtration in order to avoid HLA-antibody production. For bedside filtration, our choice was RC100 and PL100 (Pall) for red cells and platelets respectively. For laboratory use we prefer, for economic reasons, to use Sepacell R500 (Asahi) and Imugard IG500 (Terumo) for red cells and platelets respectively. Leucocyte-filtered blood products are considered indicated in all pre-transplant transfusions, in post-transplant HLA-sensitized patients, in other patients with febrile transfusion reactions, and in patients with an expected protracted platelet requirement. CMV antibody negative products are recommended for all immuno-deficient patients and pregnant women negative for CMV antibody. Irradiated blood products are used in the treatment of immuno-deficient patients receiving large amounts of blood, and in all severely immuno-compromised patients. In emergency situations where CMV antibody negative and/or irradiated blood products cannot be supplied, leucocyte filtration is suggested. PMID:2154061

  13. Influence of energy level and nicotinic acid supplementation on apoptosis of blood leukocytes of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bühler, S; Frahm, J; Tienken, R; Kersten, S; Meyer, U; Huber, K; Dänicke, S

    2016-10-15

    The periparturient period of dairy cows is accompanied by an immunosuppression that leaves the animal more susceptible to infections and metabolic disorders. Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) which peak shortly after parturition due to lipolysis are known to impair immune cell functions. Niacin with its well-known anti-lipolytic effect may have the ability to ameliorate this situation. Additionally, niacin shows also anti-inflammatory effects that may be beneficial to the immune status of the cow. To address this 29 multiparous and 18 primiparous German Holstein cows were subjected to four different feeding groups. They were fed either a ration with a high concentrate proportion of 60% (HC), or a low concentrate proportion of 30% (LC). After parturition both concentrate levels were reduced to 30% and increased again to 50% either within 16days (LC-group) or within 24days (HC-group). Half of the animals received either 24g per day of nicotinic acid from 42days prepartum until 24days postpartum (LC-NA, HC-NA) or no supplement (LC-CON, HC-CON). Apoptosis in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was examined with an Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) based fluorescence flow cytometry assay and distinguished into early apoptotic (Annexin V positive and PI negative) and late apoptotic (Annexin V and PI positive) cells. Additionally, the pro-apoptotic gene BAX, the effector caspase CASP3, and the anti-apoptotic genes BCL2 and BCL-xL, as well as the NFκB subunit RELA were quantified by real-time PCR in blood leukocytes. All variables showed time dependencies that were mainly related to parturition (p<0.01). Early apoptotic PBMC were significantly affected by concentrate level showing higher numbers of apoptotic cells in the HC groups (p=0.029). PBMC were characterized by a more pronounced apoptosis than PMN and seemed to be more susceptible to the changes that occur around parturition. The genes

  14. Circulating immune complexes of calves with bronchopneumonia modulate the function of peripheral blood leukocytes: In vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Buač, Marijana; Mojsilović, Slavko; Mišić, Dušan; Vuković, Dejan; Savić, Olivera; Valčić, Olivera; Marković, Dragana; Gvozdić, Dragan; Ilić, Vesna; Fratrić, Natalija

    2016-06-01

    In this work we studied if circulating immune complexes (CIC) of calves with bronchopneumonia have the capacity to modulate function of peripheral blood leukocytes of healthy cattle. CIC of three month old calves (6 healthy and 6 diseased) were isolated by PEG precipitation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) and granulocytes from healthy calves and cows were the CIC responder cells in in vitro tests. The most remarkable increase of adhesiveness to polystyrene and ROS synthesis (assessed by NBT test) was detected in cows' granulocytes stimulated with CIC of diseased calves. Results of MTT test showed that CIC of both healthy and diseased calves reduced granulocytes' viability. The strongest effect of inhibition of cows' granulocytes resulted from CIC of diseased calves. CIC only moderately reduced spontaneous viability of calves' MNCs. Again, the strongest effect of CIC isolated from diseased calves was observed. In contrast to the low impact of CIC on non-stimulated cells, their inhibitory effect on viability of mitogen stimulated MNCs was very strong. With CFSE assay we showed that both types of CIC stimulated spontaneous, but inhibited mitogen induced proliferation of calves' MNCs. Propidium iodide staining reviled that CIC increased apoptosis/necrosis of both non-stimulated and mitogen stimulated MNCs. CIC of both healthy and diseased calves modulated the function of peripheral blood MNCs and granulocytes, but a stronger effect of CIC of diseased calves was shown. The age of the donors (calves or cows) of the responder cells, and the activation state of these cells, were also of influence. PMID:27234551

  15. An extended convection diffusion model for red blood cell-enhanced transport of thrombocytes and leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, S. J.; Antaki, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    Transport phenomena of platelets and white blood cells (WBCs) are fundamental to the processes of vascular disease and thrombosis. Unfortunately, the dilute volume occupied by these cells is not amenable to fluid-continuum modeling, and yet the cell count is large enough that modeling each individual cell is impractical for most applications. The most feasible option is to treat them as dilute species governed by convection and diffusion; however, this is further complicated by the role of the red blood cell (RBC) phase on the transport of these cells. We therefore propose an extended convection-diffusion (ECD) model based on the diffusive balance of a fictitious field potential, Ψ, that accounts for the gradients of both the dilute phase and the local hematocrit. The ECD model was applied to the flow of blood in a tube and between parallel plates in which a profile for the RBC concentration field was imposed and the resulting platelet concentration field predicted. Compared to prevailing enhanced-diffusion models that dispersed the platelet concentration field, the ECD model was able to simulate a near-wall platelet excess, as observed experimentally. The extension of the ECD model depends only on the ability to prescribe the hematocrit distribution, and therefore may be applied to a wide variety of geometries to investigate platelet-mediated vascular disease and device-related thrombosis.

  16. Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Lung Cancer Risk: A Large Case-Control Study in Caucasians

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Espiridion, Beatriz; Chen, Meng; Chang, Joe Y.; Lu, Charles; Chang, David W.; Roth, Jack A.; Wu, Xifeng; Gu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction is a crucial event in malignant transformation and tumorigenesis. Telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been associated with lung cancer risk, but the relationship has remained controversial. In this study, we investigated whether the association might be confounded by study of different histological subtypes of lung cancer. We measured relative telomere lengths in patients in a large case-control study of lung cancer and performed stratified analyses according to the two major histological subtypes (adenocarcinoma [AC] and squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]). Notably, AC patients had longer telomeres than controls, whereas SCC patients had shorter telomeres compared to controls. Long telomeres were associated with increased risk of AC, with the highest risk associated with female sex, younger age (<60 years) and lighter smoking (<30 pack-years). In contrast, long telomeres were protective against SCC, particularly in male patients. Our results extend the concept that telomere length affects risk of lung cancer in a manner that differs with histological subtype. PMID:24618342

  17. Dry Olive Leaf Extract Counteracts L-Thyroxine-Induced Genotoxicity in Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Žukovec Topalović, Dijana; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger. PMID:25789081

  18. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger. PMID:25789081

  19. A dolphin peripheral blood leukocyte cDNA microarray for studies of immune function and stress reactions.

    PubMed

    Mancia, Annalaura; Lundqvist, Mats L; Romano, Tracy A; Peden-Adams, Margie M; Fair, Patricia A; Kindy, Mark S; Ellis, Blake C; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; McKillen, David J; Trent, Harold F; Chen, Yian Ann; Almeida, Jonas S; Gross, Paul S; Chapman, Robert W; Warr, Gregory W

    2007-01-01

    A microarray focused on stress response and immune function genes of the bottlenosed dolphin has been developed. Random expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated and sequenced from two dolphin peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) cDNA libraries biased towards T- and B-cell gene expression by stimulation with IL-2 and LPS, respectively. A total of 2784 clones were sequenced and contig analysis yielded 1343 unigenes (archived and annotated at ). In addition, 52 dolphin genes known to be important in innate and adaptive immune function and stress responses of terrestrial mammals were specifically targeted, cloned and added to the unigene collection. The set of dolphin sequences printed on a cDNA microarray comprised the 1343 unigenes, the 52 targeted genes and 2305 randomly selected (but unsequenced) EST clones. This set was printed in duplicate spots, side by side, and in two replicates per slide, such that the total number of features per microarray slide was 19,200, including controls. The dolphin arrays were validated and transcriptomic profiles were generated using PBL from a wild dolphin, a captive dolphin and dolphin skin cells. The results demonstrate that the array is a reproducible and informative tool for assessing differential gene expression in dolphin PBL and in other tissues. PMID:17084893

  20. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Qiuling; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping; Mu, Jinjun; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  1. Diagnostic implications of antigen-induced gamma interferon production by blood leukocytes from Mycobacterium bovis-infected reindeer (Rangifer tarandus).

    PubMed

    Waters, W R; Palmer, M V; Slaughter, R E; Jones, S L; Pitzer, J E; Minion, F C

    2006-01-01

    The only approved method of tuberculosis (TB) surveillance of reindeer within the United States is tuberculin skin testing; however, skin testing has an apparent lack of specificity, since numerous reindeer are classified as reactors, yet Mycobacterium bovis is not isolated from tissues upon necropsy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of an in vitro assay (the Cervigam assay) to detect gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) produced by blood leukocytes in response to mycobacterial antigens from M. bovis-infected reindeer. Thirteen male reindeer approximately 9 months of age were inoculated with 10(5) CFU M. bovis in their tonsillar crypts. Stimulation of whole-blood cultures with a mitogen resulted in significant production of IFN-gamma compared to that by nonstimulated samples. Responses by infected reindeer to M. bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) were as much as 3.5-fold higher than those by noninfected reindeer (n = 4). Despite differences in responses to PPD by the two groups, reindeer within the noninfected group had responses of >0.1 change in optical density (DeltaOD) (a level generally considered positive) to PPD. Mean responses by infected reindeer to a rESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion protein (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex specific) were as much as 20-fold higher than respective responses by noninfected reindeer at all time points. Additionally, responses by 3/4 noninfected reindeer were <0.1 DeltaOD (considered negative) at each time point. To further evaluate the specificity of the assay, samples were collected from reindeer in a TB-free herd. All reindeer had responses to mitogen; however, only 1 of 38 had a response to PPD, and none of the reindeer responded to rESAT-6-CFP-10. Together, these findings indicate that IFN-gamma-based tests may prove useful for TB surveillance of reindeer. PMID:16425998

  2. Comparison of leukocyte excretion and blood loss in inflammatory disease of the bowel.

    PubMed Central

    Teahon, K; Bjarnason, I

    1993-01-01

    Clinical relapse of inflammatory bowel disease is characterised by increased neutrophil migration into the intestine. The site of the neutrophil chemoattractant(s), whether luminal or mucosal, may be important since, on contact with a chemoattractant, neutrophils cause indiscriminate damage to their immediate surroundings by generating reactive oxygen species and by lysosomal enzyme release. If this happens within the mucosa, inflammation should correlate significantly with tissue damage as assessed by bleeding, but if it occurs within the intestinal lumen, the inflammation would be disproportionately greater than the bleeding such as is seen in classical exudation. Intestinal inflammation and bleeding were quantitated with the simultaneous use of indium-111 labelled neutrophils (four day faecal excretion of indium-111) and chromium-51 labelled red cells in patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 12), Crohn's disease (n = 15), and NSAID induced enteropathy (n = 34). Intestinal inflammation and blood loss correlated significantly (Spearman) in patients with ulcerative colitis (20.3% v 6.5 ml/d (median) r: 0.85, p < 0.001) and NSAiD enteropathy (1.6% v 1.9 ml/d, r: 0.60, p < 0.01) but not in Crohn's disease (17.0% v 2.1 ml/d, r: 0.38, p > 0.1). For a given indium-111 excretion, patients with ulcerative colitis had significantly greater (p < 0.01) blood loss than patients with Crohn's disease. These results suggest that the predominant site of neutrophil chemoattractants may be within the mucosa in ulcerative colitis and NSAID enteropathy and within the lumen in Crohn's disease. PMID:8244139

  3. Full blood count and haemozoin-containing leukocytes in children with malaria: diagnostic value and association with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Hänscheid, Thomas; Längin, Matthias; Lell, Bertrand; Pötschke, Marc; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Kremsner, Peter G; Grobusch, Martin P

    2008-01-01

    Background Diligent and correct laboratory diagnosis and up-front identification of risk factors for progression to severe disease are the basis for optimal management of malaria. Methods Febrile children presenting to the Medical Research Unit at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital (HAS) in Lambaréné, Gabon, were assessed for malaria. Giemsa-stained thick films for qualitative and quantitative diagnosis and enumeration of malaria pigment, or haemozoin (Hz)-containing leukocytes (PCL) were performed, and full blood counts (FBC) were generated with a Cell Dyn 3000® instrument. Results Compared to standard light microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick films, diagnosis by platelet count only, by malaria pigment-containing monocytes (PCM) only, or by pigment-containing granulocytes (PCN) only yielded sensitivities/specificities of 92%/93%; 96%/96%; and 85%/96%, respectively. The platelet count was significantly lower in children with malaria compared to those without (p < 0.001), and values showed little overlap between groups. Compared to microscopy, scatter flow cytometry as applied in the Cell-Dyn 3000® instrument detected significantly more patients with PCL (p < 0.01). Both PCM and PCN numbers were higher in severe versus non-severe malaria yet reached statistical significance only for PCN (p < 0.0001; PCM: p = 0.14). Of note was the presence of another, so far ill-defined pigment-containing group of phagocytic cells, identified by laser-flow cytometry as lymphocyte-like gated events, and predominantly found in children with malaria-associated anaemia. Conclusion In the age group examined in the Lambaréné area, platelets are an excellent adjuvant tool to diagnose malaria. Pigment-containing leukocytes (PCL) are more readily detected by automated scatter flow cytometry than by microscopy. Automated Hz detection by an instrument as used here is a reliable diagnostic tool and correlates with disease severity. However, clinical usefulness as a prognostic tool is limited

  4. Identification of an additional class of C3-binding membrane proteins of human peripheral blood leukocytes and cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, J L; Housley, G A; Dykman, T R; MacDermott, R P; Atkinson, J P

    1985-01-01

    Proteins binding the third component of complement (C3) were isolated by affinity chromatography from surface-labeled solubilized membranes of human peripheral blood cells and cell lines. The isolated molecules were subjected to NaDodSO4/PAGE, and autoradiographs of these gels indicated that C3-binding proteins could be divided into three groups based on Mr: (i) gp200, an approximately 200,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3b/C4b receptor or CR1; (ii) gp140, an approximately 140,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3d receptor or CR2; and (iii) gp45-70, a heretofore unrecognized group of 45,000-70,000 Mr C3-binding molecules. The cell distribution, Mr, antigenic cross-reactivity, and specificity of gp45-70 were examined. Erythrocytes have no detectable gp45-70, but all leukocyte populations examined possess this group of molecules. On neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes, CR1 is the predominant C3-binding glycoprotein, but gp45-70 is present on both cell populations and on macrophage and neutrophil cell lines. B plus null cells, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, and an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell line possess CR1, CR2, and gp45-70. On T cells and T-cell lines gp45-70 is the predominant or, in some cases, the only C3-binding protein isolated. gp45-70 is structurally characterized as a broad band or doublet with a mean Mr that is slightly different for each cell population. gp45-70 binds iC3, C3b, and C4b, but not C3d, indicating that the binding region is probably within the C3c portion of C3b. A polyclonal antibody to CR1 and monoclonal antibodies to CR1 and CR2 do not immunoprecipitate gp45-70. While gp45-70 has not been previously characterized on human cells, a C3b-binding glycoprotein of similar Mr is present on rabbit alveolar macrophages. We conclude that gp45-70 is an additional group of membrane proteins present on human leukocytes that possess ligand-binding activity for C3b. Images PMID:3871945

  5. Identification of an additional class of C3-binding membrane proteins of human peripheral blood leukocytes and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cole, J L; Housley, G A; Dykman, T R; MacDermott, R P; Atkinson, J P

    1985-02-01

    Proteins binding the third component of complement (C3) were isolated by affinity chromatography from surface-labeled solubilized membranes of human peripheral blood cells and cell lines. The isolated molecules were subjected to NaDodSO4/PAGE, and autoradiographs of these gels indicated that C3-binding proteins could be divided into three groups based on Mr: (i) gp200, an approximately 200,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3b/C4b receptor or CR1; (ii) gp140, an approximately 140,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3d receptor or CR2; and (iii) gp45-70, a heretofore unrecognized group of 45,000-70,000 Mr C3-binding molecules. The cell distribution, Mr, antigenic cross-reactivity, and specificity of gp45-70 were examined. Erythrocytes have no detectable gp45-70, but all leukocyte populations examined possess this group of molecules. On neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes, CR1 is the predominant C3-binding glycoprotein, but gp45-70 is present on both cell populations and on macrophage and neutrophil cell lines. B plus null cells, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, and an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell line possess CR1, CR2, and gp45-70. On T cells and T-cell lines gp45-70 is the predominant or, in some cases, the only C3-binding protein isolated. gp45-70 is structurally characterized as a broad band or doublet with a mean Mr that is slightly different for each cell population. gp45-70 binds iC3, C3b, and C4b, but not C3d, indicating that the binding region is probably within the C3c portion of C3b. A polyclonal antibody to CR1 and monoclonal antibodies to CR1 and CR2 do not immunoprecipitate gp45-70. While gp45-70 has not been previously characterized on human cells, a C3b-binding glycoprotein of similar Mr is present on rabbit alveolar macrophages. We conclude that gp45-70 is an additional group of membrane proteins present on human leukocytes that possess ligand-binding activity for C3b. PMID:3871945

  6. What makes a blood cell based miRNA expression pattern disease specific? - A miRNome analysis of blood cell subsets in lung cancer patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Dahmke, Indra N.; Galata, Valentina; Huwer, Hanno; Stehle, Ingo; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence of blood-borne miRNA signatures for various human diseases. To dissect the origin of disease-specific miRNA expression in human blood, we separately analyzed the miRNome of different immune cell subtypes, each in lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Each immune cell type revealed a specific miRNA expression pattern also dependinging on the cell origin, line of defense, and function. The overall expression pattern of each leukocyte subtype showed great similarities between patients and controls. However, for each cell subtype we identified miRNAs that were deregulated in lung cancer patients including hsa-miR-21, a well-known oncomiR associated with poor lung cancer prognosis that was up-regulated in all leukocyte subtype comparisons of cancer versus controls. While the miRNome of cells of the adaptive immune system allowed only a weak separation between patients and controls, cells of the innate immune system allowed perfect or nearly perfect classification. Leukocytes of lung cancer patients show a cancer-specific miRNA expression profile. Our data also show that cancer specific miRNA expression pattern of whole blood samples are not determined by a single cell type. The data indicate that additional blood components, like erythrocytes, platelets, or exosomes might contribute to the disease specificity of a miRNA signature. PMID:25344866

  7. What makes a blood cell based miRNA expression pattern disease specific?--a miRNome analysis of blood cell subsets in lung cancer patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Dahmke, Indra N; Galata, Valentina; Huwer, Hanno; Stehle, Ingo; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2014-10-15

    There is evidence of blood-borne miRNA signatures for various human diseases. To dissect the origin of disease-specific miRNA expression in human blood, we separately analyzed the miRNome of different immune cell subtypes, each in lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Each immune cell type revealed a specific miRNA expression pattern also dependinging on the cell origin, line of defense, and function. The overall expression pattern of each leukocyte subtype showed great similarities between patients and controls. However, for each cell subtype we identified miRNAs that were deregulated in lung cancer patients including hsa-miR-21, a well-known oncomiR associated with poor lung cancer prognosis that was up-regulated in all leukocyte subtype comparisons of cancer versus controls. While the miRNome of cells of the adaptive immune system allowed only a weak separation between patients and controls, cells of the innate immune system allowed perfect or nearly perfect classification. Leukocytes of lung cancer patients show a cancer-specific miRNA expression profile. Our data also show that cancer specific miRNA expression pattern of whole blood samples are not determined by a single cell type. The data indicate that additional blood components, like erythrocytes, platelets, or exosomes might contribute to the disease specificity of a miRNA signature. PMID:25344866

  8. Differential innate immune responses of bovine peripheral blood leukocytes to Salmonella enterica serovars Dublin, Typhimurium, and Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Deng; Rostagno, Marcos H; Ebner, Paul D; Eicher, Susan D

    2015-05-15

    The majority of Salmonella serovars cause no clinical disease in cattle, while some are associated with severe disease. The objective of the current study was to determine the innate immune responses of bovine peripheral blood leukocytes exposed to Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (bovine-specific), Salmonella typhimurium (murine adapted, but zoonotic), and Salmonella enteritidis (poultry host-adapted) in 3-week-old calves. All Salmonella exposures increased cell surface CD14 and CD18 regardless of serovar. The greatest CD14 marker mean fluorescence was in monocytes and the greatest mean fluorescent of the marker mean was in neutrophils. Phagocytosis increased with all serovars, but was not different among them. Neutrophils had the greatest marker mean fluorescence for phagocytosis, with all serovars being equal. Oxidative burst increased in all serovars compared to control cells, but were not different among the serovars. Neutrophils and monocytes were similar in the oxidative burst, with limited oxidative burst detected in the primarily lymphocyte population. mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-12, increased above the control cells whereas none of these serovars affected mRNA expression of TLR4. TNF-α was greatest in S. enterica and S. typhimurium, compared to Salmonella dublin. In contrast, IL-8 was expressed more in S. dublin than S. typhiurium, with S. Enteriditus intermediary. These results show while cell surface markers, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst were largely unaffected by serovar, cytokine and chemokine expression differed among the Salmonella serovars. It appears that internal responses of the cells differ, rather than cell recognition, creating pathogenicity differences among of the serovars, even in the neonate with developing immunity. PMID:25847354

  9. Immunomodulatory effects upon in vitro exposure of California sea lion and southern sea otter peripheral blood leukocytes to domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Levin, Milton; Joshi, Dhanashree; Draghi, Andrew; Gulland, Frances M; Jessup, David; De Guise, Sylvain

    2010-04-01

    During red tide bloom events, the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia produces the toxin domoic acid (DA), which has been associated with stranding and mortality events involving California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris). In addition to these well-documented DA-induced neurotoxic events, there is increasing concern that DA may exert chronic effects, such as immunomodulation, which may potentially increase an individual's susceptibility to a number of opportunistic infections following nonlethal exposure. We investigated the effects of DA on innate (phagocytosis and respiratory burst) and adaptive (mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation) immune functions with the use of peripheral blood leukocytes collected from healthy California sea lions and southern sea otters upon in vitro exposure to 0 (unexposed control), 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10, and 100 microM DA. Domoic acid did not significantly modulate phagocytosis or respiratory burst in either species. For California sea lions, DA significantly increased ConA-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation upon exposure to DA concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 10 microM, resulting in a nonlinear dose-response curve. There was no effect on lymphocyte proliferation at the highest concentration of DA tested. No effects on lymphocyte proliferation were observed in southern sea otters. Importantly, the in vitro DA concentrations affecting T-cell proliferation were within or below the range of DA in serum measured in free-ranging California sea lions following natural exposure, suggesting a risk for immunomodulation in free-ranging animals. Understanding the risk for immunomodulation upon DA exposure will contribute in the health assessment and management of California sea lions and southern sea otters, as well as guide veterinarians and wildlife rehabilitators in caring for and treating afflicted animals. PMID:20688647

  10. The calorically restricted low-fat nutrient-dense diet in Biosphere 2 significantly lowers blood glucose, total leukocyte count, cholesterol, and blood pressure in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Walford, R L; Harris, S B; Gunion, M W

    1992-01-01

    Biosphere 2 is a 3.15-acre space containing an ecosystem that is energetically open (sunlight, electric power, and heat) but materially closed, with air, water, and organic material being recycled. Since September 1991, eight subjects (four women and four men) have been sealed inside, living on food crops grown within. Their diet, low in calories (average, 1780 kcal/day; 1 kcal = 4.184 kJ), low in fat (10% of calories), and nutrient-dense, conforms to that which in numerous animal experiments has promoted health, retarded aging, and extended maximum life span. We report here medical data on the eight subjects, comparing preclosure data with data through 6 months of closure. Significant changes included: (i) weight, 74 to 62 kg (men) and 61 to 54 kg (women); (ii) mean systolic/diastolic blood pressure (eight subjects), 109/74 to 89/58 mmHg (1 mmHg = 133 Pa); (iii) total serum cholesterol, from 191 +/- 11 to 123 +/- 9 mg/dl (mean +/- SD; 36% mean reduction), and high density lipoprotein, from 62 +/- 8 to 38 +/- 5 (risk ratio unchanged); (iv) triglyceride, 139 to 96 mg/dl (men) and 78 to 114 mg/dl (women); (v) fasting glucose, 92 to 74 mg/dl; (vi) leukocyte count, 6.7 to 4.7 x 10(9) cells per liter. We conclude that drastic reductions in cholesterol and blood pressure may be instituted in normal individuals in Western countries by application of a carefully chosen diet and that a low-calorie nutrient-dense regime shows physiologic features in humans similar to those in other animal species. PMID:1454844

  11. Radiation-induced permeability and leukocyte adhesion in the rat blood-brain barrier: modulation with anti-ICAM-1 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Gaber, M Waleed; McColgan, Tamara; Naimark, Michael D; Kiani, Mohammad F; Merchant, Thomas E

    2003-04-18

    We assessed the acute effects of radiation on the rat blood-brain barrier. A cranial window model and intravital microscopy were used to measure changes in permeability and leukocyte adhesion in pial vessels after a localized, single dose of 20 Gy. Permeability was assessed using five sizes of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran molecules (4.4-, 10-, 38.2-, 70-, and 150-kDa) with measurements performed before and 2, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after irradiation for the 4.4 and 38.2-kDa molecules and before and 24 h after irradiation for the other three molecules. To demonstrate the nature of blood-brain barrier permeability, we concurrently studied the permeability of microvessels in the cremaster muscle. In both tissues, permeability to FITC-dextran was significantly greater 24 h after irradiation than before (P<0.05). The exception was that radiation did not affect the permeability of pial vessels to the 150-kDa molecule. The particle-size dependence of the permeability changes in the brain were indicative of altered integrity of endothelial tight junctions and occurred concomitantly with an increase in cell adhesion which was determined by fluorescent labeling of leukocytes with rhodamine 6G. An early inflammatory response to irradiation was apparent in the brain 2 h after irradiation. The numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased significantly and peaked at 24 h. Injection with the anti-ICAM-1 mAb significantly reduced leukocyte adhesion and permeability thereby linking the two processes. These findings provide a target to reduce radiation-related permeability and cell adhesion and potentially the side effects of radiation in the CNS. PMID:12676365

  12. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood leukocytes and the risk of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melkonian, Stephanie C; Wang, Xin; Gu, Jian; Matin, Surena F; Tannir, Nizar M; Wood, Christopher G; Wu, Xifeng

    2015-02-01

    Variation of mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) in peripheral blood leukocytes has been associated with the risk of various cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We assessed the association between mtDNAcn and clear cell RCC (ccRCC) risk in 608 cases and 629 controls frequency-matched on age and gender. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, history of hypertension, total energy intake and physical activity. Our results suggest an association between low mtDNAcn and ccRCC risk (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 0.97-1.68, P = 0.09). Lower mtDNAcn was associated with increased ccRCC risk in younger individuals (age <60, OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.13-2.49, P = 0.01), women (OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.03-2.73, P = 0.04), individuals without history of hypertension (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.09-2.41, P = 0.02) and individuals with low physical activity levels (OR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.02-2.37, P = 0.05). We observed significant and marginally significant interactions between both age and history of hypertension and mtDNAcn in elevating ccRCC risk (P for interaction = 0.04 and 0.07, respectively). Additionally, low mtDNAcn was associated with ccRCC risk in younger individuals with low levels of physical activity [ORs and 95% CI for medium and low physical activity levels, respectively, 2.31 (1.18-4.52) and 2.09 (1.17-3.75), P interaction = 0.04]. To our knowledge, this is the first report to investigate the role of mtDNAcn in the ccRCC subtype and the first to suggest that this association may be modified by risk factors including age, gender, history of hypertension and physical activity. PMID:25524925

  13. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood leukocytes and the risk of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Melkonian, Stephanie C.; Wang, Xin; Gu, Jian; Matin, Surena F.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Wood, Christopher G.; Wu, Xifeng

    2015-01-01

    Variation of mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) in peripheral blood leukocytes has been associated with the risk of various cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We assessed the association between mtDNAcn and clear cell RCC (ccRCC) risk in 608 cases and 629 controls frequency-matched on age and gender. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, history of hypertension, total energy intake and physical activity. Our results suggest an association between low mtDNAcn and ccRCC risk (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 0.97–1.68, P = 0.09). Lower mtDNAcn was associated with increased ccRCC risk in younger individuals (age <60, OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.13–2.49, P = 0.01), women (OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.03–2.73, P = 0.04), individuals without history of hypertension (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.09–2.41, P = 0.02) and individuals with low physical activity levels (OR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.02–2.37, P = 0.05). We observed significant and marginally significant interactions between both age and history of hypertension and mtDNAcn in elevating ccRCC risk (P for interaction = 0.04 and 0.07, respectively). Additionally, low mtDNAcn was associated with ccRCC risk in younger individuals with low levels of physical activity [ORs and 95% CI for medium and low physical activity levels, respectively, 2.31 (1.18–4.52) and 2.09 (1.17–3.75), P interaction = 0.04]. To our knowledge, this is the first report to investigate the role of mtDNAcn in the ccRCC subtype and the first to suggest that this association may be modified by risk factors including age, gender, history of hypertension and physical activity. PMID:25524925

  14. Cytoskeletal proteins from human skin fibroblasts, peripheral blood leukocytes, and a lymphoblastoid cell line compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Willard, K.E.; Anderson, N.L.

    1982-04-01

    Differences in proteins between cells grown as suspension cultures and those grown as attached cultures were studied by comparing the proteins of detergent-resistant cytoskeletons prepared from peripheral blood leukocytes and a lymphoblastoid cell line (GM607) (both grown as suspension cultures) and those of human skin fibroblasts (grown as attached cultures) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The major cytoskeletal proteins of the leukocytes were also present in the protein pattern of GM607 cytoskeletons. In contrast, the fibroblast cytoskeletal protein pattern contained four groups of proteins that differed from the patterns of the leukocytes and GM607. In addition, surface labeling of GM607 and human fibroblasts with /sup 125/I demonstrated that substantial amounts of vimentin and actin are exposed at the surface of the attached fibroblasts, but there is little evidence of similar exposure at the surface of the suspension-grown GM607. These results demonstrate some differences in cytoskeletal protein composition between different types of cells could be related to their ability or lack of ability to grow as attached cells in tissue culture.

  15. Analysis of the binding of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a and 1b E2 glycoproteins to peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Eriko; Montoya, Maria; Schuettler, Christian G; Hickling, Timothy P; Tarr, Alexander W; Vitelli, Alessandra; Dubuisson, Jean; Patel, Arvind H; Ball, Jonathan K; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) binding to hepatocytes is thought to be mediated via interaction of the E2 glycoprotein with (co-)receptors including CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Here, the expression of CD81 and SR-BI was analysed on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets, and the binding of genotype 1 soluble truncated E2 (sE2) proteins to these cells was investigated. All PBMC subsets expressed CD81, although at varying levels. In contrast, SR-BI was only detected on monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). The genotype 1a H77c sE2 protein showed higher PBMC binding than other genotype 1a/b sE2s. H77c sE2 binding to different PBMC subsets largely paralleled their level of CD81 expression, and could be inhibited by blocking E2-CD81 interaction. However, those PBMC subsets reported to be infected by HCV in vivo (monocytes, DCs and B cells) also exhibited residual, CD81-independent binding, indicating roles for SR-BI/other receptor(s) in mediating haematopoietic cell infection. PMID:16099909

  16. Siglec-1-positive plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in human peripheral blood: A semi-mature and myeloid-like subset imbalanced during protective and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Theresa R; Taddeo, Adriano; Winter, Oliver; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Mälzer, Julia-Nora; Domingo, Cristina; Biesen, Robert; Alexander, Tobias; Thiel, Andreas; Radbruch, Andreas; Hiepe, Falk; Gerl, Velia

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a central role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as IFN-α producers and promoters of T-cell activation or tolerance. Here, we demonstrated by flow-cytometry and confocal microscopy that Siglec-1, a molecule involved in the regulation of adaptive immunoresponses, is expressed in a subset of semi-mature, myeloid-like pDCs in human blood. These pDCs express lower BDCA-2 and CD123 and higher HLA-DR and CD11c than Siglec-1-negative pDCs and do not produce IFN-α via TLR7/TLR9 engagement. In vitro, Siglec-1 expression was induced in Siglec-1-negative pDCs by influenza virus. Proportions of Siglec-1-positive/Siglec-1-negative pDCs were higher in SLE than in healthy controls and correlated with disease activity. Healthy donors immunized with yellow fever vaccine YFV-17D displayed different kinetics of the two pDC subsets during protective immune response. PDCs can be subdivided into two subsets according to Siglec-1 expression. These subsets may play specific roles in (auto)immune responses. PMID:26674280

  17. [The effect of antioxidants on the activity of acid hydrolases in blood leukocytes from patients with leukoplakia of mouth mucosa].

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Iu A; Mashkilleĭson, A L; Suleĭmanova, G G; Lagunov, A I

    1989-01-01

    Activity of acid hydrolases, alkaline phosphatase and leucine aminopeptidase was studied in leukocytes of patients with leukoplakia of mouth mucosa before and after the treatment involving antioxidant drugs. The enzymatic activity studied was increased in leukoplakia. Cryotherapy combined with antioxidants and the treatment with antioxidants only contributed to a decrease in these enzymes activity. PMID:2617939

  18. [A new separation protocol (DRBCP-F) for automated blood component donation with the MCS 3p cell separator for collection of leukocyte depleted erythrocyte concentrates and plasma].

    PubMed

    Zeiler, T; Kretschmer, V

    1997-01-01

    Previously published studies on automated blood component donation with the MCS 3p cell separator proved fairly good quality of the collected red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP), with the disadvantage of a low hematocrit of the filtered RBC and a high platelet contamination of the FFP (RBCP-F protocol.) The DRBCP-F protocol was designed to eliminate the above-mentioned disadvantages and to provide 1 unit of leuko-depleted (filtered) RBC, 2 units of FFP, and additionally 1 platelet concentrate (PC) from the buffy coat. Twenty automated blood component collections (2 cycles, Latham bowl at 5,500 rpm, 230 ml isotonic saline for volume balance, PAGGS-M as additive solution) were performed. The RBC were filtered in a closed system after storage at 4 degrees C for 24 h. Blood cell counts and biochemical parameters of the RBC were determined initially and after 49 days. PC were separated from buffy coat after a soft spin. The volume of the RBC amounted to 293 +/- 12 ml (mean +/- SD) with a hematocrit of 0.61 +/- 0.05 l/l. Residual leukocytes after filtration were found to be 0.04 x 10(6) +/- 0.06 per unit. After storage, the following data were obtained: hemolysis 0.38%, ATP 2.1 +/- 0.4 mumol/g Hb, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) 1.4 +/- 0.3 mumol/g Hb, ph 6.3 +/- 0.1, potassium 6.4 mmol per unit, and LDH in the supernatant was 219 U/l. None of the RBC showed bacterial growth after 49 days. The volume of the collected FFP was 398 +/- 32 ml, with 3.4 +/- 3.5 x 10(3) residual platelets and 5 +/- 12 leukocytes per microliter. Platelet concentrates contained 90.2 +/- 32 x 10(9) platelets in 88 +/- 14 ml plasma. Automated blood donation with the DRBCP-F protocol provided RBC with very low residual leukocyte counts, adequate hematocrit and good metabolic status up to 49 days, and FFP with low platelet contamination. The platelet concentrates were even superior to those prepared from whole blood using the buffy coat method. The storable leuko-depleted RBC are

  19. Early Rise of Blood T Follicular Helper Cell Subsets and Baseline Immunity as Predictors of Persisting Late Functional Antibody Responses to Vaccination in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Borgogni, Erica; Zedda, Luisanna; Cantisani, Rocco; Chiappini, Nico; Schiavetti, Francesca; Rosa, Domenico; Castellino, Flora; Montomoli, Emanuele; Bodinham, Caroline L.; Lewis, David J.; Medini, Duccio; Bertholet, Sylvie; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T follicular helper cells (TFH) have been identified as the T-cell subset specialized in providing help to B cells for optimal activation and production of high affinity antibody. We recently demonstrated that the expansion of peripheral blood influenza-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS1+ T helper (TH) cells, three weeks after vaccination, associated with and predicted the rise of protective neutralizing antibodies to avian H5N1. In this study, healthy adults were vaccinated with plain seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIIV), MF59®-adjuvanted TIIV (ATIIV), or saline placebo. Frequencies of circulating CD4+ TFH1 ICOS+ TFH cells and H1N1-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS+ CXCR5+ TFH and CXCR5- TH cell subsets were determined at various time points after vaccination and were then correlated with hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers. All three CD4+ T cell subsets expanded in response to TIIV and ATIIV, and peaked 7 days after vaccination. To demonstrate that these TFH cell subsets correlated with functional antibody titers, we defined an alternative endpoint metric, decorrelated HI (DHI), which removed any correlation between day 28/day 168 and day 0 HI titers, to control for the effect of preexisting immunity to influenza vaccine strains. The numbers of total circulating CD4+ TFH1 ICOS+ cells and of H1N1-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS+ CXCR5+, measured at day 7, were significantly associated with day 28, and day 28 and 168 DHI titers, respectively. Altogether, our results show that CD4+ TFH subsets may represent valuable biomarkers of vaccine-induced long-term functional immunity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01771367 PMID:27336786

  20. Cysteinyl leukotriene overproduction in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is driven by platelet-adherent leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.; Kidder, Molly S.; Bhattacharyya, Neil; Xing, Wei; Shen, Shiliang; Milne, Ginger L.; Castells, Mariana C.; Chhay, Heng

    2012-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) overproduction is a hallmark of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), but its mechanism is poorly understood. Because adherent platelets can convert the leukocyte-derived precursor leukotriene (LT)A4 to LTC4, the parent cysLT, through the terminal enzyme LTC4 synthase, we investigated the contribution of platelet-dependent transcellular cysLT production in AERD. Nasal polyps from subjects with AERD contained many extravascular platelets that colocalized with leukocytes, and the percentages of circulating neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes with adherent platelets were markedly higher in the blood of subjects with AERD than in aspirin-tolerant controls. Platelet-adherent subsets of leukocytes had higher expression of several adhesion markers than did platelet nonadherent subsets. Adherent platelets contributed more than half of the total LTC4 synthase activity of peripheral blood granulocytes, and they accounted for the higher level of LTC4 generation by activated granulocytes from subjects with AERD compared with aspirin-tolerant controls. Urinary LTE4 levels, a measure of systemic cysLT production, correlated strongly with percentages of circulating platelet-adherent granulocytes. Because platelet adherence to leukocytes allows for both firm adhesion to endothelial cells and augmented transcellular conversion of leukotrienes, a disturbance in platelet-leukocyte interactions may be partly responsible for the respiratory tissue inflammation and the overproduction of cysLTs that characterize AERD. PMID:22262771

  1. Selective Recruitment of T-Cell Subsets to the Udder during Staphylococcal and Streptococcal Mastitis: Analysis of Lymphocyte Subsets and Adhesion Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soltys, Jindrich; Quinn, Mark T.

    1999-01-01

    During bacterial infection of the bovine mammary gland, large numbers of leukocytes migrate into the udder, resulting in the establishment of a host response against the pathogen. Currently, the specific leukocyte populations mediating this immune response are not well defined. In the studies described here, we analyzed blood and milk from healthy cows and cows with naturally occurring mastitis to determine if distinct αβ and γδ T-lymphocyte subsets were involved in the response of the udder to a mastitis pathogen and if the type of mastitis pathogen influenced the subset composition of these responding leukocytes. Although blood samples from cows with confirmed staphylococcal and streptococcal mastitis were characterized by increased numbers of γδ T cells, the most dramatic changes in leukocyte distributions occurred in milk samples from these cows, with a 75% increase in αβ T-cell levels and a 100% increase in γδ T-cell levels relative to the levels in milk samples from healthy animals. Interestingly, the increase in αβ T-cell numbers observed in milk from cows with staphylococcal mastitis was primarily due to increased numbers of CD4+ T cells, while the increase in αβ T-cell numbers observed in cows with streptococcal mastitis was due to a parallel increase in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell numbers. The increased numbers of γδ T cells in milk from cows with staphylococcal and streptococcal mastitis were due to a selective recruitment of a distinct γδ T-cell subset (GD3.1+), while no change in the numbers of GD197+ γδ T cells was observed. We also analyzed adhesion protein expression on blood and milk leukocytes and found that, in comparison to the situation for healthy cows, L-selectin was down-regulated and CD18 was up-regulated on leukocytes from cows with mastitis. Thus, shedding of L-selectin and up-regulation of CD18 by neutrophils may provide a sensitive indicator of early inflammatory responses during bovine mastitis. Overall, these studies

  2. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion

  3. Dynamic changes in the numbers of different subsets of peripheral blood NK cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus following classic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongshuang; Zhao, Ling; Jiang, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yanfang; Feng, Li; Ye, Zhuang

    2014-11-01

    Imbalance of natural killer (NK) cells is associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, little is known about the dynamic changes on NK cells following therapy. This study aimed at examining the impact of classic therapies on the numbers of different subsets of NK cells in new-onset SLE patients. The numbers of different subsets of peripheral blood NK cells in 24 new-onset SLE patients before, 4 and 12 weeks post the classic therapies, and 7 healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry. The potential correlation between the numbers of NK cells and the values of clinical measures was analyzed. In comparison with that before treatment, the numbers of NK, NKG2C+, and KIR2DL3+ NK cells were significantly increased while the numbers of NKp46+ and NKG2A + NK cells significantly decreased at 4 and/or 12 weeks post the treatment only in the drug well-responding patients, but not in those poor responders (P < 0.05 for all). The numbers of NKG2C + NK cells were correlated positively with the levels of serum C3 while the numbers of KIR2DL3+ NK cells were correlated negatively with the scores of SLEDAI in these patients at 4 weeks post the treatment. The classic therapies modulated the numbers of some subsets of NK cells in drug well-responding SLE patients. The changes in the numbers of some subsets of NK cells may serve as biomarkers for evaluating the therapeutic responses of SLE. PMID:25024095

  4. Density-Gradient Mediated Band Extraction of Leukocytes from Whole Blood Using Centrifugo-Pneumatic Siphon Valving on Centrifugal Microfluidic Discs

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Sinéad M.; Kilcawley, Niamh A.; Early, Philip L.; Glynn, Macdara T.; Ducrée, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Here we present retrieval of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by density-gradient medium based centrifugation for subsequent analysis of the leukocytes on an integrated microfluidic “Lab-on-a-Disc” cartridge. Isolation of white blood cells constitutes a critical sample preparation step for many bioassays. Centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are particularly suited for blood processing as they function without need of surface treatment and are ‘low-pass’, i.e., holding at high centrifugation speeds and opening upon reduction of the spin rate. Both ‘hydrostatically’ and ‘hydrodynamically’ triggered centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valving schemes are presented. Firstly, the geometry of the pneumatic chamber of hydrostatically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves is optimised to enable smooth and uniform layering of blood on top of the density-gradient medium; this feature proves to be key for efficient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. A theoretical analysis of hydrostatically primed valves is also presented which determines the optimum priming pressure for the individual valves. Next, ‘dual siphon’ configurations for both hydrostatically and hydrodynamically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are introduced; here plasma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells are extracted through a distinct siphon valve. This work represents a first step towards enabling on disc multi-parameter analysis. Finally, the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells extraction in these structures is characterised using a simplified design. A microfluidic mechanism, which we termed phase switching, is identified which affects the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. PMID:27167376

  5. The CD8+ granzyme B+ T-cell subset in peripheral blood from healthy individuals contains activated and apoptosis-prone cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wever, P C; Van Der Vliet, H J; Spaeny, L H; Wolbink, A M; Van Diepen, F N; Froelich, C J; Hack, C E; ten Berge, I J

    1998-01-01

    Granzyme B (GrB) has been implicated in induction of apoptosis in target cells. The presence of GrB in peripheral blood CD8+ T cells from healthy individuals was analysed in immunocytochemical and flow cytometric studies. Furthermore, CD8+ GrB- T cells and CD8+ GrB+ T cells were compared regarding phenotypical characteristics and susceptibility to both spontaneous and Fasmediated apoptosis. GrB was expressed by approximately one-fifth of CD8+ T cells. Compared with the CD8+ GrB- T-cell subset, the CD8+ GrB+ T-cell subset contained cells that were relatively more activated and more prone to spontaneous apoptosis. Culturing of cells with immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-Fas monoclonal antibody had no additional effect on the number of CD8+ GrB+ T cells undergoing apoptosis. We suggest that the presence of CD8+ GrB+ T cells in peripheral blood from healthy individuals results from immune surveillance or contact with infectious agents, and that spontaneous apoptosis of these cells might serve as a mechanism for their eventual clearance. Images Figure 1 PMID:9640249

  6. Changes in cytokine production and composition of peripheral blood leukocytes during pregnancy are not associated with a difference in the proliferative immune response to the fetus.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Lisa E E L O; van der Hoorn, Marie-Louise P; van der Mast, Barbara J; Tilburgs, Tamara; van der Lee, Nadine; van der Keur, Carin; van Beelen, Els; Roelen, Dave L; Claas, Frans H J; Scherjon, Sicco A

    2011-10-01

    We analyzed peripheral blood from women at term pregnancy for leukocyte composition, in vitro proliferative responses and cytokine production after nonspecific and fetus-specific stimulation. Maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected and stimulated with umbilical cord blood (UCB) of the mother's own child, third-party UCB, nonspecific stimulus phytohemagglutinin, and anti-CD3 antibody, with PBMCs of nonpregnant women (cPBMC) as controls. Nine combinations of patient, child, third party child, and controls were selected on basis of sharing one human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR antigen. The response of mPBMC upon specific stimulation with fetal antigens was similar to that of cPBMC. No differences were found when comparing the mother's response upon stimulation to her own child with stimulation to that with a control child. Nonspecific stimulation with phytohemagglutinin and anti-CD3 antibody did not reveal a difference in proliferation rate between mPBMC and cPBMC. However, mPBMC contained a higher percentage of CD14(+) cells (p = 0.001) and activated T cells (CD25(dim), p < 0.0001), but a lower percentage CD16(-)CD56(bright) natural killer (NK) cells (p = 0.001) and CD16(+)CD56(+) NK cells (p = 0.003). mPBMC produced more interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-17 compared with cPBMC (p < 0.05). We found differences in lymphocyte composition and cytokine production between mPBMC and cPBMC. These differences did not result in quantitative changes in proliferative responses during pregnancy compared with responses in nonpregnant controls. PMID:21708204

  7. Anandamide inhibits Theiler's virus induced VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells and reduces leukocyte transmigration in a model of blood brain barrier by activation of CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background VCAM-1 represents one of the most important adhesion molecule involved in the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that is an essential step in the pathogenesis of MS. Several evidences have suggested the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoids (CBs) in the treatment of MS and their experimental models. However, the effects of endocannabinoids on VCAM-1 regulation are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of anandamide (AEA) in the regulation of VCAM-1 expression induced by Theiler's virus (TMEV) infection of brain endothelial cells using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Methods i) in vitro: VCAM-1 was measured by ELISA in supernatants of brain endothelial cells infected with TMEV and subjected to AEA and/or cannabinoid receptors antagonist treatment. To evaluate the functional effect of VCAM-1 modulation we developed a blood brain barrier model based on a system of astrocytes and brain endothelial cells co-culture. ii) in vivo: CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-) infected with TMEV were treated with the AEA uptake inhibitor UCM-707 for three days. VCAM-1 expression and microglial reactivity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Anandamide-induced inhibition of VCAM-1 expression in brain endothelial cell cultures was mediated by activation of CB1 receptors. The study of leukocyte transmigration confirmed the functional relevance of VCAM-1 inhibition by AEA. In vivo approaches also showed that the inhibition of AEA uptake reduced the expression of brain VCAM-1 in response to TMEV infection. Although a decreased expression of VCAM-1 by UCM-707 was observed in both, wild type and CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-), the magnitude of VCAM-1 inhibition was significantly higher in the wild type mice. Interestingly, Cnr1-/- mice showed enhanced microglial reactivity and VCAM-1 expression following TMEV infection, indicating that the lack of CB1 receptor exacerbated

  8. Conditional expression of murine Flt3 ligand leads to expansion of multiple dendritic cell subsets in peripheral blood and tissues of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Manfra, Denise J; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Jensen, Kristian K; Fine, Jay S; Wiekowski, Maria T; Lira, Sergio A

    2003-03-15

    The analysis of the development and function of distinct subsets of murine dendritic cells (DC) has been hampered by the limited number of these cells in vivo. To circumvent this limitation we have developed a conditional transgenic mouse model for producing large numbers of DC. We used the tetracycline-inducible system to conditionally express murine Flt3 ligand (FL), a potent hemopoietic growth factor that promotes the differentiation and mobilization of DC. Acute treatment (96 h) of the transgenic animals with the tetracycline analog doxycycline (DOX) promoted an approximately 200-fold increase in serum levels of FL without affecting the number of circulating DC. However, within 1 wk of DOX treatment, the relative number of DC in peripheral blood increased from approximately 8 to approximately 40%. Interestingly, both the levels of FL and the number of DC remained elevated for at least 9 mo with continual DOX treatment. Chronic treatment of the mice with DOX led to dramatic increases in the number of DC in multiple tissues without any apparent pathological consequences. Most DC populations were expanded, including immature and mature DC, myeloid (CD11c(+)CD11b(+)CD8a(-)), lymphoid (CD11c(+)CD11b(-)CD8a(+)), and the recently defined plasmacytoid (pDC) subsets. Finally, transplantation of BM from green fluorescent protein-expressing mice into lethally irradiated transgenic mice followed by subsequent DOX treatment led to expansion of green fluorescent protein-labeled DC. The transgenic mice described here should thus provide a readily available source of multiple DC subsets and should facilitate the analysis of their role in homeostasis and disease. PMID:12626534

  9. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  10. Leukocyte driven-decidual angiogenesis in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Patricia D A; Zhang, Jianhong; Dunk, Caroline; Lye, Stephen J; Croy, B Anne

    2014-11-01

    Successful pregnancy and long-term, post-natal maternal and offspring cardiac, vascular and metabolic health require key maternal cardiovascular adaptations over gestation. Within the pregnant decidualizing uterus, coordinated vascular, immunological and stromal cell changes occur. Considerable attention has been given to the roles of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in initiating decidual spiral arterial remodeling, a process normally completed by mid-gestation in mice and in humans. However, leukocyte roles in much earlier, region specific, decidual vascular remodeling are now being defined. Interest in immune cell-promoted vascular remodeling is driven by vascular aberrations that are reported in human gestational complications such as infertility, recurrent spontaneous abortion, preeclampsia (PE) and fetal growth restriction. Appropriate maternal cardiovascular responses during pregnancy protect mothers and their children from later cardiovascular disease risk elevation. One of the earliest uterine responses to pregnancy in species with hemochorial placentation is stromal cell decidualization, which creates unique niches for angiogenesis and leukocyte recruitment. In early decidua basalis, the aspect of the implantation site that will cradle the developing placenta and provide the major blood vessels to support mature placental functions, leukocytes are greatly enriched and display specialized properties. UNK cells, the most abundant leukocyte subset in early decidua basalis, have angiogenic abilities and are essential for normal early decidual angiogenesis. The regulation of uNK cells and their roles in determining maternal and progeny cardiovascular health over pregnancy and postpartum are discussed. PMID:25066422

  11. Leukocyte driven-decidual angiogenesis in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patricia DA; Zhang, Jianhong; Dunk, Caroline; Lye, Stephen J; Anne Croy, B

    2014-01-01

    Successful pregnancy and long-term, post-natal maternal and offspring cardiac, vascular and metabolic health require key maternal cardiovascular adaptations over gestation. Within the pregnant decidualizing uterus, coordinated vascular, immunological and stromal cell changes occur. Considerable attention has been given to the roles of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in initiating decidual spiral arterial remodeling, a process normally completed by mid-gestation in mice and in humans. However, leukocyte roles in much earlier, region specific, decidual vascular remodeling are now being defined. Interest in immune cell-promoted vascular remodeling is driven by vascular aberrations that are reported in human gestational complications such as infertility, recurrent spontaneous abortion, preeclampsia (PE) and fetal growth restriction. Appropriate maternal cardiovascular responses during pregnancy protect mothers and their children from later cardiovascular disease risk elevation. One of the earliest uterine responses to pregnancy in species with hemochorial placentation is stromal cell decidualization, which creates unique niches for angiogenesis and leukocyte recruitment. In early decidua basalis, the aspect of the implantation site that will cradle the developing placenta and provide the major blood vessels to support mature placental functions, leukocytes are greatly enriched and display specialized properties. UNK cells, the most abundant leukocyte subset in early decidua basalis, have angiogenic abilities and are essential for normal early decidual angiogenesis. The regulation of uNK cells and their roles in determining maternal and progeny cardiovascular health over pregnancy and postpartum are discussed. PMID:25066422

  12. ATP11C Facilitates Phospholipid Translocation across the Plasma Membrane of All Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yabas, Mehmet; Jing, Weidong; Shafik, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Organization of the plasma membrane into specialized substructures in different blood lineages facilitates important biological functions including proper localization of receptors at the plasma membrane as well as the initiation of crucial intracellular signaling cascades. The eukaryotic plasma membrane is a lipid bilayer that consists of asymmetrically distributed phospholipids. This asymmetry is actively maintained by membrane-embedded lipid transporters, but there is only limited data available about the molecular identity of the predominantly active transporters and their substrate specificity in different leukocyte subsets. We demonstrate here that the P4-type ATPase ATP11C mediates significant flippase activity in all murine leukocyte subsets. Loss of ATP11C resulted in a defective internalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in comparison to control cells. The diminished flippase activity caused increased PS exposure on 7-aminoactinomycin D− (7-AAD−) viable pro-B cells freshly isolated from the bone marrow of ATP11C-deficient mice, which was corrected upon a 2-hour resting period in vitro. Despite the impaired flippase activity in all immune cell subsets, the only other blood cell type with an accumulation of PS on the surface were viable 7-AAD− developing T cells but this did not result in any discernable effect on their development in the thymus. These findings show that all leukocyte lineages exhibit flippase activity, and identify ATP11C as an aminophospholipid translocase in immune cells. PMID:26799398

  13. Widespread activation of immunity and pro-inflammatory programs in peripheral blood leukocytes of HIV-infected patients with impaired lung gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Crothers, Kristina; Petrache, Irina; Wongtrakool, Cherry; Lee, Patty J; Schnapp, Lynn M; Gharib, Sina A

    2016-04-01

    HIV infection is associated with impaired lung gas transfer as indicated by a low diffusing capacity (DLCO), but the mechanisms are not well understood. We hypothesized that HIV-associated gas exchange impairment is indicative of system-wide perturbations that could be reflected by alterations in peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) gene expression. Forty HIV-infected (HIV(+)) and uninfected (HIV(-)) men with preserved versus low DLCO were enrolled. All subjects were current smokers and those with acute illness, lung diseases other than COPD or asthma were excluded. Total RNA was extracted from PBLs and hybridized to whole-genome microarrays. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed between HIV(+) versus HIV(-) subjects with preserved DLCO and those with low DLCO to identify differentially activated pathways. Using pathway-based analyses, we found that in subjects with preserved DLCO, HIV infection is associated with activation of processes involved in immunity, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Applying a similar analysis to subjects with low DLCO, we identified a much broader repertoire of pro-inflammatory and immune-related pathways in HIV(+) patients relative to HIV(-) subjects, with up-regulation of multiple interleukin pathways, interferon signaling, and toll-like receptor signaling. We confirmed elevated circulating levels of IL-6 in HIV(+) patients with low DLCO relative to the other groups. Our findings reveal that PBLs of subjects with HIV infection and low DLCO are distinguished by widespread enrichment of immuno-inflammatory programs. Activation of these pathways may alter the biology of circulating leukocytes and play a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated gas exchange impairment. PMID:27117807

  14. Isolation, In-111 labeling, and abscess detection efficiency of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from blood and peritoneal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, K.M.; Elson, M.K.; Gerding, D.N.; Bamberger, D.M.; Forstrom, L.A.; Shafer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In-111 labeled blood and peritoneal exudate PMN were compared for labeling efficiency and ability to migrate to sites of experimental abscesses using both direct sampling and visual imaging techniques. Blood PMN were prepared by combining heparinized blood with 6% Hetastarch for 1 hour and layering the plasma over a double density Ficoll-Hy-paque gradient (S.G. 1.076 over 1.141). The PMN layer (90-99% PMN) at the interface yielded 10/sup 6/-10/sup 7/ PMN from 80-120 ml of blood. Peritoneal PMN were obtained by infusion of 0.1% glycogen, followed by infusion of saline after 4 or 18 hours. The exudate yielded 10/sup 7/-10/sup 8/ PMN (80-99% PMN). PMN suspensions were labeled for 30 minutes by addition of 100 ..mu..Ci of In-111-oxine, then washed twice. Percent cell-associated radioactivity of the labeled blood, 4 hour, and 18 hour peritoneal PMN was 89%, 88%, and 86%. The labeled PMN were injected intravenously into rabbits which had two of three abdominal capsules (table tennis balls drilled with 250 1.5 mm holes) inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus 4 hours earlier. Peak venous recovery of circulating labeled PMN, for blood, 4 hour and 18 hour peritoneal PMN was 60%, 43%, and 19%. Gamma camera images 24 hours after infusion into infected rabbits were superior with 4 hour peritoneal PMN. The peritoneal PMN harvested 4 hours after glycogen stimulation are simple to prepare, are obtainable in greater numbers than blood PMN, and result in better abscess visualization.

  15. Evaluation of propolis, honey, and royal jelly in amelioration of peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model

    PubMed Central

    El-Aidy, Waleed K.; Ebeid, Ahmad A.; Sallam, Abd El-Raouf M.; Muhammad, Ibrahim E.; Abbas, Ayman T.; Kamal, M.A.; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj

    2014-01-01

    Bee products have been used since ancient times to treat many diseases, including respiratory ailments. The present study aimed to examine the modulatory effect of honey, royal jelly, and propolis extract on peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in a mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model. The mice in group I were not sensitised or treated; they were kept as controls. The mice in group II were sensitised and challenged with conalbumin. Twenty-four hours after the first challenge with antigen, the mice in group III received 0.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone intraperitoneally per day for 18 consecutive days and kept as positive controls. The mice in groups IV, V, and VI received 650, 1000, and 30 mg/kg of honey, royal jelly, and propolis (aqueous and ethanolic extract), respectively, once per day for 18 consecutive days. Blood was collected from all of the mice for white blood cell differentiation, and the lungs were removed for histopathological studies. The groups treated with propolis extract exhibited considerable ameliorative effects against asthma, which might be explained by the flavonoids and phenolics found in propolis, which might have antioxidative effects. Otherwise, the sensitised and honey- or royal jelly-treated groups exhibited an increased incidence of asthma cascade events due to increased inflammatory cells. These results might be due to the immunostimulatory and vasodilatory effects of royal jelly and honey, which are antagonistic to bronchial asthma cases. Histopathological examination revealed that the sensitised treated propolis extract groups had significant decreases in inflammatory scores compared with other treatments and the sensitised untreated group. These results confirmed the previous data of peripheral blood cells. PMID:26587007

  16. Evaluation of propolis, honey, and royal jelly in amelioration of peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    El-Aidy, Waleed K; Ebeid, Ahmad A; Sallam, Abd El-Raouf M; Muhammad, Ibrahim E; Abbas, Ayman T; Kamal, M A; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj

    2015-11-01

    Bee products have been used since ancient times to treat many diseases, including respiratory ailments. The present study aimed to examine the modulatory effect of honey, royal jelly, and propolis extract on peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in a mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model. The mice in group I were not sensitised or treated; they were kept as controls. The mice in group II were sensitised and challenged with conalbumin. Twenty-four hours after the first challenge with antigen, the mice in group III received 0.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone intraperitoneally per day for 18 consecutive days and kept as positive controls. The mice in groups IV, V, and VI received 650, 1000, and 30 mg/kg of honey, royal jelly, and propolis (aqueous and ethanolic extract), respectively, once per day for 18 consecutive days. Blood was collected from all of the mice for white blood cell differentiation, and the lungs were removed for histopathological studies. The groups treated with propolis extract exhibited considerable ameliorative effects against asthma, which might be explained by the flavonoids and phenolics found in propolis, which might have antioxidative effects. Otherwise, the sensitised and honey- or royal jelly-treated groups exhibited an increased incidence of asthma cascade events due to increased inflammatory cells. These results might be due to the immunostimulatory and vasodilatory effects of royal jelly and honey, which are antagonistic to bronchial asthma cases. Histopathological examination revealed that the sensitised treated propolis extract groups had significant decreases in inflammatory scores compared with other treatments and the sensitised untreated group. These results confirmed the previous data of peripheral blood cells. PMID:26587007

  17. Analysis using canine peripheral blood for establishing in vitro conditions for monocyte differentiation into macrophages for Leishmania chagasi infection and T-cell subset purification.

    PubMed

    Viana, Kelvinson Fernandes; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian Oliveira; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Resende, Lucilene Aparecida; da Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Moura, Sandra Lima; Zanini, Marcos Santos; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro

    2013-11-15

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is a parasitic disease endemic in many countries, and dogs present as the major natural reservoir of the parasite, Leishmania chagasi (syn. L. infantum). Biomarkers in the canine immune system is an important technique in the course of developing vaccines and treatment strategies against CVL. New methodologies for studying the immune response of dogs during Leishmania infection and after receiving vaccines and treatments against CVL would be useful. In this context, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy dogs to evaluate procedures related to (i) establishment of in vitro conditions of monocytes differentiated into macrophages infected with L. chagasi and (ii) purification procedures of T-cell subsets (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) using microbeads. Our data demonstrated that after 5 days of differentiation, macrophages were able to induce significant phagocytic and microbicidal activity after L. chagasi infection and also showed increased frequency of parasitism and a higher parasite load. Although N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) levels presented similar levels of macrophage culture and L. chagasi infection, a progressive decrease in myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels was a hallmark over 5 days of culture. High purity levels (>90%) of CD4 and CD8 T cells were obtained on a magnetic separation column. We concluded that monocytes differentiated into macrophages at 5 days and displayed an intermediate frequency of parasitism and parasite load 72 h after L. chagasi infection. Furthermore, the purification system using canine T-lymphocyte subsets obtained after 5 days of monocyte differentiation proved efficient for CD4 or CD8 T-cell purification (≥90%). The in vitro analysis using L. chagasi-infected macrophages and purified T cells presented a prospective methodology that could be incorporated in CVL vaccine and treatment studies that aim to analyze the microbicidal potential induced by specific CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T

  18. A Subset of Circulating Blood Mycobacteria-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Predict the Time to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Sputum Culture Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lugongolo, Masixole; Gwala, Thabisile; Kiravu, Agano; Deniso, Pamela; Stewart-Isherwood, Lynsey; Omar, Shaheed Vally; Grobusch, Martin P.; Coetzee, Gerrit; Conradie, Francesca; Ismail, Nazir; Kaplan, Gilla; Fallows, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 18 HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB for M. tuberculosis (Mtb)- and PPD-specific CD4 T cell responses and followed them over 6 months of drug therapy. Twelve of these patients were sputum culture (SC) positive and six patients were SC negative upon enrollment. Our aim was to identify a subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells that would predict time to culture conversion. The total frequency of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells at baseline could not distinguish patients showing positive or negative SC. However, a greater proportion of late-differentiated (LD) Mtb- and PPD-specific memory CD4 T cells was found in SC positive patients than in those who were SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Similarly, a higher co-expression of HLA-DR+Ki67+ on Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells could also discriminate between sputum SC positive versus SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that baseline levels of Ki67+HLA-DR+ Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells were predictive of the time to sputum culture conversion, with area-under-the-curve of 0.8 (p = 0.027). Upon treatment, there was a significant decline of these Ki67+HLA-DR+ T cell populations in the first 2 months, with a progressive increase in mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional IFNγ+IL2+TNFα+ CD4 T cells over 6 months. Thus, a subset of activated and proliferating mycobacterial-specific CD4 T cells (Ki67+HLA-DR+) may provide a valuable marker in peripheral blood that predicts time to sputum culture conversion in TB patients at the start of treatment. PMID:25048802

  19. A subset of circulating blood mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells can predict the time to Mycobacterium tuberculosis sputum culture conversion.

    PubMed

    Riou, Catherine; Gray, Clive M; Lugongolo, Masixole; Gwala, Thabisile; Kiravu, Agano; Deniso, Pamela; Stewart-Isherwood, Lynsey; Omar, Shaheed Vally; Grobusch, Martin P; Coetzee, Gerrit; Conradie, Francesca; Ismail, Nazir; Kaplan, Gilla; Fallows, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 18 HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB for M. tuberculosis (Mtb)- and PPD-specific CD4 T cell responses and followed them over 6 months of drug therapy. Twelve of these patients were sputum culture (SC) positive and six patients were SC negative upon enrollment. Our aim was to identify a subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells that would predict time to culture conversion. The total frequency of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells at baseline could not distinguish patients showing positive or negative SC. However, a greater proportion of late-differentiated (LD) Mtb- and PPD-specific memory CD4 T cells was found in SC positive patients than in those who were SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Similarly, a higher co-expression of HLA-DR+ Ki67+ on Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells could also discriminate between sputum SC positive versus SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that baseline levels of Ki67+ HLA-DR+ Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells were predictive of the time to sputum culture conversion, with area-under-the-curve of 0.8 (p = 0.027). Upon treatment, there was a significant decline of these Ki67+ HLA-DR+ T cell populations in the first 2 months, with a progressive increase in mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional IFNγ+ IL2+ TNFα+ CD4 T cells over 6 months. Thus, a subset of activated and proliferating mycobacterial-specific CD4 T cells (Ki67+ HLA-DR+) may provide a valuable marker in peripheral blood that predicts time to sputum culture conversion in TB patients at the start of treatment. PMID:25048802

  20. The evaluation of leukocytes in response to the in vitro testing of ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chris H H; Hilton, Andrew; Foster, Graham; Hawkins, Karl M; Badiei, Nafiseh; Thornton, Catherine A

    2013-09-01

    Infection is a clinically relevant adverse event in patients with ventricular assist device (VAD) support. The risk of infection could be linked to a reduced immune response resulting from damage to leukocytes during VAD support. The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of leukocyte responses during the in vitro testing of VADs by analyzing the changes to their morphology and biochemistry. The VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump (IRBP) and RotaFlow centrifugal pump (CP) were tested in vitro under constant hemodynamic conditions. Automated hematology analysis of samples collected regularly over 25-h tests was undertaken. A new flow cytometric assay was employed to measure biochemical alteration, necrosis (7-AAD) and morphological alteration (CD45 expression) of the circulating leukocytes during the pumping process. The results of hematology analysis show the total leukocyte number and subset counts decreased over the period of in vitro tests dependent on different blood pumps. The percentage of leukocytes damaged during 6-h tests was 40.8 ± 5.7% for the VentrAssist IRBP, 17.6 ± 5.4% for the RotaFlow CP, and 2.7 ± 1.8% for the static control (all n=5). Flow cytometric monitoring of CD45 expression and forward/side scatter characteristics revealed leukocytes that were fragmented into smaller pieces (microparticles). Scanning electron microscopy and imaging flow cytometry were used to confirm this. Device developers could use these robust cellular assays to gain a better understanding of leukocyte-specific VAD performance. PMID:23981196

  1. Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of: (1) peripheral leukocyte distribution, (2) plasma cytokine levels and (3) cytokine production profiles following whole blood mitogenic stimulation

  2. Studies on human blood lymphocytes with iC3b (type 3) complement receptors. II. Characterization of subsets which regulate pokeweed mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and immunoglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Abo, W; Gray, J D; Bakke, A C; Horwitz, D A

    1987-01-01

    Human blood lymphocytes that express Type 3 complement receptors (CR3) can be divided into a major subset with high density Fc receptors for IgG (FcR) identified with the monoclonal antibody Leu 11 and two minor subsets which display either CD8 (Leu 2) or CD4 (Leu 3) markers. We isolated CR3+ lymphocyte subsets and examined them for regulatory effects on pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated cells. The FCR CR3+ cell suppressed PWM-induced proliferation and Ig production. Pretreatment of these lymphocytes with immune complexes was required to suppress proliferation, but not IgG production. The CR3+ Leu 2+ FCR- subset also had suppressive activity, but this effect was not observed unless the CR3+ Leu 3+ enriched subset was removed. In fact, the CR3+ Leu 3+ enriched subset enhanced IgG synthesis. Brief exposure of CR3+ lymphocytes to recombinant interleukin 2, recombinant alpha-interferon, but not gamma-interferon, markedly enhanced the inhibitory effect. Time course studies and a comparison of inhibition of Ig synthesis with natural killer cell activity suggested that CR3+ lymphocytes act shortly after lymphocytes are exposed to PWM and that Ig production was regulated by suppression rather than cytotoxicity. These CR3+ lymphocyte subsets may have broad antigen non-specific effects on immunoglobulin synthesis. PMID:2955973

  3. Hypomethylation of the IL17RC Promoter in Peripheral Blood Leukocytes is Not A Hallmark of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Verity F; Franchina, Maria; Jaffe, Andrew E; Branham, Kari E; Othman, Mohammad; Heckenlively, John R; Swaroop, Anand; Campochiaro, Betsy; Vote, Brendan J; Craig, Jamie E; Saffery, Richard; Mackey, David A; Qian, Jiang; Zack, Donald J; Hewitt, Alex W; Merbs, Shannath L

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Aberrant DNA methylation within the promoter of IL17RC in peripheral blood mononuclear cells has recently been reported in AMD. To validate this association, we examined DNA methylation of the IL17RC promoter in peripheral blood. First, we used Illumina Human Methylation450 Bead Arrays, a widely-accepted platform for measuring global DNA methylation. Second, methylation status at multiple sites within the IL17RC promoter was determined by bisulfite pyrosequencing in two cohorts. Third, a methylation-sensitive QPCR-based assay was performed on a subset of samples. In contrast to previous findings, we did not find evidence of differential methylation between AMD cases and age-matched controls. We conclude that hypomethylation within the IL17RC gene promoter in peripheral blood is not suitable for use as a clinical biomarker of AMD. This study highlights the need for considerable replication of epigenetic association studies prior to clinical application. PMID:24373284

  4. Imbalance in recruitment of IgG (Gm) allotype-producing B-cell subsets from blood to brain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Salier, J P

    1984-10-15

    In Gm3/Gm3 homozygous multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, in vitro production of the G1m(3) allotype of IgG1 induced by the T-independent polyclonal B-cell activator Salmonella paratyphi B (SPB) was lower than that of normal individuals of the same Gm phenotype. In contrast, lymphocytes from Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous MS patients responded to the same stimulus with a significantly increased G1m(3) allotype synthesis not observed in normal individuals of the same phenotype. The high level of intrathecal IgG1 production observed in MS patients might be achieved by a selection at the blood-brain barrier of some peripheral T-independent B-cell clones which in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous would bear the G1m(3) allotype, hence a peripheral depletion of this subset, whereas in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous a preferential admission of the G1m(1)-producing B-cells would lead to a preferential synthesis of this allotype in the central nervous system and to a relative increase of G1m(3) production by the remaining peripheral B cells. PMID:6333282

  5. Whole blood transcriptional profiling reveals significant down-regulation of human leukocyte antigen class I and II genes in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Skov, Vibe; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Jensen, Morten K; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Kruse, Torben A; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2013-10-01

    Gene expression profiling studies in the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms have revealed significant deregulation of several immune and inflammation genes that might be of importance for clonal evolution due to defective tumor immune surveillance. Other mechanisms might be down-regulation of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I and II genes, which are used by tumor cells to escape antitumor T-cell-mediated immune responses. We have performed whole blood transcriptional profiling of genes encoding human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, β2-microglobulin and members of the antigen processing machinery of HLA class I molecules (LMP2, LMP7, TAP1, TAP2 and tapasin). The findings of significant down-regulation of several of these genes may possibly be of major importance for defective tumor immune surveillance. Since up-regulation of HLA genes is recorded during treatment with epigenome modulating agents (DNA-hypomethylators and DNA-hyperacetylators [histone deacetylase inhibitors]) and interferon-α2, our findings call for prospective transcriptional studies of HLA genes during treatment with these agents. PMID:23302045

  6. Pathogenic Triad in Bacterial Meningitis: Pathogen Invasion, NF-κB Activation, and Leukocyte Transmigration that Occur at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifu; Peng, Liang; Gai, Zhongtao; Zhang, Lehai; Jong, Ambrose; Cao, Hong; Huang, Sheng-He

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains the leading cause of disabilities worldwide. This life-threatening disease has a high mortality rate despite the availability of antibiotics and improved critical care. The interactions between bacterial surface components and host defense systems that initiate bacterial meningitis have been studied in molecular and cellular detail over the past several decades. Bacterial meningitis commonly exhibits triad hallmark features (THFs): pathogen penetration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation in coordination with type 1 interferon (IFN) signaling and leukocyte transmigration that occur at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists mainly of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). This review outlines the progression of these early inter-correlated events contributing to the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and injury during the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. A better understanding of these issues is not only imperative to elucidating the pathogenic mechanism of bacterial meningitis, but may also provide the in-depth insight into the development of novel therapeutic interventions against this disease. PMID:26925035

  7. The expression of GPR109A, NF-kB and IL-1β in peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengxiu; Fu, Yucai; Wei, Chiju; Chen, Yongru; Ma, Shuhua; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the association between the G protein-coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A) expression in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and to discuss the regulation of inflammatory factors by GPR109A signaling. GPR109A signaling has been confirmed to be associated with homeostasis of glucose/lipid metabolism, but the role of signaling in T2DM is still poorly understood. Peripheral blood samples and biochemical data were collected from healthy individuals (normal controls) and T2DM patients. Immunocytochemical staining was used to detect the expression of GPR109A in PBLs. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure mRNA levels of GPR109A, NF-κB, and IL-1β in PBLs. Immunocytochemical staining showed that the GPR109A protein is localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes. RT-PCR showed that mRNA levels of GPR109A, NF-κB, and IL-1β were higher in the T2DM group than in the control group (P<0.05). Correlation analysis showed a positive correlation both between GPR109A/NF-κB (r=0.376, P<0.05), and GPR109A/IL-1β (r=501, P<0.05) and between GPR109A and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (r=0.179, P<0.05) and NF-κB /FPG (r=0.358, p<0.05). Our results suggest that GPR109A signaling is associated with T2DM, playing a role in regulation of the inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25361930

  8. The effect of donor leukocyte infusion on refractory pure red blood cell aplasia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome developing from Kostmann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsushi; Tsuruta, Toshihisa; Ishikawa, Kumiko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Ohtsuka, Yoshitoshi; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Ogami, Kazuo; Wada, Yuka; Kanda, Tadayasu; Tsuji, Kohichiro

    2007-12-01

    We describe the clinical course of a patient who experienced refractory pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) after undergoing HLA-matched allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT) for refractory anemia with an excess of blasts in transformation that had evolved from Kostmann syndrome. The treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) developing from Kostmann syndrome has not been standardized. We treated this patient with allo-PBSCT using a regimen combining high-dose cytosine arabinoside with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, in addition to total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide without preceding intensive chemotherapy. The donor was ABO incompatible. Myeloid and platelet recoveries were achieved rapidly. Erythroid engraftment was not evident, however, and the patient was given a diagnosis of PRCA. Regimen-related toxicity and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were limited. The PRCA did not respond to various therapies, including the discontinuation of immunosuppressants for the induction of chronic GVHD, human recombinant erythropoietin, immunosuppressive treatment with steroids, cyclosporin A, and human anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab). The patient received transfusions 48 times until the resolution of his anemia by donor leukocyte infusion (DLI) at 25 months after PBSCT. He is now clinically well (performance status, 100%) with normal blood cell counts at 5 years after SCT. An in vitro study demonstrated that serum from the recipient blocked the differentiation of erythroid cells in the bone marrow. The results indicate that the conditioning regimen we describe seems safe and effective for those who have MDS/AML and that DLI might be a valuable approach for refractory PRCA after ABO-incompatible SCT. PMID:18192114

  9. Perioperative transfusion of leukocyte depleted blood products in gastric cancer patients negatively influences oncologic outcome: A retrospective propensity score weighted analysis on 610 curatively resected gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Reim, Daniel; Strobl, Andreas N; Buchner, Christian; Schirren, Rebekka; Mueller, Werner; Luppa, Peter; Ankerst, Donna Pauler; Friess, Helmut; Novotny, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The influence of perioperative transfusion (PT) on outcome following surgery for gastric cancer (GC) remains controversial, with randomized trials lacking and observational series confounded by patient risk factors. This analysis determines the association between reception of leukocyte-depleted blood products and post-operative survival for GC.Data from 610 patients who underwent curative surgery for GC in a German tertiary care clinic from 2001 to 2013 were included. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied to determine the association of PT and clinical and patient risk factors for overall and relapse-free survival. Propensity score analysis was performed to adjust for observational biases in reception of PT.Higher Union International Contre le Cancer/American Joint Committee on Cancer (UICC/AJCC)-stages (P <0.001), postoperative complications and severity according to the Clavien-Dindo (CD) classification (P <0.001), PT (P = 0.02), higher age (P <0.001), and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P <0.001) were related to increased mortality rates. Higher UICC-stages (P <0.001), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P <0.001), and type of surgery (P = 0.02) were independently associated with increased relapse rates. Patients were more likely to receive PT with higher age (P = 0.05), surgical extension to adjacent organs/structures (P = 0.002), tumor location (P = 0.003), and female gender (P = 0.03). In the adjusted propensity score weighted analysis, PT remained associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio (HR): 1.31, 95% CI: 1.01-1.69, P = 0.04).Because of the association of PT with negative influence on patient survival following resection for GC, risks from application of blood products should be weighed against the potential benefits. PMID:27442682

  10. STAT1 signaling modulates HIV-1-induced inflammatory responses and leukocyte transmigration across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Yang, Bo; Gendelman, Howard E; Persidsky, Yuri; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2008-02-15

    The relationship among neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, and progressive HIV-1 infection as they affect the onset and development of neuroAIDS is incompletely understood. One possible link is signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) pathways. These respond to proinflammatory and regulatory factors and could affect neuroinflammatory responses induced from infected cells and disease-affected brain tissue. Our previous works demonstrated that HIV-1 activates pro-inflammatory and interferon-alpha-inducible genes in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and that these genes are linked to the Janus kinase (JAK)/STAT pathway. We now demonstrate that HIV-1 activates STAT1, induces IL-6 expression, and diminishes expression of claudin-5, ZO-1, and ZO-2 in HBMECs. The STAT1 inhibitor, fludarabine, blocked HIV-1-induced IL-6, diminished HIV-1-induced claudin-5 and ZO-1 down-regulation, and blocked HIV-1- and IL-6-induced monocyte migration across a BBB model. Enhanced expression and activation of STAT1 and decreased claudin-5 were observed in microvessels from autopsied brains of patients with HIV-1-associated dementia. These data support the notion that STAT1 plays an integral role in HIV-1-induced BBB damage and is relevant to viral neuropathogenesis. Inhibition of STAT1 activation could provide a unique therapeutic strategy to attenuate HIV-1-induced BBB compromise and as such improve clinical outcomes. PMID:18003888

  11. Leukocytes, cytokines, growth factors and hormones in human skeletal muscle and blood after uphill or downhill running.

    PubMed

    Malm, Christer; Sjödin, The Late Bertil; Sjöberg, Berit; Lenkei, Rodica; Renström, Per; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Ekblom, Björn

    2004-05-01

    Muscular adaptation to physical exercise has previously been described as a repair process following tissue damage. Recently, evidence has been published to question this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate inflammatory processes in human skeletal muscle and epimysium after acute physical exercise with large eccentric components. Three groups of subjects (n= 19) performed 45 min treadmill running at either 4 deg (n= 5) or 8 deg (n= 9) downhill or 4 deg uphill (n= 5) and one group served as control (n= 9). One biopsy was taken from each subject 48 h post exercise. Blood samples were taken up to 7 days post exercise. Compared to the control group, none of the markers of inflammation in muscle and epimysium samples was different in any exercised group. Only subjects in the Downhill groups experienced delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) and increased serum creatine kinase activity (CK). The detected levels of immunohistochemical markers for T cells (CD3), granulocytes (CD11b), leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1beta (HIF-1beta) were greater in epimysium from exercised subjects with DOMS ratings >3 (0-10 scale) compared to exercised subjects without DOMS but not higher than controls. Eccentric physical exercise (downhill running) did not result in skeletal muscle inflammation 48 h post exercise, despite DOMS and increased CK. It is suggested that exercise can induce DOMS by activating inflammatory factors present in the epimysium before exercise. Repeated physical training may alter the content of inflammatory factors in the epimysium and thus reduce DOMS. PMID:14766942

  12. CD19+ B cell subsets in the peripheral blood and skin lesions of psoriasis patients and their correlations with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Ding, Y; Yi, X; Zheng, J

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes are important in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and increasing evidence indicates that B cells also play an important role. The mechanisms of action, however, remain unclear. We evaluated the ratios of CD19+ B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 157 patients with psoriasis (65 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, 32 patients with erythrodermic psoriasis, 30 patients with arthropathic psoriasis, and 30 patients with pustular psoriasis) and 35 healthy controls (HCs). Ratios of CD19+ B cells in skin lesions were compared with non-lesions in 7 erythrodermic psoriasis patients. The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) was used to measure disease severity. CD19+ B cell ratios in PBMCs from psoriasis vulgaris (at both the active and stationary stage) and arthropathic psoriasis patients were higher compared with HCs (P<0.01), but ratios were lower in erythrodermic and pustular psoriasis patients (P<0.01). CD19+ B cell ratios in erythrodermic psoriasis skin lesions were higher than in non-lesion areas (P<0.001). Different subsets of CD19+CD40+, CD19+CD44+, CD19+CD80+, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD11b+, and CD19+HLA-DR+ B cells in PBMCs were observed in different psoriasis clinical subtypes. PASI scores were positively correlated with CD19+ B cell ratios in psoriasis vulgaris and arthropathic psoriasis cases (r=0.871 and r=0.692, respectively, P<0.01), but were negatively correlated in pustular psoriasis (r=-0.569, P<0.01). The results indicated that similar to T cells, B cells activation may also play important roles in different pathological stages of psoriasis. PMID:27532281

  13. CD19+ B cell subsets in the peripheral blood and skin lesions of psoriasis patients and their correlations with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J.; Ding, Y.; Yi, X.; Zheng, J.

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes are important in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and increasing evidence indicates that B cells also play an important role. The mechanisms of action, however, remain unclear. We evaluated the ratios of CD19+ B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 157 patients with psoriasis (65 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, 32 patients with erythrodermic psoriasis, 30 patients with arthropathic psoriasis, and 30 patients with pustular psoriasis) and 35 healthy controls (HCs). Ratios of CD19+ B cells in skin lesions were compared with non-lesions in 7 erythrodermic psoriasis patients. The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) was used to measure disease severity. CD19+ B cell ratios in PBMCs from psoriasis vulgaris (at both the active and stationary stage) and arthropathic psoriasis patients were higher compared with HCs (P<0.01), but ratios were lower in erythrodermic and pustular psoriasis patients (P<0.01). CD19+ B cell ratios in erythrodermic psoriasis skin lesions were higher than in non-lesion areas (P<0.001). Different subsets of CD19+CD40+, CD19+CD44+, CD19+CD80+, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD11b+, and CD19+HLA-DR+ B cells in PBMCs were observed in different psoriasis clinical subtypes. PASI scores were positively correlated with CD19+ B cell ratios in psoriasis vulgaris and arthropathic psoriasis cases (r=0.871 and r=0.692, respectively, P<0.01), but were negatively correlated in pustular psoriasis (r=-0.569, P<0.01). The results indicated that similar to T cells, B cells activation may also play important roles in different pathological stages of psoriasis. PMID:27532281

  14. Temporal Expression of Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Biomarkers in a Macaca fascicularis Infection Model of Tuberculosis; Comparison with Human Datasets and Analysis with Parametric/Non-parametric Tools for Improved Diagnostic Biomarker Identification

    PubMed Central

    Wareham, Alice; Lewandowski, Kuiama S.; Williams, Ann; Dennis, Michael J.; Sharpe, Sally; Vipond, Richard; Silman, Nigel; Ball, Graham

    2016-01-01

    A temporal study of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis primary, pulmonary challenge model Macaca fascicularis has been conducted. PBL samples were taken prior to challenge and at one, two, four and six weeks post-challenge and labelled, purified RNAs hybridised to Operon Human Genome AROS V4.0 slides. Data analyses revealed a large number of differentially regulated gene entities, which exhibited temporal profiles of expression across the time course study. Further data refinements identified groups of key markers showing group-specific expression patterns, with a substantial reprogramming event evident at the four to six week interval. Selected statistically-significant gene entities from this study and other immune and apoptotic markers were validated using qPCR, which confirmed many of the results obtained using microarray hybridisation. These showed evidence of a step-change in gene expression from an ‘early’ FOS-associated response, to a ‘late’ predominantly type I interferon-driven response, with coincident reduction of expression of other markers. Loss of T-cell-associate marker expression was observed in responsive animals, with concordant elevation of markers which may be associated with a myeloid suppressor cell phenotype e.g. CD163. The animals in the study were of different lineages and these Chinese and Mauritian cynomolgous macaque lines showed clear evidence of differing susceptibilities to Tuberculosis challenge. We determined a number of key differences in response profiles between the groups, particularly in expression of T-cell and apoptotic makers, amongst others. These have provided interesting insights into innate susceptibility related to different host `phenotypes. Using a combination of parametric and non-parametric artificial neural network analyses we have identified key genes and regulatory pathways which may be important in early and adaptive responses to TB. Using comparisons

  15. Temporal Expression of Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Biomarkers in a Macaca fascicularis Infection Model of Tuberculosis; Comparison with Human Datasets and Analysis with Parametric/Non-parametric Tools for Improved Diagnostic Biomarker Identification.

    PubMed

    Javed, Sajid; Marsay, Leanne; Wareham, Alice; Lewandowski, Kuiama S; Williams, Ann; Dennis, Michael J; Sharpe, Sally; Vipond, Richard; Silman, Nigel; Ball, Graham; Kempsell, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    A temporal study of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis primary, pulmonary challenge model Macaca fascicularis has been conducted. PBL samples were taken prior to challenge and at one, two, four and six weeks post-challenge and labelled, purified RNAs hybridised to Operon Human Genome AROS V4.0 slides. Data analyses revealed a large number of differentially regulated gene entities, which exhibited temporal profiles of expression across the time course study. Further data refinements identified groups of key markers showing group-specific expression patterns, with a substantial reprogramming event evident at the four to six week interval. Selected statistically-significant gene entities from this study and other immune and apoptotic markers were validated using qPCR, which confirmed many of the results obtained using microarray hybridisation. These showed evidence of a step-change in gene expression from an 'early' FOS-associated response, to a 'late' predominantly type I interferon-driven response, with coincident reduction of expression of other markers. Loss of T-cell-associate marker expression was observed in responsive animals, with concordant elevation of markers which may be associated with a myeloid suppressor cell phenotype e.g. CD163. The animals in the study were of different lineages and these Chinese and Mauritian cynomolgous macaque lines showed clear evidence of differing susceptibilities to Tuberculosis challenge. We determined a number of key differences in response profiles between the groups, particularly in expression of T-cell and apoptotic makers, amongst others. These have provided interesting insights into innate susceptibility related to different host `phenotypes. Using a combination of parametric and non-parametric artificial neural network analyses we have identified key genes and regulatory pathways which may be important in early and adaptive responses to TB. Using comparisons between

  16. Separation of uncompromised whole blood mixtures for single source STR profiling using fluorescently-labeled human leukocyte antigen (HLA) probes and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Dean, Lee; Kwon, Ye Jin; Philpott, M Katherine; Stanciu, Cristina E; Seashols-Williams, Sarah J; Dawson Cruz, Tracey; Sturgill, Jamie; Ehrhardt, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of biological mixtures is a significant problem for forensic laboratories, particularly when the mixture contains only one cell type. Contributions from multiple individuals to biologic evidence can complicate DNA profile interpretation and often lead to a reduction in the probative value of DNA evidence or worse, its total loss. To address this, we have utilized an analytical technique that exploits the intrinsic immunological variation among individuals to physically separate cells from different sources in a mixture prior to DNA profiling. Specifically, we applied a fluorescently labeled antibody probe to selectively bind to one contributor in a mixture through allele-specific interactions with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are expressed on the surfaces of most nucleated cells. Once the contributor's cells were bound to the probe, they were isolated from the mixture using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)-a high throughput technique for separating cell populations based on their optical properties-and then subjected to STR analysis. We tested this approach on two-person and four-person whole blood mixtures where one contributor possessed an HLA allele (A*02) that was not shared by other contributors to the mixture. Results showed that hybridization of the mixture with a fluorescently-labeled antibody probe complimentary to the A*02 allele's protein product created a cell population with a distinct optical profile that could be easily differentiated from other cells in the mixture. After sorting the cells with FACS, genetic analysis showed that the STR profile of this cell population was consistent with that of the contributor who possessed the A*02 allele. Minor peaks from the A*02 negative contributor(s) were observed but could be easily distinguished from the profile generated from A*02 positive cells. Overall, this indicates that HLA antibody probes coupled to FACS may be an effective approach for generating STR profiles of

  17. The role of G-CSF and IL-6 in the granulopoiesis-stimulating activity of murine blood serum induced by perorally administered ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2007-05-01

    IMUNOR, a low-molecular weight (< 12 kD) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, has been previously found to have significant stimulatory effects on murine hematopoiesis supressed by ionizing radiation or cytotoxic drugs. This communication shows data on the mechanisms of these effects. Using ELISA assay, significantly increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed. On the contrary, no detectable levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFC) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) have been found in blood serum of IMUNOR-treated mice. Incubation of the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with antibodies against G-CSF caused abrogation of the ability of the sera to stimulate in vitro growth of colonies originating from granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC). In contrast, incubation of the serum with antibodies against IL-6 did not change its colony-stimulating activity. It may be inferred from these findings that G-CSF is probably the main cytokine responsible for the granulopoiesis-stimulating effects of IMUNOR. When the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with G-CSF inactivated by anti-G-CSF antibodies (but with elevated IL-6) was added to cultures of bone marrow cells together with a suboptimum concentration of IL-3, a significant increase in the numbers of GM-CFC colonies was found. Moreover, conjoint inactivation of G-CSF and IL-6 significantly decreased the numbers of GM-CFC colonies in comparison with those observed when only G-CSF was inactivated. This observation strongly suggests that though IMUNOR-induced IL-6 is not able to induce the growth of GM-CFC colonies alone, it is able to potentiate the hematopoiesis-stimulating effect of IL-3. These findings represent a new knowledge concerning the hematopoiesis-stimulating action of IMUNOR, a promising immunomodulatory agent. PMID:17386413

  18. Labeling of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes with indium-111: a new method for the quantitation of in-vivo accumulation of PMNLs in rabbit skin

    SciTech Connect

    Wahba, A.V.; Barnes, B.; Lazarus, G.S.

    1984-02-01

    A precise method for quantitation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) accumulation in skin in vivo, has been developed so that the proinflammatory effects of various agents can be compared. This method can also be used to evaluate the effect of therapeutic agents on PMNL accumulation in vivo. Rabbit PMNLs were purified from heparinized blood by dextran sedimentation, hypotonic lysis, and separation on Ficoll-Hypaque. The PMNLs were labeled with 3-5 microCi per 10(6) cells of /sup 111/In oxine and reinfused coincidentally with different concentrations of different chemotactic and proinflammatory materials injected intradermally into the back. In some experiments, varying concentrations of acetic acid were applied topically. Four to 18 hours later, the rabbits were sacrificed. Eight-millimeter punch biopsies were obtained from the injection sites and counted in a gamma counter. The number of PMNLs infiltrating the dermis was also quantitated in histologic sections. A significant correlation was found between the percent increase in radioactivity and the percent increase in PMNL accumulation morphologically. Dose-response curves were generated using such proinflammatory materials as formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, activated serum, trypsin, glycogen, and acetic acid. These curves were highly reproducible from animal to animal. Using this assay, we found that as little as 1 microgram of trypsin induced detectable PMNL accumulation. This is 2-3 logs more sensitive than injecting mice intraperitoneally with trypsin. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate-inactivation of trypsin inhibited PMNL accumulation. This sensitive and quantitative bioassay of PMNL accumulation permits evaluation of multiple agents in the same animal, which decreases animal to animal variation.

  19. Phenotyping of Leukocytes and Leukocyte-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Pugholm, Lotte Hatting; Bæk, Rikke; Søndergaard, Evo Kristina Lindersson; Revenfeld, Anne Louise Schacht; Jørgensen, Malene Møller; Varming, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have a demonstrated involvement in modulating the immune system. It has been proposed that EVs could be used as biomarkers for detection of inflammatory and immunological disorders. Consequently, it is of great interest to investigate EVs in more detail with focus on immunological markers. In this study, five major leukocyte subpopulations and the corresponding leukocyte-derived EVs were phenotyped with focus on selected immunological lineage-specific markers and selected vesicle-related markers. The leukocyte-derived EVs displayed phenotypic differences in the 34 markers investigated. The majority of the lineage-specific markers used for identification of the parent cell types could not be detected on EVs released from monocultures of the associated cell types. In contrast, the vesicular presentation of CD9, CD63, and CD81 correlated to the cell surface expression of these markers, however, with few exceptions. Furthermore, the cellular expression of CD9, CD63, and CD81 varied between leukocytes present in whole blood and cultured leukocytes. In summary, these data demonstrate that the cellular and vesicular presentation of selected lineage-specific and vesicle-related markers may differ, supporting the accumulating observations that sorting of molecular cargo into EVs is tightly controlled. PMID:27195303

  20. Elemental composition of leukocyte subfractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Admans, L. L.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to determine the elemental concentration of various subfractions of leukocytes in a normal subject. Little work has been published on the elemental composition of these subfractions. First, a reliable technique for separation of these subfractions had to be established so that it could be applied to the determination of elemental concentrations in leukocyte subfractions from patients undergoing heart bypass surgery. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) utilising short irradiation and counting was the technique employed. Various washing media were examined during the separation of the leukocyte subfractions, for contamination of these small samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclearcytes (PMN). Early results showed Mg and Se were present in these subfractions. Possibilities for further work are also discussed.

  1. Inflammatory Leukocyte Phenotypes Correlate with Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bethany B.; Fry, Chris; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Han, MeiLan K.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Flaherty, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive deposition of extracellular matrix, worsening dyspnea, and eventual mortality. Pathogenesis of IPF is poorly understood and the role inflammation and activated leukocytes play in the disease process is controversial. Previous studies demonstrated that activated leukocyte subsets characterize IPF patients. We sought to validate this observation in a well-defined cohort of 35 IPF patients and to correlate the observed leukocyte phenotypes with robust parameters of disease progression. We demonstrate that in univariate and multivariate analyses, increases in the CD14hi, CD16hi subset of monocytes measured at baseline correlated with disease progression, with a threshold value >0.5% of the total peripheral blood mononuclear cells being a significant predictor for worse outcome. In addition, several T cell subsets, including CD25 expressing CD4 cells, and CXCR3 expressing CD4 and CD8 subsets correlated with disease progression when found in increased percentages in the peripheral blood of IPF patients when sampled at baseline. Somewhat surprising in comparison to previous literature, the CD4 T cells did not appear to have lost expression of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD28, but the CD8 T cells did. Taken together, these results are consistent with the presence of an inflammatory process in IPF patients who eventually progress. However, when longitudinal measurements of these same markers were examined, there was significant heterogeneity of expression and these biomarkers did not necessarily remain elevated in IPF patients with progressive disease. We interpret this heterogeneity to suggest that IPF patients experience episodic inflammatory events that once triggered, may lead to disease progression. This longitudinal heterogeneity in biomarker analyses may explain why such markers are not consistently measured in all IPF cohorts. PMID:25580363

  2. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon.

    PubMed

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2016-02-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. PMID:26551552

  3. A Single 9-Colour Flow Cytometric Method to Characterise Major Leukocyte Populations in the Rat: Validation in a Model of LPS-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Barnett-Vanes, Ashton; Sharrock, Anna; Birrell, Mark A.; Rankin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a commonly used model for immunological investigation. Yet basic research and characterisation of leukocyte populations and sub-sets lags far behind murine research, with inconsistency on reported leukocyte markers and their overlap. These shortcomings limit the opportunity for more complex and advanced rat immunology research. In this study, we developed a robust 9-colour flow-cytometric protocol to elucidate the major blood and tissue rat leukocyte populations, and validated it in a model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. Blood and tissues (lung, BALF, spleen, liver, bone marrow) from naïve Sprague-Dawley rats were collected and analysed by flow cytometry (FCM). Rats were exposed to aerosolised saline or LPS (1mg/mL), at 3 and 24hrs thereafter blood, lung and BALF were collected and analysed using FCM and ELISA. Neutrophils, two monocyte subsets, NK Cells, B Cells, CD4+, CD8+ T Cells and alveolar macrophages can be identified simultaneously across different tissues using a 9-colour panel. Neutrophils and monocytes can be distinguished based upon differential expression of CD43 and His48. Neutrophils and CD43Lo/His48Hi monocyte-macrophages are elevated in the lung at 3 and 24hrs during LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. This validated method for leukocyte enumeration will offer a platform for greater consistency in future rat immunology and inflammation research. PMID:26764486

  4. Stress and skin leukocyte trafficking as a dual-stage process

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Elad; Shaashua, Lee; Benish, Marganit; Page, Gayle G.; Zmora, Oded; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2011-01-01

    Stress responses are known to modulate leukocyte trafficking. In the skin, stress was reported both to enhance and reduce skin immunity, and the chronicity of stress exposure was suggested as a key determining factor. We here propose a dual-stage hypothesis, suggesting that stress, of any duration, reduces skin immunity during its course, while its cessation is potentially followed by a period of enhanced skin immunity. To start testing this hypothesis, rats were subcutaneously implanted with sterile surgical sponges for four-hours, during or after exposure to one of several acute stress paradigms, or to a chronic stress paradigm. Our findings, in both males and females, indicate that numbers of sponge-infiltrating leukocytes, and their specific subsets, were reduced during acute or chronic stress, and increased after stress cessation. Studying potential mediating mechanisms of the reduction in leukocyte numbers during acute stress, we found that neither adrenalectomy nor the administration of beta-adrenergic or glucocorticoid antagonists prevented this reduction. Additionally, administration of corticosterone or epinephrine to adrenalectomized rats did not impact skin leukocyte numbers, whereas, in the blood, these treatments did affect numbers of leukocytes and their specific subsets, as was also reported previously. Overall, our findings support the proposed dual-stage hypothesis, which can be evolutionally rationalized and accounts for most of the apparent inconsistencies in the literature regarding stress and skin immunity. Other aspects of the hypothesis should be tested, also using additional methodologies, and its predictions may bear clinical significance in treatment of skin disorders related to hyper- or hypo-immune function. PMID:21963875

  5. Expression Profile of Cytokines and Enzymes mRNA in Blood Leukocytes of Dogs with Leptospirosis and Its Associated Pulmonary Hemorrhage Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maissen-Villiger, Carla A.; Schweighauser, Ariane; van Dorland, H. Anette; Morel, Claudine; Bruckmaier, Rupert M.; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Francey, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Background Dogs with leptospirosis show similar organ manifestations and disease course as human patients, including acute kidney injury and pulmonary hemorrhage, making this naturally-occurring infection a good animal model for human leptospirosis. Expression patterns of cytokines and enzymes have been correlated with disease manifestations and clinical outcome in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to describe mRNA expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in canine leptospirosis and to compare it with other renal diseases to identify patterns characterizing the disease and especially its pulmonary form. Methodology and Principal Findings The mRNA abundance of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, TGF-β) and enzymes (5-LO, iNOS) was measured prospectively in blood leukocytes from 34 dogs with severe leptospirosis and acute kidney injury, including 22 dogs with leptospirosis-associated pulmonary hemorrhages. Dogs with leptospirosis were compared to 14 dogs with acute kidney injury of other origin than leptospirosis, 8 dogs with chronic kidney disease, and 10 healthy control dogs. Canine leptospirosis was characterized by high 5-LO and low TNF-α expression compared to other causes of acute kidney injury, although the decreased TNF-α expression was also seen in chronic kidney disease. Leptospirosis-associated pulmonary hemorrhage was not characterized by a specific pattern, with only mild changes noted, including increased IL-10 and decreased 5-LO expression on some days in affected dogs. Fatal outcome from pulmonary hemorrhages was associated with low TNF-α, high IL-1β, and high iNOS expression, a pattern possibly expressed also in dogs with other forms of acute kidney injury. Conclusion The patterns of cytokine and enzyme expression observed in the present study indicate a complex pro- and anti-inflammatory response to the infection with leptospires. The recognition of these signatures may be of diagnostic and prognostic relevance

  6. The expression of two novel orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) TNF genes in peripheral blood leukocytes, various organs, and fish larvae.

    PubMed

    Lam, Freda Wai-San; Wu, Szu-Yin; Lin, Shih-Jie; Lin, Chin-Chou; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wang, Han-Ching; Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Lin, Han-Tso; Lin, John Han-You

    2011-02-01

    The tumour necrosis factor (TNF) super-family is a group of important cytokines involved in inflammation, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and the general stimulation of the immune system. The TNF gene has been cloned in some bony fish; however, its counterparts are still unidentified in the majority of fish species. In this study, we cloned gTNF-1 and gTNF-2 from the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), an economically important farmed fish. Both genes include 4 exons and 3 introns and encoded 253 and 241 amino acid proteins with a molecular weight of approximately 27 and 26 kDa, respectively. The identity of the putative amino acid sequences between gTNF-1 and gTNF-2 was only 38%. The positions of cysteine residues, a protease cleavage site, and a transmembrane domain sequence derived from gTNF-1 and gTNF-2 were similar to those in other fish and mammalian TNF-α. The mRNA expression levels of the 2 gTNF molecules were evaluated in unstimulated/stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes, various organs, and fish larvae. Following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, gTNF-2 was expressed at higher levels, was up-regulated more quickly, and was more sensitive to the immune response than gTNF-1. gTNF-1 was constitutively expressed in the thymus, brain, and spleen, but it was also expressed in the heart, head kidney, and trunk kidney after LPS stimulation. gTNF-2 was constitutively expressed in the thymus, head kidney, trunk kidney, spleen, and intestine; further, gTNF-2 was highly expressed in all organs post-LPS stimulation. Finally, the gTNF expression levels were evaluated at various developmental stages in grouper larvae. A higher variation of gTNF expression levels was observed in fish larvae from a contaminated hatchery. This study revealed the different expression patterns of gTNF-1 and gTNF-2. In addition, gTNF-2 was more sensitive to pathogens than gTNF-1; therefore, it may be an appropriate marker for pathogen invasion and the evaluation of the larval

  7. Substitution of Aspartate for glycine 1018 in the Type III procollagen (COL3AI) gene causes type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: The mutated allele is present in most blood leukocytes of the asymptomatic and mosaic mother

    SciTech Connect

    Kontusaari, S.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J. ); Stolle, C. ); Pope, F.M.

    1992-09-01

    A proband with arterial ruptures and skin changes characteristic of the type IV variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was found to have a single-base mutation in the type III procollagen gene, which converted the codon for glycine at amino position 1018 to a codon for aspartate. (Amino acid positions are numbered by the standard convention in which the first glycine of the triple-helical domain of an [alpha] chain is number 1. The numbers of positions in the [alpha]1(III) chains can be converted to positions in the human pro[alpha](III) chain by adding 167.). Nucleotide sequencing of overlapping PCR products in which the two alleles were distinguished demonstrated that the mutation of glycine 1018 was the only mutation that changed the primary structure of type III procollagen. The glycine substitution markedly decreased the amount of type III procollagen secreted into the medium by cultured skin fibroblasts from the proband. It is surprising that the same mutation was found in about 94% of the peripheral blood leukocytes from the proband's asymptomatic 72-year-old mother. Other tissues from the mother contained the mutated allele; it was present in 0%-100% of different samples of hair cells and in about 40% of cells from the oral epithelium. Therefore, the mother was a mosaic for the mutation. Since the mutated allele was present in cells derived from all three germ layers, the results indicated that the mutation arose by the late blastocyst stage of development. The results also indicate that assays of blood leukocytes do not always reveal mosaicism or predict phenotypic involvement of tissues, such as blood vessels, that are derived from the same embryonic cells as are leukocytes. 66 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The multiple faces of leukocyte interstitial migration

    PubMed Central

    Lämmermann, Tim; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Spatiotemporal control of leukocyte dynamics within tissues is critical for successful innate and adaptive immune responses. Homeostatic trafficking and coordinated infiltration into and within sites of inflammation and infection rely on signaling in response to extracellular cues that in turn controls a variety of intracellular protein networks regulating leukocyte motility, migration, chemotaxis, positioning, and cell–cell interaction. In contrast to mesenchymal cells, leukocytes migrate in an amoeboid fashion by rapid cycles of actin polymerization and actomyosin contraction, and their migration in tissues is generally referred to as low adhesive and nonproteolytic. The interplay of actin network expansion, contraction, and adhesion shapes the exact mode of amoeboid migration, and in this review, we explore how leukocyte subsets potentially harness the same basic biomechanical mechanisms in a cell-type-specific manner. Most of our detailed understanding of these processes derives from in vitro migration studies in three-dimensional gels and confined spaces that mimic geometrical aspects of physiological tissues. We summarize these in vitro results and then critically compare them to data from intravital imaging of leukocyte interstitial migration in mouse tissues. We outline the technical challenges of obtaining conclusive mechanistic results from intravital studies, discuss leukocyte migration strategies in vivo, and present examples of mode switching during physiological interstitial migration. These findings are also placed in the context of leukocyte migration defects in primary immunodeficiencies. This overview of both in vitro and in vivo studies highlights recent progress in understanding the molecular and biophysical mechanisms that shape robust leukocyte migration responses in physiologically complex and heterogeneous environments. PMID:24573488

  9. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  10. Alloreactive CD154-expressing T-cell subsets with differential sensitivity to the immunosuppressant, belatacept: potential targets of novel belatacept-based regimens

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Chethan; Ganguly, Bishu; Townsend, Robert; White, Jaimie; Levy, Samantha; Moritz, Michael; Mazariegos, George; Sun, Qing; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Belatacept blocks CD28-mediated T-cell costimulation and prevents renal transplant rejection. Understanding T-cell subset sensitivity to belatacept may identify cellular markers for immunosuppression failure to better guide treatment selection. Here, we evaluate the belatacept sensitivity of allo-antigen-specific CD154-expressing-T-cells, whose T-cytotoxic memory (TcM) subset predicts rejection with high sensitivity after non-renal transplantation. The belatacept concentration associated with half-maximal reduction (EC50) of CD154 expression was calculated for 36 T-cell subsets defined by combinations of T-helper (Th), Tc, T-memory and CD28 receptors, following allostimulation of peripheral blood leukocytes from 20 normal healthy subjects. Subsets were ranked by median EC50, and by whether subset EC50 was correlated with and therefore could be represented by the frequency of other subsets. No single subset frequency emerged as the significant correlate of EC50 for a given subset. Most (n = 25) T-cell subsets were sensitive to belatacept. Less sensitive subsets demonstrated a memory phenotype and absence of CD28 receptor. Potential drug-resistance markers for future validation include the low frequency highly differentiated, Th-memory-CD28-negative T-cells with the highest median EC50, and the least differentiated, high-frequency Tc subset, with the most CD28-negative T-cells, the third highest median EC50, and significant correlations with frequencies of the highest number of CD28-negative and memory subsets. PMID:26472085

  11. Maternal BMI Associations with Maternal and Cord Blood Vitamin D Levels in a North American Subset of Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study Participants

    PubMed Central

    Josefson, Jami L.; Reisetter, Anna; Scholtens, Denise M.; Price, Heather E.; Metzger, Boyd E.; Langman, Craig B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity in pregnancy may be associated with reduced placental transfer of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD). The objective of this study was to examine associations between maternal BMI and maternal and cord blood levels of 25-OHD in full term neonates born to a single racial cohort residing at similar latitude. Secondary objectives were to examine associations between maternal glucose tolerance with maternal levels of 25-OHD and the relationship between cord blood 25-OHD levels and neonatal size. Methods This study was conducted among participants of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) Study meeting the following criteria: residing at latitudes 41–43°, maternal white race, and gestational age 39–41 weeks. Healthy pregnant women underwent measures of height, weight, and a 75-g fasting oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at approximately 28 weeks gestation. Maternal and cord blood sera were analyzed for total 25-OHD by HPLC tandem mass spectrometry. Statistical analyses included ANOVA and linear regression models. Results Maternal and cord blood (N = 360) mean levels (sd) of 25-OHD were 37.2 (11.2) and 23.4 (9.2) ng/ml, respectively, and these levels were significantly different among the 3 field centers (ANOVA p< 0.001). Maternal serum 25-OHD was lower by 0.40 ng/ml for BMI higher by 1 kg/m2 (p<0.001) in an adjusted model. Maternal fasting plasma glucose, insulin sensitivity, and presence of GDM were not associated with maternal serum 25-OHD level when adjusted for maternal BMI. Cord blood 25-OHD was lower by 0.26 ng/ml for maternal BMI higher by 1 kg/m2 (p<0.004). With adjustment for maternal age, field center, birth season and maternal serum 25-OHD, the association of cord blood 25-OHD with maternal BMI was attenuated. Neither birth weight nor neonatal adiposity was significantly associated with cord blood 25-OHD levels. Conclusion These results suggest that maternal levels of 25-OHD are associated with maternal BMI. The results also

  12. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints. PMID:27123929

  13. Probabilistic Subset Conjunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohli, Rajeev; Jedidi, Kamel

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce subset conjunction as a classification rule by which an acceptable alternative must satisfy some minimum number of criteria. The rule subsumes conjunctive and disjunctive decision strategies as special cases. Subset conjunction can be represented in a binary-response model, for example, in a logistic regression, using only…

  14. Human peripheral blood and bone marrow Epstein-Barr virus-specific T-cell repertoire in latent infection reveals distinct memory T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Manuel; Na, Il-Kang; Letsch, Anne; Haase, Doreen; Bauer, Sandra; Meisel, Christian; Roemhild, Andy; Reinke, Petra; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2010-06-01

    EBV infection leads to life-long viral persistence. Although EBV infection can result in chronic disease and malignant transformation, most carriers remain disease-free as a result of effective control by T cells. EBV-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells could be demonstrated in acute and chronic infection as well as during latency. Recent studies, however, provide evidence that assessing IFN-gamma alone is insufficient to assess the quantity and quality of a T-cell response. Using overlapping peptide pools of latent EBV nuclear antigen 1 and lytic BZLF-1 protein and multicolor flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the majority of ex vivo EBV-reactive T cells in healthy virus carriers are indeed IL-2- and/or TNF-producing memory cells, the latter being significantly more frequent in BM. After in vitro expansion, a substantial number of EBV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells retained a CC-chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7)-positive memory phenotype. Based on their cytokine profiles, six different EBV-specific T-cell subsets could be distinguished with TNF-single or TNF/IL-2-double producing cells expressing the highest CCR7 levels resembling early-differentiated memory T cells. Our study delineates the memory T-cell profile of a protective immune response and provides a basis for analyzing T-cell responses in EBV-associated diseases. PMID:20232341

  15. Analysis of blood leukocytes in a naturally occurring immunodeficiency of pigs shows the defect is localized to B and T cells.

    PubMed

    Ewen, C L; Cino-Ozuna, A G; He, H; Kerrigan, M A; Dekkers, J C M; Tuggle, C K; Rowland, R R R; Wyatt, C R

    2014-12-15

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is the result of a set of inherited genetic defects which render components of the immune response nonfunctional. In Arabian horses, Jack Russell terriers, and mice, the disorder is a consequence of the absence of T and B lymphocytes, while natural killer (NK) cell and other leukocyte populations remain intact. Preliminary analysis of a naturally acquired form of inherited SCID in a line of pigs showed several defects in the architecture and composition of secondary lymphoid organs. In this study, a quantitative assessment of lymphocyte populations in affected and normal littermates showed depleted T or B lymphocyte populations in affected pigs; however, NK cells and neutrophils were present in numbers comparable to unaffected littermates. The results indicate that the immune defect in pigs shares the same features as other SCID-affected species. PMID:25454085

  16. Remodeling of B-Cell Subsets in Blood during Pegylated IFNα-2a Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection.

    PubMed

    Aspord, Caroline; Bruder Costa, Juliana; Jacob, Marie-Christine; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Bertucci, Inga; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Zoulim, Fabien; Bourliere, Marc; Plumas, Joel; Leroy, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFN-α) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is HBsAg seroconversion. Even though B cells are major mediators of a positive clinical outcome, their modulation during Peg-IFN-α therapy has not yet been described. We investigated here the effects of Peg-IFN-α on eight circulating B-cell subsets thanks to an original multi-gating approach based on CD19, CD27, IgD, CD10, and CD38 markers in patients with CHB treated with nucleos(t)ide analog alone or in combination with Peg-IFN-α. These dynamic changes were analyzed during the 48-weeks of Peg-IFN-α therapy and up to 2 years after the cessation of treatment. The CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10+CD38high transitional B cells and the CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38high plasmablasts continuously increased, whereas the CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10-CD38low naive, CD19+CD27+IgD+ natural memory, and CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38low post-germinal center B cells decreased during the course of Peg-IFNα treatment. Such modulations correlated with a sustained increase in sCD30 levels and the decrease in plasma HBsAg. However, no seroconversion occurred and all parameters returned to baseline after the stop of the treatment. Peg-IFN-α therapy mediates a remodeling of B-cell compartmentalization, without clinical relevance. Our study provides new insights into the immunomodulatory effects of Peg-IFN-α on circulating B-cells, and questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment in CHB. PMID:27281019

  17. Remodeling of B-Cell Subsets in Blood during Pegylated IFNα-2a Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Marie-Christine; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Bertucci, Inga; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Zoulim, Fabien; Bourliere, Marc; Plumas, Joel; Leroy, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFN-α) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is HBsAg seroconversion. Even though B cells are major mediators of a positive clinical outcome, their modulation during Peg-IFN-α therapy has not yet been described. We investigated here the effects of Peg-IFN-α on eight circulating B-cell subsets thanks to an original multi-gating approach based on CD19, CD27, IgD, CD10, and CD38 markers in patients with CHB treated with nucleos(t)ide analog alone or in combination with Peg-IFN-α. These dynamic changes were analyzed during the 48-weeks of Peg-IFN-α therapy and up to 2 years after the cessation of treatment. The CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10+CD38high transitional B cells and the CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38high plasmablasts continuously increased, whereas the CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10-CD38low naive, CD19+CD27+IgD+ natural memory, and CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38low post-germinal center B cells decreased during the course of Peg-IFNα treatment. Such modulations correlated with a sustained increase in sCD30 levels and the decrease in plasma HBsAg. However, no seroconversion occurred and all parameters returned to baseline after the stop of the treatment. Peg-IFN-α therapy mediates a remodeling of B-cell compartmentalization, without clinical relevance. Our study provides new insights into the immunomodulatory effects of Peg-IFN-α on circulating B-cells, and questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment in CHB. PMID:27281019

  18. Oxygen radical production by avian leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Conlon, P; Smith, D; Gowlett, T

    1991-04-01

    Oxygen radical production by heterophils of red-tailed hawks and chickens, and by neutrophils of calves, was evaluated in a chemiluminescence microassay. Leukocytes were isolated by centrifugation of blood in capillary tubes and then challenged with opsonized zymosan in the presence of luminol. Avian heterophils produced significantly fewer oxygen radicals than did bovine neutrophils. PMID:1884301

  19. Leukocyte relaxation properties.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, K L; Dong, C; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Chien, S; Skalak, R

    1988-01-01

    Study of the mechanical properties of leukocytes is useful to understand their passage through narrow capillaries and interaction with other cells. Leukocytes are known to be viscoelastic and their properties have been established by micropipette aspiration techniques. Here, the recovery of leukocytes to their normal spherical form is studied after prolonged deformation in a pipette which is large enough to permit complete entry of the leukocyte. The recovery history is characterized by the time history of the major diameter (d1) and minor diameter (d2). When the cell is removed from the pipette, it shows initially a small rapid recoil followed by a slower asymptotic recovery to the spherical shape. In the presence of cell activation and formation of pseudopods, the time history for recovery is prolonged compared with passive cell recovery. If a protopod pre-existed during the holding period, the recovery only begins when the protopod starts to retract. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3207829

  20. The effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocyte response experiment MA-032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    In a series of studies performed at intervals from 30 day before flight to 30 days after recovery, blood samples were obtained from the three astronauts of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project and from eight control subjects. To determine the effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocytes, tests were performed on blood samples obtained as quickly as possible after splashdown and on the day following recovery. The astronauts' inhalation of propellant gases and the inception of corticosteroid therapy 1 day after recovery provided an additional opportunity to investigate the possible effects of these factors on leukocyte function. Data were obtained during each time period on the total leukocyte count, differential count, leukocyte adhesion, leukocyte migration and chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and histochemical staining for leukocyte acid and alkaline phosphatase. These observations present a variety of in vitro correlates to white blood cell function within the body. Taken together, they serve as a reasonable approximation of the effects of space flight on leukocyte function.

  1. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development. PMID:27178467

  2. Leukocyte Recruitment and Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Leukocytes are recruited into the cerebral microcirculation following an ischemic insult. The leukocyte–endothelial cell adhesion manifested within a few hours after ischemia (followed by reperfusion, I/R) largely reflects an infiltration of neutrophils, while other leukocyte populations appear to dominate the adhesive interactions with the vessel wall at 24 h of reperfusion. The influx of rolling and adherent leukocytes is accompanied by the recruitment of adherent platelets, which likely enhances the cytotoxic potential of the leukocytes to which they are attached. The recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the postischemic brain is mediated by specific adhesion glycoproteins expressed by the activated blood cells and on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. This process is also modulated by different signaling pathways (e.g., CD40/CD40L, Notch) and cytokines (e.g., RANTES) that are activated/released following I/R. Some of the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypercholesterolemia and obesity appear to exacerbate the leukocyte and platelet recruitment elicited by brain I/R. Although lymphocyte–endothelial cell and –platelet interactions in the postischemic cerebral microcirculation have not been evaluated to date, recent evidence in experimental animals implicate both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the cerebral microvascular dysfunction, inflammation, and tissue injury associated with brain I/R. Evidence implicating regulatory T-cells as cerebroprotective modulators of the inflammatory and tissue injury responses to brain I/R support a continued focus on leukocytes as a target for therapeutic intervention in ischemic stroke. PMID:19579016

  3. Identification and characterization of human dendritic cell subsets in the steady state: a review of our current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are generally categorized as a group of rare antigen presenting cells that are to the crucial development of immune responses to pathogens and also of tolerance to self-antigens. Therefore, having the ability to identify DC in specific tissues and to test their functional abilities in the steady state are scientific gaps needing attention. Research on primary human DC is lacking due to their rarity and the difficulty of obtaining tissue samples. However, recent findings have shown that several different DC subsets exist, and that these subsets vary both by markers expressed and functions depending on their specific microenvironment. After discriminating from other cell types, DC can be split into myeloid and plasmacytoid fractions. While plasmacytoid DC express definite markers, CD123 and BDCA-2, myeloid DC encompass several different subsets with overlapping markers expressed. Such markers include the blood DC antigens BDCA-1 and BDCA-3, along with Langerin, CD1a and CD14. Marker specificity is further reduced when accounting for microenvironmental differences, as observed in the blood, primary lymphoid tissues, skin and lungs. The mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) has been used to measure the strength of antigen presentation by specific DC subsets. Surface markers and MLR require standardization to enable consistent identification of and comparisons between DC subsets. To alleviate these issues, researchers have begun comparing DC subsets at the transcriptional level. This has allowed degrees of relatedness to be determined between DC in different microenvironments, and should be a continued area of focus in years to come. PMID:26956785

  4. A role for leukocyte-endothelial adhesion mechanisms in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F.; Mora, Graciela Navarro; Martinello, Marianna; Rossi, Barbara; Merigo, Flavia; Ottoboni, Linda; Bach, Simona; Angiari, Stefano; Benati, Donatella; Chakir, Asmaa; Zanetti, Lara; Schio, Federica; Osculati, Antonio; Marzola, Pasquina; Nicolato, Elena; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Xia, Lijun; Lowe, John B.; McEver, Rodger P.; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Butcher, Eugene C.; Constantin, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, a chronic neurological disorder that affects approximately 1 percent of the world population, are not well understood1–3. Using a mouse model of epilepsy, we show that seizures induce elevated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules and enhanced leukocyte rolling and arrest in brain vessels mediated by the leukocyte mucin P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and leukocyte integrins α4β1 and αLβ2. Inhibition of leukocyte-vascular interactions either with blocking antibodies, or in mice genetically deficient in functional PSGL-1, dramatically reduced seizures. Treatment with blocking antibodies following acute seizures prevented the development of epilepsy. Neutrophil depletion also inhibited acute seizure induction and chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage, which is known to enhance neuronal excitability, was induced by acute seizure activity but was prevented by blockade of leukocyte-vascular adhesion, suggesting a pathogenetic link between leukocyte-vascular interactions, BBB damage and seizure generation. Consistent with potential leukocyte involvement in the human, leukocytes were more abundant in brains of epileptics than of controls. Our results suggest leukocyte-endothelial interaction as a potential target for the prevention and treatment of epilepsy. PMID:19029985

  5. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  6. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: in vitro assessment of neutrophil function and leukocyte integrin expression.

    PubMed Central

    Olchowy, T W; Bochsler, P N; Neilsen, N R; Welborn, M G; Slauson, D O

    1994-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was identified in a two-month-old Holstein heifer calf using DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the affected calf and other clinical parameters. Neutrophil integrin expression (CD18, CD11a, CD11c), aggregation, and transendothelial migration were studied in vitro. Neutrophils were isolated from the affected calf and from normal, healthy, age-matched control Holstein calves. Neutrophils isolated from the affected BLAD calf had decreased expression of leukocyte integrins on their cell surface, decreased ability to aggregate in response to chemotactic stimuli, and decreased ability to migrate across bovine endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. Transendothelial migration of neutrophils from normal calves was reduced to levels comparable to the BLAD neutrophils by treatment with an anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb 60.3). Peripheral-blood lymphocytes from the BLAD calf also expressed negligible levels of leukocyte integrins, similar to their neutrophil counterparts. Our experimental findings in vitro correlate well with the clinical observations of decreased leukocyte trafficking and diminished host defense in leukocyte adhesion-deficient animals. The syndrome of BLAD may be a suitable model for one of the human leukocyte adhesion deficiency disorders. Images Fig. 4. PMID:7911733

  7. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: in vitro assessment of neutrophil function and leukocyte integrin expression.

    PubMed

    Olchowy, T W; Bochsler, P N; Neilsen, N R; Welborn, M G; Slauson, D O

    1994-04-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was identified in a two-month-old Holstein heifer calf using DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the affected calf and other clinical parameters. Neutrophil integrin expression (CD18, CD11a, CD11c), aggregation, and transendothelial migration were studied in vitro. Neutrophils were isolated from the affected calf and from normal, healthy, age-matched control Holstein calves. Neutrophils isolated from the affected BLAD calf had decreased expression of leukocyte integrins on their cell surface, decreased ability to aggregate in response to chemotactic stimuli, and decreased ability to migrate across bovine endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. Transendothelial migration of neutrophils from normal calves was reduced to levels comparable to the BLAD neutrophils by treatment with an anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb 60.3). Peripheral-blood lymphocytes from the BLAD calf also expressed negligible levels of leukocyte integrins, similar to their neutrophil counterparts. Our experimental findings in vitro correlate well with the clinical observations of decreased leukocyte trafficking and diminished host defense in leukocyte adhesion-deficient animals. The syndrome of BLAD may be a suitable model for one of the human leukocyte adhesion deficiency disorders. PMID:7911733

  8. Omics for prediction of environmental health effects: Blood leukocyte-based cross-omic profiling reliably predicts diseases associated with tobacco smoking

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Hebels, Dennie G.; Valavanis, Ioannis; Liampa, Irene; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Johansson, Anders; Palli, Domenico; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis; Jennen, Danyel G. J.; Krauskopf, Julian; Jetten, Marlon J.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Gottschalk, Ralph; van Leeuwen, Danitsja; Timmermans, Leen; de Kok, Theo M.C.M.; Botsivali, Maria; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Kelly, Rachel; Vermeulen, Roel; Portengen, Lutzen; Saberi-Hosnijeh, Fatemeh; Melin, Beatrice; Hallmans, Göran; Lenner, Per; Keun, Hector C.; Siskos, Alexandros; Athersuch, Toby J.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Stephanou, Euripides G.; Myridakis, Antonis; Fazzo, Lucia; De Santis, Marco; Comba, Pietro; Kiviranta, Hannu; Rantakokko, Panu; Airaksinen, Riikka; Ruokojärvi, Päivi; Gilthorpe, Mark; Fleming, Sarah; Fleming, Thomas; Tu, Yu-Kang; Jonsson, Bo; Lundh, Thomas; Chen, Wei J.; Lee, Wen-Chung; Kate Hsiao, Chuhsing; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Hung, Hung; Liao, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The utility of blood-based omic profiles for linking environmental exposures to their potential health effects was evaluated in 649 individuals, drawn from the general population, in relation to tobacco smoking, an exposure with well-characterised health effects. Using disease connectivity analysis, we found that the combination of smoking-modified, genome-wide gene (including miRNA) expression and DNA methylation profiles predicts with remarkable reliability most diseases and conditions independently known to be causally associated with smoking (indicative estimates of sensitivity and positive predictive value 94% and 84%, respectively). Bioinformatics analysis reveals the importance of a small number of smoking-modified, master-regulatory genes and suggest a central role for altered ubiquitination. The smoking-induced gene expression profiles overlap significantly with profiles present in blood cells of patients with lung cancer or coronary heart disease, diseases strongly associated with tobacco smoking. These results provide proof-of-principle support to the suggestion that omic profiling in peripheral blood has the potential of identifying early, disease-related perturbations caused by toxic exposures and may be a useful tool in hazard and risk assessment. PMID:26837704

  9. Adhesion of leukocytes to dermal endothelial cells is induced after single-dose, but reduced after repeated doses of UVA.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M; Pirthauer, M; Plewig, G

    1997-12-01

    Approximately 20-50% of ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation delivered to the skin surface may reach the human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) that play a pivotal role in cellular inflammatory tissue; however, the pathophysiologic role of HDMEC in UVA-induced skin changes is largely unknown. Based on previous in vivo and in vitro studies revealing UVA-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, we studied isolated HDMEC under various conditions in order to further delineate the impact of UVA on these cells. The expression of cell adhesion molecules was determined by flow cytometry and the resulting changes of stable adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells were quantitated for granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes using a newly developed multicellular adhesion assay. Additionally, antibody blocking experiments were performed to delineate the role of individual cell adhesion molecules in UVA-induced leukocyte adherence. High-dose polychromatic UVA (25 J per cm2, maximal emission at 375 nm) induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin with different kinetics but correlating the adhesion of leukocyte subsets. This effect subsided, however, in the course of 3-6 daily applied UVA doses. Moreover, pro-inflammatory cytokine challenge by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-alpha resulted in significantly weaker induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin in repeatedly UVA-exposed HDMEC. Differential quantitation of peripheral blood derived granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes revealed reduced adhesion particularly of lymphocytes followed by monocytes and granulocytes compared with leukocyte adhesion to nonirradiated but cytokine-stimulated HDMEC. It is concluded that UVA substantially influences endothelial cell adhesion molecules expression and thus directly interferes with leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Divergent UVA-induced effects in this respect can be attributed to the mode of UV exposure

  10. Influence of Hydration Status on Changes in Plasma Cortisol, Leukocytes, and Antigen-Stimulated Cytokine Production by Whole Blood Culture following Prolonged Exercise.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Ida S; Killer, Sophie C; Gleeson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Elevated antigen-stimulated anti-inflammatory cytokine production appears to be a risk factor for upper respiratory tract illness in athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged exercise and hydration on antigen-stimulated cytokine production. Twelve healthy males cycled for 120 min at 60% [Formula: see text] on two occasions, either euhydrated or moderately hypohydrated (induced by fluid restriction for 24 h). Blood samples were collected before and after exercise and following 2 h recovery for determination of cell counts, plasma cortisol, and in vitro antigen-stimulated cytokine production by whole blood culture. Fluid restriction resulted in mean body mass loss of 1.3% and 3.9% before and after exercise, respectively. Exercise elicited a significant leukocytosis and elevated plasma cortisol, with no differences between trials. IL-6 production was significantly reduced 2 h postexercise (P < 0.05), while IL-10 production was elevated postexercise (P < 0.05). IFN- γ and IL-2 production tended to decrease postexercise. No significant effect of hydration status was observed for the measured variables. Prolonged exercise appears to result in augmented anti-inflammatory cytokine release in response to antigen challenge, possibly coupled with acute suppression of proinflammatory cytokine production, corresponding with studies using mitogen or endotoxin as stimulant. Moderate hypohydration does not appear to influence these changes. PMID:24967270

  11. Lower bounds for identifying subset members with subset queries

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.

    1994-04-01

    An instance of a group testing problem is a set of objects {Omicron}and an unknown subset P of {Omicron}.The task is to determine P by using queries of the type ``does P intersect ``Q``, where Q is a subset of {Omicron}. This problem occurs in areas such as fault detection, multiaccess communications, optimal search, blood testing and chromosome mapping. Consider the two stage algorithm for solving a group testing problem where in the first stage, a predetermined set of queries, are asked in parallel, and in the second stage, P is determined by testing individual objects. Let n = {vert_bar}{Omicron}{vert_bar}. Suppose that P is generated by independently adding each {chi} {element_of}{Omicron} to P with probability p/n. Let q{sub 1} (q{sub 2}) be the number of queries asked in the first (second) stage of this algorithm. We show that if q{sub 1} = o(log(n) log(n)/log log(n)), then Exp(q{sub 2}) = n{sup l{minus}0(1)}, while there exist algorithms with q{sub 1} = O(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) and Exp(q{sub 2}) = o(l). The proof involves a relaxation technique which can be used with arbitrary distributions. The best previously known bound is q{sub 1} + Exp(q{sub 2}) = {Omega}(p log(n)). For general group testing algorithms, our results imply that if the average number of queries over the course of n{sup {gamma}} ({gamma} > 0) independent experiments is O n{sup l{minus}{element_of}}, then with high probability {Omega}(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) non-singleton subsets are queried. This settles a conjecture of Bill Bruno and David Torney and has important consequences for the use of group testing in screening DNA libraries and other applications where its is more cost effective to use non-adaptive algorithms and/or expensive to prepare a subset Q for its first test.

  12. CERES Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-18

    Description:  Search and subset CERES Level 2 SSF and FLASHFlux data Customization Options Search and subset by date, time, and geolocation Subset by parameter and ... HDF and NetCDF Details:  CERES Search and Subset Tool Screenshot:  ...

  13. Alteration of rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte function after thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Gruber, D F; D'Alesandro, M M

    1989-01-01

    One portion of host defense to bacterial challenge(s) involves the activation and infiltration of endogenous polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thermal injuries are frequently associated with immunologic abnormalities including alterations of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-associated nonspecific resistance. We examined isolated peripheral rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes for alterations in membrane potential, oxidative capability, and locomotor function after the experimental application of 20% full-thickness body surface area thermal injury. Thermal injury resulted in significant reductions of peripheral red blood cell concentration(s) and increases in leukocyte and platelet concentrations for 42 days after injury. In addition to the quantitative changes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes also demonstrated altered qualitative functions. Compared with phorbol myristate acetate-induced activation of normal cells, polymorphonuclear leukocyte membranes from thermal-injured animals were electrophysiologically less responsive for 3 weeks after injury. The ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to produce intracellular H2O2, a measure of oxidative function, was also significantly decreased for 7 days after injury. The paradox in this paradigm of thermal injury was the demonstration of peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocyte quantitative increases with concurrent significant qualitative impairment. Qualitative lesions included altered states of membrane depolarization and depressed oxidative capability that may individually, or collectively, reduce nonspecific immune capabilities of the host to levels that are inadequate to combat infection. PMID:2793916

  14. The Fruiting Bodies, Submerged Culture Biomass, and Acidic Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannan of Yellow Brain Mushroom Tremella mesenterica Modulate the Immunity of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Splenocytes in Rats with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Fang-Yi; Wasser, Solomon P; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic disease with hyperglycemia and impaired immune function, is increasing worldwide. Progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 DM has recently become a target for early intervention. The fruiting bodies (FB) and submerged culture mycelium (CM) of Tremella mesenterica, an edible and medicinal mushroom, have been demonstrated to have antihyperglycemic and immunomodulatory activities in type 1 DM rats. Herein, we investigated the effects of acidic polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GX) extracted from CM on the immunocyte responses. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) plus nicotinamide (200 mg/kg) for the induction of IGT, and gavaged daily with vehicle, FB, CM, or GX (1 g/kg/day). Rats injected with saline and gavaged vehicle were used as controls. Two weeks later, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and splenocytes were collected. Ingestion of FB, CM, and GX significantly decreased blood glucose levels in the postprandial period and in oral glucose tolerance test, and partially reversed T-splenocytic proliferation in IGT rats. CM significantly decreased T-helper lymphocytes in the PBLs and B-splenocytes. In addition, FB, CM, and GX significantly reversed the IGT-induced decreases in tumor necrosis factor-α production; GX significantly increased interleukin-6 production in T-lymphocytes in the PBLs and splenocytes; and CM and GX significantly reversed IGT-induced decrease in interferon-γ production in T-lymphocytes in the spleen. In conclusion, FB, CM, and acidic polysaccharide GX of T. mesenterica may increase T-cell immunity via the elevation of proinflammatory and T-helper cytokine production in rats with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:24872934

  15. Factors influencing human leukocyte adherence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stepniewicz, W; Tchórzewski, H; Luciak, M

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed on factors influencing leucocyte adherence in vitro. Blood condensation was found to increase leukocyte adherence. Addition of heparin, dextran or ethanol caused a significant reduction of white blood cell count in blood samples in comparison with blood mixed with sodium EDTA or ACD solution. This suggests the existence of two granulocyte subpopulations; viz, rapidly adhering and slowly adhering. Heparin enhanced granulocyte adherence, while dextran and ethanol decreased it. Five-day storage of ACD blood led to a decrease in granulocyte adherence, while addition of heparin or histamine to ACD blood prevented this change to occur. The glucose concentration of 1,000 mg/dl augmented granulocyte adherence, while higher glucose concentrations induced its progressive fall below the control values. There was no significant change of lymphocyte adherence during the experiments. PMID:6194070

  16. Biomechanics of leukocyte rolling.

    PubMed

    Sundd, Prithu; Pospieszalska, Maria K; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Ley, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Leukocyte rolling on endothelial cells and other P-selectin substrates is mediated by P-selectin binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 expressed on the tips of leukocyte microvilli. Leukocyte rolling is a result of rapid, yet balanced formation and dissociation of selectin-ligand bonds in the presence of hydrodynamic shear forces. The hydrodynamic forces acting on the bonds may either increase (catch bonds) or decrease (slip bonds) their lifetimes. The force-dependent 'catch-slip' bond kinetics are explained using the 'two pathway model' for bond dissociation. Both the 'sliding-rebinding' and the 'allosteric' mechanisms attribute 'catch-slip' bond behavior to the force-induced conformational changes in the lectin-EGF domain hinge of selectins. Below a threshold shear stress, selectins cannot mediate rolling. This 'shear-threshold' phenomenon is a consequence of shear-enhanced tethering and catch bond-enhanced rolling. Quantitative dynamic footprinting microscopy has revealed that leukocytes rolling at venular shear stresses (>0.6 Pa) undergo cellular deformation (large footprint) and form long tethers. The hydrodynamic shear force and torque acting on the rolling cell are thought to be synergistically balanced by the forces acting on tethers and stressed microvilli, however, their relative contribution remains to be determined. Thus, improvement beyond the current understanding requires in silico models that can predict both cellular and microvillus deformation and experiments that allow measurement of forces acting on individual microvilli and tethers. PMID:21515934

  17. Effect of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Combined with Argon-Helium Cryosurgery System on the Changes of NK Cells and T Cell Subsets in Peripheral Blood of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Manping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Bin, Huang

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive tumors in humans. T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells are the body's first line of defense to prevent tumor cell growth. Previous studies have demonstrated that transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with argon-helium cryosurgery system (AHCS) can effectively treat liver cancer. However, the mechanism of the treatment is unclear yet. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TACE combined with AHCS on the changes of T cell subsets and NK cells in peripheral blood of HCC. Our data show that alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in peripheral blood were significantly up-regulated in HCC patients before treatment when compared with healthy people and reduced after TACE combined with AHCS treatment (P < 0.01). In addition, we found that CD4+ cells and NK cells decreased (P < 0.05) and CD8+ cells increased (P < 0.05) in HCC patients when compared with healthy people. After treatment, the CD4+ cells, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and NK cells were dramatically increased in HCC patients (P < 0.05). In contrast, CD8+ cells were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). TACE combined with AHCS treatment significantly prolonged 1-year survival rate of HCC patients and did not show significant side effects. Taken together, our data indicate that TACE combined with AHCS treatment improves patients' immune system. It is a feasible and effective therapeutic method for HCC patients. PMID:27259326

  18. Rescue from acute neuroinflammation by pharmacological chemokine-mediated deviation of leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neutrophil influx is an important sign of hyperacute neuroinflammation, whereas the entry of activated lymphocytes into the brain parenchyma is a hallmark of chronic inflammatory processes, as observed in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Clinically approved or experimental therapies for neuroinflammation act by blocking leukocyte penetration of the blood brain barrier. However, in view of unsatisfactory results and severe side effects, complementary therapies are needed. We have examined the effect of chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose (COAM), a potent antiviral polycarboxylic acid on EAE. Methods EAE was induced in SJL/J mice by immunization with spinal cord homogenate (SCH) or in IFN-γ-deficient BALB/c (KO) mice with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55). Mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with COAM or saline at different time points after immunization. Clinical disease and histopathology were compared between both groups. IFN expression was analyzed in COAM-treated MEF cell cultures and in sera and peritoneal fluids of COAM-treated animals by quantitative PCR, ELISA and a bioassay on L929 cells. Populations of immune cell subsets in the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS) were quantified at different stages of disease development by flow cytometry and differential cell count analysis. Expression levels of selected chemokine genes in the CNS were determined by quantitative PCR. Results We discovered that COAM (2 mg i.p. per mouse on days 0 and 7) protects significantly against hyperacute SCH-induced EAE in SJL/J mice and MOG35-55-induced EAE in IFN-γ KO mice. COAM deviated leukocyte trafficking from the CNS into the periphery. In the CNS, COAM reduced four-fold the expression levels of the neutrophil CXC chemokines KC/CXCL1 and MIP-2/CXCL2. Whereas the effects of COAM on circulating blood and splenic leukocytes were limited, significant alterations were

  19. Myeloperoxidase-mediated activation of xenobiotics by human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, A H; Uetrecht, J P

    1993-10-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes contain a variety of enzymes that are capable of metabolising xenobiotics. The enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) appears to be the most important for drug metabolism. MPO is a peroxidase/oxidase and generates the powerful oxidant hypochlorous acid. MPO- or MPO-generated oxidants are capable of oxidizing a wide variety of compounds and a broad range of functional groups, especially those that contain nitrogen and sulfur. Leukocytes have a role in immune response; therefore, reactive intermediates generated by leukocyte metabolism of xenobiotics may have a role in idiosyncratic drug reactions, particularly those that are immune-mediated such as drug-induced lupus or agranulocytosis. PMID:8236277

  20. Uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes by brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, S.; Husain, M.M.; Adametz, J.R.; Pallin, J.S.; Angtuaco, T.L.; Boyd, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Uptake of indium-labeled leukocytes was seen in two cases of histologically proven brain metastasis. In one, this led to misdiagnosis of the lesion as an abscess. On histological evaluation, a large number of white blood cells or macrophages was seen at the neoplastic sites. Reasons for leukocyte accumulation around metastatic brain neoplasms are discussed. In contrast to the current reports that indium-labeled leukocyte scans can differentiate intracranial infection from tumor, these cases demonstrate their lack of specificity in the detection of brain abscess.

  1. HIV-1 gp120 induces cytokine expression, leukocyte adhesion, and transmigration across the blood-brain barrier: modulatory effects of STAT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Akhter, Sidra; Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2009-03-01

    How neuroinflammatory activities affect signaling pathways leading to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury during HIV/AIDS are currently unknown. Our previous work demonstrated that HIV-1 exposure activates pro-inflammatory genes in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and showed that these genes are linked to the janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway. Here, we report that HIV-1 gp120 protein activated STAT1 and induced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion in HBMEC. IL-6, IL-8, and gp120 increased monocyte adhesion and migration across in vitro BBB models. The STAT1 inhibitor, fludarabine, prevented gp120-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Inhibitors of STAT1, mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) (PD98059), and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) (LY294002), blocked gp120-induced STAT1 activation and significantly diminished IL-8-, IL-6-, and gp120-induced monocyte adhesion and migration across in vitro BBB models. These data support the notion that STAT1 plays an important role in gp120-induced inflammation and BBB dysfunction associated with viral infection. Results also suggest crosstalk between STAT1, MEK, and PI3K pathways in gp120-induced BBB dysfunction. Inhibition of STAT1 activation could provide a unique therapeutic strategy to decrease neuroinflammation and BBB dysfunction in HIV/AIDS. PMID:19103208

  2. Phosphorylation of a cytosolic 65-kDa protein induced by interleukin 1 in glucocorticoid pretreated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushima, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Copeland, T.D.; Akahoshi, T.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1987-11-15

    The authors have previously observed that glucocorticoids dramatically increase the number of interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptors on normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) without significant change in the binding affinity. They, therefore, used such a receptor-enriched glucocorticoid-pretreated PBMC to investigate whether IL-1 induces/increases the phosphorylation of any cell-associated proteins, including possible autophosphorylation of IL-1 receptors. Extraction of /sup 125/I-labeled IL-1..cap alpha.. cross-linked to IL-1 receptor on steroid-treated PBMC yielded two bands estimated to be 60 and 70 kDa in molecular mass. No molecules were significantly cross-linked with /sup 125/I-labeled IL-1..gamma.. on untreated PBMC. Fractionation of extracts of IL-1-stimulated prednisolone-pretreated PMBC by ultracentrifugation showed that pp65 is located in the cytosol, suggesting that pp65 is not the IL-1 receptor itself. Protein kinase inhibitors, HA1004 and W-7, but not H07, significantly inhibited the induction of the phosphorylation of 65-kDa protein by IL-1. These data indicate that the glucocorticoid-induced IL-1 receptor is functional and either contains or is closely associated with a serine kinase that is distinct from protein kinase C.

  3. Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is concerned with the health risks to astronauts, particularly those risks related to radiation exposure. Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of (A) peripheral leukocyte distribution; (B) plasma cytokine levels; (C) cytokine production profiles following whole blood stimulation of either T cells or monocytes.

  4. Alterations in Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability to Large and Small Molecules and Leukocyte Accumulation after Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects of Post-Traumatic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Lotocki, George; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Perez, Enrique R.; Sanchez-Molano, Juliana; Furones-Alonso, Ofelia; Bramlett, Helen M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the temporal and regional profile of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to both large and small molecules after moderate fluid percussion (FP) brain injury in rats and determined the effects of post-traumatic modest hypothermia (33°C/4 h) on these vascular perturbations. The visible tracers biotin-dextrin-amine 3000 (BDA-3K, 3 kDa) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa) were injected intravenously at 4 h or 3 or 7 days post-TBI. At 30 min after the tracer infusion, both small and large molecular weight tracers were detected in the contusion area as well as remote regions adjacent to the injury epicenter in both cortical and hippocampal structures. In areas adjacent to the contusion site, increased permeability to the small molecular weight tracer (BDA-3K) was evident at 4 h post-TBI and remained visible after 7 days survival. In contrast, the larger tracer molecule (HRP) appeared in these remote areas at acute permeable sites but was not detected at later post-traumatic time periods. A regionally specific relationship was documented at 3 days between the late-occurring permeability changes observed with BDA-3K and the accumulation of CD68-positive macrophages. Mild hypothermia initiated 30 min after TBI reduced permeability to both large and small tracers and the infiltration of CD68-positive cells. These results indicate that moderate brain injury produces temperature-sensitive acute, as well as more long-lasting vascular perturbations associated with secondary injury mechanisms. PMID:19558276

  5. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    PubMed Central

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-01-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1β or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1β or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. PMID:16179391

  6. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  7. The Subset Sum game☆

    PubMed Central

    Darmann, Andreas; Nicosia, Gaia; Pferschy, Ulrich; Schauer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    In this work we address a game theoretic variant of the Subset Sum problem, in which two decision makers (agents/players) compete for the usage of a common resource represented by a knapsack capacity. Each agent owns a set of integer weighted items and wants to maximize the total weight of its own items included in the knapsack. The solution is built as follows: Each agent, in turn, selects one of its items (not previously selected) and includes it in the knapsack if there is enough capacity. The process ends when the remaining capacity is too small for including any item left. We look at the problem from a single agent point of view and show that finding an optimal sequence of items to select is an NP-hard problem. Therefore we propose two natural heuristic strategies and analyze their worst-case performance when (1) the opponent is able to play optimally and (2) the opponent adopts a greedy strategy. From a centralized perspective we observe that some known results on the approximation of the classical Subset Sum can be effectively adapted to the multi-agent version of the problem. PMID:25844012

  8. Towards a computational model of leukocyte adhesion cascade: Leukocyte rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khismatullin, Damir

    2005-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into sites of acute and chronic inflammation is a vital component of the innate immune response in humans and plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. Leukocytes extravasate into the inflamed tissue through a multi-step process called "leukocyte adhesion cascade", which involves initial contact of a leukocyte with activated endothelium (tethering), leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transendothelial migration. Recently we developed a fully three-dimensional CFD model of receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The model treats the leukocyte as a viscoelastic cell with the nucleus located in the intracellular space and cylindrical microvilli distributed over the cell membrane. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is assumed to be mediated by adhesion molecules expressed on the tips of cell microvilli and on endothelium. We show that the model can predict both shape changes and velocities of rolling leukocytes under physiological flow conditions. Results of this study also indicate that viscosity of the cytoplasm is a critical parameter of leukocyte adhesion, affecting the cell's ability to roll on endothelium. This work is supported by NIH Grant HL- 57446 and NCSA Grant BCS040006 and utilized the NCSA IBM p690.

  9. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel

    PubMed Central

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14+ monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  10. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... fight infection and are part of your body's defense system. Platelets help blood to clot when you have a cut or wound. Bone marrow, the spongy material inside your bones, makes new blood cells. Blood cells ...

  11. CERES Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-24

    ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules. Subset results are ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules. Subset results are ...

  12. MOPITT Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-06

    Description:  Search and subset MOPITT Version 5 & 6 Level 2 data Customization Options Search and subset MOPITT Version 5 and Version 6 Level 2 data Update the ... NetCDF3 and NetCDF4 Details:  MOPITT Search and Subset Tool Acronyms/Abbreviations:  MOPITT ...

  13. 111 In-labeled leukocytes in the detection of prosthetic vascular graft infections

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.R.; Boyd, C.M.; Read, R.C.; Thompson, B.W.; Barnes, R.W.; Shah, H.R.; Balachandran, S.; Ferris, E.J.

    1986-07-01

    Making a clinical diagnosis of infection in prosthetic vascular grafts is difficult but when undiagnosed, this condition has a high mortality rate. Using Indium-111-labeled white-blood cells, 30 scans were performed in 21 patients suspected of having a prosthetic graft infection. The diagnosis of infected graft was confirmed by surgery in all cases, and lack of infection was established by resolution of symptoms with conservative therapy. Twenty-four hour scans of autologous Indium-111 leukocytes were obtained, and correlative CT studies were done in 11 cases. There were 13 infected grafts at surgery (purulent material present), and scans were positive in all (100% sensitivity); of 17 scans, there were 15 true negatives and two false positives (88% specificity). Using the criteria of gas or fluid around the graft, the sensitivity of CT was only 37% in a small subset of these patients. One-half of the cases in which infection was suspected clinically had no infection and had negative scans. Various types of grafts and graft materials were used, and there was no correlation with presence or absence of infection on the basis of the type of graft. Extragraft infection sites were found in five patients. In conclusion, use of Indium-111 leukocytes has been found to be an accurate and valuable diagnostic method for evaluation of suspected prosthetic vascular graft infection, and to have higher diagnostic accuracy than CT.

  14. Computational modeling of leukocyte adhesion cascade (LAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kausik

    2005-11-01

    In response to an inflammation in the body, leukocytes (white blood cell) interact with the endothelium (interior wall of blood vessel) through a series of steps--capture, rolling, adhesion and transmigration--critical for proper functioning of the immune system. We are numerically simulating this process using a Front-tracking finite-difference method. The viscoelastcity of the cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus are incorporated and allowed to change with time in response to the cell surface molecular chemistry. The molecular level forces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions are accounted for by stochastic spring-peeling model. Even though leukocyte rolling has been investigated through various models, the transitioning through subsequent steps, specifically firm adhesion and transmigration through endothelial layer, has not been modeled. The change of viscoelastic properties due to the leukocyte activation is observed to play a critical role in mediating the transition from rolling to transmigration. We will provide details of our approach and discuss preliminary results.

  15. CD99 is essential for leukocyte diapedesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Eric M; Deroche, Alana; Bae, Youngmee; Muller, William A

    2008-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into inflamed tissue requires migration of leukocytes from the blood stream across the endothelial lining and the basement membrane of the local blood vessels. CD99 in humans is a 32-kDa highly O-glycosylated cell surface protein expressed on most leukocytes. The authors recently found CD99 to be expressed in leukocytes and at human endothelial cell contacts. Human CD99 is involved in homophilic interaction between the two cell types and participates in the transendothelial migration of monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in vitro. To test the role of CD99 in vivo, the authors cloned murine CD99 (muCD99), expressed it in vitro, and generated a blocking monoclonal antibody against it. We first showed that muCD99 is expressed on mouse leukocytes as well as enriched at the endothelial cell borders. Transfection of cells with muCD99 imparts on them the ability to aggregate in a CD99-dependent homophilic manner. Cells expressing muCD99 did not bind to cells expressing murine or human platelet endothelial call adhesion molecule (PECAM) or human CD99. In the thioglycollate peritonitis model of inflammation, anti-CD99 monoclonal antibody blocked the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes by over 40% and 80%, respectively, at 18 h. Microscopy showed that this blocking occurred at the luminal surface of venules. The authors conclude that CD99 plays a major role in the emigration of leukocytes in vivo. PMID:18923973

  16. Getting Leukocytes to the Site of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Muller, W. A.

    2013-01-01

    There is no “response” in either the innate or adaptive immune response unless leukocytes cross blood vessels. They do this through the process of diapedesis, in which the leukocyte moves in ameboid fashion through tightly apposed endothelial borders (paracellular transmigration) and in some cases through the endothelial cell itself (transcellular migration). This review summarizes the steps leading up to diapedesis, then focuses on the molecules and mechanisms responsible for transendothelial migration. Surprisingly, many of the same molecules and mechanisms that regulate paracellular migration also control transcellular migration, including a major role for membrane from the recently described lateral border recycling compartment. A hypothesis that integrates the various known mechanisms of transmigration is proposed. PMID:23345459

  17. Lymphocyte subset analysis by Boolean algebra: a phenotypic approach using a cocktail of 5 antibodies and 3 color immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S D; Peters, L E; Wotherspoon, J S; Crowe, S M

    1994-03-01

    Commercial reagent kits for the evaluation of leukocyte subsets involve the staining of a panel of up to six tubes using combinations of pre-mixed fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and R-phycoerythrin (PE) conjugated monoclonal antibodies. We describe a rapid method whereby total CD3+ T-cells, CD4+ T-cells (CD3+ CD4+), CD8+ T-cells (CD3+ CD8+), putative gamma delta-receptor-T-cells (CD3+ CD4- CD8-), and T-cells that are CD3+ CD4+ CD8+ as well as B-lymphocytes and NK-cells can be enumerated after staining in a single tube. Whole blood specimens are labelled with a mixture of antibodies: FITC-conjugated antibodies to CD4 and CD19, PE-conjugated antibodies to CD8 and CD16, and either peridinin chlorophyll protein (PerCP) or allophycocyanin (APC) labelling for antibodies to CD3. After recording 20,000 events the data were analysed on the Consort 32 computer system and LYSYS-II (Becton Dickinson, San Jose, CA) and all of the lymphocyte subset values were determined by Boolean algebra using a technique we refer to as Boolean gate analysis (BGA). Our study has shown that BGA is statistically equivalent to SimulSET lymphocyte subset analysis. Furthermore, the procedure reduces the number of tubes required to two with consequential saving in reagents, consumables, and time. PMID:7514523

  18. Quality control in a manual and an automated leukocyte differential count.

    PubMed

    Takubo, T; Tatsumi, N

    1999-01-01

    Quality control (QC) has been introduced in laboratories, and QC surveys in leukocyte differential count to enhance quality have been performed by College of American Pathologists, Japanese Association of Medical Technologists, Osaka Medical Association and manufacturers. The results of QC survey in a manual leukocyte differential count indicated problems on the differentiation of segmented neutrophils and band neutrophils and the detection of pathological blood cells on blood smear. While the results of QC survey in an automated leukocyte differential count performed by same manufacturer with an automated blood cell counter were satisfactory, however, there was a difference in leukocyte differential cell counts among laboratories with other manufacturer's instruments because the synthetic blood material used in QC is an exclusive item for an instrument. It is necessary to further reeducate the medical technologists in order to improve morphological performance, and to standardize the synthetic blood material for compatibility with various automated blood cell counters. PMID:10926263

  19. Factors affecting leukocyte count in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Carel, R S; Eviatar, J

    1985-09-01

    The relationships between white blood cell (WBC) count, smoking, and other health variables were determined among 35,000 apparently healthy men and women. The effect of smoking on the WBC count was greater than that of all other variables. The leukocyte level and the variance in WBC count values increased with increased smoking intensity. The relationship between smoking intensity and leukocyte level is expressed quantitatively by the following regression equation: WBC (10(3)/mm3) = 7.1 + 0.05(SM), where SM has seven values according to the smoking level. Multiple regression analysis with additional variables other than smoking did not much improve the predictive value of the equation. The effect of smoking on WBC count could be only partially explained by an inflammatory process, e.g., chronic bronchitis. Relationships of statistical significance (but mostly with r values of less than 0.10) were found between WBC count and the following variables: hemoglobin, heart rate, weight (or Quetelet index), cholesterol, uric acid, creatinine, sex, ethnic origin, systolic blood pressure, height, blood sugar, and diastolic blood pressure. The normal WBC count range for smokers differs from that of nonsmokers and is shifted to the right according to the smoking level. This may have both a diagnostic and prognostic significance in different clinical settings. PMID:4070192

  20. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  1. Leukocyte filtration in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kurusz, Mark; Roach, John D; Vertrees, Roger A; Girouard, Mark K; Lick, Scott D

    2002-05-01

    Controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung has been used in nine consecutive patients to decrease manifestations of lung reperfusion injury. An extracorporeal circuit containing a roller pump, heat exchanger and leukodepleting filter is primed with substrate-enhanced reperfusion solution mixed with approximately 2000 ml of the patient's blood. This solution is slowly recirculated to remove leukocytes prior to reperfusion. When the pulmonary anastomoses are completed, the pulmonary artery is cannulated through the untied anastomosis using a catheter containing a pressure lumen for measurement of infusion pressure. An atrial clamp is left in place on the patient's native atrial cuff to decrease the risk of systemic air embolism during the brief period of reperfusion from the extracorporeal reservoir. During reperfusion, the water bath to the heat exchanger is kept at 35 degrees C and the flow rate for reperfusion solution is between 150 and 200 m/min, keeping the pulmonary artery pressure <14 mmHg. Eight of nine patients were ventilated on 40% inspired oxygen within a few hours of operation and 7/9 were extubated on or before postoperative day 1. Six of nine patients are long-term survivors. PMID:12009087

  2. Superoxide production by phagocytic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L

    1975-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytic leukocytes, as well as polymorphonuclear leukocytes, produce and release superoxide at rest, and this is stimulated by phagocytosis. Of the mouse monocytic cells studied, alveolar macrophages released the largest amounts of superoxide during phagocytosis, followed by normal peritoneal macrophages. Casein-elicited and "activated" macrophages released smaller quantities. In the guinea pig, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and casein-elicited macrophages were shown to release superoxide during phagocytosis whereas alveolar macrophages did not. Superoxide release accounted for only a small fraction of the respiratory burst of phagocytosis in all but the normal mouse peritoneal macrophage, the guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocyte, and probably the mouse alveolar macrophage. There are obviously considerable species differences in O2-release by various leukocytes that might reflect both the production and/or destruction (e.g. by dismutase) of that substance. PMID:804030

  3. Leukocyte biophysics. An invited review.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Schönbein, G W

    1990-10-01

    The biophysical properties of leukocytes in the passive and active state are discussed. In the passive unstressed state, leukocytes are spherical with numerous membrane folds. Passive leukocytes exhibit viscoelastic properties, and the stress is carried largely by the cell cytoplasm and the nucleus. The membrane is highly deformable in shearing and bending, but resists area expansion. Membrane tension can usually be neglected but plays a role in cases of large deformation when the membrane becomes unfolded. The constant membrane area constraint is a determinant of phagocytic capacity, spreading of cells, and passage through narrow pores. In the active state, leukocytes undergo large internal cytoplasmic deformation, pseudopod projection, and granule redistribution. Several different measurements for assessment of biophysical properties and the internal cytoplasmic deformation in form of strain and strain rate tensors are presented. The current theoretical models for active cytoplasmic motion in leukocytes are discussed in terms of specific macromolecular reactions. PMID:1705479

  4. Airway distension promotes leukocyte recruitment in rat tracheal circulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lina H K; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2003-11-01

    Mechanical distortion of blood vessels is known to activate endothelial cells. Whether airway distension likewise activates the vascular endothelium within the airway wall is unknown. Using intravital microscopy in the rat trachea, we investigated if airway distention with the application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) caused leukocyte recruitment to the airway. Tracheal postcapillary venules were visualized and leukocyte kinetics monitored in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats (80 breaths/minute, 6 ml/kg VT, 1 cm H(2)O PEEP). Leukocyte rolling velocity (Vwbc) and the number of adherent cells were not altered with normal ventilation over the course of 2 hours. Ventilation with sustained PEEP (8 cm H(2)O for 1 hour reduced Vwbc and increased adhesion, reaching a maximum at 1 hour of PEEP. Intermittent (2x and 5x) 8 cm H(2)O PEEP also induced a similar reduction in Vwbc, accompanied by an increase in adhesion. However, leukocyte recruitment after airway distension is localized to the airways because increased PEEP did not induce leukocyte recruitment in the mesenteric microcirculation or when PEEP was applied to the lung distal to the site of measurement. Pretreatment with endothelin receptor and selectin inhibitors blocked the effects of distension on leukocyte recruitment, suggesting their involvement in the proinflammatory response. PMID:12869357

  5. MOPITT Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-24

    ... 6 data is now available in both HDF5 and netCDF4 formats Login is no longer required to search and subset, only when placing an order ... 6 data is now available in both HDF5 and netCDF4 formats Login is no longer required to search and subset, only when placing an order ...

  6. Kinetics of reversible-sequestration of leukocytes by the isolated perfused rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Goliaei, B.

    1980-08-01

    The kinetics and morphology of sequestration and margination of rat leukocytes were studied using an isolated perfused and ventilated rat lung preparation. Whole rat blood, bone marrow suspension, or leukocyte suspensions, were used to perfuse the isolated rat lung. The lung was also perfused with latex particle suspensions and the passage of particles through the lung capillaries was studied. When a leukocyte suspension was perfused through the lung in the single-pass mode, the rate of sequestration decreased as more cells were perfused. In contrast, latex particles of a size comparable to that of leukocytes were totally stopped by the lung. When the leukocyte suspension was recirculated through the lung, cells were rapidly removed from circulation until a steady state was reached, after which no net removal of cells by the lung occurred. These results indicate that leukocytes are reversibly sequestered from circulation. The sequestered cells marginated and attached to the luminal surface of the endothelium of post-capillary venules and veins. A mathematical model was developed based on the assumption that the attachment and detachment of leukocytes to blood vessel walls follows first-order kinetics. The model correctly predicts the following characteristics of the system: (a) the kinetics of the sequestration of leukocytes by the lung; (b) the existence of a steady state when a suspension of leukocytes is recirculated through the lung; and (c) the independence of the fraction of cells remaining in circulation from the starting concentration for all values of starting concentration. (ERB)

  7. Leukocyte Activation in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Minervino, Daniele; Gumiero, Daniela; Nicolazzi, Maria Anna; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Fuorlo, Mariella; Guidone, Caterina; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Fattorossi, Andrea; Mingrone, Geltrude; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rising prevalence of obesity is a major global health problem. In severe obesity, bariatric surgery (BS) allows to obtain a significant weight loss and comorbidities improvement, among them one of the factors is the thrombotic risk. In this observational study, we measured indices of leukocyte activation in severely obese patients as markers of increased thrombotic risk in relation with serum markers of inflammation before and after BS. Frequency of polymorphonuclear neutrophil-platelet (PLT) and monocyte (MONO)-PLT aggregates as well as of tissue factor (TF) expressing MONOs was measured in the peripheral blood of 58 consecutive obese patients and 30 healthy controls. In 31 of the 58 obese patients, data obtained at the enrollment were compared with those obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months after BS. Compared with healthy controls, obese patients showed a higher frequency of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL)-PLT aggregates (7.47 ± 2.45 [6.82–8.11]% vs 5.85 ± 1.89 [5.14–6.55]%, P = 0.001), MONO-PLT aggregates (12.31 ± 7.33 [10.38–14.24]% vs 8.14 ± 2.22 [7.31–8.97]%, P < 0.001), and TF expressing MONOs (4.01 ± 2.11 [3.45–4.56]% vs 2.64 ± 1.65 [2.02–3.25]%, P = 0.002). PMNL-PLT and MONO-PLT aggregate frequency was positively correlated with TF expressing MONOs (R2 = 0.260, P = 0.049 and R2 = 0.318, P = 0.015, respectively). BS was performed in 31 patients and induced a significant reduction of the body mass index, and waist and hip circumferences. These effects were associated with a significant decrease of PMNL-PLT aggregates at 12 months (7.58 ± 2.27 [6.75–8.42]% vs 4.47 ± 1.11 [3.93–5.01]%, P < 0.001), and a reduction of TF expressing MONOs at 6 (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.60 ± 1.69 [0.30–2.90]%, P = 0.008) and 12 months (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.71 ± 0.54 [1.45–1.97]%, P = 0.001) after BS. These data suggest that leukocyte

  8. Reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets in healthy Korean native cattle (Hanwoo) and Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Mi; Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Joo; Suh, Guk-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    There are no accurate reference ranges for hematology parameters and lymphocyte subsets in Korean native beef cattle (Hanwoo). This study was performed to establish reliable reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets using a large number of Hanwoo cattle (n = 350) and to compare differences between Hanwoo and Holstein dairy cattle (n = 334). Additionally, age-related changes in lymphocyte subsets were studied. Bovine leukocyte subpopulation analysis was performed using mono or dual color flow cytometry. The leukocyte subpopulations investigated in healthy cattle included: CD2(+) cells, sIgM(+) cells, MHC class II(+) cells, CD3(+) CD4(+) cells, CD3(+) CD8(+) cells, and WC1(+) cells. Although Hanwoo and Holstein cattle are the same species, results showed several differences in hematology and lymphocyte subsets between Hanwoo and Holstein cattle. This study is the first report to establish reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets in adult Hanwoo cattle. PMID:26419947

  9. Lymphocytes subsets reference values in childhood.

    PubMed

    Tosato, F; Bucciol, G; Pantano, G; Putti, M C; Sanzari, M C; Basso, G; Plebani, M

    2015-01-01

    Immunophenotyping of blood lymphocyte subsets and activation markers is a basic tool in the diagnostic process of primary immunodeficiency diseases, its use becoming more and more widespread as the knowledge about these illnesses increases. However, the availability of reliable reference values, which need to be age-matched for the pediatric population, is a pre-requisite for the reliable interpretation of immunophenotyping data. Aim of this study is to analyze the lymphocyte subsets and activation markers distribution in children aged 0-18 years referring to the University Hospital of Padova and to create age-matched reference values expressed by percentiles, thus providing a valuable guideline for the interpretation of the immunophenotype. PMID:25132325

  10. Imaging of vascular development in early mouse decidua and its association with leukocytes and trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Croy, B Anne; Chen, Zhilin; Hofmann, Alexander P; Lord, Edith M; Sedlacek, Abigail L; Gerber, Scott A

    2012-11-01

    In species with endometrial decidualization and hemochorial placentation (humans, mice, and others), leukocytes localize to early implant sites and contribute to decidual angiogenesis, spiral arterial remodeling, and trophoblast invasion. Relationships between leukocytes, trophoblasts, and the decidual vasculature are not fully defined. Early C57BL/6J implant sites were analyzed by flow cytometry to define leukocyte subsets and by whole-mount immunohistochemistry to visualize relationships between leukocytes, decidual vessels, and trophoblasts. Ptprc(+) (CD45(+)) cells increased in decidua between Gestational Day (GD) 5.5 and GD 9.5. Uterine natural killer (uNK) cells that showed dynamic expression of Cd (CD) 69, an activating receptor, and Klrg1 (KLRG1), an inhibitory receptor, localized mesometrially and were the dominant CD45(+) cells between GD 5.5 and GD 7.5. At GD 8.5, immature monocytes that occurred throughout decidua exceeded uNK cells numerically and many leukocytes acquired irregular shapes, and leukocyte-leukocyte conjugates became frequent. Vessels were morphologically heterogeneous and regionally unique. Migrating trophoblasts were first observed at GD 6.5 and, at GD 9.5, breached endothelium, entered vascular lumens, and appeared to occlude some vessels, as described for human spiral arteries. No leukocyte-trophoblast conjugates were detected. Whole-mount staining gave unparalleled decidual vascular detail and cell-specific positional information. Its application across murine models of pregnancy disturbances should significantly advance our understanding of the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:22954796

  11. Macrophage subsets and microglia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Jeroen F J; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2014-08-01

    Along with microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, macrophages in the perivascular space, choroid plexus, and meninges are the principal effector cells in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. These phagocytes are highly heterogeneous cells displaying spatial- and temporal-dependent identities in the healthy, injured, and inflamed CNS. In the last decade, researchers have debated on whether phagocytes subtypes and phenotypes are pathogenic or protective in CNS pathologies. In the context of this dichotomy, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the spatiotemporal physiology of macrophage subsets and microglia in the healthy and diseased CNS, and elaborate on factors regulating their behavior. In addition, the impact of macrophages present in lymphoid organs on CNS pathologies is defined. The prime focus of this review is on multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, neurodegeneration, and CNS repair, and in which microglia and macrophages have been extensively scrutinized. On one hand, microglia and macrophages promote neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative events in MS by releasing inflammatory mediators and stimulating leukocyte activity and infiltration into the CNS. On the other hand, microglia and macrophages assist in CNS repair through the production of neurotrophic factors and clearance of inhibitory myelin debris. Finally, we define how microglia and macrophage physiology can be harnessed for new therapeutics aimed at suppressing neuroinflammatory and cytodegenerative events, as well as promoting CNS repair. We conclude that microglia and macrophages are highly dynamic cells displaying disease stage and location-specific fates in neurological disorders. Changing the physiology of divergent phagocyte subsets at particular disease stages holds promise for future therapeutics for CNS pathologies. PMID:24952885

  12. Characterization of decidual leukocyte populations in cynomolgus and vervet monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dambaeva, Svetlana V.; Breburda, Edith E.; Durning, Maureen; Garthwaite, Mark A.; Golos, Thaddeus G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was the phenotypic and functional evaluation of decidual immune cells in the cynomolgus and vervet monkeys. Early pregnancy (day 36-42) deciduas were obtained by fetectomy for histological evaluation and decidual mononuclear leukocyte (MNL) isolation. While peripheral NK (pNK) cells in these species do not express CD56, CD56+ NK cells were abundant in decidual samples. The majority of decidual NK (dNK) cells (>80%) had high light-scatter characteristics and were CD56brightCD16+ cells with no or very low levels of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NKp46, NKp30) and NKG2A, while a minor population were small CD56dimCD16-lymphocytes also expressing less NKp46, NKp30 and NKG2A than pNK cells. All dNK cells were found to be perforin+; however, their cytotoxic potential was low and cynomolgus dNK cells showed strongly reduced cytotoxicity against target cells compared with pNK cells. Macrophages and T cells together comprised approximately 25-30% of decidual MNL. Decidual T cells contained a higher proportion of the minor T cell subtypes (γδT cells, CD56+ T cells) compared with peripheral blood. A subset of DC-SIGN+ macrophages, with a distribution adjacent to areas of placental attachment in contrast to the widespread setting of general CD68+ cells, was identified in both species. Together, these results demonstrate that the maternal-fetal interface in both cynomolgus and vervet monkeys is very rich in immune cells that have similar phenotypes to those seen in humans, indicating that both species are excellent models to study the contributions of distinct immune cell populations to pregnancy support. PMID:19398130

  13. Reduced platelet-mediated and enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis in experimentally induced diabetes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Colwell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Studies of fibrinolytic activity in diabetes mellitus have produced conflicting results. This may be a result of methodologic insensitivity or of variable contributions of the different blood components to whole blood fibrinolysis. To explore these two possibilities, the authors used a sensitive solid-phase radiometric assay to examine the fibrinolytic activity of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma, leukocytes, and platelet- and leukocyte-poor plasma prepared from control rats and rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes at various times after induction of diabetes. Fibrinolytic activity of whole blood from diabetic rats after 7 days was significantly reduced, and remained reduced after longer durations of diabetes up to 28 days. Platelet-rich plasma from diabetic rats had decreased fibrinolytic activity, which followed the same time course of changes as in whole blood. The platelet contribution to whole blood fibrinolysis was further reduced in vivo after 14 days of diabetes by a reduced whole blood platelet count. In contrast, fibrinolytic activity of leukocytes from diabetic rats became enhanced after 7 days of diabetes. After 49 days of diabetes, the whole blood leukocyte count was reduced, and in vivo would offset the enhanced activity. Plasma fibrinolytic activity was small compared with that of whole blood and was unaltered in diabetic rats. The authors conclude that altered platelet function contributes to decreased fibrinolytic activity of whole blood in diabetic rats, and that this may be partially offset by enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis.

  14. Tc-99m labeled leukocytes: preparation and use in identification of abscess and tissue rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, N.A.; White, S.M.; Heck, L.L.; Van Hove, E.D.

    1983-09-01

    A simple and reproducible method for the preparation and labeling of leukocytes with Tc-99m has been developed. Leukocytes were separated from blood, incubated with stannous pyrophosphate, and then with 20-30 mCi (740-1110 MBq) of /sup 99m/TcO-4. In leukocytes separated from human blood, the labeling efficiency was 81% +/- 6% (n . 4). Experiments on dogs with abscesses showed accumulation of the Tc-99m-labeled leukocytes in the infected sites, indicating the viability of the labeled leukocytes. Additional studies showed that rat lymphocytes that were labeled with Tc-99m, using the same technique, localized in heart transplant tissue that was being rejected.

  15. Tc-99m labeled leukocytes: preparation and use in identification of abscess and tissue rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, N.A.; White, S.M.; Heck, L.L.; Van Hove, E.D.

    1983-09-01

    A simple and reproducible method for the preparation and labeling of leukocytes with Tc-99m, has been developed. Leukocytes were separated from blood, incubated with stannous pyrophosphate, and then with 20-30 mCi (740-1110 M Bq) of /sup 99m/TcO/sub 4//sup -/. In leukocytes separated from human blood, the labeling efficiency was 81% +/- 6% (n=4). Experiments on dogs with abscesses showed accumulation of the Tc-99m-labeled leukocytes in the infected sites, indicating the viability of the labeled leukocytes. Additional studies showed that rat lymphocytes that were labeled with Tc-99m, using the same technique, localized in heart transplant tissue that was being rejected.

  16. Detection of deep venous thrombosis by indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte ((/sup 111/In)WBC) scintigraphy has been used successfully for detection of inflammation. Occasionally, noninflammatory collections of white blood cells such as hematomas or hemorrhage have been localized. We report a case in which unsuspected femoral deep venous thrombosis was diagnosed on an (/sup 111/In)WBC leukocyte scan performed for detection of osteomyelitis. Readers are advised to avoid interpreting all vascular (/sup 111/In)WBC localization as necessarily infectious. This may be of particular significance in patients with vascular grafts.

  17. Leukocyte chemoattractant activity of diacylglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Nishijima, J.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    Phosphatidylinositol breakdown with the generation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DG) and inositol phosphates occurs in response to receptor mediated stimulation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In the authors attempt to demonstrate the direct role of 1,2-DG in cell migration, they have found 1,2 dioctanoyl glycerol (1,2-C8DG) to be a chemoattractant for 6C3HED, a mouse thymic lymphoma, and human peripheral blood PMN's. The chemoattractant activity for both cell types was observed at concentrations from 0.5 to 10mM in an under agarose assay. The maximum effect of 1,2-C8DG on 6C3HED cells was similar to that of 1mM lysophosphatidylcholine and the maximum effect of 1,2-C8DG on PMN's was similar to that of 10/sup -7/M f-met-leu-phe. Other 1,2-DG's with acyl chains ranging from 6 to 18 carbons in length and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol were also chemoattractants for 6C3HED, although their activities were less than 1,2-C8DG. In addition, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), another activator of protein kinase C, was a chemoattractant for 6C3HED and human PMN's. PMA was more potent than 1,2-C8DG for both 6C3HED and PMN's with chemoattractant activity in the range of 30nM to 1..mu..M. These studies support the direct role of 1,2-DG in the transduction of chemotactic stimuli in leukocytes and further suggest that the formation of diacylglycerol represents a common step in the migratory responses of lymphoid and myeloid cells.

  18. Insulin radioreceptor assay on murine splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, F.; Kahn, R.

    1982-02-01

    Insulin radioreceptor assays were developed using splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes from individual mice. Splenic leukocytes were prepared using an NH/sub 4/Cl buffer which did not alter insulin binding, but gave much higher yields than density gradient methods. Mouse erythrocytes were isolated from heparinized blood by three passages over a Boyum gradient, and a similar buffer was used to separate cells from free (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin at the end of the binding incubation. Insulin binding to both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes had typical pH, temperature, and time dependencies, and increased linearly with an increased number of cells. Optimal conditions for the splenic leukocytes (6 x 10/sup 7//ml) consisted of incubation with (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.0. In cells from 20 individual mice, the specific (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin binding was 2.6 +/- 0.1% (SEM), and nonspecific binding was 0.3 +/- 0.04% (10.6% of total binding). Erythrocytes (2.8 x 10/sup 9//ml) were incubated with (/sup 125/)iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.2. In cells from 25 individual mice, the specific (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin binding was 4.5 +/- 0.2%, and nonspecific binding was 0.7 +/- 0.03% (13.6% of total binding). In both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes, analysis of equilibrium binding data produced curvilinear Scatchard plots with approximately 3500 binding sites/leukocyte and 20 binding sites/erythrocyte. These data demonstrate that adequate numbers of splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes can be obtained from individual mice to study insulin binding in a precise and reproducible manner.

  19. Extravasation of leukocytes in comparison to tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Strell, Carina; Entschladen, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The multi-step process of the emigration of cells from the blood stream through the vascular endothelium into the tissue has been termed extravasation. The extravasation of leukocytes is fairly well characterized down to the molecular level, and has been reviewed in several aspects. Comparatively little is known about the extravasation of tumor cells, which is part of the hematogenic metastasis formation. Although the steps of the process are basically the same in leukocytes and tumor cells, i.e. rolling, adhesion, transmigration (diapedesis), the molecules that are involved are different. A further important difference is that leukocyte interaction with the endothelium changes the endothelial integrity only temporarily, whereas tumor cell interaction leads to an irreversible damage of the endothelial architecture. Moreover, tumor cells utilize leukocytes for their extravasation as linkers to the endothelium. Thus, metastasis formation is indirectly susceptible to localization signals that are literally specific for the immune system. We herein compare the extravasation of leukocytes and tumor cells with regard to the involved receptors and the localization signals that direct the cells to certain organs and sites of the body. PMID:19055814

  20. Platelets Guide Leukocytes to Their Sites of Extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Puhr-Westerheide, Daniel; Pörnbacher, Michaela; Lauber, Kirsten; Krombach, Fritz; Reichel, Christoph Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Effective immune responses require the directed migration of leukocytes from the vasculature to the site of injury or infection. How immune cells “find” their site of extravasation remains largely obscure. Here, we identified a previously unrecognized role of platelets as pathfinders guiding leukocytes to their exit points in the microvasculature: upon onset of inflammation, circulating platelets were found to immediately adhere at distinct sites in venular microvessels enabling these cellular blood components to capture neutrophils and, in turn, inflammatory monocytes via CD40-CD40L-dependent interactions. In this cellular crosstalk, ligation of PSGL-1 by P-selectin leads to ERK1/2 MAPK-dependent conformational changes of leukocyte integrins, which promote the successive extravasation of neutrophils and monocytes to the perivascular tissue. Conversely, blockade of this cellular partnership resulted in misguided, inefficient leukocyte responses. Our experimental data uncover a platelet-directed, spatiotemporally organized, multicellular crosstalk that is essential for effective trafficking of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. PMID:27152726

  1. Recent insights into endothelial control of leukocyte extravasation.

    PubMed

    Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    In the process of leukocyte migration from the circulation across the vascular wall, the crosstalk with endothelial cells that line the blood vessels is essential. It is now firmly established that in endothelial cells important signaling events are initiated upon leukocyte adhesion that impinge on the regulation of cell-cell contact and control the efficiency of transendothelial migration. In addition, several external factors such as shear force and vascular stiffness were recently identified as important regulators of endothelial signaling and, consequently, leukocyte transmigration. Here, I review recent insights into endothelial signaling events that are linked to leukocyte migration across the vessel wall. In this field, protein phosphorylation and Rho-mediated cytoskeletal dynamics are still widely studied using increasingly sophisticated mouse models. In addition, activation of tyrosine phosphatases, changes in endothelial cell stiffness as well as different vascular beds have all been established as important factors in endothelial signaling and leukocyte transmigration. Finally, I address less-well-studied but interesting components in the endothelium that also control transendothelial migration, such as the ephrins and their Eph receptors, that provide novel insights in the complexity associated with this process. PMID:26794844

  2. Hydrodynamic forces on a wall-bound leukocyte due to interactions with flowing red cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isfahani, Amir H. G.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2011-11-01

    As part of both healthy and pathologically physiological mechanisms sphere-like white blood cells (leukocytes) adhere to the walls of small blood vessels. We use quantitative numerical simulations to compare the forces from flowing red blood cells on a wall-adhered leukocyte to a homogenized model of blood at the same flow conditions. We model the highly flexible red blood cells using a fast O (N log N) boundary integral formulation. These elastic membranes deform substantially but strongly resist surface dilatation. They enclose a higher than plasma viscosity hemoglobin solution. The no-slip condition is enforced on the stationary leukocyte as well as the vessel walls. Vessel diameters of 10 to 20 microns are studied. Different hematocrits, leukocyte shapes, and flow conditions are examined. In vessels comparable to the size of the cells, we show that the particulate character of blood significantly affects the magnitude of the forces that the leukocyte experiences, transiently increasing it well above the homogenized-blood prediction: for example, for a tube hematocrit of 25 % and a spherical protrusion with a diameter 0.75 that of the tube, the average forces are increased by about 40 % and the local forces by more than 100 % relative to those expected for a blood model homogenized by its effective viscosity.

  3. Imaging leukocytes in vivo with third harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Chien-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Shing; Wu, Pei-Chun; Hsieh, Tsung-Yuan; Liu, Han-Wen; Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Lin, Win-Li; Chia, Jean-San; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Without a labeling, we demonstrated that lipid granules in leukocytes have distinctive third harmonic generation (THG) contrast. Excited by a 1230nm femtosecond laser, THG signals were generated at a significantly higher level in neutrophils than other mononuclear cells, whereas signals in agranular lymphocytes were one order smaller. These characteristic THG features can also be observed in vivo to trace the newly recruited leukocytes following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Furthermore, using video-rate THG microscopy, we also captured images of blood cells in human capillaries. Quite different from red-blood-cells, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appeared in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. These results suggested that labeling-free THG imaging may provide timely tracing of leukocyte movement and hematology inspection without disturbing the normal cellular or physiological status.

  4. The effects of medium-strength electric impulses on human blood.

    PubMed

    Filipic, B; Kovács, K; Somogyvári, F; Ihan, A; Ocsovszky, I; Koren, S; Tóth, S

    2000-09-01

    Leukocyte subsets, total leukocyte isolates or full blood samples were subjected to medium-strength square-wave electric impulses (100 V/cm field force, 5 ms duration). On the surface of the leukocytes, the expressions of several markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD11a, CD11b and ICAM-1) were determined in order to study the influence of pulsed ionic currents on different aspects of the cellular immune response. Large individual differences were observed among randomly chosen healthy donors, both in the initial expression rate and in the response patterns of different antigens. As a general conclusion, it can be stated that electric impulses with the above parameters activate the state of immune response alertness of human leukocytes. Changes in the activities of several enzymes in the serum in response to electric impulses were also tested in order to examine the feasibility of ex vivo electric treatment of human blood for the establishment of an antiviral and immune activated condition. Slightly elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels point to a possibility of enhanced haemolysis, while the lack of an elevation in the membrane-bound peroxidase activity indicates the absence of haemolysis. Significant rises were detected in the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Since most ex vivo blood manipulations are characterised by the appearance of superoxide radicals in the serum, a SOD activity enhancement is considered beneficial in these cases. A mild, but significant reduction in the blood clotting time indicates that electric treatment of human blood should be performed with special attention to thrombosis-prone conditions, and adequate precautions and countermeasures should be introduced. Although wider examinations are required before this method can be fully recommended, ex vivo blood treatment with medium-strength electric impulses seems to be a promising adjuvant course for the establishment of acute immune potentiation and an antiviral state in patients

  5. Cervical leukocytes and spontaneous preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Patricia J.; Sheikh, Sairah; David, Anna L.; Peebles, Donald M.; Klein, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to characterise cervical leukocyte populations and inflammatory mediators associated with term and recurrent spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) in pregnant women with a history of SPTB. A prospective observational study was undertaken on 120 women with a history of SPTB. A cytobrush was used to sample cells from the cervix at 12–25 weeks’ gestation. Cells were enumerated and characterised by flow cytometry. Cytokines and chemokines were also measured. Participants were then grouped according to delivery at term (>36 + 6 weeks), late SPTB (34–36 + 6 weeks) or early SPTB (<34 weeks). Differences in leukocyte sub-populations, cytokine and chemokine levels were compared with outcome. Cervical leukocytes comprised up to 60% of the host-derived cells. Most of these (90–100%) were polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). Most of the remaining cells were mucosal macrophages expressing CD68 and CD103 in addition to markers shared with blood-borne monocytes. Failure to detect cervical macrophages in at least 250,000 cervical epithelial cells was a feature of women who experienced early SPTB (6 out of 6 cases, 95% CI 61–100%) compared with 34% (30 out of 88 cases, 95% CI 25–43%, P < 0.001) of women delivering after 34 weeks. CCL2 (MCP-1) was also low in SPTB before 34 weeks and levels above 75 ng/g and/or the presence of macrophages increased the specificity for birth after 34 weeks from 66% to 82% (55 out of 67 cases, 95% CI 73–91%). Absence of cervical macrophages and low CCL2 may be features of pregnancies at risk of early SPTB. PMID:26637953

  6. Imaging of Leukocyte Trafficking in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pietronigro, Enrica; Zenaro, Elena; Constantin, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and is characterized by a progressive decline of cognitive functions. The neuropathological features of AD include amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles derived from the cytoskeletal hyperphosphorylated tau protein, amyloid angiopathy, the loss of synapses, and neuronal degeneration. In the last decade, inflammation has emerged as a key feature of AD, but most studies have focused on the role of microglia-driven neuroinflammation mechanisms. A dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD, and several studies have demonstrated that the vascular deposition of Aβ induces the expression of adhesion molecules and alters the expression of tight junction proteins, potentially facilitating the transmigration of circulating leukocytes. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has become an indispensable tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms controlling leukocyte trafficking in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent TPLSM studies have shown that vascular deposition of Aβ in the CNS promotes intraluminal neutrophil adhesion and crawling on the brain endothelium and also that neutrophils extravasate in the parenchyma preferentially in areas with Aβ deposits. These studies have also highlighted a role for LFA-1 integrin in neutrophil accumulation in the CNS of AD-like disease models, revealing that LFA-1 inhibition reduces the corresponding cognitive deficit and AD neuropathology. In this article, we consider how current imaging techniques can help to unravel new inflammation mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AD and identify novel therapeutic strategies to treat the disease by interfering with leukocyte trafficking mechanisms. PMID:26913031

  7. Microfluidic Leukocyte Isolation for Gene Expression Analysis in Critically Ill Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Russom, Aman; Sethu, Palaniappan; Irimia, Daniel; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Calvano, Steve E.; Garcia, Iris; Finnerty, Celeste; Tannahill, Cynthia; Abouhamze, Amer; Wilhelmy, Julie; López, M. Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Herndon, David N.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Microarray technology is becoming a powerful tool for diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic applications. There is at present no consensus regarding the optimal technique to isolate nucleic acids from blood leukocyte populations for subsequent expression analyses. Current collection and processing techniques pose significant challenges in the clinical setting. Here, we report the clinical validation of a novel microfluidic leukocyte nucleic acid isolation technique for gene expression analysis from critically ill, hospitalized patients that can be readily used on small volumes of blood. METHODS We processed whole blood from hospitalized patients after burn injury and severe blunt trauma according to the microfluidic and standard macroscale leukocyte isolation protocol. Side-by-side comparison of RNA quantity, quality, and genome-wide expression patterns was used to clinically validate the microfluidic technique. RESULTS When the microfluidic protocol was used for processing, sufficient amounts of total RNA were obtained for genome-wide expression analysis from 0.5 mL whole blood. We found that the leukocyte expression patterns from samples processed using the 2 protocols were concordant, and there was less variability introduced as a result of harvesting method than there existed between individuals. CONCLUSIONS The novel microfluidic approach achieves leukocyte isolation in <25 min, and the quality of nucleic acids and genome expression analysis is equivalent to or surpasses that obtained from macroscale approaches. Microfluidics can significantly improve the isolation of blood leukocytes for genomic analyses in the clinical setting. PMID:18375483

  8. Immunologic Monitoring of T-Lymphocyte Subsets and Hla-Dr-Positive Monocytes in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang-Hee; Yoon, Young-Deuk; Jang, Hye Min; Kwon, Eugene; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Choi, Ji-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Hyung-Kee; Huh, Seung; Won, Dong-Il; Kim, Chan-Duck

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical significance of circulating T-lymphocyte subsets and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-positive monocytes in the peripheral blood of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) remains unclear. We examined the efficacy of enumerating these cells for the immunologic monitoring of KTRs. Blood samples were obtained before transplantation, 2 weeks after transplantation and at diagnosis, and 2 weeks after treating biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Serial flow cytometric analysis was performed using peripheral blood obtained from 123 patients to identify the frequencies of HLA-DR+, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD25+ T-lymphocytes and HLA-DR-positive monocytes. Frequencies of CD4+CD25+/CD4+ T cells, CD8+CD25+/CD8+ T cells, and HLA-DR-positive monocytes were significantly lower at 2 weeks after transplantation than before transplantation (all P < 0.001). This decrease was not correlated with clinical parameters. The frequency of CD4+CD25+/CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in KTRs with acute rejection than in KTRs at 2 weeks after transplantation (9.10% [range 4.30–25.6%] vs 5.10% [range 0.10–33.3%]; P = 0.024). However, no significant differences were observed between stable KTRs and KTRs with CMV infection. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curve adjusted by covariates showed that acute rejection could be predicted with 75.0% sensitivity and 68.4% specificity by setting the cutoff value of CD4+CD25+/CD4+ T cell frequency as 5.8%. Circulating T-lymphocyte and monocyte subsets showed significant and consistent changes in their frequencies after immunosuppression. Of the various immune cells examined, circulating levels of CD4+CD25+ T cells might be a useful noninvasive immunologic indicator for detecting acute rejection. PMID:26554788

  9. Immune-Stimulatory Effects of a Bacteria-Based Probiotic on Peripheral Leukocyte Subpopulations and Cytokine mRNA Expression Levels in Scouring Holstein Calves

    PubMed Central

    QADIS, Abdul Qadir; GOYA, Satoru; YATSU, Minoru; KIMURA, Atsushi; ICHIJO, Toshihiro; SATO, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Subpopulations of peripheral leukocytes and cytokine mRNA expression levels were evaluated in scouring and healthy Holstein calves (age 10 ± 5 days; n=42) treated with a probiotic consisting of Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium and Clostridium butyricum. The calves were assigned to the scouring or healthy group and then subdivided into pathogen-positive treated (n=8), pathogen-positive control (n=8), pathogen-negative treated (n=6), pathogen-negative control (n=6), healthy treated (n=6) and healthy control (n=8) groups. A single dose of the probiotic (3.0 g/100 kg body weight) was given to each calf in the treatment groups for 5 days. Blood samples were collected on the first day of scour occurrence (day 0) and on day 7. In the scouring calves, smaller peripheral leukocyte subpopulations and cytokine mRNA expression levels were noted on day 0. The numbers of CD3+ T cells; CD4+, CD8+ and WC1+ γδ T cell subsets; and CD14+, CD21+ and CD282+ (TLR2) cells were significantly increased in the scouring and healthy treated calves on day 7. Furthermore, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma mRNA expression was elevated in the peripheral leukocytes of the scouring and healthy treated calves on day 7. The scouring calves given the probiotic recovered on day 7. A significantly smaller number of peripheral leukocytes and lower cytokine mRNA expression level might be induced by scouring in calves. Repeated probiotic administration might stimulate cellular immunity and encourage recovery from scouring in pre-weaning Holstein calves. PMID:24451928

  10. Peripheral leukocyte populations and oxidative stress biomarkers in aged dogs showing impaired cognitive abilities.

    PubMed

    Mongillo, Paolo; Bertotto, Daniela; Pitteri, Elisa; Stefani, Annalisa; Marinelli, Lieta; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the peripheral blood leukocyte phenotypes, lymphocyte subset populations, and oxidative stress parameters were studied in cognitively characterized adult and aged dogs, in order to assess possible relationships between age, cognitive decline, and the immune status. Adult (N = 16, 2-7 years old) and aged (N = 29, older than 8 years) dogs underwent two testing procedures, for the assessment of spatial reversal learning and selective social attention abilities, which were shown to be sensitive to aging in pet dogs. Based on age and performance in cognitive testing, dogs were classified as adult not cognitively impaired (ADNI, N = 12), aged not cognitively impaired (AGNI, N = 19) and aged cognitively impaired (AGCI, N = 10). Immunological and oxidative stress parameters were compared across groups with the Kruskal-Wallis test. AGCI dogs displayed lower absolute CD4 cell count (p < 0.05) than ADNI and higher monocyte absolute count and percentage (p < 0.05) than AGNI whereas these parameters were not different between AGNI and ADNI. AGNI dogs had higher CD8 cell percentage than ADNI (p < 0.05). Both AGNI and AGCI dogs showed lower CD4/CD8 and CD21 count and percentage and higher neutrophil/lymphocyte and CD3/CD21 ratios (p < 0.05). None of the oxidative parameters showed any statistically significant difference among groups. These observations suggest that alterations in peripheral leukocyte populations may reflect age-related changes occurring within the central nervous system and disclose interesting perspectives for the dog as a model for studying the functional relationship between the nervous and immune systems during aging. PMID:25905581

  11. Changes in leukocyte populations of cows with milk fever or displaced abomasum after calving.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Fukuda, Shigeo; Kudo, Katsunori; Tomioka, Michiko; Koiwa, Masateru; Kimura, Kayoko

    2013-07-01

    Most of the metabolic diseases of dairy cows occur within the first 2 wk after calving, and cows with a metabolic disease are prone to infectious diseases. Although metabolic diseases are generally recognized as a risk factor for infectious diseases owing to the associated decrease in immune function, the difference in immune status between cows with milk fever (MF) or displaced abomasum (DA) during the lactation period has not been clarified. Therefore, the peripheral blood leukocyte populations in 38 multiparous Holstein cows from 1 herd were analyzed after calving. The cows were divided into 3 groups according to health: 21 cows that remained clinically healthy throughout the experimental period (control group), 9 cows that had MF on the day of calving, and 8 cows with an onset of DA within 4 wk after calving. The T- and B-cell numbers were lowest at week 0, and they increased gradually after calving. There was no significant difference between the 3 groups in the number of each subset of leukocytes on the day of calving, but the number of CD8⁺ T-cells was significantly lower in the MF and DA groups than in the control group at week 1. The numbers of CD4⁺, CD8⁺, and WC1⁺ T-cells tended to be lower in the DA group than in control group from weeks 4 to 12, a tendency not observed in the MF group. These data suggest that when cows have DA around the time of calving, their lymphocyte numbers remain lower until 12 wk after calving. PMID:24101801

  12. Brain infiltration of leukocytes contributes to the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zattoni, Michela; Mura, Maria Luisa; Deprez, Francine; Schwendener, Reto A; Engelhardt, Britta; Frei, Karl; Fritschy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-16

    Clinical and experimental evidence indicates that inflammatory processes contribute to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, but underlying mechanisms remain mostly unknown. Using immunohistochemistry for CD45 (common leukocyte antigen) and CD3 (T-lymphocytes), we show here microglial activation and infiltration of leukocytes in sclerotic tissue from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), as well as in a model of TLE (intrahippocampal kainic acid injection), characterized by spontaneous, nonconvulsive focal seizures. Using specific markers of lymphocytes, microglia, macrophages, and neutrophils in kainate-treated mice, we investigated with pharmacological and genetic approaches the contribution of innate and adaptive immunity to kainate-induced inflammation and neurodegeneration. Furthermore, we used EEG analysis in mutant mice lacking specific subsets of lymphocytes to explore the significance of inflammatory processes for epileptogenesis. Blood-brain barrier disruption and neurodegeneration in the kainate-lesioned hippocampus were accompanied by sustained ICAM-1 upregulation, microglial cell activation, and infiltration of CD3(+) T-cells. Moreover, macrophage infiltration was observed, selectively in the dentate gyrus where prominent granule cell dispersion was evident. Unexpectedly, depletion of peripheral macrophages by systemic clodronate liposome administration affected granule cell survival. Neurodegeneration was aggravated in kainate-lesioned mice lacking T- and B-cells (RAG1-knock-out), because of delayed invasion by Gr-1(+) neutrophils. Most strikingly, these mutant mice exhibited early onset of spontaneous recurrent seizures, suggesting a strong impact of immune-mediated responses on network excitability. Together, the concerted action of adaptive and innate immunity triggered locally by intrahippocampal kainate injection contributes seizure-suppressant and neuroprotective effects, shedding new light on neuroimmune interactions in temporal lobe

  13. Changes in leukocyte populations of cows with milk fever or displaced abomasum after calving

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Fukuda, Shigeo; Kudo, Katsunori; Tomioka, Michiko; Koiwa, Masateru; Kimura, Kayoko

    2013-01-01

    Most of the metabolic diseases of dairy cows occur within the first 2 wk after calving, and cows with a metabolic disease are prone to infectious diseases. Although metabolic diseases are generally recognized as a risk factor for infectious diseases owing to the associated decrease in immune function, the difference in immune status between cows with milk fever (MF) or displaced abomasum (DA) during the lactation period has not been clarified. Therefore, the peripheral blood leukocyte populations in 38 multiparous Holstein cows from 1 herd were analyzed after calving. The cows were divided into 3 groups according to health: 21 cows that remained clinically healthy throughout the experimental period (control group), 9 cows that had MF on the day of calving, and 8 cows with an onset of DA within 4 wk after calving. The T- and B-cell numbers were lowest at week 0, and they increased gradually after calving. There was no significant difference between the 3 groups in the number of each subset of leukocytes on the day of calving, but the number of CD8+ T-cells was significantly lower in the MF and DA groups than in the control group at week 1. The numbers of CD4+, CD8+, and WC1+ T-cells tended to be lower in the DA group than in control group from weeks 4 to 12, a tendency not observed in the MF group. These data suggest that when cows have DA around the time of calving, their lymphocyte numbers remain lower until 12 wk after calving. PMID:24101801

  14. The spreading of leukocytes released from their liquid environment.

    PubMed

    Cuadra, M

    1978-08-15

    It is known that while leukocytes in conventional blood smears reveal their structures, in smears of erythrocyte-free suspension (EFS) they show a tendency to pyknosis. From the present study it appears that: 1. When any leukocyte suspension is subjected to drying on slides the cells undergo shrinkage (pyknosis in stained state) because their water content is extracted by the suspending fluid that is rendered increasingly hypertonic during drying. 2. When the leukocytes, which while floating within physiological fluids are ball-shaped, are entirely released from their suspending fluid, they suddenly spread into flat cells because the capillary force between the cell membranes and glass overcomes the surface tension of the cells. 3. In contrast to shrunken or even normal (spherical) cells, spread cells are able to display their morphology. Using the smear technique, the cell density of the suspension will determine whether spreading or shrinkage are to occur; with normal blood (high density) the release and consequently the spread are achieved; with EFS (usually of low density) an inadequate release and consequently shrinkage occur. 4. A device (cell spreader) for spreading leukocytes of EFS is presented. PMID:678682

  15. Effects of a Bacteria-Based Probiotic on Subpopulations of Peripheral Leukocytes and Their Cytokine mRNA Expression in Calves

    PubMed Central

    QADIS, Abdul Qadir; GOYA, Satoru; YATSU, Minoru; YOSHIDA, Yu-uki; ICHIJO, Toshihiro; SATO, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eight Holstein calves (10 ± 3 weeks) were used to examine the interaction between a bacteria-based probiotic agent (probiotic) and the function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The probiotic, consisting of Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium and Clostridium butyricum, was administered orally at 3.0 g/100 kg body weight to calves once daily for 5 consecutive days. Calves given the vehicle alone with no probiotic served as the control. In the treatment group, increases in numbers of CD282+ (TLR2) monocytes, CD3+ T cells and CD4+, CD8+ and WC1+ γδ T cell subsets were noted on day 7 post-placement compared to predose day and the control group. Expression of interleukin (IL)-6, interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was elevated in peripheral leukocytes on days 7 and 14. These results suggest that peripheral blood leukocytes in healthy calves may be stimulated via the gastrointestinal microbiota, which was increased by the oral probiotic treatment, with overall stability of the rumen bacterial flora. The 5-day repeated administration of a bacteria-based probiotic may enhance cellular immune function in weaned calves. PMID:24131856

  16. New TES Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-06

    New TES Search and Subset Application Search & Subset Application Wednesday, September 19, 2012 The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the ...

  17. The removal of morphologically abnormal sperm forms by phagocytes: a positive role for seminal leukocytes?

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, M J; White, A; Barratt, C L; Bolton, A E; Cooke, I D

    1992-04-01

    A preliminary investigation was undertaken further to determine the function of the leukocytic cells found in semen. We performed semen analysis and quantified leukocyte subsets using immunocytochemical staining techniques in ejaculates of 351 patients. Leukocyte profiles were examined in relation to sperm morphological data for evidence of a sperm removal/selection process. Three types of seminal phagocytic cell were found to contain spermatozoa: small polymorphonuclear leukocytes (approximately 10-12 microns), monocytes of similar size and much larger (30-40 microns) macrophages capable of engulfing multiple sperm heads. The total leukocyte count (P less than 0.01), the numbers of phagocytic cells i.e. polymorphonuclear leukocytes (P less than 0.05), monocyte/macrophages (P less than 0.01) and HLA-DR positive cells (P less than 0.01), were significantly higher in those samples with greater than 50% ideal sperm forms. Significantly fewer of these same cell types were observed in samples with greater than 50% head defects. There was no difference in the number of tail or midpiece defects between leukocytospermic (greater than 10(6)/ml) and non-leukocytospermic semen samples. Oligozoospermic samples contained significantly fewer leukocytes (P less than 0.005), although above a concentration of 5 x 10(6)/ml, the sperm number was not correlated with leukocyte number. These data, along with repeated observation of spermatozoa or sperm fragments within phagocytic cells, support the hypothesis that leukocytes have a role in the removal of abnormal spermatozoa from the ejaculate. PMID:1522196

  18. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. RESULTS The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  19. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. Material/Methods Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. Results The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  20. Is Chronic Asthma Associated with Shorter Leukocyte Telomere Length at Midlife?

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Idan; Sears, Malcolm R.; Hancox, Robert J.; Lee Harrington, Hona; Houts, Renate; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Asthma is prospectively associated with age-related chronic diseases and mortality, suggesting the hypothesis that asthma may relate to a general, multisystem phenotype of accelerated aging. Objectives: To test whether chronic asthma is associated with a proposed biomarker of accelerated aging, leukocyte telomere length. Methods: Asthma was ascertained prospectively in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (n = 1,037) at nine in-person assessments spanning ages 9–38 years. Leukocyte telomere length was measured at ages 26 and 38 years. Asthma was classified as life-course-persistent, childhood-onset not meeting criteria for persistence, and adolescent/adult-onset. We tested associations between asthma and leukocyte telomere length using regression models. We tested for confounding of asthma-leukocyte telomere length associations using covariate adjustment. We tested serum C-reactive protein and white blood cell counts as potential mediators of asthma-leukocyte telomere length associations. Measurements and Main Results: Study members with life-course-persistent asthma had shorter leukocyte telomere length as compared with sex- and age-matched peers with no reported asthma. In contrast, leukocyte telomere length in study members with childhood-onset and adolescent/adult-onset asthma was not different from leukocyte telomere length in peers with no reported asthma. Adjustment for life histories of obesity and smoking did not change results. Study members with life-course-persistent asthma had elevated blood eosinophil counts. Blood eosinophil count mediated 29% of the life-course-persistent asthma-leukocyte telomere length association. Conclusions: Life-course-persistent asthma is related to a proposed biomarker of accelerated aging, possibly via systemic eosinophilic inflammation. Life histories of asthma can inform studies of aging. PMID:24956257

  1. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury: role of adhesion molecules in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Quarmby, S; Kumar, P; Kumar, S

    1999-07-30

    The late onset of necrosis and fibrosis in normal tissues can be a serious consequence of radiotherapy in cancer patients. Because radiation-induced vascular injury precedes the tissue damage, vascular injury is regarded as crucial in the pathogenesis of tissue damage. An understanding of the processes responsible is essential to develop strategies for the amelioration of radiation-induced normal tissue damage. Leukocyte infiltration is commonly observed at sites of irradiation and is likely to lead to the acceleration and/or induction of parenchymal atrophy, fibrosis and necrosis in normal tissues following radiotherapy. The molecular mechanisms mediating leukocyte infiltration of tissues during inflammation have been studied extensively. It is now well established that cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) expressed on leukocytes and endothelial cells control the trafficking of leukocytes from the blood vessel lumen in these conditions. CAMs including E (endothelial), P (platelet) and L (leukocyte)-selectins, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), beta1 and beta2 integrins and CD31 are involved in the cascade of events resulting in rolling, arrest and transmigration of leukocytes through the inflamed endothelium. Whether a similar sequence of molecular events induces leukocyte sequestration in irradiated normal tissues is not known. This review is focussed on the role of CAMs in radiation-induced leukocyte infiltration of normal tissues and the therapeutic implications of these findings. PMID:10399956

  2. Receptor cleavage and P-selectin-dependent reduction of leukocyte adhesion in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Angela Y; Ha, Jessica N; Delano, Frank A; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2012-07-01

    The SHR, a genetic model for hypertension and the metabolic syndrome, has attenuated leukocyte adhesion to the postcapillary endothelium by an unknown mechanism. Based on recent evidence of elevated levels of MMPs in plasma and on microvascular endothelium of the SHR with cleavage of several receptor types, we hypothesize that the reduced leukocyte-endothelial interaction is a result of enhanced proteolytic cleavage of P-selectin on the postcapillary endothelium and PSGL-1 on leukocytes. The attenuated rolling interactions of SHR leukocytes with the endothelium were restored by chronic treatment with a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor (CGS) for 24 weeks. The SHR MMP levels, in plasma and mesentery, as well as the systolic blood pressure, decreased significantly with treatment. In the SHR mesentery, labeling of P-selectin in the postcapillary venules by immunohistochemistry demonstrated, on average, a 31% lower extracellular P-selectin density compared with the normotensive WKY. A significantly lower extracellular PSGL-1 density on the membranes of SHR neutrophils compared with the WKY also supported our hypothesis. In vivo stimulation of the mesenteric postcapillary venules with histamine demonstrated that the SHR had an attenuated response, as measured by leukocyte rolling velocity on the endothelium. The reduced P-selectin and PSGL-1 density, on SHR postcapillary endothelium and on SHR leukocytes, respectively, was restored significantly by chronic MMP inhibition. The impaired ability of SHR leukocytes to reduce rolling velocity upon inflammatory stimulation led to fewer firmly adhered leukocytes to the endothelium as a contributor to immune suppression. PMID:22566571

  3. Selective Harvesting of Marginating-pulmonary Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shaashua, Lee; Sorski, Liat; Melamed, Rivka; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2016-01-01

    Marginating-pulmonary (MP) leukocytes are leukocytes that adhere to the inner endothelium of the lung capillaries. MP-leukocytes were shown to exhibit unique composition and characteristics compared to leukocytes of other immune compartments. Evidence suggests higher cytotoxicity of natural killer cells, and a distinct pro- and anti-inflammatory profile of the MP-leukocyte population compared to circulating or splenic immunocytes. The method presented herein enables selective harvesting of MP-leukocytes by forced perfusion of the lungs in either mice or rats. In contrast to other methods used to extract lung-leukocytes, such as tissue grinding and biological degradation, this method exclusively yields leukocytes from the lung capillaries, uncontaminated with parenchymal, interstitial, and broncho-alveolar cells. In addition, the perfusion technique better preserves the integrity and the physiological milieu of MP-leukocytes, without inducing physiological responses due to tissue processing. This unique MP leukocyte population is strategically located to identify and react towards abnormal circulating cells, as all circulating malignant cells and infected cells are detained while passing through the lung capillaries, physically interacting with endothelial cells and resident leukocytes,. Thus, selective harvesting of MP-leukocytes and their study under various conditions may advance our understanding of their biological and clinical significance, specifically with respect to controlling circulating aberrant cells and lung-related diseases. PMID:27023665

  4. Leukocyte Infiltration Triggers Seizure Recurrence in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zanhua; Wang, Suping; Liu, Jinjie; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yongbo

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy, which affects about 1 % of the population worldwide, leads to poor prognosis and increased morbidity. However, effective drugs providing satisfactory control on seizure relapse were rare, which encouraged more etiological studies. Whether inflammation is one of key events underlying seizure is in debate. In order to explore the role of inflammatory in the pathogenesis and development of epilepsy, we conducted intra-caudal vein injection of leukocytes to aggravated brain inflammatory process in kainic acid-induced seizure model in this study. The results showed that intravenous administration of activated leukocytes increased the frequency and reduced the latent phase of seizure recurrences in rat models of epileptic seizure, during which leukocyte inflammation, brain-blood barrier damage, and neuron injury were also significantly aggravated, indicating that leukocyte infiltration might facilitate seizure recurrence through aggravating brain inflammation, brain-blood barrier damage, and neuron injury. PMID:27040283

  5. Cannabinoid-receptor expression in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Bouaboula, M; Rinaldi, M; Carayon, P; Carillon, C; Delpech, B; Shire, D; Le Fur, G; Casellas, P

    1993-05-15

    Marijuana and many of its constituent cannabinoids influence the central nervous system (CNS), probably through the cannabinoid receptor, which has recently been cloned in rat and human. While numerous reports have also described effects of cannabinoids on the immune system, the observation of both mRNA and cannabinoid receptor has hitherto been exclusively confined to the brain, a reported detection in the testis being the sole example of its presence at the periphery. Here we report the expression of the cannabinoid receptor on human immune tissues using a highly sensitive polymerase-chain-reaction-based method for mRNA quantification. We show that, although present in a much lower abundance than in brain, cannabinoid receptor transcripts are found in human spleen, tonsils and peripheral blood leukocytes. The distribution pattern displays important variations of the mRNA level for the cannabinoid receptor among the main human blood cell subpopulations. The rank order of mRNA levels in these cells is B cells > natural killer cells > or = polymorphonuclear neutrophils > or = T8 cells > monocytes > T4 cells. Cannabinoid-receptor mRNA, which is also found in monocytic, as well as T and B leukemia cell lines but not in Jurkat cells, presents a great diversity of expression on these cells as well, B-cell lines expressing a much higher level than T-cell lines. The cannabinoid receptor PCR products from leukocytes and brain are identical both in size and sequence suggesting a strong similarity between central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors. The expression of this receptor was demonstrated on membranes of the myelomonocytic U937 cells using the synthetic cannabinoid [3H]CP-55940 as ligand. The Kd determined from Scatchard analysis was 0.1 nM and the Bmax for membranes was 525 fmol/mg protein. The demonstration of cannabinoid-receptor expression at both mRNA and protein levels on human leukocytes provides a molecular basis for cannabinoid action on these cells. PMID

  6. The role of nitric oxide in regulation of leukocyte migration into the heart tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petenkova, A A; Kovalenko, R I; Nozdrachev, A D

    2015-11-01

    Characteristics of leukocyte migration have been studied during the incubation of the right and left ventricles of rat heart explants in autologous blood plasma. Within the first 60 min, the leukocyte amount in the medium increases. Moreover, it is associated with cell release from the heart tissue. During further incubation, the cell release decreases; after 3 h of incubation, the cells begin to migrate back into the heart tissue. However, neutrophil migration does not change. Sodium nitrite, being a donor of nitric oxide significantly, reduces the leukocyte migration from the heart explants into the incubation medium, especially from left ventricle explants. PMID:26725240

  7. Quantitative measurement of the levels of melanocortin receptor subtype 1, 2, 3 and 5 and pro-opio-melanocortin peptide gene expression in subsets of human peripheral blood leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, G N; Hägglund, M; Nagaeva, O; Frängsmyr, L; Petrovska, R; Mincheva-Nilsson, L; Wikberg, J E S

    2005-03-01

    Levels of the melanocortin receptor (MCR) 1, 2, 3 and 5 subtypes and pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) protein mRNA were measured by the real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method in CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, CD8+ T cytotoxic cells, CD19+ B cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocytes from healthy donors. We found high levels of all of the MC1, 2, 3 and 5R subtype mRNA in Th cells and moderate levels in NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes. POMC peptide mRNA was found in all examined leucocyte subsets, but only low levels were present in granulocytes. Our findings suggest a co-ordinating role for MCR subtypes and their naturally occurring ligands in the co-operation between innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, our findings are compatible with earlier finding of MCR-mediated tolerance induction in Th cells. PMID:15787746

  8. Cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of women with a history of preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Morgan R; Faux, David S; Hamblin, Steven D; Silver, Robert M; Esplin, M Sean

    2010-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha at the maternal-fetal interface. Previous studies have suggested that women with a history of preterm birth produce aberrantly strong inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However many intrauterine infections in women are associated with pathogens including Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis and Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) that contain pro-inflammatory factors other than LPS. We evaluated whether peripheral blood leukocytes from women with a history of preterm birth produce elevated amounts of TNFalpha upon stimulation with pathogens associated with preterm birth and if pre-treatment with aspirin, an anti-inflammatory medication, decreases the ex vivo production of this cytokine. Heat-killed bacteria elicited increased TNFalpha production from leukocytes in a dose-dependent manner, but no differences in TNFalpha production between leukocytes from women with preterm birth and control women with term birth were detected. In women who consumed aspirin each day for one week, TNFalpha production was increased in leukocytes from control women stimulated with Escherichia coli and U. urealyticum, but was reduced or unchanged in leukocytes from women with preterm birth. Similar trends were observed for a subset of samples stimulated with U. urealyticum and assayed for IL-6, IL-10, IL-1beta and TNFalpha by bead array. We conclude that leukocytes from women with a history of preterm birth do not have elevated pro-inflammatory responses to pathogens, and that reproductive history is associated with different effects of aspirin on pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:20005575

  9. Carbohydrate ligands for endothelial - Leukocyte adhesion molecule 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tiemeyer, M.; Swiedler, S.J.; Ishihara, Masayuki; Moreland, M.; Schweingruber, H.; Hirtzer, P.; Brandley, B.K. )

    1991-02-15

    The acute inflammatory response requires that circulating leukocytes bind to and penetrate the vascular wall to access the site of injury. Several receptors have been implicated in this interaction, including a family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins. The authors report here the identification of an endogenous carbohydrate ligand for one of these receptors, endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1). Radiolabeled COS cells transfected with a plasmid containing the cDNA for ELAM-1 were used as probes to screen glycolipids extracted from human leukocytes. COS cells transfected with this plasmid adhered to a subset of sialylated glycolipids resolved on TLC plates or adsorbed on polyvinyl chloride microtiter wells. Adhesion to these glycolipids required calcium but was not inhibited by heparin, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or yeast phosphomannan. Monosaccharide composition, linkage analysis, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of the glycolipids indicate that the ligands for ELAM-1 are terminally sialylated lactosylceramides with a variable number of N-acetyllactosamine repeats and at least one fucosylated N-acetylglucosamine residue.

  10. Rapid in vitro biocompatibility assay of endovascular stents by flow cytometry using platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tárnok, A; Mahnke, A; Müller, M; Zotz, R J

    1999-02-15

    Clinical studies suggest that stent design and surface texture are responsible for differences in biocompatibility of metallic endovascular stents. A simple in vitro experimental setup was established to test stent-induced degree of platelet and leukocyte activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation by flow cytometry. Heparin-coated tantalum stents and gold-coated and uncoated stainless steel stents were tested. Stents were implanted into silicone tubes and exposed to blood from healthy volunteers. Platelet and leukocyte activation and percentage of leukocyte-platelet aggregates were determined in a whole-blood assay by subsequent staining for activation-associated antigens (CD41a, CD42b, CD62p, and fibrinogen binding) and leukocyte antigens (CD14 and CD45) and flow cytometric analysis. Blood taken directly after venous puncture or exposed to the silicone tube alone was used as negative controls. Positive control was in vitro stimulation with thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6). Low degree of platelet activation and significant increase in monocyte- and neutrophil-platelet aggregation were observed in blood exposed to stents (P < 0.05). In addition, leukocyte activation was induced as measured by increased CD45 and CD14 expression. Heparin coated stents continuously induced less platelet activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation than uncoated stainless steel stents of the same length and shorter stents of the same structure. Stent surface coating and texture plays a role in platelet and leukocyte activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation. Using this simple in vitro assay and whole blood and flow cytometry, it seems possible to differentiate stents by their potency to activate platelets and/or leukocytes. This assay could be applied for improving the biocompatibility of coronary stents. PMID:10088974

  11. Assessing leukocyte-endothelial interactions under flow conditions in an ex vivo autoperfused microflow chamber assay.

    PubMed

    Mulki, Lama; Sweigard, J Harry; Connor, Kip M

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte-endothelial interactions are early and critical events in acute and chronic inflammation and can, when dysregulated, mediate tissue injury leading to permanent pathological damage. Existing conventional assays allow the analysis of leukocyte adhesion molecules only after the extraction of leukocytes from the blood. This requires the blood to undergo several steps before peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) can be ready for analysis, which in turn can stimulate PBLs influencing the research findings. The autoperfused micro flow chamber assay, however, allows scientists to study early leukocytes functional dysregulation using the systemic flow of a live mouse while having the freedom of manipulating a coated chamber. Through a disease model, the functional expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules can be assessed and quantified in a micro-glass chamber coated with immobilized endothelial adhesion molecules ex vivo. In this model, the blood flows between the right common carotid artery and left external jugular vein of a live mouse under anesthesia, allowing the interaction of native PBLs in the chamber. Real-time experimental analysis is achieved with the assistance of an intravital microscope as well as a Harvard Apparatus pressure device. The application of a flow regulator at the input point of the glass chamber allows comparable physiological flow conditions amongst the experiments. Leukocyte rolling velocity is the main outcome and is measured using the National Institutes of Health open-access software ImageJ. In summary, the autoperfused micro flow chamber assay provides an optimal physiological environment to study leukocytes endothelial interaction and allows researchers to draw accurate conclusions when studying inflammation. PMID:25590688

  12. Noncytotoxic T cell clones obtained from a human mixed leukocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Chu, M H; Wee, S L; Bach, F H

    1990-02-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a DQW-1 homozygous individual were cocultured with irradiated lymphoblastoid cell line from a DQW-1 homozygous unrelated donor bearing BW35-DW1 haplotype. From T cell cloning of primary and twice-stimulated mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC), 7 and 11 T cell clones were obtained respectively. None of the 18 clones showed specific cytotoxic activity against the alloantigen of the stimulator cell as well as natural killer (NK)-like activity against K562 cells. However, most T cell clones from both primary and re-stimulated MLC demonstrated moderate cytotoxic activity in lectin-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (LDCC) assay. Screening assay for cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) performed on growing microcultures obtained from restimulated MLC cloning confirmed the non-cytotoxic status of these T cell clones by showing that 41 out of 44 growing microcultures were not cytotoxic against the stimulator cell; the other 3 clones lyzed the target cell mildly. The cells from all 5 T cell clones detected for indirect fluorescence expressed CD3 and CD4 surface markers. Taken together, the results suggested that proliferation-regulating T cell subsets or factor(s) may be generated during the course of MLCs under the present responder-stimulator combination, and may suppress the development of alloreactive cytotoxic T cells and NK-like cells. PMID:2144231

  13. Decreased levels of peripheral leukocytes following sodium selenite treatment in female mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, G.R.

    1986-08-01

    Selenium is known to be an essential micronutrient to a number of animal species (Schwarz 1961). Above its trace levels, however, selenium accumulation has long been known to induce deleterious conditions in domestic animals and in humans. Selenium has been reported to induce a hemolytic anemia, alter the configuration of plasma protein, reduce the synthesis of hemoglobin, depress packed red blood cell volume, and accumulate in renal and hepatic tissues. There are substantial data in regard to selenium effects on the erythrocyte component of peripheral blood, but there is an obvious deficiency in such information concerning the effects of selenium on the leukocyte component of blood. The major purpose of this investigation is to focus upon the effects of selenium on formed elements of the blood, and specifically, the leukocytes. Following three separate treatments of selenium, the number and class of peripheral leukocytes were determined as a function of time following administration of the selenium salt.

  14. Curcumin modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion in murine sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Wang, Si-Wei; Mishra, Nilamadhab; El-Gazzar, Mohammad; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective Circulating cell-endothelial cell interaction in sepsis is a rate-determining factor in organ dysfunction, and interventions targeting this process have a potential therapeutic value. In this project, we examined whether curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric and an anti-inflammatory agent, could disrupt interactions between circulating blood cells and endothelium and improve survival in a murine model of sepsis. Methods Mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis vs. sham surgery. We studied leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy technique, blood brain barrier dysfunction using Evans Blue leakage method, P-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique and survival in mice subjected to Sham, CLP and CLP with curcumin pre-treatment (CLP+Curcumin). Results Curcumin significantly attenuated leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation, Evans Blue leakage in the brain tissue and improved survival in mice with CLP. P-selectin expression in mice with CLP+Curcumin was significantly attenuated compared to CLP in various microcirculatory beds including brain. Reduction in platelet adhesion was predominantly via modulation of endothelium by curcumin. Conclusion Curcumin pre-treatment modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion and blood brain barrier dysfunction in mice with CLP via P-selectin expression and improves survival in mice with CLP. PMID:20690979

  15. Role of leukotrienes in leukocyte adhesion following systemic administration of oxidatively modified human low density lipoprotein in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, H A; Hübner, C; Finckh, B; Angermüller, S; Nolte, D; Beisiegel, U; Kohlschütter, A; Messmer, K

    1991-01-01

    In vitro studies indicate that oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, a constant feature of early atherogenesis. Using intravital fluorescence microscopy in the dorsal skinfold chamber model in awake Syrian golden hamsters, we studied whether (a) oxLDL elicits leukocyte/endothelium interaction in vivo, and whether (b) leukotrienes play a mediator role in this event. Leukocyte/endothelium interaction was assessed in the time course after intravenous injection of native human LDL (4 mg/kg body wt) and of oxLDL (7.5 microM Cu++, 6 h, 37 degrees C) into control hamsters and into hamsters, pretreated with the selective leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor MK-886 (20 mumol/kg, i.v.). While no effect was seen after injection of native LDL, oxLDL elicited an immediate induction of leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium of arterioles and postcapillary venules. Total and differential leukocyte counts suggest that all leukocyte subsets were likewise affected by oxLDL with no specific preference for monocytes. Stimulation of leukocyte adhesion was entirely prevented in inhibitor-treated animals, suggesting the important mediator role of leukotrienes in oxLDL-induced leukocyte/endothelium interaction. Images PMID:2056134

  16. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of conducting experiments with the formed elements of the blood under conditions of microgravity opens up important opportunities to improve the understanding of basic formed element physiology, as well as, contribution to improved preservation of the formed elements for use in transfusion. The physiological, biochemical, and physical changes of the membrane of the erythrocyte, platelet, and leukocyte was studied during storage under two specific conditions: standard blood bank conditions and microgravity, utilizing three FDA approved plastic bags. Storage lesions; red cell storage on Earth; platelet storage on Earth; and leukocyte storage Earth were examined. The interaction of biomaterials and blood cells was studied during storage.

  17. Leukocyte Responsiveness to Exercise in Individuals Positive for Human Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J N; Navalta, J W

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects 50% of adults in the United States. HCMV can become a cause for concern in individuals who have a compromised immune system, which may occur after high-intensity exercise. The purpose of this preliminary study was to characterize the lymphocyte, monocyte, and neutrophil responses to exercise in HCMV+individuals. Participants were either positive (HCMV +) or negative (HCMV-) for HCMV. Participants visited the laboratory on 3 separate occasions: HCMV screening, 100% VO2max test, and 80% VO2max run. Mixed-model factorial ANOVA procedures with repeated measures on sampling condition were performed on absolute and relative circulating lymphocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils. Significant main effects for time for both absolute and relative values were seen for all leukocyte subsets regardless of virus status. Significant differences for absolute and relative values were seen between sampling conditions for all leukocyte subsets. We report for the first time that HCMV status does not affect circulating neutrophil responses to high-intensity exercise, though exercise-induced neutrocytosis is seen during the post-exercise and 60 min post-exercise sampling conditions, regardless of HCMV status. There is no HCMV effect on circulating monocyte responses to exercise, though exercise-induced monocytosis was seen during the post-exercise sampling condition regardless of HCMV status. PMID:26837931

  18. Leukocyte margination at arteriole shear rate

    PubMed Central

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Nakaaki, Keita; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We numerically investigated margination of leukocytes at arteriole shear rate in straight circular channels with diameters ranging from 10 to 22 μm. Our results demonstrated that passing motion of RBCs effectively induces leukocyte margination not only in small channels but also in large channels. A longer time is needed for margination to occur in a larger channel, but once a leukocyte has marginated, passing motion of RBCs occurs continuously independent of the channel diameter, and leukocyte margination is sustained for a long duration. We also show that leukocytes rarely approach the wall surface to within a microvillus length at arteriole shear rate. PMID:24907300

  19. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients: Value of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Brown, M.L.; Sutton, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients with currently available radiologic and radionuclide imaging techniques is often difficult. Recently, 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy has been proposed as an attractive alternative. Accordingly, the authors retrospectively reviewed 51 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, 49 technetium-99m bone scans, and 49 plain radiographs obtained in 51 adults with diabetes in whom osteomyelitis of the foot was suspected. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques were evaluated in all patients, as well as in a subgroup of 11 patients with neuroarthropathy. Results with 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were also examined in subsets of patients with soft-tissue ulcers (n = 35) and those receiving antibiotics during investigation (n = 20). Confirmation or exclusion of osteomyelitis was made surgically in 28 patients and clinically in 23. Fourteen patients had osteomyelitis. Bone scans were most sensitive (93%) but least specific (43%); plain radiographs were most specific (83%) but least sensitive (43%). 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were both sensitive (79%) and specific (78%), and remained useful in patients with neuroarthropathy, soft-tissue ulcers, and antibiotic treatment. Poor spatial resolution contributed to the false-negative and false-positive 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, suggesting that this technique should not be interpreted independent of other tests. 111In-labeled leukocyte scans are a valuable diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients.

  20. Improved survival of newborns receiving leukocyte transfusions for sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, M.S.; Rucker, R.; Bennetts, G.A.; Hicks, D.; Worcester, C.; Amlie, R.; Johnson, S.; Katz, J.

    1984-11-01

    To determine the role of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte transfusions in neonates with sepsis, 23 consecutive newborns were prospectively randomly selected during an 18-month period in a treatment plan to receive polymorphonuclear leukocyte transfusions with supportive care or supportive care alone. Thirteen neonates received transfusions every 12 hours for a total of five transfusions. Each transfusion consisting of 15 mL/kg of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was subjected to 1,500 rads of radiation. The polymorphonuclear leukocytes were obtained by continuous-flow centrifugation leukapheresis and contained 0.5 to 1.0 X 10(9) granulocytes per 15 mL with less than 10% lymphocytes. Positive findings on blood cultures were obtained in 14/23 patients and seven were randomly selected for each treatment group. Absolute granulocyte counts were less than 1,500/microL in 13 patients but tibial bone marrow examinations revealed that the neutrophil supply pool was depleted in only three patients. The survival was significantly greater in the treatment group compared with the group that did not receive transfusions.

  1. Multiparticle adhesive dynamics: Hydrodynamic recruitment of rolling leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    The slow rolling motion of leukocytes along the walls of blood vessels mediated by specific receptor-ligand adhesion is important in inflammation and occurs in postcapillary venules over a wide range of wall shear stresses and vessel diameters. The ability of hydrodynamic collisions between cells to induce capture of free-stream leukocytes to a selectin-bearing surface under shear flow was studied experimentally by using a cell-free assay. It was found that carbohydrate-coated spherical beads, representing model leukocytes, tend to attach to the adhesive wall 4–5 cell diameters up- or downstream of a slowly rolling or stationary adhesive bead. A key feature of such “hydrodynamic recruitment” is that only glancing, indirect collisions occurring close to the plane will result in downstream attachment. A direct numerical simulation of cell capture and rolling that includes multiparticle hydrodynamic interactions is shown to reproduce the observed behavior accurately. The theory predicts that hydrodynamic recruitment will occur in the absence of buoyancy effects and over a range of shear rates, suggesting that the mechanism may be important in vivo. This theory is supported by measurements of leukocyte capture in vivo using the hamster cheek pouch model. PMID:11752440

  2. A Model of Canine Leukocyte Telomere Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Benetos, Athanase; Kimura, Masayuki; Labat, Carlos; Buchoff, Gerald M.; Huber, Shell; Labat, Laura; Lu, Xiaobin; Aviv, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have found associations of leukocyte telomere length (TL) with diseases of aging and with longevity. However, it is unknown whether birth leukocyte TL or its age-dependent attrition— the two factors that determine leukocyte TL dynamics— explains these associations, since acquiring this information entails monitoring individuals over their entire life course. We tested in dogs a model of leukocyte TL dynamics, based on the following premises: (i) TL is synchronized among somatic tissues; (ii) TL in skeletal muscle, which is largely post-mitotic, is a measure of TL in early development; (iii) the difference between TL in leukocytes and muscle (ΔLMTL) is the extent of leukocyte TL shortening since early development. Using this model, we observed in 83 dogs (ages 4–42 months) no significant change with age in TLs of skeletal muscle and a shorter TL in leukocytes than in skeletal muscle (P<0.0001). Age explained 43% of the variation in ΔLMTL (P<0.00001) but only 6% of the variation in leukocyte TL (P=0.035) among dogs. Accordingly, muscle TL and ΔLMTL provide the two essential factors of leukocyte TL dynamics in the individual dog. When applied to humans, the partition of the contribution of leukocyte TL during early development versus telomere shortening afterward might provide information about whether the individual’s longevity is calibrated to either one or both factors that define leukocyte TL dynamics. PMID:21917112

  3. Leukocyte numbers and function in subjects eating n-3 enriched foods: selective depression of natural killer cell levels

    PubMed Central

    Mukaro, Violet R; Costabile, Maurizio; Murphy, Karen J; Hii, Charles S; Howe, Peter R; Ferrante, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Introduction While consumption of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) has been recommended for those at risk of inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, the mechanism of their anti-inflammatory effect remains to be clearly defined, particularly in relation to the dose and type of n-3 LCPUFA. The objective of this study was to determine whether varying the levels of n-3 LCPUFA in erythrocyte membrane lipids, following dietary supplementation, is associated with altered numbers and function of circulating leukocytes conducive to protection against inflammation. Methods In a double-blind and placebo-controlled study, 44 healthy subjects aged 23 to 63 years consumed either standard or n-3 LCPUFA-enriched versions of typical processed foods, the latter allowing a target daily consumption of 1 gram n-3 LCPUFA. After six months, peripheral blood leukocyte and subpopulation proportions and numbers were assessed by flow cytometry. Leukocytes were also examined for lymphoproliferation and cytokine production, neutrophil chemotaxis, chemokinesis, bactericidal, adherence and iodination activity. Erythrocytes were analyzed for fatty-acid content. Results Erythrocyte n-3 LCPUFA levels were higher and absolute leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers were lower in subjects consuming n-3 enriched foods than in controls. There were no changes in the number of neutrophils, monocytes, T cells (CD3+), T-cell subsets (CD4+, CD8+) and B cells (CD19+). However, natural killer (NK) (CD3-CD16+CD56+) cell numbers were lower in n-3 supplemented subjects than in controls and were inversely related to the amount of eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid in erythrocytes. No significant correlations were found with respect to lymphocyte lymphoproliferation and production of IFN-γ and IL-2, but lymphotoxin production was higher with greater n-3 LCPUFA membrane content. Similarly, neutrophil chemotaxis, chemokinesis, bactericidal activity and adherence did not

  4. Comparisons of CVID and IgGSD: Referring Physicians, Autoimmune Conditions, Pneumovax Reactivity, Immunoglobulin Levels, Blood Lymphocyte Subsets, and HLA-A and -B Typing in 432 Adult Index Patients

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Bertoli, Luigi F.; Barton, J. Clayborn

    2014-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD) are heterogeneous disorders characterized by respiratory tract infections, selective Ig isotype deficiencies, and impaired antibody responses to polysaccharide antigens. Using univariable analyses, we compared observations in 34 CVID and 398 IgGSD adult index patients (81.9% women) referred to a hematology/oncology practice. Similarities included specialties of referring physicians, mean ages, proportions of women, reactivity to Pneumovax, median serum IgG3 and IgG4 levels, median blood CD56+/CD16+ lymphocyte levels, positivity for HLA-A and -B types, and frequencies of selected HLA-A, -B haplotypes. Dissimilarities included greater prevalence of autoimmune conditions, lower median IgG, IgA, and IgM, and lower median CD19+, CD3+/CD4+, and CD3+/CD8+ blood lymphocytes in CVID patients. Prevalence of Sjögren's syndrome and hypothyroidism was significantly greater in CVID patients. Combined subnormal IgG1/IgG3 occurred in 59% and 29% of CVID and IgGSD patients, respectively. Isolated subnormal IgG3 occurred in 121 IgGSD patients (88% women). Logistic regression on CVID (versus IgGSD) revealed a significant positive association with autoimmune conditions and significant negative associations with IgG1, IgG3, and IgA and CD56+/CD16+ lymphocyte levels, but the odds ratio was increased for autoimmune conditions alone (6.9 (95% CI 1.3, 35.5)). PMID:25295286

  5. Visualization of a prosthetic vascular graft due to platelet contamination during /sup 111/Indium-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Ramberg, K.

    1988-09-01

    A prosthetic axillo-femoral bypass graft was visualized during /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in a patient referred for possible abdominal abscess. The presence of significant cardiac blood-pool activity raised the possibility that this uptake was due to deposition of contaminating labeled platelets rather than labeled leukocytes. An analysis of a small sample of the patient's blood confirmed that the circulating activity was due to labeled platelets. Increased activity along prosthetic vascular grafts in patients undergoing /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy may be due to adherent platelet, and not indicative of infection.

  6. Beta(2) integrin Mac-1 is a receptor for Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin on bovine and ovine leukocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pneumonia caused by Mannheimia haemolytica is an important disease of cattle (BO), domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries) and bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis). Leukotoxin (Lkt) produced by M. haemolytica is cytolytic to all leukocyte subsets of these three species. Although it is certain that CD18, the...

  7. Fecal Leukocytes in Children Infected with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Erik H.; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Ecker, Lucie; Cabello, Martin; Durand, David; Barletta, Francesca; Molina, Margarita; Gil, Ana I.; Huicho, Luis; Lanata, Claudio F.; Cleary, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the presence and quantity of fecal leukocytes in children infected with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and to compare these levels between diarrhea and control cases. We analyzed 1,474 stool samples from 935 diarrhea episodes and 539 from healthy controls of a cohort study of children younger than 2 years of age in Lima, Peru. Stools were analyzed for common enteric pathogens, and diarrheagenic E. coli isolates were studied by a multiplex real-time PCR. Stool smears were stained with methylene blue and read by a blinded observer to determine the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-power field (L/hpf). Fecal leukocytes at >10 L/hpf were present in 11.8% (110/935) of all diarrheal episodes versus 1.1% (6/539) in controls (P < 0.001). Among stool samples with diarrheagenic E. coli as the only pathogen isolated (excluding coinfection), fecal leukocytes at >10 L/hpf were present in 8.5% (18/212) of diarrhea versus 1.3% (2/157) of control samples (P < 0.01). Ninety-five percent of 99 diarrheagenic E. coli diarrhea samples were positive for fecal lactoferrin. Adjusting for the presence of blood in stools, age, sex, undernutrition, and breastfeeding, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) isolation as a single pathogen, excluding coinfections, was highly associated with the presence of fecal leukocytes (>10 L/hpf) with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 15.51; P < 0.05). Although diarrheagenic E. coli was isolated with similar frequencies in diarrhea and control samples, clearly it was associated with a more inflammatory response during symptomatic infection; however, in general, these pathogens elicited a mild inflammatory response. PMID:21325554

  8. Fecal leukocytes in children infected with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Erik H; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ecker, Lucie; Cabello, Martin; Durand, David; Barletta, Francesca; Molina, Margarita; Gil, Ana I; Huicho, Luis; Lanata, Claudio F; Cleary, Thomas G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the presence and quantity of fecal leukocytes in children infected with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and to compare these levels between diarrhea and control cases. We analyzed 1,474 stool samples from 935 diarrhea episodes and 539 from healthy controls of a cohort study of children younger than 2 years of age in Lima, Peru. Stools were analyzed for common enteric pathogens, and diarrheagenic E. coli isolates were studied by a multiplex real-time PCR. Stool smears were stained with methylene blue and read by a blinded observer to determine the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-power field (L/hpf). Fecal leukocytes at >10 L/hpf were present in 11.8% (110/935) of all diarrheal episodes versus 1.1% (6/539) in controls (P < 0.001). Among stool samples with diarrheagenic E. coli as the only pathogen isolated (excluding coinfection), fecal leukocytes at >10 L/hpf were present in 8.5% (18/212) of diarrhea versus 1.3% (2/157) of control samples (P < 0.01). Ninety-five percent of 99 diarrheagenic E. coli diarrhea samples were positive for fecal lactoferrin. Adjusting for the presence of blood in stools, age, sex, undernutrition, and breastfeeding, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) isolation as a single pathogen, excluding coinfections, was highly associated with the presence of fecal leukocytes (>10 L/hpf) with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 15.51; P < 0.05). Although diarrheagenic E. coli was isolated with similar frequencies in diarrhea and control samples, clearly it was associated with a more inflammatory response during symptomatic infection; however, in general, these pathogens elicited a mild inflammatory response. PMID:21325554

  9. Single and repeated moderate consumption of native or dealcoholized red wine show different effects on antioxidant parameters in blood and DNA strand breaks in peripheral leukocytes in healthy volunteers: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN68505294

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Bianca M; Ellinger, Sabine; Kekic, Klaudia; Geus, Leonie; Fimmers, Rolf; Spengler, Ulrich; Müller, Wolfgang-Ulrich; Goerlich, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Background Red wine (RW) is rich in antioxidant polyphenols that might protect from oxidative stress related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Antioxidant effects after single ingestion of RW or dealcoholized RW (DRW) have been observed in several studies, but results after regular consumption are contradictory. Thus, we examined if single or repeated consumption of moderate amounts of RW or DRW exert antioxidant activity in vivo. Methods Total phenolic content and concentration of other antioxidants in plasma/serum, total antioxidant capacity (TEAC) in plasma as well as DNA strand breaks in peripheral leukocytes were measured in healthy non-smokers A) before, 90 and 360 min after ingestion of one glass of RW, DRW or water; B) before and after consumption of one glass of RW or DRW daily for 6 weeks. DNA strand breaks (SB) were determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet Assay) in untreated cells and after induction of oxidative stress ex vivo with H2O2 (300 μM, 20 min). Results Both RW and DRW transiently increased total phenolic content in plasma after single consumption, but only RW lead to a sustained increase if consumed regularly. Plasma antioxidant capacity was not affected by single or regular consumption of RW or DRW. Effects of RW and DRW on DNA SB were conflicting. DNA strand breaks in untreated cells increased after a single dose of RW and DRW, whereas H2O2 induced SB were reduced after DRW. In contrast, regular RW consumption reduced SB in untreated cells but did not affect H2O2 induced SB. Conclusion The results suggest that consumption of both RW and DRW leads to an accumulation of phenolic compounds in plasma without increasing plasma antioxidant capacity. Red wine and DRW seem to affect the occurrence of DNA strand breaks, but this cannot be referred to antioxidant effects. PMID:16287499

  10. Methamphetamine Administration Targets Multiple Immune Subsets and Induces Phenotypic Alterations Suggestive of Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Robert; Morsey, Brenda; Boyer, Craig W.; Fox, Howard S.; Sarvetnick, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a widely abused stimulant and its users are at increased risk for multiple infectious diseases. To determine the impact of meth on the immune system, we utilized a murine model that simulates the process of meth consumption in a typical addict. Our phenotypic analysis of leukocytes from this dose escalation model revealed that meth affected key immune subsets. Meth administration led to a decrease in abundance of natural killer (NK) cells and the remaining NK cells possessed a phenotype suggesting reduced responsiveness. Dendritic cells (DCs) and Gr-1high monocytes/macrophages were also decreased in abundance while Gr-1low monocytes/macrophages appear to show signs of perturbation. CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets were affected by methamphetamine, both showing a reduction in antigen-experienced subsets. CD4 T cells also exhibited signs of activation, with increased expression of CD150 on CD226-expressing cells and an expansion of KLRG1+, FoxP3− cells. These results exhibit that meth has the ability to disrupt immune homeostasis and impact key subsets of leukocytes which may leave users more vulnerable to pathogens. PMID:23227154

  11. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Stafford, James L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W.; Blazer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  12. Observing a fictitious stressful event: haematological changes, including circulating leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Mian, Rubina; Shelton-Rayner, Graham; Harkin, Brendan; Williams, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of watching a psychological stressful event on the activation of leukocytes in healthy human volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from 32 healthy male and female subjects aged between 20 and 26 years before, during and after either watching an 83-minute horror film that none of the subjects had previously seen (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974) or by sitting quietly in a room (control group). Total differential cell counts, leukocyte activation as measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at defined time points. There were significant increases in peripheral circulating leukocytes, the number of activated circulating leukocytes, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) in response to the stressor. These were accompanied by significant increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.05 from baseline). This is the first reported study on the effects of observing a psychologically stressful, albeit fictitious event on circulating leukocyte numbers and the state of leukocyte activation as determined by the nitrotetrazolium test. PMID:12637206

  13. Leukocyte telomere length predicts overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma treated with transarterial chemoembolization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-Qiang; An, Jia-Ze; Liu, Juan; Yang, Ye-Fa; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Zhao, Bin-Yu; Li, Ji-Bin; Yang, Hu-Shan; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Xing, Jin-Liang

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes can predict the clinical outcome of several cancers. However, whether leukocyte telomere length is associated with the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be determined. In this study, relative telomere length (RTL) in peripheral blood leukocytes was measured using a real-time PCR-based method for 269 HCC patients treated with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) from two independent hospitals. The association between RTL and the overall survival (OS) of HCC was analyzed. The immunological function of the HCC patients with different leukocyte RTLs was evaluated. Multivariate analyses indicated that long leukocyte RTL was significantly associated with poor OS of HCC patients, with a hazard ratio of 2.04 (95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.86; P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier analyses showed a significant difference of median survival time between patients with long and short RTL (log rank P < 0.001). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses showed that the long RTL group had a significantly increased percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) Treg in CD4(+) T cells compared with short RTL group (P = 0.002). In conclusion, our results suggest that leukocyte RTL may serve as an independent prognostic marker for HCC patients treated with TACE. PMID:22318909

  14. Derivation of Cinnamon Blocks Leukocyte Attachment by Interacting with Sialosides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Guu, Shih-Yun; Tsai, Chan-Chuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Viswaraman, Mohan; Chen, Hsing-Bao; Chang, Chuan-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Molecules derived from cinnamon have demonstrated diverse pharmacological activities against infectious pathogens, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the cinnamon-derived molecule IND02 on the adhesion of leukocytes to host cells. The anti-inflammatory ability of IND02, a pentameric procyanidin type A polyphenol polymer isolated from cinnamon alcohol extract, was examined. Pretreatment with IND02 significantly reduced the attachment of THP-1 cells or neutrophils to TNF-α-activated HUVECs or E-selectin/ICAM-1, respectively. IND02 also reduced the binding of E-, L- and P-selectins with sialosides. Furthermore, IND02 could agglutinate human red blood cells (RBC), and the agglutination could be disrupted by sialylated glycoprotein. Our findings demonstrate that IND02, a cinnamon-derived compound, can interact with sialosides and block the binding of selectins and leukocytes with sialic acids. PMID:26076445

  15. Derivation of Cinnamon Blocks Leukocyte Attachment by Interacting with Sialosides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Guu, Shih-Yun; Tsai, Chan-Chuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Viswaraman, Mohan; Chen, Hsing-Bao; Chang, Chuan-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Molecules derived from cinnamon have demonstrated diverse pharmacological activities against infectious pathogens, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the cinnamon-derived molecule IND02 on the adhesion of leukocytes to host cells. The anti-inflammatory ability of IND02, a pentameric procyanidin type A polyphenol polymer isolated from cinnamon alcohol extract, was examined. Pretreatment with IND02 significantly reduced the attachment of THP-1 cells or neutrophils to TNF-α-activated HUVECs or E-selectin/ICAM-1, respectively. IND02 also reduced the binding of E-, L- and P-selectins with sialosides. Furthermore, IND02 could agglutinate human red blood cells (RBC), and the agglutination could be disrupted by sialylated glycoprotein. Our findings demonstrate that IND02, a cinnamon-derived compound, can interact with sialosides and block the binding of selectins and leukocytes with sialic acids. PMID:26076445

  16. The potential of the novel leukocyte removal filter in cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is indispensable for cardiac surgery but leads to systemic inflammatory responses and leukocyte activation, possibly due to blood contact with the surface of the CPB unit, surgical, ischemic reperfusion injury, etc. Systemic inflammatory responses during CPB result in increased morbidity and mortality. Activation of leukocytes is an important part of this process and directly contributes to coagulopathy and hemorrhage. This inflammatory response may contribute to the development of postoperative complications, including myocardial dysfunction, respiratory failure, renal and neurologic dysfunction, altered liver function and ultimately, multiple organ failure. Various pharmacologic and mechanical strategies have been developed to minimize the systemic inflammatory response during CPB. For example, leukocyte removal filters were developed in the 1990s for incorporation into the CPB circuit. However, studies of this approach have yielded conflicting findings. The purpose of this was to review the studies of a novel leukocyte removal filter in patients undergoing CPB. PMID:26613267

  17. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy.

  18. Enlarging Red Blood Cell Distribution Width During Hospitalization Identifies a Very High-Risk Subset of Acutely Decompensated Heart Failure Patients and Adds Valuable Prognostic Information on Top of Hemoconcentration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Arrigo, Mattia; Medeiros, Pedro Bettencourt; Ricardo, Miguel Bento; Almeida, Tiago; Rola, Alexandre; Tolpannen, Heli; Laribi, Said; Gayat, Etienne; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Mueller, Christian; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Aragão, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) may serve as an integrative marker of pathological processes that portend worse prognosis in heart failure (HF). The prognostic value of RDW variation (ΔRDW) during hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF) has yet to be studied. We retrospectively analyzed 2 independent cohorts: Centro Hospitalar do Porto (derivation cohort) and Lariboisière hospital (validation cohort). In the derivation cohort a total of 170 patients (age 76.2 ± 10.3 years) were included and in the validation cohort 332 patients were included (age 76.4 ± 12.2 years). In the derivation cohort the primary composite outcome of HF admission and/or cardiovascular death occurred in 78 (45.9%) patients during the 180-day follow-up period. Discharge RDW and ΔRDW were both increased when hemoglobin levels were lower; peripheral edema was also associated with increased discharge RDW (all P < 0.05). Discharge RDW value was significantly associated with adverse events: RDW > 15% at discharge was associated with a 2-fold increase in event rate, HR = 1.95 (1.05–3.62), P = 0.04, while a ΔRDW >0 also had a strong association with outcome, HR = 2.47 (1.35–4.51), P = 0.003. The addition of both discharge RDW > 15% and ΔRDW > 0 to hemoconcentration was associated with a significant improvement in the net reclassification index, NRI = 18.3 (4.3–43.7), P = 0.012. Overlapping results were found in the validation cohort. As validated in 2 independent AHF cohorts, an in-hospital RDW enlargement and an elevated RDW at discharge are associated with increased rates of mid-term events. RDW variables improve the risk stratification of these patients on top of well-established prognostic markers. PMID:27057905

  19. The role of platelets in the recruitment of leukocytes during vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ed Rainger, G.; Chimen, Myriam; Harrison, Matthew J.; Yates, Clara M.; Harrison, Paul; Watson, Stephen P.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Nash, Gerard B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Besides their role in the formation of thrombus during haemostasis, it is becoming clear that platelets contribute to a number of other processes within the vasculature. Indeed, the integrated function of the thrombotic and inflammatory systems, which results in platelet-mediated recruitment of leukocytes, is now considered to be of great importance in the propagation, progression and pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease of the arteries. There are three scenarios by which platelets can interact with leukocytes: (1) during haemostasis, when platelets adhere to and are activated on sub-endothelial matrix proteins exposed by vascular damage and then recruit leukocytes to a growing thrombus. (2) Platelets adhere to and are activated on stimulated endothelial cells and then bridge blood borne leukocytes to the vessel wall and. (3) Adhesion between platelets and leukocytes occurs in the blood leading to formation of heterotypic aggregates prior to contact with endothelial cells. In the following review we will not discuss leukocyte recruitment during haemostasis, as this represents a physiological response to tissue trauma that can progress, at least in its early stages, in the absence of inflammation. Rather we will deal with scenarios 2 and 3, as these pathways of platelet–leukocyte interactions are important during inflammation and in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Indeed, these interactions mean that leukocytes possess means of adhesion to the vessel wall under conditions that may not normally be permissive of leukocyte–endothelial cell adhesion, meaning that the disease process may be able to bypass the regulatory pathways which would ordinarily moderate the inflammatory response. PMID:26196409

  20. Telomere length assessment in leukocytes presents potential diagnostic value in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    BARCZAK, WOJCIECH; ROZWADOWSKA, NATALIA; ROMANIUK, ALEKSANDRA; LIPIŃSKA, NATALIA; LISIAK, NATALIA; GRODECKA-GAZDECKA, SYLWIA; KSIĄŻEK, KRZYSZTOF; RUBIŚ, BŁAŻEJ

    2016-01-01

    Telomere shortening is associated with cancer development, primarily through the induction of genomic instability. The majority of studies have indicated that individuals with shorter blood telomeres may be at a higher risk of developing various types of cancer. There is increasing evidence that the study of the alterations in telomere length may improve cancer prognosis. The aim of the present study was to verify the use of telomere length parameters in the diagnostics of breast cancer stage. Telomere length was analyzed in the blood leukocytes of 52 patients with breast cancer relative to 47 control subjects using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The effects of stage, grade, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) status were assessed. The current study demonstrated that the average telomeric sequence length was significantly shorter in leukocytes from individuals diagnosed with a more severe stage of breast cancer (T2N1M0) than in leukocytes in the early stages of the disease (T1N0M0) (P=0.0207). Furthermore, the data indicated that telomeres in leukocytes derived from patients with HER2+ breast cancer were significantly longer compared with those with the HER2− type (P=0.0347). These results suggest that the assessment of telomeres in blood leukocytes may, at least partially, correspond with breast cancer staging and HER2 receptor status. PMID:26998167

  1. Production of monoclonal antibodies against canine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Palis; Borges dos Santos, Roberto Robson; Lima, Carla Andrade; Rios de Sousa Gomes, Hilton; Larangeira, Daniela Farias; Santos, Patrícia Meira; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Conrado dos-Santos, Washington Luis; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain

    2004-04-01

    A panel of anti-canine leukocyte monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was produced by immunizing BALB/c mice with canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), either resting or stimulated with concanavalin A (ConA). Three out of 28 clones-IH1, AB6, and HG6-screened by ELISA and producing antibody with the highest specificity for canine cell immunostaining, were subjected to three subsequent subcloning steps by limiting dilution, and selected for further characterization. These MAbs belonged to IgG1 (HG6 and IH1) and IgG2a (AB6) isotypes. The distribution of cell populations expressing the antigen recognized by the antibodies was identified by indirect immunoflorescence on canine PBMC and on tissue sections of lymph node, spleen, liver and skin. The possible crossreactivity with human PBMC was also examined in immunocytochemistry. One of the antibodies specifically recognized macrophages. The MAbs presented here can be foreseen as possible valuable diagnostic and research tools to study immune functions in dogs. PMID:15165486

  2. [Effect of proteflazid on TLRs expression by mononuclear leukocytes of peripheral blood and epithelial cells of mucous membranes and skin in patients with herpes-associated erythema multiforme and erythema annulare centrifugum].

    PubMed

    Sorokina, E V; Akhmatova, N K; Skhodova, S A

    2014-01-01

    The article reports survey data on 23 patients with erythemas, including 19 patients with herpes-associated erythema multiforme (HAEM) and 4 patients with Darier's erythema annulare centrifugum (DEAC). Patients in the initial state (baseline) and after two weeks of therapy with proteflazid were characterized by measuring the levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and in epithelial cells of the throat and the skin. The TLR expression in PBMC and skin was assessed by flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies (ICA) (Caltag Laboratories, USA; Hycult Biotech, Netherlands) against relevant antigens. In addition, patients were also characterized by the content of subpopulations of lymphocytes expressing surface markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD21, CD23, CD72, CD25, and HLA-DR in the peripheral blood, which was measured by flow cytometry. The therapy with proteflazid in patients with both HAEM and DEAC led to normalization of the level of both T-cell and B-cell immunity, which was manifested by an increase in the total number of lymphocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD21+, and CD72+. Measurements of the dynamics of TLR expression in the course of immunotherapy showed an increase in the number of TLR 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 in PBMC (which was especially pronounced for TLR2) and in epithelium of the pharyngeal mucosa and skin (increased expression of TLR3, 7, and 9). PMID:24800523

  3. Glycobiology of leukocyte trafficking in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rachael D; Cooper, Dianne

    2014-12-01

    To fulfill their potential, leukocytes must be able to exit the vasculature and reach the site of inflammation within the tissue. This process of leukocyte extravasation is a tightly regulated sequence of events that is governed by a host of cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, chemokines and lipid mediators. Of major importance to this process and the function of many of the proteins and lipids involved is the posttranslational modification of these moieties by glycosylation. The glycosylation process is coordinated by multiple enzymes that add and remove saccharides to/from glycan structures on proteins and lipids, resulting in a unique molecular signature that affords specificity to the molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment. This review will discuss how glycosylation impacts the function of these key molecules involved in the recruitment of leukocytes during inflammation and the function of specific lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) that have a role in leukocyte trafficking. PMID:25258391

  4. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Induced with Leukocyte Procoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Kociba, Gary J.; Griesemer, Richard A.

    1972-01-01

    The procoagulant activity of rabbit peritoneal leukocytes significantly increased when the leukocytes were incubated in suspension cultures at 37 C for 24 hours. Intravenous infusions of Iysates of 232 × 106 rabbit leukocytes which had been incubated in cultures at 37 C for 24 hours produced disseminated intravascular coagulation and vasculitis involving the pulmonary arteries in normal rabbits. Intraaortic infusions of lysates of 230 × 106 similarly incubated leukocytes produced renal thrombosis and renal cortical necrosis in normal rabbits. These observations suggest that the procoagulant of granulocytic leukocytes could play a role in the generalized Shwartzman reaction and other syndromes of disseminated intravascular coagulation. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 1Fig 2 PMID:5086898

  5. Leukocyte rheology in recent stroke.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Matrai, A; Paulsen, F

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen patients with recent ischemic stroke were compared with an equal number of matched controls. Standardized suspensions of red cells as well as of red and white cells were filtered in a new filtration apparatus capable of discriminating between cell deformability and filter occlusion. Results show that red cell deformability, although slightly lower than in controls, is not significantly altered in stroke patients. Filter occlusion, however, was significantly higher in patients when red and white cell suspensions were filtered, but not when red cell suspensions were used, suggesting that white cell filterability is impaired after stroke, which could be due to decreased deformability and/or increased adhesiveness of leukocytes. Slowed white cell passage may also occur in the living microcirculation and may present an obstacle to nutritive flow in exchange vessels, possibly contributing to local ischemia and tissue necrosis after stroke. PMID:3810770

  6. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5−/− mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4+ T-cells from wild type or CCR5−/− mice into RAG-1−/−. CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4+ and CD11b+ leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  7. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5(-/-) mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4(+) T-cells from wild type or CCR5(-/-) mice into RAG-1(-/-). CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4(+) and CD11b(+) leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  8. Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking leukocytes with application to neurodegenerative pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Minsuk; Kim, Dong-Joo; Lee, Mi-Ri; Wu, Yu; Han, Lin; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Fan, Rong

    2014-05-01

    Despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that restricts the entry of immune cells and mediators into the central nervous system (CNS), a small number of peripheral leukocytes can traverse the BBB and infiltrate into the CNS. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the major routes through which trafficking leukocytes migrate into the CNS. Therefore, the number of leukocytes and their phenotypic compositions in the CSF may represent important sources to investigate immune-to-brain interactions or diagnose and monitor neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the paucity of trafficking leucocytes in the CSF, a technology capable of efficient isolation, enumeration, and molecular typing of these cells in the clinical settings has not been achieved. In this study, we report on a biofunctionalized silicon nanowire array chip for highly efficient capture and multiplexed phenotyping of rare trafficking leukocytes in small quantities (50 microliters) of clinical CSF specimens collected from neurodegenerative disease patients. The antibody coated 3D nanostructured materials exhibited vastly improved rare cell capture efficiency due to high-affinity binding and enhanced cell-substrate interactions. Moreover, our platform creates multiple cell capture interfaces, each of which can selectively isolate specific leukocyte phenotypes. A comparison with the traditional immunophenotyping using flow cytometry demonstrated that our novel silicon nanowire-based rare cell analysis platform can perform rapid detection and simultaneous molecular characterization of heterogeneous immune cells. Multiplexed molecular typing of rare leukocytes in CSF samples collected from Alzheimer's disease patients revealed the elevation of white blood cell counts and significant alterations in the distribution of major leukocyte phenotypes. Our technology represents a practical tool for potentially diagnosing and monitoring the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by allowing an effective

  9. Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking leukocytes with application to neurodegenerative pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Minsuk; Kim, Dong-Joo; Lee, Mi-Ri; Wu, Yu; Han, Lin; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Fan, Rong

    2014-05-01

    Despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that restricts the entry of immune cells and mediators into the central nervous system (CNS), a small number of peripheral leukocytes can traverse the BBB and infiltrate into the CNS. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the major routes through which trafficking leukocytes migrate into the CNS. Therefore, the number of leukocytes and their phenotypic compositions in the CSF may represent important sources to investigate immune-to-brain interactions or diagnose and monitor neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the paucity of trafficking leucocytes in the CSF, a technology capable of efficient isolation, enumeration, and molecular typing of these cells in the clinical settings has not been achieved. In this study, we report on a biofunctionalized silicon nanowire array chip for highly efficient capture and multiplexed phenotyping of rare trafficking leukocytes in small quantities (50 microliters) of clinical CSF specimens collected from neurodegenerative disease patients. The antibody coated 3D nanostructured materials exhibited vastly improved rare cell capture efficiency due to high-affinity binding and enhanced cell-substrate interactions. Moreover, our platform creates multiple cell capture interfaces, each of which can selectively isolate specific leukocyte phenotypes. A comparison with the traditional immunophenotyping using flow cytometry demonstrated that our novel silicon nanowire-based rare cell analysis platform can perform rapid detection and simultaneous molecular characterization of heterogeneous immune cells. Multiplexed molecular typing of rare leukocytes in CSF samples collected from Alzheimer's disease patients revealed the elevation of white blood cell counts and significant alterations in the distribution of major leukocyte phenotypes. Our technology represents a practical tool for potentially diagnosing and monitoring the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by allowing an effective

  10. Novel insights into the relationships between dendritic cell subsets in human and mouse revealed by genome-wide expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Scott H; Walzer, Thierry; Dembélé, Doulaye; Thibault, Christelle; Defays, Axel; Bessou, Gilles; Xu, Huichun; Vivier, Eric; Sellars, MacLean; Pierre, Philippe; Sharp, Franck R; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Dalod, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Lymph-node resident DCs (LN-DCs) are subdivided into conventional DC (cDC) subsets (CD11b and CD8α in mouse; BDCA1 and BDCA3 in human) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). It is currently unclear if these various DC populations belong to a unique hematopoietic lineage and if the subsets identified in the mouse and human systems are evolutionary homologs. To gain novel insights into these questions, we sought conserved genetic signatures for LN-DCs and in vitro derived granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) DCs through the analysis of a compendium of genome-wide expression profiles of mouse or human leukocytes. Results We show through clustering analysis that all LN-DC subsets form a distinct branch within the leukocyte family tree, and reveal a transcriptomal signature evolutionarily conserved in all LN-DC subsets. Moreover, we identify a large gene expression program shared between mouse and human pDCs, and smaller conserved profiles shared between mouse and human LN-cDC subsets. Importantly, most of these genes have not been previously associated with DC function and many have unknown functions. Finally, we use compendium analysis to re-evaluate the classification of interferon-producing killer DCs, lin-CD16+HLA-DR+ cells and in vitro derived GM-CSF DCs, and show that these cells are more closely linked to natural killer and myeloid cells, respectively. Conclusion Our study provides a unique database resource for future investigation of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways governing the ontogeny and functions of leukocyte subsets, especially DCs. PMID:18218067

  11. Isolation and Analysis of Brain-sequestered Leukocytes from Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryg-Cornejo, Victoria; Ioannidis, Lisa J.; Hansen, Diana S.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a method for isolation and characterization of adherent inflammatory cells from brain blood vessels of P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. Infection of susceptible mouse-strains with this parasite strain results in the induction of experimental cerebral malaria, a neurologic syndrome that recapitulates certain important aspects of Plasmodium falciparum-mediated severe malaria in humans 1,2 . Mature forms of blood-stage malaria express parasitic proteins on the surface of the infected erythrocyte, which allows them to bind to vascular endothelial cells. This process induces obstructions in blood flow, resulting in hypoxia and haemorrhages 3 and also stimulates the recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes to the site of parasite sequestration. Unlike other infections, i.e neutrotopic viruses4-6, both malaria-parasitized red blood cells (pRBC) as well as associated inflammatory leukocytes remain sequestered within blood vessels rather than infiltrating the brain parenchyma. Thus to avoid contamination of sequestered leukocytes with non-inflammatory circulating cells, extensive intracardial perfusion of infected-mice prior to organ extraction and tissue processing is required in this procedure to remove the blood compartment. After perfusion, brains are harvested and dissected in small pieces. The tissue structure is further disrupted by enzymatic treatment with Collagenase D and DNAse I. The resulting brain homogenate is then centrifuged on a Percoll gradient that allows separation of brain-sequestered leukocytes (BSL) from myelin and other tissue debris. Isolated cells are then washed, counted using a hemocytometer and stained with fluorescent antibodies for subsequent analysis by flow cytometry. This procedure allows comprehensive phenotypic characterization of inflammatory leukocytes migrating to the brain in response to various stimuli, including stroke as well as viral or parasitic infections. The method also provides a useful tool for assessment of novel

  12. Kinetics of leukocyte sequestration in the lungs of acutely septic primates: A study using sup 111 In-labeled autologous leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hangen, D.H.; Segall, G.M.; Harney, E.W.; Stevens, J.H.; McDougall, I.R.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-03-01

    To further clarify the role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of ARDS, we studied the localization and kinetics of leukocyte migration using 111In-labeled autologous white cell scans ({sup 111}In wbc scans) in four primates made acutely septic with infusions of Escherichia coli. Whole body images were obtained with a gamma camera and were acquired on computer every 15 min beginning immediately after the E. coli infusion. Simultaneous measurements of C5a and peripheral blood leukocyte count were also obtained. Within 5 min of initiating sepsis, three major events occurred: complement activation as measured by the production of C5a, a profound fall in peripheral leukocyte count, and a significant increase in the sequestration of leukocytes in the lungs. The pulmonary sequestration reached a peak at 15 min with a mean of 152% of baseline activity. This sequestration consisted of a population that was predominantly neutrophils. Damage to the pulmonary capillary endothelium was demonstrated by an increase in extravascular lung water. The results support a role for neutrophils and complement as mediators in the pathogenesis of ARDS.

  13. Detection of aggregated leukocytes in the circulating pool during stress-demargination is not necessarily a result of decreased leukocyte adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    Arber, N; Berliner, S; Rotenberg, Z; Friedman, J; Belagodatni, E; Ostfeld, I; Aronson, M; Pinkhas, J

    1991-01-01

    Leukocyte endothelial interactions are essential for a normal immune response. It is known that this response is influenced by stress and that the latter induces demargination. We examined the question of whether stress demargination results from a decreased state of leukocyte adhesiveness. Included were various volunteers and patients under different degrees of stress. 66 young athletes before beginning their daily exercises, 67 middle-aged healthy volunteers, 25 patients before ergometry for evaluation of chest pain, 75 patients who were referred to the emergency room with chest pain without ischemia/infarction, 78 patients with ischemia/infarction, 65 patients with minor trauma, 25 with a fracture and 12 with polytrauma. The leukocyte adhesiveness/aggregation (LAA) values were measured with a direct slide test. The respective LAA values were 7.4 +/- 4.7, 6.3 +/- 4.4, 5.8 +/- 3.6, 5.2 +/- 3.5, 10.8 +/- 8.5, 9.1 +/- 5.8, 12.2 +/- 6.6 and 19 +/- 12.6% of aggregated leukocytes. We conclude that an increase in aggregated white blood cells can be detected in the circulating pool during major stress. It is therefore suggested that stress demargination is not necessarily a result of diminished leukocyte adhesiveness. PMID:1950357

  14. Blood leukocytes from benznidazole-treated indeterminate chagas disease patients display an overall type-1-modulated cytokine profile upon short-term in vitro stimulation with trypanosoma cruzi antigens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benznidazole (Bz)-chemotherapy is recommended to prevent Chagas disease progression, despite its limited efficacy during chronic disease. However, the host mechanisms underlying these benefits still remain to be elucidated. Methods In this study, we have used short-term whole blood cultures to describe the cytokine profile of Bz-treated Indeterminate Chagas disease patients-(INDt) as compared to untreated patients-(IND). Results Our findings showed that IND presented increased levels of IL-10+neutrophils, IL-12+ and IL-10+monocytes and IFN-γ+NK-cells. Moreover, IND showed slight increase of IL-4+CD4+T-cells and enhanced levels of IL-10+CD8+T-cells and B-cells. Additional analysis of cytokine Low and High producers also highlighted the presence of High cytokine producers within IND, including IL-10 from CD4+ T-cells and IFN-γ from CD8+ T-cells, as compared to NI. The Bz-treatment lead to an overall cytokine down-regulation in the innate and adaptive compartments, including low levels of IL-12+ and IL-10+neutrophils and monocytes, IFN-γ+NK-cells, IL-12+, TNF-α+, IFN-γ+ and IL-5+CD4+T-cells and IL-10+B-cells, along with basal levels of cytokine-expressing CD8+T-cells in INDt as compared to IND. The in vitro antigen stimulation shifted the cytokine profile toward a type 1-modulated profile, with increased levels of IL-12+ and IL-10+ monocytes, IFN-γ+ and IL-4+NK-cells along with TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+CD8+T-cells. Analysis of Low and High cytokine producers, upon in vitro antigen stimulation, further confirm these data. Conclusion Together, our findings showed that the Bz treatment of Indeterminate Chagas’ disease patients shifts the cytokine patterns of peripheral blood monocytes, NK-cells and CD8+ T-cells towards a long-lasting Type-1-modulated profile that could be important to the maintenance of a non-deleterious immunological microenvironment. PMID:22625224

  15. [Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD)--a hereditary disease in cattle].

    PubMed

    Heckert, H P; Wittstatt, U; Hofmann, W

    1997-07-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is an autosomal recessive and lethal disease of Holstein-Friesian cattle. It is characterized by leukocytosis with more than 30,000 cells/microliter blood and decreased resistance to infectious diseases. Details of the history and pathological findings in three patients, the situation in the herd and breeding aspects are described. PMID:9312893

  16. Appearance of hyperostosis frontalis interna on indium-111 leukocyte scans: potential diagnostic pitfall

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, J.L.; Jackson, D.E. Jr.; Carretta, R.

    1986-04-01

    The appearance of hyperostosis frontalis interna on an (/sup 111/In)leukocyte scan is reported. Recognition of the potential for normal accumulation of 111In-labeled white blood cells within this common process involving the skull is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis.

  17. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  18. [Investigation on bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Zhu; Cui, Yu-Dong; Zhu, Zhan-Bo; Cao, Hong-Wei; Piao, Fan-Ze

    2006-10-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is autosomal recessive disease. The pathogeny of BLAD is genic mutation of CD18-integrins on the leukocyte. In order to know the carrier and occurrence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) among cows age from one to six years old in China, 1,000 cows were investigated by means of amplifying a CD18 gene fragment via reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by restriction digestion with Taq I. Results showed that 19 cows were BLAD carriers, indicating that the BLAD carrier rate was 1.9 percent. In addition, one cow was found to have BLAD. PMID:17035180

  19. TRAIL-coated leukocytes that kill cancer cells in the circulation

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Wayne, Elizabeth; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Schaffer, Chris B.; King, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis through the bloodstream contributes to poor prognosis in many types of cancer. Mounting evidence implicates selectin-based adhesive interactions between cancer cells and the blood vessel wall as facilitating this process, in a manner similar to leukocyte trafficking during inflammation. Here, we describe a unique approach to target and kill colon and prostate cancer cells in the blood that causes circulating leukocytes to present the cancer-specific TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) on their surface along with E-selectin adhesion receptor. This approach, demonstrated in vitro with human blood and also in mice, mimics the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells and increases the surface area available for delivery of the receptor-mediated signal. The resulting “unnatural killer cells” hold promise as an effective means to neutralize circulating tumor cells that enter blood with the potential to form new metastases. PMID:24395803

  20. Mechanisms of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): anti-leukocyte antibodies.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G

    2006-05-01

    There is abundant evidence that leukocyte antibodies in blood donor products are somehow involved in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, HLA class II, and neutrophil-specific antibodies in the plasma of both blood donors and recipients have been implicated in the pathogenesis of TRALI. The case for a relationship between leukocyte antibodies and TRALI is more compelling if concordance between the antigen specificity of the leukocyte antibodies in the donor plasma and the corresponding antigen on the cells of the affected recipient is demonstrated. Such antibody-antigen concordance can be investigated by typing the recipient for the cognate leukocyte antigens or by cross-matching the donor plasma against the recipient's leukocytes. Two proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms for TRALI have received the most attention: the antibody hypothesis and the two-event hypothesis. The final common pathway in all of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of TRALI is increased pulmonary capillary permeability, which results in movement of plasma into the alveolar space causing pulmonary edema. A typical TRALI serologic workup consists of tests for HLA class I and II and neutrophil-specific antibodies. The use of flow cytometry and HLA-coated microbeads is recommended for detection of HLA antibodies in plasma of implicated blood donors and a combination of the granulocyte agglutination test and granulocyte immunofluorescence test for detection of neutrophil-specific antibodies. Genotyping for class I and II HLA and for a limited number of neutrophil antigens may also be helpful in establishing antibody-antigen concordance. PMID:16617255

  1. Optimizing Viable Leukocyte Sampling from the Female Genital Tract for Clinical Trials: An International Multi-Site Study

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Stephen C.; Martinson, Jeffrey A.; Plants, Jill; Brady, Kirsten E.; Gumbi, Pamela P.; Adams, Devin J.; Vojtech, Lucia; Galloway, Christine G.; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Gao, Dayong; Shu, Zhiquan; Nyanga, Billy; Izulla, Preston; Kimani, Joshua; Kimwaki, Steve; Bere, Alfred; Moodie, Zoe; Landay, Alan L.; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Kaul, Rupert; Novak, Richard M.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Hladik, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional analysis of mononuclear leukocytes in the female genital mucosa is essential for understanding the immunologic effects of HIV vaccines and microbicides at the site of HIV exposure. However, the best female genital tract sampling technique is unclear. Methods and Findings We enrolled women from four sites in Africa and the US to compare three genital leukocyte sampling methods: cervicovaginal lavages (CVL), endocervical cytobrushes, and ectocervical biopsies. Absolute yields of mononuclear leukocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometric bead-based cell counting. Of the non-invasive sampling types, two combined sequential cytobrushes yielded significantly more viable mononuclear leukocytes than a CVL (p<0.0001). In a subsequent comparison, two cytobrushes yielded as many leukocytes (∼10,000) as one biopsy, with macrophages/monocytes being more prominent in cytobrushes and T lymphocytes in biopsies. Sample yields were consistent between sites. In a subgroup analysis, we observed significant reproducibility between replicate same-day biopsies (r = 0.89, p = 0.0123). Visible red blood cells in cytobrushes increased leukocyte yields more than three-fold (p = 0.0078), but did not change their subpopulation profile, indicating that these leukocytes were still largely derived from the mucosa and not peripheral blood. We also confirmed that many CD4+ T cells in the female genital tract express the α4β7 integrin, an HIV envelope-binding mucosal homing receptor. Conclusions CVL sampling recovered the lowest number of viable mononuclear leukocytes. Two cervical cytobrushes yielded comparable total numbers of viable leukocytes to one biopsy, but cytobrushes and biopsies were biased toward macrophages and T lymphocytes, respectively. Our study also established the feasibility of obtaining consistent flow cytometric analyses of isolated genital cells from four study sites in the US and Africa. These data represent an important step

  2. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  3. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH.

    PubMed

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  4. High leukocyte mtDNA content contributes to poor prognosis through ROS-mediated immunosuppression in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Xingchun; Chen, Yibing; Guo, Xu; Li, Jibin; Huang, Qichao; Yang, Yefa; Lyu, Zhuomin; Zhang, Hongxin; Xing, Jinliang

    2016-01-01

    Compelling epidemiological evidences indicate a significant association between leukocyte mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and incidence risk of several malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, whether leukocyte mtDNA content affect prognosis of HCC patients and underlying mechanism has never been explored. In our study, leukocyte mtDNA content was measured in 618 HCC patients and its prognostic value was analyzed. Moreover, we detected the immunophenotypes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma concentrations of several cytokines in 40 HCC patients and assessed the modulating effects of mtDNA content on immunosuppression in cell models. Our results showed that HCC patients with high leukocyte mtDNA content exhibited a significantly worse recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those with low leukocyte mtDNA content. Leukocyte mtDNA content and TNM stage exhibited a notable joint effect in prognosis prediction. Furthermore, we found that patients with high leukocyte mtDNA content exhibited a higher frequency of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and lower frequency of NK cells in PBMCs and had higher TGF-β1 and lower TNF-α and IFN-γ plasma concentration when compared with those with low leukocyte mtDNA content, which suggests an immunosuppressive status. High leukocyte mtDNA content significantly enhanced the ROS-mediated secretion of TGF-β1, which accounted for higher Treg and lower NK frequency in PBMCs. In a conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrates that leukocyte mtDNA content is an independent prognostic marker complementing TNM stage and associated with an ROS-mediated immunosuppressive phenotype in HCC patients. PMID:26985767

  5. 21 CFR 864.7660 - Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. 864.7660... Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test is a device used to identify the enzyme leukocyte alkaline phosphatase in neutrophilic granulocytes...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7660 - Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. 864.7660... Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test is a device used to identify the enzyme leukocyte alkaline phosphatase in neutrophilic granulocytes...

  7. Indium-111 autologous leukocyte imaging in pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R.; Spence, R.A.; Laird, J.D.; Ferguson, W.R.; Kennedy, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thirty-nine patients with acute pancreatitis have been assessed using a prognostic factor grading system, abdominal ultrasound, and autologous leukocyte imaging. Both prognostic factor grading and leukocyte imaging can accurately assess the severity of the disease early in its course. All patients with a negative indium-labeled leukocyte image recovered without sequelae, whereas five of the 12 patients with a positive image developed complications, including two deaths. Abdominal ultrasound is of no value in assessing severity, but is a useful method of detecting those patients with gallstone-associated disease. In patients with suspected abscess formation following acute pancreatitis, indium leukocyte imaging does not differentiate between fat necrosis and abscess formation. In this situation, computerized tomography should be carried out before laparotomy is undertaken.

  8. Coagulant Activity of Leukocytes. TISSUE FACTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Niemetz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal leukocytes harvested from rabbits which have received two spaced doses of endotoxin have significantly greater (10-fold) coagulant activity than leukocytes from control rabbits. The coagulant activity accelerates the clotting of normal plasma and activates factor X in the presence of factor VII and calcium and is therefore regarded as tissue factor. A total of 40-80 mg tissue factor activity was obtained from the peritoneal cavity of single endotoxin-treated rabbits. In leukocyte subcellular fractions, separated by centrifugation, the specific tissue factor activity sedimented mainly at 14,500 g and above. The procoagulant activity was destroyed after heating for 10 min at 65°C but was preserved at lower temperatures. Polymyxin B, when given with the first dose of endotoxin, reduced both the number of peritoneal leukocytes and their tissue factor activity by two-thirds. When given immediately before the second dose of endotoxin, polymyxin B had no inhibitory effect. PMID:4333021

  9. Weaning management of newly received beef calves with or without continuous exposure to a persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus pen mate: effects on health, performance, bovine viral diarrhea virus titers, and peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Richeson, J T; Kegley, E B; Powell, J G; Beck, P A; Ley, B L Vander; Ridpath, J F

    2012-06-01

    Exposure to animals persistently infected (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) results in immunomodulation of cohorts that may have health and growth consequences; however, effects may differ in low-risk, preconditioned (PC) vs. high-risk, auction market (AM) beef cattle. Our objective was to compare health and performance of PC or AM management systems with (PI) or without (CON) presence of a PI-BVDV pen mate using a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Four shipment blocks of crossbred PC steers (n = 236) from 3 ranch-origins were weaned, dewormed, vaccinated, tested for PI-BVDV, and kept on the ranch for ≥42 d. Subsequently, PC steers were transported to a stocker receiving unit (RU), weighed (251 ± 2 kg), blood sampled, stratified by d -1 BW, and assigned randomly to treatment (PCPI or PCCON) with no additional processing. Simultaneously, 4 blocks of crossbred AM calves (n = 292) were assembled from regional auction markets and transported to the RU ± 36 h from PC arrival. The AM calves were weighed (245 ± 1.3 kg), stratified by gender and d -1 BW, processed under the same regimen used for PC steers at their origin ranch except bull calves were castrated, and then assigned randomly to treatment (AMPI or AMCON). Treatment pens (0.45 ha) were arranged spatially such that PI did not have fence-line or water source contact with CON. Calves were fed identically and followed the same antibiotic treatment protocol. Daily BW gain for the entire 42-d receiving trial was greater (P < 0.001) for PC (1.2 kg) compared with AM (0.85 kg). There was an exposure effect (P = 0.002) on ADG from d 28 to 42; CON gained 1.12 kg vs. 0.90 kg BW for PI cohort. Morbidity was markedly greater (P < 0.001) in AM (70%) vs. PC (7%), resulting in (P < 0.001) an antibiotic treatment cost of $20.52 and $2.48/animal, respectively. Treatment with a third antibiotic occurred more often (P = 0.04) for PI cohort, and the percentage of chronically ill cattle was greatest (P = 0.06) for AMPI

  10. CD Nomenclature 2015: Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshops as a Driving Force in Immunology.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Boumsell, Laurence; Balderas, Robert; Bensussan, Armand; Gattei, Valter; Horejsi, Vaclav; Jin, Bo-Quan; Malavasi, Fabio; Mortari, Frank; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Stockinger, Hannes; van Zelm, Menno C; Zola, Heddy; Clark, Georgina

    2015-11-15

    CD (cluster of differentiation) Ags are cell surface molecules expressed on leukocytes and other cells relevant for the immune system. CD nomenclature has been universally adopted by the scientific community and is officially approved by the International Union of Immunological Societies and sanctioned by the World Health Organization. It provides a unified designation system for mAbs, as well as for the cell surface molecules that they recognize. This nomenclature was established by the Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops. In addition to defining the CD nomenclature, these workshops have been instrumental in identifying and determining the expression and function of cell surface molecules. Over the past 30 y, the data generated by the 10 Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops have led to the characterization and formal designation of more than 400 molecules. CD molecules are commonly used as cell markers, allowing the identification and isolation of leukocyte populations, subsets, and differentiation stages. mAbs against these molecules have proven to be essential for biomedical research and diagnosis, as well as in biotechnology. More recently, they have been recognized as invaluable tools for the treatment of several malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this article, we describe how the CD nomenclature was established, present the official updated list of CD molecules, and provide a rationale for their usefulness in the 21st century. PMID:26546687

  11. Evaluation of leptin receptor expression on buffalo leukocytes.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Giovanna; Grandoni, Francesco; Scatà, Maria Carmela; Catizone, Angela; Reale, Anna; Crisà, Alessandra; Moioli, Bianca

    2016-09-01

    Experimental evidences support a direct role for leptin in immunity. Besides controlling food intake and energy expenditure, leptin was reported to be involved in the regulation of the immune system in ruminants. The aim of this work was to highlight the expression of leptin receptor (LEPR) on Bubalus bubalis immune cells using a multi-approach assessment: flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and gene expression analysis. Flow cytometric analysis of LEPR expression showed that peripheral blood monocytes were the predominant cells expressing LEPR. This result was corroborated by confocal microscopy and RT-PCR analysis. Moreover, among lymphocytes, LEPR was mainly expressed by B lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Evidence of LEPR expression on buffalo blood leukocytes showed to be a good indicator of the responsivity of these cells to leptin, so confirming the involvement of leptin in buffalo immune response. PMID:27436440

  12. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  13. Human dendritic cells and macrophages. In situ immunophenotypic definition of subsets that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Turner, R. R.; Shiurba, R. A.; Eng, L.; Warnke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and antisera in situ, the authors have defined subsets of human dendritic cells and macrophages that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics. All subsets contained cells that reacted with antibodies directed against HLA-A,B,C, HLA-Dr, leukocyte common, Leu-M3, and Leu-3(T4) antigens. R4/23 and anti-S100 defined three major subsets. R4/23+, S100- cells constituted the B-cell-related follicular dendritic cells, which were identified only within the germinal center/mantle microenvironment of lymphoid follicles. R4/23-, S100+ cells constituted the T-cell-related dendritic cell subset. Anti-Leu-6(T6) further subdivided this group into Leu-6(T6)- interdigitating cells within the T-cell microenvironments of lymphoid organs and Leu-6(T6)+ Langerhans cells found predominantly in epithelial microenvironments, especially the skin. R4/23-, S100- cells constituted the nondendritic tissue macrophage subset which was widely distributed, primarily outside of dendritic-cell microenvironments. These data indicate that although dendritic cells and macrophages share several common antigenic features, morphologically and microenvironmentally distinct subsets express distinct immunologic phenotypes. Such data may provide insight into the ontogeny and function of these subsets and constitute a basis for the comparison of normal dendritic cells and macrophages to various histiocytic proliferative disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p78-c Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3985124

  14. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Arruda, L.C.M.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Malmegrim, K.C.R.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease. PMID:27007651

  15. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify “insults” and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The

  16. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  17. New MOPITT Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-09-11

    New MOPITT Search and Subset Application New Subsetter for Level 2 Version 5 data Wednesday, September 11, 2013 The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration ...

  18. The Role of Physical Stabilization in Whole Blood Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith H. K.; Sandlin, Rebecca D.; Carey, Thomas R.; Miller, Kathleen L.; Shank, Aaron T.; Oklu, Rahmi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Irimia, Daniel; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The rapid degradation of blood ex vivo imposes logistical limitations on the utilization of blood-borne cells in medical diagnostics and scientific investigations. A fundamental but overlooked aspect in the storage of this fluid tissue is blood settling, which induces physical stress and compaction, aggregates blood cells, and causes collateral damage due to leukocyte activation. Here we show that the polymer Ficoll 70 kDa stabilized blood samples and prevented blood settling over the course of 72 hours, primarily by inhibiting depletion-mediated red blood cell aggregation. Physical stabilization decreased echinocyte formation, improved leukocyte viability, and inhibited the release of neutrophil elastase—a marker of neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In addition, Ficoll-stabilized blood was compatible with common leukocyte enrichment techniques including red blood cell lysis and immunomagnetic purification. This study showed for the first time that blood settling can be prevented using polymers and has implications in diagnostics. PMID:26876805

  19. The Role of Physical Stabilization in Whole Blood Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Keith H. K.; Sandlin, Rebecca D.; Carey, Thomas R.; Miller, Kathleen L.; Shank, Aaron T.; Oklu, Rahmi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Irimia, Daniel; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    The rapid degradation of blood ex vivo imposes logistical limitations on the utilization of blood-borne cells in medical diagnostics and scientific investigations. A fundamental but overlooked aspect in the storage of this fluid tissue is blood settling, which induces physical stress and compaction, aggregates blood cells, and causes collateral damage due to leukocyte activation. Here we show that the polymer Ficoll 70 kDa stabilized blood samples and prevented blood settling over the course of 72 hours, primarily by inhibiting depletion-mediated red blood cell aggregation. Physical stabilization decreased echinocyte formation, improved leukocyte viability, and inhibited the release of neutrophil elastase—a marker of neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In addition, Ficoll-stabilized blood was compatible with common leukocyte enrichment techniques including red blood cell lysis and immunomagnetic purification. This study showed for the first time that blood settling can be prevented using polymers and has implications in diagnostics.

  20. The Role of Physical Stabilization in Whole Blood Preservation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Keith H K; Sandlin, Rebecca D; Carey, Thomas R; Miller, Kathleen L; Shank, Aaron T; Oklu, Rahmi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A; Irimia, Daniel; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The rapid degradation of blood ex vivo imposes logistical limitations on the utilization of blood-borne cells in medical diagnostics and scientific investigations. A fundamental but overlooked aspect in the storage of this fluid tissue is blood settling, which induces physical stress and compaction, aggregates blood cells, and causes collateral damage due to leukocyte activation. Here we show that the polymer Ficoll 70 kDa stabilized blood samples and prevented blood settling over the course of 72 hours, primarily by inhibiting depletion-mediated red blood cell aggregation. Physical stabilization decreased echinocyte formation, improved leukocyte viability, and inhibited the release of neutrophil elastase--a marker of neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In addition, Ficoll-stabilized blood was compatible with common leukocyte enrichment techniques including red blood cell lysis and immunomagnetic purification. This study showed for the first time that blood settling can be prevented using polymers and has implications in diagnostics. PMID:26876805

  1. Monoclonal antibody blockade of L-selectin inhibits mononuclear leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Pizcueta, P.; Luscinskas, F. W.

    1994-01-01

    L-selectin interacting with inducible endothelial counterreceptors mediates in part the initial adhesive interactions, termed rolling, between circulating blood leukocytes and vascular endothelium. While blockade of L-selectin function in in vivo models of inflammation reduces both neutrophil and lymphocyte influx at early times, little is known concerning the role of L-selectin in leukocyte recruitment at later times (> 24 hours). Using an in vivo murine model of experimentally induced inflammation of the peritoneum, the role of L-selectin in recruitment of mononuclear leukocytes to chronic sites of inflammation (48 hours) was investigated. Saturating levels of function blocking anti-L-selectin monoclonal antibody (MEL-14) or control rat IgG were maintained for 48 hours using surgically implanted mini-osmotic pumps; this treatment did not alter the circulating leukocyte cell count or differential. In animals receiving MEL-14 monoclonal antibody (MAb), macrophage and lymphocyte accumulation in response to thioglycollate was reduced by 60% (P < or = 0.0002) and > 90% (P < 0.001), respectively, at 48 hours as compared with animals implanted with pumps containing saline. Similarly, MEL-14 MAb dramatically inhibited granulocyte influx by 80% (P < 0.03) at 6 hours; recruitment at 24 and 48 hours was reduced by 50%. In contrast, the effects of purified rat IgG was not significantly different from saline. Our results suggest L-selectin, interacting with its inducible endothelial counterreceptor(s), plays an important role in circulating mononuclear leukocyte extravasation at sites of inflammation. PMID:7519828

  2. Exposure to Sodium Fluoride Produces Signs of Apoptosis in Rat Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Morales-González, José A.; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Esquivel-Chirino, César; González-Rubio, Manuel García-Luna y; Suástegui-Domínguez, Sigrit; Valadez-Vega, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride is naturally present in the earth’s crust and can be found in rocks, coal, and clay; thus, it can be found in small quantities in water, air, plants, and animals. Therefore, humans are exposed to fluoride through food, drinking water, and in the air they breathe. Flouride is essential to maintain bone strength and to protect against dental decay, but if it is absorbed too frequently, it can cause tooth decay, osteoporosis, and damage to kidneys, bones, nerves, and muscles. Therefore, the present work was aimed at determining the effect of intake of sodium fluoride (NaF) as an apoptosis inducer in leukocytes of rats treated for eight weeks with 1 or 50 parts per million (ppm) NaF. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspade-3 were used as apoptotic and general metabolism indicators of leukocyte-like indicators of the (INT) oxidation system. Male rats were exposed to NaF (1 and 500 ppm) for eight weeks, and then sacrificed weekly to obtain blood samples. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspase-3 were determined in leukocytes by Western blot, and general metabolism of leukocytes was analyzed with a commercial kit. We found changes in the expression of the proteins described, especially when the animals received 50 ppm of NaF. These results indicate that NaF intoxication can be an apoptosis inducer in rat leukocytes treated with the compound for eight weeks. PMID:20957113

  3. Leukocyte ABCA1 controls susceptibility to atherosclerosis and macrophage recruitment into tissues

    PubMed Central

    Van Eck, Miranda; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Kaminski, Wolfgang E.; Orsó, Evelyn; Rothe, Gregor; Twisk, Jaap; Böttcher, Alfred; Van Amersfoort, Edwin S.; Christiansen-Weber, Trudy A.; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Schmitz, Gerd

    2002-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1) has recently been identified as a key regulator of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, which is defective in familial HDL-deficiency syndromes such as Tangier disease. ABCA1 functions as a facilitator of cellular cholesterol and phospholipid efflux, and its expression is induced during cholesterol uptake in macrophages. To assess the role of macrophage ABCA1 in atherosclerosis, we generated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout (LDLr−/−) mice that are selectively deficient in leukocyte ABCA1 (ABCA1−/−) by using bone marrow transfer (ABCA1−/− → LDLr−/−). Here we demonstrate that ABCA1−/− → LDLr−/− chimeras develop significantly larger and more advanced atherosclerotic lesions compared with chimeric LDLr−/− mice with functional ABCA1 in hematopoietic cells. Targeted disruption of leukocyte ABCA1 function did not affect plasma HDL cholesterol levels. The amount of macrophages in liver and spleen and peripheral blood leukocyte counts is increased in the ABCA1−/− → LDLr−/− chimeras. Our results provide evidence that leukocyte ABCA1 plays a critical role in the protection against atherosclerosis, and we identify ABCA1 as a leukocyte factor that controls the recruitment of inflammatory cells. PMID:11972062

  4. Purpose and Criteria for Blood Smear Scan, Blood Smear Examination, and Blood Smear Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Florea, Alina Dulau; Gong, Jerald

    2013-01-01

    A microscopic examination of an appropriately prepared and well-stained blood smear by a knowledgeable laboratory professional is necessary and clinically useful in a number of circumstances and for a variety of reasons. In this article, an attempt is made to delineate the purpose and criteria for blood smear examination in a variety of circumstances that are encountered in everyday laboratory hematology practice. A blood smear scan serves to at least (a) verify the flagged automated hematology results and (b) determine if a manual differential leukocyte count needs to be performed. Blood smear examination/manual differential leukocyte count with complete blood count (CBC) provides the complete hematologic picture of the case, at least from the morphologic standpoint. Blood smear review with or without interpretation serves to ensure that no clinically significant finding is missed, besides providing diagnosis or diagnostic clue(s), particularly if and when interpreted by a physician. PMID:23301216

  5. Halloysite Nanotube Coatings Suppress Leukocyte Spreading.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew D; Marsh, Graham; Waugh, Richard E; Foster, David G; King, Michael R

    2015-12-22

    The nanoscale topography of adhesive surfaces is known to be an important factor governing cellular behavior. Previous work has shown that surface coatings composed of halloysite nanotubes enhance the adhesion, and therefore capture of, rare target cells such as circulating tumor cells. Here we demonstrate a unique feature of these coatings in their ability to reduce the adhesion of leukocytes and prevent leukocyte spreading. Surfaces were prepared with coatings of halloysite nanotubes and functionalized for leukocyte adhesion with E-selectin, and the dilution of nanotube concentration revealed a threshold concentration below which cell spreading became comparable to smooth surfaces. Evaluation of surface roughness characteristics determined that the average distance between discrete surface features correlated with adhesion metrics, with a separation distance of ∼2 μm identified as the critical threshold. Computational modeling of the interaction of leukocytes with halloysite nanotube-coated surfaces of varying concentrations demonstrates that the geometry of the cell surface and adhesive counter-surface produces a significantly diminished effective contact area compared to a leukocyte interacting with a smooth surface. PMID:26605493

  6. A reassessment of IgM memory subsets in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors we performed high-throughput V-h sequencing of human B-cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD+CD27+ (“MZ”), IgD−CD27+(“memory”, including IgM (“IgM-only”), IgG and IgA) and IgD−CD27− cells (“double-negative”, including IgM, IgG and IgA). 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for Vh-gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and Vh/Jh usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin, for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency, and lower Vh4 and higher Jh6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (between MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The “IgM-only” subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27+ switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells, and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  7. A Reassessment of IgM Memory Subsets in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-10-15

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors, we performed high-throughput VH sequencing of human B cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD(+)CD27(+) ("marginal zone [MZ]"), IgD(-)CD27(+) ("memory," including IgM ["IgM-only"], IgG and IgA) and IgD(-)CD27(-) cells ("double-negative," including IgM, IgG, and IgA). A total of 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for VH gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and VH/JH usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency and lower VH4 and higher JH6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (among MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The "IgM-only" subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27(+) switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  8. Cardiac and vascular imaging with labeled platelets and leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1984-07-01

    The contribution of platelets in atherosclerosis and thrombosis in animal models and in clinical studies has been quantified with 111In-platelet scintigraphy. New in vitro quantitative techniques have been developed using 111In-labeled platelets to determine the number of adherent platelets on deendothelialized surfaces of damaged vessel walls and synthetic vascular grafts. In vivo imaging techniques are semi-quantitative in nature; in these studies 111In radioactivity on thrombotic vessels or graft surfaces of iliac, femoral, or popliteal arteries is compared with contralateral vessels. Background 111In radioactivity in the circulating blood pool of venous and capillary networks and radioactivity in marrow decreases the sensitivity of these techniques. Subtraction of blood pool radioactivity with 99mTc-labeled autologous red cells and calculation of 111In radioactivity associated with platelet thrombus on vessel walls also have been performed for coronary, carotid, and femoral arteries. Although platelet concentrates are used frequently after open heart surgery (one to six per patient), consumption of platelets in the artificial lung or oxygenator, lysis of platelets during pumping, and suction of blood only recently have been quantified with the use of 111In-labeled platelets. These studies also demonstrated far less trauma to platelets with the use of a membrane rather than a bubble oxygenator. Further reduction in platelet consumption and trauma was observed with the use of prostacyclin, a short-acting drug with significant beneficial effect on platelet thrombus reduction and disaggregation of aggregated platelets. The role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflammation, infection and myocardial infarction, and in vivo evaluation with 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy in animals and humans has been described.

  9. Anti-CD44-mediated blockade of leukocyte migration in skin-associated immune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zöller, Margot; Gupta, Pooja; Marhaba, Rachid; Vitacolonna, Mario; Freyschmidt-Paul, Pia

    2007-07-01

    CD44 plays an important role in leukocyte extravasation, which is fortified in autoimmune diseases and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions. There is additional evidence that distinct CD44 isoforms interfere with the extravasation of selective leukocyte subsets. We wanted to explore this question in alopecia areata (AA), a hair-follicle centric autoimmune disease, and in a chronic eczema. The question became of interest because AA is treated efficiently by topical application of a contact sensitizer, such that a mild DTH reaction is maintained persistently. Aiming to support the therapeutic efficacy of a chronic eczema in AA by anti-CD44 treatment, it became essential to control whether a blockade of migration, preferentially of AA effector cells, could be achieved by CD44 isoform-specific antibodies. Anti-panCD44 and anti-CD44 variant 10 isoform (CD44v10) inhibited in vitro migration of leukocytes from untreated and allergen-treated, control and AA mice. In vivo, both antibodies interfered with T cell and monocyte extravasation into the skin; only anti-panCD44 prevented T cell homing into lymph nodes. Contributing factors are disease-dependent alterations in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression and a blockade of CD44 on endothelial cells and leukocytes. It is important that CD44 can associate with several integrins and ICAM-1. Associations depend on CD44 activation and vary with CD44 isoforms and leukocyte subpopulations. CD44 standard isoform preferentially associates with CD49d in T cells and CD44v10 with CD11b in monocytes. Accordingly, anti-panCD44 and anti-CD49d inhibit T cell, anti-CD11b, and anti-CD44v10 macrophage migration most efficiently. Thus, allergen treatment of AA likely can be supported by targeting AA T cells selectively via a panCD44-CD49d-bispecific antibody. PMID:17442857

  10. The effect of polystyrene beads on cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate concentration in leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Manganiello, V; Evans, W H; Stossel, T P; Mason, R J; Vaughan, M

    1971-12-01

    After incubation with polystyrene latex beads for 5 min. the cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) content of human peripheral blood leukocyte suspensions was increased severalfold. Preparations enriched in mononuclear cells and containing only 0-20% polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and no visible platelets exhibited a quantitatively similar response. Purified fractions of cells containing 85-90% PMN responded to polystyrene beads with a much smaller increase in cyclic AMP content. Phagocytosis of paraffin oil emulsion in the unfractionated mixed human leukocyte preparation was associated with little or no change in cyclic AMP levels. There was no change in cyclic AMP content of rabbit alveolar macrophages or guinea pig PMN during phagocytosis of polystyrene beads. All of these observations are consistent with the view that particle uptake per se does not increase cyclic AMP levels in phagocytic cells. It seems probable that the increase in cyclic AMP concentration that results when unfractionated human blood leukocytes are incubated with polystyrene beads occurs in cells other than PMN. PMID:4331596

  11. Osteomyelitis: diagnosis with In-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.

    1989-04-01

    In a retrospective review, 485 patients with suspected osteomyelitis were studied. Of these, 453 patients were studied with both bone and indium-111 leukocyte scanning (173 sequentially and 280 simultaneously). The ability to determine that the infection was in bone rather than in adjacent soft tissue was greater with simultaneous bone scan and In-111 leukocyte studies than with sequential studies. The locations of suspected osteomyelitis were divided into central (containing active bone marrow), peripheral (hands and feet), and middle (between central and peripheral). Specificity remained high (about 90%) regardless of the location. Overall sensitivity was significantly lower in the central location than in the peripheral or middle location. Determination of whether the In-111 leukocyte activity was in bone or adjacent soft tissue was also more difficult when the infection was in the central location. For acute osteomyelitis, sensitivity was high regardless of the location. For chronic osteomyelitis, sensitivity was lower in the central location.

  12. Comparison of mesenchymal stem cells and leukocytes from Large White and Göttingen Minipigs: Clues for stem cell-based immunomodulatory therapies.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Verónica; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco-Miguel; Blázquez, Rebeca; Tarazona, Raquel; Casado, Javier G

    2016-10-15

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the most promising cell types for human and veterinary use and their therapeutic effect is associated with their immunomodulatory properties. Farm animal models, such as pigs, have become a valuable tool to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adoptively transferred MSCs in the setting of veterinary medicine. In order to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of stem cell-based therapies in porcine breeds, a deep analysis and comparison of MSCs and leukocyte subsets are absolutely necessary. Here we provide a detailed analysis of bone-marrow derived MSCs and leukocyte subsets from Large White pigs and Göttingen Minipigs. Significant differences were observed between the two pig breeds in terms of T cell subsets that need to be considered for immune monitoring of stem cell-based therapies. PMID:27590427

  13. Mononuclear Leukocyte Infiltrate in Extraplacental Membranes and Preterm Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Holzman, Claudia; Senagore, Patricia K.; Wang, Jianling

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the amnion and chorion define histological chorioamnionitis (HCA), a condition linked to spontaneous preterm delivery (PTD). Less is known about placental patterns of mononuclear leukocyte (MNL) density and PTD. In this prospective study (1998–2004), women were sampled from 52 clinics in 5 Michigan communities and enrolled at 16–27 weeks’ gestation. HCA and MNL distributions in delivered placentas were evaluated microscopically in a subcohort (290 preterm, 823 term). Midpregnancy biomarkers from maternal blood (i.e., C-reactive protein (CRP), corticotropin-releasing hormone, and cytokines) were compared among term and PTD subjects grouped by presence/absence of HCA and high MNL density. A density of more than 10 MNLs per high-power field in the chorion of the membrane roll, referred to as MNL-CMR, was associated with medically indicated PTD (odds ratio = 2.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 3.6) and spontaneous PTD (odds ratio = 2.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.7). Associations persisted after removal of women with HCA-positive placentas, abruption, hypertensive disorders, or obesity. HCA-associated PTD showed higher CRP and cytokine levels. MNL-CMR-associated PTD showed higher CRP and corticotropin-releasing hormone levels. These data suggest that an MNL infiltrate in the chorion of the membrane roll marks PTD pathways that are distinct from HCA and not entirely explained by pregnancy complications. PMID:23429723

  14. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte localization in hematomas: a pitfall in abscess detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Kipper, S.; Bieberstein, M.P.

    1984-07-01

    Indium-111-labeled white-blood-cell scanning is a useful modality in abscess detection and has replaced gallium scanning in many institutions. Sensitivities of 72% to 90% and specificities of 90% to 100% have been reported. In searching for abscesses seven cases of indium-111-labeled leukocyte uptake were encountered in collections subsequently proved to be noninfected hematomas. Abundant red blood cells with few or no white blood cells, no bacteria, and a benign clinical course identified these noninfected hematomas. Five of the patients were being treated with hemodialysis and three were recent allograft recipients. The results indicate some limitation and nonspecificity in indium-111 scanning, despite its many benefits.

  15. Leukocyte migration inhibition in nickel dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Mirza, A M; Perera, M G; Maccia, C A; Dziubynskyj, O G; Bernstein, I L

    1975-01-01

    Leukocyte migration inhibitory factor assay was employed as an in vitro diagnostic aid in nickel dermatitis, the second most common contact dermatitis in North America. 15 patch test-positive and 5 patch test-negative patients, all giving a past history suggestive of nickel dermatitis, were investigated. Significant inhibition of leukocyte migration in both groups of patients was obtained only with nickel sulfate-albumin conjugate and not with unconjugated nickel sulfate. Specificity of this system was tested by utilizing an unrelated metallic albumin complex, and no inhibition was found. When patch testing is equivocal or contraindicated, this in vitro technique may be a practical alternative. PMID:1102460

  16. The melanocortin system in leukocyte biology.

    PubMed

    Catania, Anna

    2007-02-01

    The melanocortin system is composed of the melanocortin peptides, adrenocorticotropic hormone and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, the melanocortin receptors (MCRs), and the endogenous antagonists agouti- and agouti-related protein. Melanocortin peptides exert multiple effects upon the host, including anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Leukocytes are a source of melanocortins and a major target for these peptides. Because of reduced translocation of the nuclear factor NF-kappaB to the nucleus, MCR activation by their ligands causes a collective reduction of the most important molecules involved in the inflammatory process. This review examines how melanocortin peptides and their receptors participate in leukocyte biology. PMID:17041004

  17. Effects of red blood cell lysing solutions on the detection of peripheral basophils of healthy normals and SLE patients by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingjun; Ye, Ling; Deng, Zhenzhen; Li, Lu; Liu, Huafeng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of four widely used red blood cell lysing solutions on counting and measurement of activation marker of peripheral basophils in normals and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients by flow cytometry. Our results showed that the light scatter properties including FS and SS value of leukocytes in whole blood were preserved when whole blood samples were lysed in RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution, while were affected when lysed in distilled water or ACK. By counting basophils, RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution were almost the same level, while were significantly lower when lysed in distilled water or ACK. The expressions of CD203c on peripheral basophils of SLE patients were significantly higher than those of normals. Comparing the data of CD203c expression obtained demonstrated that there were no significant differences among them, while FACS Lysing Solution treatment leads to a slightly lower staining intensity of CD203c. We provide a solid description that the widely used red blood cell lysing reagents may influence the light scatter properties of leukocytes, the accuracy of quantity of absolute number of the existence of basophil subsets and the quantity of staining intensity of cell-activated marker CD203c fluorescence when measured by flow cytometry. PMID:24593031

  18. [Dynamic changes of circulating monocyte subsets in high-NaCl diet fed mice].

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaotong; Luo, Yanwei; Ma, Yongqiang; Zhao, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Ji, Wenjie; Li, Yuming; Zhou, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Objective To observe the dynamic changes of the circulating monocyte subsets in C57BL/6 mice fed with high-NaCl diet. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups: 9, 40 and 80 g/L NaCl groups. Before the treatment and 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the treatment, the cardiac function was dynamically determined by echocardiography and the blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff plethysmography. Flow cytometry analysis of circulating monocyte subsets was performed. HE staining was used to observe cardiac pathological changes at the time of sacrifice. Results Systolic blood pressure significantly increased with the progression of the high-salt diet. Compared with 9 g/L NaCl group, the ejection fraction of the other two groups slightly increased at week 4, followed by a significant decreasing trend up to week 12, in addition, the percentage of Ly6C(high) monocyte subset showed a progressive increase during high-salt feeding and reached a plateau at week 4, and then abruptly went down up to week 12. On the contrary, Ly6C(low) monocyte subset had an opposite trend, whereas Ly6C(int) monocyte subset remained constant. HE staining showed that cardiomyocyte size, as determined by the myocyte cross-sectional area, became enlarged obviously in the latter two groups. Conclusion Circulating monocyte subsets dynamically changed in the mice fed with high-salt diet. PMID:27371845

  19. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion deficiency type 1 leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that causes the immune system ...

  20. Halo sign on indium-111 leukocyte scan in gangrenous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, J.M.; Boykin, M.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Cawthon, M.A.; Landry, A.J.

    1986-02-01

    A 56-year-old man with a long history of Crohn's disease was evaluated by In-111 labeled leukocyte scanning. A halo of leukocyte activity was seen around the gallbladder fossa. A gangrenous gallbladder was removed at surgery.

  1. Galectin-1 signaling in leukocytes requires expression of complex-type N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Sougata; Stowell, Sean R; Cummings, Richard D; McEver, Rodger P

    2008-01-01

    Dimeric galectin-1 (dGal-1) is a homodimeric lectin with multiple proposed functions. Although dGal-1 binds to diverse glycans, it is unclear whether dGal-1 preferentially binds to specific subsets of glycans on cell surfaces to transmit signals. To explore this question, we selectively inhibited major glycan biosynthetic pathways in human HL60, Molt-4, and Jurkat cells. Inhibition of N-glycan processing blocked surface binding of dGal-1 and prevented dGal-1-induced Ca2+ mobilization and phosphatidylserine exposure. By contrast, inhibition of O-glycan or glycosphingolipid biosynthesis did not affect dGal-1 binding or dGal-1-induced Ca2+ mobilization and phosphatidylserine exposure. These results demonstrate that dGal-1 preferentially binds to and signals through glycoproteins containing complex-type N-glycans in at least some leukocyte subsets. PMID:18633135

  2. Synergistic effects of LTB4 and LTD4 on leukocyte emigration into the guinea pig conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Spada, C S; Woodward, D F; Hawley, S B; Nieves, A L; Williams, L S; Feldmann, B J

    1988-02-01

    Leukotrienes (LT) B4 and D4, alone and in combination, were topically applied to the eyes of guinea pigs, and their effects on conjunctival leukocyte infiltration studied. LTD4 potentiated the neutrophil response to LTB4, even though no neutrophil emigration was evoked by LTD4 itself over a dose range of 10-1000 ng. LTB4 alone at the 1-ng and 10-ng doses failed to evoke any leukocyte emigration, but significant numbers of neutrophils were observed at these concentrations when LTD4 (1-1000 ng) was present. Although a dose-dependent increase in neutrophil infiltration was observed for the 100-ng and 1000-ng doses of LTB4, cell counts were substantially higher with these doses in the presence of LTD4. Eosinophil numbers increased in a dose-related manner in response to LTB4 and LTD4 alone, with a greater response to LTD4. The addition of either 10 ng or 100 ng of LTB4 to graded doses of LTD4 (10-1000 ng) caused increased eosinophil numbers, the lower dose of LTB4 potentiating the response to LTD4 and the higher LTB4 dose showing no significant effect. The effects on leukocyte infiltration that were evoked by the LT combinations could not be explained simply on the basis of an increase in vascular permeability. Bradykinin (BK), a potent conjunctival microvascular permeability factor that does not elicit any leukocyte infiltration, did not significantly potentiate LTB4-induced eosinophil or neutrophil emigration. The synergistic effects of LTs on leukocyte emigration are also difficult to ascribe to hyperemia (ie, increased blood volume in the conjunctiva), because both LTB4 and LTD4 caused only very modest increases in conjunctival blood content, and BK, which did not potentiate the leukocytic responses to LTB4, caused marked increases in tissue blood content. High-dose LT combinations caused eosinophils, but not neutrophils, to migrate into the conjunctival epithelium and fragment, resulting in overt tissue damage. These results further suggest a synergistic

  3. Flow cytofluorometric monitoring of leukocyte apoptosis in experimental cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsmanova, Ekaterina Y.; Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Livanova, Ludmila F.; Kobkova, Irina M.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.; Shchukovskaya, Tatyana N.; Smirnova, Nina I.; Kutyrev, Vladimir V.

    2003-10-01

    Flow cytofluorometric DNA analysis was applied to determine of the relative contents of proliferative (more then 2C DNA per cell) and apoptotic (less then 2C DNA per cell) leukocytes in blood of adult rabbits, challenged with 10,000 times the 50 % effective dose of Vibrio cholerae virulent strain by the RITARD technique. It has been shown that irreversible increase the percentage of cells carrying DNA in the degradation stage brings to disbalance between the genetically controlled cell proliferation and apoptosis that leads to animal death from the cholera infection. Such fatal changes were not observed in challenging of immunized animals that were not died. Thus received data show that the flow cytofluorometric measurements may be used for detection of transgressions in homeostasis during acute infection diseases, for outlet prognosis of the cholera infection.

  4. Triggering of leukocytes by phase contrast in imaging cytometry with scanning fluorescence microscope (SFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, József; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Marecka, Monika; Malkusch, Wolf; Tárnok, Attila

    2009-02-01

    Slide-based cytometry (SBC) leads to breakthrough in cytometry of cells in tissues, culture and suspension. Carl Zeiss Imaging Solutions' new automated SFM combines imaging with cytometry. A critical step in image analysis is selection of appropriate triggering signal to detect all objects. Without correct target cell definition analysis is hampered. DNA-staining is among the most common triggering signals. However, the majority of DNA-dyes yield massive spillover into other fluorescence channels limiting their application. By microscopy objects of >5μm diameter can be easily detected by phase-contrast signal (PCS) without any staining. Aim was to establish PCS - triggering for cell identification. Axio Imager.Z1 motorized SFM was used (high-resolution digital camera, AxioCam MRm; AxioVision software: automatic multi-channel scanning, analysis). Leukocytes were stained with FITC (CD4, CD8) and APC (CD3) labelled antibodies in combinations using whole blood method. Samples were scanned in three channels (PCS/FITC/APC). Exposition-times for PCS were set as low as possible; the detection efficiency was verified by fluorescence. CD45-stained leukocytes were counted and compared to the number of PCS detected events. Leukocyte subtyping was compared with other cytometers. In focus the PCS of cells showed ring-form that was not optimal for cell definition. Out of focus PCS allows more effective qualitative and quantitative cell analyses. PCS was an accurate triggering signal for leukocytes enabling cell counting and discrimination of leukocytes from platelets. Leukocyte subpopulation frequencies were comparable to those obtained by other cytometers. In conclusion PCS is a suitable trigger-signal not interfering with fluorescence detection.

  5. Ordered subsets algorithms for transmission tomography.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, H; Fessler, J A

    1999-11-01

    The ordered subsets EM (OSEM) algorithm has enjoyed considerable interest for emission image reconstruction due to its acceleration of the original EM algorithm and ease of programming. The transmission EM reconstruction algorithm converges very slowly and is not used in practice. In this paper, we introduce a simultaneous update algorithm called separable paraboloidal surrogates (SPS) that converges much faster than the transmission EM algorithm. Furthermore, unlike the 'convex algorithm' for transmission tomography, the proposed algorithm is monotonic even with nonzero background counts. We demonstrate that the ordered subsets principle can also be applied to the new SPS algorithm for transmission tomography to accelerate 'convergence', albeit with similar sacrifice of global convergence properties as for OSEM. We implemented and evaluated this ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm. The results indicate that the OSTR algorithm speeds up the increase in the objective function by roughly the number of subsets in the early iterates when compared to the ordinary SPS algorithm. We compute mean square errors and segmentation errors for different methods and show that OSTR is superior to OSEM applied to the logarithm of the transmission data. However, penalized-likelihood reconstructions yield the best quality images among all other methods tested. PMID:10588288

  6. MICROWAVES, HYPERTHERMIA, AND HUMAN LEUKOCYTE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to determine whether exposure to microwaves (2450 MHz) affects the function of human leukocytes in the resting state and during antigenic or mitogenic challenge. This publication is a summary report of the construction and calibration of a waveguide...

  7. Impact of fibronectin fragments on the transendothelial migration of HIV-infected leukocytes and the development of subendothelial foci of infectious leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, Holly H; Porter, Wendy J; Green, David M; Rubio, Jose; Trial, JoAnn; Rossen, Roger D

    2004-08-15

    Leukocyte infiltrates that can serve as viral reservoirs, and sites for viral replication are found in many organs of HIV-1-infected patients. Patients whose blood leukocytes migrate across confluent endothelial monolayers ex vivo and transmit infectious virus to mononuclear leukocytes (MNLs) lodged beneath this endothelial barrier have a worse prognosis. We evaluated the ability of 110- to 120-kDa fibronectin fragments (FNf), which are found in the blood of >60% of HIV-1-infected patients, to stimulate transendothelial migration and drive productively infected MNLs into a potential perivascular space. FNf induced MNLs to release TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent fashion; the resulting increase in lymphocyte and monocyte transendothelial migration could be blocked with soluble TNF receptor I. Rather than penetrate deeply into the subendothelial matrix, as is seen with untreated controls, FNf-treated MNLs clustered just below the endothelial monolayer. Treatment with FNf during migration increased subsequent recovery of HIV-infected cells from the subendothelial compartment. FNf treatment also significantly increased the numbers of HLA-DR(bright), dendritic-type cells that reverse-migrated from the subendothelial depot to the apical endothelial surface 48 h after migration. Fibronectin fragments can be produced by viral and host proteases in the course of inflammatory conditions. The ability of FNf to stimulate transendothelial migration of HIV-1-infected MNLs may help to explain the dissemination of this infection into cardiac, renal, and CNS tissues. PMID:15294993

  8. Endothelial gaps and adherent leukocytes in allergen-induced early- and late-phase plasma leakage in rat airways.

    PubMed

    Baluk, P; Bolton, P; Hirata, A; Thurston, G; McDonald, D M

    1998-06-01

    Exposure of sensitized individuals to antigen can induce allergic responses in the respiratory tract, manifested by early and late phases of vasodilatation, plasma leakage, leukocyte influx, and bronchoconstriction. Similar responses can occur in the skin, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. The early-phase response involves mast cell mediators and the late-phase response is leukocyte dependent, but the mechanism of leakage is not understood. We sought to identify the leaky blood vessels, to determine whether these vessels contained endothelial gaps, and to analyze the relationship of the gaps to adherent leukocytes, using biotinylated lectins or silver nitrate to stain the cells in situ and Monastral blue as a tracer to quantify plasma leakage. Most of the leakage occurred in postcapillary venules (< 40-microns diameter), whereas most of the leukocyte migration (predominantly neutrophils) occurred in collecting venules. Capillaries and arterioles did not leak. Endothelial gaps were found in the leaky venules, both by silver nitrate staining and by scanning electron microscopy, and 94% of the gaps were distinct from sites of leukocyte adhesion or migration. We conclude that endothelial gaps contribute to both early and late phases of plasma leakage induced by antigen, but most leakage occurs upstream to sites of leukocyte adhesion. PMID:9626051

  9. Endothelial gaps and adherent leukocytes in allergen-induced early- and late-phase plasma leakage in rat airways.

    PubMed Central

    Baluk, P.; Bolton, P.; Hirata, A.; Thurston, G.; McDonald, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of sensitized individuals to antigen can induce allergic responses in the respiratory tract, manifested by early and late phases of vasodilatation, plasma leakage, leukocyte influx, and bronchoconstriction. Similar responses can occur in the skin, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. The early-phase response involves mast cell mediators and the late-phase response is leukocyte dependent, but the mechanism of leakage is not understood. We sought to identify the leaky blood vessels, to determine whether these vessels contained endothelial gaps, and to analyze the relationship of the gaps to adherent leukocytes, using biotinylated lectins or silver nitrate to stain the cells in situ and Monastral blue as a tracer to quantify plasma leakage. Most of the leakage occurred in postcapillary venules (< 40-microns diameter), whereas most of the leukocyte migration (predominantly neutrophils) occurred in collecting venules. Capillaries and arterioles did not leak. Endothelial gaps were found in the leaky venules, both by silver nitrate staining and by scanning electron microscopy, and 94% of the gaps were distinct from sites of leukocyte adhesion or migration. We conclude that endothelial gaps contribute to both early and late phases of plasma leakage induced by antigen, but most leakage occurs upstream to sites of leukocyte adhesion. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9626051

  10. Small and cheap: accurate differential blood count with minimal sample volume by laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, Anja; Lenz, Dominik; Smith, Paul J.; Pach, Susanne; Tarnok, Attila

    2005-04-01

    Aim: In patients, e.g. with congenital heart diseases, a differential blood count is needed for diagnosis. To this end by standard automatic analyzers 500 μl of blood is required from the patients. In case of newborns and infants this is a substantial volume, especially after operations associated with blood loss. Therefore, aim of this study was to develop a method to determine a differential blood picture with a substantially reduced specimen volume. Methods: To generate a differential blood picture 10 μl EDTA blood were mixed with 10 μl of a DRAQ5 solution (500μM, Biostatus) and 10 μl of an antibody mixture (CD45-FITC, CD14-PE, diluted with PBS). 20 μl of this cell suspension was filled into a Neubauer counting chamber. Due to the defined volume of the chamber it is possible to determine the cell count per volume. The trigger for leukocyte counting was set on DRAQ5 signal in order to be able to distinguish nucleated white blood cells from erythrocytes. Different leukocyte subsets could be distinguished due to the used fluorescence labeled antibodies. For erythrocyte counting cell suspension was diluted another 150 times. 20 μl of this dilution was analyzed in a microchamber by LSC with trigger set on forward scatter signal. Results: This method allows a substantial decrease of blood sample volume for generation of a differential blood picture (10 μl instead of 500μl). There was a high correlation between our method and the results of routine laboratory (r2=0.96, p<0.0001 n=40). For all parameters intra-assay variance was less than 7 %. Conclusions: In patients with low blood volume such as neonates and in critically ill infants every effort has to be taken to reduce the blood volume needed for diagnostics. With this method only 2% of standard sample volume is needed to generate a differential blood picture. Costs are below that of routine laboratory. We suggest this method to be established in paediatric cardiology for routine diagnostics and for

  11. Specific Role of Each Human Leukocyte Type in Viral Infections I. Monocyte as Host Cell for Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Replication In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Robert; Wheelock, E. Frederick

    1967-01-01

    Each major leukocyte type of the peripheral blood of healthy donors was studied in vitro for its ability to support vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication. Purified cultures of each white blood cell type were prepared by the selective adsorption and elution of cells from silicone-treated glass beads. It was found that monocytes and macrophages (derived from the rapid transformation of monocytes in vitro) were the principal host cells for VSV replication. Interferon added to mixed leukocyte cultures, prior to virus inoculation, reduced virus yields and prevented destruction of macrophages. Cultures of small lymphocytes, containing no detectable monocytes or macrophages, produced amounts of virus equivalent to 1% of that produced in leukocyte cultures which contained 7% monocytes. Small lymphocytes did not undergo demonstrable cytopathic alterations in virus-infected cultures. VSV neither replicated nor produced cytopathic effects in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Images PMID:4316248

  12. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  13. Leukocyte Homing, Fate, and Function Are Controlled by Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanxia; Brown, Chrysothemis; Ortiz, Carla; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2015-01-01

    Although vitamin A was recognized as an “anti-infective vitamin” over 90 years ago, the mechanism of how vitamin A regulates immunity is only beginning to be understood. Early studies which focused on the immune responses in vitamin A-deficient (VAD) animals clearly demonstrated compromised immunity and consequently increased susceptibility to infectious disease. The active form of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), has been shown to have a profound impact on the homing and differentiation of leukocytes. Both pharmacological and genetic approaches have been applied to the understanding of how RA regulates the development and differentiation of various immune cell subsets, and how RA influences the development of immunity versus tolerance. These studies clearly show that RA profoundly impacts on cell- and humoral-mediated immunity. In this review, the early findings on the complex relationship between VAD and immunity are discussed as well as vitamin A metabolism and signaling within hematopoietic cells. Particular attention is focused on how RA impacts on T-cell lineage commitment and plasticity in various diseases. PMID:25540140

  14. Ovine leukocyte profiles do not associate with variation in the prion gene, but are breed-dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion genotype in sheep confer resistance to scrapie. In cattle, lymphocyte profile has been found to be associated with prion genotype. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if variations in the sheep prion gene were associated with leukocyte populations as measured by complete blood ce...

  15. Contributions of phosphatidylserine-positive platelets and leukocytes and microparticles to hypercoagulable state in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfa; Ma, Ruishuang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Muhua; Zhao, Liangliang; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Shi, Jialan; Zou, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    Hypercoagulability in gastric cancer is a common complication and a major contributor to poor prognosis. This study aimed to determine procoagulant activity of blood cells and microparticles (MPs) in gastric cancer patients. Phosphatidylserine-positive blood cells and MPs, and their procoagulant properties in particular, were assessed in 48 gastric cancer patients and 35 healthy controls. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in patients with tumor-node-metastasis stage III/IV gastric cancer were significantly higher than those in stage I/II patients or healthy controls. Moreover, procoagulant activity of platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in stage III/IV patients was significantly increased compared to the controls, as indicated by shorter clotting time, higher intrinsic and extrinsic factor tenase, and prothrombinase complex activity. Interestingly, lactadherin, which competes with factors V and VIII to bind phosphatidylserine, dramatically prolonged clotting time of the cells and MPs by inhibiting factor tenase and prothrombinase complex activity. Although anti-tissue factor antibody significantly attenuated extrinsic tenase complex activity of leukocytes and MPs, it only slightly prolonged clotting times. Meanwhile, treatment with radical resection reduced phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs, and prolonged the clotting times of the remaining cells and MPs. Our results suggest that phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs contribute to hypercoagulability and represent a potential therapeutic target to prevent coagulation in patients with stage III/IV gastric cancer. PMID:26700666

  16. Leukocyte Diapedesis In Vivo Induces Transient Loss of Tight Junction Protein at the Blood–Retina Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heping; Dawson, Rosemary; Crane, Isabel J.; Liversidge, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Although much is now understood about the molecular structure of tight junctions (TJs), little is known about the regulation of their function during neural inflammatory disease processes in vivo. The mechanisms by which leukocytes transmigrate the blood-retina barrier (BRB) without affecting endothelial permeability are controversial. Methods Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of ex vivo retinal wholemounts was used to study BRB integrity during leukocyte adhesion and migration during experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Western blot analysis was used to measure levels of TJ proteins in EAU retina and RPE and in normal retina or RPE cultured with cytokines or chemokines. Results No evidence for discontinuity or other weakness of the endothelial or epithelial barrier at tricellular corners was observed, and maximum disruption of TJ protein expression was focused in retinal venules correlating with sites of leukocyte extravasation. Areas of maximum TJ protein loss in vivo also correlated with redistribution or loss of ensheathing astrocyte processes on venules but not adjacent capillaries or arterioles. Exposure of normal choroidal and retinal explants ex vivo to cytokines and chemokines alone did not downregulate total occludin-1 or claudin-3 TJ protein expression. Conclusions The data presented herein support an active role for leukocytes in TJ disruption and blood-retina barrier (BRB) breakdown during retinal inflammation and further implicate venule microenvironment as a key factor in leukocyte recruitment to retinal tissue in vivo. PMID:15980240

  17. Oxidative stress and reduced responsiveness of challenged circulating leukocytes following pulmonary instillation of metal-rich particulate matter in rats.

    PubMed

    Erdely, Aaron; Antonini, James M; Young, Shih-Houng; Kashon, Michael L; Gu, Ja K; Hulderman, Tracy; Salmen, Rebecca; Meighan, Terence; Roberts, Jenny R; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C

    2014-01-01

    Welding fume is an exposure that consists of a mixture of metal-rich particulate matter with gases (ozone, carbon monoxide) and/or vapors (VOCs). Data suggests that welders are immune compromised. Given the inability of pulmonary leukocytes to properly respond to a secondary infection in animal models, the question arose whether the dysfunction persisted systemically. Our aim was to evaluate the circulating leukocyte population in terms of cellular activation, presence of oxidative stress, and functionality after a secondary challenge, following welding fume exposure. Rats were intratracheally instilled (ITI) with PBS or 2 mg of welding fume collected from a stainless steel weld. Rats were sacrificed 4 and 24 h post-exposure and whole blood was collected. Whole blood was used for cellular differential counts, RNA isolation with subsequent microarray and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and secondary stimulation with LPS utilizing TruCulture technology. In addition, mononuclear cells were isolated 24 h post-exposure to measure oxidative stress by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Welding fume exposure had rapid effects on the circulating leukocyte population as identified by relative mRNA expression changes. Instillation of welding fume reduced inflammatory protein production of circulating leukocytes when challenged with the secondary stimulus LPS. The effects were not related to transcription, but were observed in conjunction with oxidative stress. These findings support previous studies of an inadequate pulmonary immune response following a metal-rich exposure and extend those findings showing leukocyte dysfunction occurs systemically. PMID:25123171

  18. Oxidative stress and reduced responsiveness of challenged circulating leukocytes following pulmonary instillation of metal-rich particulate matter in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Welding fume is an exposure that consists of a mixture of metal-rich particulate matter with gases (ozone, carbon monoxide) and/or vapors (VOCs). Data suggests that welders are immune compromised. Given the inability of pulmonary leukocytes to properly respond to a secondary infection in animal models, the question arose whether the dysfunction persisted systemically. Our aim was to evaluate the circulating leukocyte population in terms of cellular activation, presence of oxidative stress, and functionality after a secondary challenge, following welding fume exposure. Rats were intratracheally instilled (ITI) with PBS or 2 mg of welding fume collected from a stainless steel weld. Rats were sacrificed 4 and 24 h post-exposure and whole blood was collected. Whole blood was used for cellular differential counts, RNA isolation with subsequent microarray and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and secondary stimulation with LPS utilizing TruCulture technology. In addition, mononuclear cells were isolated 24 h post-exposure to measure oxidative stress by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Welding fume exposure had rapid effects on the circulating leukocyte population as identified by relative mRNA expression changes. Instillation of welding fume reduced inflammatory protein production of circulating leukocytes when challenged with the secondary stimulus LPS. The effects were not related to transcription, but were observed in conjunction with oxidative stress. These findings support previous studies of an inadequate pulmonary immune response following a metal-rich exposure and extend those findings showing leukocyte dysfunction occurs systemically. PMID:25123171

  19. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase leukocyte overexpression in Graves' opthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Budny, Bartłomiej; Zybek-Kocik, Ariadna; Sowiński, Jerzy; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the role of NAMPT/visfatin in euthyroid patients with Graves' disease without (GD) and with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), we analyzed NAMPT leukocyte expression and its serum concentration. This was a single-center, cross-sectional study with consecutive enrollment. In total, 149 patients diagnosed with Graves' disease were enrolled in the study. We excluded subjects with hyper- or hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, other autoimmune disorders, active neoplastic disease, and infection. The control group was recruited among healthy volunteers adjusted for age, sex, and BMI with normal thyroid function and negative thyroid antibodies. Serum levels of visfatin, TSH, FT4, FT3, antibodies against TSH receptor (TRAb), antithyroperoxidase antibodies, antithyroglobulin antibodies, fasting glucose, and insulin were measured. NAMPT mRNA leukocyte expression was assessed using RT-qPCR. NAMPT/visfatin serum concentration was higher in GD (n = 44) and GO (n = 49) patients than in the control group (n = 40) (p = 0.0275). NAMPT leukocyte expression was higher in patients with GO (n = 30) than in GD patients (n = 27) and the control group (n = 29) (p < 0.0001). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that NAMPT/visfatin serum concentration was significantly associated with GD (β = 1.5723; p = 0.021). When NAMPT leukocyte expression was used as a dependent variable, simple regression analysis found association with TRAb, fasting insulin level, HOMA-IR, GD, and GO. In the stepwise multiple regression analysis, we confirmed the association between higher serum NAMPT/visfatin level and GD (coefficient = 1.5723; p = 0.0212), and between NAMPT leukocyte expression and GO (coefficient = 2.4619; p = 0.0001) and TRAb (coefficient = 0.08742; p = 0.006). Increased NAMPT leukocyte expression in patients with GO might suggest a presently undefined role in the pathogenesis of GO. PMID:26767650

  20. Interleukin-1 activation of vascular endothelium. Effects on procoagulant activity and leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, M. P.; Pober, J. S.; Wheeler, M. E.; Cotran, R. S.; Gimbrone, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1), an inflammatory/immune mediator, acts directly and selectively on cultured human vascular endothelial cells to alter two important functional properties. First, IL-1 induces endothelial cell biosynthesis and surface expression of a tissue factor-like procoagulant activity. Second, IL-1 dramatically increases the adhesiveness of the endothelial cell surface for human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (6-42-fold increase) and monocytes (2-5-fold increase), as well as the related leukocyte cell lines HL-60 and U937. These IL-1 effects are concentration-dependent (maximum, 5-10 U/ml), time-dependent (peak 4-6 hours), and reversible. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D block these IL-1 actions on endothelium, which suggests the requirement for de novo protein synthesis. Human-monocyte-derived IL-1, cell-line--derived IL-1, and recombinant IL-1 exhibited comparable biologic activities in our assays, whereas two other mediators, IL-2 and immune interferon, were without effect. IL-1 stimulated procoagulant activity and leukocyte adhesion in human endothelial cells cultured from both umbilical veins and adult saphenous veins but not in other cultured cell types, including SV-40-transformed human endothelial cells and human dermal fibroblasts. Similar actions of IL-1 on vascular endothelium in vivo may contribute to the development of intravascular coagulation and enhanced leukocyte--vessel wall adhesion at sites of inflammation. Images Figure 2 PMID:3878084

  1. Enzyme analysis for Pompe disease in leukocytes; superior results with natural substrate compared with artificial substrates.

    PubMed

    van Diggelen, O P; Oemardien, L F; van der Beek, N A M E; Kroos, M A; Wind, H K; Voznyi, Y V; Burke, D; Jackson, M; Winchester, B G; Reuser, A J J

    2009-06-01

    Enzyme analysis for Pompe disease in leukocytes has been greatly improved by the introduction of acarbose, a powerful inhibitor of interfering alpha-glucosidases, which are present in granulocytes but not in lymphocytes. Here we show that the application of acarbose in the enzymatic assay employing the artificial substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D: -glucoside (MU-alphaGlc) is insufficient to clearly distinguish patients from healthy individuals in all cases. Also, the ratios of the activities without/with acarbose only marginally discriminated Pompe patients and healthy individuals. By contrast, when the natural substrate glycogen is used, the activity in leukocytes from patients (n = 82) with Pompe disease is at most 17% of the lowest control value. The use of artificial substrate in an assay with isolated lymphocytes instead of total leukocytes is a poor alternative as blood samples older than one day invariably yield lymphocyte preparations that are contaminated with granulocytes. To diagnose Pompe disease in leukocytes we recommend the use of glycogen as substrate in the presence of acarbose. This assay unequivocally excludes Pompe disease. To also exclude pseudo-deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase caused by the sequence change c.271G>A (p.D91N or GAA2; homozygosity in approximately 1:1000 caucasians), a second assay employing MU-alphaGlc substrate plus acarbose or DNA analysis is required. PMID:19387865

  2. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  3. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate betweenmore » age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.« less

  4. Modulation of chemokine gradients by apheresis redirects leukocyte trafficking to different compartments during sepsis, studies in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prior work suggests that leukocyte trafficking is determined by local chemokine gradients between the nidus of infection and the plasma. We recently demonstrated that therapeutic apheresis can alter immune mediator concentrations in the plasma, protect against organ injury, and improve survival. Here we aimed to determine whether the removal of chemokines from the plasma by apheresis in experimental peritonitis changes chemokine gradients and subsequently enhances leukocyte localization into the infected compartment, and away from healthy tissues. Methods In total, 76 male adult Sprague–Dawley rats weighing 400 g to 600 g were included in this study. Eighteen hours after inducing sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture, we randomized these rats to apheresis or sham treatment for 4 hours. Cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte counts from blood, peritoneal cavity, and lung were measured. In a separate experiment, we labeled neutrophils from septic donor animals and injected them into either apheresis or sham-treated animals. All numeric data with normal distributions were compared with one-way analysis of variance, and numeric data not normally distributed were compared with the Mann–Whitney U test. Results Apheresis significantly removed plasma cytokines and chemokines, increased peritoneal fluid-to-blood chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1, ligand 2, and C-C motif ligand 2) ratios, and decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid-to-blood chemokine ratios, resulting in enhanced leukocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity and improved bacterial clearance, but decreased recruitment into the lung. Apheresis also reduced myeloperoxidase activity and histologic injury in the lung, liver, and kidney. These Labeled donor neutrophils exhibited decreased localization in the lung when infused into apheresis-treated animals. Conclusions Our results support the concept of chemokine gradient control of leukocyte trafficking and demonstrate the efficacy of apheresis

  5. Lensfree Holographic Imaging of Antibody Microarrays for High-Throughput Detection of Leukocyte Numbers and Function

    PubMed Central

    Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Mudanyali, Onur; Seo, Sungkyu; Silangcruz, Jaime; Macal, Monica; Ramanculov, Erlan; Dandekar, Satya; Erlinger, Anthony; Ozcan, Aydogan; Revzin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of leukocytes is an integral part of blood analysis and blood-based diagnostics. In the present paper we combine lensless holographic imaging with antibody microarrays for rapid and multiparametric analysis of leukocytes from human blood. Monoclonal antibodies (Abs) specific for leukocyte surface antigens (CD4 and CD8) and cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2) were printed in an array so as to juxtapose cell capture and cytokine detection Ab spots. Integration of Ab microarrays into a microfluidic flow chamber (4 μl volume) followed by incubation with human blood resulted in capture of CD4 and CD8 T-cells on specific Ab spots. On-chip mitogenic activation of these cells induced release of cytokine molecules that were subsequently captured on neighboring anti-cytokine Ab spots. The binding of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ molecules on their respective Ab spots was detected using HRP-labeled anti-cytokine Abs and a visible color reagent. Lensfree holographic imaging was then used to rapidly (∼4 sec) enumerate CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes captured on Ab spots and to quantify the cytokine signal emanating from IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ spots on the same chip. To demonstrate the utility of our approach for infectious disease monitoring, blood samples of healthy volunteers and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients were analyzed to determine CD4/CD8 ratio – an important HIV/AIDS diagnostic marker. The ratio obtained by lensfree on-chip imaging of CD4 and CD8 T-cells captured on Ab spots was in close agreement with conventional microscopy-based cell counting. The present paper, describing tandem use of Ab microarrays and lensfree holographic imaging, paves the way for future development of miniature cytometry devices for multiparametric blood analysis at the point of care or in a resource-limited setting. PMID:20359168

  6. Development of a Modular Assay for Detailed Immunophenotyping of Peripheral Human Whole Blood Samples by Multicolor Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rühle, Paul F; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S; Frey, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of immune cells gained great significance in prognosis and prediction of therapy responses. For analyzing blood samples, the multicolor flow cytometry has become the method of choice as it combines high specificity on single cell level with multiple parameters and high throughput. Here, we present a modular assay for the detailed immunophenotyping of blood (DIoB) that was optimized for an easy and direct application in whole blood samples. The DIoB assay characterizes 34 immune cell subsets that circulate the peripheral blood including all major immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. In addition, it evaluates their functional state and a few non-leukocytes that also have been associated with the outcome of cancer therapy. This DIoB assay allows a longitudinal and close-meshed monitoring of a detailed immune status in patients requiring only 2.0 mL of peripheral blood and it is not restricted to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It is currently applied for the immune monitoring of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (IMMO-GLIO-01 trial, NCT02022384), pancreatic cancer (CONKO-007 trial, NCT01827553), and head and neck cancer (DIREKHT trial, NCT02528955) and might pave the way for immune biomarker identification for prediction and prognosis of therapy outcome. PMID:27529227

  7. Development of a Modular Assay for Detailed Immunophenotyping of Peripheral Human Whole Blood Samples by Multicolor Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Rühle, Paul F.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of immune cells gained great significance in prognosis and prediction of therapy responses. For analyzing blood samples, the multicolor flow cytometry has become the method of choice as it combines high specificity on single cell level with multiple parameters and high throughput. Here, we present a modular assay for the detailed immunophenotyping of blood (DIoB) that was optimized for an easy and direct application in whole blood samples. The DIoB assay characterizes 34 immune cell subsets that circulate the peripheral blood including all major immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. In addition, it evaluates their functional state and a few non-leukocytes that also have been associated with the outcome of cancer therapy. This DIoB assay allows a longitudinal and close-meshed monitoring of a detailed immune status in patients requiring only 2.0 mL of peripheral blood and it is not restricted to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It is currently applied for the immune monitoring of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (IMMO-GLIO-01 trial, NCT02022384), pancreatic cancer (CONKO-007 trial, NCT01827553), and head and neck cancer (DIREKHT trial, NCT02528955) and might pave the way for immune biomarker identification for prediction and prognosis of therapy outcome. PMID:27529227

  8. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning and fracture healing

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, L.P.; Scott, A.C.; Bondurant, F.J.; Browner, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the specificity of indium-111 leukocyte scans for osteomyelitis when fractures are present. Midshaft tibial osteotomies were performed in 14 New Zealand white rabbits, seven of which were infected postoperatively with Staphylococcus aureus per Norden's protocol. All 14 rabbits were scanned following injection with 75 microCi of indium 111 at 72 h after osteotomy and at weekly intervals for 4 weeks. Before the rabbits were killed, the fracture sites were cultured to document the presence or absence of infection. The results of all infected osteotomy sites were positive, whereas no positive scans were found in the noninfected osteotomies. We concluded from this study that uncomplicated fracture healing does not result in a positive indium-111 leukocyte scan.

  9. Comparison of technetium-99m-HM-PAO leukocytes with indium-111-oxine leukocytes for localizing intraabdominal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Mountford, P.J.; Kettle, A.G.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Coakley, A.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Technetium-99m-HM-PAO (({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO) leukocyte and indium-111-oxine (111In-oxine) leukocyte scanning were carried out simultaneously in 41 patients at 4 hr and 24 hr after reinjection to determine whether the 4-hr {sup 99m}Tc scan could replace the 24-hr {sup 111}In scan for detecting intraabdominal sepsis. Abdominal infection was confirmed in 12 cases. The 4-hr {sup 99}Tc-leukocyte scan, the 4-hr {sup 111}In-leukocyte scan, and the 24-hr {sup 111}In-leukocyte scan yielded a sensitivity of 100%, 67%, and 100%, respectively, and a specificity of 62%, 90%, and 86%, respectively. The 24-hr {sup 99m}Tc-leukocyte scan also produced a sensitivity of 100%, but it was falsely positive in all 29 cases without infection due to physiologic bowel uptake. False-positive 4-hr {sup 99m}Tc-leukocyte scans were also produced by physiologic bowel uptake in seven cases all of whom had true-negative 4-hr and 24-hr {sup 111}In-leukocyte scans. Because of the high incidence of false-positive 4-hr ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO leukocyte scans, it was concluded that they could not replace 24-hr {sup 111}In-leukocyte scans for detecting intraabdominal sepsis, and that serial {sup 99m}Tc leukocyte scans starting earlier than 4 hr after reinjection must be evaluated.

  10. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD): a review.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime

    2004-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) in Holstein cattle is an autosomal recessive congenital disease characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, delayed wound healing and stunted growth, and is also associated with persistent marked neutrophilia. The molecular basis of BLAD is a single point mutation (adenine to guanine) at position 383 of the CD18 gene, which caused an aspartic acid to glycine substitution at amino acid 128 (D128G) in the adhesion molecule CD18. Neutrophils from BLAD cattle have impaired expression of the beta2 integrin (CD11a,b,c/CD18) of the leukocyte adhesion molecule. Abnormalities in a wide spectrum of adherence dependent functions of leukocytes have been fully characterized. Cattle affected with BLAD have severe ulcers on oral mucous membranes, severe periodontitis, loss of teeth, chronic pneumonia and recurrent or chronic diarrhea. Affected cattle die at an early age due to the infectious complications. Holstein bulls, including carrier sires that had a mutant BLAD gene in heterozygote were controlled from dairy cattle for a decade. The control of BLAD in Holstein cattle by publishing the genotypes and avoiding the mating between BLAD carriers was found to be successful. This paper provides an overview of the genetic disease BLAD with reference to the disease in Holstein cattle. PMID:15644595

  11. Monocyte Subsets and Related Chemokines in Carotid Artery Stenosis and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Gerrit M.; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J.; Teebken, Omke E.; Schuppner, Ramona; Dirks, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Maye, Gerrit; Limbourg, Florian P.; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis (CS) is an important cause of ischemic stroke. However, reliable markers for the purpose of identification of high-risk, so-called vulnerable carotid plaques, are still lacking. Monocyte subsets are crucial players in atherosclerosis and might also contribute to plaque rupture. In this study we, therefore, aimed to investigate the potential role of monocyte subsets and associated chemokines as clinical biomarkers for vulnerability of CS. Patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CS (n = 21), patients with cardioembolic ischemic strokes (n = 11), and controls without any cardiovascular disorder (n = 11) were examined. Cardiovascular risk was quantified using the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS). Monocyte subsets in peripheral blood were measured by quantitative flow cytometry. Plaque specimens were histologically analyzed. Furthermore, plasma levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and fractalkine were measured. Intermediate monocytes (Mon2) were significantly elevated in symptomatic and asymptomatic CS-patients compared to controls. Mon2 counts positively correlated with the ESRS. Moreover, stroke patients showed an elevation of Mon2 compared to controls, independent of the ESRS. MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic than in those with asymptomatic CS. Several histological criteria significantly differed between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. However, there was no association of monocyte subsets or chemokines with histological features of plaque vulnerability. Due to the multifactorial influence on monocyte subsets, the usability as clinical markers for plaque vulnerability seems to be limited. However, monocyte subsets may be critically involved in the pathology of CS. PMID:27023515

  12. Monocyte Subsets and Related Chemokines in Carotid Artery Stenosis and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Gerrit M; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Teebken, Omke E; Schuppner, Ramona; Dirks, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Maye, Gerrit; Limbourg, Florian P; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis (CS) is an important cause of ischemic stroke. However, reliable markers for the purpose of identification of high-risk, so-called vulnerable carotid plaques, are still lacking. Monocyte subsets are crucial players in atherosclerosis and might also contribute to plaque rupture. In this study we, therefore, aimed to investigate the potential role of monocyte subsets and associated chemokines as clinical biomarkers for vulnerability of CS. Patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CS (n = 21), patients with cardioembolic ischemic strokes (n = 11), and controls without any cardiovascular disorder (n = 11) were examined. Cardiovascular risk was quantified using the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS). Monocyte subsets in peripheral blood were measured by quantitative flow cytometry. Plaque specimens were histologically analyzed. Furthermore, plasma levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and fractalkine were measured. Intermediate monocytes (Mon2) were significantly elevated in symptomatic and asymptomatic CS-patients compared to controls. Mon2 counts positively correlated with the ESRS. Moreover, stroke patients showed an elevation of Mon2 compared to controls, independent of the ESRS. MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic than in those with asymptomatic CS. Several histological criteria significantly differed between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. However, there was no association of monocyte subsets or chemokines with histological features of plaque vulnerability. Due to the multifactorial influence on monocyte subsets, the usability as clinical markers for plaque vulnerability seems to be limited. However, monocyte subsets may be critically involved in the pathology of CS. PMID:27023515

  13. Comparison of gene expression profiles between human and mouse monocyte subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Molly A.; Spanbroek, Rainer; Lottaz, Claudio; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Frankenberger, Marion; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Lang, Roland; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Collin, Matthew; Tacke, Frank; Habenicht, Andr