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Sample records for blood pump development

  1. Engineering Aspects in Blood Pump Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golding, Leonard; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    NASA turbomachinery computer codes assisted in the design of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's centrifugal bladed blood pump. The codes were originally developed for the aerospace industry, but are applicable to the blood pump because of a high degree of synergy with this application. Traditional turbomachinery design criteria were used in the design of the blood pump centrifugal impeller and volute casing. The fluid dynamic performance of the blood pump is meeting the engineering design goals of flow rate and pressure rise.

  2. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in humans, especially in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed to quantify the flow in these devices such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended to the analysis and development of a ventricular assist device (VAD), i.e., a blood pump. The blood flow in a VAD is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure can be applied. A primitive variable formulation is used in conjunction with the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. The primary purpose of developing the incompressible flow analysis capability was to quantify the flow in advanced turbopump for space propulsion system. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey VAD that is based on an axial blood pump. Due to massive computing requirements, high-end computing is necessary for simulating three-dimensional flow in these pumps. Computational, experimental, and clinical results are presented.

  3. Computational Approach for Developing Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the computational approach to developing a ventricular assist device (VAD) which utilizes NASA aerospace technology. The VAD is used as a temporary support to sick ventricles for those who suffer from late stage congestive heart failure (CHF). The need for donor hearts is much greater than their availability, and the VAD is seen as a bridge-to-transplant. The computational issues confronting the design of a more advanced, reliable VAD include the modelling of viscous incompressible flow. A computational approach provides the possibility of quantifying the flow characteristics, which is especially valuable for analyzing compact design with highly sensitive operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and rocket engine technology has been applied to modify the design of a VAD which enabled human transplantation. The computing requirement for this project is still large, however, and the unsteady analysis of the entire system from natural heart to aorta involves several hundred revolutions of the impeller. Further study is needed to assess the impact of mechanical VADs on the human body

  4. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the transfer of rocket engine flow simulation technology to work involving the development of blood pumps. Details are offered regarding the design and requirements of mechanical heart assist devices, or VADs (ventricular assist device). There are various computational fluid dynamics issues involved in the visualization of flow in such devices, and these are highlighted and compared to those of rocket turbopumps.

  5. Development of a pump flow estimator for rotary blood pumps to enhance monitoring of ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Granegger, Marcus; Moscato, Francesco; Casas, Fernando; Wieselthaler, Georg; Schima, Heinrich

    2012-08-01

    Estimation of instantaneous flow in rotary blood pumps (RBPs) is important for monitoring the interaction between heart and pump and eventually the ventricular function. Our group has reported an algorithm to derive ventricular contractility based on the maximum time derivative (dQ/dt(max) as a substitute for ventricular dP/dt(max) ) and pulsatility of measured flow signals. However, in RBPs used clinically, flow is estimated with a bandwidth too low to determine dQ/dt(max) in the case of improving heart function. The aim of this study was to develop a flow estimator for a centrifugal pump with bandwidth sufficient to provide noninvasive cardiac diagnostics. The new estimator is based on both static and dynamic properties of the brushless DC motor. An in vitro setup was employed to identify the performance of pump and motor up to 20 Hz. The algorithm was validated using physiological ventricular and arterial pressure waveforms in a mock loop which simulated different contractilities (dP/dt(max) 600 to 2300 mm Hg/s), pump speeds (2 to 4 krpm), and fluid viscosities (2 to 4 mPa·s). The mathematically estimated pump flow data were then compared to the datasets measured in the mock loop for different variable combinations (flow ranging from 2.5 to 7 L/min, pulsatility from 3.5 to 6 L/min, dQ/dt(max) from 15 to 60 L/min/s). Transfer function analysis showed that the developed algorithm could estimate the flow waveform with a bandwidth up to 15 Hz (±2 dB). The mean difference between the estimated and measured average flows was +0.06 ± 0.31 L/min and for the flow pulsatilities -0.27 ± 0.2 L/min. Detection of dQ/dt(max) was possible up to a dP/dt(max) level of 2300 mm Hg/s. In conclusion, a flow estimator with sufficient frequency bandwidth and accuracy to allow determination of changes in ventricular contractility even in the case of improving heart function was developed. PMID:22882439

  6. Development of a portable bridge-to-decision blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Kitamura, K

    2013-01-01

    We are developing an axial-flow pump with a cylindrical-impeller without airfoils. In the mock experiments of HA02 model a pressure of 13.3 kPa was obtained at a rotational speed of 12500 rpm and flow of 5L/min. The obtained pressure with HA02 was almost double than an airfoil-type impeller. The 2D analysis of hydrodynamic bearings for the pump revealed that a section with 3 or more arcs is stable with respect to angular position, and a minimum bearing gap of 100 µm can be attained at a design bearing gap of 150 µm and at a groove depth of 100 µm. PMID:24110291

  7. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Greg S. (Inventor); Vandamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  8. Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  9. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor); Kiris, Cetin (Inventor); Kwak, Dochan (Inventor); Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); DeBakey, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blood pump that comprises a pump housing having a blood flow path therethrough, a blood inlet, and a blood outlet; a stator mounted to the pump housing, the stator having a stator field winding for producing a stator magnetic field; a flow straightener located within the pump housing, and comprising a flow straightener hub and at least one flow straightener blade attached to the flow straightener hub; a rotor mounted within the pump housing for rotation in response to the stator magnetic field, the rotor comprising an inducer and an impeller; the inducer being located downstream of the flow straightener, and comprising an inducer hub and at least one inducer blade attached to the inducer hub; the impeller being located downstream of the inducer, and comprising an impeller hub and at least one impeller blade attached to the impeller hub; and preferably also comprising a diffuser downstream of the impeller, the diffuser comprising a diffuser hub and at least one diffuser blade. Blood flow stagnation and clot formation within the pump are minimized by, among other things, providing the inducer hub with a diameter greater than the diameter of the flow straightener hub; by optimizing the axial spacing between the flow straightener hub and the inducer hub, and between the impeller hub and the diffuser hub; by optimizing the inlet angle of the diffuser blades; and by providing fillets or curved transitions between the upstream end of the inducer hub and the shaft mounted therein, and between the impeller hub and the shaft mounted therein.

  10. Development of a Compact Maglev Centrifugal Blood Pump Enclosed in a Titanium Housing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    A compact centrifugal blood pump consisting of a controlled two-degrees-of-freedom radial magnetic bearing and a brushless DC motor enclosed in a titanium housing has been developed for use as an implantable ventricular assist device. The magnetic bearing also supports axial and angular motions of the impeller via a magnetic coupling. The top housing is made of pure titanium, while the impeller and the stator are coated with pure titanium and Ti-6Al-7Nb, respectively, to improve the biocompatibility of the pump. The combination of pure titanium and titanium alloy was chosen because of the sensitivity of eddy current type displacement sensors through the intervening conducting wall. The dimensions of the pump are 69.0 mm in diameter and 28.5 mm in height. During a pump performance test, axial shifting of the impeller due to hydraulic forces led to variations in the rotational positioning signal, causing loss of control of the rotational speed. This problem was solved by conditioning the rotational positioning signal. With a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 100 mmHg, the power consumption and efficiency of the pump were 5.5 W and 20%, respectively. Furthermore, the hemolysis of the blood pump was 43.6% lower when compared to that of a commercially available pump.

  11. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  12. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  13. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  14. Development of magnetic bearing system for a new third-generation blood pump.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Joo; Ahn, Chi Bum; Choi, Jaesoon; Park, Jun Woo; Song, Seung-Joon; Sun, Kyung

    2011-11-01

    A magnetic bearing system is a crucial component in a third-generation blood pump, particularly when we consider aspects such as system durability and blood compatibility. Many factors such as efficiency, occupying volume, hemodynamic stability in the flow path, mechanical stability, and stiffness need to be considered for the use of a magnetic bearing system in a third-generation blood pump, and a number of studies have been conducted to develop novel magnetic bearing design for better handling of these factors. In this study, we developed and evaluated a new magnetic bearing system having a motor for a new third-generation blood pump. This magnetic bearing system consists of a magnetic levitation compartment and a brushless direct current (BLDC) motor compartment. The active-control degree of freedom is one; this control is used for controlling the levitation in the axial direction. The levitation in the radial direction has a passive magnetic levitation structure. In order to improve the system efficiency, we separated the magnetic circuit for axial levitation by using a magnetic circuit for motor drive. Each magnetic circuit in the bearing system was designed to have a minimum gap by placing mechanical parts, such as the impeller blades, outside the circuit. A custom-designed noncontact gap sensor was used for minimizing the system volume. We fabricated an experimental prototype of the proposed magnetic bearing system and evaluated its performance by a control system using the Matlab xPC Target system. The noncontact gap sensor was an eddy current gap sensor with an outer diameter of 2.38 mm, thickness of 0.88 mm, and resolution of 5 µm. The BLDC motor compartment was designed to have an outer diameter of 20 mm, length of 28.75 mm, and power of 4.5 W. It exhibited a torque of 8.6 mNm at 5000 rpm. The entire bearing system, including the motor and the sensor, had an outer diameter of 22 mm and a length of 97 mm. The prototype exhibited sufficient levitation

  15. Rapid manufacturing techniques in the development of an axial blood pump impeller.

    PubMed

    Chan, W K; Wong, Y W; Chua, C K; Lee, C W; Feng, C

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of manufacturing techniques used in the development of an axial blood pump impeller. In this development process the impeller was designed and its performance was evaluated with the aid of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Prototypes of those designs where the CFD results show promise were needed in sufficient quantities at a low cost for experimental validation of the CFD results. As the impeller is less than 16 mm in diameter with a maximum blade thickness of about 1.5 mm, innovative manufacturing techniques are explored in this paper to determine the best process for quick fabrication of prototypes that are dimensionally accurate, structurally robust and low in cost. Four rapid prototyping techniques were explored. The completed parts were compared on the basis of manufacturing time, quality and strength of parts obtained, manufacturing cost and also in vitro performances. Based on these studies, it was concluded that selective laser sintering (SLS) is the most appropriate method for the quick production of prototype parts for evaluation of pump performance. PMID:14702984

  16. Development of a compact, sealless, tripod supported, magnetically driven centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yuhki, A; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, a tripod supported sealless centrifugal blood pump was designed and fabricated for implantable application using a specially designed DC brushless motor. The tripod structure consists of 3 ceramic balls mounted at the bottom surface of the impeller moving in a polyethylene groove incorporated at the bottom pump casing. The follower magnet inside the impeller is coupled to the driver magnet of the motor outside the bottom pump casing, thus allowing the impeller to slide-rotate in the polyethylene groove as the motor turns. The pump driver has a weight of 230 g and a diameter of 60 mm. The acrylic pump housing has a weight of 220 g with the priming volume of 25 ml. At the pump rpm of 1,000 to 2,200, the generated head pressure ranged from 30 to 150 mm Hg with the maximum system efficiency being 12%. When the prototype pump was used in the pulsatile mock loop to assist the ventricle from its apex to the aorta, a strong correlation was obtained between the motor current and bypass flow waveforms. The waveform deformation index (WDI), defined as the ratio of the fundamental to the higher order harmonics of the motor current power spectral density, was computed to possibly detect the suction occurring inside the ventricle due to the prototype centrifugal pump. When the WDI was kept under the value of 0.20 by adjusting the motor rpm, it was successful in suppressing the suction due to the centrifugal pump in the ventricle. The prototype sealless, centrifugal pump together with the control method based on the motor current waveform analysis may offer an intermediate support of the failing left or right ventricle bridging to heart transplantation. PMID:10886073

  17. Mechanical drive for blood pump

    DOEpatents

    Bifano, N.J.; Pouchot, W.D.

    1975-07-29

    This patent relates to a highly efficient blood pump to be used as a replacement for a ventricle of the human heart to restore people disabled by heart disease. The mechanical drive of the present invention is designed to operate in conjunction with a thermoelectric converter power source. The mechanical drive system essentially converts the output of a rotary power into pulsatile motion so that the power demand from the thermoelectric converter remains essentially constant while the blood pump output is pulsed. (auth)

  18. Development of Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor for an alternative axial flow blood pump design.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2006-05-01

    A Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed to provide delivery of both motoring torque and levitation force for an alternative axial flow blood pump design with an enclosed impeller. The axial flow pumps currently available introduce electromagnetic coupling from the motor's stator to the impeller by means of permanent magnets (PMs) embedded in the tips of the pump's blades. This design has distinct disadvantages, for example, pumping efficiency and electromagnetic coupling transmission are compromised by the constrained or poor geometry of the blades and limited pole width of the PMs, respectively. In this research, a Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed. It is composed of (i) an eight-pole PM hollow-cylindrical rotor assembly supposedly to house and enclose the impeller of an axial flow blood pump, and (ii) a six-pole stator with two sets of copper wire and different winding configurations to provide the motoring torque and levitating force for the rotor assembly. MATLAB's xPC Target interface hardware was used as the rapid prototyping tool for the development of the controller for the self-bearing motor. Experimental results on a free/simply supported rotor assembly validated the design feasibility and control algorithm effectiveness in providing both the motoring torque and levitation force for the rotor. When levitated, a maximum orbital displacement of 0.3 mm corresponding to 1050 rpm of the rotor was measured by two eddy current probes placed in the orthogonal direction. This design has the advantage of eliminating the trade-off between motoring torques, levitating force, and pumping efficiency of previous studies. It also indicated the benefits of enclosed-impeller design as having good dynamic response, linearity, and better reliability. The nonmechanical contact feature between rotating and stationary parts will further reduce hemolysis and thromboembolitic tendencies in a typical blood pump application. PMID:16683951

  19. The valvo-pump. An axial, nonpulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Yozu, R; Tanaka, T; Yamazaki, K

    1991-01-01

    The valvo-pump, an axial, nonpulsatile blood pump implanted at the heart valve position while preserving diseased heart muscle, has several advantages over an artificial heart replacement, including 1) a good anatomic fit to the natural heart, 2) less blood contacting surface, and 3) ease of implantation. The housing for the pump is a tube, 37 mm in diameter (maximum) and 33 mm in length. Within the housing there is an impeller with either 10 vanes (33 mm in diameter) or 5 vanes (22 mm in diameter). The impeller is connected to a samarium-cobalt-rare-earth magnet direct current (DC) brushless motor measuring 23.8 mm in diameter and 30.2 mm in length. Sealing is achieved by means of a magnetic fluid seal. A guiding wheel with 4 vanes is located behind the impeller. The pump was studied on a hydraulic mock circulatory system to evaluate its performance characteristics. A pump flow of 6.9 L/min was obtained at a pump differential pressure of 48 mmHg, and flow of 3.1 L/min was obtained at 58 mmHg. The valvo-pump can be made feasible by developing a small, high-output, power motor and an endurable seal, as well as by optimizing the impeller design. PMID:1751257

  20. Method for Reducing Pumping Damage to Blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Robert J. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for minimizing damage to blood in a blood pump wherein the blood pump comprises a plurality of pump components that may affect blood damage such as clearance between pump blades and housing, number of impeller blades, rounded or flat blade edges, variations in entrance angles of blades, impeller length, and the like. The process comprises selecting a plurality of pump components believed to affect blood damage such as those listed herein before. Construction variations for each of the plurality of pump components are then selected. The pump components and variations are preferably listed in a matrix for easy visual comparison of test results. Blood is circulated through a pump configuration to test each variation of each pump component. After each test, total blood damage is determined for the blood pump. Preferably each pump component variation is tested at least three times to provide statistical results and check consistency of results. The least hemolytic variation for each pump component is preferably selected as an optimized component. If no statistical difference as to blood damage is produced for a variation of a pump component, then the variation that provides preferred hydrodynamic performance is selected. To compare the variation of pump components such as impeller and stator blade geometries, the preferred embodiment of the invention uses a stereolithography technique for realizing complex shapes within a short time period.

  1. A teaspoon pump for pumping blood with high hydraulic efficiency and low hemolysis potential.

    PubMed

    Dame, D

    1996-06-01

    Virtually all blood pumps contain some kind of rubbing, sliding, closely moving machinery surfaces that are exposed to the blood being pumped. These valves, internal bearings, magnetic bearing position sensors, and shaft seals cause most of the problems with blood pumps. The original teaspoon pump design prevented the rubbing, sliding machinery surfaces from contacting the blood. However, the hydraulic efficiency was low because the blood was able to "slip around" the rotating impeller so that the blood itself never rotated fast enough to develop adequate pressure. An improved teaspoon blood pump has been designed and tested and has shown acceptable hydraulic performance and low hemolysis potential. The new pump uses a nonrotating "swinging" hose as the pump impeller. The fluid enters the pump through the center of the swinging hose; therefore, there can be no fluid slip between the revolving blood and the revolving impeller. The new pump uses an impeller that is comparable to a flexible garden hose. If the free end of the hose were swung around in a circle like half of a jump rope, the fluid inside the hose would rotate and develop pressure even though the hose impeller itself did not "rotate"; therefore, no rotating shaft seal or internal bearings are required. PMID:8817965

  2. Characteristics of a nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood roller pump.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves

    2013-01-01

    For decades, extracorporeal life support (ECLS) systems have relied on pumps designed for short-term cardiopulmonary bypass. In the past, occlusive roller pumps were the standard. They are being progressively replaced by centrifugal pumps and devices developed specifically for ECLS. However, the ideal pump for long-term bypass is yet to be created. One interesting alternative is the Rhône-Poulenc 06 pump that is a nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood pump developed in France in the 1970s. This pump is composed of a double-stage rotor with three rollers at each level. The raceway tubing is stretched on the roller and pump occlusivity depends on the tension of the chamber on the rotor. The pump is able to deliver physiological blood flow values without generating dangerous negative or positive pressures. The specific design of the chamber allows the pump to generate a pulsatile flow, inducing minimal blood trauma, and to act as a bubble trap, making it inherently safe. This pump has been used for cardiopulmonary bypass, extracorporeal lung support, and more specifically single-lumen single-cannula venovenous membrane oxygenation for neonates, left-heart or right-heart assist, and venovenous bypass during liver transplant. In conclusion, this old-fashion pump is perfectly adapted for any kind of short- or long-term bypass. PMID:23305578

  3. [Hemodynamic analysis of a centrifugal blood pump].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Li, Qilei; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper built the mathematical model of a centrifugal blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, combined it with that of the human cardiovascular system and simulated the coupling system using Matlab. Then we set up the experiment platform, linked the blood pump to mock human cardiovascular system in case of three-stage heart failure, and measured aortic pressure and flow under different speed. The comparison between experiment results and simulation results not only indicates the coupling model is correct and the blood pump works well, but also shows that with the increase of blood pump speed, the pulsation of aortic pressure and flow will be reduced, this situation will affect the structure and function of blood vessels. PMID:26027287

  4. Numerical simulation of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chua, Leok Poh; Su, Boyang; Lim, Tau Meng; Zhou, Tongming

    2007-07-01

    The axial blood pump with a magnetically suspended impeller is superior to other artificial blood pumps because of its small size. In this article, the distributions of velocity, path line, pressure, and shear stress in the straightener, the rotor, and the diffuser of the axial blood pump, as well as the gap zone were obtained using the commercial software, Fluent (version 6.2). The main focus was on the flow field of the blood pump. The numerical results showed that the axial blood pump could produce 5.14 L/min of blood at 100 mm Hg through the outlet when rotating at 11,000 rpm. However, there was a leakage flow of 1.06 L/min in the gap between the rotor cylinder and the pump housing, and thus the overall flow rate the impeller could generate was 6.2 L/min. The numerical results showed that 75% of the scalar shear stresses (SSs) were less than 250 Pa, and 10% were higher than 500 Pa within the whole pump. The high SS region appeared around the blade tip where a large variation of velocity direction and magnitude was found, which might be due to the steep angle variation at the blade tip. Because the exposure time of the blood cell at the high SS region within the pump was relatively short, it might not cause serious damage to the blood cells, but the improvement of blade profile should be considered in the future design of the axial pump. PMID:17584481

  5. Fluid dynamics aspects of miniaturized axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kang, Can; Huang, Qifeng; Li, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Rotary blood pump (RBP) is a kind of crucial ventricular assist device (VAD) and its advantages have been evidenced and acknowledged in recent years. Among the factors that influence the operation performance and the durability of various rotary blood pumps, medium property and the flow features in pump's flow passages are conceivably significant. The major concern in this paper is the fluid dynamics aspects of such a kind of miniaturized pump. More specifically, the structural features of axial-flow blood pump and corresponding flow features are analyzed in detail. The narrow flow passage between blade tips and pump casing and the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) zone may exert a negative effect on the shear stress distribution in the blood flow. Numerical techniques are briefly introduced in view of their contribution to facilitating the optimal design of blood pump and the visualization of shear stress distribution and multiphase flow analysis. Additionally, with the development of flow measurement techniques, the high-resolution, effective and non-intrusive flow measurement techniques catering to the measurement of the flows inside rotary blood pumps are highly anticipated. PMID:24211957

  6. Inverse design and CFD investigation of blood pump impeller.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Chan, W K

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional inverse design method using mean swirl specification is applied to the design of centrifugal blood pump impeller blades. CFD investigation of the passage flows is carried out to analyze the flow field and pressure generated across the blade. The results show that the possibility of blood cells' damage may not be increased when the pressure developed is increased. This technique can provide designers valuable insight on the development of efficient blood pump with reduced risk of blood traumatization. PMID:10999368

  7. Development of a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump intended for one-month support in bridge-to-bridge applications: in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Someya, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Waguri, Satoshi; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Nagaoka, Eiki; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2009-09-01

    MedTech Dispo, a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump with two degrees of freedom magnetic suspension and radial magnetic coupling rotation, has been developed for 1-month extracorporeal circulatory support. As the first stage of a two-stage in vivo evaluation, 2-week evaluation of a prototype MedTech Dispo was conducted. In in vitro study, the pump could produce 5 L/min against 800 mm Hg and the normalized index of hemolysis was 0.0054 +/- 0.0008 g/100 L. In in vivo study, the pump, with its blood-contacting surface coated with biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, was implanted in seven calves in left heart bypass. Pump performance was stable with a mean flow of 4.49 +/- 0.38 L/min at a mean speed of 2072.1 +/- 64.5 rpm. The maglev control revealed its stability in rotor position during normal activity by the calves. During 2 weeks of operation in two calves which survived the intended study period, no thrombus formation was seen inside the pump and levels of plasma free hemoglobin were maintained below 4 mg/dL. Although further experiments are required, the pump demonstrated the potential for sufficient and reliable performance and biocompatibility in meeting the requirements for cardiopulmonary bypass and 1-week circulatory support. PMID:19775262

  8. Design of a Bearingless Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barletta, Natale; Schoeb, Reto

    1996-01-01

    In the field of open heart surgery, centrifugal blood pumps have major advantages over roller pumps. The main drawbacks to centrifugal pumps are however problems with the bearings and with the sealing of the rotor shaft. In this paper we present a concept for a simple, compact and cost effective solution for a blood pump with a totally magnetically suspended impeller. It is based on the new technology of the 'Bearingless Motor' and is therefore called the 'Bearingless Blood Pump.' A single bearingless slice motor is at the same time a motor and a bearing system and is able to stabilize the six degrees of freedom of the pump impeller in a very simple way. Three degrees of freedom are stabilized actively (the rotation and the radial displacement of the motor slice). The axial and the angular displacement are stabilized passively. The pump itself (without the motor-stator and the control electronics) is built very simply. It consists of two parts only: the impeller with the integrated machine rotor and the housing. So the part which gets in contact with blood and has therefore to be disposable, is cheap. Fabricated in quantities, it will cost less than $10 and will therefore be affordable for the use in a heart-lung-machine.

  9. In vivo evaluation of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass-Spiral Pump.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Leme, Juliana; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron; Zavaglia, Cecília

    2013-11-01

    The Spiral Pump (SP), a centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), has been developed at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology/Adib Jatene Foundation laboratories, with support from Sintegra Company (Pompeia, Brazil). The SP is a disposable pump with an internal rotor-a conically shaped fuse with double entrance threads. This rotor is supported by two ball bearings, attached to a stainless steel shaft fixed to the housing base. Worm gears provide axial motion to the blood column, and the rotational motion of the conically shaped impeller generates a centrifugal pumping effect, improving pump efficiency without increasing hemolysis. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the SP's hydrodynamic performance, and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate hemodynamic impact during usual CPB. A commercially available centrifugal blood pump was used as reference. In vivo experiments were conducted in six male pigs weighing between 60 and 90 kg, placed on CPB for 6 h each. Blood samples were collected just before CPB (T0) and after every hour of CPB (T1-T6) for hemolysis determination and laboratory tests (hematological and biochemical). Values of blood pressure, mean flow, pump rotational speed, and corporeal temperature were recorded. Also, ergonomic conditions were recorded: presence of noise, difficulty in removing air bubbles, trouble in installing the pump in the drive module (console), and difficulties in mounting the CPB circuit. Comparing the laboratory and hemolysis results for the SP with those of the reference pump, we can conclude that there is no significant difference between the two devices. In addition, reports made by medical staff and perfusionists described a close similarity between the two devices. During in vivo experiments, the SP maintained blood flow and pressure at physiological levels, consistent with those applied in cardiac surgery with CPB, without presenting any malfunction. Also, the SP needed lower rotational

  10. Evaluation of four blood pump geometries: the optical tracer technique.

    PubMed

    Rose, M L; Mackay, T G; Martin, W; Wheatley, D J

    2000-01-01

    Artificial blood pump assistance of the failing human heart can allow it to recover. Analysis of blood pump fluid flow is a useful tool for design development and thrombosis minimization. The aim of this study was to investigate fluid flow, particularly ventricular clearance rate and stagnation areas, in four different blood pump geometries and to determine the best design. The blood pumps consisted of a polyurethane ventricle, and combinations of inlet/outlet pipe angles and compression plate shapes. A video camera recorded the motion of fluid labelled with an optical tracer (Methyl Blue histological dye). A novel processing method was developed to produce colour maps of tracer concentration, experimentally calibrated. An overall picture of fluid flow in each pump geometry was generated by considering clearance curves, tracer concentration maps and inflow jet animations. Overall and local mixing coefficients are calculated for each pump. The best geometry featured straight inlet/outlet pipes and a domed compression plate. This optical tracer technique has proven convenient, economical, sensitive to low concentrations of tracer and provides instantaneous pictures of tracer distribution in a ventricle. PMID:10997058

  11. Piezohydraulic Pump Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    Reciprocating piston piezohydraulic pumps were developed originally under the Smart Wing Phase II program (Lynch) and later under the CHAP program (CSA, Kinetic Ceramics). These pumps focused on 10 cm scale stack actuators operating below resonance and, more recently, at resonance. A survey of commercially available linear actuators indicates that obtaining power density and specific power greater than electromagnetic linear actuators requires driving the stacks at frequencies greater than 1 KHz at high fields. In the case of 10 cm scale actuators the power supply signal conditioning becomes large and heavy and the soft PZT stack actuators generate a lot of heat due to internal losses. Reciprocation frequencies can be increased and material losses significantly decreased through use of millimeter scale single crystal stack actuators. We are presently targeting the design of pumps that utilize stacks at the 1-10 mm length scale and run at reciprocating frequencies of 20kHz or greater. This offers significant advantages over current approaches including eliminating audible noise and significantly increasing the power density and specific power of the system (including electronics). The pump currently under development will comprise an LC resonant drive of a resonant crystal and head mass operating against a resonant fluid column. Each of these resonant systems are high Q and together should produce a single high Q second order system.

  12. Design optimization of flow channel and performance analysis for a new-type centrifugal blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J. J.; Luo, X. W.; Y Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a new-type centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is suspended inside a pump chamber with hydraulic bearings, is presented. In order to improve the hydraulic performance of the pump, an internal flow simulation is conducted to compare the effects of different geometrical parameters of pump flow passage. Based on the numerical results, the pumps can satisfy the operation parameters and be free of hemolysis. It is noted that for the pump with a column-type supporter at its inlet, the pump head and hydraulic efficiency decreases compared to the pump with a step-type support structure. The performance drop is caused by the disturbed flow upstream impeller inlet. Further, the unfavorable flow features such as reverse flow and low velocity in the pump may increases the possibility of thrombus. It is also confirmed that the casing shape can little influence pump performance. Those results are helpful for design optimization in blood pump development.

  13. Gas-heat-pump development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creswick, F. A.

    Incentives for the development of gas heat pumps are discussed. Technical progress made on several promising technologies was reviewed. The status of development of gas-engine-driven heat pumps, the absorption cycle for the near- and long-term gas heat pump systems, the Stirling engine, the small Rankine-cycle engines, and gas-turbine-driven heat pump systems were briefly reviewed. Progress in the US, Japan, and Europe is noted.

  14. Transformation of vibration signals in rotary blood pumps: the diagnostic potential of pump failure.

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Although non-destructive and continuous monitoring is indispensable for long-term circulatory support with rotary blood pumps, a practical monitoring system has not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of detecting pump failure caused by thrombus formation through the monitoring of vibration signals. The data acquisition equipment included vibration pickups, a charge amplifier, vibration analysis systems, and exclusive hardware. A pivot-bearing centrifugal pump with a mock circuit was investigated for vibration analysis. To simulate the four common areas of thrombus formation, we used a piece of silicon attached to each of the following four locations: the total area of the bottom of the impeller, an eccentric shape on the bottom of the impeller, a circular shape around the shaft top, and an eccentric shape on the top of the impeller. Vibration signals were picked up, and the power spectrum density analysis was performed at pump rotational speeds of 2100, 2400, and 3000 rpm. In this study, pump failure could be detected, and the types of imitation thrombi could be determined. We conclude that vibration detection with a computerized analysis system is a potentially valuable diagnostic tool for long-term circulatory support with rotary blood pumps. PMID:23625149

  15. Mechanical axial flow blood pump to support cavopulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, A L; Kapadia, J; Madduri, D

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a collapsible, percutaneously inserted, axial flow blood pump to support the cavopulmonary circulation in infants with a failing single ventricle physiology. An initial design of the impeller for this axial flow blood pump was performed using computational fluid dynamics analysis, including pressure-flow characteristics, scalar stress estimations, blood damage indices, and fluid force predictions. A plastic prototype was constructed for hydraulic performance testing, and these experimental results were compared with the numerical predictions. The numerical predictions and experimental findings of the pump performance demonstrated a pressure generation of 2-16 mm Hg for 50-750 ml/min over 5,500-7,500 RPM with deviation found at lower rotational speeds. The axial fluid forces remained below 0.1 N, and the radial fluid forces were determined to be virtually zero due to the centered impeller case. The scalar stress levels remained below 250 Pa for all operating conditions. Blood damage analysis yielded a mean residence time of the released particles, which was found to be less than 0.4 seconds for both flow rates that were examined, and a maximum residence time was determined to be less than 0.8 seconds. We are in the process of designing a cage with hydrodynamically shaped filament blades to act as a diffuser and optimizing the impeller blade shape to reduce the flow vorticity at the pump outlet. This blood pump will improve the clinical treatment of patients with failing Fontan physiology and provide a unique catheter-based therapeutic approach as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. PMID:19089799

  16. Effects of muscle pump on rotary blood pumps in dynamic exercise: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Lim, Scott

    2008-09-01

    Computer simulation is an important tool to study the interaction between rotary blood pumps (RBPs) and human circulatory system. This interaction is critical for the development of reliable physiological control systems of long-term RBPs. This paper presents a numerical model of the human circulatory system, which innovatively takes the muscle pump into account in dynamic exercise. Simulation results demonstrate that the inclusion of muscle pump will change the response of hemodynamic variables and RBP parameters. These findings also show the necessity to verify the performance of RBPs and their physiological control systems in dynamic exercise with the muscle pump taken into account. By using Matlab Simulink software to simulate real-time circulatory properties, this study provides the bench-top test environment for long-term RBPs and their physiological controller. PMID:18563564

  17. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  18. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  19. Modified fabrication techniques lead to improved centrifugal blood pump performance.

    PubMed

    Pacella, J J; Goldstein, A H; Magovern, G J; Clark, R F

    1994-01-01

    The authors are developing an implantable centrifugal blood pump for short- and medium-term (1-6 months) left ventricular assist. They hypothesized that the application of result dependent modifications to this pump would lead to overall improved performance in long-term implantation studies. Essential requirements for pump operation, such as durability and resistance to clot formation, have been achieved through specialized fabrication techniques. The antithrombogenic character of the pump has been improved through coating at the cannula-housing interfaces and the baffle seal, and through changing the impeller blade material from polysulfone to pyrolytic carbon. The electronic components of the pump have been sealed for implantable use through specialized processes of dipping and potting, and the surfaces of the internal pump components have been treated to increase durability. The device has demonstrated efficacy in five chronic sheep implantation studies of 14, 10, 28, 35, and 154 day duration. Post mortem findings from the 14 day experiment showed stable fibrin entangled around the impeller shaft and blades. After pump modification, autopsy findings of the 10 day study showed no evidence of clot. Additionally, the results of the 28 day experiment showed only a small (2.0 mm) ring of fibrin at the shaft-seal interface. In the 35 and 154 day experiments, redesign of the stators have resulted in improved motor corrosion resistance. The 35 day study showed a small, 0.5 mm wide fibrin deposit at the lip seal, but no motor failure. In the 154 day experiment, the motor failed because of stator fluid corrosion, while the explanted pump was devoid of thrombus. Based on these findings, the authors believe that these pump refinements have contributed significantly to improvements in durability and resistance to clot formation. PMID:8555619

  20. High efficiency magnetic bearing for a rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chen, H M; Smith, W A; Walton, J F

    1998-01-01

    Mohawk Innovative Technology, Inc. (MiTi; Albany, NY) and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (Cleveland, OH) have been engaged in a joint project to develop a new, high efficiency magnetic bearing for use in a rotary blood pump. Such a bearing would have some advantages with respect to permitting large, low shear clearances and avoiding crevice-like pivot interfaces and surface wear related issues. While magnetically suspended blood pumps have been demonstrated, other prototypes reported in the literature consume 5-15 W of power to energize the bearing. The MiTi bearing has been prototyped and tested. The design is a hybrid configuration, radially passive and axially active. The rotor-and-bearing system has been run in air and in blood analog solution, in all orientations. Measurements show a bearing power consumption below 0.5 W. Vibration peaked at 0.2 g in blood analog solution; frequency analysis indicated that this was primarily related to motor design features. Measured displacements from the equilibrium position were less than 0.005 cm. Based on this highly successful bearing prototype, an integrated pump/bearing system is now being developed. PMID:9804532

  1. Physiologic control algorithms for rotary blood pumps using pressure sensor input.

    PubMed

    Bullister, Edward; Reich, Sanford; Sluetz, James

    2002-11-01

    Hierarchical algorithms have been developed for enhanced physiologic control and monitoring of blood pumps using pressure inputs. Pressures were measured at pump inlet and outlet using APEX pressure sensors (APSs). The APS is a patented, long-term implantable, flow-through blood pressure sensor and designed to control implantable heart pumps. The algorithms have been tested using a Donavan circulatory mock-loop setup, a generic rotary pump, and LabVIEW software. The hierarchical algorithms control pump speed using pump inlet pressure as a primary independent variable and pump outlet pressure as a secondary dependent variable. Hierarchical control algorithms based on feedback from pressure sensors can control the speed of the pump to stably maintain ventricular filling pressures and arterial pressures. Monitoring algorithms based on pressure inputs are able to approximate flow rate and hydraulic power for the pump and the left ventricle. PMID:12406146

  2. A multiple disk centrifugal pump as a blood flow device.

    PubMed

    Miller, G E; Etter, B D; Dorsi, J M

    1990-02-01

    A multiple disk, shear force, valveless centrifugal pump was studied to determine its suitability as a blood flow device. A pulsatile version of the Tesla viscous flow turbine was designed by modifying the original steady flow pump concept to produce physiological pressures and flows with the aid of controlling circuitry. Pressures and flows from this pump were compared to a Harvard Apparatus pulsatile piston pump. Both pumps were connected to an artificial circulatory system. Frequency and systolic duration were varied over a range of physiological conditions for both pumps. The results indicated that the Tesla pump, operating in a pulsatile mode, is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows similar to the Harvard pump and other pulsatile blood pumps. PMID:2312140

  3. Application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, R; Athavale, M M; Makhijani, V B; Przekwas, A J

    1996-06-01

    Present-day computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques can be used to analyze the behavior of fluid flow in a variety of pumps. CFD can be a powerful tool during the design stage for rapid virtual prototyping of different designs, analyzing performance parameters, and making design improvements. Computational flow solutions provide information such as the location and size of stagnation zones and the local shear rate. These parameters can be correlated to the extent of hemolysis and thrombus formation and are critical to the success of a blood pump. CFD-ACE, an advanced commercial CFD code developed by CFD Research Corporation, has been applied to fluid flows in rotary machines, such as axial flow pumps and inducers. Preprocessing and postprocessing tools for efficient grid generation and advanced graphical flow visualization are integrated seamlessly with CFD-ACE. The code has structured multiblock grid capability, non-Newtonian fluid treatment, a variety of turbulence models, and an Eulerian-Langrangian particle tracking model. CFD-ACE has been used successfully to study the flow characteristics in an axial flow blood pump. An unstructured flow solver that greatly automates the process of grid generation and speeds up the flow simulation is under development. PMID:8817950

  4. Assessment of aortic valve opening during rotary blood pump support using pump signals.

    PubMed

    Granegger, Marcus; Schima, Heinrich; Zimpfer, Daniel; Moscato, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    During left ventricular support by rotary blood pumps (RBPs), the biomechanics of the aortic valve (AV) are altered, potentially leading to adverse events like commissural fusion, valve insufficiency, or thrombus formation. To avoid these events, assessment of AV opening and consequent adaptation of pump speed seem important. Additionally, this information provides insight into the heart-pump interaction. The aim of this study was to develop a method to assess AV opening from the pump flow signal. Data from a numerical model of the cardiovascular system and animal experiments with an RBP were employed to detect the AV opening from the flow waveform under different hemodynamic conditions. Three features calculated from the pump flow waveform were used to classify the state of the AV: skewness, kurtosis, and crest factor. Three different classification algorithms were applied to determine the state of the AV based on these features. In the model data, the best classifier resulted in a percentage of correctly identified beats with a closed AV (specificity) of 99.9%. The percentage of correctly identified beats with an open AV (sensitivity) was 99.5%. In the animal experiments, specificity was 86.8% and sensitivity reached 96.5%. In conclusion, a method to detect AV opening independently from preload, afterload, heart rate, contractility, and degree of support was developed. This algorithm makes the evaluation of the state of the AV possible from pump data only, allowing pump speed adjustment for a frequent opening of the AV and providing information about the interaction of the native heart with the RBP. PMID:24102321

  5. Implantable axialflow blood pump for left ventricular support.

    PubMed

    Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Artificial blood pumps, either ventricular assist devices (VADs) or total artificial hearts, are currently employed for bridge to recovery, bridge to transplant, and destination therapy situations. The clinical effectiveness of VADs has been demonstrated; however, all of the currently available pumps have a limited life because of either the damage they cause to blood or their limited mechanical design life. A magnetically suspended rotary blood pump offers the potential to meet the requirements of both extending design life and causing negligible blood damage due to superior hemodynamics. Therefore, over the last few years, efforts of an interdisciplinary research team at University of Virginia have been concentrated on the design and development of a fully implantable axial flow VAD with a magnetically levitated impeller (LEV-VAD). This paper details the second generation developmental prototype (LEV-VAD2 design configuration) and includes a complete CFD analysis of device performance. Based on encouraging results of the first design stage, including a good agreement between the CFD performance estimations and the experimental measurements, a second design phase was initiated in an attempt to enhance device flow performance and suspension system capabilities. Using iterative design optimization stages, the design of the impeller and the geometry of the stationary and rotating blades have been reevaluated. A thorough CFD analysis allowed for optimization of the blood flow path such that an optimal trade-off among the hydraulic performance, specific requirements of a blood pump, and manufacturing requirements has been achieved. Per the CFD results, the LEV-VAD2 produces 6 lpm and 100 mmHg at a rotational speed of 7,000 rpm. The pressure-flow performance predictions indicate the LEV-VAD2's ability to deliver adequate flow over physiologic pressures for rotational speeds varying from 5,000 to 8,000 rpm. The blood damage numerical predictions also demonstrate

  6. Particle image velocimetry experimental and computational investigation of a blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Gui, Xingmin; Huang, Hui; Shen, Yongbin; Yu, Ziwen; Zhang, Yan

    2012-06-01

    Blood pumps have been adopted to treat heart failure over the past decades. A novel blood pump adopting the rotor with splitter blades and tandem cascade stator was developed recently. A particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment was carried out to verify the design of the blood pump based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and further analyze the flow properties in the rotor and stator. The original sized pump model with an acrylic housing and an experiment loop were constructed to perform the optical measurement. The PIV testing was carried out at the rotational speed of 6952±50 r/min with the flow rate of 3.1 l/min and at 8186±50 r/min with 3.5 l/min, respectively. The velocity and the Reynolds shear stress distributions were investigated by PIV and CFD, and the comparisons between them will be helpful for the future blood pump design.

  7. Recent progress in developing durable and permanent impeller pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y

    2002-04-01

    Since 1980s, the author's impeller pump has successively achieved the device implantability, blood compatibility and flow pulsatility. In order to realize a performance durability, the author has concentrated in past years on solving the bearing problems of the impeller pump. Recent progress has been obtained in developing durable and permanent impeller blood pumps. At first, a durable impeller pump with rolling bearing and purge system has been developed, in which the wear-less rollers made of super-high-molecular weight polythene make the pump to work for years without mechanical wear; and the purge system enables the bearing to work in saline and heparin, and no thrombus therefore could be formed. Secondly, a durable centrifugal pump with rolling bearing and axially reciprocating impeller has been developed, the axial reciprocation of rotating impeller makes the fresh blood in and out of the bearing and to wash the rollers once a circle; in such way, no thrombus could be formed and no fluid infusion is necessary, which may bring inconvenience and discomfort to the receptors. Finally, a permanent maglev impeller pump has been developed, its rotor is suspended and floating in the blood under the action of permanent magnetic force and nonmagnetic forces, without need for position measurement and feed-back control. In conclusion, an implantable, pulsatile, and blood compatible impeller pump with durability may have more extensive applications than ever before and could replace the donor heart for transplantation in the future. PMID:12099505

  8. Concept designs of nonrotating-type centrifugal blood pump and basic study on output characteristics of the oscillating disk-type centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kabei, N; Tuichiya, K; Sakurai, Y

    1994-09-01

    When designing a turbo-type blood pump as an artificial heart, the gap between a rotating shaft and a pump housing should be perfectly sealed to prevent any leakage or contamination through a seal. In addition, blood coagulation in a blood chamber must be avoided. To overcome these problems, we proposed five different nonrotating-type turbo pumps: a caudal-fin-type axial-flow pump, a caudal-fin-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-column-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-collapsible-tube-type centrifugal pump, and an oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump. We selected and developed the oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump that consists of a disk, a driving rod, a seal, an oscillation mechanism, and a pump housing. The disk is mounted on the end of the rod, which is connected to a high-speed DC motor through an oscillation mechanism. The rod and the disk do not rotate, but they oscillate in the pump housing. This movement of the disk generates forward fluid flow around the axis (i.e., the rotational fluid flow). Centrifugal force due to fluid rotation supports the pressure difference between the outlet and the inlet. The diameter of the disk is 39 mm, the maximum inner diameter of the pump housing is 40 mm, and the volume of the blood chamber for 25 degrees' oscillation is 16.9 ml. The performance of the pump was tested in a mock circulatory system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7998882

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Design Optimization Method for Archimedes Screw Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Janiga, Gábor; Thévenin, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    An optimization method suitable for improving the performance of Archimedes screw axial rotary blood pumps is described in the present article. In order to achieve a more robust design and to save computational resources, this method combines the advantages of the established pump design theory with modern computer-aided, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based design optimization (CFD-O) relying on evolutionary algorithms and computational fluid dynamics. The main purposes of this project are to: (i) integrate pump design theory within the already existing CFD-based optimization; (ii) demonstrate that the resulting procedure is suitable for optimizing an Archimedes screw blood pump in terms of efficiency. Results obtained in this study demonstrate that the developed tool is able to meet both objectives. Finally, the resulting level of hemolysis can be numerically assessed for the optimal design, as hemolysis is an issue of overwhelming importance for blood pumps. PMID:26526039

  10. Inlet and outlet devices for rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinwei; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E; Antaki, James F; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    The purposes of inlet and outlet devices for rotary blood pumps, including inducers and diffusers for axial pumps, inlet and exit volutes for centrifugal pumps, and inlet and outlet cannulas, are to guide the blood into the impeller, where the blood is accelerated, and to convert the high kinetic energy into pressure after the impeller discharge, respectively. The designs of the inlet and outlet devices have an important bearing on the pump performance. Their designs are highly dependent on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, guided by intuition and experience. For inlet devices, the design objectives are to eliminate separated flow, to minimize recirculation, and to equalize the radial components of velocity. For outlet devices, the design goals are to reduce speed, to minimize energy loss, and to avoid flow separation and whirl. CFD analyses indicate the velocity field and pressure distribution. Geometrical optimization of these components has been implemented in order to improve the flow pattern. PMID:15384997

  11. Rotary blood pump control using integrated inlet pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Cysyk, Joshua; Jhun, Choon-Sik; Newswanger, Ray; Weiss, William; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2011-01-01

    Due to improved reliability and reduced risk of thromboembolic events, continuous flow left ventricular assist devices are being used more commonly as a long term treatment for end-stage heart failure. As more and more patients with these devices are leaving the hospital, a reliable control system is needed that can adjust pump support in response to changes in physiologic demand. An inlet pressure sensor has been developed that can be integrated with existing assist devices. A control system has been designed to adjust pump speed based on peak-to-peak changes in inlet pressure. The inlet pressure sensor and control system have been tested with the HeartMate II axial flow blood pump using a mock circulatory loop and an active left ventricle model. The closed loop control system increased total systemic flow and reduced ventricular load following a change in preload as compared to fixed speed control. The increase in systemic flow occurred under all operating conditions, and maximum unloading occurred in the case of reduced ventricular contractility. PMID:22254326

  12. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  2. An original versatile nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood roller pump for extracorporeal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves; Wang, Shigang; Ündar, Akif

    2014-06-01

    Currently, only a small number of centrifugal pumps are being used for hemodynamic and/or respiratory support, but all of them have limitations. This article aims to present the Rhône-Poulenc 06 nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood pump. This pump was developed in France in the 1970s and used for decades in perfusion for cardiopulmonary bypass procedures, cardiac or lung assist as well as venovenous bypass during liver transplant. The intrinsic properties of this pump allowed us to describe a new technique for extracorporeal lung support in the 1980s, using a single cannula tidal flow venovenous bypass. This pump compared favorably with conventional pumps in terms of flow and pressure, hemolysis, pulsatility, safety, and cost-effectiveness. We believe that this simple pump could be an alternative to more sophisticated and expensive devices. PMID:24125196

  3. Preliminary validation of a new magnetic wireless blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Hashi, Shuichiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    In general, a blood pump must be small, have a simple configuration, and have sufficient hydrodynamic performance. Herein, we introduce new mechanisms for a wireless blood pump that is small and simple and provides wireless and battery-free operation. To achieve wireless and battery-free operation, we implement magnetic torque and force control methods that use two external drivers: an external coil and a permanent magnet with a DC-motor, respectively. Power harvesting can be used to drive an electronic circuit for wireless monitoring (the observation of the pump conditions and temperature) without the use of an internal battery. The power harvesting will be used as a power source to drive other electronic devices, such as various biosensors with their driving circuits. To have both a compact size and sufficient pumping capability, the fully magnetic impeller has five stages and each stage includes four backward-curved blades. The pump has total and inner volumes of 20 and 9.8 cc, respectively, and weighs 52 g. The pump produces a flow rate of approximately 8 L/min at 80 mm Hg and the power generator produces 0.3 W of electrical power at 120 Ω. The pump also produces a minimum flow rate of 1.5 L/min and a pressure of 30 mm Hg for circulation at a maximum distance of 7.5 cm. PMID:23634711

  4. Experimental and computational studies of the relative flow field in a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ng, B T; Chan, W K; Yu, S C; Li, H D

    2000-01-01

    The relative flow field within the impeller passage of a centrifugal blood pump had been examined using flow visualization technique and computational fluid dynamics. It was found that for a seven-blade radial impeller design, the required flow rate and static pressure rise across the pump could be achieved but the flow field within the blades was highly undesirable. Two vortices were observed near the suction side and these could lead to thrombus formation. Preliminary results presented in this article are part of our overall effort to minimize undesirable flow patterns such flow separation and high shear stress regions within the centrifugal blood pump. This will facilitate the future progress in developing a long-term clinically effective blood pump. PMID:10999375

  5. An implantable centrifugal blood pump with a recirculating purge system (Cool-Seal system).

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Litwak, P; Tagusari, O; Mori, T; Kono, K; Kameneva, M; Watach, M; Gordon, L; Miyagishima, M; Tomioka, J; Umezu, M; Outa, E; Antaki, J F; Kormos, R L; Koyanagi, H; Griffith, B P

    1998-06-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump has been developed as an implantable left ventricular assist system. The impeller diameter is 40 mm, and pump dimensions are 55 x 64 mm. This first prototype, fabricated from titanium alloy, resulted in a pump weight of 400 g including a brushless DC motor. The weight of a second prototype pump was reduced to 280 g. The entire blood contacting surface is coated with diamond like carbon (DLC) to improve blood compatibility. Flow rates of over 7 L/min against 100 mm Hg pressure at 2,500 rpm with 9 W total power consumption have been measured. A newly designed mechanical seal with a recirculating purge system (Cool-Seal) is used for the shaft seal. In this seal system, the seal temperature is kept under 40 degrees C to prevent heat denaturation of blood proteins. Purge fluid also cools the pump motor coil and journal bearing. Purge fluid is continuously purified and sterilized by an ultrafiltration unit which is incorporated in the paracorporeal drive console. In vitro experiments with bovine blood demonstrated an acceptably low hemolysis rate (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.005 +/- 0.002 g/100 L). In vivo experiments are currently ongoing using calves. Via left thoracotomy, left ventricular (LV) apex descending aorta bypass was performed utilizing an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) vascular graft with the pump placed in the left thoracic cavity. In 2 in vivo experiments, the pump flow rate was maintained at 5-9 L/min, and pump power consumption remained stable at 9-10 W. All plasma free Hb levels were measured at less than 15 mg/dl. The seal system has demonstrated good seal capability with negligible purge fluid consumption (<0.5 ml/day). In both calves, the pumps demonstrated trouble free continuous function over 6 month (200 days and 222 days). PMID:9650667

  6. Performance of enlarged blood pump models with five different impellers.

    PubMed

    Chua, L P; Yu, S C; Leo, H L

    2000-01-01

    In earlier studies, a 5:1 enlarged pump model of the Kyoto-NTN Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Blood Pump had been constructed and the flow characteristics investigated. Although the results obtained were satisfactory, the medium used was air. A 5:1 enlarged pump model using water as the medium thus was designed and constructed. Five different impeller blade profile designs were used in the present study. By varying (1) the blade profile design: forward, radial, and backward, (2) the number of blades used, and (3) the rotating speed, the flow characteristics of the pump were investigated. It was found that the impeller with the higher number of blades, used in the forward and straight blade profiles, have the best performance. PMID:10999376

  7. Numerical analysis of blood flow in the clearance regions of a continuous flow artificial heart pump.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Wood, H G; Allaire, P E; Olsen, D B

    2000-06-01

    The CFVAD3 is the third prototype of a continuous flow ventricular assist device being developed for implantation in humans. The pump consists of a fully shrouded 4-blade impeller supported by magnetic bearings. On either side of this suspended rotating impeller is a small clearance region through which the blood flows. The spacing and geometry of these clearance regions are very important to the successful operation of this blood pump. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions for this flow were obtained using TascFlow, a software package available from AEA Technology, U.K. Flow in these clearance regions was studied parametrically by varying the size of the clearance, the blood flow rate into the pump, and the rotational speed of the pump. The numerical solutions yield the direction and magnitude of the flow and the dynamic pressure. Experimentally measured pump flow rates are compared to the numerical study. The results of the study provide guidance for improving pump efficiency. It is determined that current clearances can be significantly reduced to improve pump efficiency without negative impacts. PMID:10886072

  8. Effect of parameter variations on the hemodynamic response under rotary blood pump assistance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Einly; Dokos, Socrates; Salamonsen, Robert F; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L; Ayre, Peter J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2012-05-01

    Numerical models, able to simulate the response of the human cardiovascular system (CVS) in the presence of an implantable rotary blood pump (IRBP), have been widely used as a predictive tool to investigate the interaction between the CVS and the IRBP under various operating conditions. The present study investigates the effect of alterations in the model parameter values, that is, cardiac contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and total blood volume on the efficiency of rotary pump assistance, using an optimized dynamic heart-pump interaction model previously developed in our laboratory based on animal experimental measurements obtained from five canines. The effect of mean pump speed and the circulatory perturbations on left and right ventricular pressure volume loops, mean aortic pressure, mean cardiac output, pump assistance ratio, and pump flow pulsatility from both the greyhound experiments and model simulations are demonstrated. Furthermore, the applicability of some of the previously proposed control parameters, that is, pulsatility index (PI), gradient of PI with respect to pump speed, pump differential pressure, and aortic pressure are discussed based on our observations from experimental and simulation results. It was found that previously proposed control strategies were not able to perform well under highly varying circulatory conditions. Among these, control algorithms which rely on the left ventricular filling pressure appear to be the most robust as they emulate the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. PMID:22489771

  9. Feasibility of the optical imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump by near-infrared light.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    Blood coagulation is one of the primary concerns when using mechanical circulatory support devices such as blood pumps. Noninvasive detection and imaging of thrombus formation is useful not only for the development of more hemocompatible devices but also for the management of blood coagulation to avoid risk of infarction. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of near-infrared light for imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. The optical properties of a thrombus at wavelengths ranging from 600 to 750 nm were analyzed using a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system. A specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a visible bottom area was used. In vitro antithrombogenic testing was conducted five times with the pump using bovine whole blood in which the activated blood clotting time was adjusted to 200 s prior to the experiment. Two halogen lights were used for the light sources. The forward scattering through the pump and backward scattering on the pump bottom area were imaged using the HSI system. HSI showed an increase in forward scattering at wavelengths ranging from 670 to 750 nm in the location of thrombus formation. The time at which the thrombus began to form in the impeller rotating at 2780 rpm could be detected. The spectral difference between the whole blood and the thrombus was utilized to image thrombus formation. The results indicate the feasibility of dynamically detecting and imaging thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. PMID:25234757

  10. Interaction of an idealized cavopulmonary circulation with mechanical circulatory assist using an intravascular rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Sonya S; Moskowitz, William B; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2010-10-01

    This study evaluated the performance of an intravascular, percutaneously-inserted, axial flow blood pump in an idealized total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) model of a Fontan physiology. This blood pump, intended for placement in the inferior vena cava (IVC), is designed to augment pressure and blood flow from the IVC to the pulmonary circulation. Three different computational models were examined: (i) an idealized TCPC without a pump; (ii) an idealized TCPC with an impeller pump; and (iii) an idealized TCPC with an impeller and diffuser pump. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of these models were performed to assess the hydraulic performance of each model under varying physiologic conditions. Pressure-flow characteristics, fluid streamlines, energy augmentation calculations, and blood damage analyses were evaluated. Numerical predictions indicate that the pump with an impeller and diffuser blade set produces pressure generations of 1 to 16 mm Hg for rotational speeds of 2000 to 6000 rpm and flow rates of 1 to 4 L/min. In contrast, for the same flow range, the model with the impeller only in the IVC demonstrated pressure generations of 1 to 9 mm Hg at rotational speeds of 10,000 to 12,000 rpm. Influence of blood viscosity was found to be insignificant at low rotational speeds with minimal performance deviation at higher rotational speeds. Results from the blood damage index analyses indicate a low probability for damage with maximum damage index levels less than 1% and maximum fluid residence times below 0.6 s. The numerical predictions further indicated successful energy augmentation of the TCPC with a pump in the IVC. These results support the continued design and development of this cavopulmonary assist device. PMID:20964699

  11. Survey of blood pump diaphragm damage in the NIPRO-ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Kashiwa, Koichi; Nishimura, Takashi; Nakahata, Aoi; Momose, Naoki; Umeda, Chinori; Kubo, Hitoshi; Tamai, Hisayoshi; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Adachi, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Katohgi, Toshiyuki; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru

    2012-12-01

    We surveyed the incidence of blood pump diaphragm damage (rupture or crack) in the NIPRO-ventricular assist device (VAD). In the cases in which rupture or suspected blood pump crack was detected, we disassembled the pumps to visually check the condition of the diaphragm after replacement or use. Of 366 blood pumps surveyed, diaphragm damage was observed in 2.7 %. The duration of use of the blood pumps with diaphragm damage was significantly longer than that of pumps without damage. The incidence of diaphragm damage increased with longer duration of use. On the basis of these findings, blood pump diaphragm damage in the NIPRO-VAD may be associated with duration of use. However, some blood pumps were used for prolonged periods without diaphragm damage. All blood pumps with damage had a crack in the diaphragm on the air chamber side near the diaphragm-housing (D-H) junction. Cracks were not found in any specific part of the diaphragm. In blood pumps with diaphragm rupture, the crack had a through-hole reaching the blood-contacting surface. Although we were unable to identify the causes of the cracks, it is suggested that when a crack appears in the diaphragm it will gradually expand and eventually lead to rupture. If a crack is detected in a blood pump, we advocate replacing the pump before it grows. When the NIPRO-VAD is used, it is necessary to keep in mind that blood pump diaphragm damage may occur. PMID:22923169

  12. [Study on optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump with constraints on blood perfusion and on blood damage indexes].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Pan, Youlian; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tianyi; Lu, Lijun

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed to study the optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal objective is determined according to requirements of clinical use. Possible schemes are generally worked out based on structural feature of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal structure is selected from possible schemes with constraints on blood perfusion and blood damage indexes. Using an optimal selection method one can find the optimum structure scheme from possible schemes effectively. The results of numerical simulation of optimal blood pump showed that the method of constraints of blood perfusion and blood damage is competent for the requirements of selection of the optimal blood pumps. PMID:23469557

  13. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with an axially levitated motor.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ezoe, Shiroh; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Yohji

    2003-07-01

    The longevity of a rotary blood pump is mainly determined by the durability of its wearing mechanical parts such as bearings and seals. Magnetic suspension techniques can be used to eliminate these mechanical parts altogether. This article describes a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump using an axially levitated motor. The motor comprises an upper stator, a bottom stator, and a levitated rotor-impeller between the stators. The upper stator has permanent magnets to generate an attractive axial bias force on the rotor and electric magnets to control the inclination of the rotor. The bottom stator has electric magnets to generate attractive forces and rotating torque to control the axial displacement and rotation of the rotor. The radial displacement of the rotor is restricted by passive stability. A shrouded impeller is integrated within the rotor. The performance of the magnetic suspension and pump were evaluated in a closed mock loop circuit filled with water. The maximum amplitude of the rotor displacement in the axial direction was only 0.06 mm. The maximum possible rotational speed during levitation was 1,600 rpm. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 120 mm Hg and 7 L/min, respectively. The pump shows promise as a ventricular assist device. PMID:12823418

  14. A magnetically suspended and hydrostatically stabilized centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Hart, R M; Filipenco, V G; Kung, R T

    1996-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump intended for application as a long-term implantable ventricular assist device has been built and tested. The rotor is freely suspended in the blood by magnetic and hydrostatic restoring forces. This design obviates the need for bearings and shaft seals, and eliminates the problems of reliability and thrombogenicity associated with them. The positional stability and hydrodynamic performance of the pump has been characterized in vitro at flows of up to 10 L/min at physiologic pressures. Radial position control is realized by an analog electronic feedback control system. The pressure distribution in the fluid surrounding the rotor provides dynamic control in the axial direction with no active feedback. Rotor excursion is less than 50 microns (mu) when the housing receives an impulse peaking at an acceleration of 40 g or upon sudden blockage of the flow. In vitro blood measurements indicate an acceptable level of hemolysis compared with that of a standard centrifugal pump. PMID:8817962

  15. Magnetically suspended rotary blood pump with radial type combined motor-bearing.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Kita, T; Matsuda, K; Okada, Y

    2000-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump is being developed with a combined motor-bearing for long-term ventricular assist systems. The combined motor-bearing actively suspends a rotor in a radial direction to deal with radial force unbalance in the pump and rotates the rotor by using the electric magnetic field. Therefore, the pump has no mechanical parts such as bearings of the motor and has a long lifetime. The developed pump consists of a thin rotor with a semi open-type 6 vane impeller and a stator to suspend and rotate the rotor. The rotor has 4-pole permanent magnets on the circumferential surface. The outer diameter and the thickness of the rotor are 60 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Axial movement and tilt of the rotor are restricted by passive stability based on the thin rotor structure. Radial movements of the rotor, such as levitation in radial direction and rotation, are controlled actively by using electric magnets of the stator. The electric magnet coils to produce levitation and rotation forces are constructed on the periphery stator. The p +/- 2-pole algorithm and the synchronous motor mechanism are adopted to levitate and rotate the rotor. The radial gap between the rotor and the stator is 1 mm. A closed-loop circuit filled with water was connected to the developed pump to examine the basic performance of the pump and the magnetic suspension system. Maximum rotational speed, flow rate, and head were 2,800 rpm, 11 L/min, and 270 mm Hg, respectively. The rotor with the impeller could be suspended completely during the entire pumping process. We conclude the pump with the combined motor-bearing has sufficient performance for the blood pump. PMID:10886067

  16. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26736252

  17. Water Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design, fabricate, and test a preflight prototype pump for use in the Extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump will accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting noncondensable gas without becoming "air locked." The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the preflight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES will simulate the vacuum environment in which the flight pump will operate. Testing will verify that the pump meets design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure rise, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, and restart capability. Pump testing is currently

  18. Numerical simulation and comparative analysis of flow field in axial blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuhua; Wu, Yaqin; Tang, Xiaoying; Liu, Weifeng; Chen, Duanduan; Gao, Tianxin; Xu, Yong; Zeng, Yanjun

    2014-05-01

    The objective study was to estimate the rheological properties and physiological compatibility of the blood pump by simulating the internal flow field of the blood pump. In this study we use computational fluid dynamics method to simulate and analyse two models of axial blood pumps with a three-blade diffuser and a six-blade diffuser, named pump I and pump II, respectively, and to compare the flow patterns of these two kinds of blood pumps while both of them satisfy the conditions of the normal human blood differential pressure and blood flow. Results indicate that (i) the high shear force occurs between the diffuser and the rotor in which the crucial place leads to haemolysis and (ii) under the condition of 100 mmHg pressure head and 5 l/min flow rate, the difference between the two kinds of blood pumps, as far as the haemolytic performance is concerned, is notable. The haemolysis index of the two pumps is 0.32% and 0.2%. In conclusion, the performance of the blood pump is influenced by the diffusers' blade number. Pump II performed better than pump I, which can be the basic model for blood pump option. PMID:22974125

  19. Twenty-four hour left ventricular bypass with a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed Central

    Berstein, E F; DeLaria, G A; Johansen, K H; Shuman, R L; Stasz, P; Reich, S

    1975-01-01

    A new centrifugal blood pump system has been developed for left ventricular bypass by the addition of non-thrombogenic blood surface materials and an ultrathin-walled cannula for the retrograde cannulation of the left ventricle. Partial LV bypass at 3 to 6 L/min was undertaken in 55 calves without thoracotomy. In 20 it was continued for 24 hours, with 13 survivors who were eventually sacrificed. Eleven of the last 14 experiments were completed without mishap. Heparin was employed only during pump insertion. Hematologic changes were limited to moderate platelet depression, and tolerable hemolysis (average serum level 21 mg% in the last 13 experiments). Normal clotting parameters and the absence of significant fibrin split product formation correlated with the absence of gross thrombosis and few minor renal emboli observed at autopsy. This pump system appears to have several advantages over previously described equipment for LV bypass. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1130859

  20. Pumped limiter development on ISX

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.K.; Edmonds, P.H.; Sheffield, J.

    1981-01-01

    Pumped limiter configurations are being suggested for FED and INTOR for helium ash exhaust and fuel particle control. The goal of the pump limiter studies in ISX is the selection of the most promising concept and its evaluation in the ISX-C device under the following conditions: (1) quasi steady state operation (less than or equal to 30s), (2) high edge power densities, and (3) particle control by means of mechanical devices. We are considering various options, including particle scraper and ballistic particle collection concepts as well as the current FED design. In ISX-B we will test a full-size pump limiter and directly compare the heat removal and particle control capabilities with a bundle divertor. In ISX-C the steady state operation characteristics of pump limiters will be explored.

  1. PIV Investigations of the Flow Field in the Volute of a Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Smith, William A.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    A full-size acrylic model of a rotary blood pump was developed in order to utilize Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to make measurements of the fluid velocities and turbulent stresses throughout the device. The development of an understanding of the hemodynamics within the blood pump is critical to the development and validation of computational models. A blood analog solution, consisting of sodium iodide solution and glycerin, was developed to match physiological kinematic viscosity. The refractive indices of the fluid, the pump casing, and the impeller were matched to facilitate the use of PIV to make velocity measurements. Velocity measurements made in the volute exit/diffuser region are presented for pumps speeds of 3000-3850 rpm. At each speed data were obtained at a physiological pressure of 12 kPa and at a maximum flow condition. Four hundred data pairs were used for each resultant mean velocity vector value, representing greater than an order of magnitude more data pairs than reported previously in the literature on similar devices and resulting in velocity uncertainty levels of approximately 22.9%.

  2. PIV Investigations of the Flow Field in the Volute of a Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Mehta, Mehul; Smith, William A.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    A full-size acrylic model of a rotary blood pump was developed in order to utilize Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to make measurements of the fluid velocities and turbulent stresses throughout the device. The development of an understanding of the hemodynamics within the blood pump is critical to the development and validation of computational models. A blood analog solution, consisting of sodium iodide solution and glycerin, was developed to match physiological kinematic viscosity. The refractive indecies of the fluid, the pump casing and the impeller were matched to facilitate the use of PIV to make velocity measurements. Velocity measurements made in the volute exit/diffuser region are presented for pumps speeds of 3000-3850 rpm. At each speed data were obtained at a physiological pressure of 90 mmHg and at a maximum flow condition. Four hundred data pairs were used for each resultant mean velocity vector value, representing greater than an order of magnitude more data pairs than reported previously in the literature on similar devices and resulting in velocity uncertainty levels of approximately 2.9%.

  3. Controlled pitch-adjustment of impeller blades for an intravascular blood pump.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Sciolino, Michael G; Downs, Emily A; Saxman, Robert S; López-Isaza, Sergio; Moskowitz, William B

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of mechanical blood pumps are currently providing circulatory support, and the incidence of their use continues to increase each year. As the use of blood pumps becomes more pervasive in the treatment of those patients with congestive heart failure, critical advances in design features to address known limitations and the integration of novel technologies become more imperative. To advance the current state-of-the-art in blood pump design, this study investigates the inclusion of pitch-adjusting blade features in intravascular blood pumps as a means to increase energy transfer; an approach not explored to date. A flexible impeller prototype was constructed with a configuration to allow for a variable range of twisted blade geometries of 60-250°. Hydraulic experiments using a blood analog fluid were conducted to characterize the pressure-flow performance for each of these twisted positions. The flexible, twisted impeller was able to produce 1-25 mmHg for 0.5-4 L/min at rotational speeds of 5,000-8,000 RPM. For a given twisted position, the pressure rise was found to decrease as a function of increasing flow rate, as expected. Generally, a steady increase in the pressure rise was observed as a function of higher twisted degrees for a constant rotational speed. Higher rotational speeds for a specific twisted impeller configuration resulted in a more substantial pressure generation. The findings of this study support the continued exploration of this unique design approach in the development of intravascular blood pumps. PMID:22691415

  4. Tiny magnetic wireless pump: Fabrication of magnetic impeller and magnetic wireless manipulation for blood circulation in legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Yu, Chang Ho; Ishiyama, K.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a wireless pump that uses magnetic wireless manipulation to pump blood in the legs. A compact size and sufficient hydrodynamic performance were the most important requirements. Because the bonded magnet technique allows for a complex shape and various magnetization orientations, we fabricated a magnetic impeller from magnetic SmFeN powder. The impellers demonstrated a magnetic moment of 2772.64 emu and coercive force of 7.55 kOe. Using the impeller, we developed a tiny blood pump with a diameter of 22 mm and height of 6 mm. The pump allows for a maximum flow rate of 2.7 l/min and maximum pump head of approximately 170 mm Hg at a rotating speed of 6000 rpm. This level of hydrodynamic performance is sufficient to circulate blood in the legs. In this paper, we present the magnetic properties of the magnetic impeller and the hydrodynamic performance with wireless operation.

  5. A novel permanent maglev impeller TAH: most requirements on blood pumps have been satisfied.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y

    2003-07-01

    Based on the development of an impeller total artificial heart (TAH) (1987) and a permanent maglev (magnetic levitation) impeller pump (2002), as well as a patented magnetic bearing and magnetic spring (1996), a novel permanent maglev impeller TAH has been developed. The device consists of a rotor and a stator. The rotor is driven radially. Two impellers with different dimensions are fixed at both the ends of the rotor. The levitation of the rotor is achieved by using two permanent magnetic bearings, which have double function: radial bearing and axial spring. As the rotor rotates at a periodic changing speed, two pumps deliver the pulsatile flow synchronously. The volume balance between the two pumps is realized due to self-modulation property of the impeller pumps, without need for detection and control. Because the hemo-dynamic force acting on the left impeller is larger than that on the right impeller, and this force during systole is larger than that during diastole, the rotor reciprocates axially once a cycle. This is beneficial to prevent the thrombosis in the pump. Furthermore, a small flow via the gap between stator and rotor from left pump into right pump comes to a full washout in the motor and the pumps. Therefore, it seems neither mechanical wear nor thrombosis could occur. The previously developed prototype impeller TAH had demonstrated that it could operate in animal experiments indefinitely, if the bearing would not fail to work. Expectantly, this novel permanent magnetic levitation impeller TAH with simplicity, implantability, pulsatility, compatibility and durability has satisfied the most requirements on blood pumps and will have more extensive applications in experiments and clinics. PMID:12873075

  6. Testing of a centrifugal blood pump with a high efficiency hybrid magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Locke, Dennis H; Swanson, Erik S; Walton, James F; Willis, John P; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present test results for a second generation, high efficiency, nonpulsatile centrifugal blood pump that is being developed for use as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The LVAD pump uses a hybrid passive-active magnetic bearing support system that exhibits extremely low power loss, low vibration, and high reliability under transient conditions and varying pump orientations. A unique feature of the second generation design configuration is the very simple and direct flow path for both main and washing blood flows. The pump was tested in both vertical and horizontal orientations using a standard flow loop to demonstrate the performance and durability of the second generation LVAD. Steady state and transient orientation pump operating characteristics including pressure, flow, speed, temperatures, vibration, and rotor orientation were measured. During the tests, pump performance was mapped at several operating conditions including points above and below the nominal design of 5 L/min at 100 mm Hg pressure rise. Flow rates from 2 to 7 L/min and pressure rises from 50 to 150 mm Hg were measured. Pump speeds were varied during these tests from 2,500 to 3,500 rpm. The nominal design flow of 5 L/min at 100 mm Hg pressure rise was successfully achieved at the design speed of 3,000 rpm. After LVAD performance testing, both 28 day continuous duty and 5 day transient orientation durability tests were completed without incident. A hydrodynamic backup bearing design feasibility study was also conducted. Results from this design study indicate that an integral hydrodynamic backup bearing may be readily incorporated into the second generation LVAD and other magnetically levitated pump rotors. PMID:14655745

  7. An intraventricular axial flow blood pump integrated with a bearing purge system.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kormos, R; Mori, T; Umezu, M; Kameneva, M; Antaki, J; Outa, E; Litwak, P; Kerrigan, J; Tomczak, J

    1995-01-01

    The future development of implantable axial flow blood pumps must address two major issues: mechanically induced hemolysis and shaft seal reliability. The recent revisions to our miniature intraventricular axial flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) were aimed particularly at addressing these concerns. To improve hemocompatibility, a new impeller has been designed according to the following criteria: 1) gradual pressure rise along the blade chord; 2) minimized local fluid acceleration to prevent cavitation; 3) minimum surface roughness; and 4) radius edges. Subsequent in vitro hemolysis tests conducted with bovine and ovine blood have demonstrated very low hemolysis (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.0051 +/- 0.0047 g/100 L) with this new impeller design. To address the need for a reliable seal, we have developed a purged seal system consisting of a miniature lip seal and ceramic pressure groove journal bearing that also acts as a purge pump. Several spiral grooves formed on the bearing surface provide viscous pumping of the purge fluid, generating more than 3,000 mmHg at 10,000 rpm. This purge flow flushes the lip seal and prevents blood backflow into the bearing. We have found this purge pump to offer several advantages because it is simple, compact, durable, does not require separate actuation, and offers a wide range of flow, depending upon the groove design. In vivo animal tests demonstrated the potential of the purged seal system. PMID:8573818

  8. Coal pump development phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushida, R. O.; Sankur, V. D.; Gerbracht, F. G.; Mahajan, V.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for achieving continuous coal sprays were studied. Coazial injection with gas and pressure atomization were studied. Coal particles, upon cooling, were found to be porous and fragile. Reactivity tests on the extruded coal showed overall conversion to gases and liquids unchanged from that of the raw coal. The potentials for applications of the coal pump to eight coal conversion processes were examined.

  9. Study of a centrifugal blood pump in a mock loop system.

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Beatriz; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Leão, Tarcísio; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump (ICBP) is being developed to be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) in patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. The ICBP system is composed of a centrifugal pump, a motor, a controller, and a power supply. The electricity source provides power to the controller and to a motor that moves the pump's rotor through magnetic coupling. The centrifugal pump is composed of four parts: external conical house, external base, impeller, and impeller base. The rotor is supported by a pivot bearing system, and its impeller base is responsible for sheltering four permanent magnets. A hybrid cardiovascular simulator (HCS) was used to evaluate the ICBP's performance. A heart failure (HF) (when the heart increases beat frequency to compensate for decrease in blood flow) was simulated in the HCS. The main objective of this work is to analyze changes in physiological parameters such as cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate in three situations: healthy heart, HF, and HF with left circulatory assistance by ICBP. The results showed that parameters such as aortic pressure and cardiac output affected by the HF situation returned to normal values when the ICBP was connected to the HCS. In conclusion, the test results showed satisfactory performance for the ICBP as a VAD. PMID:24237361

  10. Development of the sonic pump levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype levitating/positioning device termed the Sonic Pump Levitator was designed, built and successfully tested in full gravity and in the reduced gravity of the parabolic flight regime of the KC-135. Positioning is achieved by timely and appropriate application of gas momentum from one or more of six sonic pumps. The sonic pumps, which are arranged orthogonally in opposed pairs about the levitation region, are activated by an electro-optical, computer controlled, feedback system. The sonic pump is a transducer which is capable of converting sound energy into a directed flow of gas. It consists of a loudspeaker whose face is sealed by a closure perforated by one or more orifices. The diaphragm of the loudspeaker is the only moving part of the sonic pump, no valves being needed. This very low inertia electromechanical device was developed to provide the short response time necessary to keep pace with the demands of computerized position keeping.

  11. New concepts and new design of permanent maglev rotary artificial heart blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y

    2006-05-01

    According to tradition, permanent maglev cannot achieve stable equilibrium. The authors have developed, to the contrary, two stable permanent maglev impeller blood pumps. The first pump is an axially driven uni-ventricular assist pump, in which the rotor with impeller is radially supported by two passive magnetic bearings, but has one point contact with the stator axially at standstill. As the pump raises its rotating speed, the increasing hydrodynamic force of fluid acting on the impeller will make the rotor taking off from contacting point and disaffiliate from the stator. Then the rotor becomes fully suspended. The second pump is a radially driven bi-ventricular assist pump, i.e., an impeller total artificial heart. Its rotor with two impellers on both ends is supported by two passive magnetic bearings, which counteract the attractive force between rotor magnets and stator coil iron core. The rotor is affiliated to the stator radially at standstill and becomes levitated during rotation. Therefore, the rotor keeps concentric with stator during rotation but eccentric at standstill, as is confirmed by rotor position detection with Honeywell sensors. It concludes that the permanent maglev needs action of a non-magnetic force to achieve stability but a rotating magnetic levitator with high speed and large inertia can maintain its stability merely with passive magnetic bearings. PMID:16183322

  12. Third-generation blood pumps with mechanical noncontact magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-05-01

    This article reviews third-generation blood pumps, focusing on the magnetic-levitation (maglev) system. The maglev system can be categorized into three types: (i) external motor-driven system, (ii) direct-drive motor-driven system, and (iii) self-bearing or bearingless motor system. In the external motor-driven system, Terumo (Ann Arbor, MI, U.S.A.) DuraHeart is an example where the impeller is levitated in the axial or z-direction. The disadvantage of this system is the mechanical wear in the mechanical bearings of the external motor. In the second system, the impeller is made into the rotor of the motor, and the magnetic flux, through the external stator, rotates the impeller, while the impeller levitation is maintained through another electromagnetic system. The Berlin Heart (Berlin, Germany) INCOR is the best example of this principle where one-axis control combination with hydrodynamic force achieves high performance. In the third system, the stator core is shared by the levitation and drive coil to make it as if the bearing does not exist. Levitronix CentriMag (Zürich, Switzerland), which appeared recently, employs this concept to achieve stable and safe operation of the extracorporeal system that can last for a duration of 14 days. Experimental systems including HeartMate III (Thoratec, Woburn, MA, U.S.A.), HeartQuest (WorldHeart, Ottawa, ON, Canada), MagneVAD (Gold Medical Technologies, Valhalla, NY, U.S.A.), MiTiHeart (MiTi Heart, Albany, NY, U.S.A.), Ibaraki University's Heart (Hitachi, Japan) and Tokyo Medical and Dental University/Tokyo Institute of Technology's disposable and implantable maglev blood pumps are also reviewed. In reference to second-generation blood pumps, such as the Jarvik 2000 (Jarvik Heart, New York, NY, U.S.A.), which is showing remarkable achievement, a question is raised whether a complicated system such as the maglev system is really needed. We should pay careful attention to future clinical outcomes of the ongoing clinical

  13. Fault-tolerant strategies for an implantable centrifugal blood pump using a radially controlled magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2011-10-01

    In our laboratory, an implantable centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a two degrees-of-freedom radially controlled magnetic bearing (MB) to support the impeller without contact has been developed to assist the pumping function of the weakened heart ventricle. In order to maintain the function of the CBP after damage to the electromagnets (EMs) of the MB, fault-tolerant strategies for the CBP are proposed in this study. Using a redundant MB design, magnetic levitation of the impeller was maintained with damage to up to two out of a total of four EMs of the MB; with damage to three EMs, contact-free support of the impeller was achieved using hydrodynamic and electromagnetic forces; and with damage to all four EMs, the pump operating point, of 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, was achieved using the motor for rotation of the impeller, with contact between the impeller and the stator. PMID:21382738

  14. Advanced heat pump research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliasha, M. A.

    The Office of Building Energy Research and Development of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has been funding R&D in advanced heat pumps and appliances since 1976. Much of that research has been managed for DOE by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the Building Equipment Research (BER) program at ORNL has been to generate new concepts and develop a technology base for improving the energy efficiency and load characteristics of energy conversion equipment used in residential and commercial buildings. The research being pursued to achieve these objectives falls under three general areas: thermally activated heat pumps (TAHP), refrigeration systems, and building equipment systems. The TAHP work is concentrated on three technologies: (1) absorption heat pumps; (2) Stirling engine-driven heat pumps; and (3) internal combustion (IC) engine-driven heat pumps. Major project areas in refrigeration systems research include electric heat pumps, ground-coupled heat pumps, and refigerant mixtures. In the building equipment systems areas, project areas include advanced distribution systems, advanced insulation for appliances, and commercial building equipment.

  15. Measurements of enlarged blood pump models using Laser Doppler Anemometer.

    PubMed

    Chua, L P; Yu, S C; Leo, H L

    2000-01-01

    In an earlier study (Chua et al., 1998, 1999a), a 5:1 enlarged model of the Kyoto-NTN Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Blood Pump (Akamatsu et al., 1995) with five different impeller blade profiles was designed and constructed. Their respective flow characteristics with respect to (1) the three different blade profile designs: forward, radial, and backward, (2) the number of blades used, and (3) the rotating speed were investigated. Among the five impeller designs, the results obtained suggested that impellers A and C designs should be adopted if higher head is required. Impellers A and C therefore were selected for the flow in between their blades to be measured using Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA), so as to have a better understanding of the flow physics with respect to the design parameters. PMID:10999377

  16. Shape optimization of the diffuser blade of an axial blood pump by computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lailai; Zhang, Xiwen; Yao, Zhaohui

    2010-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been a viable and effective way to predict hydraulic performance, flow field, and shear stress distribution within a blood pump. We developed an axial blood pump with CFD and carried out a CFD-based shape optimization of the diffuser blade to enhance pressure output and diminish backflow in the impeller-diffuser connecting region at a fixed design point. Our optimization combined a computer-aided design package, a mesh generator, and a CFD solver in an automation environment with process integration and optimization software. A genetic optimization algorithm was employed to find the pareto-optimal designs from which we could make trade-off decisions. Finally, a set of representative designs was analyzed and compared on the basis of the energy equation. The role of the inlet angle of the diffuser blade was analyzed, accompanied by its relationship with pressure output and backflow in the impeller-diffuser connecting region. PMID:20447042

  17. Electro-elastic modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric

    2004-07-01

    A dielectric elastomer diaphragm is to be designed for potential use in a prosthetic blood pump. Application of an electric field deforms the membrane such that it moves from an initially flat configuration to an inflated state. This motion creates positive displacement of blood from the cardiac chambers thus mimicking the pump-like behavior of the natural heart. A comprehensive large deformation model accounting for the combined dielectric and elastic effect has been formulated. This paper presents recent developments in the model to further incorporate the entire nonlinear range of material elastic behavior and to more accurately represent the applied electric field by keeping the voltage constant as the membrane thickness decreases. The updated model is used to calculate the effects of varying system parameters such as pressure, voltage, prestretch, material constants, and membrane geometry. Analytical results are obtained for biaxially stretched 3M VHB 4905 polyacrylate films.

  18. Comparison of a pulsatile blood pump and a peristaltic roller pump during hemoperfusion treatment in a canine model of paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Seong Wook; Kim, Jeong Chul; Lim, Ki Moo; Kim, Kyuseok; Jung, Sung Koo; Kwak, Young Ho; Shin, Sang Do; Jo, Ik Joon; Suh, Gil Joon; Min, Byoung Goo

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the treatment efficacy and the damage to the blood during hemoperfusion for treating paraquat poisoning using two blood pump mechanisms. Paraquat-poisoned animal models were prepared. A conventional hemodialysis machine, AK90, with a peristaltic roller pump and a cardiopulmonary support system, T-PLS, with a pulsatile blood pump were used during the animal experiments. A total of 12 dogs were treated with hemoperfusion using a charcoal column. Six dogs were treated with hemoperfusion and T-PLS, and the other six were treated with AK90. A paraquat dose of 30 mg/kg was administrated by an intravenous injection. Both pumps maintained blood flow rates of 125 mL/min measured by an ultrasonic flowmeter. For anticoagulation, heparin was administrated by an initial bolus (250 IU/kg) and a continuous injection (100 IU/kg/h). During the experiments, T-PLS and AK90 showed a similar toxin removal efficacy. Both devices decreased the plasma paraquat concentration to 10% of the initial dose within 4-h hemoperfusion. The two pumps showed similar hemolysis properties with acceptable levels. Although T-PLS was developed as a cardiopulmonary bypass system, it can also be used as a hemoperfusion treatment device. PMID:18638308

  19. Survey of advanced-heat-pump developments for space conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of heat pump projects with special emphasis on those supported by DOE, EPRI, and the Gas Research Institute is presented. Some historical notes on heat pump development are discussed. Market and equipment trends, well water and ground-coupled heat pumps, heat-actuated heat pump development, and international interest in heat pumps are also discussed. 30 references.

  20. In vivo experimental testing of the FW axial blood pump for left ventricular support in Fu Wai Hospital.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Hu, Sheng-Shou; Zhou, Jian-Ye; Sun, Han-Song; Tang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Zhe; Li, Guo-Rong; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Gui, Xin-Min

    2009-01-01

    A fully implantable, axial flow blood pump has been developed in Fu Wai Hospital aiming for clinical use. This ventricular assist device (VAD), which was developed after numerous CFD analyses for the flow characteristics of the pump, is 58.5-mm long, 30-mm wide (including DC motor), and weighs 240 g. The pump can deliver 5 L/min for pressures of 100 mm Hg over 8,000 rpm. In this study, short-term hemocompatibility effects of the axial left ventricular assist device (LVAD) (FW blood pump) were evaluated in four healthy sheep. The device was implanted into the left ventricular apex of beating hearts. The outflow graft of each device was anastomosed to the descending aorta. The hemolysis, which was evaluated in vivo by free hemoglobin value, was below 30 mg/dL. Evaluation of serum biochemical data showed that implantation of the FW blood pump in sheep with normal hearts did not impair end organ function. Gross and microscopic sections of kidney, liver, and lung revealed no evidence of microemboli. Performance of the pump in vivo was considered sufficient for a LVAD, although further design improvement is necessary in terms of hemolysis and antithrombosis to improve biocompatibility of the pump. PMID:19092667

  1. Concept for a new hydrodynamic blood bearing for miniature blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Kink, Thomas; Reul, Helmut

    2004-10-01

    The most crucial element of a long-term implantable rotary blood pump is the rotor bearing. Because of heat generation and power loss resulting from friction, seals within the devices have to be avoided. Actively controlled magnetic bearings, although maintenance-free, increase the degree of complexity. Hydrodynamic bearings for magnetically coupled rotors may offer an alternative solution to this problem. Additionally, for miniature pumps, the load capacity of hydrodynamic bearings scales slower than that of, for example, magnetic bearings because of the cube-square-law. A special kind of hydrodynamic bearing is a spiral groove bearing (SGB), which features an excellent load capacity. Mock-loop tests showed that SGBs do not influence the hydraulic performance of the tested pumps. Although, as of now, the power consumption of the SBG is higher than for a mechanical pivot bearing, it is absolutely contact-free and has an unlimited lifetime. The liftoff of the rotor occurs already at 10% of design speed. Further tests and flow visualization studies on scaled-up models must demonstrate its overall blood compatibility. PMID:15384998

  2. Centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices with low priming and ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Fonseca, Jeison; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    A new model of centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices has been developed and evaluated. The design of the device is based on centrifugal pumping principles and the usage of ceramic bearings, resulting in a pump with reduced priming (35 ± 2 mL) that can be applied for up to 30 days. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is an efficient tool to optimize flow path geometry, maximize hydraulic performance, and minimize shear stress, consequently decreasing hemolysis. Initial studies were conducted by analyzing flow behavior with different impellers, aiming to determine the best impeller design. After CFD studies, rapid prototyping technology was used for production of pump prototypes with three different impellers. In vitro experiments were performed with those prototypes, using a mock loop system composed of Tygon tubes, oxygenator, digital flow meter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control, filled with a solution (1/3 water, 1/3 glycerin, 1/3 alcohol) simulating blood viscosity and density. Flow-versus-pressure curves were obtained for rotational speeds of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. As the next step, the CFD analysis and hydrodynamic performance results will be compared with the results of flow visualization studies and hemolysis tests. PMID:24219168

  3. A new design for a compact centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated rotor.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump has been developed using a radial magnetic bearing with a two-degree of freedom active control. The proposed magnetic bearing exhibits high stiffness, even in passively controlled directions, and low power consumption because a permanent magnet, incorporated with the rotor, suspends its weight. The rotor is driven by a Lorentz force type of built-in motor, avoiding mechanical friction and material wear. The built-in motor is designed to generate only rotational torque, without radial and axial attractive forces on the rotor, leading to low power consumption by the magnetic bearing. The fabricated centrifugal pump measured 65 mm in diameter and 45 mm in height and weighed 0.36 kg. In the closed loop circuit filled with water, the pump provided a flow rate of 4.5 L/min at 2,400 rpm against a pressure head of 100 mm Hg. Total power consumption at that point was 18 W, including 2 W required for magnetic levitation, with a total efficiency of 5.7%. The experimental results showed that the design of the compact magnetic bearing was feasible and effective for use in a centrifugal blood pump. PMID:15672787

  4. Pulsatile blood pump with a linear drive actuator.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Homma, Akihiko; Funakubo, Akio; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Soichiro; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an implantable direct-electromagnetic left ventricular assist system driven by a linear actuator (linear LVAS). The linear LVAS is a pulsatile pump with a pusher plate that is driven directly by a linear oscillatory actuator (LOA) without any movement converters. This prototype pump unit with a LOA was 100 mm in diameter, 50 mm in thickness, and weighed 740 g. The full-fill/full-eject driving method was applied to the control algorithm. In addition, a mechanism to detect and release sucking was realized to overcome this problem that accompanies the active-filling type of VAS. The performance of the linear LVAS was evaluated in a long-term animal experiment using a goat (56 kg). The goat survived for 42 days. The reason why we terminated this experiment was that thrombus was found in the pump. There was no frictional debris found around the LOA. The linear LVAS did not exhibit electrical or mechanical problems during the first animal experiment. PMID:17574509

  5. Infusion pump development and implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    Infusion pumps are commonplace in today's healthcare settings and their design and development has kept pace with technology over the decades. In the 1970s and 1980s infusion pumps began to emerge in the UK market and were basic, mechanical devices with limited functions. Today, infusion pumps have a plethora of functions and features and a range of alarms to help alert the user and the patient that infusions are nearing completion, have ended or their range of sensors has detected that the infusion pump, or patient, requires attention. The role of the nurse in safely managing this ever-changing technology should not be underestimated. This paper reviews the progress made over the past 40 years in the UK healthcare setting and how the nurses have had to keep up to speed with the technology as it develops. It highlights the importance of fully integrating infusion pumps into intravenous (IV) therapy training and assessment. The important role the nurse plays is highlighted as well as exploring how he or she can help organisations better understand infusion pumps in the day-to-day management of patients undergoing intravenous therapy. PMID:26496875

  6. Minimal sensor count approach to fuzzy logic rotary blood pump flow control.

    PubMed

    Casas, Fernando; Ahmed, Nisar; Reeves, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    A rotary blood pump fuzzy logic flow controller without flow sensors was developed and tested in vitro. The controller, implemented in LabView, was set to maintain a flow set point in the presence of external pressure disturbances. Flow was estimated as a function of measured pump's delta P and speed, using a steady-state, nonlinear approximation. The fuzzy controller used the pump's flow estimate and delta P as feedback variables. The defuzzified control output manipulated the pump speed. Membership functions included flow error, delta P, and pump speed. Experimental runs in a mock loop (water/glycerin 3.5 cPs, 37 degrees C), using the estimated flow, were compared with those using a Transonic flow meter for nine conditions of flow and delta P (4 to 6 L/min, 150 to 350 mm Hg). Pressure disturbances generated by a servo pinch valve ranged from +/-23 to +/-47 mm Hg. Results indicated that the fuzzy controller ably regulated the flow set point to within +/-10% of the baseline even under large swings in pressure. There was no difference in controller performance between the ultrasonic flow measurement and the estimated flow calculation scenarios. These tests demonstrated that the fuzzy controller is capable of rejecting disturbances and regulating flow to acceptable limits while using a flow estimate. PMID:17413551

  7. Numerical investigation of the effect of blade geometry on blood trauma in a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chan, W K; Wong, Y W; Ding, Y; Chua, L P; Yu, S C M

    2002-09-01

    Fluid dynamic forces in centrifugal blood pump impellers are of key importance in destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) because high rotational speed leads to strong interaction between the impeller and the RBCs. In this paper, three-dimensional models of five different blade geometries are investigated numerically using the commercial software CFX-TASCflow, and the streaklines of RBCs are obtained using the Lagrangian particle tracking method. In reality, RBCs pass through the pump along complicated paths resulting in a highly irregular loading condition for each RBC. In order to enable the prediction of blood damage under the action of these complex-loading conditions, a cumulative damage model for RBCs was adopted in this paper. The numerically simulated percent hemoglobin (%HB) released as RBCs traversed the impeller and volute was examined. It was observed that the residence time of particles in the blade passage is a critical factor in determining hemolytic effects. This, in turn, is a function of the blade geometry. In addition, it was observed that the volute profile is an important influence on the computed HB% released. PMID:12197935

  8. A cost-effective extracorporeal magnetically-levitated centrifugal blood pump employing a disposable magnet-free impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, W; Mamiya, T; Shinshi, T; Takatani, S

    2011-12-01

    In the field of rotary blood pumps, contactless support of the impeller by a magnetic bearing has been identified as a promising method to reduce blood damage and enhance durability. The authors developed a two-degrees-of-freedom radial controlled magnetic bearing system without a permanent magnet in the impeller in order that a low-cost disposable pump-head for an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump could be manufactured more easily. Stable levitation and contactless rotation of the 'magnet-free' impeller were realized for a prototype blood-pump that made use of this magnetic bearing. The run-out of the impeller position at between 1000 r/min and 3000 r/min was less than 40 microm in the radial-controlled directions. The total power consumption of the magnetic bearing was less than 1 W at the same rotational speeds. When the pump was operated, a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 78.66 kPa was achieved at a rotational speed of 4000 r/min, which is sufficient for extracorporeal circulation support. The proposed technology offers the advantage of low-cost mass production of disposable pump heads. PMID:22320054

  9. Automatic system for noninvasive blood pressure determination in rotary pump recipients.

    PubMed

    Schima, Heinrich; Boehm, Herbert; Huber, Leopold; Schmallegger, Helmut; Vollkron, Michael; Hiesmayr, Michael; Noisser, Robert; Wieselthaler, Georg

    2004-05-01

    In patients with implanted rotary pumps, the arterial pressure pulsatility is usually far lower than in normal individuals. Depending on the remaining degree of pulsatility, cuff-based systems such as the classical Riva-Rocci-determination of arterial blood pressure and correlated sounds or pressure measurements based on cuffpressure oscillations become inaccurate or even impossible. Therefore, a system was developed which evaluates the flow in the radial artery using an ultrasound wristwatch sensor, and this additional information is used for pressure determination. A computerized data acquisition and cuff-control system based on a PC using Matlab software, a wristwatch ultrasound device, and a compressor-driven pressure cuff was set up. The cuff was controlled for automatic inflation and deflation cycles. Cuff pressure and arterial flow was recorded. Several algorithm strategies were developed, which gave data for systolic blood pressure and heart rate together with a reliability index for data quality. Finally, the new algorithms were implemented in a microcontroller system. Comparisons with invasive measurements showed excellent correlation with systolic blood pressure (mean deltaP -0.3 mm Hg, n = 28). During exercise of rotary pump patients and therefore enhanced pulsatility the difference from manual evaluation was -2.1 mm Hg (n = 18). In conclusion, adaptation of the classical cuff-pressure method with ultrasound evaluation of peripheral flow allows reliable determination of blood pressure in patients with low pulsatility resulting from implanted rotary cardiac assist pumps. By development of a wristwatch sensor and an automatic control system a robust method for daily use could be developed. PMID:15113339

  10. The effects of residual pump blood on patient plasma free haemoglobin levels post cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    H, Schotola; Aj, Wetz; Af, Popov; I, Bergmann; Bc, Danner; Fa, Schöndube; M, Bauer; A, Bräuer

    2016-09-01

    At the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, there are invariably several hundred millilitres of residual pump blood in the reservoir, which can either be re-transfused or discarded. The objective of this prospective observational study was to investigate the quality of the residual pump blood, focusing on plasma free haemoglobin (pfHb) and blood cell counts. Fifty-one consecutive patients were included in the study. Forty-nine units of residual pump blood and 58 units of transfused red blood cell (RBC) concentrates were analysed. The mean preoperative pfHb of the patients was 0.057 ± 0.062 g/l, which increased gradually to 0.55 ± 0.36 g/l on arrival in the intensive care unit postoperatively. On the first postoperative day, the mean pfHb had returned to within the normal range. Our data showed that haemoglobin, haematocrit, and erythrocyte counts of residual pump blood were approximately 40% of the values in standardised RBC concentrates. Plasma free haemoglobin was significantly higher in residual pump blood compared to RBC concentrates, and nearly twice as high as the pfHb in patient blood samples taken contemporaneously. Our findings indicate that residual pump blood pfHb levels are markedly higher compared to patients' blood and RBC concentrates, but that its administration does not significantly increase patients' pfHb levels. PMID:27608341

  11. Mechanical cavopulmonary assist for the univentricular Fontan circulation using a novel folding propeller blood pump.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Ballman, Kimberly K; Myers, Cynthia D; Litwak, Kenneth N; Frankel, Steven H; Rodefeld, Mark D

    2007-01-01

    A blood pump specifically designed to operate in the unique anatomic and physiologic conditions of a cavopulmonary connection has never been developed. Mechanical augmentation of cavopulmonary blood flow in a univentricular circulation would reduce systemic venous pressure, increase preload to the single ventricle, and temporarily reproduce a scenario analogous to the normal two-ventricle circulation. We hypothesize that a folding propeller blood pump would function optimally in this cavopulmonary circulation. The hydraulic performance of a two-bladed propeller prototype was characterized in an experimental flow loop using a blood analog fluid for 0.5-3.5 lpm at rotational speeds of 3,600-4,000 rpm. We also created five distinctive blood pump designs and evaluated their hydraulic performance using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The two-bladed prototype performed well over the design range of 0.5-3.5 lpm, producing physiologic pressure rises of 5-18 mm Hg. Building upon this proof-of-concept testing, the CFD analysis of the five numerical models predicted a physiologic pressure range of 5-40 mm Hg over 0.5-4 lpm for rotational speeds of 3,000-7,000 rpm. These preliminary propeller designs and the two-bladed prototype achieved the expected hydraulic performance. Optimization of these configurations will reduce fluid stress levels, remove regions of recirculation, and improve the hydraulic performance of the folding propeller. This propeller design produces the physiologic pressures and flows that are in the ideal range to mechanically support the cavopulmonary circulation and represents an exciting new therapeutic option for the support of a univentricular Fontan circulation. PMID:18043158

  12. Noninvasive blood-flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Fukuda, Kyohei; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In order to monitor the condition of a patient using a left ventricular assist system (LVAS), blood flow should be measured. However, the reliable determination of blood-flow rate has not been established. The purpose of the present study is to develop a noninvasive blood-flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation for an axial flow blood pump. The flow meter uses the centrifugal force generated by the flow rate in the curved cannula. Two strain gauges served as sensors. The first gauges were attached to the curved area to measure static pressure and centrifugal force, and the second gauges were attached to straight area to measure static pressure. The flow rate was determined by the differences in output from the two gauges. The zero compensation was constructed based on the consideration that the flow rate could be estimated during the initial driving condition and the ventricular suction condition without using the flow meter. A mock circulation loop was constructed in order to evaluate the measurement performance of the developed flow meter with zero compensation. As a result, the zero compensation worked effectively for the initial calibration and the zero-drift of the measured flow rate. We confirmed that the developed flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation was able to accurately measure the flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:24110631

  13. Development of a centrifugal pump with thick blades.

    PubMed

    Kim, W G; Chung, C H; Yang, W S; Park, Y N; Kim, H I; Kim, H C; Kang, S H

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a centrifugal blood pump with thick impeller blades (60% of pitch) to obtain a small tip clearance. An unshrouded impeller with 6 backward curved thick blades was used to reduce the dead zone between the shroud and upper casing. A streamline angle in volute was uniform in circumferential direction by continuity and angular momentum conservation. To prove the effectiveness of small tip clearance, performance and hemolysis tests were conducted on pumps with a tip clearance of 0.5, 1.5, and 2.0 mm at exit with the blade thickness of 60% of pitch, and with that of 1.0, 2.0, and 2.5 mm at exit with the thickness of 40% of pitch. The results showed that the smaller the tip clearance, the better the hydrodynamic and hemolytic performance. The best result was seen in the pump with tip clearance of 0.5 mm with a blade thickness of 60% of pitch. These results suggest that a centrifugal pump with thick blades and a small tip clearance can be a promising alternative as a cardiopulmonary bypass pump. PMID:10718771

  14. Rotary blood pump control strategy for preventing left ventricular suction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    The risk for left ventricular (LV) suction while maintaining adequate perfusion over a range of physiologic conditions during continuous flow LV assist device (LVAD) support is a significant clinical concern. To address this challenge, we developed a suction prevention and physiologic control (SPPC) algorithm for use with axial and centrifugal LVADs. The SPPC algorithm uses two gain-scheduled, proportional-integral controllers that maintain a differential pump speed (ΔRPM) above a user-defined threshold to prevent LV suction, while maintaining an average reference differential pressure (ΔP) between the LV and aorta to provide physiologic perfusion. Efficacy and robustness of the proposed algorithm were evaluated in silico during simulated rest and exercise test conditions for (1) ΔP/ΔRPM excessive setpoint (ES); (2) rapid eightfold increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR); and (3) ES and PVR. Hemodynamic waveforms (LV pressure and volume; aortic pressure and flow) were simulated and analyzed to identify suction event(s), quantify total flow output (pump + cardiac output), and characterize the performance of the SPPC algorithm. The results demonstrated that the proposed SPPC algorithm prevented LV suction while maintaining physiologic perfusion for all simulated test conditions, and warrants further investigation in vivo. PMID:25248043

  15. Computational flow study of the continuous flow ventricular assist device, prototype number 3 blood pump.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J B; Wood, H G; Allaire, P E; Bearnson, G; Khanwilkar, P

    2000-05-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of blood flow in the continuous flow ventricular assist device, Prototype No. 3 (CFVAD3), which consists of a 4 blade shrouded impeller fully supported in magnetic bearings, was performed. This study focused on the regions within the pump where return flow occurs to the pump inlet, and where potentially damaging shear stresses and flow stagnation might occur: the impeller blade passages and the narrow gap clearance regions between the impeller-rotor and pump housing. Two separate geometry models define the spacing between the pump housing and the impeller's hub and shroud, and a third geometry model defines the pump's impeller and curved blades. The flow fields in these regions were calculated for various operating conditions of the pump. Pump performance curves were calculated, which compare well with experimentally obtained data. For all pump operating conditions, the flow rates within the gap regions were predicted to be toward the inlet of the pump, thus recirculating a portion of the impeller flow. Two smaller gap clearance regions were numerically examined to reduce the recirculation and to improve pump efficiency. The computational and geometry models will be used in future studies of a smaller pump to determine increased pump efficiency and the risk of hemolysis due to shear stress, and to insure the washing of blood through the clearance regions to prevent thrombosis. PMID:10848679

  16. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  17. A compact highly efficient and low hemolytic centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated impeller.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2006-03-01

    A magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP), intended for use as a ventricular assist device, needs to be highly durable and reliable for long-term use without any mechanical failure. Furthermore, maglev CBPs should be small enough to be implanted into patients of various size and weight. We have developed a compact maglev CBP employing a two-degree-of-freedom controlled magnetic bearing, with a magnetically suspended impeller directly driven by an internal brushless direct current (DC) motor. The magnetic bearing actively controls the radial motion of the impeller and passively supports axial and angular motions using a permanent magnet embedded in the impeller. The overall dimensions of the maglev CBP are 65 mm in diameter and 40 mm in height. The total power consumption and pump efficiency for pumping 6 L/min against a head pressure of 105 mm Hg were 6.5 W and 21%, respectively. To evaluate the characteristics of the maglev CBP when subjected to a disturbance, excitation of the base, simulating the movement of the patient in various directions, and the sudden interception of the outlet tube connected with the pump in a mock circulatory loop, simulating an unexpected kink and emergent clamp during a heart surgery, were tested by monitoring the five-degree-of-freedom motion of the impeller. Furthermore, the hemolytic characteristics of the maglev CBP were compared with those of the Medtronic Biomedicus BPX-80, which demonstrated the superiority of the maglev CBP. PMID:16480390

  18. [Numerical assessment of impeller features of centrifugal blood pump based on fast hemolysis approximation model].

    PubMed

    Shou, Chen; Guo, Yongjun; Su, Lei; Li, Yongqian

    2014-12-01

    The impeller profile, which is one of the most important factors, determines the creation of shear stress which leads to blood hemolysis in the internal flow of centrifugal blood pump. The investigation of the internal flow field in centrifugal blood pump and the estimation of the hemolysis within different impeller profiles will provide information to improve the performance of centrifugal blood pump. The SST kappa-omega with low Reynolds correction was used in our laboratory to study the internal flow fields for four kinds of impellers of centrifugal blood pump. The flow fields included distributions of pressure field, velocity field and shear stress field. In addition, a fast numerical hemolysis approximation was adopted to calculate the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH). The results indicated that the pressure field distribution in all kinds of blood pump were reasonable, but for the log spiral impeller pump, the vortex and backflow were much lower than those of the other pumps, and the high shear stress zone was just about 0.004%, and the NIH was 0.0089. PMID:25868241

  19. Magnetic drive system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Andrew; Tansley, Geoff

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to design a novel magnetic drive and bearing system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP). The drive system consists of two components: (i) permanent magnets within the impeller of the CRBP; and (ii) the driving electromagnets. Orientation of the magnets varies from axial through to 60 degrees included out-lean (conical configuration). Permanent magnets replace the electromagnet drive to allow easier characterization. The performance characteristics tested were the axial force of attraction between the stator and rotor at angles of rotational alignment, Ø, and the corresponding torque at those angles. The drive components were tested for various magnetic cone angles, theta. The test was repeated for three backing conditions: (i) non-backed; (ii) steel-cupped; and (iii) steel plate back-iron, performed on an Instron tensile testing machine. Experimental results were expanded upon through finite element and boundary element analysis (BEM). The force/torque characteristics were maximal for a 12-magnet configuration at 0 degree cone angle with steel-back iron (axial force = 60 N, torque = 0.375 Nm). BEM showed how introducing a cone angle increases the radial restoring force threefold while not compromising axial bearing force. Magnets in the drive system may be orientated not only to provide adequate coupling to drive the CRBP, but to provide significant axial and radial bearing forces capable of withstanding over 100 m/s(2) shock excitation on the impeller. Although the 12 magnet 0 degree (theta) configuration yielded the greatest force/torque characteristic, this was seen as potentially unattractive as this magnetic cone angle yielded poor radial restoring force characteristics. PMID:18959665

  20. Inducer analysis/pump model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.

    1994-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design information in a productive manner. The main goal of this study was to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes an extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving zonal interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. In the present study, three key components of the turbopump, the inducer, impeller, and diffuser, were investigated by the proposed pump model, and the numerical results were benchmarked by the experimental data provided by Rocketdyne. For the numerical calculation of inducer flows with tip clearance, the turbulence model and grid spacing are very important. Meanwhile, the development of the cross-stream secondary flow, generated by curved blade passage and the flow through tip leakage, has a strong effect on the inducer flow. Hence, the prediction of the inducer performance critically depends on whether the numerical scheme of the pump model can simulate the secondary flow pattern accurately or not. The impeller and diffuser, however, are dominated by pressure-driven flows such that the effects of turbulence model and grid spacing (except near leading and trailing edges of blades) are less sensitive. The present CFD pump model has been proved to be an efficient and robust analytical tool for pump design due to its very compact numerical structure (requiring small memory), fast turnaround computing time, and versatility for different geometries.

  1. Recent Development in Hydrogen Peroxide Pumped Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A G; Antelman, D R; Dobie, D W; Gorman, T S; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; McMahon, D H; Ng, L C; Nielsen, D P; Ormsby, A E; Pittenger, L C; Robinson, J A; Skulina, K M; Taylor, W G; Urone, D A; Wilson, B A

    2004-03-22

    This paper describes the development of a lightweight high performance pump-fed divert and attitude control system (DACS). Increased kinetic Kill Vehicles (KV) capabilities (higher .v and acceleration capability) will especially be needed for boost phase engagements where a lower mass KV DACS enables smaller overall interceptors. To increase KV performance while reducing the total DACS dry mass (<10 kg), requires a design approach that more closely emulates those found in large launch vehicles, where pump-fed propulsion enables high propellant-mass-fraction systems. Miniaturized reciprocating pumps, on a scale compatible with KV applications, offer the potential of a lightweight DACS with both high {Delta}v and acceleration capability, while still enabling the rapid pulsing of the divert thrusters needed in the end-game fly-in. Pumped propulsion uses lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks, as the main vehicle structure and eliminates the need for high-pressure gas bottles, reducing mass and increasing the relative propellant load. Prior work used hydrazine and demonstrated a propellant mass fraction >0.8 and a vehicle propulsion dry mass of {approx}3 kg. Our current approach uses the non-toxic propellants 90% hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. This approach enables faster development at lower costs due to the ease of handling. In operational systems these non-toxic propellants can simplify the logistics for manned environments including shipboard applications. This DACS design configuration is expected to achieve sufficient mass flows to support divert thrusters in the 1200 N to 1330 N (270 lbf to 300 lbf) range. The DACS design incorporates two pairs of reciprocating differential piston pumps (oxidizer and fuel), a warm-gas drive system, compatible bi-propellant thrusters, lightweight valves, and lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks. This paper summarizes the current development status and plans.

  2. Sensorless Viscosity Measurement in a Magnetically-Levitated Rotary Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Rao, Jun; Abe, Shodai; Takatani, Setsuo; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2015-07-01

    Controlling the flow rate in an implantable rotary blood pump based on the physiological demand made by the body is important. Even though various methods to estimate the flow rate without using a flow meter have been proposed, no adequate method for measuring the blood viscosity, which is necessary for an accurate estimate of the flow rate, without using additional sensors or mechanisms in a noninvasive way, has yet been realized. We have developed a sensorless method for measuring viscosity in magnetically levitated rotary blood pumps, which requires no additional sensors or mechanisms. By applying vibrational excitation to the impeller using a magnetic bearing, we measured the viscosity of the working fluid by measuring the phase difference between the current in the magnetic bearing and the displacement of the impeller. The measured viscosity showed a high correlation (R(2)  > 0.992) with respect to a reference viscosity. The mean absolute deviation of the measured viscosity was 0.12 mPa·s for several working fluids with viscosities ranging from 1.18 to 5.12 mPa·s. The proposed sensorless measurement method has the possibility of being utilized for estimating flow rate. PMID:25920684

  3. Development of a simulated smart pump interface.

    PubMed

    Elias, Beth L; Moss, Jacqueline A; Shih, Alan; Dillavou, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Medical device user interfaces are increasingly complex, resulting in a need for evaluation in clinicallyaccurate settings. Simulation of these interfaces can allow for evaluation, training, and use for research without the risk of harming patients and with a significant cost reduction over using the actual medical devices. This pilot project was phase 1 of a study to define and evaluate a methodology for development of simulated medical device interface technology to be used for education, device development, and research. Digital video and audio recordings of interface interactions were analyzed to develop a model of a smart intravenous medication infusion pump user interface. This model was used to program a high-fidelity simulated smart intravenous medication infusion pump user interface on an inexpensive netbook platform. PMID:24189715

  4. In vitro testing of a novel blood pump designed for temporary extracorporeal support.

    PubMed

    Spurlock, David J; Ranney, David N; Fracz, Emilia M; Mazur, Daniel E; Bartlet, R H; Haft, Jonathan W

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal blood pumps are used as temporary ventricular assist devices or for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The ideal pump would be intrinsically self-regulating, carry no risk of cavitation or excessive inlet suction, be afterload insensitive, and valveless thus reducing thrombogenicity. Currently used technology, including roller, centrifugal, and pneumatic pulsatile pumps, does not meet these requirements. We studied a nonocclusive peristaltic pump (M-Pump) in two mock circulatory loops and compared the performance to a frequently used centrifugal pump and a modified prototype of the M-Pump (the BioVAD). The simple resistance loop consisted of the investigated pump, a fixed height reservoir at 150 mm Hg, and a variable inflow reservoir. The pulsatile circulation used a mock patient simulator with adjustable resistance elements connected to a pneumatic pulsatile pump. The M-Pump intrinsically regulated flow with changing preload, was afterload insensitive, and did not cavitate, unlike the centrifugal pump. The BioVAD also demonstrated these features and could augment output with the use of vacuum assistance. A nonocclusive peristaltic pump may be superior for short-term extracorporeal circulatory assist by mitigating risks of excessive inlet suction, afterload sensitivity, and thrombosis. PMID:22236624

  5. In Vitro Testing of a Novel Blood Pump Designed for Temporary Extracorporeal Support

    PubMed Central

    Spurlock, DJ; Ranney, DN; Fracz, E; Mazur, DE; Bartlett, RH; Haft, JW

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal blood pumps are used as temporary ventricular assist devices or for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The ideal pump would be intrinsically self-regulating, carry no risk of cavitation or excessive inlet suction, be afterload insensitive, and valveless thus reducing thrombogenicity. Currently used technology, including roller, centrifugal, and pneumatic pulsatile pumps, does not meet these requirements. We studied a non-occlusive peristaltic pump (M-Pump) in two mock circulatory loops, and compared the performance to a frequently used centrifugal pump and a modified prototype of the M-Pump (the BioVAD). The simple resistance loop consisted of the investigated pump, a fixed height reservoir at 150 mmHg, and a variable inflow reservoir. The pulsatile circulation utilized a mock patient simulator with adjustable resistance elements connected to a pneumatic pulsatile pump. The M-Pump intrinsically regulated flow with changing preload, was afterload insensitive, and did not cavitate, unlike the centrifugal pump. The BioVAD also demonstrated these features, and could augment output with use of vacuum assistance. A non-occlusive peristaltic pump may be superior for short term extracorporeal circulatory assist by mitigating risks of excessive inlet suction, afterload sensitivity, and thrombosis. PMID:22236624

  6. Elementary theory of synchronous arterio-arterial blood pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.; Petscheck, H. E.; Kantrowitz, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    In the technique of arterio-arterial pumping, a volume of fluid is withdrawn from the aorta during systole and reinjected during diastole, thereby reducing the systolic pressure of the heart and adding energy to the systemic circulation. It is found that an upper bound for the effectiveness of such devices is given by a formula that considers stroke output of the unaided heart and the increment caused by the pump with a stroke. The division of effort of the pump between the reduction of pressure and the increase of flow depends on the physiological mechanical impedance of the heart. The total effect is, however, independent of the impedance.

  7. Numerical study of a centrifugal blood pump with different impeller profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the Kyoto-NTN magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with 16 forward-bending blades (16FB), 16 straight blades (16SB), and eight backward-bending blades (8BB) impellers were performed in this study. Commercial CFD software package FLUENT were used as the solver. The purpose of this study is to find out how the impeller blade profiles affect the inner flow and the performance of the centrifugal blood pump. The simulations were carried out with the same impeller rotating speed of 2,000 rpm and pump flow rate of 5 L/min to compare the three pump models. It was found that the 16SB impeller can produce higher pressure head than the 16FB and 8BB impellers under the same impeller rotating speed and pump flow rate. The flow particle tracing was carried out to estimate the blood damage level caused by the three different impeller profiles. It was found that the 16FB and 8BB models have caused the highest and lowest blood damage, respectively. The 16SB is recommended among the three pumps because it can generate the highest pressure head and induce mild blood damage index, although it was higher than that of the 8BB model. PMID:20019595

  8. Design and parameter estimation of hybrid magnetic bearings for blood pump applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng; Yang, Juanjuan; Cheng, Shanbao; Low, Sze Hsien; Chua, Leok Poh; Wu, Xiaowei

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses the design and parameter estimation of the dynamics characteristics of a high-speed hybrid magnetic bearings (HMBs) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet (PM) brushless and sensorless DC motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five-degree-of-freedom with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers; among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. Test results show that the rotor can be stably supported to speeds of 14,000 rpm. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMBs system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air—in both the radial and axial directions. The radial stiffness of the HMBs is compared to the Ansoft's Maxwell 2D/3D finite element magnetostatic results. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamics characteristics of the HMBs system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamics properties under normal operating conditions with fluid.

  9. Development of a centrifugal pump with improved antithrombogenicity and hemolytic property for chronic circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Taenaka, Y; Wakisaka, Y; Masuzawa, T; Tatsumi, E; Toda, K; Miyazaki, K; Eya, K; Baba, Y; Nakatani, T; Ohno, T; Nishimura, T; Takano, H

    1996-06-01

    A centrifugal pump with a unique structure has been developed for chronic support. The pump is driven by a magnetic coupling and has no rotating shaft, no seal around the rotating part, and a balancing hole at the center of the impeller and the thrust bearing. The pump was improved in stepwise fashion to realize good antithrombogenicity and low hemolysis. The first pump, the National Cardiovascular Center (NCVC)-0, had an impeller with 4 rectangular and curved vanes; 6 triangularly shaped curved vanes were employed in the second model, the NCVC-1, to reduce trauma to the blood. In the third design, the NCVC-2, the central hole was enlarged, and the thrust bearing shoulder was rounded so that blood washing was enhanced around the impeller; stream lines also were smoothed for improved antithrombogenicity. The hemolytic property of the device was evaluated in vitro with heparinized fresh goat blood; hemolysis indexes of the NCVC-0, -1, and -2 were 0.05, 0.01, and 0.006 g per 100 L, respectively. Antithrombogenicity of the pumps was examined in animal experiments as a left heart bypass device in goals weighing 52-75 kg. Six NCVC-0 pumps were driven for 14 to 33 (22.0 +/- 7.6) days in goats receiving the antiplatelet drug cilostazol orally. Four NCVC-1 pumps ran for 1 to 80 (28.5 +/- 30.6) days with the same drug regimen in 2 cases and with no anticoagulation therapy in 2 cases. After 3 preliminary 1-week tests of NCVC-2 pumps in animals, the pump was installed in 3 goats; 2 pumps were still running on the 182nd and 58th pumping day. Intracorporeal implantation also was attempted successfully. The results indicate that this pump has promising features for chronic support although longer term and additional evaluations are necessary. PMID:8817945

  10. Development of an algorithm to regulate pump output for a closed air-loop type pneumatic biventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Lee, Jung Joo; Hwang, Chang Mo; Choi, Jaesoon; Choi, Hyuk; Choi, Seong Wook; Sun, Kyung

    2009-12-01

    The closed air space-type of extracorporeal pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD) developed by the Korea Artificial Organ Center utilizes a bellows-transforming mechanism to generate the air pressure required to pump blood. This operating mechanism can reduce the size and weight of the driving unit; however, the output of the blood pump can be affected by the pressure loading conditions of the blood sac. Therefore, to guarantee a proper pump output level, regardless of the pressure loading conditions that vary over time, automatic pump output regulation of the blood pump is required. We describe herein a pump output regulation algorithm that was developed to maintain pump output around a reference level against various afterload pressures, and verified the pump performance in vitro. Based on actual operating conditions in animal experiments, the pumping rate was limited to 40-84 beats per minute, and the afterload pressure was limited to 80-150 mm Hg. The tested reference pump output was 4.0 L/min. During experiments, the pump output was successfully and automatically regulated within the preset area regardless of the varying afterload conditions. The results of this preliminary experiment can be used as the basis for an automatic control algorithm that can enhance the stability and reliability of the applied VAD. PMID:19604228

  11. Disposable MagLev centrifugal blood pump utilizing a cone-shaped impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Sobajima, Hideo; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Nagamine, Yasuyuki; Wada, Suguru; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2010-08-01

    To enhance the durability and reduce the blood trauma of a conventional blood pump with a cone-shaped impeller, a magnetically levitated (MagLev) technology has been applied to the BioPump BPX-80 (Medtronic Biomedicus, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), whose impeller is supported by a mechanical bearing. The MagLev BioPump (MagLev BP), which we have developed, has a cone-shaped impeller, the same as that used in the BPX-80. The suspension and driving system, which is comprised of two degrees of freedom, radial-controlled magnetic bearing, and a simply structured magnetic coupling, eliminates any physical contact between the impeller and the housing. To reduce both oscillation of the impeller and current in the coils, the magnetic bearing system utilizes repetitive and zero-power compensators. In this article, we present the design of the MagLev mechanism, measure the levitational accuracy of the impeller and pressure-flow curves (head-quantity [HQ] characteristics), and describe in vitro experiments designed to measure hemolysis. For the flow-induced hemolysis of the initial design to be reduced, the blood damage index was estimated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Stable rotation of the impeller in a prototype MagLev BP from 0 to 2750 rpm was obtained, yielding a flow rate of 5 L/min against a head pressure in excess of 250 mm Hg. Because the impeller of the prototype MagLev BP is levitated without contact, the normalized index of hemolysis was 10% less than the equivalent value with the BPX-80. The results of the CFD analysis showed that the shape of the outlet and the width of the fluid clearances have a large effect on blood damage. The prototype MagLev BP satisfied the required HQ characteristics (5 L/min, 250 mm Hg) for extracorporeal circulation support with stable levitation of the impeller and showed an acceptable level of hemolysis. The simulation results of the CFD analysis indicated the possibility of further reducing the blood damage of

  12. Recent Developments in Magnetically Coupled Vane Pumps for Tritium Service

    SciTech Connect

    Capuder, F. C.; Quigley, L. T.; Baker, C. K.

    1985-04-01

    Despite advances in shaft sealing, a totally reliable shaft seal for two-stage vane pumps has never been developed. Therefore, the magnetically coupled vane pump drive was developed to solve the critical problem of tritium leakage at the shaft seals of vane pumps. As a result, radioactive contamination of the work area and loss of valuable material can now be prevented.

  13. Geometric optimization of a step bearing for a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller has been developed for mechanical circulatory assistance. However, a narrow bearing gap has the potential to cause hemolysis. The purpose of the present study is to optimize the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing in order to reduce hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. First, a numerical analysis of the step bearing, based on lubrication theory, was performed to determine the optimal design. Second, in order to assess the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic forces calculated in the numerical analysis were compared with those obtained in an actual measurement test using impellers having step lengths of 0%, 33%, and 67% of the vane length. Finally, a bearing gap measurement test and a hemolysis test were performed. As a result, the numerical analysis revealed that the hydrodynamic force was the largest when the step length was approximately 70%. The hydrodynamic force calculated in the numerical analysis was approximately equivalent to that obtained in the measurement test. In the measurement test and the hemolysis test, the blood pump having a step length of 67% achieved the maximum bearing gap and reduced hemolysis, as compared with the pumps having step lengths of 0% and 33%. It was confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing was effective, and the developed blood pump having a step length of approximately 70% was found to be a suitable configuration for the reduction of hemolysis. PMID:23834855

  14. Computational fluid dynamics-based hydraulic and hemolytic analyses of a novel left ventricular assist blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Chen; Zhang, Yan; Gui, Xing-Min; Hu, Sheng-Shou

    2011-10-01

    The advent of various technologies has allowed mechanical blood pumps to become more reliable and versatile in recent decades. In our study group, a novel structure of axial flow blood pump was developed for assisting the left ventricle. The design point of the left ventricular assist blood pump 25 (LAP-25) was chosen at 4 Lpm with 100 mm Hg according to our clinical practice. Computational fluid dynamics was used to design and analyze the performance of the LAP-25. In order to obtain a required hydraulic performance and a satisfactory hemolytic property in the LAP-25 of a smaller size, a novel structure was developed including an integrated shroud impeller, a streamlined impeller hub, and main impeller blades with splitter blades; furthermore, tandem cascades were introduced in designing the diffuser. The results of numerical simulation show the LAP-25 can generate flow rates of 3-5 Lpm at rotational speeds of 8500-10,500 rpm, producing pressure rises of 27.5-148.3 mm Hg with hydraulic efficiency points ranging from 13.4 to 27.5%. Moreover, the fluid field and the hemolytic property of the LAP-25 were estimated, and the mean hemolysis index of the pump was 0.0895% with Heuser's estimated model. In conclusion, the design of the LAP-25 shows an acceptable result. PMID:21517911

  15. Power consumption of rotary blood pumps: pulsatile versus constant-speed mode.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Cotter, Chris; Bourque, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the power consumption of a HeartMate III rotary blood pump based on in vitro experiments performed in a cardiovascular simulator. To create artificial-pulse mode, we modulated the pump speed by decreasing the mean speed by 2000 rpm for 200 ms and then increasing speed by 4000 rpm (mean speeds plus 2000 rpm) for another 200 ms, creating a square waveform shape. The HeartMate III was connected to a cardiovascular simulator consisting of a hydraulic pump system to simulate left ventricle pumping action, arterial and venous compliance chambers, and an adjustable valve for peripheral resistance to facilitate the desired aortic pressure. The simulator operated based on Suga's elastance model to mimic the Starling response of the heart, thereby reproducing physiological blood flow and pressure conditions. We measured the instantaneous total electrical current and voltage of the pump to evaluate its power consumption. The aim was to answer these fundamental questions: (i) How does pump speed modulation affect pump power consumption? (ii) How does the power consumption vary in relation to external pulsatile flow? The results indicate that speed modulation and external pulsatile flow both moderately increase the power consumption. Increasing the pump speed reduces the impact of external pulsatile flow. PMID:24842216

  16. Development of a miniature undulation pump for the distributed artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Ono, T; Isoyama, T; Mochizuki, S; Iwasaki, K; Chinzei, T; Saito, I; Kouno, A; Imachi, K

    2000-08-01

    Research of the distributed artificial heart is important not only to acquire the means of individual organ perfusion but also to clarify the characteristics of the organ and the mechanism of blood distribution. To investigate the distributed artificial heart, the miniature undulation pump was developed. The outer diameter and the thickness of the developed pump were 38 mm and 11 mm, respectively. The priming volume of the pump was 3.2 ml. The total size including the motor unit was 38 mm in diameter and 32 mm in length. The total weight was 67.5 g. The total volume was 27.5 ml. The pump was driven with pulse width modulation by using a 1 chip motor controller. More than 5 L/min of continuous output could be obtained. The results showed that the developed miniature undulation pump system had enough performance for individual organ perfusion. PMID:10971257

  17. Infusion pumps and red blood cell damage in transfusion therapy: an integrative revision of the academic literature 1

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ana Maria Miranda Martins; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to obtain information from scientific literature concerning infusion pumps used in administering erythrocyte (red blood cells) and to evaluate the implications in the practical use of this equipment by nurses when conducting transfusions. Method: an integrative revision of the following scientific databases: Pubmed/Medline, Scopus, the Virtual Library for Health, SciELO, Web of Science and Cochrane. The following descriptors were used: "infusion pumps", "blood transfusion", "transfused erythrocyte" and "hemolyis". There were no restrictions on the scope of the initial data and it was finalized in December 2014. 17 articles were identified in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: all of the publications included in the studies were experimental in vitro and covered the use of infusion pumps in transfusion therapy. A summary of the data was presented in a synoptic chart and an analysis of it generated the following categories: cellular damage and the infusion mechanism. Conclusion: infusion pumps can be harmful to erythrocytes based on the infusion mechanism that is used, as the linear peristaltic pump is more likely to cause hemolysis. Cellular damage is related to the plasmatic liberation of markers that largely dominate free hemoglobin and potassium. We reiterate the need for further research and technological investments to guide the development of protocols that promote safe practices and that can contribute to future clinical studies. PMID:27533272

  18. Fault detection in rotary blood pumps using motor speed response.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Koenig, Steven C; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2013-01-01

    Clinical acceptance of ventricular assist devices (VADs) as long-term heart failure therapy requires safe and effective circulatory support for a minimum of 5 years. Yet, VAD failure beyond 2 years of support is still a concern. Currently, device controllers cannot consistently predict VAD failure modes, and undetected VAD faults may lead to catastrophic device failure. To minimize this risk, a model-based algorithm for reliable VAD fault detection that only requires VAD revolutions per minute (rpm) was developed. The algorithm was tested using computer models of the human cardiovascular system simulating heart failure and axial flow (AF) or centrifugal flow (CF) VADs. Ventricular assist device rpm was monitored after a step down of motor current for normal and simulated fault conditions (>750 faults). The ability to detect fault conditions with 1%, 5%, and 10% rpm measurement noise was evaluated. All failure modes affected the VAD rpm responses to the motor current step down. Fault detection rates were >95% for AF and >89% for CF VADs, even with 10% rpm measurement noise. The VAD rpm responses were significantly altered by blood viscosity (3.5-6.2 cP), which should be accounted for in clinical application. The proposed VAD fault detection algorithm may deliver a convenient and nonintrusive way to minimize catastrophic device failures. PMID:23820281

  19. Parametric study of blade tip clearance, flow rate, and impeller speed on blood damage in rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nahn Ju; Diao, Chenguang; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong; Kameneva, Marina V; Antaki, James F

    2009-06-01

    Phenomenological studies on mechanical hemolysis in rotary blood pumps have provided empirical relationships that predict hemoglobin release as an exponential function of shear rate and time. However, these relations are not universally valid in all flow circumstances, particularly in small gap clearances. The experiments in this study were conducted at multiple operating points based on flow rate, impeller speed, and tip gap clearance. Fresh bovine red blood cells were resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline at about 30% hematocrit, and circulated for 30 min in a centrifugal blood pump with a variable tip gap, designed specifically for these studies. Blood damage indices were found to increase with increased impeller speed or decreased flow rate. The hemolysis index for 50-microm tip gap was found to be less than 200-microm gap, despite increased shear rate. This is explained by a cell screening effect that prevents cells from entering the smaller gap. It is suggested that these parameters should be reflected in the hemolysis model not only for the design, but for the practical use of rotary blood pumps, and that further investigation is needed to explore other possible factors contributing to hemolysis. PMID:19473143

  20. Real-Time Observation of Thrombus Growth Process in an Impeller of a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump by Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the thrombus formation in cardiovascular devices such as rotary blood pumps is the most important issue in developing more hemocompatible devices. The objective of this study was to develop a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) method to visualize the thrombus growth process within a rotary blood pump and investigate the optical properties of the thrombus. An in vitro thrombogenic test was conducted using fresh porcine blood and a specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a transparent bottom. The pump rotating at 3000 rpm circulated the blood at 1.0 L/min. The bottom surface of the pump was illuminated with white light pulsed at the same frequency as the pump rotation, and the backward-scattered light was imaged using the HSI system. Using stroboscopic HSI and an image construction algorithm, dynamic spectral imaging at wavelengths ranging from 608 to 752 nm within the rotating pump was achieved. After completing the experiment, we collected the red thrombus formed in the pump impeller and quantified the thrombus hemoglobin concentration (Hbthrombus ). The spectrum changed around the center of the impeller, and the area of change expanded toward the impeller flow path. The shape corresponded approximately to the shape of the thrombus. The spectrum change indicated that the light scattering derived from red blood cells decreased. The Hbthrombus was 4.7 ± 1.3 g/dL versus a total hemoglobin of 13 ± 0.87 g/dL. The study revealed that Hbthrombus was reduced by the surrounding blood flow. PMID:26234451

  1. Comparison of Warm Blood Cardioplegia Delivery With or Without the Use of a Roller Pump

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Mizja M.; Noordzij, Peter G.; Hennink, Simon; Kelder, Hans; de Vroege, Roel; Waanders, Frans G.; Daeter, Edgar; Stehouwer, Marco C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Various techniques for administration of blood cardioplegia are used worldwide. In this study, the effect of warm blood cardioplegia administration with or without the use of a roller pump on perioperative myocardial injury was studied in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting using minimal extra-corporeal circuits (MECCs). Sixty-eight patients undergoing elective coronary bypass surgery with an MECC system were consecutively enrolled and randomized into a pumpless group (PL group: blood cardioplegia administration without roller pump) or roller pump group (RP group: blood cardioplegia administration with roller pump). No statistically significant differences were found between the PL group and RP group regarding release of cardiac biomarkers. Maximum postoperative biomarker values reached at T1 (after arrival intensive care unit) for heart-type fatty acid binding protein (2.7 [1.5; 6.0] ng/mL PL group vs. 3.2 [1.6; 6.3] ng/mL RP group, p = .63) and at T3 (first postoperative day) for troponin T high-sensitive (22.0 [14.5; 29.3] ng/L PL group vs. 21.1 [15.3; 31.6] ng/L RP group, p = .91), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (2.1 [1.7; 2.9] ng/mL PL group vs. 2.6 [1.6; 3.6] ng/mL RP group, p = .48), and C-reactive protein (138 [106; 175] μg/mL PL group vs. 129 [105; 161] μg/mL RP group, p = .65). Besides this, blood cardioplegia flow, blood cardioplegia line pressure, and aortic root pressure during blood cardioplegia administration were similar between the two groups. Administration of warm blood cardioplegia with or without the use of a roller pump results in similar clinically acceptable myocardial protection. PMID:26834282

  2. Pediatric ECMO outcomes: comparison of centrifugal versus roller blood pumps using propensity score matching.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Cindy S; Jaggers, James J; Cook, E Francis; Graham, Dionne A; Yarlagadda, Vasmi V; Teele, Sarah A; Almond, Christopher S; Bratton, Susan L; Seeger, John D; Dalton, Heidi J; Rycus, Peter T; Laussen, Peter C; Thiagarajan, Ravi R

    2013-01-01

    Centrifugal blood pumps are being increasingly utilized in children supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our aim was to determine if survival and ECMO-related morbidities in children supported with venoarterial (VA) ECMO differed by blood pump type.Children aged less than 18 years who underwent VA ECMO support from 2007 to 2009 and reported to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry were propensity score matched (Greedy 1:1 matching) using pre-ECMO characteristics.A total of 2,656 (centrifugal = 2,231, roller = 425) patients were identified and 548 patients (274 per pump type) were included in the propensity score-matched cohort. Children supported with centrifugal pumps had increased odds of hemolysis (odds ratio [OR], 4.03 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.37-6.87), hyperbilirubinemia (OR, 5.48; 95% CI, 2.62-11.49), need for inotropic support during ECMO (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.09-2.17), metabolic alkalosis (blood pH > 7.6) during ECMO (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.49-6.54), and acute renal failure (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10-2.39). Survival to hospital discharge did not differ by pump type.In a propensity score-matched cohort of pediatric ECMO patients, children supported with centrifugal pumps had increased odds of ECMO-related complications. There was no difference in survival between groups. PMID:23438777

  3. Validation of an axial flow blood pump: computational fluid dynamics results using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok Poh; Wang, Xikun

    2012-04-01

    A magnetically suspended axial flow blood pump is studied experimentally in this article. The pump casing enclosed a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller shrouded by a permanent magnet-embedded cylinder, and a three-blade diffuser. The internal flow fields were simulated earlier using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the pump characteristic curves were determined. The simulation results showed that the internal flow field was basically streamlined, except the diffuser region. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of the 1:1 pump model was conducted to validate the CFD result. In order to ensure the optical access, an acrylic prototype was fabricated with the impeller driven by a servomotor instead, as the magnet is opaque. In addition to the transparent model, the blood analog fluid with the refractive index close to that of acrylic was used to avoid refraction. According to the CFD results, the axial flow blood pump could generate adequate pressure head at the rotating speed of 9500rpm and flow rate of 5L/min, and the same flow condition was applied during the PIV measurement. Through the comparisons, it was found that the experimental results were close to those obtained by CFD and had thus validated the CFD model, which could complement the limitation of the measurement in assessing the more detailed flow fields of the axial flow pump. PMID:22040356

  4. Hemolytic performance of a MagLev disposable rotary blood pump (MedTech Dispo): effects of MagLev gap clearance and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Hijikata, Wataru; Hara, Chikara; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-12-01

    Mechanical shaft seal bearing incorporated in the centrifugal blood pumps contributes to hemolysis and thrombus formation. In addition, the problem of durability and corrosion of mechanical shaft seal bearing has been recently reported from the safety point of view. To amend the shortcomings of the blood-immersed mechanical bearings, a magnetic levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump (MedTech Dispo Model 1; Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan) has been developed for extracorporeal disposable application. In this study, the hemolytic performance of the MedTech Dispo Model 1 centrifugal blood pump system was evaluated, with special focus on the narrow blood path clearance at the magnetic bearing between rotor and stator, and on the pump housing surface roughness. A pump flow of 5 L/min against the head pressure of 100 mm Hg for 4 h was included in the hemolytic test conditions. Anticoagulated fresh porcine blood was used as a working fluid. The clearance of blood path at the magnetic bearing was in the range of 100-250 micro m. Pump housing surface roughness was controlled to be around Ra = 0.1-1.5 micro m. The lowest hemolytic results were obtained at the clearance of 250 micro m and with the polished surface (Ra = 0.1 micro m) yielding the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of less than 0.001 g/100 L, which was 1/5 of the Biopump BP-80 (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA, and 1/4 of the BPX-80. In spite of rough surface and narrow blood path, NIH levels were less than clinically acceptable level of 0.005 g/100 L. The noncontact, levitated impeller system is useful to improve pump performance in blood environment. PMID:17181835

  5. Disposable magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump: design and in vitro performance.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Arai, Hirokuni; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-07-01

    A magnetically levitated (MagLev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a disposable pump head has been designed to realize a safe, easy-to-handle, reliable, and low-cost extracorporeal blood pump system. It consisted of a radial magnetic-coupled driver with a magnetic bearing having a two-degree freedom control and a disposable pump head unit with a priming volume of 24 mL. The easy on-off disposable pump head unit was made into a three-piece system consisting of the top and bottom housings, and the impeller-rotor assembly. The size and weight of the disposable pump unit were 75 mm x 45 mm and 100 g, respectively. Because the structure of the pump head unit is easily attachable and removable, the gap between the electromagnets of the stator and the target material in the rotor increased to 1.8 mm in comparison to the original integrated bearing system of 1.0 mm. The pump performance, power requirements, and controllability of the magnetic bearing revealed that from 1400 to 2400 rpm, the pump performance remained fairly unchanged. The amplitudes of the X- and Y-axis rotor oscillation increased to +/- 24 microm. The axial displacement of the rotor, 0.4 mm, toward the top housing was also observed at the pump rpm between 1400 and 2400. The axial and rotational stiffness of the bearing were 15.9 N/mm and 4.4 Nm/rad, respectively. The MagLev power was within 0.7 Watts. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a disposable, magnetically suspended CBP as the safe, reliable, easy-to-handle, low-cost extracorporeal circulation support device. PMID:15982279

  6. Numerical Analysis of Blood Damage Potential of the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD Rotary Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Thamsen, Bente; Blümel, Bastian; Schaller, Jens; Paschereit, Christian O; Affeld, Klaus; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kertzscher, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) became the therapy of choice in treating end-stage heart failure. Although survival improved substantially and is similar in currently clinically implanted LVADs HeartMate II (HM II) and HeartWare HVAD, complications related to blood trauma are frequently observed. The aim of this study was to compare these two pumps regarding their potential blood trauma employing computational fluid dynamics. High-resolution structured grids were generated for the pumps. Newtonian flow was calculated, solving Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a sliding mesh approach and a k-ω shear stress transport turbulence model for the operating point of 4.5 L/min and 80 mm Hg. The pumps were compared in terms of volumes subjected to certain viscous shear stress thresholds, below which no trauma was assumed (von Willebrand factor cleavage: 9 Pa, platelet activation: 50 Pa, and hemolysis: 150 Pa), and associated residence times. Additionally, a hemolysis index was calculated based on a Eulerian transport approach. Twenty-two percent of larger volumes above 9 Pa were observed in the HVAD; above 50 Pa and 150 Pa the differences between the two pumps were marginal. Residence times were higher in the HVAD for all thresholds. The hemolysis index was almost equal for the HM II and HVAD. Besides the gap regions in both pumps, the inlet regions of the rotor and diffuser blades have a high hemolysis production in the HM II, whereas in the HVAD, the volute tongue is an additional site for hemolysis production. Thus, in this study, the comparison of the HM II and the HVAD using numerical methods indicated an overall similar tendency to blood trauma in both pumps. However, influences of turbulent shear stresses were not considered and effects of the pivot bearing in the HM II were not taken into account. Further in vitro investigations are required. PMID:26234447

  7. Development of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzyll, Lawrence R.; Silvestri, John J.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the current development status of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump for low-lift applications. The heat pump provides electronics cooling by evaporating a pure refrigerant from an absorbent/refrigerant mixture in a generator/cold plate. The current development focused on evaluation of absorbent/refrigerant pairs, corrosion testing, pump and compressor design, and electronic cold plate design. Two cycle configurations were considered. The first configuration utilized a standard mechanical compressor and pump. The second cycle configuration investigated pumps and compressors with non-moving parts. An innovative generator/cold plate design is also presented. The development to date shows that this cycle has about the same performance as standard vapor compression heat pumps with standard refrigerants but may have some performance and reliability advantages over vapor compression heat pumps.

  8. Application of Drag-Reducing Polymer Solutions as Test Fluids for In Vitro Evaluation of Potential Blood Damage in Blood Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Amanda R.; Sobajima, Hideo; Olia, Salim E.; Takatani, Setsuo; Kameneva, Marina V.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of the potential of a circulatory-assist device to damage blood cells has generally been performed using blood from various species. Problems with this approach include the variability of blood sensitivity to mechanical stress in different species, preparation of blood including the adjustment of hematocrit to a standard value, changes in the mechanical properties of blood that occur during storage, and necessity to pool blood samples to obtain an adequate amount of blood for in vitro circulating systems. We investigated whether the mechanical degradation of a drag-reducing polymer (DRP) solution resulting in the loss of drag-reducing ability can indicate the degree of shear-induced blood damage within blood pumps. DRP solution (polyethylene oxide, 4,500 kDa, 1,000 ppm) or porcine blood were driven through a turbulent flow system by a centrifugal pump, either the Bio-Pump BPX-80 (Medtronic, Inc.) or CentriMag (Levitronix LLC) at a constant pressure gradient of 300 mm Hg for 120 minutes. DRP mechanical degradation was evaluated by reduction of flow rate and solution viscosity. A proposed index of DRP mechanical degradation (PDI) is similar to the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) typically used to quantify the results of in vitro testing of blood pumps. Results indicate that the mechanical degradation of DRP solutions may provide a sensitive standard method for the evaluation of potential blood trauma produced by blood pumps without the use of blood. PMID:20019596

  9. Numerical study of a bio-centrifugal blood pump with straight impeller blade profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the flow in the Kyoto-NTN (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a 16-straight-bladed impeller were performed in the present study. The flow in the pump was assumed as unsteady and turbulent, and blood was treated as a Newtonian fluid. At the impeller rotating speed of 2000 rpm and flow rate of 5 L/min, the pump produces a pressure head of 113.5 mm Hg according to the simulation. It was found that the double volute of the pump has caused symmetrical pressure distribution in the volute passages and subsequently caused symmetrical flow patterns in the blade channels. Due to the tangentially increasing pressure in the volute passages, the flow through the blade channels initially increases at the low-pressure region and then decreases due to the increased pressure. The reverse flow and vortices have been identified in the impeller blade channels. The high shear stress of the flow in the pump mainly occurred at the inlet and outlet of the blade channels, the beginning of the volute passages and the regions around the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate. Higher shear stress is obtained when the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate are located at the impeller blade trailing edges than when they are located at the middle of the impeller blade channel. It was found that the blood damage index assessed based on the blood corpuscle path tracing of the present pump was about 0.94%, which has the same order of magnitude as those of the clinical centrifugal pumps reported in the literature. PMID:19817732

  10. Transient Stress- and Strain-Based Hemolysis Estimation in a Simplified Blood Pump

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, L.; Nam, J.; Pasquali, M.; Behr, M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We compare two approaches to numerical estimation of mechanical hemolysis in a simplified blood pump model. The stress-based model relies on the instantaneous shear stress in the blood flow, whereas the strain-based model uses an additional tensor equation to relate distortion of red blood cells to a shear stress measure. We use the newly proposed least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) to prevent negative concentration fields and show a stable and volume preserving LSFEM for the tensor equation. Application of both models to a simplified centrifugal blood pump at three different operating conditions show that the stress-based model overestimates the rate of hemolysis. The strain-based model is found to deliver lower hemolysis rates since it incorporates a more detailed description of biophysical phenomena into the simulation process. PMID:23922311

  11. Transient stress-based and strain-based hemolysis estimation in a simplified blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Lutz; Nam, Jaewook; Pasquali, Matteo; Behr, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We compare two approaches to numerical estimation of mechanical hemolysis in a simplified blood pump model. The stress-based model relies on the instantaneous shear stress in the blood flow, whereas the strain-based model uses an additional tensor equation to relate distortion of red blood cells to a shear stress measure. We use the newly proposed least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) to prevent negative concentration fields and show a stable and volume preserving LSFEM for the tensor equation. Application of both models to a simplified centrifugal blood pump at three different operating conditions shows that the stress-based model overestimates the rate of hemolysis. The strain-based model is found to deliver lower hemolysis rates because it incorporates a more detailed description of biophysical phenomena into the simulation process. PMID:23922311

  12. Feasibility of Pump Speed Modulation for Restoring Vascular Pulsatility with Rotary Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ising, Mickey S; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) diminish vascular pressure pulsatility, which may be associated with clinically reported adverse events including gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic valve insufficiency, and hemorrhagic stroke. Three candidate CF LVAD pump speed modulation algorithms designed to augment aortic pulsatility were evaluated in mock flow loop and ischemic heart failure (IHF) bovine models by quantifying hemodynamic performance as a function of mean pump speed, modulation amplitude, and timing. Asynchronous and synchronous copulsation (high revolutions per minute [RPM] during systole, low RPM during diastole) and counterpulsation (low RPM during systole, high RPM during diastole) algorithms were tested for defined modulation amplitudes (±300, ±500, ±800, and ±1,100 RPM) and frequencies (18.75, 37.5, and 60 cycles/minute) at low (2,900 RPM) and high (3,200 RPM) mean LVAD speeds. In the mock flow loop model, asynchronous, synchronous copulsation, and synchronous counterpulsation algorithms each increased pulse pressure (ΔP = 931%, 210%, and 98% and reduced left ventricular external work (LVEW = 20%, 22%, 16%). Similar improvements in vascular pulsatility (1,142%) and LVEW (40%) were observed in the IHF bovine model. Asynchronous modulation produces the largest vascular pulsatility with the advantage of not requiring sensor(s) for timing pump speed modulation, facilitating potential clinical implementation. PMID:26102173

  13. Custom Unit Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Little, Frank; Oinuma, Ryoji; Larsen, Ben; Goldman, Jeff; Reinis, Filip; Trevino, Luis

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design and test a pre-flight prototype pump for use in the Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump must accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting non-condensable gas without becoming air locked. The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, seal-less, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES verified that the pump meets the design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure drop, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, gas ingestion, and restart capability under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The pump operated at 40 to 240 lbm/hr flow rate, 35 to 100 oF pump temperature, and 5 to 10 psid pressure rise. Power consumption of the pump controller at the nominal operating point in both ambient and vacuum conditions was 9.5 W, which was less than the 12 W predicted. Gas ingestion capabilities were tested by injecting 100 cc of air into the fluid line; the pump operated normally throughout this test.

  14. A fluid dynamic analysis of a rotary blood pump for design improvement.

    PubMed

    Treichler, J; Rosenow, S E; Damm, G; Naito, K; Ohara, Y; Mizuguchi, K; Makinouchi, K; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y

    1993-09-01

    The proper design of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) requires an understanding of the pump's fluid dynamic and biocompatible properties. A hydraulically efficient system minimizes the power required for pumping. Biocompatibility refers to the ability to pump blood with minimal hemolysis and thrombus formation. Typically, shear stresses below a threshold level will not damage blood significantly. A fluid dynamic analysis of a prototype centrifugal pump designed for use as an LVAD was performed to establish flow characteristics. A flow visualization technique using Amberlite particles suspended in a glycerin/water blood analogue was used. The system was illuminated with a 1 mm planar beam strobed helium-neon laser, and the results were recorded photographically. An analysis of photographs revealed laminar and turbulent flows with vortices within an illuminated plane in both the inlet and outlet port areas. From these data, velocity and shear stress profiles were generated that showed possible areas of improvement. It was concluded that the outlet port design could be improved by changing its angle and the continuity of its expansion. The inlet port could also be improved by smoothing the transition area between the inlet tube and the pump body to allow for gradual acceleration of the entering fluid. PMID:8240074

  15. Effects of fluid viscoelasticity on the performance of an axial blood pump model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi-Hui; Li, Jing-Yin; Zhang, Ming-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    An aqueous Xanthan gum solution (XGS) was used as blood analog fluid to explore the influence of fluid viscoelasticity on the performance of an axial blood pump model. For comparison, a 39 wt% Newtonian aqueous glycerin solution (GS), the common fluid in blood pump tests, was also used as a working fluid. The experimental results showed that a higher head curve was obtained using XGS in the pump than using GS. The heads of the XGS that were computed using the viscoelastic turbulence model agreed well with the measured data. In contrast, the standard k-ε turbulence model failed to provide satisfactory predictions for the XGS. The computational results revealed that in most parts of the pump model flow fields, the Reynolds shear stress values and turbulent dissipation rates of the XGS were all lower than those of the GS. The hemolysis index of the pump model using the XGS was calculated to be only one-third of that using the GS. PMID:22210649

  16. The activation of the sodium pump in pig red blood cells by internal and external cations.

    PubMed

    Brand, S C; Whittam, R

    1985-05-30

    A study has been made with pig red blood cells of the activation of the sodium pump by internal and external cations. Cell Na and K concentrations were altered using a PCMBS cation loading procedure. The procedure was characterised for resultant ionic conditions, maintenance of ATP levels and fragility. The activation of the sodium pump by external K was measured in cells suspended in choline (Na-free) solutions. External Cs was used as a substitute for K and elicited lower rates of pump activity. Both the Vmax and apparent Km for 42K influx and 134Cs influx increased as internal Na concentration was raised (within the non-saturating range). Vmax/apparent Km ratios for cation influx were constant. Raising external Cs concentration exerted a similar influence on pump activation by internal Na: both the maximum pump velocity and the apparent Na-site dissociation constant (K'Na) increased. The results provide evidence for a transmembrane connection between cation binding sites on opposite faces of the membrane and are consistent with a consecutive model for the sodium pump in pig red blood cells. PMID:2581622

  17. Multimodal flow visualization and optimization of pneumatic blood pump for sorbent hemodialysis system.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fangjun; Parks, Robert; Maholtz, John; Ash, Steven; Antaki, James F

    2009-04-01

    Renal Solutions Allient Sorbent Hemodialysis System utilizes a two-chambered pneumatic pump (Pulsar Blood Pump, Renal Solutions, Inc., Warrendale, PA, USA) to avoid limitations associated with peristaltic pumping systems. Single-needle access is enabled by counter-pulsing the two pump chambers, thereby obviating compliance chambers or blood reservoirs. Each chamber propels 20 cc per pulse of 3 s (dual access) or 6 s (single access) duration, corresponding to a peak Reynolds number of approximately 8000 (based on inlet velocity and chamber diameter). A multimodal series of flow visualization studies (tracer particle, dye washout, and dye erosion) was conducted on a sequence of pump designs with varying port locations and diaphragms to improve the geometry with respect to risk of thrombogenesis. Experiments were conducted in a simplified flow loop using occluders to simulate flow resistance induced by tubing and dialyzer. Tracer visualization revealed flow patterns and qualitatively indicated turbulence intensity. Dye washout identified dwell volume and areas of flow stagnation for each design. Dye erosion results indicated the effectiveness and homogeneity of surface washing. Compared to a centered inlet which resulted in a fluid jet that produced two counter-rotating vortices, a tangential inlet introduced a single vortex, and kept the flow laminar. It also provided better surface washing on the pump inner surface. However, a tangential outlet did not present as much benefit as expected. On the contrary, it created a sharp defection to the flow when transiting from filling to ejection. PMID:19335410

  18. Numerical simulation and experimental research on passive hydrodynamic bearing in a blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qing; Ruan, Xiaodong; Chen, Wenyu; Fu, Xin

    2013-09-01

    The current research of hydrodynamic bearing in blood pump mainly focuses on the bearing structure design. Compared with the typical plane slider bearing and Rayleigh step bearing, spiral groove bearing has excellent performance in load-carrying capacity. However, the load-carrying capacity would decrease significantly with increasing flow rate in conventional designs. In this paper, the special treatment is made to the upper spiral groove bearing to make sure that both the circulatory flowing and load-carrying capacity are high. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics(CFD) models in the space between rotor and shaft are developed by using FLUENT software. Effects of groove number, film height and groove depth on load-carrying capacity of the spiral groove bearings are investigated by orthogonal experiment design. The experimental results show that film height is the most remarkable factor to the load-carrying capacity. The variation tendency of load-carrying capacity reveals that the best combination of geometry is the one with groove number of 8, film height 0.03 mm and groove depth 0.08 mm. The velocity and pressure distributions in spiral groove bearings are also analyzed, and the analysis result shows that the distributions are in conformity with the design of the blood pump based on the principle of hydrodynamic bearing. The displacement of the rotor with the best combination parameters is tested by using laser displacement sensors, the testing result shows that the suspending performance is satisfactory both in axial and radial directions. This research proposes a bearing design method which has sufficient load-carrying capacity to support rotor as an effective passive hydrodynamic bearing.

  19. Development of blood extraction system for health monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Nakanishi, Naoyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop the compact human blood sampling device applied for a health monitoring system(HMS), which is called "Mobile Hospital". The HMS consists of (1) a micro electrical pumping system for blood extraction, (2) a bio-sensor to detect and evaluate an amount of Glucose, Cholesterol and Urea in extracted blood, by using enzyme such as Glucoseoxidase (GOD), Cholesteroloxidase and Urease. The mechanical design elements of the device are bio-compatible microneedle, indentation unit using a shape memory alloy(SMA) actuator and pumping unit using a piezoelectric microactuator. The design concept is the biomimetic micromachine of female mosquito"s blood sampling mechanism. The performances of the main mechanical elements such as indentation force of the microneedle, actual stroke of the indentation unit using a SMA actuator and liquid sampling ability of the pumping unit using PZT piezoelectric microactuator were measured. The 3 mm stroke of the indentation load generated by SMA actuator was 0.8mN. The amount of imitation blood extracted by using bimorph PZT actuators was about 0.5 microliters for 10 sec. A 60-micrometer outer diameter and 25-micrometer inner diameter Titanium microneedle, which size is same as female mosquito"s labium, was produced by sputter deposition.

  20. Microhaemodynamics within the blade tip clearance of a centrifugal turbodynamic blood pump.

    PubMed

    Antaki, J F; Diao, C-G; Shu, F-J; Wu, J-C; Zhao, R; Kameneva, M V

    2008-05-01

    A persistent challenge facing the quantitative design of turbodynamic blood pumps is the great disparity of spatial scales between the primary and auxiliary flow paths. Fluid passages within journals and adjacent to the blade tips are often on the scale of several blood cells, confounding the application of macroscopic continuum models. Yet, precisely in these regions there exists the highest shear stress, which is most likely to cause cellular trauma. This disparity has motivated these microscopic studies to visualize the kinematics of the blood cells within the small clearances of a miniature turbodynamic blood pump. A transparent model of a miniature centrifugal pump having an adjustable tip clearance (50-200 microm) was prepared for direct optical visualization of the region between the impeller blade tip and the stationary housing. Synchronized images of the blood cells were obtained by a microscopic visualization system, consisting of an inverted microscope fitted with long-working-distance objective lens (40x), mercury lamp, and high-resolution charge-coupled device camera electronically triggered by the rotation of the impeller. Experiments with 7 microm fluorescent particles revealed the influence of the gap dimension on the trajectory across the blade thickness. The lateral component of velocity (perpendicular to the blade) was dramatically enhanced in the 50 microm gap compared with the 200 microm gap, thereby reducing the exposure time. Studies with diluted bovine blood (Ht = 0.5 per cent) showed that the concentration of cells traversing the gap is also reduced dramatically (30 per cent) as the blade tip clearance is reduced from 200 microm to 50 microm. These results motivate further investigation into the microfluidic phenomena responsible for cellular trauma within turbodynamic blood pumps. PMID:18595366

  1. Development of blood extraction system designed by female mosquito's blood sampling mechanism for bio-MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Nakanishi, Naoyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2005-02-01

    A compact and wearable wristwatch type Bio-MEMS such as a health monitoring system (HMS) to detect blood sugar level for diabetic patient, was newly developed. The HMS consists of (1) a indentation unit with a microneedle to generate the skin penetration force using a shape memory alloy(SMA) actuator, (2) a pumping unit using a bimorph PZT piezoelectric actuator to extract the blood and (3) a gold (Au) electrode as a biosensor immobilized GOx and attached to the gate electrode of MOSFET to detect the amount of Glucose in extracted blood. GOx was immobilized on a self assembled spacer combined with an Au electrode by the cross-link method using BSA as an additional bonding material. The device can extract blood in a few microliter through a painless microneedle with the negative pressure by deflection of the bimorph PZT piezoelectric actuator produced in the blood chamber, by the similar way the female mosquito extracts human blood with muscle motion to flex or relax. The performances of the liquid sampling ability of the pumping unit through a microneedle (3.8mm length, 100μm internal diameter) using the bimorph PZT piezoelectric microactuator were measured. The blood extraction micro device could extract human blood at the speed of 2μl/min, and it is enough volume to measure a glucose level, compared to the amount of commercial based glucose level monitor. The electrode embedded in the blood extraction device chamber could detect electrons generated by the hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide produced by the reaction between GOx and glucose in a few microliter extracted blood, using the constant electric current measurement system of the MOSFET type hybrid biosensor. The output voltage for the glucose diluted in the chamber was increased lineally with increase of the glucose concentration.

  2. Numerical analysis of the inner flow field of a biocentrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chua, Leok Poh; Song, Guoliang; Lim, Tau Meng; Zhou, Tongming

    2006-06-01

    Implantable ventricular assist devices have been regarded as a promising instrument in the clinical treatment of patients with severe heart failures. In this article, a three-dimensional model of the Kyoto-NTN magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump was generated and a computational fluid dynamics solution of the inner flow field of the pump including the static pressure distributions, velocity profiles, and the shear stress distributions of the blood was presented. The results revealed that reverse flow generally occurred in the impeller blade channels during the operation of the pump, due to the imbalance of the flow and the pressure gradient generated in the blade channels. The flow pattern at the exit of the blade channels was varying with its angular positions in the pump. The reverse flow at the exit of the impeller blade channels was found to be closely related with the static pressure distribution in the volute passage. Higher pressure in the volute caused severe backflow from the volute into the blade channels. To clarify the effects of a moving impeller on the blood, shear stresses of the blood in the pump were investigated according to the simulation results. The studies indicated that at the beginning of the splitter plate and the cutwater, the highest shear stress exceeded 700 Pa. At other regions such as the inlet and outlet of the impeller blade channels and some regions in the volute passage, shear stresses were found to be about 200 Pa. These areas are believed to have a high possibility of rendering blood trauma. PMID:16734599

  3. Comparison of hydraulic and hemolytic properties of different impeller designs of an implantable rotary blood pump by computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Arvand, Arash; Hahn, Nicole; Hormes, Marcus; Akdis, Mustafa; Martin, Michael; Reul, Helmut

    2004-10-01

    A mixed-flow blood pump for long-term applications has been developed at the Helmholtz-Institute in Aachen, Germany. Central features of this implantable pump are a centrally integrated motor, a blood-immersed mechanical bearing, magnetic coupling of the impeller, and a shrouded impeller, which allows a relatively wide clearance. The aim of the study was a numerical analysis of hydraulic and hemolytic properties of different impeller design configurations. In vitro testing and numerical simulation techniques (computational fluid dynamics [CFD]) were applied to achieve a comprehensive overview. Pressure-flow charts were experimentally measured in a mock loop in order to validate the CFD data. In vitro hemolysis tests were performed at the main operating point of each impeller design. General flow patterns, pressure-flow charts, secondary flow rates, torque, and axial forces on the impeller were calculated by means of CFD. Furthermore, based on streak line techniques, shear stress (stress loading), exposure times, and volume percentage with critical stress loading have been determined. Comparison of CFD data with pressure head measurements showed excel-lent agreement. Also, impressive trend conformity was observed between in-vitro hemolysis results and numerical data. Comparison of design variations yielded clear trends and results. Design C revealed the best hydraulic and hemolytic properties and was chosen as the final design for the mixed-flow rotary blood pump. PMID:15384994

  4. PIV measurements of flow in a centrifugal blood pump: time-varying flow.

    PubMed

    Day, Steven W; McDaniel, James C

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of the time-varying flow in a centrifugal blood pump operating as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are presented. This includes changes in both the pump flow rate as a function of the left ventricle contraction and the interaction of the rotating impeller and fixed exit volute. When operating with a pulsing ventricle, the flow rate through the LVAD varies from 0-11 L/min during each cycle of the heartbeat. Phase-averaged measurements of mean velocity and some turbulence statistics within several regions of the pump, including the inlet, blade passage, exit volute, and diffuser, are reported at 20 phases of the cardiac cycle. The transient flow fields are compared to the constant flow rate condition that was reported previously in order to investigate the transient effects within the pump. It is shown that the quasi-steady assumption is a fair treatment of the time varying flow field in all regions of this representative pump, which greatly simplifies the comprehension and modeling of this flow field. The measurements are further interpreted to identify the effects that the transient nature of the flow field will have on blood damage. Although regions of recirculation and stagnant flow exist at some phases of the cardiac cycle, there is no location where flow is stagnant during the entire heartbeat. PMID:15971703

  5. Modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric M.; Snyder, Alan J.

    2003-07-01

    The electromechanical behavior of dielectric elastomers is to be exploited for medical application in artificial blood pumps. It is required that the pump diaphragm achieves a swept volume increase of 70 cc into a systolic pressure of 120 mmHg with the main design objective being volumetric efficiency. As such, a model that accommodates large deformation behavior is used. In order to design prosthetic blood pumps that closely mimic the natural pumping chambers of the heart, a dielectric elastomer diaphragm design is proposed. The elastomer's change in shape in response to the applied electric field will permit it to be the active element of the pump just as the ventricular walls are in the natural heart. A comprehensive analytical model that accounts for the combined elastic and dielectric behavior of the membrane is used to compute the stresses and deformations of the inflated membrane. Dielectric elastomers are often pre-strained in order to obtain optimal electromechanical performance. The resulting model incorporates pre-strain and shows how system parameters such as pre-strain, pressure, electric field, and edge constraints affect membrane deformation. The model predicts more than adequate volume displacement for moderate pre-strain of the elastomer.

  6. Development of a magnetically suspended centrifugal pump as a cardiac assist device for long-term application.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, K; Park, C H; Akamatsu, T; Yamada, T; Ban, T

    1996-01-01

    To overcome problems with the shaft seal in conventional centrifugal pumps, the authors have been developing a magnetically suspended centrifugal pump (MSCP) that operates as a valveless, sealless, and bearingless pump. The prototype of the MSCP was modified with respect to size of the volute diffuser and impeller blade profiles. A hemolysis test in vitro using a new version of the MSCP was performed in comparison with a commercially available centrifugal pump. The test circuit for the hemolysis test comprised a blood reservoir, a pump, and polyvinyl tubes, and was filled with fresh heparinized bovine blood. The pumping conditions were a flow rate of 5 L/min and a pump head afterload of 100 mmHg. The index of hemolysis in the MSCP was significantly lower than that in the Biomedicus pump (0.0035 +/- 0.0025 versus 0.0097 +/- 0.0056 g/100 L, p < 0.05). Reduction in the platelet count during pumping also was lower in the MSCP compared with the Biomedicus pump at both 6 hrs and 12 hrs of pumping (p < 0.01). This MSCP may be advantageous for extended use of assist devices, not only from the theoretical point of view, but in a practical sense after the results of the current hemolysis test. PMID:8808462

  7. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  8. Heat Pump Clothes Dryer Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A heat pump clothes dryer (HPCD) is an innovative appliance that uses a vapor compression system to dry clothes. Air circulates in a closed loop through the drum, so no vent is required. The condenser heats air to evaporate moisture out of the clothes, and the evaporator condenses water out of the air stream. As a result, the HPCD can achieve 50% energy savings compared to a conventional electric resistance dryer. We developed a physics-based, quasi-steady-state HPCD system model with detailed heat exchanger and compressor models. In a novel approach, we applied a heat and mass transfer effectiveness model to simulate the drying process of the clothes load in the drum. The system model is able to simulate the inherently transient HPCD drying process, to size components, and to reveal trends in key variables (e.g. compressor discharge temperature, power consumption, required drying time, etc.) The system model was calibrated using experimental data on a prototype HPCD. In the paper, the modeling method is introduced, and the model predictions are compared with experimental data measured on a prototype HPCD.

  9. Development and evaluation of oral osmotic pump of butorphanol tartrate.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik; Raichandani, Yogesh; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2014-11-01

    Butorphanol is potent analgesic useful in pain management. However, because of high first-pass metabolism butorphanol is not available in market as oral dosage form. Drugs that undergo extensive first-pass metabolism can be delivered orally if protected in the stomach, and proximal small intestine. An oral controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) was designed to deliver butorphanol tartrate that can maintain therapeutic blood concentration up to 24 h. The target release profile for extended release formulation was calculated by Wagner Nelson de-convolution using published immediate release blood concentration data for oral route. Composition of the core and coating were optimized using USFDA approved ingredients by evaluation of the drug release. Drug release from the developed system was inversely proportional to the weight gain and directly related to the level of pore former. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the formation of pores in the coating membrane on contact with water which lead to drug to release. Kinetic models were applied to drug release data to establish the drug release mechanism. The developed osmotic system effectively delivers selected drug at a predetermined rate for extended period. PMID:24079361

  10. PIV measurements of flow in a centrifugal blood pump: steady flow.

    PubMed

    Day, Steven W; McDaniel, James C

    2005-04-01

    Magnetically suspended left ventricular assist devices have only one moving part, the impeller. The impeller has absolutely no contact with any of the fixed parts, thus greatly reducing the regions of stagnant or high shear stress that surround a mechanical or fluid bearing. Measurements of the mean flow patterns as well as viscous and turbulent stresses were made in a shaft-driven prototype of a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump at several constant flow rates (3-9 L/min) using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The chosen range of flow rates is representative of the range over which the pump may operate while implanted. Measurements on a three-dimensional measurement grid within several regions of the pump, including the inlet, blade passage, exit volute, and diffuser are reported. The measurements are used to identify regions of potential blood damage due to high shear stress and/or stagnation of the blood, both of which have been associated with blood damage within artificial heart valves and diaphragm-type pumps. Levels of turbulence intensity and Reynolds stresses that are comparable to those in artificial heart valves are reported. At the design flow rate (6 L/min), the flow is generally well behaved (no recirculation or stagnant flow) and stress levels are below levels that would be expected to contribute to hemolysis or thrombosis. The flow at both high (9 L/min) and low (3 L/min) flow rates introduces anomalies into the flow, such as recirculation, stagnation, and high stress regions. Levels of viscous and Reynolds shear stresses everywhere within the pump are below reported threshold values for damage to red cells over the entire range of flow rates investigated; however, at both high and low flow rate conditions, the flow field may promote activation of the clotting cascade due to regions of elevated shear stress adjacent to separated or stagnant flow. PMID:15971702

  11. New mechanism to reduce the size of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump: direct drive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Kijima, T; Maekawa, J

    1997-07-01

    Size reduction of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump has been achieved by reducing the size of the magnetic suspension and employing a direct drive mechanism in place of a brushless DC motor and a magnetic coupling. The flow has also been improved using a closed hollow impeller to remove flow obstruction at the inlet and using radial straight vanes to reduce the impeller speed by 30%. Hemolysis testing was conducted for the new models. Results showed that model DD1 presented only a slightly higher level of hemolysis than a regular extracorporeal centrifugal pump. PMID:9212927

  12. Onset of Buccal Pumping in Catshark Embryos: How Breathing Develops in the Egg Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Taketeru; Nakamura, Masaru; Sato, Keiichi; Takaoka, Hiroko; Toda, Minoru; Kawauchi, Junro; Nakaya, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Respiration in fishes involves buccal pumping, which is characterized by the generation of nearly continuous water flow over the gills because of the rhythmic expansion/compression of the pharyngeal cavity. This mechanism is achieved by the functions of the vascular, skeletal, and muscular systems. However, the process by which the embryo establishes the mechanism remains a mystery. Morphological and kinematical observations on captive cloudy catsharks, Scyliorhinus torazame, have suggested that the embryo starts buccal pumping just before the respiratory slits open on the egg capsule. During the pre-opening period, the embryo acquires oxygen mainly via the external gill filaments. After slit opening, respiration of the embryo involves buccal pumping to pass water over the “internal gills.” The onset of buccal pumping accompanies four morphological changes: (1) regression of the external gill filaments, (2) development of blood vessels within the “internal gills,” (3) completion of the development of hyoid skeletal and muscular elements, and (4) development of the oral valve. A previous study showed that buccal pumping allows the embryo to actively regulate oxygen intake by changing the pumping frequency. Thus, establishment of buccal pumping in the egg capsule is probably important for embryo survival in the unstable oxygen environment of the egg capsule after slit opening. PMID:25329313

  13. Non-invasive estimation and control of inlet pressure in an implantable rotary blood pump for heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Alomari, A H; Savkin, A V; Ayre, P J; Lim, E; Mason, D G; Salamonsen, R F; Fraser, J F; Lovell, N H

    2011-08-01

    We propose a dynamical model for mean inlet pressure estimation in an implantable rotary blood pump during the diastolic period. Non-invasive measurements of pump impeller rotational speed (ω), motor power (P), and pulse width modulation signal acquired from the pump controller were used as inputs to the model. The model was validated over a wide range of speed ramp studies, including (i) healthy (C1), variations in (ii) heart contractility (C2); (iii) afterload (C2, C3, C4), and (iv) preload (C5, C6, C7). Linear regression analysis between estimated and extracted mean inlet pressure obtained from in vivo animal data (greyhound dogs, N = 3) resulted in a highly significant correlation coefficients (R(2) = 0.957, 0.961, 0.958, 0.963, 0.940, 0.946, and 0.959) and mean absolute errors of (e = 1.604, 2.688, 3.667, 3.990, 2.791, 3.215, and 3.225 mmHg) during C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, and C7, respectively. The proposed model was also used to design a controller to regulate mean diastolic pump inlet pressure using non-invasively measured ω and P. In the presence of model uncertainty, the controller was able to track and settle to the desired input within a finite number of sampling periods and minimal error (0.92 mmHg). The model developed herein will play a crucial role in developing a robust control system of the pump that detects and thus avoids undesired pumping states by regulating the inlet pressure within a predefined physiologically realistic limit. PMID:21666292

  14. Development and test of a plastic deep-well pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. H.; Gao, X. F.; Xu, Y.; Shi, W. D.; Lu, W. G.; Liu, W.

    2013-12-01

    To develop a plastic deep-well pump, three methods are proposed on structural and forming technique. First, the major hydraulic components are constructed by plastics, and the connection component is constructed by steel. Thus the pump structure is more concise and slim, greatly reducing its weight and easing its transportation, installation, and maintenance. Second, the impeller is designed by maximum diameter method. Using same pump casing, the stage head is greatly increased. Third, a sealing is formed by impeller front end face and steel end face, and two slots are designed on the impeller front end face, thus when the two end faces approach, a lubricating pair is formed, leading to an effective sealing. With above methods, the pump's axial length is greatly reduced, and its stage head is larger and more efficient. Especially, the pump's axial force is effectively balanced. To examine the above proposals, a prototype pump is constructed, and its testing results show that the pump efficiency exceeds the national standard by 6%, and the stage head is improved by 41%, meanwhile, its structure is more concise and ease of transportation. Development of this pump would provide useful experiences for further popularity of plastic deep-well pumps.

  15. Effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Imachi, Kou; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for long-term circulatory assist. The pump uses hydrodynamic bearings to enhance durability and reliability without additional displacement-sensors or control circuits. However, a narrow bearing gap of the pump has a potential for hemolysis. The purpose of this study is to develop the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller, and to evaluate the effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property. The impeller levitates using a spiral-groove type thrust bearing, and a herringbone-groove type radial bearing. The pump design was improved by adopting a step type thrust bearing and optimizing the pull-up magnetic force. The pump performance was evaluated by a levitation performance test, a hemolysis test and an animal experiment. In these tests, the bearing gap increased from 1 to 63 μm. In addition, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) improved from 0.415 to 0.005 g/100 l, corresponding to the expansion of the bearing gap. In the animal experiment for 24 h, the plasma-free hemoglobin remained within normal ranges (<4.0 mg/dl). We confirmed that the hemolytic property of the pump was improved to the acceptable level by expanding the bearing gap greater than 60 μm. PMID:23442235

  16. Development of the sonic pump levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The process and mechanism involved in producing glass microballoons (GMBs) of acceptable quality for laser triggered inertial fusion through use of glass jet levitation and manipulation are considered. The gas jet levitation device, called sonic pumps, provides positioning by timely and appropriate application of gas mementum from one or more of six sonic pumps which are arranged orthogonally in opposed pairs about the levitation region and are activated by an electrooptical, computer controlled, feedback system. The levitation device was fabricated and its associated control systems were assembled into a package and tested in reduced gravity flight regime of the NASA KC-135 aircraft.

  17. FIELD TRIALS OF NEWLY DEVELOPED POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT SUBMERSIBLE PUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Rob Beard; Leland Traylor

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this grant was to evaluate under real world conditions the performance of a new type of downhole pump, the hydraulically driven submersible diaphragm pump. This pump is supplied by Pumping Solutions Incorporated, Albuquerque NM. The original scope of the project was to install 10 submersible pumps, and compare that to 10 similar installations of rod pumps. As an operator, the system as tested was not ready for prime time. The PSI group did improve the product and offered excellent service. The latest design appears to be much better, but more test data is needed to show short run life is not a problem. This product should continue to be developed; the testing did not uncover any fundamental problems that would preclude it's widespread use. On the positive side, the pump was easy to run, was more power efficient then a rod pump, and is the only submersible that could handle the large quantities of solids typical of CBM production. The product shows much promise for the future, and with continued design and testing, this type of submersible pump has the potential to become the standard of the industry.

  18. A miniaturized extracorporeal membrane oxygenator with integrated rotary blood pump: preclinical in vivo testing.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Ruedger; Bensberg, Ralf; Arens, Jutta; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Rossaint, Rolf; Henzler, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can achieve sufficient gas exchange in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. A highly integrated extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (HEXMO) was developed to reduce filling volume and simplify management. Six female pigs were connected to venovenous HEXMO with a total priming volume of 125 ml for 4 hours during hypoxemia induced by a hypoxic inspired gas mixture. Animals were anticoagulated with intravenous heparin. Gas exchange, hemodynamics, hemolysis, and coagulation activation were examined. One device failed at the magnetic motor coupling of the integrated diagonal pump. In the remaining five experiments, the oxygenation increased significantly (arterial oxygen saturation [SaO2] from 79 ± 5% before HEXMO to 92% ± 11% after 4 hours) facilitated by a mean oxygen transfer of 66 ± 29 ml/dl through the oxygenator. The CO2 elimination by the HEXMO reduced arterial PaCO2 only marginal. Extracorporeal blood flow was maintained at 32% ± 6% of cardiac output. Hemodynamic instability or hemolysis was not observed. The plasmatic coagulation was only mildly activated without significant platelet consumption. The HEXMO prototype provided sufficient gas exchange to prevent hypoxemia. This proof of concept study supports further development and design modifications to increase performance and to reduce coagulation activation for potential long-term application. PMID:21317635

  19. Optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yasui, Kazuya; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump as a bridge-to-decision device. The purpose of the present study is to determine the optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis. We prepared eight pump models having bearing gaps of 20, 30, 40, 80, 90, 100, 180, and 250 μm. The driving conditions were set to a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4 L/min. First, the orbital radius of the impeller was measured for the evaluation of the impeller stability. Second, the hemolytic property was evaluated in an in vitro hemolysis test. As a result, the orbital radius was not greater than 15 μm when the bearing gap was between 20 and 100 μm. The relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios in comparison with BPX-80 were 37.67 (gap: 20 μm), 0.95 (gap: 30 μm), 0.96 (gap: 40 μm), 0.82 (gap: 80 μm), 0.77 (gap: 90 μm), 0.92 (gap: 100 μm), 2.76 (gap: 180 μm), and 2.78 (gap: 250 μm). The hemolysis tended to increase at bearing gaps of greater than 100 μm due to impeller instability. When the bearing gap decreased from 30 to 20 μm, the relative NIH ratios increased significantly from 0.95 to 37.67 times (P < 0.01) due to high shear stress. We confirmed that the optimal bearing gap was determined between 30 and 100 μm in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis. PMID:25234763

  20. Improvement of hemocompatibility in centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and semi-open impeller: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yada, Toru; Saito, Sakae; Hirai, Shusaku; Yamane, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a noncontact-type centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and a semi-open impeller for mechanical circulatory assist. The impeller is levitated by an original spiral-groove thrust bearing and a herringbone-groove journal bearing, without any additional displacement-sensing module or additional complex control circuits. The pump was improved by optimizing the groove direction of the spiral-groove thrust bearing and the pull-up magnetic force between the rotor magnet and the stator coil against the impeller. To evaluate hemocompatibility, we conducted a levitation performance test and in vitro hemocompatibility tests by means of a mock-up circulation loop. In the hemolysis test, the normalized index of hemolysis was reduced from 0.721 to 0.0335 g/100 L corresponding to an expansion of the bearing gap from 1.1 to 56.1 microm. In the in vitro antithrombogenic test, blood pumps with a wide thrust bearing gap were effective in preventing thrombus formation. Through in vitro evaluation tests, we confirmed that hemocompatibility was improved by balancing the hydrodynamic fluid dynamics and magnetic forces. PMID:19681836

  1. Wear-resistant, hemocompatible Ti-Nb-Zr and Zr-Nb alloys to improve blood pump design and performance.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J A; Daigle, K P; Kovacs, P

    1996-06-01

    Over the past several years, we have developed novel titanium-niobium-zirconium (Ti-Nb-Zr) alloys to address the long-term performance needs of orthopedic implants. The unique properties of these alloys also render them promising candidates for blood pumps. These properties include excellent biocompatibility in combination with high strength and toughness, and low elastic modulus (low stiffness). Additionally, these metal alloys are readily hot or cold worked into complex shapes including wire, foil, tubing and bar. They are readily machined and polished, and they can be surface oxidized to form a hard, wear-resistant, low-friction ceramic surface layer. In this diffusion-hardened condition, oxygen also hardens the underlying metal to optimize the bone between the ceramic oxide surface and the tough metal substrate. Unlike metal surfaces, oxidative wear, which can alter surface energy, friction, and hemocompatibility, does not occur. Consequently, the combined benefits of a stable, wear-resistant, low-friction ceramic surface layer with the toughness, strength, formability, and thermal conductivity of metal may provide improvements in the design and performance of blood pumps and peripheral graft and percutaneous (power) components of the pump. PMID:8817948

  2. Development of efflux pump inhibitors in antituberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-06-01

    Resistance and tolerance to antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs, especially the first-line drugs, has become a serious problem in anti-TB therapy. Efflux of antimicrobial agents via bacterial efflux pumps is one of the main reasons for drug resistance. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) bind to efflux pumps to inhibit drug efflux and thus enhance the drug effect and reduce drug resistance. Studies on EPIs targeting the efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) help to understand Mtb resistance and to identify the potential drug target and are of significance in guiding the development of new anti-TB drugs and optimal combinations. Currently, there are many potential EPIs under study, but none of them has been used clinically for anti-TB therapy. In this article, we will provide an overview on the current development of EPIs targeting the efflux pumps of Mtb and discuss their potential clinical applications. PMID:27211826

  3. Generic Safety Requirements for Developing Safe Insulin Pump Software

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jetley, Raoul; Jones, Paul L; Ray, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors previously introduced a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model that identified common features and hazards shared by most insulin pumps on the market. The aim of this article is to extend our previous work on the GIIP model by articulating safety requirements that address the identified GIIP hazards. These safety requirements can be validated by manufacturers, and may ultimately serve as a safety reference for insulin pump software. Together, these two publications can serve as a basis for discussing insulin pump safety in the diabetes community. Methods In our previous work, we established a generic insulin pump architecture that abstracts functions common to many insulin pumps currently on the market and near-future pump designs. We then carried out a preliminary hazard analysis based on this architecture that included consultations with many domain experts. Further consultation with domain experts resulted in the safety requirements used in the modeling work presented in this article. Results Generic safety requirements for the GIIP model are presented, as appropriate, in parameterized format to accommodate clinical practices or specific insulin pump criteria important to safe device performance. Conclusions We believe that there is considerable value in having the diabetes, academic, and manufacturing communities consider and discuss these generic safety requirements. We hope that the communities will extend and revise them, make them more representative and comprehensive, experiment with them, and use them as a means for assessing the safety of insulin pump software designs. One potential use of these requirements is to integrate them into model-based engineering (MBE) software development methods. We believe, based on our experiences, that implementing safety requirements using MBE methods holds promise in reducing design/implementation flaws in insulin pump development and evolutionary processes, therefore improving

  4. Analysis of pressure head-flow loops of pulsatile rotodynamic blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Jahren, Silje E; Ochsner, Gregor; Shu, Fangjun; Amacher, Raffael; Antaki, James F; Vandenberghe, Stijn

    2014-04-01

    The clinical importance of pulsatility is a recurring topic of debate in mechanical circulatory support. Lack of pulsatility has been identified as a possible factor responsible for adverse events and has also demonstrated a role in myocardial perfusion and cardiac recovery. A commonly used method for restoring pulsatility with rotodynamic blood pumps (RBPs) is to modulate the speed profile, synchronized to the cardiac cycle. This introduces additional parameters that influence the (un)loading of the heart, including the timing (phase shift) between the native cardiac cycle and the pump pulses, and the amplitude of speed modulation. In this study, the impact of these parameters upon the heart-RBP interaction was examined in terms of the pressure head-flow (HQ) diagram. The measurements were conducted using a rotodynamic Deltastream DP2 pump in a validated hybrid mock circulation with baroreflex function. The pump was operated with a sinusoidal speed profile, synchronized to the native cardiac cycle. The simulated ventriculo-aortic cannulation showed that the level of (un)loading and the shape of the HQ loops strongly depend on the phase shift. The HQ loops displayed characteristic shapes depending on the phase shift. Increased contribution of native contraction (increased ventricular stroke work [WS ]) resulted in a broadening of the loops. It was found that the previously described linear relationship between WS and the area of the HQ loop for constant pump speeds becomes a family of linear relationships, whose slope depends on the phase shift. PMID:23889536

  5. Flow visualization in the outflow cannula of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangmao; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Haibo; Sun, Hansong; Zhou, Jianye; Hu, Shengshou

    2014-01-01

    The properties of blood flow in the outflow cannula of an axial blood pump play a critical role in potential thrombus formation and vascular injury. In this study, an in vitro flow visualization technique using particle image velocimetry (PIV) was applied to investigate the flow characteristics in the outflow cannula of a FW-2 model axial pump. The two-dimensional (2-D) flow field in the axial central section and the three-dimensional (3-D) flow field in the whole outflow cannula were examined with the PIV system. Tests were carried out with a blood-mimic working fluid in the axial pump at a rotational speed of 8500 ± 20 rpm with a flow rate of 5 L/min. The velocity distribution in the outflow cannula was analyzed to evaluate the flow characteristics. There was no backflow or stagnant flow in the tested area, while the flow velocity rapidly increased outside the boundary layer. A spiral flow was observed near the boundary layer, but this was worn off within the tested area. Based on the results, hemolysis and thrombus formation in the cannula, and injury to aortic endothelium are unlikely to occur due to spiral flow. PMID:24211890

  6. Solar-pumped gas laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of gas properties through detailed kinetic models led to the identification of critical gas parameters for use in choosing appropriate gas combinations for solar pumped lasers. Broadband photoabsorption in the visible or near UV range is required to excite large volumes of gas and to insure good solar absorption efficiency. The photoexcitation density is independent of the absorption bandwidth. The state excited must be a metastable state which is not quenched by the parent gas. The emission bandwidth must be less than 10 A to insure lasing threshold over reasonable gain lengths. The system should show a high degree of chemical reversibility and an insensitivity to increasing temperature. Other properties such as good quantum efficiency and kinetic efficiency are also implied. Although photoexcitation of electronic vibrational transitions is considered as a possible system if the emission bands sufficiently narrow, it appears that photodissociation into atomic metastables is more likely to result in a successful solar pumped laser system.

  7. Anatomy and Physiology of Left Ventricular Suction Induced by Rotary Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Salamonsen, Robert Francis; Lim, Einly; Moloney, John; Lovell, Nigel Hamilton; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L

    2015-08-01

    This study in five large greyhound dogs implanted with a VentrAssist left ventricular assist device focused on identification of the precise site and physiological changes induced by or underlying the complication of left ventricular suction. Pressure sensors were placed in left and right atria, proximal and distal left ventricle, and proximal aorta while dual perivascular and tubing ultrasonic flow meters measured blood flow in the aortic root and pump outlet cannula. When suction occurred, end-systolic pressure gradients between proximal and distal regions of the left ventricle on the order of 40-160 mm Hg indicated an occlusive process of variable intensity in the distal ventricle. A variable negative flow difference between end systole and end diastole (0.5-3.4 L/min) was observed. This was presumably mediated by variable apposition of the free and septal walls of the ventricle at the pump inlet cannula orifice which lasted approximately 100 ms. This apposition, by inducing an end-systolic flow deficit, terminated the suction process by relieving the imbalance between pump requirement and delivery from the right ventricle. Immediately preceding this event, however, unnaturally low end-systolic pressures occurred in the left atrium and proximal left ventricle which in four dogs lasted for 80-120 ms. In one dog, however, this collapse progressed to a new level and remained at approximately -5 mm Hg across four heart beats at which point suction was relieved by manual reduction in pump speed. Because these pressures were associated with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure of -5 mm Hg as well, they indicate total collapse of the entire pulmonary venous system, left atrium, and left ventricle which persisted until pump flow requirement was relieved by reducing pump speed. We suggest that this collapse caused the whole vascular region from pulmonary capillaries to distal left ventricle to behave as a Starling resistance which further reduced right

  8. Design analysis and performance assessment of hybrid magnetic bearings for a rotary centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhaohui; Jahanmir, Said; Heshmat, Hooshang; Hunsberger, Andrew Z; Walton, James F

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid magnetic bearing system was designed for a rotary centrifugal blood pump being developed to provide long-term circulatory support for heart failure patients. This design consists of two compact bearings to suspend the rotor in five degrees-of-freedom with single axis active control. Permanent magnets are used to provide passive radial support and electromagnets to maintain axial stability of the rotor. Characteristics of the passive radial and active thrust magnetic bearing system were evaluated by the electromagnetic finite element analysis. A proportional-integral-derivative controller with force balance algorithm was implemented for closed loop control of the magnetic thrust bearing. The control position is continuously adjusted based on the electrical energy in the bearing coils, and thus passive magnetic forces carry static thrust loads to minimize the bearing current. Performance of the magnetic bearing system with associated control algorithm was evaluated at different operating conditions. The bearing current was significantly reduced with the force balance control method and the power consumption was below 0.5 W under various thrust loads. The bearing parameters predicted by the analysis were validated by the experimental data. PMID:19381082

  9. Mathematical model development and simulation of heat pump fruit dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Achariyaviriya, S.; Soponronnarit, S.; Terdyothin, A.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of a heat pump fruit dryer was developed to study the performance of heat pump dryers. Using the moisture content of papaya glace drying, the refrigerant temperature at the evaporator and condenser and the performance, was verified. It was found that the simulated results using closed loop heat pump dryer were close to the experimental results. The criteria for evaluating the performance were specific moisture extraction rate and drying rate. The results showed that ambient conditions affected significantly on the performance of the open loop dryer and the partially closed loop dryer. Also, the fraction of evaporator bypass air affected markedly the performance of all heat pump dryers. In addition, it was found that specific air flow rate and drying air temperature affected significantly the performance of all heat pump dryers.

  10. A new technique to control brushless motor for blood pump application.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Jeison; Andrade, Aron; Nicolosi, Denys E C; Biscegli, José F; Legendre, Daniel; Bock, Eduardo; Lucchi, Júlio César

    2008-04-01

    This article presents a back-electromotive force (BEMF)-based technique of detection for sensorless brushless direct current motor (BLDCM) drivers. The BLDCM has been chosen as the energy converter in rotary or pulsatile blood pumps that use electrical motors for pumping. However, in order to operate properly, the BLDCM driver needs to know the shaft position. Usually, that information is obtained through a set of Hall sensors assembled close to the rotor and connected to the electronic controller by wires. Sometimes, a large distance between the motor and controller makes the system susceptible to interference on the sensor signal because of winding current switching. Thus, the goal of the sensorless technique presented in this study is to avoid this problem. First, the operation of BLDCM was evaluated on the electronic simulator PSpice. Then, a BEMF detector circuitry was assembled in our laboratories. For the tests, a sensor-dependent system was assembled where the direct comparison between the Hall sensors signals and the detected signals was performed. The obtained results showed that the output sensorless detector signals are very similar to the Hall signals at speeds of more than 2500 rpm. Therefore, the sensorless technique is recommended as a responsible or redundant system to be used in rotary blood pumps. PMID:18370953

  11. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W; Burger, Aaron F; Day, Steven W

    2011-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers' initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  12. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W.; Burger, Aaron F.; Day, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers’ initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  13. Seal-less centrifugal blood pump with magnetically suspended rotor: rot-a-flot.

    PubMed

    Mendler, N; Podechtl, F; Feil, G; Hiltmann, P; Sebening, F

    1995-07-01

    Limitations of current centrifugal blood pumps are related to heat generation of bearings and leakage of seals, to dead water zones, and to poor efficiency. A new concept is proposed in this paper to ameliorate these problems based on a miniaturized magnetic drive, and a prototype is introduced. The pump rotor is suspended and driven by a radial permanent magnetic field that stabilizes the impeller in 4 of the 6 spatial degrees of freedom and allows it to be top-spun on a single blood-flushed pivot bearing with minimal load and friction. A shrouded impeller with an open center and 4 logarithmically curved channels is run inside a cone-and-plate-type housing with a spiral volute chamber. In vitro testing was performed comparing this design with the BioMedicus, St. Jude, and Sarns pumps. The prototype is demonstrated to have the smallest internal volume (35 ml), surface (190 qcm), and passage time (0.5 s at 4 L/min), as well as the highest hydraulic efficiency (up to 0.4) of all devices studied. PMID:8572962

  14. A novel integrated rotor of axial blood flow pump designed with computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xue, Song; Gui, Xing-min; Sun, Han-song; Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Xiao-dong; Hu, Sheng-Shou

    2007-07-01

    Due to the smaller size, smaller artificial surface, and higher efficiency, axial blood pumps have been widely applied in clinic in recent years. However, because of its high rotor speed, axial flow pump always has a high risk for hemolysis, which the red blood cells devastated by the shearing of tip clearance flow. We reported a novel design with the integrated blade-shroud structure that was expected to solve this problem by abolishing the radial clearance between blade and casing designed with the techniques of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, the numerical simulation result of the newly designed structure showed an unexpected backflow (where flow velocity is reverse of the main flow direction) at the blade tip. In order to eliminate this backflow, four flow passes were attempted, and the expansion angles (which reflect the radial amplification of the flow pass, on the meridional section, and should be defined as the angle between the center line of the flow pass and the axial direction) of the blades of the integrated rotor are 0 degrees, 8 degrees, 15 degrees, and 20 degrees, respectively. In the CFD result, it could be easily found as the expansion angles increased, the backflow was restrained gradually, and was eliminated at last. After numerous "cut and try" circles, the pump model was finally optimized. The numerical simulation of this model also showed a stable hydraulic characteristic. PMID:17584484

  15. The Aachen MiniHLM--a miniaturized heart-lung machine for neonates with an integrated rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Arens, Jutta; Schnoering, Heike; Pfennig, Michael; Mager, Ilona; Vázquez-Jiménez, Jaime F; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    The operation of congenital heart defects in neonates often requires the use of heart-lung machines (HLMs) to provide perfusion and oxygenation. This is prevalently followed by serious complications inter alia caused by hemodilution and extrinsic blood contact surfaces. Thus, one goal of developing a HLM for neonates is the reduction of priming volume and contact surface. The currently available systems offer reasonable priming volumes for oxygenators, reservoirs, etc. However, the necessary tubing system contains the highest volumes within the whole system. This is due to the use of roller pumps; hence, the resulting placement of the complete HLM is between 1 and 2 m away from the operating table due to connective tubing between the components. Therefore, we pursued a novel approach for a miniaturized HLM (MiniHLM) by integrating all major system components in one single device. In particular, the MiniHLM is a HLM with the rotary blood pump centrically integrated into the oxygenator and a heat exchanger integrated into the cardiotomy reservoir which is directly connected to the pump inlet. Thus, tubing is only necessary between the patient and MiniHLM. A total priming volume of 102 mL (including arterial filter and a/v line) could be achieved. To validate the overall concept and the specific design we conducted several in vitro and in vivo test series. All tests confirm the novel concept of the MiniHLM. Its low priming volume and blood contact surface may significantly reduce known complications related to cardiopulmonary bypass in neonates (e.g., inflammatory reaction and capillary leak syndrome). PMID:20883389

  16. Fluid dynamic characteristics of the VentrAssist rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Tansley, G; Vidakovic, S; Reizes, J

    2000-06-01

    The VentrAssist pump has no shaft or seal, and the device is unique in design because the rotor is suspended passively by hydrodynamic forces, and urging is accomplished by an integrated direct current motor rotor that also acts as the pump impeller. This device has led to many challenges in its fluidic design, namely large flow-blockage from impeller blades, low stiffness of bearings with concomitant impeller displacement under pulsatile load conditions, and very small running clearances. Low specific speed and radial blade off-flow were selected in order to minimize the hemolysis. Pulsatile and steady-flow tests show the impeller is stable under normal operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to optimize flow paths and reduce net axial force imbalance to acceptably small values. The latest design of the pump achieved a system efficiency of 18% (in 30% hematocrit of red blood cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline), and efficiency was optimized over the range of operating conditions. Parameters critical to improving pump efficiency were investigated. PMID:10886070

  17. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a centrifugal blood pump with washout holes.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Y; Ito, K; Sawairi, T; Konishi, Y; Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Masuzawa, T; Tsukiya, T; Endo, S; Taenaka, Y

    2000-08-01

    The authors studied avoidance of coagulation occurrence using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis from the fluid dynamical point of view. Concerning centrifugal pumps, blood coagulation sometimes occurs at the region behind the impeller where the flow is generally stagnant. Therefore, we conducted a thorough study with the specimen pump with and without washout holes, mocking up the Nikkiso HPM-15. As the result, the model with washout holes indicated that the fluid rotates rapidly at the vicinity of the shaft and generates washout effects near the stationary rear casing. On the other hand, the model without washout holes showed that fluid cannot be quickly shipped out of the area behind the impeller and rotates mildly around the shaft. To clarify the moving relations between the impeller and the fluid, validation studies by comparing the results of CFD analysis and flow visualization experiments are ongoing; thus far, the studies show that CFD results are similar to the results from flow visualization experiments. PMID:10971255

  18. Blood pressure regulation X: What happens when the muscle pump is lost? Post-exercise hypotension and syncope

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, John R.; Sieck, Dylan C.; Romero, Steven A.; Buck, Tahisha M.; Ely, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Syncope which occurs suddenly in the setting of recovery from exercise, known as post-exercise syncope, represents a failure of integrative physiology during recovery from exercise. We estimate that between 50 and 80% of healthy individuals will develop pre-syncopal signs and symptoms if subjected to a 15-min head-up tilt following exercise. Post-exercise syncope is most often neurally mediated syncope during recovery from exercise, with a combination of factors associated with post-exercise hypotension and loss of the muscle pump contributing to the onset of the event. One can consider the initiating reduction in blood pressure as the tip of the proverbial iceberg. What is needed is a clear model of what lies under the surface; a model that puts the observational variations in context and provides a rational framework for developing strategic physical or pharmacological countermeasures to ultimately protect cerebral perfusion and avert loss of consciousness. This review summarizes the current mechanistic understanding of post-exercise syncope and attempts to categorize the variation of the physiological processes that arise in multiple exercise settings. Newer investigations into the basic integrative physiology of recovery from exercise provide insight into the mechanisms and potential interventions that could be developed as countermeasures against post-exercise syncope. While physical counter maneuvers designed to engage the muscle pump and augment venous return are often found to be beneficial in preventing a significant drop in blood pressure after exercise, countermeasures that target the respiratory pump and pharmacological countermeasures based on the involvement of histamine receptors show promise. PMID:24197081

  19. Left ventricular volume unloading with axial and centrifugal rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Koenig, Steven C; Soucy, Kevin G; Choi, Young; Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Bartoli, Carlo R; Monreal, Gretel; Sobieski, Michael A; Schumer, Erin; Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Axial (AX) and centrifugal (CFG) rotary blood pumps have gained clinical acceptance for the treatment of advanced heart failure. Differences between AX and CFG designs and mechanism of blood flow delivery may offer clinical advantages. In this study, pump characteristics, and acute physiologic responses during support with AX (HeartMate II) and CFG (HVAD) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) were investigated in mock loop and chronic ischemic heart failure bovine models. In the mock loop model, pump performance was characterized over a range of pump speeds (HeartMate II: 7,000-11,000 rpm, HVAD: 2,000-3,600 rpm) and fluid viscosities (2.7 cP, 3.2 cP, 3.7 cP). In the ischemic heart failure bovine model, hemodynamics, echocardiography, and end-organ perfusion were investigated. CFG LVAD had a flatter HQ curve, required less power, and had a more linear flow estimation relation than AX LVAD. The flow estimation error for the AX LVAD (±0.9 L/min at 2.7 cP, ±0.7 L/min at 3.2 cP, ±0.8 L/min at 3.7 cP) was higher than the CFG LVAD (±0.5 L/min at 2.7 cP, ±0.2 L/min at 3.2 cP, ±0.5 L/min at 3.7 cP). No differences in acute hemodynamics, echocardiography, or end-organ perfusion between AX and CFG LVAD over a wide range of support were statistically discernible. These findings suggest no pronounced acute differences in LV volume unloading between AX and CFG LVAD. PMID:25635936

  20. The Molecular Control of Blood Cell Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Leo

    1987-12-01

    The establishment of a cell culture system for the clonal development of blood cells has made it possible to identify the proteins that regulate the growth and differentiation of different blood cell lineages and to discover the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cell development in blood forming tissues. A model system with myeloid blood cells has shown that (i) normal blood cells require different proteins to induce cell multiplication (growth inducers) and cell differentiation (differentiation inducers), (ii) there is a hierarchy of growth inducers as cells become more restricted in their developmental program, and (iii) a cascade of interactions between proteins determines the correct balance between immature and mature cells in normal blood cell development. Gene cloning has shown that there is a family of different genes for these proteins. Normal protein regulators of blood cell development can control the abnormal growth of certain types of leukemic cells and suppress malignancy by incuding differentiation to mature nondividing cells. Chromosome abnormalities that give rise to malignancy in these leukemic cells can be bypassed and their effects nullified by inducing differentiation, which stops cells from multiplying. These blood cell regulatory proteins are active in culture and in the body, and they can be used clinically to correct defects in blood cell development.

  1. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. PMID:26736996

  2. Development of a jet pump-assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe is described. The concept utilizes a built-in capillary driven jet pump to remove vapor and gas from the artery and to prime it. The continuous pumping action also prevents depriming during operation of the heat pipe. The concept is applicable to fixed conductance and gas loaded variable conductance heat pipes. A theoretical model for the jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe is presented. The model was used to design a prototype for laboratory demonstration. The 1.2 m long heat pipe was designed to transport 500 watts and to prime at an adverse elevation of up to 1.3 cm. The test results were in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The heat pipe carried as much as 540 watts and was able to prime up to 1.9 cm. Introduction of a considerable amount of noncondensible gas had no adverse effect on the priming capability.

  3. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  4. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response. PMID:20839658

  5. Studies of turbulence models in a computational fluid dynamics model of a blood pump.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinwei; Wood, Houston G; Day, Steven W; Olsen, Don B

    2003-10-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used widely in design of rotary blood pumps. The choice of turbulence model is not obvious and plays an important role on the accuracy of CFD predictions. TASCflow (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, U.S.A.) has been used to perform CFD simulations of blood flow in a centrifugal left ventricular assist device; a k-epsilon model with near-wall functions was used in the initial numerical calculation. To improve the simulation, local grids with special distribution to ensure the k-omega model were used. Iterations have been performed to optimize the grid distribution and turbulence modeling and to predict flow performance more accurately comparing to experimental data. A comparison of k-omega model and experimental measurements of the flow field obtained by particle image velocimetry shows better agreement than k-epsilon model does, especially in the near-wall regions. PMID:14616539

  6. Blood flow analysis for the secondary impeller of an IVAS heart pump.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Ding, W; Smith, W A; Golding, L A

    1997-01-01

    The rotodynamic heart pump (IVAS), designed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, includes a secondary flow path along the journal bearing, through a secondary impeller, and over the rotor outer surface. The flow behaviors of the blood through the journal bearing and the secondary impeller are investigated by a computational fluid dynamics method that solves the 3-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using a new solution algorithm. Results of the analyses include: 1) the blood flow patterns within the journal bearing, 2) the effect of the non-uniform bearing clearance on the flow patterns of the impeller cavity, 3) the flow patterns around a secondary impeller blade that include effects of tip clearance and the gap between the blade and the inner or outer side wall, 4) effects of the blade angles on the secondary impeller performance, and 5) the shear stress distribution. PMID:9360151

  7. Direct detection of cancer biomarkers in blood using a “place n play” modular polydimethylsiloxane pump

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Honglian; Li, Gang; Liao, Lingying; Mao, HongJu; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2013-01-01

    Cancer biomarkers have significant potential as reliable tools for the early detection of the disease and for monitoring its recurrence. However, most current methods for biomarker detection have technical difficulties (such as sample preparation and specific detector requirements) which limit their application in point of care diagnostics. We developed an extremely simple, power-free microfluidic system for direct detection of cancer biomarkers in microliter volumes of whole blood. CEA and CYFRA21-1 were chosen as model cancer biomarkers. The system automatically extracted blood plasma from less than 3 μl of whole blood and performed a multiplex sample-to-answer assay (nano-ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) technique) without the use of external power or extra components. By taking advantage of the nano-ELISA technique, this microfluidic system detected CEA at a concentration of 50 pg/ml and CYFRA21-1 at a concentration of 60 pg/ml within 60 min. The combination of PnP polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pump and nano-ELISA technique in a single microchip system shows great promise for the detection of cancer biomarkers in a drop of blood. PMID:24404025

  8. A novel design of spiral groove bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing; Zou, Jun; Ruan, Xiaodong; Fu, Xin; Yang, Huayong

    2012-08-01

    Good washout is very important in spiral groove bearing (SGB) designs when applied to blood pumps due to the micrometer scales of lubrication films and groove depths. To improve washout, flow rate or leakage through SGBs should be as large as possible. However, this special goal violates conventional SGB designs in which no leakage is desired as the leakage would decrease load-carrying capacity significantly. So, a design concept is formed fulfilling the two goals of high load-carrying capacity and large flow rate: let groove width decrease along flow path and the mating surface of the rotor rotate with a direction facilitating the flow through the grooves. Under this concept, a novel SGB is designed, contrary to conventional ones, with groove width decreasing with increasing spiral radius. This SGB is mounted on the motionless upper plate of our designed centrifugal blood pump, with the mating surface of rotor rotating with a direction facilitating the outward flow. To assess SGB designs, a characteristic plane is originally presented relating to pressure-normalized load-carrying capacity and flow rate. Comparisons between various kinds of SGB designs are made, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results are plotted in this characteristic plane from which load/flow performances can be directly read out. CFD and comparison results show that the new designs have superior load/flow characteristics. However, the impact of SGB designs upon hemolysis/thrombus formation is still to be verified according to the concept presented. PMID:22747897

  9. Current Advances in Developing Inhibitors of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Hannah Y; Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a significant challenge to future healthcare provision. An acronym ESKAPEE has been derived from the names of the organisms recognised as the major threats although there are a number of other organisms, notably Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that have become equally challenging to treat in the clinic. These pathogens are characterised by the ability to rapidly develop and/or acquire resistance mechanisms in response to exposure to different antimicrobial agents. A key part of the armoury of these pathogens is a series of efflux pumps, which effectively exclude or reduce the intracellular concentration of a large number of antibiotics, making the pathogens significantly more resistant. These efflux pumps are the topic of considerable interest, both from the perspective of basic understanding of efflux pump function, and its role in drug resistance but also as targets for the development of novel adjunct therapies. The necessity to overcome antimicrobial resistance has encouraged investigations into the characterisation of resistance-modifying efflux pump inhibitors to block the mechanisms of drug extrusion, thereby restoring antibacterial susceptibility and returning existing antibiotics into the clinic. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. This review discusses different bacterial EPIs originating from both natural source and chemical synthesis and examines the challenges to designing successful EPIs that can be useful against multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:26947776

  10. [Research on magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump control based on a self-tuning fuzzy PI algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haibo; Han, Lu; Xu, Liang

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the research and design of control system of magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump in our laboratory, and to briefly describe the structure of the magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump and principles of the body circulation model. The performance of blood pump is not only related to materials and structure, but also depends on the control algorithm. We studied the algorithm about motor current double-loop control for brushless DC motor. In order to make the algorithm adjust parameter change in different situations, we used the self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm and gave the details about how to design fuzzy rules. We mainly used Matlab Simulink to simulate the motor control system to test the performance of algorithm, and briefly introduced how to implement these algorithms in hardware system. Finally, by building the platform and conducting experiments, we proved that self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm could greatly improve both dynamic and static performance of blood pump and make the motor speed and the blood pump flow stable and adjustable. PMID:25764720

  11. Development of a nonthrombogenic collagenous blood-prosthetic interface.

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, W F; Colo, N A; Szycher, M; Wesolowski, J S; Haudenschild, C C; Franzblau, C C; Parkman, R; Liss, R H

    1980-01-01

    Investigations to develop an implantable assist pump for prolonged circulatory support have been impeded by accumulation of friable thrombus on the prosthetic interface, with subsequent embolization. To circumvent this problem, the textured, fibril surface of a polyurethane pump chamber (mat thickness 430 microns) was inoculated with cultured bovine fetal fibroblasts (labelled with thymidine-14C) prior to animal implantation. The pneumatically actuated device (stroke volume 75 ml), maintained a pulsatile blood flow throughout each study. In 20 calf experiments, extending up to 335 days, 30 X 10(6) fibroblasts (in 50 ml media) derived from a single Holstein fetus were distributed on the urethane surface (360 +/- 50 cells/mm2) by rotation of a sealed device for three hours (12 revolutions/hour). Following connection to the circulation, cell washout was minimal. Resultant biologic linings, examined after animal sacrifice, were densely adherent to the underlying polymer matrix, and varied in thickness from 250 micron-1.5 mm. Microscopically, fibroblasts were identified from the surface to base, accompanied by numerous collagen bundles and abundant ground substance. Amino acid analysis in 10/20 pumps implanted for 31--335 days, revealed 50 +/- 5 Hydroxyproline residues/1000 residues (50% collagen) and scant elastin. Donor fibroblasts were identified by radioautography and karyotyping. Lack of immunologic response in 12 Hereford pump recipients as confirmed by serial fibroblast cytotoxicity assays. In conclusion, an induced collagenous-blood interface permitted prolonged mechanical circulatory support in animals without thromboembolic complications. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Figs. 3A and B. Fig. 4A. Fig. 4B. PMID:6448027

  12. Ankle positions and exercise intervals effect on the blood flow velocity in the common femoral vein during ankle pumping exercises

    PubMed Central

    Toya, Kaori; Sasano, Ken; Takasoh, Tomomi; Nishimoto, Teppei; Fujimoto, Yuta; Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Yoshimatsu, Tatsuki; Kusaka, Satomi; Takahashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to identify the most effective method of performing ankle pumping exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 10 men. We measured time-averaged maximum flow velocity and peak systolic velocity in the common femoral vein using a pulse Doppler method with a diagnostic ultrasound system during nine ankle pumping exercises (three different ankle positions and three exercise intervals). Changes of blood flow velocity during ankle pumping exercises with different ankle positions and exercise intervals were compared. [Result] Peak systolic velocity of the leg-up position showed significantly lower values than those of the supine and head-up positions. For all exercise intervals, the increased amount of blood flow velocity in the leg-up position was significantly lower than that in the head-up and supine positions. [Conclusion] Ankle positions and exercise intervals must be considered when performing effective ankle pumping exercises. PMID:27065564

  13. Development and Optimized Design of Propeller Pump System & Structure with VFD in Low-head Pumping Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentian, Zhang; Honggeng, Zhu; Arnold, Jaap; Linbi, Yao

    2010-06-01

    Compared with vertical-installed pumps, the propeller (bulb tubular) pump systems can achieve higher hydraulic efficiencies, which are particularly suitable for low-head pumping stations. More than four propeller pumping stations are being, or will be built in the first stage of the S-to-N Water Diversion Project in China, diverting water from Yangtze River to the northern part of China to alleviate water-shortage problems and develop the economy. New structures of propeller pump have been developed for specified pumping stations in Jiangsu and Shandong Provinces respectively and Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) are used in those pumping stations to regulate operating conditions. Based on the Navier-Stokes equations and the standard k-e turbulent model, numerical simulations of the flow field and performance prediction in the propeller pump system were conducted on the platform of commercial software CFX by using the SIMPLEC algorithm. Through optimal design of bulb dimensions and diffuser channel shape, the hydraulic system efficiency has improved evidently. Furthermore, the structures of propeller pumps have been optimized to for the introduction of conventional as well as permanent magnet motors. In order to improve the hydraulic efficiency of pumping systems, both the pump discharge and the motor diameter were optimized respectively. If a conventional motor is used, the diameter of the pump casing has to be increased to accommodate the motor installed inside. If using a permanent magnet motor, the diameter of motor casing can be decreased effectively without decreasing its output power, thus the cross-sectional area is enlarged and the velocity of flowing water decreased favorably to reduce hydraulic loss of discharge channel and thereby raising the pumping system efficiency. Witness model tests were conducted after numerical optimization on specific propeller pump systems, indicating that the model system hydraulic efficiencies can be improved by 0.5%˜3.7% in

  14. Development of a mercury electromagnetic centrifugal pump for the SNAP-8 refractory boiler development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, R. A.; Schnacke, A. W.

    1974-01-01

    An electromagnetic pump, in which pressure is developed in mercury because of the interaction of the magnetic field and current which flows as a result of the voltage induced in the mercury contained in the pump duct, was developed for the SNAP-8 refractory boiler test facility. Pump performance results are presented for ten duct configurations and two stator sizes. These test results were used to design and fabricate a pump which met the SNAP-8 criteria of 530 psi developed pressure at 12,500 lb/hr. The pump operated continuously for over 13,000 hours without failure or performance degradation. Included in this report are descriptions of the experimental equipment, measurement techniques, all experimental data, and an analysis of the electrical losses in the pump.

  15. ADRC or adaptive controller--A simulation study on artificial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Zheng, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has gained popularity because it requires little knowledge about the system to be controlled, has the inherent disturbance rejection ability, and is easy to tune and implement in practical systems. In this paper, the authors compared the performance of an ADRC and an adaptive controller for an artificial blood pump for end-stage congestive heart failure patients using only the feedback signal of pump differential pressure. The purpose of the control system was to provide sufficient perfusion when the patients' circulation system goes through different pathological and activity variations. Because the mean arterial pressure is equal to the total peripheral flow times the total peripheral resistance, this goal was converted to an expression of making the mean aortic pressure track a reference signal. The simulation results demonstrated that the performance of the ADRC is comparable to that of the adaptive controller with the saving of modeling and computational effort and fewer design parameters: total peripheral flow and mean aortic pressure with ADRC fall within the normal physiological ranges in activity variation (rest to exercise) and in pathological variation (left ventricular strength variation), similar to those values of adaptive controller. PMID:26409226

  16. The flow patterns within the impeller passages of a centrifugal blood pump model.

    PubMed

    Yu, S C; Ng, B T; Chan, W K; Chua, L P

    2000-07-01

    The effects of impeller geometry on the performance of a centrifugal blood pump model [the MSCBP design of Akamatsu and Tsukiya (The Seventh Asian Congress of Fluid Mechanics (1997), 7-10) at a 1:1 scale] have been investigated both experimentally and computationally. Four impeller designs were tested for pump hydraulic performance at the operating point (i.e. 2000 rpm), using blood analog as the working fluid. Each impeller has seven blades with different configurations including the radial straight blade and backward swept blade designs. The results show that both designs can achieve a stable head of about 100 mm Hg at the operating point. Subsequent investigations involved the visualization of the relative flow field within the impeller passages via the image de-rotation system coupled with a 2.5 W argon ion laser. Flow structures in all sectors of each impeller were examined and discussed. To further quantify the possible effects of blade geometry to thrombus formation and hemolysis, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate a simplified two-dimensional blade-to-blade flow analysis so as to estimate the shear stress levels. The results indicate that the stress levels found within the blade passages are generally below the threshold level of 150 N/m(2) for extensive erythrocyte damage to occur. There are some localized regions near the leading edge of the blades where the stress levels are 60% above the threshold level. However, given such a short residence time for the fluid particles to go through these high shear stress regions, their effects appear to be insignificant. PMID:11086249

  17. Shaft/shaft-seal interface characteristics of a multiple disk centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Manning, K B; Miller, G E

    1999-06-01

    A multiple disk centrifugal pump (MDCP) is under investigation as a potential left ventricular assist device. As is the case with most shaft driven pumps, leakage problems around the shaft/shaft seal interface are of major interest. If leakage were to occur during or after implantation, potential events such as blood loss, clotting, blood damage, and/or infections might result in adverse effects for the patient. Because these effects could be quite disastrous, potential shaft and shaft seal materials have been investigated to determine the most appropriate course to limit these effects. Teflon and nylon shaft seals were analyzed as potential candidates along with a stainless steel shaft and a Melonite coated shaft. The materials and shafts were evaluated under various time durations (15, 30, 45, and 60 min), motor speeds (800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 rpm), and outer diameters (1/2 and 3/4 inches). The motor speed and geometrical configurations were typical for the MDCP under normal physiologic conditions. An air and water study was conducted to analyze the inner diameter wear, the inner temperature values, and the outer temperature values. Statistical comparisons were computed for the shaft seal materials, the shafts, and the outer diameters along with the inner and outer temperatures. The conclusions made from the results indicate that both the tested shaft seal materials and shaft materials are not ideal candidates to be used for the MDCP. Teflon experienced a significant amount of wear in air and water studies. Nylon did experience little wear, but heat generation was an evident problem. A water study on nylon was not conducted because of its molecular structure. PMID:10392284

  18. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    A dual-pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) instrument has been developed to obtain simultaneous measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in supersonic combustion and generate databases for validation and development of CFD codes. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. Approximately one million dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  19. Classification of Unsteady Flow Patterns in a Rotodynamic Blood Pump: Introduction of Non-Dimensional Regime Map.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fangjun; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Brackett, Jaclyn; Antaki, James F

    2015-09-01

    Rotodynamic blood pumps (also known as rotary or continuous flow blood pumps) are commonly evaluated in vitro under steady flow conditions. However, when these devices are used clinically as ventricular assist devices (VADs), the flow is pulsatile due to the contribution of the native heart. This study investigated the influence of this unsteady flow upon the internal hemodynamics of a centrifugal blood pump. The flow field within the median axial plane of the flow path was visualized with particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a transparent replica of the Levacor VAD. The replica was inserted in a dynamic cardiovascular simulator that synchronized the image acquisition to the cardiac cycle. As compared to steady flow, pulsatile conditions produced periodic, transient recirculation regions within the impeller and separation in the outlet diffuser. Dimensional analysis revealed that the flow characteristics could be uniquely described by the non-dimensional flow coefficient (Φ) and its time derivative ([Formula: see text]), thereby eliminating impeller speed from the experimental matrix. Four regimes within the Φ-[Formula: see text] plane were found to classify the flow patterns, well-attached or disturbed. These results and methods can be generalized to provide insights for both design and operation of rotodynamic blood pumps for safety and efficacy. PMID:26577357

  20. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnotti, Gaetano

    Successful design of hypersonic air-breathing engines requires new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for turbulence and turbulence-chemistry interaction in supersonic combustion. Unfortunately, not enough data are available to the modelers to develop and validate their codes, due to difficulties in taking measurements in such a harsh environment. Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is a non-intrusive, non-linear, laser-based technique that provides temporally and spatially resolved measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in H2-air flames. A dual-pump CARS instrument has been developed to obtain measurements in supersonic combustion and generate databases for the CFD community. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. The facility provides a central jet of hot "vitiated air" simulating the hot air entering the engine of a hypersonic vehicle flying at Mach numbers between 5 and 7. Three different silicon carbide nozzles, with exit Mach number 1, 1.6 and 2, are used to provide flows with the effects of varying compressibility. H2 co-flow is available in order to generate a supersonic combusting free jet. Dual-pump CARS measurements have been obtained for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Approximately one million Dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N 2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  1. LED pumped Nd:YAG laser development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, G. I.; Kiang, Y. C.; Lynch, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a development program for light emitting diode (LED) pumped Nd:YAG lasers are described. An index matching method to increase the coupling efficiency of the laser is described. A solid glass half-cylinder of 5.0 by 5.6 centimeters was used for index matching and also as a pumping cavity reflector. The laser rods were 1.5 by 56 millimeters with dielectric coatings on both end surfaces. The interfaces between the diode array, glass cylinder, and laser rod were filled with viscous fluid of refractive index n = 1.55. Experiments performed with both the glass cylinder and a gold coated stainless steel reflector of the same dimensions under the same operating conditions indicate that the index matching cylinder gave 159 to 200 percent improvement of coupling efficiency over the metal reflector at various operating temperatures.

  2. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Development of an optically pumped polarized deuterium target

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Holt, R.J.; Green, M.C.; Kowalczyk, R.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a polarized deuterium target for internal use at an electron storage ring is of great interest for fundamental studies in nuclear physics. In order to achieve the maximum allowable target thickness, 10/sup 14/ nuclei/cm/sup 2/, consistent with various constraints imposed by the storage ring environment, a flux of 4 x 10/sup 17/ polarized atom/s must be provided. This flux exceeds the capability of conventional atomic beam sources by an order of magnitude. We have been developing an alternative source based upon the spin-exchange optical pumping method in which the flux is limited only by laser power. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Development of a vapor compression heat pump for space use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, F.; Savage, C. J.

    1981-06-01

    A heat pump is presently developed for use in Spacelab as a stand-alone refrigeration unit as well as within a fluid loop system. It is expected to feature a high coefficient of performance because its power requirement is minimized through continuous adjustment of two operating parameters of its vapor compression cycle, i.e., evaporator pressure and compressor speed, to the instantaneous cooling requirements and heat rejection conditions. The heat pump system will achieve the highest possible cooling rate as long as the temperature of the payload to be cooled is significantly above the desired level, and it will minimize the difference between actual and set heat source temperature when this difference has become small. The most complicated component of the heat pump is the reciprocating vapor compressor. This component's main features are described and its experimentally determined performance parameters are given. Based on these parameters, operating maps, showing achievable heat source temperatures and cooling rates with curves of constant power consumption included, are presented for different temperatures of the fluid to which the heat is rejected.

  5. Development and optimization of buspirone oral osmotic pump tablet.

    PubMed

    Derakhshandeh, K; Berenji, M Ghasemnejad

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to design a porous osmotic pump-based drug delivery system for controlling the release of buspirone from the delivery system. The osmotic pump was successfully developed using symmetric membrane coating. The core of the tablets was prepared by direct compression technique and coated using dip-coating technique. Drug release from the osmotic system was studied using USP paddle type apparatus. The effect of various processing variables such as the amount of osmotic agent, the amount of swellable polymer, concentration of the core former, concentration of the plasticizer, membrane thickness, quantum of orifice on drug release from osmotic pump were evaluated. Different kinetic models (zero order, first order and Higuchi model) were applied to drug release data in order to establish the kinetics of drug release. It was found that the drug release was mostly affected by the amount of NaCl as osmotic agent, the swellable polymer; hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), the amount of PEG-400 and cellulose acetate in the coating solution and thickness of the semipermeable membrane. The optimized formulation released buspirone independent of pH and orifice quantum at the osmogen amount of 42%, hydrophilic polymer of 13% and pore size of 0.8 mm on the tablet surface. The drug release of osmotic formulation during 24 h showed zero order kinetics and could be suggested that this formulation as a once-daily regimen improves pharmacokinetic parameters of the drug and enhances patient compliance. PMID:25657794

  6. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump. PMID:19894088

  7. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for temporary ventricular support. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump (NRP) devices for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) for NRP devices for temporary ventricular support. FDA is also revising the title and identification of the regulation for NRP devices in this order. PMID:26054096

  8. Thrombosis and blood cells in atherosclerosis development.

    PubMed

    Santolaya, C; Hernández, M R; Villaverde, C A

    1988-06-01

    Hemorheological changes produced in blood cells seem to be essential in atheroma plaque development and thrombotic episodes. In this study, we investigated the relationship between blood cells count, thrombogenic situations and morphological mesenteric alterations in atherosclerotic rats. Atherosclerosis was induced by an atherogenic diet made up of two phases, the first a hypervitaminic diet, and the second a hyperlipidic one. Cell counts were performed with Thoma's camera. Morphological changes were observed directly in rat mesentery. Thrombogenic situations were investigated by a mesenteric microthrombosis induction method. In atherosclerotic animals we can observe a higher mesenteric opacity, increase in blood viscosity and a thickness in vessel wall. Thrombosis time is shortened at 3 days, which indicates a thrombogenic situation although at 10 days there is a lenthening in this parameter. Blood cell counts were not modified significantly, but modifications in differential leukocyte counts were significant. We found a direct relationship between lymphocyte number and thrombosis time whereas with granulocytes this relationship was inverse: shortening in thrombosis time appearing simultaneously with an increase in cell number. PMID:3419397

  9. In vitro study to estimate particle release from a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Takami, Yoshiyuki

    2006-05-01

    Centrifugal pumps have been increasingly used in clinical settings. Like roller pumps, centrifugal pumps can cause debris release due to mechanical stress. The objectives of this study were to evaluate in vitro the particle release from a centrifugal pump, Gyro Pump (Japan Medical Materials Co., Osaka, Japan), which is a pivot-bearing supported pump clinically used in Japan, and to identify the released particles. In the clean room Class 10,000, the pump was operated for 24 h at 4000 rpm and 6 L/min in a mock loop filled with lactated Ringer's solution. After 24 h, the sample fluid and a blank were filtered with a 0.45-microm membrane filter for microscopic counting, followed by observation with a scanning electron microscope and element analysis with an X-ray spectrometer. Microscopic countings were 128 +/- 42 in the test samples (n = 10) of the Gyro Pump and 98 +/- 42 in the blank samples (n = 10) (P = 0.12). The oxygen/carbon atomic ratio of the particles in the test samples was 0.32 +/- 0.06, which was similar to the ratio of the particles in the blank sample (0.34 +/- 0.06). The profiles of elements with an X-ray spectrometer showed that the released particles from the Gyro Pump were not derived from the pump materials. In conclusion, an in vitro test system has been established for estimation of particle release from a centrifugal pump. Based upon the results with the system, the Gyro Pump with a pivot-bearing system has little risk to release debris particles even in a severe condition. PMID:16683955

  10. FIELD TRIALS OF NEWLY DEVELOPED POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT SUBMERSIBLE PUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Rob Beard

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this grant was to evaluate under real world conditions the performance of a new type of downhole pump, the hydraulically driven submersible diaphragm pump. This pump is supplied by Pumping Solutions Incorporated, Albuquerque NM. The original scope of the project was to install 10 submersible pumps, and compare that to 10 similar installations of rod pumps. As an operator, the system as tested was not ready for prime time, but has shown the ability to reduce costs, and increase production, if run times can be improved. The PSI group did improve the product and offered excellent service. The latest design appears to be much better, but more test data is needed to show short run life is not a problem. PSI and Beard Oil intend to continue testing the pump with non-government funding. The testing to date did not uncover any fundamental problems that would preclude the widespread use of this pump, and as an operator, I believe that with further improvement and testing, the pump can have a significant impact on stripper well costs. On the positive side, the pump was easy to run, was more power efficient then a rod pump, and is the only submersible that could handle the large quantities of solids typical of the production environment found at the Weber field and in CMB production. The product shows much promise for the future, and with continued design and testing, this type of submersible pump has the potential to become the standard of the industry.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH PERFORMANCE COLD CLIMATE HEAT PUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Travis; Groll, Eckhard A.; Braun, James E.

    2014-06-01

    The primary goals of the proposed project were to develop, test, and evaluate a high performance and cost-effective vapor compression air-source heat pump for use in cold climate regions. Vapor compression heat pumps are a proven technology, and have been used for many years to meet heating requirements for buildings in residential, commercial, and industrial applications. However, in climate regions that experience very low outdoor ambient temperatures both the heating capacity and coefficient of performance (COP) of traditional air-source vapor compression heat pumps drops dramatically with a decrease in the outdoor air temperature. The efficiency of heat pumping equipment has improved substantially over the past 20 years; however, the efficiencies of the highest rated equipment on the market are approaching practical limits that cannot be surpassed without modifications to the basic cycle and possibly the use of additional hardware. In this report, three technologies to improve the efficiency of vapor compression systems are described. These are a) vapor injected compression, b) oil flooded compression and c) hybrid flow control of the evaporator. Compressor prototypes for both, oil flooded and vapor injected compression were developed by Emerson Climate Technologies. For the oil flooded compressor, the oil injection port location was optimized and an internal oil separator was added using several design iterations. After initial testing at Emerson Climate Technologies, further testing was done at Purdue University, and compressor models were developed. These models were then integrated into a system model to determine the achievable improvement of seasonal energy efficiency (SEER) for Minneapolis (Minnesota) climate. For the oil flooded compression, a 34% improvement in seasonal energy efficiency was found while a 21% improvement in seasonal energy efficiency ratio was found for the vapor injected compression. It was found that one benefit of both tested

  12. A computational study of the effects of inlet guide vanes on the performance of a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chan, W K; Wong, Y W; Yu, S C M; Chua, L P

    2002-06-01

    This article presents computational studies on the effects of inlet guide vanes (IGVs) on the flow pattern and shear stress in a centrifugal blood pump. The effect of IGVs is to introduce a pre-swirl to fluid particles entering the impeller with the intention that the fluid particles will travel along the blade profile. Currently, most commercial centrifugal blood pumps employ straight radial impeller blades that are not hydrodynamically ideal for a good flow pattern within the blade passage. Flow separation and formation of vortices within the blade passage are believed to increase the degree of hemolysis and thrombosis. These are causes for blood clotting that will lead to malfunctioning of ventricular assist devices. Four IGVs of different geometrical profiles have been numerically investigated using a commercial software program CFX-Tascflow. The pump is operated at 2,000 rpm, and the results revealed that the relative flow patterns in the blade passage have been dramatically altered. The size of the vortices was reduced, and the pressure contours indicated a gradual rise from the impeller leading edge to the trailing edge. However, inclusion of IGV causes a drop in the pressure head generated. Higher frictional losses are incurred as fluid particles passed through the IGV. In addition, the IGV modifies the inlet velocity triangles, and this also contributes to a drop in the pressure head generated that is consistent with Euler's pump theory. The change in the flow patterns and the gradual variation of the pressure contours have led to lower shear stress within the blade passages as compared to the case without IGVs. PMID:12072110

  13. Development of a Compact, Efficient Cooling Pump for Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Boeyen, Roger; Reeh, Jonathan; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A compact, low-power electrochemically-driven fluid cooling pump is currently being developed by Lynntech, Inc. With no electric motor and minimal lightweight components, the pump is significantly lighter than conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps. Reliability and robustness is achieved with the absence of rotating or moving components (apart from the bellows). By employing sulfonated polystyrene-based proton exchange membranes, rather than conventional Nafion membranes, a significant reduction in the actuator power consumption was demonstrated. Lynntech also demonstrated that these membranes possess the necessary mechanical strength, durability, and temperature range for long life space operation. The preliminary design for a Phase II prototype pump compares very favorably to the fluid cooling pumps currently used in space suit primary life support systems (PLSSs). Characteristics of the electrochemically-driven pump are described and the benefits of the technology as a replacement for electric motor pumps in mechanically pumped single-phase fluid loops is discussed.

  14. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  15. [The on-line simulation of blood propofol concentration by personal computer transmitting settings of the syringe pump via a digital port].

    PubMed

    Nakao, M

    1997-02-01

    A program for on-line simulation of blood propofol concentration was developed. Various pharmacokinetic model programs are available for the estimation of intravenous anesthetic concentration. But manual entry of data such as body weight, rate of infusion and the timing of changing the flow rate is mandatory in these programs. This limited the use of these programs for investigational use only. In a new program, the data required such as total dose, flow rate, body weight and time were collected automatically on-line via the digital outlet of the syringe driven pump (Terumo STC525X, Japan and Graseby 3500, UK) to a personal computer (Apple Macintosh Power Book Duo230 or Power Book 520, USA). Based on the obtained data, pharmacokinetic model was solved with personal computer. Calculated blood concentrations of propofol were displayed in a numeric form and a trend graph was obtained. This program provides useful information for maintainance of anesthesia with propofol. PMID:9071117

  16. Blood flow measurements within optic nerve head during on-pump cardiovascular operations. A window to the brain?

    PubMed

    Nenekidis, Ioannis; Geiser, Martial; Riva, Charles; Pournaras, Constantin; Tsironi, Evangelia; Vretzakis, Georgios; Mitilis, Vasilios; Tsilimingas, Nikolaos

    2011-05-01

    This observational study is conducted to demonstrate optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow alterations during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in routine on-pump cardiovascular operations in order to evaluate the perfusion status of important autoregulatory tissue vascular beds during moderate hypothermia. Twenty-one patients free from eye disease were prospectively enrolled in our database. Perioperative ONH blood flow measurements were performed using a hand-held portable ocular laser Doppler flowmeter just after administration of general anesthesia and during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) upon the lowest temperature point of moderate hypothermia. Important operative flow variables were correlated to optic nerve blood flow during surgical phases. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction of 32.1 ± 14.5% of mean ONH blood flow in phase 2 (P < 0.0001) compared to the reference flow values of phase 1. A negative univariate association between ECC time and ONH blood flow in phase 2 (P = 0.031) is noted. This angiokinetic approach can detect changes of flow within autoregulatory vascular tissue beds like ONH, thus creating a 'window' on cerebral microvasculature. ONH blood flow is reduced during CPB. Our data suggest that it is of paramount importance to avoid extracorporeal prolongation even in moderate hypothermic cardiovascular operations. PMID:21297131

  17. Pressure-Flow Experimental Performance of New Intravascular Blood Pump Designs for Fontan Patients.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Fox, Carson S; Riddle, Michelle L; McKenna, Kelli L; Patel, Jay P; Rozolis, John T; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2016-03-01

    An intravascular axial flow pump is being developed as a mechanical cavopulmonary assist device for adolescent and adult patients with dysfunctional Fontan physiology. Coupling computational modeling with experimental evaluation of prototypic designs, this study examined the hydraulic performance of 11 impeller prototypes with blade stagger or twist angles varying from 100 to 600 degrees. A refined range of twisted blade angles between 300 and 400 degrees with 20-degree increments was then selected, and four additional geometries were constructed and hydraulically evaluated. The prototypes met performance expectations and produced 3-31 mm Hg for flow rates of 1-5 L/min for 6000-8000 rpm. A regression analysis was completed with all characteristic coefficients contributing significantly (P < 0.0001). This analysis revealed that the impeller with 400 degrees of blade twist outperformed the other designs. The findings of the numerical model for 300-degree twisted case and the experimental results deviated within approximately 20%. In an effort to simplify the impeller geometry, this work advanced the design of this intravascular cavopulmonary assist device closer to preclinical animal testing. PMID:26333131

  18. Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D; Hern, Shawn; McDowell, Tim; Munk, Jeffrey D; Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

  19. Numerical investigation of the effects of the clearance gap between the inducer and impeller of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chan, Weng-Kong; Wong, Yew-Wah; Ong, Wendy; Koh, Sy-Yuan; Chong, Victor

    2005-03-01

    A series of numerical models are generated to investigate the flow characteristics and performance of an axial blood pump. The pump model includes a straightener, an inducer-impeller, and diffuser. Numerical studies of the effects of angular alignment of the inducer and impeller blades and the axial clearance gap between the inducer and impeller are presented in this article. The pump characteristics derived from numerical simulation are validated with experimental data. Numerically simulated results showed a sinusoidal variation in the pressure generated across the pump with changes in angular alignment between the inducer and impeller. This is attributed to additional losses when flow is forced or diverted from the trailing edge of the inducer to either the pressure or suction side of the impeller blade when the alignment between the two sets of blades is not optimal. The pressure generated is a maximum when the impeller blades are at 0 or 30 degrees with respect to the inducer. The effect of rotating the impeller with respect to the inducer causes the sinusoidal pressure variation. In addition, it was observed that when the clearance gap between the inducer and impeller is reduced to 1 mm, the pressure generated is a minimum when compared to the other models. This is attributed to the interference between the inducer and impeller when the gap separating them is too small. The location of the maximum pressure on the pressure side of the impeller blade shifts upstream while its magnitude decreases for small clearance gap between the inducer and the impeller. There was no flow separation in the inducer while small regions of backflow are observed at the impeller trailing edge. Recommendations for future modifications and improvements to the pump design and model simulation are also given. PMID:15725228

  20. Development of an Ionic-Liquid Absorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Don

    2011-03-29

    Solar Fueled Products (SFP) is developing an innovative ionic-liquid absorption heat pump (ILAHP). The development of an ILAHP is extremely significant, as it could result in annual savings of more than 190 billion kW h of electrical energy and $19 billion. This absorption cooler uses about 75 percent less electricity than conventional cooling and heating units. The ILAHP also has significant environmental sustainability benefits, due to reduced CO2 emissions. Phase I established the feasibility and showed the economic viability of an ILAHP with these key accomplishments: • Used the breakthrough capabilities provided by ionic liquids which overcome the key difficulties of the common absorption coolers. • Showed that the theoretical thermodynamic performance of an ILAHP is similar to existing absorption-cooling systems. • Established that the half-effect absorption cycle reduces the peak generator temperature, improving collector efficiency and reducing collector area. • Component testing demonstrated that the most critical components, absorber and generator, operate well with conventional heat exchangers. • Showed the economic viability of an ILAHP. The significant energy savings, sustainability benefits, and economic viability are compelling reasons to continue the ILAHP development.

  1. Development of a nonazeotropic heat pump for crew hygiene water heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, David H.; Deming, Glenn I.

    1991-01-01

    A heat pump system is currently under development to produce hot water for crew hygiene on future manned space missions. The heat pump uses waste heat sources and a nonazeotropic working fluid in a highly efficient cycle. The potential benefits include a reduction in peak power draw from 2 to 5 kW for electric cartridge heaters to just more than 100 W for the heat pump. As part of the heat pump development project, a unique high efficiency compressor was developed to maintain lubrication in a zero-gravity environment.

  2. Ground Source Integrated Heat Pump (GS-IHP) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V. D.; Rice, K.; Murphy, R.; Munk, J.; Ally, Moonis; Shen, Bo; Craddick, William; Hearn, Shawn A.

    2013-05-24

    Between October 2008 and May 2013 ORNL and ClimateMaster, Inc. (CM) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop a groundsource integrated heat pump (GS-IHP) system for the US residential market. A initial prototype was designed and fabricated, lab-tested, and modeled in TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) to predict annual performance relative to 1) a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater) and 2) a state-of-the-art (SOA) two-capacity ground-source heat pump with desuperheater water heater (WH) option (GSHPwDS). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a 2600 ft{sup 2} (242 m{sup 2}) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 52 to 59%, averaging 55%, relative to the minimum efficiency suite. Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 68 to 78% relative to resistance WH. Predicted total annual savings for the GSHPwDS relative to the same baseline averaged 22.6% with water heating energy use reduced by 10 to 30% from desuperheater contributions. The 1st generation (or alpha) prototype design for the GS-IHP was finalized in 2010 and field test samples were fabricated for testing by CM and by ORNL. Two of the alpha units were installed in 3700 ft{sup 2} (345 m{sup 2}) houses at the ZEBRAlliance site in Oak Ridge and field tested during 2011. Based on the steady-state performance demonstrated by the GS-IHPs it was projected that it would achieve >52% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite at this specific site. A number of operational issues with the alpha units were identified indicating design changes needed to the system before market introduction could be accomplished. These were communicated to CM throughout the field test period. Based on the alpha unit test results and the diagnostic information coming from the field test

  3. THz Pump and X-Ray Probe Development at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan S; Durr, Hermann; Lindenberg, Aaron; Stanford U., Materials Sci.Dept.; Reis, David; Frisch, Josef; Loos, Henrik; Petree, Mark; Daranciang, Dan; Fuchs, Matthias; Ghimire, Shambhu; Goodfellow, John; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2011-11-08

    We report on measurements of broadband, intense, coherent transition radiation at terahertz frequencies, generated as the highly compressed electron bunches in Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) pass through a thin metal foil. The foil is inserted at 45{sup o} to the electron beam, 31 m downstream of the undulator. The THz emission passes downward through a diamond window to an optical table below the beamline. A fully compressed 350-pC bunch produces up to 0.5 mJ in a nearly half-cycle pulse of 50 fs FWHM with a spectrum peaking at 10 THz. We estimate a peak field at the focus of over 2.5 GV/m. A 20-fs Ti:sapphire laser oscillator has recently been installed for electro-optic measurements. We are developing plans to add an x-ray probe to this THz pump, by diffracting FEL x rays onto the table with a thin silicon crystal. The x rays would arrive with an adjustable time delay after the THz. This will provide a rapid start to user studies of materials excited by intense single-cycle pulses and will serve as a step toward a THz transport line for LCLS-II.

  4. Design and Evaluation of a Fully Implantable Control Unit for Blood Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Unthan, Kristin; Gräf, Felix; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Sommer, Christoph; Lanmüller, Hermann; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    As the number of donor hearts is limited while more and more patients suffer from end stage biventricular heart failure, Total Artificial Hearts become a promising alternative to conventional treatment. While pneumatic devices sufficiently supply the patients with blood flow, the patient's quality of life is limited by the percutaneous pressure lines and the size of the external control unit. This paper describes the development of the control unit of the ReinHeart, a fully implantable Total Artificial Heart. General requirements for any implantable control unit are defined from a technical and medical point of view: necessity of a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission, autonomous operation, safety, geometry, and efficiency. Based on the requirements, a prototype is designed; it incorporates a LiFePo4 battery pack with charger, a rectifier for transcutaneous energy transmission, the motor's driver electronics, and a microcontroller which monitors and controls all functions. In validation tests, the control unit demonstrated a stable operation on TET and battery supply and a safe switching from one supply to the other. The overall mean efficiency is 14% on TET and 22% on battery supply. The control unit is suitable for chronic animal trials of the ReinHeart. PMID:26583095

  5. Design and Evaluation of a Fully Implantable Control Unit for Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Unthan, Kristin; Gräf, Felix; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Sommer, Christoph; Lanmüller, Hermann; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    As the number of donor hearts is limited while more and more patients suffer from end stage biventricular heart failure, Total Artificial Hearts become a promising alternative to conventional treatment. While pneumatic devices sufficiently supply the patients with blood flow, the patient's quality of life is limited by the percutaneous pressure lines and the size of the external control unit. This paper describes the development of the control unit of the ReinHeart, a fully implantable Total Artificial Heart. General requirements for any implantable control unit are defined from a technical and medical point of view: necessity of a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission, autonomous operation, safety, geometry, and efficiency. Based on the requirements, a prototype is designed; it incorporates a LiFePo4 battery pack with charger, a rectifier for transcutaneous energy transmission, the motor's driver electronics, and a microcontroller which monitors and controls all functions. In validation tests, the control unit demonstrated a stable operation on TET and battery supply and a safe switching from one supply to the other. The overall mean efficiency is 14% on TET and 22% on battery supply. The control unit is suitable for chronic animal trials of the ReinHeart. PMID:26583095

  6. Development and Verification of a TOPAZ-II Electromagnetic Pump Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Paramonov, Dmitry V.

    1994-07-01

    An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II electromagnetic (EM) pump is developed and incorporated into the Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM). The magnetic field strength of the induction coil depends not only on the current supplied by the pump TFEs, but also on the temperature of the coil. All electric and thermal properties of the coolant, wall material of pump ducts, and the electric leads are taken to be temperature dependent. The pump model is benchmarked with experimental data at different coolant temperatures. Results show the pump model to be in good agreement with experimental data. The maximum deviation in the mass flow predictions obtained at different coolant temperatures and pump currents is less than 0.1 kg/s.

  7. Peristaltic Pumping of Blood Through Small Vessels of Varying Cross-Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, J. C.; Maiti, S.

    2012-11-01

    The paper is devoted to a study of the peristaltic motion of blood in the micro-circulatory system. The vessel is considered to be of varying cross-section. The progressive peristaltic waves are taken to be of sinusoidal nature. Blood is considered to be a Herschel-Bulkley fluid. Of particular concern here is to investigate the effects of amplitude ratio, mean pressure gradient, yield stress and the power law index on the velocity distribution, streamline pattern and wall shear stress. On the basis of the derived analytical expression, extensive numerical calculations have been made. The study reveals that velocity of blood and wall shear stress are appreciably affected due to the non-uniform geometry of blood vessels. They are also highly sensitive to the magnitude of the amplitude ratio and the value of the fluid index.

  8. Development of a Compact Efficient Cooling Pump for Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanBoeyen, Roger W.; Reeh, Jonathan A.; Trevino, Luis

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing demands placed on extravehicular activity (EVA) for the International Space Station (ISS) assembly and maintenance, along with planned lunar and Martian missions, the need for increased human productivity and capability becomes ever more critical. This is most readily achieved by reduction in space suit weight and volume, and increased hardware reliability, durability, and operating lifetime. Considerable progress has been made with each successive generation of space suit design; from the Apollo A7L suit, to the current Shuttle Extravehicular Mobile Unit (EMU) suit, and the next generation Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE). However, one area of space suit design which has continued to lag is the fluid pump used to drive the water cooling loop of the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The two main types of fluid pumps typically used in space applications are rotodynamic pumps (pumping is achieved through a rotary vaned impeller) and displacement pumps (which includes rotary and diaphragm pumps). The rotating and moving parts found in the pumps and electric motor add significantly to the susceptibility to wear and friction, thermal mismatch, and complexity of the pumps. Electric motor-driven pumps capable of achieving high operational reliability are necessarily large, heavy, and energy inefficient. This report describes a development effort conducted for NASA by Lynntech, Inc., who recently demonstrated the feasibility of an electrochemically-driven fluid cooling pump. With no electric motor and minimal lightweight components, an electrochemically-driven pump is expected to be significantly smaller, lighter and achieve a longer life time than conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps. By employing sulfonated polystyrene-based proton exchange membranes, rather than conventional Nafion membranes, a significant reduction in the actuator power consumption was demonstrated. It was also demonstrated that these membranes possess the

  9. Development of the Geothermal Heat Pump Market in China; Renewable Energy in China

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-03-01

    This case study is one in a series of Success Stories on developing renewable energy technologies in China for a business audience. It focuses on the development of the geothermal heat pump market in China.

  10. Development, testing, and certification of Calmac Mfg. Corp. solar collector and solar operated pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Development of a rubber tube solar collector and solar operated pump for use with solar heating and cooling systems is discussed. The development hardware, problems encountered during fabrication and testing, and certification statements of performance are included.