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Sample records for blood vessel branching

  1. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  2. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure and function, provides a tool for identifying the structural and functional determinants of tumor vessel normalization.

  3. Blood Vessels in Allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Abrahimi, P; Liu, R; Pober, J S

    2015-07-01

    Human vascularized allografts are perfused through blood vessels composed of cells (endothelium, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells) that remain largely of graft origin and are thus subject to host alloimmune responses. Graft vessels must be healthy to maintain homeostatic functions including control of perfusion, maintenance of permselectivity, prevention of thrombosis, and participation in immune surveillance. Vascular cell injury can cause dysfunction that interferes with these processes. Graft vascular cells can be activated by mediators of innate and adaptive immunity to participate in graft inflammation contributing to both ischemia/reperfusion injury and allograft rejection. Different forms of rejection may affect graft vessels in different ways, ranging from thrombosis and neutrophilic inflammation in hyperacute rejection, to endothelialitis/intimal arteritis and fibrinoid necrosis in acute cell-mediated or antibody-mediated rejection, respectively, and to diffuse luminal stenosis in chronic rejection. While some current therapies targeting the host immune system do affect graft vascular cells, direct targeting of the graft vasculature may create new opportunities for preventing allograft injury and loss. PMID:25807965

  4. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  5. Patterning of embryonic blood vessels.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Amanda C; Mironov, Vladimir A; Argraves, W Scott; Czirók, András; Fleming, Paul A; Drake, Christopher J

    2003-09-01

    Morphometric methods were developed to characterize the geometry of vascular patterns in avian and murine embryos. By using these methods, we found that networks of blood vessels formed during vasculogenesis share similar geometric properties (i.e., mean blood vessel diameters and avascular space diameters) regardless of developmental stage, location, or species in which they form. We also found that endothelial cell density within a unit area of an embryonic vasculature could be used to accurately distinguish between a small diameter, capillary-like vascular network (low endothelial cell density) and a large diameter, presinusoidal network (high endothelial cell density). Furthermore, we show that endothelial cell size remains constant in small and large diameter vessels, indicating that increased endothelial cell size is not the basis for diversity in vessel diameter. These observations serve as a foundation for future studies seeking to evaluate the effects of agents or genetic mutations on aspects of vasculogenesis. PMID:12950076

  6. BPC 157 and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Seiwerth, Sven; Brcic, Luka; Vuletic, Lovorka Batelja; Kolenc, Danijela; Aralica, Gorana; Misic, Marija; Zenko, Anita; Drmic, Domagoj; Rucman, Rudolf; Sikiric, Predrag

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the described effects of BPC 157 on blood vessels after different types of damage, and elucidate by investigating different aspects of vascular response to injury (endothelium damage, clotting, thrombosis, vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, vasculoneogenesis and edema formation) especially in connection to the healing processes. In this respect, BPC 157 was concluded to be the most potent angiomodulatory agent, acting through different vasoactive pathways and systems (e.g. NO, VEGF, FAK) and leading to optimization of the vascular response followed, as it has to be expected, by optimization of the healing process. Formation of new blood vessels involves two main, partly overlapping mechanisms, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The additional mechanism of arteriogenesis is involved in the formation of collaterals. In conjunction with blood vessel function, we at least have to consider leakage of fluid/proteins/plasma, resulting in edema/exudate formation as well as thrombogenesis. Blood vessels are also strongly involved in tumor biology. In this aspect, we have neoangiogenesis resulting in pathological vascularization, vascular invasion resulting in release of metastatic cells and the phenomenon of homing resulting in formation of secondary tumors--metastases. PMID:23782145

  7. Two-photon lifetime imaging of blood and blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grauw, Cees J.; van Zandvoort, Marc M.; oude Egbrink, M. G.; Slaaf, Dick W.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2001-04-01

    We investigated the potential of two-photon excitation microscopy for the imaging in large blood vessels. Experiments were carried out on isolated rat aorta, labeled with a DNA/RNA dye. Images of the vessel wall indicated that a penetration depth of more than 200 micrometers could be reached. Moreover, blood cells and platelets inside blood vessels could be imaged through the vessel wall. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) was used as a contrast mechanism for discrimination of autofluorescence from fluorescence of labeled blood cells. We were able to observe labeled blood cells through the vessel wall and identify them by their morphology and characteristic fluorescent lifetimes.

  8. Purinergic transmission in blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Ralevic, Vera; Dunn, William R

    2015-09-01

    There are nineteen different receptor proteins for adenosine, adenine and uridine nucleotides, and nucleotide sugars, belonging to three families of G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors, and ionotropic P2X receptors. The majority are functionally expressed in blood vessels, as purinergic receptors in perivascular nerves, smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and roles in regulation of vascular contractility, immune function and growth have been identified. The endogenous ligands for purine receptors, ATP, ADP, UTP, UDP and adenosine, can be released from different cell types within the vasculature, as well as from circulating blood cells, including erythrocytes and platelets. Many purine receptors can be activated by two or more of the endogenous ligands. Further complexity arises because of interconversion between ligands, notably adenosine formation from the metabolism of ATP, leading to complex integrated responses through activation of different subtypes of purine receptors. The enzymes responsible for this conversion, ectonucleotidases, are present on the surface of smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and may be coreleased with neurotransmitters from nerves. What selectivity there is for the actions of purines/pyrimidines comes from differential expression of their receptors within the vasculature. P2X1 receptors mediate the vasocontractile actions of ATP released as a neurotransmitter with noradrenaline (NA) from sympathetic perivascular nerves, and are located on the vascular smooth muscle adjacent to the nerve varicosities, the sites of neurotransmitter release. The relative contribution of ATP and NA as functional cotransmitters varies with species, type and size of blood vessel, neuronal firing pattern, the tone/pressure of the blood vessel, and in ageing and disease. ATP is also a neurotransmitter in non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves and mediates vasorelaxation via smooth muscle P2Y-like receptors. ATP and adenosine can act as neuromodulators, with the most robust evidence being for prejunctional inhibition of neurotransmission via A1 adenosine receptors, but also prejunctional excitation and inhibition of neurotransmission via P2X and P2Y receptors, respectively. P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y6 receptors expressed on the vascular smooth muscle are coupled to vasocontraction, and may have a role in pathophysiological conditions, when purines are released from damaged cells, or when there is damage to the protective barrier that is the endothelium. Adenosine is released during hypoxia to increase blood flow via vasodilator A2A and A2B receptors expressed on the endothelium and smooth muscle. ATP is released from endothelial cells during hypoxia and shear stress and can act at P2Y and P2X4 receptors expressed on the endothelium to increase local blood flow. Activation of endothelial purine receptors leads to the release of nitric oxide, hyperpolarising factors and prostacyclin, which inhibits platelet aggregation and thus ensures patent blood flow. Vascular purine receptors also regulate endothelial and smooth muscle growth, and inflammation, and thus are involved in the underlying processes of a number of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26004513

  9. Unsteady Flow in Stenotic Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Devi Williamson, Shobha; Berger, Stanley A.; Saloner, David

    2003-11-01

    Recent studies show that many heart attacks and strokes occur from sudden rupture of partially occluding atherosclerotic plaque rather than total vessel occlusion. Our goal is to understand how the mechanical forces induced by blood flow on specific plaque deposits makes them vulnerable to rupture. Models of severely stenotic carotid bifurcations are created from MR images and grids generated for the flow domains. The three-dimensional, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in finite-volume form are solved numerically using physiological boundary conditions. During systole a high velocity jet forms at the stenotic throat in one of the branches, and a long recirculation zone is observed downstream of the plaque. During diastole the flow is more stagnant. The flow is highly three-dimensional and unsteady with chaotic streamlines. Whereas flow in healthy arteries is laminar, irregular geometries and sharp changes in vessel diameter of a severely stenotic artery significantly disrupt the flow, with consequences for shear and normal wall stresses at the wall, and important implications for plaque stability. Supported by NIH Grant HL61823

  10. Dynamic mechanisms of blood vessel growth

    PubMed Central

    Merks, Roeland M H; Glazier, James A

    2009-01-01

    The formation of a polygonal configuration of proto-blood-vessels from initially dispersed cells is the first step in the development of the circulatory system in vertebrates. This initial vascular network later expands to form new blood vessels, primarily via a sprouting mechanism. We review a range of recent results obtained with a Monte Carlo model of chemotactically migrating cells which can explain both de novo blood vessel growth and aspects of blood vessel sprouting. We propose that the initial network forms via a percolation-like instability depending on cell shape, or through an alternative contact-inhibition of motility mechanism which also reproduces aspects of sprouting blood vessel growth. PMID:19526066

  11. Retinal blood vessels extraction using probabilistic modelling.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Djibril; Wang, Chuang; Li, Yongmin; Salazar-Gonzalez, Ana; Liu, Xiaohui; Serag, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of retinal blood vessels plays an important role in detecting and treating retinal diseases. In this review, we present an automated method to segment blood vessels of fundus retinal image. The proposed method could be used to support a non-intrusive diagnosis in modern ophthalmology for early detection of retinal diseases, treatment evaluation or clinical study. This study combines the bias correction and an adaptive histogram equalisation to enhance the appearance of the blood vessels. Then the blood vessels are extracted using probabilistic modelling that is optimised by the expectation maximisation algorithm. The method is evaluated on fundus retinal images of STARE and DRIVE datasets. The experimental results are compared with some recently published methods of retinal blood vessels segmentation. The experimental results show that our method achieved the best overall performance and it is comparable to the performance of human experts. PMID:25825666

  12. Designer blood vessels and therapeutic revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Joseph D; Galis, Zorina S

    2003-01-01

    Inadequate vascular perfusion leads to fatal heart attacks, chronic ulcers, and other serious clinical conditions. The body's capacity to restore vascular perfusion through angiogenesis and arteriogenesis is often impaired by pre-existing disease, and availability of native replacements for nonfunctional arteries is limited in many patients. Thus, recreating blood vessels of various calibres through novel engineering technologies has emerged as a radical option among therapeutic strategies for revascularization. Ranging from artificial, recycled or reassembled natural conduits to sophisticated microdevices, we refer to these as ‘designer blood vessels'. Our common efforts to continuously improve vascular replacement design have provided many clues about our own blood vessels, but nature's ability to create nonthrombogenic, immunocompatible, strong, yet biologically responsive blood vessels remains unparalleled. Just as art reproductions never equal the original masterpiece, designer blood vessels may never attain nature's perfection. Nevertheless, they will provide a valuable option as long as they come close enough and are available to many. PMID:14534146

  13. Readdressing the issue of thermally significant blood vessels using a countercurrent vessel network.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Devashish; Roemer, Robert B

    2006-04-01

    A physiologically realistic arterio-venous countercurrent vessel network model consisting of ten branching vessel generations, where the diameter of each generation of vessels is smaller than the previous ones, has been created and used to determine the thermal significance of different vessel generations by investigating their ability to exchange thermal energy with the tissue. The temperature distribution in the 3D network (8178 vessels; diameters from 10 to 1000 microm) is obtained by solving the conduction equation in the tissue and the convective energy equation with a specified Nusselt number in the vessels. The sensitivity of the exchange of energy between the vessels and the tissue to changes in the network parameters is studied for two cases; a high temperature thermal therapy case when tissue is heated by a uniformly distributed source term and the network cools the tissue, and a hypothermia related case, when tissue is cooled from the surface and the blood heats the tissue. Results show that first, the relative roles of vessels of different diameters are strongly determined by the inlet temperatures to those vessels (e.g., as affected by changing mass flow rates), and the surrounding tissue temperature, but not by their diameter. Second, changes in the following do not significantly affect the heat transfer rates between tissue and vessels; (a) the ratio of arterial to venous vessel diameter, (b) the diameter reduction coefficient (the ratio of diameters of successive vessel generations), and (c) the Nusselt number. Third, both arteries and veins play significant roles in the exchange of energy between tissue and vessels, with arteries playing a more significant role. These results suggest that the determination of which diameter vessels are thermally important should be performed on a case-by-case, problem dependent basis. And, that in the development of site-specific vessel network models, reasonable predictions of the relative roles of different vessel diameters can be obtained by using any physiologically realistic values of Nusselt number and the diameter reduction coefficient. PMID:16524332

  14. Microvascular Branching as a Determinant of Blood Flow by Intravital Particle Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; McKay, Terri L.; Vickerman, Mary B.; Wernet, Mark P.; Myers, Jerry G.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    2007-01-01

    The effects of microvascular branching on blood flow were investigated in vivo by microscopic particle imaging velocimetry (micro-PIV). We use micro-PIV to measure blood flow by tracking red blood cells (RBC) as the moving particles. Velocity flow fields, including flow pulsatility, were analyzed for the first four branching orders of capillaries, postcapillary venules and small veins of the microvascular network within the developing avian yolksac at embryonic day 5 (E5). Increasing volumetric flowrates were obtained from parabolic laminar flow profiles as a function of increasing vessel diameter and branching order. Maximum flow velocities increased approximately twenty-fold as the function of increasing vessel diameter and branching order compared to flow velocities of 100 - 150 micron/sec in the capillaries. Results from our study will be useful for the increased understanding of blood flow within anastomotic, heterogeneous microvascular networks.

  15. Automated computational framework of blood vessel quantification in chick chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peng; Hong, Jinsheng; Huang, Yue; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Lurong

    2014-10-01

    Chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis assay has been widely used for finding drugs targeting new blood vessel development in cancer research. In addition to the setup materials and protocols, laboratory findings depend on the quantification and analysis of microscopic blood vessel images. However, it is still a challenging problem because of the high complexity of blood vessel branching structures. We applied preprocessing on CAM microscopic images by keeping the integrity of minor branches in the vessel structure. We then proposed an efficient way to automatically extract blood vessel centerlines based on vector tracing starting from detected seed points. Finally, all branches were coded to construct an abstract model of the branching structure, which enabled more accurate modeling for in-depth analysis. The framework was applied in quantifying Icaritin (ICT) inhibition effects on angiogenesis in a CAM model. Experimental results showed the high accuracy in blood vessel quantification and modeling compared with semimanual measurements. Meanwhile, a set of blood vessel growth indicators were extracted to provide fully automated analysis for angiogenesis assays. Further analysis proved that ICT took effect in a dose-dependent manner which could be applied in suppressing tumor blood vessel growth.

  16. Rasip1 is essential to blood vessel stability and angiogenic blood vessel growth.

    PubMed

    Koo, Yeon; Barry, David M; Xu, Ke; Tanigaki, Keiji; Davis, George E; Mineo, Chieko; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular function depends on patent, continuous and stable blood vessel formation by endothelial cells (ECs). Blood vessel development initiates by vasculogenesis, as ECs coalesce into linear aggregates and organize to form central lumens that allow blood flow. Molecular mechanisms underlying in vivo vascular 'tubulogenesis' are only beginning to be unraveled. We previously showed that the GTPase-interacting protein called Rasip1 is required for the formation of continuous vascular lumens in the early embryo. Rasip1(-/-) ECs exhibit loss of proper cell polarity and cell shape, disrupted localization of EC-EC junctions and defects in adhesion of ECs to extracellular matrix. In vitro studies showed that Rasip1 depletion in cultured ECs blocked tubulogenesis. Whether Rasip1 is required in blood vessels after their initial formation remained unclear. Here, we show that Rasip1 is essential for vessel formation and maintenance in the embryo, but not in quiescent adult vessels. Rasip1 is also required for angiogenesis in three models of blood vessel growth: in vitro matrix invasion, retinal blood vessel growth and directed in vivo angiogenesis assays. Rasip1 is thus necessary in growing embryonic blood vessels, postnatal angiogenic sprouting and remodeling, but is dispensable for maintenance of established blood vessels, making it a potential anti-angiogenic therapeutic target. PMID:26897025

  17. The effects of blood vessels on electrocorticography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleichner, M. G.; Vansteensel, M. J.; Huiskamp, G. M.; Hermes, D.; Aarnoutse, E. J.; Ferrier, C. H.; Ramsey, N. F.

    2011-08-01

    Electrocorticography, primarily used in a clinical context, is becoming increasingly important for fundamental neuroscientific research, as well as for brain-computer interfaces. Recordings from these implanted electrodes have a number of advantages over non-invasive recordings in terms of band width, spatial resolution, smaller vulnerability to artifacts and overall signal quality. However, an unresolved issue is that signals vary greatly across electrodes. Here, we examine the effect of blood vessels lying between an electrode and the cortex on signals recorded from subdural grid electrodes. Blood vessels of different sizes cover extensive parts of the cortex causing variations in the electrode-cortex connection across grids. The power spectral density of electrodes located on the cortex and electrodes located on blood vessels obtained from eight epilepsy patients is compared. We find that blood vessels affect the power spectral density of the recorded signal in a frequency-band-specific way, in that frequencies between 30 and 70 Hz are attenuated the most. Here, the signal is attenuated on average by 30-40% compared to electrodes directly on the cortex. For lower frequencies this attenuation effect is less pronounced. We conclude that blood vessels influence the signal properties in a non-uniform manner.

  18. Trends in Tissue Engineering for Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nemeno-Guanzon, Judee Grace; Lee, Soojung; Berg, Johan Robert; Jo, Yong Hwa; Yeo, Jee Eun; Nam, Bo Mi; Koh, Yong-Gon; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, cardiovascular diseases continue to increase and affect not only human health but also the economic stability worldwide. The advancement in tissue engineering is contributing a lot in dealing with this immediate need of alleviating human health. Blood vessel diseases are considered as major cardiovascular health problems. Although blood vessel transplantation is the most convenient treatment, it has been delimited due to scarcity of donors and the patient's conditions. However, tissue-engineered blood vessels are promising alternatives as mode of treatment for blood vessel defects. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of the advancement on biofabrication technology for treatment of soft tissue defects particularly for vascular tissues. This will also provide an overview and update on the current status of tissue reconstruction especially from autologous stem cells, scaffolds, and scaffold-free cellular transplantable constructs. The discussion of this paper will be focused on the historical view of cardiovascular tissue engineering and stem cell biology. The representative studies featured in this paper are limited within the last decade in order to trace the trend and evolution of techniques for blood vessel tissue engineering. PMID:23251085

  19. Blackworms, Blood Vessel Pulsations and Drug Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesiuk, Nalena M.; Drewes, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces the freshwater oligochaete worm, lumbriculus variegatus (common name: blackworms), an organism that is well suited for classroom study because of its closed circulatory system. Describes a set of simple, fast, noninvasive, and inexpensive methods for observing pulsations of the worm's dorsal blood vessels under baseline conditions, and…

  20. Blackworms, Blood Vessel Pulsations and Drug Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesiuk, Nalena M.; Drewes, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces the freshwater oligochaete worm, lumbriculus variegatus (common name: blackworms), an organism that is well suited for classroom study because of its closed circulatory system. Describes a set of simple, fast, noninvasive, and inexpensive methods for observing pulsations of the worm's dorsal blood vessels under baseline conditions, and…

  1. Automated measurement of retinal blood vessel tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities in the vascular pattern of the retina are associated with retinal diseases and are also risk factors for systemic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. The three-dimensional retinal vascular pattern is mostly formed congenitally, but is then modified over life, in response to aging, vessel wall dystrophies and long term changes in blood flow and pressure. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e. how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. We developed a new quantitative metric for vascular tortuosity, based on the vessel's angle of curvature, length of the curved vessel over its chord length (arc to chord ratio), number of curvature sign changes, and combined these into a unidimensional metric, Tortuosity Index (TI). In comparison to other published methods this method can estimate appropriate TI for vessels with constant curvature sign and vessels with equal arc to chord ratios, as well. We applied this method to a dataset of 15 digital fundus images of 8 patients with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and to the other publically available dataset of 60 fundus images of normal cases and patients with hypertensive retinopathy, of which the arterial and venous tortuosities have also been graded by masked experts (ophthalmologists). The method produced exactly the same rank-ordered list of vessel tortuosity (TI) values as obtained by averaging the tortuosity grading given by 3 ophthalmologists for FSHD dataset and a list of TI values with high ranking correlation with the ophthalmologist's grading for the other dataset. Our results show that TI has potential to detect and evaluate abnormal retinal vascular structure in early diagnosis and prognosis of retinopathies.

  2. Zinc oxide nanoflowers make new blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barui, Ayan Kumar; Veeriah, Vimal; Mukherjee, Sudip; Manna, Joydeb; Patel, Ajay Kumar; Patra, Sujata; Pal, Krishnendu; Murali, Shruthi; Rana, Rohit K.; Chatterjee, Suvro; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2012-11-01

    It is well established that angiogenesis is the process of formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels. It is a complex process, involving both pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, and plays a significant role in physiological and pathophysiological processes such as embryonic development, atherosclerosis, post-ischemic vascularization of the myocardium, tumor growth and metastasis, rheumatoid arthritis etc. This is the first report of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoflowers that show significant pro-angiogenic properties (formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels), observed by in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays. The egg yolk angiogenesis assay using ZnO nanoflowers indicates the presence of matured blood vessels formation. Additionally, it helps to promote endothelial cell (EA.hy926 cells) migration in wound healing assays. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)--a redox signaling molecule, might be the plausible mechanism for nanoflower-based angiogenesis. Angiogenesis by nanoflowers may provide the basis for the future development of new alternative therapeutic treatment strategies for cardiovascular and ischemic diseases, where angiogenesis plays a significant role.It is well established that angiogenesis is the process of formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels. It is a complex process, involving both pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, and plays a significant role in physiological and pathophysiological processes such as embryonic development, atherosclerosis, post-ischemic vascularization of the myocardium, tumor growth and metastasis, rheumatoid arthritis etc. This is the first report of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoflowers that show significant pro-angiogenic properties (formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels), observed by in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays. The egg yolk angiogenesis assay using ZnO nanoflowers indicates the presence of matured blood vessels formation. Additionally, it helps to promote endothelial cell (EA.hy926 cells) migration in wound healing assays. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)--a redox signaling molecule, might be the plausible mechanism for nanoflower-based angiogenesis. Angiogenesis by nanoflowers may provide the basis for the future development of new alternative therapeutic treatment strategies for cardiovascular and ischemic diseases, where angiogenesis plays a significant role. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32369a

  3. A probe for blood-vessel and spinal interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Probe design allows insertion into lumen of blood vessels to perform oximetry and investigate plaque on interior vessel walls. Probe is more accurate than standard oximetry procedures of determining oxygenation of circulating blood.

  4. How Does Smoking Affect the Heart and Blood Vessels?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does Smoking Affect the Heart and Blood Vessels? Cigarette smoking ... Cough , discuss how smoking affects the lungs. Overview Smoking and Your Heart and Blood Vessels The chemicals ...

  5. The transport of nanoparticles in blood vessels: the effect of vessel permeability and blood rheology.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Ferrari, Mauro; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2008-02-01

    The longitudinal transport of nanoparticles in blood vessels has been analyzed with blood described as a Casson fluid. Starting from the celebrated Taylor and Aris theory, an explicit expression has been derived for the effective longitudinal diffusion (Deff) depending non-linearly on the rheological parameter xi(c), the ratio between the plug and the vessel radii; and on the permeability parameters pi and omega, related to the hydraulic conductivity and pressure drop across the vessel wall, respectively. An increase of xi(c) or pi has the effect of reducing Deff, and thus both the rheology of blood and the permeability of the vessels may constitute a physiological barrier to the intravascular delivery of nanoparticles. PMID:18172768

  6. Zinc oxide nanoflowers make new blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Barui, Ayan Kumar; Veeriah, Vimal; Mukherjee, Sudip; Manna, Joydeb; Patel, Ajay Kumar; Patra, Sujata; Pal, Krishnendu; Murali, Shruthi; Rana, Rohit K; Chatterjee, Suvro; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2012-12-21

    It is well established that angiogenesis is the process of formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels. It is a complex process, involving both pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, and plays a significant role in physiological and pathophysiological processes such as embryonic development, atherosclerosis, post-ischemic vascularization of the myocardium, tumor growth and metastasis, rheumatoid arthritis etc. This is the first report of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoflowers that show significant pro-angiogenic properties (formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels), observed by in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays. The egg yolk angiogenesis assay using ZnO nanoflowers indicates the presence of matured blood vessels formation. Additionally, it helps to promote endothelial cell (EA.hy926 cells) migration in wound healing assays. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-a redox signaling molecule, might be the plausible mechanism for nanoflower-based angiogenesis. Angiogenesis by nanoflowers may provide the basis for the future development of new alternative therapeutic treatment strategies for cardiovascular and ischemic diseases, where angiogenesis plays a significant role. PMID:23152079

  7. Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

  8. Method and device for supporting blood vessels during anastomosis

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1985-05-20

    A device and method for preventing first and second severed blood vessels from collapsing during attachment to each other. The device comprises a dissolvable non-toxic stent that is sufficiently rigid to prevent the blood vessels from collapsing during anastomosis. The stent can be hollow or have passages to permit blood flow before it dissolves. A single stent can be inserted with an end in each of the two blood vessels or separate stents can be inserted into each blood vessel. The stent may include a therapeutically effective amount of a drug which is slowly released into the blood stream as the stent dissolves. 12 figs.

  9. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lei-Lei; Dong, Yan-Min; Zong, Yao; Zheng, Qi-Shan; Fu, Yue; Yuan, Yong-Guang; Huang, Xia; Qian, Garrett; Gao, Qian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26) and non-ischemic (n=24) groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively) were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%), instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%), showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5%) in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05). The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO. PMID:26949618

  10. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Heart and Blood Vessels Healthy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lung and Blood Institute American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your heart and blood vessels healthy ...

  11. Segmentation of Retinal Blood Vessels Based on Cake Filter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xi-Rong; Ge, Xin; She, Li-Huang; Zhang, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels is significant to diagnosis and evaluation of ocular diseases like glaucoma and systemic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The retinal blood vessel segmentation for small and low contrast vessels is still a challenging problem. To solve this problem, a new method based on cake filter is proposed. Firstly, a quadrature filter band called cake filter band is made up in Fourier field. Then the real component fusion is used to separate the blood vessel from the background. Finally, the blood vessel network is got by a self-adaption threshold. The experiments implemented on the STARE database indicate that the new method has a better performance than the traditional ones on the small vessels extraction, average accuracy rate, and true and false positive rate. PMID:26636095

  12. Segmentation of Retinal Blood Vessels Based on Cake Filter

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xi-Rong; Ge, Xin; She, Li-Huang; Zhang, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels is significant to diagnosis and evaluation of ocular diseases like glaucoma and systemic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The retinal blood vessel segmentation for small and low contrast vessels is still a challenging problem. To solve this problem, a new method based on cake filter is proposed. Firstly, a quadrature filter band called cake filter band is made up in Fourier field. Then the real component fusion is used to separate the blood vessel from the background. Finally, the blood vessel network is got by a self-adaption threshold. The experiments implemented on the STARE database indicate that the new method has a better performance than the traditional ones on the small vessels extraction, average accuracy rate, and true and false positive rate. PMID:26636095

  13. Deltoid branch of thoracoacromial vein: a safe alternative entry vessel for intravenous port implantation.

    PubMed

    Su, Ta-Wei; Wu, Ching-Feng; Fu, Jui-Ying; Ko, Po-Jen; Yu, Sheng-Yueh; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Hsieh, Hong-Chang; Wu, Ching-Yang

    2015-05-01

    An entry vessel is crucial for intravenous port implantation. A safe alternative entry vessel that can be easily explored is crucial for patients without feasible cephalic vein or for those who need port reimplantation because of disease relapse. In this study, we tried to analyze the safety and feasibility of catheter implantation via the deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial vein.From March 2012 to November 2013, 802 consecutive oncology patients who had received intravenous port implantation via the superior vena cava were enrolled in this study. The functional results and complications of different entry vessels were compared.The majority of patients (93.6%) could be identified as thoracoacromial vessel. The deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial vein is located on the medial aspect of the deltopectoral groove beneath the pectoralis major muscle (85.8%) and in the deep part of the deltopectoral groove (14.2%). Due to the various calibers employed and tortuous routes followed, we utilized 3 different methods for catheter implantation, including vessel cutdown (47.4%), wire assisted (17.9%), and modified puncture method (34.6%). The functional results and complication rate were similar to other entry vessels.The deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial vein is located in the neighborhood of the cephalic vein. The functional results of intravenous port implantation via the deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial vein are similar to other entry vessels. It is a safe alternative entry vessel for intravenous port implantation. PMID:25929903

  14. Simulation of Blood Flow at Vessel Bifurcation by Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiu-Ying; Liu, Da-He; Zhou, Jing; Jin, Yong-Juan

    2005-11-01

    The application of the lattice Boltzmann method to the large vessel bifurcation blood flow is investigated in a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The velocity, shear stress and pressure distributions at the bifurcation are presented in detail. The flow separation zones revealed with increase of Reynolds number are located in the areas of the daughter branches distal to the outer corners of the bifurcation where some deposition of particular blood components might occur to form arteriosclerosis. The results also demonstrate that the lattice Boltzmann method is adaptive to simulating the flow in larger vessels under a high Reynolds number.

  15. Glucose metabolism in diabetic blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.J.; Crass, M.F. III

    1986-03-05

    Since glycolysis appears to be coupled to active ion transport in vascular smooth muscle, alterations in glucose metabolism may contribute to cellular dysfunction and angiopathy in diabetes. Uptake and utilization of glucose were studied in perfused blood vessels in which pulsatile flow and perfusion pressure were similar to those measured directly in vivo. Thoracic aortae isolated from 8-wk alloxan diabetic (D) and nondiabetic control rabbits were cannulated, tethered, and perfused with oxygenated buffer containing 7 or 25 mM glucose and tracer amounts of glucose-U/sup -14/ C. Norepinephrine (NE) (10/sup -6/ M) and/or insulin (I) (150 ..mu..U/ml) and albumin (0.2%) were added. NE-induced tension development increased glucose uptake 39% and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and lactate production 2.3-fold. With 7 mM glucose, marked decreases in glucose uptake (74%), /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ (68%), lactate (30%), total tissue glycogen (75%), and tissue phospholipids (70%) were observed in D. Addition of I or elevation of exogenous glucose to 25 mM normalized glucose uptake, but had differential effects on the pattern of substrate utilization. Thus, in D, there was a marked depression of vascular glucose metabolism that was partially reversed by addition of low concentrations of insulin or D levels of glucose.

  16. Avian Blood-Vessel Formation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelkes, Peter I.

    1999-01-01

    Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that the developmental anomalies observed in the past might be related to or caused by delayed or improper vascular development. The objective of our research is to test the hypothesis that exposure to microgravity during space flight cause delayed or improper vascular development during embryogenesis. The effects of microgravity on the time course and extent of avian blood-vessel formation are assessed using two models, one for angiogenesis and one for vasculogenesis. The methodological approach is dictated by the constraints of the tissue preservation method used in space. Thus, both in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in the adrenal, we will evaluate microscopically the vascular architecture and immunostain endothelial cells with specific antibodies (anti- vWF and QH1). The extent of ECM protein deposition will be assessed by immunohistochemistry and correlated with the degree of vascularization, using computer-based image analysis. Also, the cellular source for ECM proteins will be assessed by in situ hybridization.

  17. Contact-inhibited chemotaxis in de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth.

    PubMed

    Merks, Roeland M H; Perryn, Erica D; Shirinifard, Abbas; Glazier, James A

    2008-01-01

    Blood vessels form either when dispersed endothelial cells (the cells lining the inner walls of fully formed blood vessels) organize into a vessel network (vasculogenesis), or by sprouting or splitting of existing blood vessels (angiogenesis). Although they are closely related biologically, no current model explains both phenomena with a single biophysical mechanism. Most computational models describe sprouting at the level of the blood vessel, ignoring how cell behavior drives branch splitting during sprouting. We present a cell-based, Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg model (also called Cellular Potts Model) simulation of the initial patterning before the vascular cords form lumens, based on plausible behaviors of endothelial cells. The endothelial cells secrete a chemoattractant, which attracts other endothelial cells. As in the classic Keller-Segel model, chemotaxis by itself causes cells to aggregate into isolated clusters. However, including experimentally observed VE-cadherin-mediated contact inhibition of chemotaxis in the simulation causes randomly distributed cells to organize into networks and cell aggregates to sprout, reproducing aspects of both de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth. We discuss two branching instabilities responsible for our results. Cells at the surfaces of cell clusters attempting to migrate to the centers of the clusters produce a buckling instability. In a model variant that eliminates the surface-normal force, a dissipative mechanism drives sprouting, with the secreted chemical acting both as a chemoattractant and as an inhibitor of pseudopod extension. Both mechanisms would also apply if force transmission through the extracellular matrix rather than chemical signaling mediated cell-cell interactions. The branching instabilities responsible for our results, which result from contact inhibition of chemotaxis, are both generic developmental mechanisms and interesting examples of unusual patterning instabilities. PMID:18802455

  18. Contact-Inhibited Chemotaxis in De Novo and Sprouting Blood-Vessel Growth

    PubMed Central

    Merks, Roeland M. H.; Perryn, Erica D.; Shirinifard, Abbas; Glazier, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Blood vessels form either when dispersed endothelial cells (the cells lining the inner walls of fully formed blood vessels) organize into a vessel network (vasculogenesis), or by sprouting or splitting of existing blood vessels (angiogenesis). Although they are closely related biologically, no current model explains both phenomena with a single biophysical mechanism. Most computational models describe sprouting at the level of the blood vessel, ignoring how cell behavior drives branch splitting during sprouting. We present a cell-based, Glazier–Graner–Hogeweg model (also called Cellular Potts Model) simulation of the initial patterning before the vascular cords form lumens, based on plausible behaviors of endothelial cells. The endothelial cells secrete a chemoattractant, which attracts other endothelial cells. As in the classic Keller–Segel model, chemotaxis by itself causes cells to aggregate into isolated clusters. However, including experimentally observed VE-cadherin–mediated contact inhibition of chemotaxis in the simulation causes randomly distributed cells to organize into networks and cell aggregates to sprout, reproducing aspects of both de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth. We discuss two branching instabilities responsible for our results. Cells at the surfaces of cell clusters attempting to migrate to the centers of the clusters produce a buckling instability. In a model variant that eliminates the surface–normal force, a dissipative mechanism drives sprouting, with the secreted chemical acting both as a chemoattractant and as an inhibitor of pseudopod extension. Both mechanisms would also apply if force transmission through the extracellular matrix rather than chemical signaling mediated cell–cell interactions. The branching instabilities responsible for our results, which result from contact inhibition of chemotaxis, are both generic developmental mechanisms and interesting examples of unusual patterning instabilities. PMID:18802455

  19. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr. )

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No penetration of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor was cross fire between the vessel assumed. The results are useful in assessing the dose to blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures.

  20. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G. ); Poston, J.W. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor cross fire between vessel was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the dose in blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. High orientation of long chain branched poly (lactic acid) with enhanced blood compatibility and bionic structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengqiu; Ye, Lin; Zhao, Xiaowen; Coates, Phil; Caton-Rose, Fin; Martyn, Michasel

    2016-05-01

    Highly oriented poly (lactic acid) (PLA) with bionic microgrooves was fabricated through solid hot drawing technology for further improving the mechanical properties and blood biocompatibility of PLA. In order to enhance the melt strength and thus obtain high orientation degree, long chain branched PLA was prepared at first through a two-step ring-opening reaction during processing. Linear viscoelasticity combined with branch-on-branch model was used to predict probable compositions and chain topologies of the products, and it was found that the molecular weight of PLA increased and topological structures with star like chain with three arms and tree-like chain with two generations formed during reactive processing, and consequently draw ratio as high as1200% can be achieved during the subsequent hot stretching. With the increase of draw ratio, the tensile strength and orientation degree of PLA increased dramatically. Long chain branching and orientation could significantly enhance the blood compatibility of PLA by prolonging clotting time and decreasing platelet activation. Microgrooves can be observed on the surface of the oriented PLA which were similar to the intimal layer of blood vessel, and such bionic structure resulted from the formation of the oriented shish kebab-like crystals along the draw direction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1082-1089, 2016. PMID:26743130

  2. How blood vessel networks are made and measured.

    PubMed

    Chappell, John C; Wiley, David M; Bautch, Victoria L

    2012-01-01

    Tissue and organ viability depends on the proper systemic distribution of cells, nutrients, and oxygen through blood vessel networks. These networks arise in part via angiogenic sprouting. Vessel sprouting involves the precise coordination of several endothelial cell processes including cell-cell communication, cell migration, and proliferation. In this review, we discuss zebrafish and mammalian models of blood vessel sprouting and the quantification methods used to assess vessel sprouting and network formation in these models. We also review the mechanisms involved in angiogenic sprouting, and we propose that the process consists of distinct stages. Sprout initiation involves endothelial cell interactions with neighboring cells and the environment to establish a specialized tip cell responsible for leading the emerging sprout. Furthermore, local sprout guidance cues that spatially regulate this outward migration are discussed. We also examine subsequent events, such as sprout fusion and lumenization, that lead to maturation of a nascent sprout into a patent blood vessel. PMID:21996655

  3. A Computational Model Predicting Disruption of Blood Vessel Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vascular development is a complex process regulated by dynamic biological networks that vary in topology and state across different tissues and developmental stages. Signals regulating de novo blood vessel formation (vasculogenesis) and remodeling (angiogenesis) come from a varie...

  4. Computer Analysis of Eye Blood-Vessel Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, R. J.; White, B. S.

    1984-01-01

    Technique rapidly diagnoses diabetes mellitus. Photographs of "whites" of patients' eyes scanned by computerized image analyzer programmed to quantify density of small blood vessels in conjuctiva. Comparison with data base of known normal and diabetic patients facilitates rapid diagnosis.

  5. Development of a blood vessel searching device for HMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Tatsuro; Uenoya, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    In this study, an automatic blood vessel searching system (BVSS) is newly developed, which is built in the health monitoring system (HMS) and the drug delivery system (DDS) to extract the blood, evaluates the blood sugar level and injects the insulin for the diabetic patients. Main subjects of our BVSS development are 1) a transmittance photo imaging of the finger by using the LED light as a near-infrared light source with peak wave length of 870 nm, and 2) an image processing to detect the location of the center of the blood vessel cross section. The sharp edge focus method was applied in our BVSS to detect the depth of blood vessel. We carried out experiments by using blood vessel phantoms, which consist of an artificial cylindrical blood vessel and skin tissue, which are made of the teflon tube and the silicone rubber. The teflon tube has the size of 0.6 mm in diameter and is filled with the human blood. The experimental results demonstrated that the estimated depth, which is obtained by image analysis corresponding to given depths, shows a good agreement with the real values, and consequently the availability of our BVSS is confirmed.

  6. Allogeneic human tissue-engineered blood vessel

    PubMed Central

    Quint, Clay; Arief, Melissa; Muto, Akihito; Dardik, Alan; Niklason, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Arterial bypass graft implantation remains the primary therapy for patients with advanced cardiovascular disease; however, there is no available synthetic small-diameter vascular graft. Methods Tissue-engineered vessels were grown from human smooth muscle cells that were seeded on a biodegradable scaffold using a biomimetic perfusion system. The human tissue-engineered vessels (hTEV) were decellularized by a two-step process using a combination of detergents and hypertonic solutions. The mechanical characteristics were assessed by suture retention strength and burst pressure. The decellularized hTEV were implanted as aortic interpositional grafts in nude rats to evaluate in vivo performance as an arterial graft over a 6-week period. Results The human tissue-engineered structure formed a vessel composed of smooth muscle cells and the extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen. After decellularization, the collagen matrix remained intact while the cellular components were removed. The mechanical strength of the hTEV after decellularization was similar to human vein in vitro, with a burst pressure of 1,567 ± 384 mm Hg (n = 3) versus 1,680 ± 307 mm Hg for human saphenous vein. The hTEVs had a high patency rate (four of five grafts) without evidence of rupture or aneurysm over a 6-week period as an aortic interpositional graft in a nude rat model. Histologic analysis showed a thin neointima with a confluent endothelium and a subendothelial layer of smooth muscle cells on the explanted tissue-engineered vessels. Transmission electron microscopy on the explanted tissue demonstrated elastin formation in the neointima and intact residual collagen fibers from the tissue-engineered vessel. Conclusions The hTEV had a high patency rate and remained mechanically stable as an aortic interpositional graft in a nude rat. The vessel supported the growth of a neointima with endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. The host remodeling suggested the engineered matrix had a positive effect to create a regenerated vascular graft. PMID:22056286

  7. Analysis of Blood Flow in a Partially Blocked Bifurcated Blood Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Elkassabgi, Yousri; Punati, Pavan K.; Nasser, Naseer

    2009-09-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of death in the United States. It is the narrowing of the lumens of the coronary blood vessel by a gradual build-up of fatty material, atheroma, which leads to the heart muscle not receiving enough blood. This my ocardial ischemia can cause angina, a heart attack, heart failure as well as sudden cardiac death [9]. In this project a solid model of bifurcated blood vessel with an asymmetric stenosis is developed using GAMBIT and imported into FLUENT for analysis. In FLUENT, pressure and velocity distributions in the blood vessel are studied under different conditions, where the size and position of the blockage in the blood vessel are varied. The location and size of the blockage in the blood vessel are correlated with the pressures and velocities distributions. Results show that such correlation may be used to predict the size and location of the blockage.

  8. Heart and Blood Vessels in Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... organs or an aorta that is seriously enlarged. Mitral valve prolapse Mitral valve prolapsed is a condition in which the flaps of one of the heart’s valves (the mitral valve, which regulates blood flow on the left ...

  9. Regional blood flow analysis and its relationship with arterial branch lengths and lumen volume in the coronary arterial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloi, Sabee; Wong, Jerry T.

    2007-03-01

    The limitations of visually assessing coronary artery disease are well known. These limitations are particularly important in intermediate coronary lesions (30-70% diameter stenosis) where it is difficult to determine whether a particular lesion is the cause of ischaemia. Therefore, a functional measure of stenosis severity is needed. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the expected maximum coronary blood flow in an arterial tree is predictable from its sum of arterial branch lengths or lumen volume. Using a computer model of a porcine coronary artery tree, an analysis of blood flow distribution was conducted through a network of millions of vessels that included the entire coronary artery tree down to the first capillary branch. The flow simulation results show that there is a linear relationship between coronary blood flow and the sum of its arterial branch lengths. This relationship holds over the entire arterial tree. The flow simulation results also indicate that there is a \\frac34 power relation between coronary blood flow (Q) and the sum of its arterial lumen volume (V). Moreover, there is a linear relationship between normalized Q and normalized V raised to a power of \\frac34 over the entire arterial tree. These results indicate that measured arterial branch lengths or lumen volumes can be used to predict the expected maximum blood flow in an arterial tree. This theoretical maximum blood flow, in conjunction with an angiographically measured blood flow, can potentially be used to calculate fractional flow reserve based entirely on angiographic data.

  10. Brain blood vessel segmentation using line-shaped profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Danilo; Pižurica, Aleksandra; De Vylder, Jonas; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-11-01

    Segmentation of cerebral blood vessels is of great importance in diagnostic and clinical applications, especially for embolization of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In order to perform embolization of the AVM, the structural and geometric information of blood vessels from 3D images is of utmost importance. For this reason, the in-depth segmentation of cerebral blood vessels is usually done as a fusion of different segmentation techniques, often requiring extensive user interaction. In this paper we introduce the idea of line-shaped profiling with an application to brain blood vessel and AVM segmentation, efficient both in terms of resolving details and in terms of computation time. Our method takes into account both local proximate and wider neighbourhood of the processed pixel, which makes it efficient for segmenting large blood vessel tree structures, as well as fine structures of the AVMs. Another advantage of our method is that it requires selection of only one parameter to perform segmentation, yielding very little user interaction.

  11. Blood vessels and the satellite cell niche.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Rémi; Chrétien, Fabrice; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2011-01-01

    The fate of stem cell is regulated by cues received from the surrounding area. Recently, the concept of "stem cell zone"--rather than a predefined niche--introduced the notion of dynamic and permanent interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment. In adult skeletal muscle, satellite cells are considered as the main stem cells responsible for muscle repair and maintenance. They are localized close to vessels regardless their state of activation and differentiation. Moreover, the number of satellite cells is positively correlated to the capillarization of the myofiber. Angiogenesis has been known for a long time to be essential for muscle repair. However, relationships between vessel cells and satellite/myogenic cells that govern myogenic cell expansion, myogenesis, and angiogenesis have been only recently investigated. In this chapter, we discuss the possible existence of a vascular amplifying/differentiating niche, in an attempt to reconciliate several recent observations showing that satellite/myogenic cells interact with various cell types during the time course of muscle regeneration. Indeed, endothelial cells (ECs) stimulate myogenic cell growth and, inversely, differentiating myogenic cells promote angiogenesis. However, stromal cells may also provide some proliferating or differentiating cues to satellite/myogenic cells in this vascular area. Although some molecular effectors have been identified, including growth factors and cytokines, molecular regulations that occur within this vascular amplifying/differentiating niche requires further investigation. At the end of muscle repair, maturation of newly formed vessels takes place. In this context, we discuss the potential quiescence niche of satellite cells and the specific role of periendothelial cells. Indeed, periendothelial cells promote the return to quiescence of a subset of satellite/myogenic cells and maintain their quiescence (through Angiopoietin-1/Tie-2 signaling). We ask to what extent the environment may control the fate choice of satellite/myogenic cells and we also question the "hypoxic niche" in skeletal muscle, such a quiescence niche having being observed in the bone marrow. PMID:21621069

  12. Simple Analysis of the Pulse Wave for Blood Vessel Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2009-07-01

    A pulse wave is considered to be a good indicator to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of blood vessels. The wave is composed of an incident wave and a reflected wave. The evaluation of blood vessels may be possible from the analysis of this reflected wave, because the reflected wave propagates to the peripheral artery. We propose a simple method of estimating the reflected wave from the pulse wave observed at common carotid artery, making use of a commercial piezoelectric transducer. First, we estimate the incident wave from the observed blood flow velocity. Then, the reflected wave is estimated by subtracting the incident wave from the observed pulse wave. The amplitudes of the reflected wave obtained in senior subjects were larger than those of junior subjects. This result is in good agreement with the common point of view about the vessel wall, that the attenuation during pulse wave propagation is usually small in elderly people.

  13. Higher blood vessel density in comparison to the lymphatic vessels in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Espinoza, Iris; Reyes, Montserrat; Aitken, Juan Pablo; Aguayo, Francisco; Hartel, Steffen; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is characterized by local invasion and the development of cervical metastasis. In the tongue, an association between the invasion of the lymphatic vessels and the development of metastasis in the regional lymph nodes has been demonstrated. Moreover, invasion of the blood vessels is associated with greater recurrence and poorer prognoses. Therefore, the presence and density of lymphatic and blood vessels in intra- and peritumoral tissues should play an important role in the progression, dissemination and metastasis of carcinomas. However, the evidence regarding OSCC is inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the comparison and association between the lymphatic (D2-40) and blood vessel (CD34) densities in intratumoral OSCC tissue. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven cases diagnosed as OSCC between the years 2000 and 2008 were obtained from the Anatomic Pathology Service of the School of Dentistry, University of Chile. The immunohistochemical markers D2-40 and CD34 were used, and the densities (mm2) of lymphatic vessels (LVD) and blood vessels (BVD) in the intratumoral region were determined. The relationship between LVD and BVD values was evaluated. Results: There were significant association between the CD34 and D2-40 expression (rho=0.4, P<0.05) and between the LVD and the location in the tongue (P=0.019). The BVD was greater (128.0 vessels/mm2) than the LVD (42.9 vessels/mm2), and there was a positive correlation between the LVD and BVD. Conclusions: In OSCC, the BVD is greater than the LVD, and there is a moderate correlation between the two quantities. PMID:26722595

  14. Acrolein generation stimulates hypercontraction in isolated human blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, D.J.; Bhatnagar, A.; Cowley, H.R.; Johnson, G.H.; Wiechmann, R.J.; Sayre, L.M.; Trent, M.B.; Boor, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of vasospasm, a spontaneous hyperconstriction, is associated with atherosclerosis, cigarette smoking, and hypertension—all conditions involving oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammation. To test the role of the lipid peroxidation- and inflammation-derived aldehyde, acrolein, in human vasospasm, we developed an ex vivo model using human coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) blood vessels and a demonstrated acrolein precursor, allylamine. Allylamine induces hypercontraction in isolated rat coronary artery in a semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity (SSAO) dependent manner. Isolated human CABG blood vessels (internal mammary artery, radial artery, saphenous vein) were used to determine: (1) vessel responses and sensitivity to acrolein, allylamine, and H2O2 exposure (1 ?M–1 mM), (2) SSAO dependence of allylamine-induced effects using SSAO inhibitors (semicarbazide, 1 mM; MDL 72274-E, active isomer; MDL 72274-Z, inactive isomer; 100 ?M), (3) the vasoactive effects of two other SSAO amine substrates, benzylamine and methylamine, and (4) the contribution of extracellular Ca2+ to hypercontraction. Acrolein or allylamine but not H2O2, benzylamine, or methylamine stimulated spontaneous and pharmacologically intractable hypercontraction in CABG blood vessels that was similar to clinical vasospasm. Allylamine-induced hypercontraction and blood vessel SSAO activity were abolished by pretreatment with semicarbazide or MDL 72274-E but not by MDL 72274-Z. Allylamine-induced hypercontraction also was significantly attenuated in Ca2+-free buffer. In isolated aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rat, allylamine-induced an SSAO-dependent contraction and enhanced norepinephrine sensitivity but not in Sprague–Dawley rat aorta. We conclude that acrolein generation in the blood vessel wall increases human susceptibility to vasospasm, an event that is enhanced in hypertension. PMID:17095030

  15. Acrolein generation stimulates hypercontraction in isolated human blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, D.J. . E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu; Bhatnagar, A.; Cowley, H.R.; Johnson, G.H.; Trent, M.B.; Boor, P.J.

    2006-12-15

    Increased risk of vasospasm, a spontaneous hyperconstriction, is associated with atherosclerosis, cigarette smoking, and hypertension-all conditions involving oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammation. To test the role of the lipid peroxidation- and inflammation-derived aldehyde, acrolein, in human vasospasm, we developed an ex vivo model using human coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) blood vessels and a demonstrated acrolein precursor, allylamine. Allylamine induces hypercontraction in isolated rat coronary artery in a semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity (SSAO) dependent manner. Isolated human CABG blood vessels (internal mammary artery, radial artery, saphenous vein) were used to determine: (1) vessel responses and sensitivity to acrolein, allylamine, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure (1 {mu}M-1 mM), (2) SSAO dependence of allylamine-induced effects using SSAO inhibitors (semicarbazide, 1 mM; MDL 72274-E, active isomer; MDL 72274-Z, inactive isomer; 100 {mu}M), (3) the vasoactive effects of two other SSAO amine substrates, benzylamine and methylamine, and (4) the contribution of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} to hypercontraction. Acrolein or allylamine but not H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, benzylamine, or methylamine stimulated spontaneous and pharmacologically intractable hypercontraction in CABG blood vessels that was similar to clinical vasospasm. Allylamine-induced hypercontraction and blood vessel SSAO activity were abolished by pretreatment with semicarbazide or MDL 72274-E but not by MDL 72274-Z. Allylamine-induced hypercontraction also was significantly attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer. In isolated aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rat, allylamine-induced an SSAO-dependent contraction and enhanced norepinephrine sensitivity but not in Sprague-Dawley rat aorta. We conclude that acrolein generation in the blood vessel wall increases human susceptibility to vasospasm, an event that is enhanced in hypertension.

  16. Wavelength dependence of the apparent diameter of retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert; Twietmeyer, Karen; Chipman, Russell; Beaudry, Neil; Salyer, David

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of retinal blood vessels may assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and hypertension. However, close examination reveals that the contrast and apparent diameter of vessels are dependent on the wavelength of the illuminating light. In this study multispectral images of large arteries and veins within enucleated swine eyes are obtained with a modified fundus camera by use of intravitreal illumination. The diameters of selected vessels are measured as a function of wavelength by cross-sectional analysis. A fixed scale with spectrally independent dimension is placed above the retina to isolate the chromatic effects of the imaging system and eye. Significant apparent differences between arterial and venous diameters are found, with larger diameters observed at shorter wavelengths. These differences are due primarily to spectral absorption in the cylindrical blood column.

  17. Gene Expression Analysis in Human Breast Cancer Associated Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dylan T.; Lechertier, Tanguy; Mitter, Richard; Herbert, John M. J.; Bicknell, Roy; Jones, J. Louise; Li, Ji-Liang; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L.; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5–72 fold) in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of potentially novel anti-angiogenic targets that are likley to be, but not exclusivley, relevant to breast cancer. PMID:23056178

  18. Enhanced Cytomegalovirus Infection in Atherosclerotic Human Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nerheim, Pamela L.; Meier, Jeffery L.; Vasef, Mohammad A.; Li, Wei-Gen; Hu, Ling; Rice, James B.; Gavrila, Daniel; Richenbacher, Wayne E.; Weintraub, Neal L.

    2004-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a possible co-factor in atherogenesis and vascular occlusion, but its ability to actively infect medium and large blood vessels is unclear. A vascular explant model was adapted to investigate CMV infection in human coronary artery, internal mammary artery (IMA), and saphenous vein (SV). Vascular explants were inoculated with CMV Towne or low-passage clinical isolate and examined in situ for CMV cytopathic effect and immediate-early and early antigens, as indicators of active infection. At 5 to 7 days after inoculation, we found that CMV Towne actively infected eight of eight different atherosclerotic blood vessel explants (coronary artery, n = 4; SV and IMA grafts, n = 4), whereas it only infected 2 of 14 nonatherosclerotic blood vessel explants (SV, n = 10; IMA, n = 4) (P = 0.001). The CMV clinical isolate actively infected none of six sets of nonatherosclerotic SV explants at 5 to 7 days after inoculation. The active CMV infections involved adventitial and, less frequently, intimal cells. A small subset of infected cells in atherosclerotic tissue expresses the endothelial cell marker CD31. Smooth muscle cells residing in both atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic blood vessels were free of active CMV infections even after all vascular tissue layers were exposed to the virus. In contrast, active CMV Towne infection was evident at 2 days after inoculation in smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells previously isolated from the SV tissues. We conclude that active CMV infection is enhanced in atherosclerotic blood vessels compared to atherosclerosis-free vascular equivalents, and this viral activity is restricted to subpopulations of intimal and adventitial cells. PMID:14742264

  19. Plug Effect of Erythrocytes in Capillary Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Lew, H. S.; Fung, Y. C.

    1970-01-01

    As an idealized problem of the motion of blood in small capillary blood vessels, the low Reynolds number flow of plasma (a newtonian fluid) in a circular cylindrical tube involving a series of circular disks is studied. It is assumed in this study that the suspended disks are equally spaced along the axis of the tube, and that their centers remain on the axis of the tube and that their faces are perpendicular to the tube axis. The inertial force of the fluid due to the convective acceleration is neglected on the basis of the smallness of the Reynolds number. The solution of the problem is derived for a quasi-steady flow involving infinitesimally thin disks. The numerical calculation is carried out for a set of different combinations of the interdisk distance and the ratio of the disk radius to the tube radius. The ratio of the velocity of the disk to the average velocity of the fluid is calculated. The different rates of transport of red blood cells and of plasma in capillary blood vessels are discussed. The average pressure gradient along the axis of the tube is computed, and the dependence of the effective viscosity of the blood on the hematocrit and the diameter of the capillary vessel is discussed. PMID:5409778

  20. Interest of ICG blood clearance monitoring for reproducible 810-nm diode laser coagulation of blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmettre, Thomas; Soulie-Begu, Sylvie; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.

    1999-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a method of control of diode laser fluence leading to a reproducible ICG-enhanced selective photocoagulation of blood vessels. This method would use the chromophore clearance, i.e. ICG blood concentration decay to adapt the laser fluence. Materials and Methods: A skin flap window was used on hamsters. After a 15 mg/kg ICG solution injection, photocoagulation of vessels were performed. Results: Selective photocoagulation of blood vessels was obtained only during the first 10 minutes. The fluence required to obtain a selective photocoagulation of vessels (F) was modelized using a one compartment phamacokinetic equation: F equals Of(1-e-t/(tau )). The best fit was obtained for a time constant (tau) equals 4.8 min and Of equals 300 J/cm2 (correlation coefficient r2 equals 0.996). During the first 10 minutes, the fluence required for selective photocoagulation of vessels was increased by a factor 4.5. Conclusion: Fluence required for a selective photocoagulation of vessels was correlated to ICG blood concentration decay. The time constant was equivalent to ICG half-life time in human blood. These results demonstrate that diode laser ICG-enhanced photocoagulation can be controlled by monitoring the ICG blood clearance.

  1. Artificial blood vessel: the Holy Grail of peripheral vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Kakisis, John D; Liapis, Christos D; Breuer, Christopher; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2005-02-01

    Artificial blood vessels composed of viable tissue represent the ideal vascular graft. Compliance, lack of thrombogenicity, and resistance to infections as well as the ability to heal, remodel, contract, and secrete normal blood vessel products are theoretical advantages of such grafts. Three basic elements are generally required for the construction of an artificial vessel: a structural scaffold, made either of collagen or a biodegradable polymer; vascular cells, and a nurturing environment. Mechanical properties of the artificial vessels are enhanced by bioreactors that mimic the in vivo environment of the vascular cells by producing pulsatile flow. Alternative approaches include the production of fibrocollagenous tubes within the recipient's own body (subcutaneous tissue or peritoneal cavity) and the construction of an artificial vessel from acellular native tissues, such as decellularized small intestine submucosa, ureter, and allogeneic or xenogeneic arteries. This review details the most recent developments on vascular tissue engineering, summarizes the results of initial experiments on animals and humans, and outlines the current status and the challenges for the future. PMID:15768021

  2. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Blood Flow in Blood Vessels with the Rolling Massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou-Hui; Xu, Shi-Xiong; Qian, Yue-Hong; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2005-12-01

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese massage, which is expected to improve the circulation by pushing, pulling and kneading of the muscle. A model for the rolling massage manipulation is proposed and the lattice Boltzmann method is applied to study the blood flow in the blood vessels. The simulation results show that the blood flux is considerably modified by the rolling massage and the explicit value depends on the rolling frequency, the rolling depth, and the diameter of the vessel. The smaller the diameter of the blood vessel, the larger the enhancement of the blood flux by the rolling massage. The model, together with the simulation results, is expected to be helpful to understand the mechanism and further development of rolling massage techniques.

  3. Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 Amplifies Canonical Wnt Signaling in Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Kiran; Gu, Jingsheng; Werner, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Tumor Endothelial Marker 8/Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 (TEM8/ANTXR1) expression is induced in the vascular compartment of multiple tumors and therefore, is a candidate molecule to target tumor therapies. This cell surface molecule mediates anthrax toxin internalization, however, its physiological function in blood vessels remains largely unknown. We identified the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) as a model system to study the endogenous function of TEM8 in blood vessels as we found that TEM8 expression was induced transiently between day 10 and 12 of embryonic development, when the vascular tree is undergoing final development and growth. We used the cell-binding component of anthrax toxin, Protective Antigen (PA), to engage endogenous TEM8 receptors and evaluate the effects of PA-TEM8 complexes on vascular development. PA applied at the time of highest TEM8 expression reduced vascular density and disrupted hierarchical branching as revealed by quantitative morphometric analysis of the vascular tree after 48h. PA-dependent reduced branching phenotype was partially mimicked by Wnt3a application and ameliorated by the Wnt antagonist, Dikkopf-1. These results implicate TEM8 expression in endothelial cells in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway at this day of CAM development. Consistent with this model, PA increased beta catenin levels acutely in CAM blood vessels in vivo and in TEM8 transfected primary human endothelial cells in vitro. TEM8 expression in Hek293 cells, which neither express endogenous PA-binding receptors nor Wnt ligands, stabilized beta catenin levels and amplified beta catenin-dependent transcriptional activity induced by Wnt3a. This agonistic function is supported by findings in the CAM, where the increase in TEM8 expression from day 10 to day 12 and PA application correlated with Axin 2 induction, a universal reporter gene for canonical Wnt signaling. We postulate that the developmentally controlled expression of TEM8 modulates endothelial cell response to canonical Wnt signaling to regulate vessel patterning and density. PMID:21829615

  4. DLC coating of textile blood vessels using PLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocourek, Tomas; Jelinek, Miroslav; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Zemek, Josef; Janča, Tomáš; Žížková, Věra; Podlaha, Jiří; Popov, Cyril

    2008-11-01

    Textile blood vessels with a length of 30 cm were coated with amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers with thicknesses up to 200 nm. The layers were created by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum or argon ambient. The percentage of sp3 carbon was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Depending on the deposition conditions the sp3 content varied from ˜40% to 60%. The adhesion of the DLC layers to the textile vessels was checked. The preliminary biocompatibility results from in vivo tests with sheep are also given.

  5. Melanopsin mediates light-dependent relaxation in blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Gautam; Hussmann, G. Patrick; Pandey, Deepesh; Cao, Suyi; Hori, Daijiro; Park, Jong Taek; Steppan, Jochen; Kim, Jae Hyung; Barodka, Viachaslau; Myers, Allen C.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Nyhan, Daniel; Halushka, Marc K.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2014-01-01

    Melanopsin (opsin4; Opn4), a non-image-forming opsin, has been linked to a number of behavioral responses to light, including circadian photo-entrainment, light suppression of activity in nocturnal animals, and alertness in diurnal animals. We report a physiological role for Opn4 in regulating blood vessel function, particularly in the context of photorelaxation. Using PCR, we demonstrate that Opn4 (a classic G protein-coupled receptor) is expressed in blood vessels. Force-tension myography demonstrates that vessels from Opn4?/? mice fail to display photorelaxation, which is also inhibited by an Opn4-specific small-molecule inhibitor. The vasorelaxation is wavelength-specific, with a maximal response at ?430–460 nm. Photorelaxation does not involve endothelial-, nitric oxide-, carbon monoxide-, or cytochrome p450-derived vasoactive prostanoid signaling but is associated with vascular hyperpolarization, as shown by intracellular membrane potential measurements. Signaling is both soluble guanylyl cyclase- and phosphodiesterase 6-dependent but protein kinase G-independent. ?-Adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (?ARK 1 or GRK2) mediates desensitization of photorelaxation, which is greatly reduced by GRK2 inhibitors. Blue light (455 nM) regulates tail artery vasoreactivity ex vivo and tail blood blood flow in vivo, supporting a potential physiological role for this signaling system. This endogenous opsin-mediated, light-activated molecular switch for vasorelaxation might be harnessed for therapy in diseases in which altered vasoreactivity is a significant pathophysiologic contributor. PMID:25404319

  6. Cutting Edge: Lymphatic Vessels, Not Blood Vessels, Primarily Mediate Immune Rejections After Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Tina; Bock, Felix; Yuen, Don; Hos, Deniz; Bachmann, Björn O.; Zahn, Grit; Wiegand, Stanley; Chen, Lu; Cursiefen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of blood vessels (hemangiogenesis) versus lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis) in mediating immunological responses after transplantation. Using the murine model of corneal transplantation, graft survival was compared in differentially prevascularized and avascular recipient beds. Donor corneas (C57BL/6) were transplanted into uninflamed or inflamed avascular, prehemvascularized only or prehemvascularized and prelymphvascularized recipient murine eyes (BALB/C). Selective inhibition of lymphangiogenesis was achieved using antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 Abs and anti-integrin ?5 small molecules. Grafts placed into only prehemvascularized recipient beds had a similarly good graft survival compared with grafts placed into completely avascular, normal recipients, whereas the pre-existence of lymphatic vessels significantly deteriorated corneal graft survival (p < 0.05). Lymphatic vessels seem to contribute significantly to graft rejection after (corneal) transplantation. That may allow for selective, temporary, perioperative antilymphangiogenic treatment to promote graft survival without affecting blood vessels, even after solid organ transplantation. PMID:20018627

  7. Control of Blood Vessel Identity: From Embryo to Adult

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Arteries and veins have been historically defined by the direction of blood flow and oxygen tension within the vessel, in addition to their functional, hemodynamic, and anatomical differences. It is now known that the molecular identity of these vessels is genetically predetermined, with specific molecular pathways activated during the development of arteries and veins. Eph-B4 is a determinant of venous differentiation and Ephrin-B2 is a determinant of arterial differentiation. Placement of a vein into the higher pressure and flow of the arterial circulation results in adaptation of the vein to the arterial environment. There is selective loss of Eph-B4 expression without induction of Ephrin-B2 expression during vein graft adaptation. These findings suggest that loss of venous identity is the crucial mechanism in vein graft adaptation and that developmentally critical determinants of vessel identity are plastic during adult life. PMID:23555335

  8. Deformations and end effects in isolated blood vessel testing.

    PubMed

    Monson, Kenneth L; Mathur, Vishwas; Powell, David A

    2011-01-01

    Blood vessels are commonly studied in isolation to define their mechanical and biological properties under controlled conditions. While sections of the wall are sometimes tested, vessels are most often attached to needles and examined in their natural cylindrical configuration where combinations of internal pressure and axial force can be applied to mimic in vivo conditions. Attachments to needles, however, constrain natural vessel response, resulting in a complex state of deformation that is not easily determined. As a result, measurements are usually limited to the midsection of a specimen where end effects do not extend and the deformation is homogeneous. To our knowledge, however, the boundaries of this uninfluenced midsection region have not been explored. The objective of this study was to define the extent of these end effects as a function of vessel geometry and material properties, loading conditions, and needle diameter. A computational fiber framework was used to model the response of a nonlinear anisotropic cylindrical tube, constrained radially at its ends, under conditions of axial extension and internal pressure. Individual fiber constitutive response was defined using a Fung-type strain energy function. While quantitative results depend on specific parameter values, simulations demonstrate that axial stretch is always highest near the constraint and reduces to a minimum in the uninfluenced midsection region. Circumferential stretch displays the opposite behavior. As a general rule, the length of the region disturbed by a needle constraint increases with the difference between the diameter of the needle and the equilibrium diameter of the blood vessel for the imposed loading conditions. The reported findings increase the understanding of specimen deformation in isolated vessel experiments, specifically defining considerations important to identifying a midsection region appropriate for measurement. PMID:21186895

  9. Scatter Factor Induces Blood Vessel Formation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Derrick S.; Kleinman, Hynda K.; Goldberg, Itzhak D.; Bhargava, Mahdu M.; Nickoloff, Brian J.; Kinsella, James L.; Polverini, Peter; Rosen, Eliot M.

    1993-03-01

    Scatter factor (also known as hepatocyte growth factor) is a glycoprotein secreted by stromal cells that stimulates cell motility and proliferation. In vitro, scatter factor stimulates vascular endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and organization into capillary-like tubes. Using two different in vivo assays, we showed that physiologic quantities of purified native mouse scatter factor and recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor induce angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). The angiogenic activity was blocked by specific anti-scatter factor antibodies. Scatter factor induced cultured microvascular endothelial cells to accumulate and secrete significantly increased quantities of urokinase, an enzyme associated with development of an invasive endothelial phenotype during angiogenesis. We further showed that immunoreactive scatter factor is present surrounding sites of blood vessel formation in psoriatic skin. These findings suggest that scatter factor may act as a paracrine mediator in pathologic angiogenesis associated with human inflammatory disease.

  10. Isolating and defining cells to engineer human blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Critser, P. J.; Voytik-Harbin, S. L.; Yoder, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been recently focused on understanding the role that bone marrow-derived putative endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) may play in the process of neoangiogenesis. However, recent data indicate that many of the putative EPC populations are comprised of various haematopoietic cell subsets with proangiogenic activity, but these marrow-derived putative EPC fail to display vasculogenic activity. Rather, this property is reserved for a rare population of circulating viable endothelial cells with colony-forming cell (ECFC) ability. Indeed, human ECFC possess clonal proliferative potential, display endothelial and not haematopoietic cell surface antigens, and display in vivo vasculogenic activity when suspended in an extracellular matrix and implanted into immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, human vessels derived became integrated into the murine circulatory system and eventually were remodelled into arterial and venous vessels. Identification of this population now permits determination of optimal type I collagen matrix microenvironment into which the cells should be embedded and delivered to accelerate and even pattern number and size of blood vessels formed, in vivo. Indeed, altering physical properties of ECFC-collagen matrix implants changed numerous parameters of human blood vessel formation, in host mice. These recent discoveries may permit a strategy for patterning vascular beds for eventual tissue and organ regeneration. PMID:21481038

  11. Numerical investigation of blood flow in a deformable coronary bifurcation and non-planar branch

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Esmail; Omidi, Amir Ali; Saghafi Zanjani, Massoud

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Among cardiovascular diseases, arterials stenosis is recognized more commonly than the others. Hemodynamic characteristics of blood play a key role in the incidence of stenosis. This paper numerically investigates the pulsatile blood flow in a coronary bifurcation with a non-planar branch. To create a more realistic analysis, the wall is assumed to be compliant. Furthermore, the flow is considered to be three-dimensional, incompressible, and laminar. Methods: The effects of non-Newtonian blood, compliant walls and different angles of bifurcation on hemodynamic characteristics of flow were evaluated. Shear thinning of blood was simulated with the Carreau-Yasuda model. The current research was mainly focused on the flow characteristics in bifurcations since atherosclerosis occurs mostly in bifurcations. Moreover, as the areas with low shear stresses are prone to stenosis, these areas were identified. Results: Our findings indicated that the compliant model of the wall, bifurcation’s angle, and other physical properties of flow have an impact on hemodynamics of blood flow. Lower wall shear stress was observed in the compliant wall than that in the rigid wall. The outer wall of bifurcation in all models had lower wall shear stress. In bifurcations with larger angles, wall shear stress was higher in outer walls, and lower in inner walls. Conclusion: The non-Newtonian blood vessels and different angles of bifurcation on hemodynamic characteristics of flow evaluation confirmed a lower wall shear stress in the compliant wall than that in the rigid wall, while the wall shear stress was higher in outer walls but lower in inner walls in the bifurcation regions with larger angles. PMID:25671176

  12. Pharmacological characteristics of endothelin receptors on sheep rectal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Lohsiriwat, Varut; Scholefield, John H; Dashwood, Michael R; Wilson, Vincent G

    2011-06-01

    Haemorrhoids is associated with high blood flow of the anorectal region. The question of whether pharmacological manipulation of vascular supply can relieve the symptoms of haemorrhoids has been raised. In order to undertake this type of clinical investigation, it is first essential to gain a better understanding of the properties of vascular receptors that may regulate blood flow into anal cushions and haemorrhoids. Due to the limited availability of human anorectal specimens and the good reliability of sheep tissue as an experimental model of human anorectal diseases, we studied the properties of endothelin receptors in sheep rectal artery (SRA) and vein (SRV), the vessels contributing to the blood flow of haemorrhoidal plexus, using isometric tension recordings. We found that endothelin-1 and sarafotoxin 6a were very potent constrictor agents in both SRA and SRV. The selective ET(A) receptor antagonist PD156707 (100 nM) produced a parallel rightward displacement of ET-1-induced contractions in both vessels and abolished sarafotoxin 6a-induced contractions in the SRA. PD156707 (3 ?M) practically abolished contractions to ET-1 in the SRA, suggesting that the response is entirely mediated by ET(A) receptors. While, the selective ET(B) receptor antagonist BQ788 (100 nM) caused no significant change in ET-1-induced contractions in both vessels, a minor role for ET(B) receptor subtype to responses to sarafotoxin 6a in the artery was suggested. PMID:21382493

  13. Regenerative Translation of Human Blood-Vessel-Derived MSC Precursors.

    PubMed

    Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Huard, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) represent a promising adult progenitor cell source for tissue repair and regeneration. Their mysterious identity in situ has gradually been unveiled by the accumulating evidence indicating an association between adult multipotent stem/progenitor cells and vascular/perivascular niches. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we and other groups have prospectively identified and purified subpopulations of multipotent precursor cells associated with the blood vessels within multiple human organs. The three precursor subsets, myogenic endothelial cells (MECs), pericytes (PCs), and adventitial cells (ACs), are located, respectively, in the three structural tiers of typical blood vessels: intima, media, and adventitia. MECs, PCs, and ACs have been extensively characterized in prior studies and are currently under investigation for their therapeutic potentials in preclinical animal models. In this review, we will briefly discuss the identification, isolation, and characterization of these human blood-vessel-derived stem cells (hBVSCs) and summarize the current status of regenerative applications of hBVSC subsets. PMID:26273304

  14. Regenerative Translation of Human Blood-Vessel-Derived MSC Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C. W.; Péault, Bruno; Huard, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) represent a promising adult progenitor cell source for tissue repair and regeneration. Their mysterious identity in situ has gradually been unveiled by the accumulating evidence indicating an association between adult multipotent stem/progenitor cells and vascular/perivascular niches. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we and other groups have prospectively identified and purified subpopulations of multipotent precursor cells associated with the blood vessels within multiple human organs. The three precursor subsets, myogenic endothelial cells (MECs), pericytes (PCs), and adventitial cells (ACs), are located, respectively, in the three structural tiers of typical blood vessels: intima, media, and adventitia. MECs, PCs, and ACs have been extensively characterized in prior studies and are currently under investigation for their therapeutic potentials in preclinical animal models. In this review, we will briefly discuss the identification, isolation, and characterization of these human blood-vessel-derived stem cells (hBVSCs) and summarize the current status of regenerative applications of hBVSC subsets. PMID:26273304

  15. Transport of magnetic nanobeads in a small blood vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    Numerical simulations are used to study the transport of sub-micron spherical magnetic beads in a model microvessel, particularly how transport is affected by physiologically realistic concentrations of flowing red cells. (Such beads are candidate vehicles for targeted drug delivery.) A previously validated high-fidelity boundary integral algorithm is used to solve the flow equations in the viscous limit in a ~ 15 ? m vessel. As expected, the red cells suppress transport toward the vessel wall when a magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. A more subtle mechanism is important when a magnetic field has a component parallel to the vessel. A homogeneous fluid model would be insensitive to forces applied in this direction, but tendency of blood cells to tilt away from the wall on their upstream side breaks the streamwise symmetry. These tilted cells act as viscous-flow variants of turning vanes, guiding magnets toward the wall if they are slowed by the magnetic field and toward the vessel center if they are accelerated by the magnetic field. This affects dispersion in the vessel and can also alter wall-ward magnetic field driven transport.

  16. Three-dimensional analysis of complex branching vessels in confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Maddah, Mahnaz; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Afzali-Kusha, Ali; Shahrokni, Ali; Zhang, Zheng G

    2005-09-01

    The characteristic of confocal microscopy (CM) vascular data is that it contains many tiny vessels with branching and complex structure. In this work, an automated method for quantitative analysis and reconstruction of cerebral vessels from CM images is presented in which the extracted centerline of the vessels plays the key role. To assess the efficiency and accuracy of different centerline extraction methods, a comparison among three fully automated approaches is given. The centerline extraction methods studied in this work are a snake model, a path planning approach, and a distance transform-based method. To evaluate the accuracy of the quantitative parameters of vessels such as length and diameter, we apply the method to synthetic data. These results indicate that the snake model and the path planning method are more accurate in extracting the quantitative parameters. The efficiency of the approach in clinical applications is then confirmed by applying the method to real CM images. All three methods investigated in this work are accurate enough to correctly distinguish between normal and stroke brain data, while the snake model is the fastest for clinical applications. In addition, three-dimensional visualization, reconstruction, and characterization of CM vascular images of rat brains are presented. PMID:15996853

  17. By Different Cellular Mechanisms, Lymphatic Vessels Sprout by Endothelial Cell Recruitment Whereas Blood Vessels Grow by Vascular Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; McKay, Terri L.; Leontiev, Dmitry; Condrich, Terence K.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The development of effective vascular therapies requires the understanding of all modes of vessel formation contributing to vasculogenesis, angiogenesis (here termed hemangiogenesis) and lymphangiogenesis. We show that lymphangiogenesis proceeds by blind-ended vessel sprouting via recruitment of isolated endothelial progenitor cells to the tips of growing vessels, whereas hemangiogenesis occurs by non-sprouting vessel expansion from the capillary network, during middevelopment in the quail chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Blood vessels expanded out of capillaries that displayed transient expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alphaSMA), accompanied by mural recruitment of migratory progenitor cells expressing SMA. Lymphatics and blood vessels were identified by confocal/fluorescence microscopy of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, alphaSMA (expressed on CAM blood vessels but not on lymphatics), homeobox transcription factor Prox-1 (specific to CAM lymphatic endothelium), and the quail hematopoetic/vascular marker, QH-1. Expression of VEGFR-1 was highly restricted to blood vessels (primarily capillaries). VEGFR-2 was expressed intensely in isolated hematopoietic cells, lymphatic vessels and moderately in blood vessels. Prox-1 was absent from endothelial progenitor cells prior to lymphatic recruitment. Although vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF(sub 165)) is a key regulator of numerous cellular processes in hemangiogenesis and vasculogenesis, the role of VEGF(sub 165) in lymphangiogenesis is less clear. Exogenous VEGF(sub 165) increased blood vessel density without changing endogenous modes of vascular/lymphatic vessel formation or marker expression patterns. However, VEGF(sub 165) did increase the frequency of blood vascular anastomoses and strongly induced the antimaturational dissociation of lymphatics from blood vessels, with frequent formation of homogeneous lymphatic networks.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of irradiated recipient blood vessels in head and neck free flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Guelinckx, P.J.; Boeckx, W.D.; Fossion, E.; Gruwez, J.A.

    1984-08-01

    Irradiated and control recipient blood vessels in a similar patient population were studied with scanning electron microscopy. The vessels that were biopsied were then anastomosed to a free flap. Irradiated arteries display a significantly greater wall thickness and higher incidence of intimal dehiscence compared with control arteries. Fibrin deposition, microthrombi, and endothelium cell dehiscence are present more frequently in irradiated vessels than in control vessels. Details of the preparation and anastomotic technique for irradiated blood vessels are discussed. Microvascular surgery in irradiated human blood vessels carries with it a higher risk of thrombosis due to preexisting vessel wall damage. This risk can be minimized by experience and attention to detail.

  19. Microprobes For Blood Flow Measurements In Tissue And Small Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberg, P. A.; Salerud, E. G.

    1988-04-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry is a method for the continuous and non-invasive recording of tissue blood flow. The method has already proved to be advantageous in a number of clinical as well as theoretical medical disciplines. In dermatology, plastic- and gastrointestinal surgery laser Doppler measurements have substantially contributed to increase knowledge of microvascular perfusion. In experimental medicine, the method has been used in the study of a great variety of microvascular problems. Spontaneous rhythmical variations, spatial and temporal fluctuations in human skin blood flow are mentioned as examples of problem areas in which new knowledge has been generated. The method has facilitated further investigations of the nature of spongeous bone blood flow, testis and kidney cortex blood flow. Recently we have showed that a variant of the laser Doppler method principle, using a single optical fiber, can be advantageous in deep tissue measurements. With this method laser light is transmitted bidirectionally in a single fiber. The tissue trauma which affects blood flow can be minimized by introducing small diameter fibers (0.1-0.5 mm). A special set-up utilizing the same basic principle has been used for the recording of blood flow in small vessels.

  20. Blood vessel classification into arteries and veins in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondermann, Claudia; Kondermann, Daniel; Yan, Michelle

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase dramatically in coming years; already today it accounts for a major proportion of the health care budget in many countries. Diabetic Retinopathy (DR), a micro vascular complication very often seen in diabetes patients, is the most common cause of visual loss in working age population of developed countries today. Since the possibility of slowing or even stopping the progress of this disease depends on the early detection of DR, an automatic analysis of fundus images would be of great help to the ophthalmologist due to the small size of the symptoms and the large number of patients. An important symptom for DR are abnormally wide veins leading to an unusually low ratio of the average diameter of arteries to veins (AVR). There are also other diseases like high blood pressure or diseases of the pancreas with one symptom being an abnormal AVR value. To determine it, a classification of vessels as arteries or veins is indispensable. As to our knowledge despite the importance there have only been two approaches to vessel classification yet. Therefore we propose an improved method. We compare two feature extraction methods and two classification methods based on support vector machines and neural networks. Given a hand-segmentation of vessels our approach achieves 95.32% correctly classified vessel pixels. This value decreases by 10% on average, if the result of a segmentation algorithm is used as basis for the classification.

  1. Surgical anatomy of the retroperitoneal spaces, Part III: Retroperitoneal blood vessels and lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros; Skandalakis, John E

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we discuss the surgical anatomy of the blood vessels and the lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes found in the retroperitoneum. Retroperitoneal blood vessels include the aorta and all its branches--parietal and visceral--from the diaphragm to the pelvis, and the inferior vena cava and its tributaries. The retroperitoneal lymphatics form a very rich and extensive chain. As a general rule, lymphatics follow the arteries and named lymph nodes are found at the root of the arteries. Retroperitoneal nodes of the abdomen comprise the inferior diaphragmatic nodes and the lumbar nodes. The latter are classified as left lumbar (aortic), intermediate (interaorticovenous), and right lumbar (caval). These nodes surround the aorta and the inferior vena cava. Around the aorta lie the paraortic nodes, preaortic nodes (include celiac, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric nodes collecting lymph from the splanchna supplied by the homonymous arteries), and retroaortic nodes. Similarly, around the vena cava lie the paracaval, precaval, and retrocaval nodes. Pelvic nodes include the common iliac, external and internal iliac, obturator, and sacral nodes. PMID:20336888

  2. Triamcinolone Acetonide Selectively Inhibits Angiogenesis in Small Blood Vessels and Decreases Vessel Diameter within the Vascular Tree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Terri L.; Gredeon, Dan J.; Vickerman, Mary B.; Hylton, alan G.; Ribita, Daniela; Olar, Harry H.; Kaiser, Peter K.; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    The steroid triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is a potent anti-angiogenesis drug used to treat retinal vascular diseases that include diabetic retinopathy, vascular occlusions and choroidal neovascularization. To quantify the effects of TA on branching morphology within the angiogenic microvascular tree of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of quail embryos. Increasing concentrations of TA (0-16 ng/ml) were applied topically on embryonic day 7 (E7) to the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of quail embryos cultured in Petri dishes, and incubated for an additional 24 or 48 hours until fixation. Binary (black/white) microscopic images of arterial end points were quantified by VESGEN software (for Generational Analysis of Vessel Branching) to obtain major vascular parameters that include vessel diameter (Dv), fractal dimension (Df), tortuosity (Tv) and densities of vessel area, length, number and branch point (Av, Lv, Nv and Brv). For assessment of specific changes in vascular morphology induced by TA, the VESGEN software automatically segmented the vascular tree into branching generations (G1...G10) according to changes in vessel diameter and branching. Vessel density decreased significantly up to 34% as the function of increasing concentration of TA according to Av, Lv, Brv, Nv and Df. TA selectively inhibited the growth of new, small vessels, because Lv decreased from 13.14plus or minus 0.61 cm/cm2 for controls to 8.012 plus or minus 0.82 cm/cm2 at 16 ng TA/ml in smaller branching generations (G7-G10), and for Nv from 473.83 plus or minus 29.85 cm(-)2 to 302.32 plus or minus 33.09 cm-()2. In contrast, vessel diameter (Dv) decreased throughout the vascular tree (G1-G10).

  3. Effect of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood on magnetic particle capture in occluded blood vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Magnetic carrier particles with surface-bound drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from the desired target site, and are captured at the target site via a local applied magnetic field. Herein, a numerical investigation of steady magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using functionalized magnetic micro-spheres in partly occluded blood vessel having a 90° bent is presented considering the effects of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the insert configuration and its position from the central plane of the artery (zoffset), particle size (dp) and its magnetic property (χ) and the magnitude of current (I) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. Analysis shows that there exists an optimum regime of operating parameters for which deposition of the drug carrying magnetic particles in a target zone on the partly occluded vessel wall can be maximized. The results provide useful design bases for in vitro set up for the investigation of MDT in stenosed blood vessels.

  4. Plasma membrane electron transport in frog blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rashmi P; Nalini, K; Rao, J Prakasa

    2009-12-01

    In an attempt to see if frog blood vessels possess a plasma membrane electron transport system, the postcaval vein and aorta isolated from Rana tigrina were tested for their ability to reduce ferricyanide, methylene blue, and 2,6-dichloroindophenol. While the dyes remained unchanged, ferricyanide was reduced to ferrocyanide. This reduction was resistant to inhibition by cyanide and azide. Heptane extraction or formalin fixation of the tissues markedly reduced the capability to reduce ferricyanide. Denuded aortas retained only 30% of the activity of intact tissue. Our results indicate that the amphibian postcaval vein and aorta exhibit plasma membrane electron transport. PMID:20093738

  5. Laser Doppler measurements of blood velocity in human retinal vessels.

    PubMed

    Feke, G T; Riva, C E

    1978-04-01

    We have measured Doppler shift frequency spectra (DSFS) of laser light scattered from red blood cells (RBC's) flowing through individual human retinal vessels. Each spectrum exhibits a cutoff frequency which is directly related to the maximum RBC velocity at the measurement site. Meaningful DSFS can be measured in times as short as 0.1 s. DSFS obtained from suspensions of polystyrene spheres and RBC's flowing through glass capillary tubes are used to illustrate the basic principles of the technique and to aid in the interpretation of the in vivo measurements. Our measurements show that maximum RBC velocities in retinal arteries vary markedly during each cardiac cycle. PMID:671138

  6. Annexin A3 Regulates Early Blood Vessel Formation

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Stryder M.; Cleaver, Ondine

    2015-01-01

    Annexins are a large family of calcium binding proteins that associate with cell membrane phospholipids and are involved in various cellular processes including endocytosis, exocytosis and membrane-cytoskeletal organization. Despite studies on numerous Annexin proteins, the function of Annexin A3 (Anxa3) is largely unknown. Our studies identify Anxa3 as a unique marker of the endothelial and myeloid cell lineages of Xenopus laevis during development. Anxa3 transcripts are also detected in endothelial cells (ECs) of zebrafish and mouse embryos, suggesting an important evolutionary function during formation of blood vessels. Indeed, Anxa3 loss-of-function experiments in frog embryos reveal its critical role during the morphogenesis of early blood vessels, as angioblasts in MO injected embryos fail to form vascular cords. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in mammalian cells identify a role for Anxa3 in EC migration. Our results are the first to reveal an in vivo function for Anxa3 during vascular development and represent a previously unexplored aspect of annexin biology. PMID:26182056

  7. [War injuries of blood vessels of the extremities].

    PubMed

    Radulovi?, Svetozar; Depot, Branko; Papi?, Vladimir; Pusac, Branislava; Trkulja, Nebojsa

    2002-01-01

    Treatment results of 200 injured with the lesions of 282 magistral blood vessels were analyzed. All were combat injuries, and the majority was caused by the fragments of explosive device. The mechanisms of such the injuries produced large defects of soft tissues as well as the high level of the wound contamination, which aggravated reconstructive procedures and increased the risk of infection. In the majority of cases anatomic reconstruction of the artery was performed, and the ligature was used only in the case of graft infection and in the injuries of one artery of the lower leg or the forearm. The majority of injuries was solved by lateral suture or patch plastic, since postoperative constriction caused by those methods did not cause greater hemodynamic disorders due to the size of venous lumen. The duration of ischemic interval was of the utmost importance for the favorable final result of the treatment, as well as the adequate debridement of the wound, good soft-tissue cover of the reconstructed blood vessel and precise atraumatic technique. Total percentage of amputations was 14.5%, and all were involving the lower extremities, and were mostly caused by popliteal artery lesion. PMID:12053468

  8. Microfluidic strategy to investigate dynamics of small blood vessel function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasotharan, Sanjesh; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Guenther, Axel

    2010-11-01

    Resistance arteries (RAs, 30-300 microns in diameter) that are located within the terminal part of the vascular tree regulate the laminar perfusion of tissue with blood, via the peripheral vascular resistance, and hence controls the systemic blood pressure. The structure of RAs is adapted to actively controlling flow resistance by dynamically changing their diameter, which is non-linearly dependent on the temporal variation of the transmural pressure, perfusion flow rate and spatiotemporal changes in the chemical environment. Increases in systemic blood pressure (hypertension) resulting from pathologic changes in the RA response represent the primary risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We use a microfluidic strategy to investigate small blood vessels by quantifying structural variations within the arterial wall, RA outer contour and diameter over time. First, we document the artery response to vasomotor drugs that were homogeneously applied at step-wise increasing concentration. Second, we investigate the response in the presence of well-defined axial and circumferential heterogeneities. Artery per- and superfusion is discussed based on microscale PIV measurements of the fluid velocity on both sides of the arterial wall. Structural changes in the arterial wall are quantified using cross-correlation and proper orthogonal decomposition analyses of bright-field micrographs.

  9. Parametrically defined cerebral blood vessels as non-invasive blood input functions for brain PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Marie-Claude; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Amano, Shigeko; Gunn, Roger N.; Nahmias, Claude

    2004-03-01

    A non-invasive alternative to arterial blood sampling for the generation of a blood input function for brain positron emission tomography (PET) studies is presented. The method aims to extract the dimensions of the blood vessel directly from PET images and to simultaneously correct the radioactivity concentration for partial volume and spillover. This involves simulation of the tomographic imaging process to generate images of different blood vessel and background geometries and selecting the one that best fits, in a least-squares sense, the acquired PET image. A phantom experiment was conducted to validate the method which was then applied to eight subjects injected with 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA and one subject injected with [11C]CO-labelled red blood cells. In the phantom study, the diameter of syringes filled with an 11C solution and inserted into a water-filled cylinder were estimated with an accuracy of half a pixel (1 mm). The radioactivity concentration was recovered to 100 ± 4% in the 8.7 mm diameter syringe, the one that most closely approximated the superior sagittal sinus. In the human studies, the method systematically overestimated the calibre of the superior sagittal sinus by 2-3 mm compared to measurements made in magnetic resonance venograms on the same subjects. Sources of discrepancies related to the anatomy of the blood vessel were found not to be fundamental limitations to the applicability of the method to human subjects. This method has the potential to provide accurate quantification of blood radioactivity concentration from PET images without the need for blood samples, corrections for delay and dispersion, co-registered anatomical images, or manually defined regions of interest.

  10. Bioprinting of artificial blood vessels: current approaches towards a demanding goal.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Eva; Tovar, Günter E M; Borchers, Kirsten

    2014-11-01

    Free-form fabrication techniques, often referred to as '3D printing', are currently tested with regard to the processing of biological and biocompatible materials in general and for fabrication of vessel-like structures in particular. Such computer-controlled methods assemble 3D objects by layer-wise deposition or layer-wise cross-linking of materials. They use, for example, nozzle-based deposition of hydrogels and cells, drop-on-demand inkjet-printing of cell suspensions with subsequent cross-linking, layer-by-layer cross-linking of synthetic or biological polymers by selective irradiation with light and even laser-induced deposition of single cells. The need of vessel-like structures has become increasingly crucial for the supply of encapsulated cells for 3D tissue engineering, or even with regard to future application such as vascular grafts. The anticipated potential of providing tubes with tailored branching geometries made of biocompatible or biological materials pushes future visions of patient-specific vascularized tissue substitutions, tissue-engineered blood vessels and bio-based vascular grafts. We review here the early attempts of bringing together innovative free-form manufacturing processes with bio-based and biodegradable materials. The presented studies provide many important proofs of concepts such as the possibility to integrate viable cells into computer-controlled processes and the feasibility of supplying cells in a hydrogel matrix by generation of a network of perfused channels. Several impressive results in the generation of complex shapes and high-aspect-ratio tubular structures demonstrate the potential of additive assembly methods. Yet, it also becomes obvious that there remain major challenges to simultaneously match all material requirements in terms of biological functions (cell function supporting properties), physicochemical functions (mechanical properties of the printed material) and process-related (viscosity, cross-linkability) functions, towards the demanding goal of biofabricating artificial blood vessels. PMID:24970571

  11. Small GTPase R-Ras regulates Integrity and Functionality of Tumor Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Junko; Urakami, Takeo; Li, Fangfei; Urakami, Akane; Zhu, Weiquan; Fukuda, Minoru; Li, Dean Y.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    Summary We show that R-Ras, a small GTPase of the Ras family, is essential for the establishment of mature, functional blood vessels in tumors. The genetic disruption of R-Ras severely impaired the maturation processes of tumor vessels in mice. Conversely, the gain of function of R-Ras improved vessel structure and blood perfusion and blocked plasma leakage by enhanced endothelial barrier function and pericyte association with nascent blood vessels. Thus, R-Ras promotes normalization of the tumor vasculature. These findings identify R-Ras as a critical regulator of vessel integrity and function during tumor vascularization. PMID:22897853

  12. A Heuristic Framework for Image Filtering and Segmentation: Application to Blood Vessel Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Chi-Hsuan; Lu, Yi-Chien; Yuan, Ang; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The blood vessel density in a cancerous tissue sample may represent increased levels of tumor growth. However, identifying blood vessels in the histological (tissue) image is difficult and time-consuming and depends heavily on the observer's experience. To overcome this drawback, computer-aided image analysis frameworks have been investigated in order to boost object identification in histological images. We present a novel algorithm to automatically abstract the salient regions in blood vessel images. Experimental results show that the proposed framework is capable of deriving vessel boundaries that are comparable to those demarcated manually, even for vessel regions with weak contrast between the object boundaries and background clutter. PMID:26819914

  13. Inherited neurovascular diseases affecting cerebral blood vessels and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sam, Christine; Li, Fei-Feng; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Neurovascular diseases are among the leading causes of mortality and permanent disability due to stroke, aneurysm, and other cardiovascular complications. Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) and Marfan syndrome are two neurovascular disorders that affect smooth muscle cells through accumulation of granule and osmiophilic materials and defective elastic fiber formations respectively. Moyamoya disease, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II), and Fabry's disease are disorders that affect the endothelium cells of blood vessels through occlusion or abnormal development. While much research has been done on mapping out mutations in these diseases, the exact mechanisms are still largely unknown. This paper briefly introduces the pathogenesis, genetics, clinical symptoms, and current methods of treatment of the diseases in the hope that it can help us better understand the mechanism of these diseases and work on ways to develop better diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25893882

  14. Migraine aura pathophysiology: the role of blood vessels and microembolisation

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Turgay; Nozari, Ala; Moskowitz, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Migraine attacks with auras are sometimes associated with underlying hereditary or acquired cerebrovascular disorders. A unifying pathophysiological explanation linking migraine to these conditions has been diffcult to identify. On the basis of genetic and epidemiological evidence, we suggest that changes in blood vessels, hypoperfusion disorders, and microembolisation can cause neurovascular dysfunction and evoke cortical spreading depression, an event that is widely thought to underlie aura symptoms. In fact, recent experimental data have indicated that focal, mild, and transient ischaemia can trigger cortical spreading depression without an enduring tissue signature. Although migraine with aura has many causes (eg, neuronal network excitability), it seems that migraine and stroke might both be triggered by hypoperfusion and could therefore exist on a continuum of vascular complications in a subset of patients who have these hereditary or acquired comorbid vascular conditions. PMID:20170844

  15. Laser-irradiation-induced relaxation of blood vessels in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgouliatos, Z.F.; Welch, A.J.; Diller, K.R.; Aggarwal, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The response of blood vessels to laser irradiation in vivo was studied in the dorsal skin flap glass window chamber model of hamsters. The vasodilatory response of venules was critically dependent on the wavelength of irradiating laser. Relaxation was not produced in arterioles, although it was tried repeatedly. Vessels were irradiated with the 514.5 nm single line argon laser with irradiances from 1 to 10 W/cm{sup 2} on a 1.2 mm-diameter spot. Irradiation of venules with 2.2 W/cm{sup 2} and 4.25 W/cm{sup 2} produced reversible relaxation. Venules relaxed initially and after the interruption of irradiation returned to their original diameter. At higher irradiances (8.5 W/cm{sup 2}) an irreversible relaxation was observed. At irradiances of 10 W/cm{sup 2} and above initial relaxation was accompanied with constriction, focal coaguli, and hemostasis. Irradiation with the argon-pumped dye laser at 595 nm did not produce any significant relaxation.

  16. The effect of blood vessels on the computation of the scanning laser ophthalmoscope retinal thickness map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantri, A.; Li, Y.; Hutchings, N.; Flanagan, J.; Holmes, T.

    2007-03-01

    Retinal thickness maps obtained using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope are useful in the diagnosis of macular edema and other diseases that cause changes in the retinal thickness. However, the thickness measurements are adversely affected by the presence of blood vessels. This paper studies the effect that the blood vessels have on the computation of the retinal thickness. The retinal thickness is estimated using maximum-likelihood resolution with anatomical constraints. The blood vessels are segmented using local image features. Comparison of the retinal thickness with and without the blood vessel removal is made using correlation coefficient and I-divergence.

  17. The vascular Ca2+-sensing receptor regulates blood vessel tone and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Schepelmann, M; Yarova, P L; Lopez-Fernandez, I; Davies, T S; Brennan, S C; Edwards, P J; Aggarwal, A; Graça, J; Rietdorf, K; Matchkov, V; Fenton, R A; Chang, W; Krssak, M; Stewart, A; Broadley, K J; Ward, D T; Price, S A; Edwards, D H; Kemp, P J; Riccardi, D

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor CaSR is expressed in blood vessels where its role is not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the CaSR expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is directly involved in regulation of blood pressure and blood vessel tone. Mice with targeted CaSR gene ablation from vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were generated by breeding exon 7 LoxP-CaSR mice with animals in which Cre recombinase is driven by a SM22α promoter (SM22α-Cre). Wire myography performed on Cre-negative [wild-type (WT)] and Cre-positive (SM22α)CaSR(Δflox/Δflox) [knockout (KO)] mice showed an endothelium-independent reduction in aorta and mesenteric artery contractility of KO compared with WT mice in response to KCl and to phenylephrine. Increasing extracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) concentrations (1-5 mM) evoked contraction in WT but only relaxation in KO aortas. Accordingly, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures of KO animals were significantly reduced compared with WT, as measured by both tail cuff and radiotelemetry. This hypotension was mostly pronounced during the animals' active phase and was not rescued by either nitric oxide-synthase inhibition with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester or by a high-salt-supplemented diet. KO animals also exhibited cardiac remodeling, bradycardia, and reduced spontaneous activity in isolated hearts and cardiomyocyte-like cells. Our findings demonstrate a role for CaSR in the cardiovascular system and suggest that physiologically relevant changes in extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations could contribute to setting blood vessel tone levels and heart rate by directly acting on the cardiovascular CaSR. PMID:26538090

  18. Aquaporin-1 in blood vessels of rat circumventricular organs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alan J; Carati, Colin J; Gannon, Bren J; Haberberger, Rainer; Chataway, Tim K

    2010-04-01

    Although the water channel protein aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is widely observed outside the rat brain in continuous, but not fenestrated, vascular endothelia, it has not previously been observed in any endothelia within the normal rat brain and only to a limited extent in the human brain. In this immunohistochemical study of rat brain, AQP1 has also been found in microvessel endothelia, probably of the fenestrated type, in all circumventricular organs (except the subcommissural organ and the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis): in the median eminence, pineal, subfornical organ, area postrema and choroid plexus. The majority of microvessels in the median eminence, pineal and choroid plexus, known to be exclusively fenestrated, are shown to be AQP1-immunoreactive. In the subfornical organ and area postrema in which many, but not all, microvessels are fenestrated, not all microvessels are AQP1-immunoreactive. In the AQP1-immunoreactive microvessels, the AQP1 probably facilitates water movement between blood and interstitium as one component of the normal fluxes that occur in these specialised sensory and secretory areas. AQP1-immunoreactive endothelia have also been seen in a small population of blood vessels in the cerebral parenchyma outside the circumventricular organs, similar to other observations in human brain. The proposed development of AQP1 modulators to treat various brain pathologies in which AQP1 plays a deleterious role will necessitate further work to determine the effect of such modulators on the normal function of the circumventricular organs. PMID:20177708

  19. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  20. Bone Marrow Blood Vessel Ossification and “Microvascular Dead Space” in Rat and Human Long Bone

    PubMed Central

    Prisby, Rhonda D.

    2014-01-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4–6 mon; n=8) and old (22–24 mon; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner’s Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via µCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and “normal” vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (p <0.05) in old vs. young rats. Calcified and ossified vessel volumes per tissue volume and calcified vessel volume per patent vessel volume were augmented (p <0.05) 262%, 375% and 263%, respectively, in old vs. young rats. Ossified and patent vessel number was higher (171%) and lower (40%), respectively, in old vs. young rats. Finally, adipocyte volume per patent vessel volume was higher (86%) with age. This study is the first to report ossification of bone marrow blood vessels in rats and humans. Ossification presumably results in “microvascular dead space” in regards to loss of patency and vasomotor function as opposed to necrosis. The progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. PMID:24680721

  1. Transmitted ultrasound pressure variation in micro blood vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengping; Kruse, Dustin E; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2008-06-01

    Silica, cellulose and polymethylmethacrylate tubes with inner diameters of ten to a few hundred microns are commonly used as blood vessel phantoms in in vitro studies of microbubble or nanodroplet behavior during insonation. However, a detailed investigation of the ultrasonic fields within these micro-tubes has not yet been performed. This work provides a theoretical analysis of the ultrasonic fields within micro-tubes. Numerical results show that for the same tube material, the interaction between the micro-tube and megaHertz-frequency ultrasound may vary drastically with incident frequency, tube diameter and wall thickness. For 10 MHz ultrasonic insonation of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube with an inner diameter of 195 microm and an outer diameter of 260 microm, the peak pressure within the tube can be up to 300% of incident pressure amplitude. However, using 1 MHz ultrasound and a silica tube with an inner diameter of 12 microm and an outer diameter of 50 microm, the peak pressure within the tube is only 12% of the incident pressure amplitude and correspondingly, the spatial-average-time-average intensity within the tube is only 1% of the incident intensity. PMID:18395962

  2. 3D simulations of early blood vessel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, F.; Gamba, A.; Naldi, G.; Semplice, M.; Valdembri, D.; Serini, G.

    2007-08-01

    Blood vessel networks form by spontaneous aggregation of individual cells migrating toward vascularization sites (vasculogenesis). A successful theoretical model of two-dimensional experimental vasculogenesis has been recently proposed, showing the relevance of percolation concepts and of cell cross-talk (chemotactic autocrine loop) to the understanding of this self-aggregation process. Here we study the natural 3D extension of the computational model proposed earlier, which is relevant for the investigation of the genuinely three-dimensional process of vasculogenesis in vertebrate embryos. The computational model is based on a multidimensional Burgers equation coupled with a reaction diffusion equation for a chemotactic factor and a mass conservation law. The numerical approximation of the computational model is obtained by high order relaxed schemes. Space and time discretization are performed by using TVD schemes and, respectively, IMEX schemes. Due to the computational costs of realistic simulations, we have implemented the numerical algorithm on a cluster for parallel computation. Starting from initial conditions mimicking the experimentally observed ones, numerical simulations produce network-like structures qualitatively similar to those observed in the early stages of in vivo vasculogenesis. We develop the computation of critical percolative indices as a robust measure of the network geometry as a first step towards the comparison of computational and experimental data.

  3. TOPAZ: a computer code for modeling heat transfer and fluid flow in arbitrary networks of pipes, flow branches, and vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the computer code TOPAZ (Transient-One-Dimensional Pipe Flow Analyzer) is presented. TOPAZ models the flow of compressible and incompressible fluids through complex and arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, flow branches and vessels. Heat transfer to and from the fluid containment structures (i.e. vessel and pipe walls) can also be modeled. This document includes discussions of the fluid flow equations and containment heat conduction equations. The modeling philosophy, numerical integration technique, code architecture, and methods for generating the computational mesh are also discussed.

  4. Electrokinetic effect of the endothelial glycocalyx layer on two-phase blood flow in small blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Yang, Jun

    2009-06-01

    Blood flow behaves differently at the microvascular level than they do at upper levels of circulating systems. The endothelial glycocalyx layer on the luminal surface of blood vessels plays a significant role in regulating blood flow and blood cell movement in microvascular networks. For instance, previous experimental studies showed that the endothelial glycocalyx layer causes additional resistance to blood flow in small blood vessels. One of the important facts of the endothelial glycocalyx layer is that this layer is highly negatively charged. The question remains: do these electrostatic charges retard blood flow in small blood vessels according to the electroviscous effect? Here, a theoretical model is proposed to investigate the electrochemical effects of the endothelial glycocalyx layer on two-phase non-Newtonian blood flow in small blood vessels. Results show that electrostatic charges on the endothelial glycocalyx layer induce negligible effect to blood flow. Therefore, we can attribute the cause of additional resistance by the endothelial glycocalyx layer mainly to other mechanisms, such as, the glycocalyx constituted proteins acting as a flow barrier. PMID:19362568

  5. The Rheology of Blood Flow in a Branched Arterial System.

    PubMed

    Shibeshi, Shewaferaw S; Collins, William E

    2005-01-01

    Blood flow rheology is a complex phenomenon. Presently there is no universally agreed upon model to represent the viscous property of blood. However, under the general classification of non-Newtonian models that simulate blood behavior to different degrees of accuracy, there are many variants. The power law, Casson and Carreau models are popular non-Newtonian models and affect hemodynamics quantities under many conditions. In this study, the finite volume method is used to investigate hemodynamics predictions of each of the models. To implement the finite volume method, the computational fluid dynamics software Fluent 6.1 is used. In this numerical study the different hemorheological models are found to predict different results of hemodynamics variables which are known to impact the genesis of atherosclerosis and formation of thrombosis. The axial velocity magnitude percentage difference of up to 2 % and radial velocity difference up to 90 % is found at different sections of the T-junction geometry. The size of flow recirculation zones and their associated separation and reattachment point's locations differ for each model. The wall shear stress also experiences up to 12 % shift in the main tube. A velocity magnitude distribution of the grid cells shows that the Newtonian model is close dynamically to the Casson model while the power law model resembles the Carreau model. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Die Rheologie von Blutströmungen ist ein komplexes Phänomen. Gegenwärtig existiert kein allgemein akzeptiertes Modell, um die viskosen Eigenschaften von Blut wiederzugeben. Jedoch gibt es mehrere Varianten unter der allgemeinen Klassifikation von nicht-Newtonschen Modellen, die das Verhalten von Blut mit unterschiedlicher Genauigkeit simulieren. Die Potenzgesetz-, Casson und Carreau-Modelle sind beliebte nicht-New-tonsche Modelle und beeinflussen die hämodynamischen Eigenschaften in vielen Situationen. In dieser Studie wurde die finite Volumenmethode angewandt, um die hämodynamischen Vorhersagen dieser Modelle zu untersuchen. Um die finite Volumenmethode zu implementieren, wurde die Fluiddynamiksoftware Fluent 6.1 verwendet. In dieser numerischen Studie wurde gefunden, dass die unterschiedlichen hämorheologischen Modelle unterschiedliche Resultate für die hämodynamischen Grössen vorhersagen, von denen bekannt ist, dass sie die Entstehung von Arteriosklerose und die Bildung von Thrombose beeinflussen. Es wurde gefunden, dass die relative Differenz der axialen Geschwindigkeit bis zu 2% und die der radialen Geschwindigkeit bis zu 90% in unterschiedlichen Abschnitten der T-Verbindung beträgt. Die Grösse der Strömungszirkulationszonen und ihrer dazugehörigen Trennungs- und Vereinigungspunkte differieren für jedes Modell. Die Scherspannung an der Wand erfährt ebenfalls eine Verschiebung im Hauptrohr von bis zu 12%. Der Verlauf der Geschwindigkeit auf den Gitterzellen zeigt, dass das Newtonsche Modell mit Bezug auf die Dynamik dem Casson-Modell nahe ist, während das Potenzgesetzmodell dem Carreau-Modell ähnlich ist. R#ENTITYSTARTX000E9;SUM#ENTITYSTARTX000E9;: La rhéologie de l'écoulement sanguin est un phénomène complexe. Présentement, il n'y a pas de consensus universel sur le modèle qui représente la propriété visqueuse du sang. Cependant, parmi la classification générale des modèles non-Newtoniens qui simulent le comportement du sang avec différents degrés de précision, il y a plusieurs différences. Les lois de puissance, les modèles de Casson et Carreau sont des modèles non-Newtoniens populaires et ont un effet sur les quantités hémodynamiques sous plusieurs conditions. Dans cette étude, la méthode de volume fini est utilisée pour explorer les prédictions hémodynamiques de chacun de ces modèles. Pour implémenter la méthode de volume fini, le logiciel de calcul de dynamique des fluides Fluent 6.1 a été utilisé. Dans cette étude numérique, les différents modèles hémorhéologiques tendent à prédire des résultats différents pour les variables hémodynamiques qui sont reconnues comme aya

  6. The Rheology of Blood Flow in a Branched Arterial System

    PubMed Central

    Shibeshi, Shewaferaw S.; Collins, William E.

    2006-01-01

    Blood flow rheology is a complex phenomenon. Presently there is no universally agreed upon model to represent the viscous property of blood. However, under the general classification of non-Newtonian models that simulate blood behavior to different degrees of accuracy, there are many variants. The power law, Casson and Carreau models are popular non-Newtonian models and affect hemodynamics quantities under many conditions. In this study, the finite volume method is used to investigate hemodynamics predictions of each of the models. To implement the finite volume method, the computational fluid dynamics software Fluent 6.1 is used. In this numerical study the different hemorheological models are found to predict different results of hemodynamics variables which are known to impact the genesis of atherosclerosis and formation of thrombosis. The axial velocity magnitude percentage difference of up to 2 % and radial velocity difference up to 90 % is found at different sections of the T-junction geometry. The size of flow recirculation zones and their associated separation and reattachment point's locations differ for each model. The wall shear stress also experiences up to 12 % shift in the main tube. A velocity magnitude distribution of the grid cells shows that the Newtonian model is close dynamically to the Casson model while the power law model resembles the Carreau model. Zusammenfassung Die Rheologie von Blutströmungen ist ein komplexes Phänomen. Gegenwärtig existiert kein allgemein akzeptiertes Modell, um die viskosen Eigenschaften von Blut wiederzugeben. Jedoch gibt es mehrere Varianten unter der allgemeinen Klassifikation von nicht-Newtonschen Modellen, die das Verhalten von Blut mit unterschiedlicher Genauigkeit simulieren. Die Potenzgesetz-, Casson und Carreau-Modelle sind beliebte nicht-New-tonsche Modelle und beeinflussen die hämodynamischen Eigenschaften in vielen Situationen. In dieser Studie wurde die finite Volumenmethode angewandt, um die hämodynamischen Vorhersagen dieser Modelle zu untersuchen. Um die finite Volumenmethode zu implementieren, wurde die Fluiddynamiksoftware Fluent 6.1 verwendet. In dieser numerischen Studie wurde gefunden, dass die unterschiedlichen hämorheologischen Modelle unterschiedliche Resultate für die hämodynamischen Größen vorhersagen, von denen bekannt ist, dass sie die Entstehung von Arteriosklerose und die Bildung von Thrombose beeinflussen. Es wurde gefunden, dass die relative Differenz der axialen Geschwindigkeit bis zu 2% und die der radialen Geschwindigkeit bis zu 90% in unterschiedlichen Abschnitten der T-Verbindung beträgt. Die Größe der Strömungszirkulationszonen und ihrer dazugehörigen Trennungs- und Vereinigungspunkte differieren für jedes Modell. Die Scherspannung an der Wand erfährt ebenfalls eine Verschiebung im Hauptrohr von bis zu 12%. Der Verlauf der Geschwindigkeit auf den Gitterzellen zeigt, dass das Newtonsche Modell mit Bezug auf die Dynamik dem Casson-Modell nahe ist, während das Potenzgesetzmodell dem Carreau-Modell ähnlich ist. Résumé La rhéologie de l'écoulement sanguin est un phénomène complexe. Présentement, il n'y a pas de consensus universel sur le modèle qui représente la propriété visqueuse du sang. Cependant, parmi la classification générale des modèles non-Newtoniens qui simulent le comportement du sang avec différents degrés de précision, il y a plusieurs différences. Les lois de puissance, les modèles de Casson et Carreau sont des modèles non-Newtoniens populaires et ont un effet sur les quantités hémodynamiques sous plusieurs conditions. Dans cette étude, la méthode de volume fini est utilisée pour explorer les prédictions hémodynamiques de chacun de ces modèles. Pour implémenter la méthode de volume fini, le logiciel de calcul de dynamique des fluides Fluent 6.1 a été utilisé. Dans cette &

  7. Automated branching pattern report generation for laparoscopic surgery assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Tetsuro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a method for generating branching pattern reports of abdominal blood vessels for laparoscopic gastrectomy. In gastrectomy, it is very important to understand branching structure of abdominal arteries and veins, which feed and drain specific abdominal organs including the stomach, the liver and the pancreas. In the real clinical stage, a surgeon creates a diagnostic report of the patient anatomy. This report summarizes the branching patterns of the blood vessels related to the stomach. The surgeon decides actual operative procedure. This paper shows an automated method to generate a branching pattern report for abdominal blood vessels based on automated anatomical labeling. The report contains 3D rendering showing important blood vessels and descriptions of branching patterns of each vessel. We have applied this method for fifty cases of 3D abdominal CT scans and confirmed the proposed method can automatically generate branching pattern reports of abdominal arteries.

  8. Differential patterns of relaxation by atrial natriuretic peptide in major blood vessels of two distantly related teleosts.

    PubMed

    Sverdrup, A; Helle, K B

    1994-09-22

    In order to elucidate the role of the atrial hormone in the teleost circulation, the vascular effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have been compared in major blood vessels of the cod (Gadus morhua) and of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The relaxing effects of ANP from eel (eANP) have been examined in ventral aorta (VA) versus dorsal aorta (DA) in the cod and in VA versus the coeliaco mesenteric artery (CMA), a major branch of DA, in the salmon. The vessels were precontracted by acetylcholine (ACh) and adrenaline (A) and by the mammalian endothelium-derived vasoconstrictor peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1). The role of endothelial integrity for these responses has been assessed in vessels either mechanically probed or chemically impaired by indomethacin or the L-arginine analogue, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Adrenaline and noradrenaline (NA) failed to contract the salmon VA. In the salmon vessels, eANP was without relaxing effects in ACh-contracted VA, while completely relaxing CMA when precontracted with ACh. The eANP was also a relaxant of A-contracted CMA and of ET-1-contracted VA. The cod vessels, which were insensitive to ACh were markedly relaxed by eANP when precontracted with either A (VA) or ET-1 (DA). In DA also the resting tension was reversed, an effect of eANP that was highly potentiated in mechanical probed vessels. Otherwise the relaxing effects of eANP in these vessels were seemingly independent of endothelial factors. In conclusion ANP is not a general relaxant of the precontracted VA which in teleosts is the first possible target vessel for the myocardial release of this hormone. On the arterial side ANP serves as a relaxant both in the salmon and the cod vessels, indicating that myocardial release of ANP in teleosts may have an important role in regulation of blood flow via diverse, species-specific effects on major blood vessels on both sides of the gills. PMID:7831502

  9. Fluid Forces Combine with Molecular Signal to Trigger New Blood Vessel Growth | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, is required for the development and spread of cancer, but the physical and biochemical factors that trigger this complex process are poorly understood. Using a microfluidic model of angiogenic sprouting, the initial visible step in new blood vessel formation, a pair of investigators from Harvard Medical School has shown that the sheer stress produced by flowing blood plays a critical role in early angiogenesis.

  10. [How do blood vessels age? Mechanisms and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    van der Loo, B; Koppensteiner, R; Lüscher, T F

    2004-02-01

    Ageing is one of the most important cardiovascular risk factors. Vascular ageing is determined by genetic, mechanic and hemodynamic factors. The latter is strengthened by the fact that age-associated changes in capillaries and veins, vessels which are less prone to changes in pulsatility and blood pressure, are less pronounced or even absent. Age-related morphologic changes in large resistance vessels include an intima-media thickening, increased deposition of matrix substances, thus ultimately leading to a reduced compliance. Vascular ageing is mainly characterized by an impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), producing vasodilatatory nitric oxide (NO), is markedly upregulated with increasing age. However, vasorelaxation is impaired, as the production of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide (O2-), concomitantly increases. NO and O2- react to form the powerful oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO-). Peroxynitrite is known to initiate oxidative modification of proteins, including nitration of aromatic rings, thereby rendering functionally inactive certain regulatory proteins. Deposition of nitrated proteins is mainly found within endothelial mitochondria, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in the vascular ageing process. It yet remains to be shown whether oxidative stress, which is, according to the currently accepted "oxidative stress hypothesis", a key event of vascular ageing, can be pharmacologically prevented, e.g. by naturally occurring antioxidant vitamins. However, in a mammalian model of ageing, an unexpected accumulation of vitamin E was found to accumulate within the aortic wall. This may represent a self-regulatory adaptive mechanism to prevent age-associated oxidative stress. In contrast, ascorbic acid was found to decrease with increasing age. Eventually, it remains to be seen if vitamin C or other antioxidative substances may be useful therapies. Statins and ACE inhibitors are known to have effects on mechanisms interfering with the ageing process. Given the strong age-dependency of cardiovascular disease, the developments of therapies to delay vascular ageing might have enormous medical (and economic) consequences in the future. PMID:15061041

  11. A new mechanism of blood vessel growth - hope for new treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Kilarski, Witold W; Gerwins, Pär

    2009-06-01

    Growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is essential for embryo development as well as for wound healing and progression of a number of diseases such as cancer, inflammatory conditions, eye diseases, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis in the adult. Current paradigms explain blood vessel growth entirely by sprouting angiogenesis or by vessel splitting through so called intussusceptive angiogenesis. However, these mechanisms are mainly derived from experiments on the developing embryo while less is known about angiogenesis in the adult during, e.g., wound healing, tumor growth, and inflammation. Recently we showed that blood vessel growth in the adult can be induced and directed by mechanical forces that naturally develop during healing or remodeling of tissues. In contrast to sprouting and intussusception, the new biomechanical hypothesis assumes that functional blood vessels are passively translocated which, if found generic, may drastically change the approach for developing anti- and pro-angiogenic therapies in the treatment of a variety of diseases. PMID:19772838

  12. Selective Stimulation of Penumbral Cones Reveals Perception in the Shadow of Retinal Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Spitschan, Manuel; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.; Brainard, David H.

    2015-01-01

    In 1819, Johann Purkinje described how a moving light source that displaces the shadow of the retinal blood vessels to adjacent cones can produce the entopic percept of a branching tree. Here, we describe a novel method for producing a similar percept. We used a device that mixes 56 narrowband primaries under computer control, in conjunction with the method of silent substitution, to present observers with a spectral modulation that selectively targeted penumbral cones in the shadow of the retinal blood vessels. Such a modulation elicits a clear Purkinje-tree percept. We show that the percept is specific to penumbral L and M cone stimulation and is not produced by selective penumbral S cone stimulation. The Purkinje-tree percept was strongest at 16 Hz and fell off at lower (8 Hz) and higher (32 Hz) temporal frequencies. Selective stimulation of open-field cones that are not in shadow, with penumbral cones silenced, also produced the percept, but it was not seen when penumbral and open-field cones were modulated together. This indicates the need for spatial contrast between penumbral and open-field cones to create the Purkinje-tree percept. Our observation provides a new means for studying the response of retinally stabilized images and demonstrates that penumbral cones can support spatial vision. Further, the result illustrates a way in which silent substitution techniques can fail to be silent. We show that inadvertent penumbral cone stimulation can accompany melanopsin-directed modulations that are designed only to silence open-field cones. This in turn can result in visual responses that might be mistaken as melanopsin-driven. PMID:25897842

  13. Biomechanical regulation of blood vessel growth during tissue vascularization.

    PubMed

    Kilarski, Witold W; Samolov, Branka; Petersson, Ludvig; Kvanta, Anders; Gerwins, Pär

    2009-06-01

    Formation of new vessels in granulation tissue during wound healing has been assumed to occur solely through sprouting angiogenesis. In contrast, we show here that neovascularization can be accomplished by nonangiogenic expansion of preexisting vessels. Using neovascularization models based on the chick chorioallantoic membrane and the healing mouse cornea, we found that tissue tension generated by activated fibroblasts or myofibroblasts during wound contraction mediated and directed translocation of the vasculature. These mechanical forces pulled vessels from the preexisting vascular bed as vascular loops with functional circulation that expanded as an integral part of the growing granulation tissue through vessel enlargement and elongation. Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 confirmed that biomechanical forces were sufficient to mediate the initial vascular growth independently of endothelial sprouting or proliferation. The neovascular network was further remodeled by splitting, sprouting and regression of individual vessels. This model explains the rapid appearance of large functional vessels in granulation tissue during wound healing. PMID:19483693

  14. Fpga based hardware synthesis for automatic segmentation of retinal blood vessels in diabetic retinopathy images.

    PubMed

    Sivakamasundari, J; Kavitha, G; Sujatha, C M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a disorder that affects the structure of retinal blood vessels due to long-standing diabetes mellitus. Real-Time mass screening system for DR is vital for timely diagnosis and periodic screening to prevent the patient from severe visual loss. Human retinal fundus images are widely used for an automated segmentation of blood vessel and diagnosis of various blood vessel disorders. In this work, an attempt has been made to perform hardware synthesis of Kirsch template based edge detection for segmentation of blood vessels. This method is implemented using LabVIEW software and is synthesized in field programmable gate array board to yield results in real-time application. The segmentation of blood vessels using Kirsch based edge detection is compared with other edge detection methods such as Sobel, Prewitt and Canny. The texture features such as energy, entropy, contrast, mean, homogeneity and structural feature namely ratio of vessel to vessel free area are obtained from the segmented images. The performance of segmentation is analysed in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. It is observed from the results that the Kirsch based edge detection technique segmented the edges of blood vessels better than other edge detection techniques. The ratio of vessel to vessel free area classified the normal and DR affected retinal images more significantly than other texture based features. FPGA based hardware synthesis of Kirsch edge detection method is able to differentiate normal and diseased images with high specificity (93%). This automated segmentation of retinal blood vessels system could be used in computer-assisted diagnosis for diabetic retinopathy screening in real-time application. PMID:25405418

  15. High-resolution ultrasound imaging and noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of blood variables in peripheral blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is being widely used in clinics to obtain diagnostic information non-invasively and in real time. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging platform, Vevo (VisualSonics, Inc.) provides in vivo, real-time images with exceptional resolution (up to 30 microns) using high-frequency transducers (up to 80 MHz). Recently, we built optoacoustic systems for probing radial artery and peripheral veins that can be used for noninvasive monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and concentration of important endogenous and exogenous chromophores (such as ICG). In this work we used the high-resolution ultrasound imaging system Vevo 770 for visualization of the radial artery and peripheral veins and acquired corresponding optoacoustic signals from them using the optoacoustic systems. Analysis of the optoacoustic data with a specially developed algorithm allowed for measurement of blood oxygenation in the blood vessels as well as for continuous, real-time monitoring of arterial and venous blood oxygenation. Our results indicate that: 1) the optoacoustic technique (unlike pure optical approaches and other noninvasive techniques) is capable of accurate peripheral venous oxygenation measurement; and 2) peripheral venous oxygenation is dependent on skin temperature and local hemodynamics. Moreover, we performed for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) a comparative study of optoacoustic arterial oximetry and a standard pulse oximeter in humans and demonstrated superior performance of the optoacoustic arterial oximeter, in particular at low blood flow.

  16. SIMULATION OF DISCRETE BLOOD VESSEL EFFECTS ON THE THERMAL SIGNATURE OF A MELANOMA LESION.

    PubMed

    Kandala, Sri Kamal; Deng, Daxiang; Herman, Cila

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the underlying blood vessel on the transient thermal response of the skin surface with and without a melanoma lesion is studied. A 3D computational model of the layers of the skin tissue with cancerous lesion was developed in COMSOL software package. Heat transfer in the skin layers and the lesion is governed by the Pennes bio-heat equation, while the blood vessel is modeled as fully developed pipe flow with constant heat transfer coefficient. The effect of various pertinent parameters, such as diameter of the blood vessel, lateral location of the blood vessel relative to the lesion, flow velocity of the blood, on the skin surface temperature distribution, have been studied in the paper. The results show significant influence of the underlying blood vessel on the temperature of the skin surface and lesion as well as on the surrounding healthy tissue. Thus, a need for development of evaluation criteria for detection of malignant lesions in the presence of blood vessels is is discussed. PMID:25328916

  17. Blood vessel growth blocker may treat AIDS-related Kaposi’s sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with an AIDS-associated cancer, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), showed improvement after receiving the combination of bevacizumab, a cancer drug that blocks the growth of new blood vessels, and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  18. Automatic Detection of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images for Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Siva Sundhara Raja, D.; Vasuki, S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss in diabetic patients. DR is mainly caused due to the damage of retinal blood vessels in the diabetic patients. It is essential to detect and segment the retinal blood vessels for DR detection and diagnosis, which prevents earlier vision loss in diabetic patients. The computer aided automatic detection and segmentation of blood vessels through the elimination of optic disc (OD) region in retina are proposed in this paper. The OD region is segmented using anisotropic diffusion filter and subsequentially the retinal blood vessels are detected using mathematical binary morphological operations. The proposed methodology is tested on two different publicly available datasets and achieved 93.99% sensitivity, 98.37% specificity, 98.08% accuracy in DRIVE dataset and 93.6% sensitivity, 98.96% specificity, and 95.94% accuracy in STARE dataset, respectively. PMID:25810749

  19. Label-free imaging of blood vessel morphology with capillary resolution using optical microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Several tissue pathologies are correlated with changes in the blood vessel morphology and microcirculation that supplies the tissue. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique that enables acquiring non-invasive three-dimensional images of biological structures with micrometer resolution. Optical microangiography (OMAG) is a method of processing OCT data which enables visualizing the three-dimensional blood vessel morphology within biological tissues. OMAG has high spatial resolution which allows visualizing single capillary vessels, and does not require the use of contrast agents. The intrinsic optical signals backscattered by the moving blood cells inside blood vessels are used as the contrast for which OMAG images are based on. In this paper, we discuss a brief review of the OMAG theory, and present some examples of applications for this technique. PMID:23256081

  20. Temperature evolution in tissues embedded with large blood vessels during photo-thermal heating.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anup; Narasimhan, Arunn; Kahlen, Franz J; Das, Sarit K

    2014-04-01

    During laser-assisted photo-thermal therapy, the temperature of the heated tissue region must rise to the therapeutic value (e.g., 43°C) for complete ablation of the target cells. Large blood vessels (larger than 500 micron in diameter) at or near the irradiated tissues have a considerable impact on the transient temperature distribution in the tissue. In this study, the cooling effects of large blood vessels on temperature distribution in tissues during laser irradiation are predicted using finite element based simulation. A uniform flow is assumed at the entrance and three-dimensional conjugate heat transfer equations in the tissue region and the blood region are simultaneously solved for different vascular models. A volumetric heat source term based on Beer-Lambert law is introduced into the energy equation to account for laser heating. The heating pattern is taken to depend on the absorption and scattering coefficients of the tissue medium. Experiments are also conducted on tissue mimics in the presence and absence of simulated blood vessels to validate the numerical model. The coupled heat transfer between thermally significant blood vessels and their surrounding tissue for three different tissue-vascular networks are analyzed keeping the laser irradiation constant. A surface temperature map is obtained for different vascular models and for the bare tissue (without blood vessels). The transient temperature distribution is seen to differ according to the nature of the vascular network, blood vessel size, flow rate, laser spot size, laser power and tissue blood perfusion rate. The simulations suggest that the blood flow through large blood vessels in the vicinity of the photothermally heated tissue can lead to inefficient heating of the target. PMID:24679976

  1. [The surgical anatomy of the rectal and anal blood vessels].

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Klosterhalfen, B

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined 40 rectum specimens by angiography, preparation and staining methods to show the exact arterial vessel supply of the rectum and tried to find out whether a reason could be found for the relatively high rate of suture leaks after low resection of the rectum or not. The insertion of the levator muscle is a sort of vessel divide: caudal to the levator muscle the inferior rectal artery is the main supplying vessel, cranially the superior rectal artery. Here a vessel deficient-area always remains in the dorso-caudal sector of the rectal ampulla which cannot be compensated by another rectum-supplying vessel. The middle rectal artery supplies the rectum accessorily. The results are able to explain why the suture leaks are constantly observed in the dorso-caudal ampulla after profound anterior resection of the rectum. Furthermore the results account for the good healing tendency of coloanal anastomoses: the inferior rectal artery amply supplies the anal canal; there is not the same vessel-deficient area as found cranial to the levator muscle. PMID:3268710

  2. Hybrid Features and Mediods Classification based Robust Segmentation of Blood Vessels.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Amna; Akram, M Usman; Khalid, Shehzad; Waheed, Zahra; Khan, Muazzam A; Shaukat, Arslan

    2015-10-01

    Retinal blood vessels are the source to provide oxygen and nutrition to retina and any change in the normal structure may lead to different retinal abnormalities. Automated detection of vascular structure is very important while designing a computer aided diagnostic system for retinal diseases. Most popular methods for vessel segmentation are based on matched filters and Gabor wavelets which give good response against blood vessels. One major drawback in these techniques is that they also give strong response for lesion (exudates, hemorrhages) boundaries which give rise to false vessels. These false vessels may lead to incorrect detection of vascular changes. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid feature set along with new classification technique for accurate detection of blood vessels. The main motivation is to lower the false positives especially from retinal images with severe disease level. A novel region based hybrid feature set is presented for proper discrimination between true and false vessels. A new modified m-mediods based classification is also presented which uses most discriminating features to categorize vessel regions into true and false vessels. The evaluation of proposed system is done thoroughly on publicly available databases along with a locally gathered database with images of advanced level of retinal diseases. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed system as compared to existing state of the art techniques. PMID:26306876

  3. Engineering a Blood Vessel Network Module for Body-on-a-Chip Applications.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyunryul; Oh, Soojung; Lee, Hyun Jae; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Hae Kwang; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-06-01

    The blood circulatory system links all organs from one to another to support and maintain each organ's functions consistently. Therefore, blood vessels have been considered as a vital unit. Engineering perfusable functional blood vessels in vitro has been challenging due to difficulties in designing the connection between rigid macroscale tubes and fragile microscale ones. Here, we propose a generalizable method to engineer a "long" perfusable blood vessel network. To form millimeter-scale vessels, fibroblasts were co-cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in close proximity. In contrast to previous works, in which all cells were permanently placed within the device, we developed a novel method to culture paracrine factor secreting fibroblasts on an O-ring-shaped guide that can be transferred in and out. This approach affords flexibility in co-culture, where the effects of secreted factors can be decoupled. Using this, blood vessels with length up to 2 mm were successfully produced in a reproducible manner (>90%). Because the vessels form a perfusable network within the channel, simple links to inlets and outlets of the device allowed connections to the outside world. The robust and reproducible formation of in vitro engineered vessels can be used as a module to link various organ components as parts of future body-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25532526

  4. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions.

  5. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchenko, V V; Kuznetsov, Yu L; Meglinski, I V

    2013-07-31

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions. (laser applications in biology and medicine)

  6. Development of blood vessel search system using near-infrared light for laparoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, K.; Nakamachi, E.; Morita, Y.; Hagiwara, A.

    2013-09-01

    Our objective of this study is to develop a miniature and high accuracy automatic 3D blood vessel searching system, which will be introduced in the laparoscopic operation with the minimally invasive surgery. Now, the conventional optical system used in the laparoscopic surgery has many difficulties of blood vessel imaging and detection, because the peripheral bio-tissue located around the blood vessel disturbs the light wave propagation, disperses and refracts. Consequently, only unclear image is obtained. We develop a new blood vessel detecting system by using Near-Infrared (NIR) light, two CMOS camera modules and a comprehensive image processing technique, which is implemented in the laparoscope pipe with 25mm in diameter. We adopt the stereo method for the searching system to determine 3D blood vessel location. The blood vessel visualization system adopts hemoglobin's absorption characteristics of the NIR light, which has high permeability for the bio-tissue and absorbency for the hemoglobin. A sharpening process is employed to improve the image quality of original ones, through the LoG filter and the un-sharp-mask processing. 2D location of the blood vessel is calculated from luminance distribution of the image and its depth is calculated by the stereo method. A validity of our blood vessel visualization and 3D detecting system was examined through the comparison with the imaging and detecting the results of organization phantoms, which embedded at known depths under the surface. Experimental results of depth obtained by our detecting system showed good agreements with the given depths, and the availability of this system is confirmed.

  7. Growth and Remodeling in Blood Vessels Studied In Vivo With Fractal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.

    2003-01-01

    Every cell in the human body must reside in close proximity to a blood vessel (within approximately 200 mm) because blood vessels provide the oxygen, metabolite, and fluid exchanges required for cellular existence. The growth and remodeling of blood vessels are required to support the normal physiology of embryonic development, reproductive biology, wound healing and adaptive remodeling to exercise, as well as abnormal tissue change in diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Cardiovascular and hemodynamic (blood flow dynamics) alterations experienced by astronauts during long-term spaceflight, including orthostatic intolerance, fluid shifts in the body, and reduced numbers of red (erythrocyte) and white (immune) blood cells, are identified as risk factors of very high priority in the NASA task force report on risk reduction for human spaceflight, the "Critical Path Roadmap."

  8. Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Giglio, Nicholas; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-05-01

    Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578±154, 530±171, and 426±174 mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0±0.4 mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (>4 mm outer diameter).

  9. The extracellular matrix and blood vessel formation: not just a scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, John M; Simons, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The extracellular matrix plays a number of important roles, among them providing structural support and information to cellular structures such as blood vessels imbedded within it. As more complex organisms have evolved, the matrix ability to direct signalling towards the vasculature and remodel in response to signalling from the vasculature has assumed progressively greater importance. This review will focus on the molecules of the extracellular matrix, specifically relating to vessel formation and their ability to signal to the surrounding cells to initiate or terminate processes involved in blood vessel formation. PMID:17488472

  10. Temperature field formed inside a blood vessel under the action of pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, L. G.; Zheltov, G. I.

    2007-10-01

    A model that simulates the dynamics of the temperature field formed by pulsed laser radiation inside a biological structure containing blood vessels is developed. The threshold conditions of denaturation of vessel walls and subsequent blocking the blood flow are determined based on the thermochemical concept. The possibility of application of a pulsed modulation of the radiation for increasing the homogeneity of coagulation of vessel walls and reducing the risk of damage of tissues caused by the phase transition is considered. The modulation frequency range of radiation that ensures the realization of this effect is determined.

  11. Application of the Carreau viscosity model to the oscillatory flow in blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakova, Sonia; Kutev, Nikolay; Radev, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    When studying the oscillatory flow in different types of blood vessels it is very important to know what type of the blood viscosity model has to be used. In general the blood viscosity is defined as a shear-thinning liquid, for which there exist different shear-dependent models, for example the Carreau model, which represents the viscosity as a non-linear function of the shear-rate. In some cases, however, the blood viscosity could be regarded as constant, i.e., the blood is treated as Newtonian fluid. The aim of the present work is to show theoretically and numerically some approximate limits of the Newtonian model application, when the blood vessel is assumed as a 2D straight tube. The obtained results are in agreement with other authors' numerical results based on similar blood viscosity models.

  12. Label free in vivo laser speckle imaging of blood and lymph vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Meglinski, Igor; Harmelin, Alon

    2012-05-01

    The peripheral lymphatic vascular system is a part of the immune body system comprising a complex network of lymph vessels and nodes that are flowing lymph toward the heart. Traditionally the imaging of lymphatic vessels is based on the conventional imaging modalities utilizing contrast fluorescence materials. Given the important role of the lymphatic system there is a critical need for the development of noninvasive imaging technologies for functional quantitative diagnosis of the lymph vessels and lymph flow without using foreign chemicals. We report a label free methodology for noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood and lymph vessels, using long-exposure laser speckle imaging approach. This approach entails great promise in the noninvasive studies of tissues blood and lymph vessels distribution in vivo.

  13. Tissue Engineering of Blood Vessels: Functional Requirements, Progress, and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Brewster, Luke P.; Caves, Jeffrey M.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular disease results in the decreased utility and decreased availability of autologus vascular tissue for small diameter (< 6 mm) vessel replacements. While synthetic polymer alternatives to date have failed to meet the performance of autogenous conduits, tissue-engineered replacement vessels represent an ideal solution to this clinical problem. Ongoing progress requires combined approaches from biomaterials science, cell biology, and translational medicine to develop feasible solutions with the requisite mechanical support, a non-fouling surface for blood flow, and tissue regeneration. Over the past two decades interest in blood vessel tissue engineering has soared on a global scale, resulting in the first clinical implants of multiple technologies, steady progress with several other systems, and critical lessons-learned. This review will highlight the current inadequacies of autologus and synthetic grafts, the engineering requirements for implantation of tissue-engineered grafts, and the current status of tissue-engineered blood vessel research. PMID:23181145

  14. Determination of the mechanical properties of the different layers of blood vessels in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Y C; Liu, S Q

    1995-01-01

    The structure and materials of the blood vessel wall are layered. This article presents the principle of a method to determine the mechanical properties of the different layers in vivo. In vivo measurement begets in vivo data and avoids pitfalls of in vitro tests of dissected specimens. With the proposed method, we can measure vessels of diameters 100 microns and up and obtain data on vascular smooth muscles and adventitia. To derive the full constitutive equations, one must first determine the zero-stress state, obtain the morphometric data on the thicknesses of the layers, and make mechanical measurements in the neighborhood of the zero-stress state. Then eight small perturbation experiments are done on earth blood vessel in vivo to determine eight incremental elastic moduli of the two layers of the blood vessel wall. The calculation requires the morphometric data and the location of the neutral axis. The experiments are simple, the interpretation is definitive, but the analysis is somewhat sophisticated. The method will yield results that are needed to assess the stress and strain in the tissues of the blood vessel. The subject is important because blood vessels remodel themselves significantly and rapidly when their stress and strain deviate from their homeostatic values, and because cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, contraction, and locomotion depend on stress and strain in the tissue. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7892241

  15. Relevance of Blood Vessel Networks in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yi; Lin, Shengmao; Gu, Linxia

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral vasculature is a complex network that circulates blood through the brain. However, the role of this networking effect in brain dynamics has seldom been inspected. This work is to study the effects of blood vessel networks on dynamic responses of the brain under blast loading. Voronoi tessellations were implemented to represent the network of blood vessels in the brain. The brain dynamics in terms of maximum principal strain (MPS), shear strain (SS), and intracranial pressure (ICP) were monitored and compared. Results show that blood vessel networks significantly affected brain responses. The increased MPS and SS were observed within the brain embedded with vessel networks, which did not exist in the case without blood vessel networks. It is interesting to observe that the alternation of the ICP response was minimal. Moreover, the vessel diameter and density also affected brain dynamics in both MPS and SS measures. This work sheds light on the role of cerebral vasculature in blast-induced traumatic brain injury. PMID:26495036

  16. Proteomic Profiling of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessel Walls Constructed by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Guo, Fangfang; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Yun; Xiao, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can differentiate into smooth muscle cells and have been engineered into elastic small diameter blood vessel walls in vitro. However, the mechanisms involved in the development of three-dimensional (3D) vascular tissue remain poorly understood. The present study analyzed protein expression profiles of engineered blood vessel walls constructed by human ASCs using methods of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). These results were compared to normal arterial walls. A total of 1701±15 and 1265±26 protein spots from normal and engineered blood vessel wall extractions were detected by 2DE, respectively. A total of 20 spots with at least 2.0-fold changes in expression were identified, and 38 differently expressed proteins were identified by 2D electrophoresis and ion trap MS. These proteins were classified into seven functional categories: cellular organization, energy, signaling pathway, enzyme, anchored protein, cell apoptosis/defense, and others. These results demonstrated that 2DE, followed by ion trap MS, could be successfully utilized to characterize the proteome of vascular tissue, including tissue-engineered vessels. The method could also be employed to achieve a better understanding of differentiated smooth muscle protein expression in vitro. These results provide a basis for comparative studies of protein expression in vascular smooth muscles of different origin and could provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of action needed for constructing blood vessels that exhibit properties consistent with normal blood vessels. PMID:22963350

  17. The cortical representation of shadows cast by retinal blood vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J C; Adams, D L

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: We inquired whether the representation of angioscotomas could be detected in the primary (striate) visual cortex. METHODS: In 12 normal squirrel monkeys, the ocular fundi were photographed and retinal vascular landmarks were projected onto a tangent screen for calibration. Each animal then underwent monocular enucleation under general anesthesia. Animals were perfused after 8 to 10 days, and flat-mounted sections of striate cortex were processed for the metabolic enzyme cytochrome oxidase (CO). RESULTS: In each animal, the cortical region corresponding to the blind spot appeared as a 3 x 2 mm oval in the CO staining pattern. It stood out because it received input from only 1 eye. In 9 of 12 animals, the representation of the major retinal vessels was also visible, for the same reason. In our best examples, CO sections showed about 10 thin lines radiating from the blind spot representation. Some could be traced for 15 mm, all the way to the vertical meridian. Vessels only 12 minutes of arc in diameter were represented in the cortex. Each angioscotoma representation in the cortex could be matched with its corresponding retinal vessel in the fundus. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that (1) the visual field map in layer IVc is more precise than indicated by physiological studies, and (2) visual experience must refine the final pattern of geniculocortical projections, given that the retinal vessels can produce a shadow only after birth. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 12 PMID:11190031

  18. Strain distribution in small blood vessels with zero-stress state taken into consideration.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Liu, S Q

    1992-02-01

    The active and passive deformation of a blood vessel is related to the stress in it. Any analysis of stress and strain must begin with the zero-stress state. Recent reports on large blood vessels such as the aorta, pulmonary arteries, and vena cava have shown that, at zero-stress state, blood vessels are not tubes, but opens sectors. This report presents data on the zero-stress state of small blood vessels with lumen diameters down to approximately 50 microns. Zero-stress state of a vessel was obtained by cutting the vessel into rings and then the rings into sectors; each sector is characterized by an opening angle, alpha. In rat ileal and plantar arterioles, the opening angles are in the order of 100-250 degrees; those in the venules are in the order of 50-100 degrees. The effect of norepinephrine on the opening angle alpha is minor; it decreases alpha of the superior mesenteric artery, and increases alpha of the ileocecocolic and ileal arteries. EDTA has little effect on alpha of arteries greater than 100 microns in diameter, but decreases alpha of arteries less than 100 microns. The physiological meaning of the opening angle is demonstrated in terms of the residual strains in a vessel at the no-load state and homeostatic strains at normal blood pressure. The strains in real vessels are compared with those in hypothetical vessels having an opening angle of zero. It is shown that ignoring the opening angle will cause a large error in strain evaluation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1539714

  19. HIFU procedures at moderate intensities—effect of large blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, P.; Myers, M. R.; Banerjee, R. K.

    2007-07-01

    A three-dimensional computational model is presented for studying the efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) procedures targeted near large blood vessels. The analysis applies to procedures performed at intensities below the threshold for cavitation, boiling and highly nonlinear propagation, but high enough to increase tissue temperature a few degrees per second. The model is based upon the linearized KZK equation and the bioheat equation in tissue. In the blood vessel the momentum and energy equations are satisfied. The model is first validated in a tissue phantom, to verify the absence of bubble formation and nonlinear effects. Temperature rise and lesion-volume calculations are then shown for different beam locations and orientations relative to a large vessel. Both single and multiple ablations are considered. Results show that when the vessel is located within about a beam width (few mm) of the ultrasound beam, significant reduction in lesion volume is observed due to blood flow. However, for gaps larger than a beam width, blood flow has no major effect on the lesion formation. Under the clinically representative conditions considered, the lesion volume is reduced about 40% (relative to the no-flow case) when the beam is parallel to the blood vessel, compared to about 20% for a perpendicular orientation. Procedures involving multiple ablation sites are affected less by blood flow than single ablations. The model also suggests that optimally focused transducers can generate lesions that are significantly larger (>2 times) than the ones produced by highly focused beams.

  20. Signaling Required for Blood Vessel Maintenance: Molecular Basis and Pathological Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    As our understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to vascular formation increases, vessel maintenance including stabilization of new vessels and prevention of vessel regression began to be considered as an active process that requires specific cellular signaling. While signaling pathways such as VEGF, FGF, and angiopoietin-Tie2 are important for endothelial cell survival and junction stabilization, PDGF and TGF-? signaling modify mural cell (vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes) functions, thus they fortify vessel integrity. Breakdown of these signaling systems results in pathological hyperpermeability and/or genetic vascular abnormalities such as vascular malformations, ultimately progressing to hemorrhage and edema. Hence, blood vessel maintenance is fundamental to controlling vascular homeostasis and tissue functions. This paper discusses signaling pathways essential for vascular maintenance and clinical conditions caused by deterioration of vessel integrity. PMID:22187650

  1. Tracing retinal blood vessels by matrix-forest theorem of directed graphs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; De, Jaydeep; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Feng; Li, Huiqi

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to trace retinal blood vessel trees in fundus images. This task is far from being trivial as the crossover of vessels are commonly encountered in image-based vessel networks. Meanwhile it is often crucial to separate the vessel tree structures in applications such as diabetic retinopathy analysis. In this work, a novel directed graph based approach is proposed to cast the task as label propagation over directed graphs, such that the graph is to be partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the vessel trees is traced and separated from the rest of the vessel network. Then the tracing problem is addressed by making novel usage of the matrix-forest theorem in algebraic graph theory. Empirical experiments on synthetic as well as publicly available fundus image datasets demonstrate the applicability of our approach. PMID:25333171

  2. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a pulsed laser diode.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Roy G M; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G

    2006-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that is based on the detection of acoustic waves generated by absorption of pulsed light by tissue chromophores such as hemoglobin in blood. For this technique, usually large and costly Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers are used. These lasers provide a pulse energy of at least several milliJoules. In search of alternative light sources, we investigated the use of a small and compact pulsed laser diode to image blood vessels. We proved that a pulsed laser diode can be applied for imaging blood vessels in vivo. PMID:16721626

  3. Imaginary part-based correlation mapping optical coherence tomography for imaging of blood vessels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoliang; Shi, Weisong; Gao, Wanrong

    2015-11-01

    We present an imaginary part-based correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (IMcmOCT) technique for in vivo blood vessels imaging. In the conventional correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (cmOCT) method, two adjacent frames of intensity-based structural images are correlated to extract blood flow information and the size of correlation window has to be increased to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of microcirculation maps, which may cause image blur and miss the small blood vessels. In the IMcmOCT method, the imaginary part of a depth-resolved complex analytic signal in two adjacent B-scans is correlated to reconstruct microcirculation maps. Both phantom and in vivo experiments were implemented to demonstrate that the proposed method can provide improved sensitivity for extracting blood flow information in small vessels. PMID:26618523

  4. Imaginary part-based correlation mapping optical coherence tomography for imaging of blood vessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaoliang; Shi, Weisong; Gao, Wanrong

    2015-11-01

    We present an imaginary part-based correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (IMcmOCT) technique for in vivo blood vessels imaging. In the conventional correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (cmOCT) method, two adjacent frames of intensity-based structural images are correlated to extract blood flow information and the size of correlation window has to be increased to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of microcirculation maps, which may cause image blur and miss the small blood vessels. In the IMcmOCT method, the imaginary part of a depth-resolved complex analytic signal in two adjacent B-scans is correlated to reconstruct microcirculation maps. Both phantom and in vivo experiments were implemented to demonstrate that the proposed method can provide improved sensitivity for extracting blood flow information in small vessels.

  5. Evaluation of the Contribution of Signals Originating from Large Blood Vessels to Signals of Functionally Specific Brain Areas

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jun-Young; Sung, Yul-Wan; Ogawa, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is known to play a pivotal role in face processing. The FFA is located in the ventral region, at the base of the brain, through which large blood vessels run. The location of the FFA via functional MRI (fMRI) may be influenced by these large blood vessels. Responses of large blood vessels may not exactly correspond to neuronal activity in a target area, because they may be diluted and influenced by inflow effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of large blood vessels in the FFA, that is, whether the FFA includes large blood vessels and/or whether inflow signals contribute to fMRI signals of the FFA. For this purpose, we used susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequences to visualize large blood vessels and dual-echo gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) to measure inflow effects. These results showed that the location and response signals of the FFA were not influenced by large blood vessels or inflow effects, although large blood vessels were located near the FFA. Therefore, the data from the FFA obtained by individual analysis were robust to large blood vessels but leaving a warning that the data obtained by group analysis may be prone to large blood vessels. PMID:26413511

  6. Evaluation of the Contribution of Signals Originating from Large Blood Vessels to Signals of Functionally Specific Brain Areas.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun-Young; Sung, Yul-Wan; Ogawa, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is known to play a pivotal role in face processing. The FFA is located in the ventral region, at the base of the brain, through which large blood vessels run. The location of the FFA via functional MRI (fMRI) may be influenced by these large blood vessels. Responses of large blood vessels may not exactly correspond to neuronal activity in a target area, because they may be diluted and influenced by inflow effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of large blood vessels in the FFA, that is, whether the FFA includes large blood vessels and/or whether inflow signals contribute to fMRI signals of the FFA. For this purpose, we used susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequences to visualize large blood vessels and dual-echo gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) to measure inflow effects. These results showed that the location and response signals of the FFA were not influenced by large blood vessels or inflow effects, although large blood vessels were located near the FFA. Therefore, the data from the FFA obtained by individual analysis were robust to large blood vessels but leaving a warning that the data obtained by group analysis may be prone to large blood vessels. PMID:26413511

  7. Visualization of deep blood vessels in speckle imaging using homogeneity measurement of the co-occurrence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Cruz, Jose A.; Perez-Corona, Cruz E.; Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben; Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio Cesar

    2015-08-01

    The blood flow velocity optical monitoring techniques, such as laser speckle velocimetry, are attractive due its noninvasive character, but they are limited to superficial blood vessels. The visualization of deep blood vessel is difficult because of the highly scattering coefficient of the biological tissue. There are some techniques that allow the visualization of deep blood vessels, for example: optical clearing, Magnetomotive Laser Speckle Imaging and Pulsed Photo-Thermal Radiometry, unfortunately these techniques use an external agent to improve the visualization of blood vessels. In this work we improve the visualization and location of in-vitro deep blood vessels by speckle image processing without an external agents. The proposed methodology is based in a homogeneity measurement of the co-occurrence matrix by the direct processing of the speckle image. Our technique is able to determine the edges of a deep blood vessel and therefore improves its visualization.

  8. An experimental system for the study of ultrasound exposure of isolated blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarczyk, Anna; Rivens, Ian; van Bavel, E.; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; ter Haar, Gail

    2013-04-01

    An experimental system designed for the study of the effects of diagnostic or therapeutic ultrasound exposure on isolated blood vessels in the presence or absence of intraluminal contrast agent is described. The system comprised several components. A microscope was used to monitor vessel size (and thus vessel functionality), and potential leakage of intraluminal 70 kDa FITC-dextran fluorescence marker. A vessel chamber allowed the mounting of an isolated vessel whilst maintaining its viability, with pressure regulation for the control of intraluminal pressure and induction of flow for the infusion of contrast microbubbles. A fibre-optic hydrophone sensor mounted on the vessel chamber using a micromanipulator allowed pre-exposure targeting of the vessel to within 150 µm, and monitoring of acoustic cavitation emissions during exposures. Acoustic cavitation was also detected using changes in the ultrasound drive voltage and by detection of audible emissions using a submerged microphone. The suitability of this system for studying effects in the isolated vessel model has been demonstrated using a pilot study of 6 sham exposed and 18 high intensity focused ultrasound exposed vessels, with or without intraluminal contrast agent (SonoVue) within the vessels.

  9. Aging changes in the heart and blood vessels

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lungs to receive oxygen and get rid of carbon dioxide. The left side pumps oxygen-rich blood to ... oxygen and nutrients to the tissues, and receives carbon dioxide and wastes back from the tissues. Then, the ...

  10. Blood vessel extraction and optic disc removal using curvelet transform and kernel fuzzy c-means.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sudeshna Sil; Maity, Santi P

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes an automatic blood vessel extraction method on retinal images using matched filtering in an integrated system design platform that involves curvelet transform and kernel based fuzzy c-means. Since curvelet transform represents the lines, the edges and the curvatures very well and in compact form (by less number of coefficients) compared to other multi-resolution techniques, this paper uses curvelet transform for enhancement of the retinal vasculature. Matched filtering is then used to intensify the blood vessels' response which is further employed by kernel based fuzzy c-means algorithm that extracts the vessel silhouette from the background through non-linear mapping. For pathological images, in addition to matched filtering, Laplacian of Gaussian filter is also employed to distinguish the step and the ramp like signal from that of vessel structure. To test the efficacy of the proposed method, the algorithm has also been applied to images in presence of additive white Gaussian noise where the curvelet transform has been used for image denoising. Performance is evaluated on publicly available DRIVE, STARE and DIARETDB1 databases and is compared with the large number of existing blood vessel extraction methodologies. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method is very much efficient in detecting the long and the thick as well as the short and the thin vessels with an average accuracy of 96.16% for the DRIVE and 97.35% for the STARE database wherein the existing methods fail to extract the tiny and the thin vessels. PMID:26848729

  11. Segmentation of the blood vessels and optic disk in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Ana; Kaba, Djibril; Li, Yongmin; Liu, Xiaohui

    2014-11-01

    Retinal image analysis is increasingly prominent as a nonintrusive diagnosis method in modern ophthalmology. In this paper, we present a novel method to segment blood vessels and optic disk in the fundus retinal images. The method could be used to support nonintrusive diagnosis in modern ophthalmology since the morphology of the blood vessel and the optic disk is an important indicator for diseases like diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and hypertension. Our method takes as first step the extraction of the retina vascular tree using the graph cut technique. The blood vessel information is then used to estimate the location of the optic disk. The optic disk segmentation is performed using two alternative methods. The Markov random field (MRF) image reconstruction method segments the optic disk by removing vessels from the optic disk region, and the compensation factor method segments the optic disk using the prior local intensity knowledge of the vessels. The proposed method is tested on three public datasets, DIARETDB1, DRIVE, and STARE. The results and comparison with alternative methods show that our method achieved exceptional performance in segmenting the blood vessel and optic disk. PMID:25265617

  12. Tissue engineering of blood vessels with endothelial cells differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Gan; Tsung, Hsiao Chien; Wu, Chun Fang; Liu, Xiao Yin; Wang, Xiao Yun; Liu, Wei; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yi Lin

    2003-10-01

    Endothelial cells (TEC3 cells) derived from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were used as seed cells to construct blood vessels. Tissue engineered blood vessels were made by seeding 8 106 smooth muscle cells (SMCs) obtained from rabbit arteries onto a sheet of nonwoven polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers, which was used as a biodegradable polymer scaffold. After being cultured in DMEM medium for 7 days in vitro, SMCs grew well on the PGA fibers, and the cell-PGA sheet was then wrapped around a silicon tube, and implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. After 6~8 weeks, the silicon tube was replaced with another silicon tube in smaller diameter, and then the TEC3 cells (endothelial cells differentiated from mouse ES cells) were injected inside the engineered vessel tube as the test group. In the control group only culture medium was injected. Five days later, the engineered vessels were harvested for gross observation, histological and immunohistochemical analysis. The preliminary results demonstrated that the SMC-PGA construct could form a tubular structure in 6~8 weeks and PGA fibers were completely degraded. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the newly formed tissue revealed a typical blood vessel structure, including a lining of endothelial cells (ECs) on the lumimal surface and the presence of SMC and collagen in the wall. No EC lining was found in the tubes of control group. Therefore, the ECs differentiated from mouse ES cells can serve as seed cells for endothelium lining in tissue engineered blood vessels. PMID:14672556

  13. Blood vessel adaptation to gravity in a semi-arboreal snake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conklin, D. J.; Lillywhite, H. B.; Olson, K. R.; Ballard, R. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of vasoactive agonists on systemic blood vessels were examined with respect to anatomical location and gravity acclimation in the semi-arboreal snake, Elaphe Obsoleta. Major blood vessels were reactive to putative neurotransmitters, hormones or local factors in vessel specific patterns. Catecholamines, adenosine triphosphate, histamine and high potassium (80 mM) stimulated significantly greater tension per unit vessel mass in posterior than anterior arteries. Anterior vessels were significantly more sensitive to catecholamines than midbody and posterior vessels. Angiotensin II stimulated significantly greater tension in carotid artery than in midbody and posterior dorsal aorta. Arginine vasotocin strongly contracted the left and right aortic arches and anterior dorsal aorta. Veins were strongly contracted by catecholamines, high potassium and angiotensin II, but less so by adenosine triphosphate, arginine vasotocin and histamine. Precontracted vessel were relaxed by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, but not by atrial natriuretic peptide or bradykinin. Chronic exposure of snakes to intermittent hypergravity stress ( + 1.5 Gz at tail) did not affect the majority of vessel responses. These data demonstrate that in vitro tension correlates with that catecholamines, as well as other agonists, are important in mediating vascular responses to gravitational stresses in snakes.

  14. Extracellular matrix molecules influence innervation density in rat cerebral blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Gavazzi, I; Boyle, K S; Cowen, T

    1996-09-23

    We have investigated the contribution of the acellular component (i.e., the extracellular matrix, or ECM) in determining the innervation density of peripheral target tissue, and the possible involvement of ECM molecules in age-related axonal atrophy. We addressed this issue using cerebral blood vessels where both the overall density and the density of sympathetic innervation decrease by 50% in aged rats. In order to study the capacity of the ECM to influence pattern and density of innervation, cerebral blood vessels from young (6 weeks) and old (24 months) rats were repeatedly freeze-thawed to kill the cellular component of the vessel wall before transplantation in oculo into young host rats. After 4 weeks, the nature and degree of reinnervation of transplants by host nerves was studied by quantitative immunohistochemistry using PGP9.5 (a general neuronal marker) or CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide, a sensory marker), or catecholamine histochemistry using the glyoxylic acid technique to visualise noradrenergic sympathetic nerves. The density of reinnervation was measured by computerized image analysis. The PGP-immunoreactive reinnervation on old transplanted cerebral blood vessels was significantly less dense compared to young ones. However, nerve density on both young and old transplants was lower than on control, ex vivo blood vessels. CGRP-positive nerves on both young and old transplants were sparse, but similar to control tissues, whereas catecholamine-containing nerves were very sparse on all transplants, and significantly less than on control blood vessels. These results suggest that alterations occur in the aged ECM, that make it less receptive to innervation. However, they also indicate that, along with the ECM, factors produced by the cellular components of the blood vessel wall are essential, at least for the maintenance of the sympathetic innervation. PMID:8896822

  15. Transdermal drug targeting and functional imaging of tumor blood vessels in the mouse auricle.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Hannes; Komljenovic, Dorde; Hecker, Markus; Korff, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Subcutaneously growing tumors are widely utilized to study tumor angiogenesis and the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapies in mice. To additionally assess functional and morphologic alterations of the vasculature in the periphery of a growing tumor, we exploited the easily accessible and hierarchically organized vasculature of the mouse auricle. By site-specific subcutaneous implantation of a defined preformed mouse B16/F0 melanoma aggregate, a solid tumor nodule developed within 14 d. Growth of the tumor nodule was accompanied by a 4-fold increase in its perfusion as well as a 2- to 4-fold elevated diameter and perfusion of peripheral blood vessels that had connected to the tumor capillary microvasculature. By transdermal application of the anticancer drug bortezomib, tumor growth was significantly diminished by about 50% without provoking side effects. Moreover, perfusion and tumor microvessel diameter as well as growth and perfusion of arterial or venous blood vessels supplying or draining the tumor microvasculature were decreased under these conditions by up to 80%. Collectively, we observed that the progressive tumor growth is accompanied by the enlargement of supplying and draining extratumoral blood vessels. This process was effectively suppressed by bortezomib, thereby restricting the perfusion capacity of both extra and intratumoral blood vessels.-Schröder, H., Komljenovic, D., Hecker, M., Korff, T. Transdermal drug targeting and functional imaging of tumor blood vessels in the mouse auricle. PMID:26546130

  16. MSC Frequency Correlates with Blood Vessel Density in Equine Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Theodore T.; Harman, Robert J.; Lennon, Donald P.

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that have the capacity to develop into different mature mesenchymal cell types. They were originally isolated from bone marrow, but MSC-like cells have also been isolated from other tissues. The common feature of all of these tissues is that they all house blood vessels. It is, thus, possible that MSCs are associated with perivascular locations. The objective of this work was to test the hypothesis that MSCs are associated with blood vessels by verifying if MSC frequency positively correlates with blood vessel density. To this end, samples from highly and poorly vascularized adipose tissue sites of two equine donors were collected and processed for histology and cell isolation. MSC frequency in these samples was estimated by means of CFU-F assays, which were performed under MSC conditions. Culture-adherent cells from equine adipose tissue and bone marrow were culture expanded, tested for differentiation into mesenchymal cell types in vitro, and implanted in vivo in porous ceramic vehicles to assess their osteogenic capacity, using human MSCs and brain pericytes as controls. The differentiation assays showed a difference between adipose tissue–derived cells as compared to equine bone marrow MSCs. While differences in CFU-F frequencies between both donors were evident, the CFU-F numbers correlated directly with blood vessel densities (r2?=?0.86). We consider these preliminary data as further evidence linking MSCs to blood vessels. PMID:18847356

  17. Mathematical modelling for trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shashi; Katiyar, V. K.; Singh, Uaday

    2015-04-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of a cluster of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel for the application of magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a blood vessel upstream from a malignant tissue and are captured at the tumour site with help of an applied magnetic field. The applied field is produced by a rare earth cylindrical magnet positioned outside the body. All forces expected to significantly affect the transport of nanoparticles were incorporated, including magnetization force, drag force and buoyancy force. The results show that particles are slow down and captured under the influence of magnetic force, which is responsible to attract the magnetic particles towards the magnet. It is optimized that all particles are captured either before or at the centre of the magnet (z≤0) when blood vessel is very close proximity to the magnet (d=2.5 cm). However, as the distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) increases (above 4.5 cm), the magnetic nanoparticles particles become free and they flow away down the blood vessel. Further, the present model results are validated by the simulations performed using the finite element based COMSOL software.

  18. Vessel Labeling in Combined Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy and Optical Coherence Tomography Images: Criteria for Blood Vessel Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Motte, Jeremias; Alten, Florian; Ewering, Carina; Osada, Nani; Kadas, Ella M.; Brandt, Alexander U.; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Clemens, Christoph R.; Eter, Nicole; Paul, Friedemann; Marziniak, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The diagnostic potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in neurological diseases is intensively discussed. Besides the sectional view of the retina, modern OCT scanners produce a simultaneous top-view confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) image including the option to evaluate retinal vessels. A correct discrimination between arteries and veins (labeling) is vital for detecting vascular differences between healthy subjects and patients. Up to now, criteria for labeling (cSLO) images generated by OCT scanners do not exist. Objective This study reviewed labeling criteria originally developed for color fundus photography (CFP) images. Methods The criteria were modified to reflect the cSLO technique, followed by development of a protocol for labeling blood vessels. These criteria were based on main aspects such as central light reflex, brightness, and vessel thickness, as well as on some additional criteria such as vascular crossing patterns and the context of the vessel tree. Results and Conclusion They demonstrated excellent inter-rater agreement and validity, which seems to indicate that labeling of images might no longer require more than one rater. This algorithm extends the diagnostic possibilities offered by OCT investigations. PMID:25203135

  19. A novel scheme for nanoparticle steering in blood vessels using a functionalized magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Mohammad Dadkhah; Yoon, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic drug targeting is a drug delivery approach in which therapeutic magnetizable particles are injected, generally into blood vessels, and magnets are then used to guide and concentrate them in the diseased target organ. Although many analytical, simulation, and experimental studies on capturing schemes for drug targeting have been conducted, there are few studies on delivering the nanoparticles to the target region. Furthermore, the sticking phenomenon of particles to vessels walls near the injection point, and far from the target region, has not been addressed sufficiently. In this paper, the sticking issue and its relationship to nanoparticle steering are investigated in detail using numerical simulations. For wide ranges of blood vessel size, blood velocity, particle size, and applied magnetic field, three coefficient numbers are uniquely generalized: vessel elongation, normal exit time, and force rate. With respect these new parameters, we investigated particle distribution trends for a Y-shaped channel and computed ratios of correctly guided particles and particles remaining in the vessel. We found that the sticking of particles to vessels occurred because of low blood flow velocity near the vessel walls, which is the main reason for low targeting efficiency when using a constant magnetic gradient. To reduce the sticking ratio of nanoparticles, we propose a novel field function scheme that uses a simple time-varying function to separate the particles from the walls and guide them to the target point. The capabilities of the proposed scheme were examined by several simulations of both Y-shaped channels and realistic three-dimensional (3-D) model channels extracted from brain vessels. The results showed a significant decrease in particle adherence to walls during the delivery stage and confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed magnetic field function method for steering nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. PMID:25163053

  20. Lattice Boltzmann method for simulating the viscous flow in large distensible blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Haiping; Wang, Zuowei; Lin, Zhifang; Liu, Muren

    2002-05-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method for simulating the viscous flow in large distensible blood vessels is presented by introducing a boundary condition for elastic and moving boundaries. The mass conservation for the boundary condition is tested in detail. The viscous flow in elastic vessels is simulated with a pressure-radius relationship similar to that of the pulmonary blood vessels. The numerical results for steady flow agree with the analytical prediction to very high accuracy, and the simulation results for pulsatile flow are comparable with those of the aortic flows observed experimentally. The model is expected to find many applications for studying blood flows in large distensible arteries, especially in those suffering from atherosclerosis, stenosis, aneurysm, etc.

  1. Combining cell sheet technology and electrospun scaffolding for engineered tubular, aligned, and contractile blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Rayatpisheh, Shahrzad; Heath, Daniel E; Shakouri, Amir; Rujitanaroj, Pim-On; Chew, Sing Yian; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2014-03-01

    Herein we combine cell sheet technology and electrospun scaffolding to rapidly generate circumferentially aligned tubular constructs of human aortic smooth muscles cells with contractile gene expression for use as tissue engineered blood vessel media. Smooth muscle cells cultured on micropatterned and N-isopropylacrylamide-grafted (pNIPAm) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a small portion of which was covered by aligned electrospun scaffolding, resulted in a single sheet of unidirectionally aligned cells. Upon cooling to room temperature, the scaffold, its adherent cells, and the remaining cell sheet detached and were collected on a mandrel to generating tubular constructs with circumferentially aligned smooth muscle cells which possess contractile gene expression and a single layer of electrospun scaffold as an analogue to a small diameter blood vessel's internal elastic lamina (IEL). This method improves cell sheet handling, results in rapid circumferential alignment of smooth muscle cells which immediately express contractile genes, and introduction of an analogue to small diameter blood vessel IEL. PMID:24411678

  2. Macrophage-Induced Blood Vessels Guide Schwann Cell-Mediated Regeneration of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Cattin, Anne-Laure; Burden, Jemima J.; Van Emmenis, Lucie; Mackenzie, Francesca E.; Hoving, Julian J.A.; Garcia Calavia, Noelia; Guo, Yanping; McLaughlin, Maeve; Rosenberg, Laura H.; Quereda, Victor; Jamecna, Denisa; Napoli, Ilaria; Parrinello, Simona; Enver, Tariq; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Lloyd, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The peripheral nervous system has remarkable regenerative capacities in that it can repair a fully cut nerve. This requires Schwann cells to migrate collectively to guide regrowing axons across a ‘bridge’ of new tissue, which forms to reconnect a severed nerve. Here we show that blood vessels direct the migrating cords of Schwann cells. This multicellular process is initiated by hypoxia, selectively sensed by macrophages within the bridge, which via VEGF-A secretion induce a polarized vasculature that relieves the hypoxia. Schwann cells then use the blood vessels as “tracks” to cross the bridge taking regrowing axons with them. Importantly, disrupting the organization of the newly formed blood vessels in vivo, either by inhibiting the angiogenic signal or by re-orienting them, compromises Schwann cell directionality resulting in defective nerve repair. This study provides important insights into how the choreography of multiple cell-types is required for the regeneration of an adult tissue. PMID:26279190

  3. The use of high-hydrostatic pressure treatment to decellularize blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Funamoto, Seiichi; Nam, Kwangwoo; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Murakoshi, Ayako; Hashimoto, Yoshihide; Niwaya, Kazuo; Kitamura, Soichiro; Fujisato, Toshiya; Kishida, Akio

    2010-05-01

    A decellularization method using high-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) technology (>600MPa) is described. The HHP disrupts the cells inside the tissue. The cell debris can be eliminated with a simple washing process, producing clean, decellularized tissue. In this study, porcine aortic blood vessel was decellularized by HHP. The mechanical properties and in vivo performance of the decellularized tissue were evaluated. Mechanical properties of the decellularized tissue were not altered by the HHP treatment. Reduced inflammation of the decellularized tissue was confirmed by xenogenic transplant experimentation. An allogenic transplantation study showed that decellularized blood vessel endured the arterial blood pressure, and there was no clot formation on the luminal surface. In addition, cellular infiltration into the vessel wall was observed 4 weeks after implantation, suggesting that HHP treatments could be applied widely as a high-quality decellularization method. PMID:20149445

  4. Mathematical modeling and simulation of the evolution of plaques in blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifan; Jäger, Willi; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Richter, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a model is developed for the evolution of plaques in arteries, which is one of the main causes for the blockage of blood flow. Plaque rupture and spread of torn-off material may cause closures in the down-stream vessel system and lead to ischemic brain or myocardial infarctions. The model covers the flow of blood and its interaction with the vessel wall. It is based on the assumption that the penetration of monocytes from the blood flow into the vessel wall, and the accumulation of foam cells increasing the volume, are main factors for the growth of plaques. The dynamics of the vessel wall is governed by a deformation gradient, which is given as composition of a purely elastic tensor, and a tensor modeling the biologically caused volume growth. An equation for the evolution of the metric is derived quantifying the changing geometry of the vessel wall. To calculate numerically the solutions of the arising free boundary problem, the model system of partial differential equations is transformed to an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) formulation, where all equations are given in fixed domains. The numerical calculations are using newly developed algorithms for ALE systems. The results of the simulations, obtained for realistic system parameters, are in good qualitative agreement with observations. They demonstrate that the basic modeling assumption can be justified. The increase of stresses in the vessel wall can be computed. Medical treatment tries to prevent critical stress values, which may cause plaque rupture and its consequences. PMID:26385578

  5. Do Haematophagous Bugs Assess Skin Surface Temperature to Detect Blood Vessels?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Raquel A.; Lazzari, Claudio R.; Lorenzo, Marcelo G.; Pereira, Marcos H.

    2007-01-01

    Background It is known that some blood-sucking insects have the ability to reach vessels under the host skin with their mouthparts to feed blood from inside them. However, the process by which they locate these vessels remains largely unknown. Less than 5% of the skin is occupied by blood vessels and thus, it is not likely that insects rely on a “random search strategy”, since it would increase the probability of being killed by their hosts. Indeed, heterogeneities along the skin surface might offer exploitable information for guiding insect's bites. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the bug Rhodnius prolixus can evaluate temperature discontinuities along the body surface in order to locate vessels before piercing the host skin. When placed over a rabbit ear, the bug's first bites were mostly directed towards the main vessels. When insects were confronted to artificial linear heat sources presenting a temperature gradient against the background, most bites were directly addressed to the warmer linear source, notwithstanding the temperature of both, the source and the background. Finally, tests performed using uni- and bilaterally antennectomized insects revealed that the bilateral integration of thermal inputs from both antennae is necessary for precisely directing bites. Conclusions/Significance R. prolixus may be able to exploit the temperature differences observed over the skin surface to locate blood vessles. Bugs bite the warmest targets regardless of the target/background temperatures, suggesting that they do not bite choosing a preferred temperature, but select temperature discontinuities along the skin. This strategy seems to be an efficient one for finding blood vessels within a wide temperature range, allowing finding them on different hosts, as well as on different areas of the host body. Our study also adds new insight about the use of antennal thermal inputs by blood sucking bugs. PMID:17895973

  6. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying blood vessel lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Marta S; Conlon, Frank L

    2014-03-01

    The establishment of a functional vascular system requires multiple complex steps throughout embryogenesis, from endothelial cell (EC) specification to vascular patterning into venous and arterial hierarchies. Following the initial assembly of ECs into a network of cord-like structures, vascular expansion and remodeling occur rapidly through morphogenetic events including vessel sprouting, fusion, and pruning. In addition, vascular morphogenesis encompasses the process of lumen formation, critical for the transformation of cords into perfusable vascular tubes. Studies in mouse, zebrafish, frog, and human endothelial cells have begun to outline the cellular and molecular requirements underlying lumen formation. Although the lumen can be generated through diverse mechanisms, the coordinated participation of multiple conserved molecules including transcription factors, small GTPases, and adhesion and polarity proteins remains a fundamental principle, leading us closer to a more thorough understanding of this complex event. PMID:24323945

  7. Effect of Rolling Massage on the Vortex Flow in Blood Vessels with Lattice Boltzmann Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou Hui

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese Medical Massage, which is a nature therapy in eliminating many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on the cavity flows in blood vessel under the rolling manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that the vortex flows are fully disturbed by the rolling massage. The flow behavior depends on the rolling velocity and the rolling depth. Rolling massage has a better effect on the flows in the cavity than that of the flows in a planar blood vessel. The result is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the rolling techniques.

  8. Identification and characterization of a resident vascular stem/progenitor cell population in preexisting blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Hisamichi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Sakimoto, Susumu; Wakabayashi, Taku; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Vasculogenesis, the in-situ assembly of angioblast or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), may persist into adult life, contributing to new blood vessel formation. However, EPCs are scattered throughout newly developed blood vessels and cannot be solely responsible for vascularization. Here, we identify an endothelial progenitor/stem-like population located at the inner surface of preexisting blood vessels using the Hoechst method in which stem cell populations are identified as side populations. This population is dormant in the steady state but possesses colony-forming ability, produces large numbers of endothelial cells (ECs) and when transplanted into ischaemic lesions, restores blood flow completely and reconstitutes de-novo long-term surviving blood vessels. Moreover, although surface markers of this population are very similar to conventional ECs, and they reside in the capillary endothelium sub-population, the gene expression profile is completely different. Our results suggest that this heterogeneity of stem-like ECs will lead to the identification of new targets for vascular regeneration therapy. PMID:22179698

  9. Postmortem computed tomography with the use of air for blood vessel enhancement-Early experience.

    PubMed

    Borowska-Solonynko, Aleksandra; Solonynko, Bohdan; Fudalej, Marcin; Żyłkowski, Jarosław

    2016-04-01

    Postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) is gaining popularity in forensic medicine. Computed tomography routinely performed in clinical medicine involves intravenous contrast administration. Unfortunately, postmortem examinations are typically limited to uncontrasted CT scans, where blood vessels and their potential injury sites are invisible. One serious problem is the fact that due to the process of decomposition, contrast agents used for vessel visualization in the living cannot be used in cadavers. Therefore, a special contrast agent designed for cadavers has been developed. This contrast agent has a high density and is lipophilic. Its use ensures very good visualization of blood vessels it is, however, associated with high costs and may alter findings of a later histopathological examination. This study presents early experience with the air as negative contrast agent to enhance all blood vessels in the body. The carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used as a contrast agent in live individuals with contraindications against the use of iodinated contrast. In corpses with advanced postmortem changes, putrefaction gases also considerably enhance the visibility of blood vessels and organs they fill. There have also been some positive effects with the use of gas in postmortem angiography of coronary vessels. These findings encouraged us to attempt air administration via catheters introduced into the femoral artery or a central venous access site in the superior vena cava. The gas distributed easily throughout the body and surprisingly well contrasted both arteries and veins of various caliber. The presence of the air administered into vessels did not cause any apparent, significant alterations in autopsy findings. Although optimization of the gas administration technique requires further studies, we can already say that this is a promising direction in postmortem angiography. PMID:26921814

  10. Polysaccharides from astragali radix restore chemical-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Astragali Radix has been used widely for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and to enhance endurance and stamina in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for over 2000 years. The polysaccharide constituents of Astragali Radix (ARP) are considered as one of the major constituents contributing to the multiple pharmacological effects of this medicinal plant. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the vascular regenerative activities of ARPs in a chemically-induced blood vessel loss model in zebrafish. Methods Blood vessel loss was induced in both Tg(fli-1a:EGFP)y1 and Tg(fli-1a:nEGFP)y7 embryos by administration of 300 nM VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) for 3 h at 24 hpf (hour post-fertilization). Then, the blood vessel damaged zebrafish were treated with ARPs for 21 h and 45 h after VRI withdrawal. Morphological changes in intersegmental vessels (ISVs) of zebrafish larvae were observed under the fluorescence microscope and measured quantitatively. The rescue effect of ARPs in the zebrafish models was validated by measuring the relative mRNA expressions of Kdrl, Kdr and Flt-1 using real-time PCR. Results Two polysaccharide fractions, P4 (50000 D < molecular weight & diameter < 0.1 ?m) and P5 (molecular diameter > 0.1 ?m), isolated from Astragali Radix by ultrafiltration, produced a significant and dose-dependent recovery in VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Flk-1 and Flt-1 mRNA expression induced by VRI was reversed by treatment with P4. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that P4 isolated from Astragali Radix reduces VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish. These findings support the hypothesis that polysaccharides are one of the active constituents in Astragali Radix, contributing to its beneficial effect on treatment of diseases associated with a deficiency in angiogenesis. PMID:22357377

  11. The role of blood vessels in high-resolution volume conductor head modeling of EEG.

    PubMed

    Fiederer, L D J; Vorwerk, J; Lucka, F; Dannhauer, M; Yang, S; Dümpelmann, M; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Aertsen, A; Speck, O; Wolters, C H; Ball, T

    2016-03-01

    Reconstruction of the electrical sources of human EEG activity at high spatio-temporal accuracy is an important aim in neuroscience and neurological diagnostics. Over the last decades, numerous studies have demonstrated that realistic modeling of head anatomy improves the accuracy of source reconstruction of EEG signals. For example, including a cerebro-spinal fluid compartment and the anisotropy of white matter electrical conductivity were both shown to significantly reduce modeling errors. Here, we for the first time quantify the role of detailed reconstructions of the cerebral blood vessels in volume conductor head modeling for EEG. To study the role of the highly arborized cerebral blood vessels, we created a submillimeter head model based on ultra-high-field-strength (7T) structural MRI datasets. Blood vessels (arteries and emissary/intraosseous veins) were segmented using Frangi multi-scale vesselness filtering. The final head model consisted of a geometry-adapted cubic mesh with over 17×10(6) nodes. We solved the forward model using a finite-element-method (FEM) transfer matrix approach, which allowed reducing computation times substantially and quantified the importance of the blood vessel compartment by computing forward and inverse errors resulting from ignoring the blood vessels. Our results show that ignoring emissary veins piercing the skull leads to focal localization errors of approx. 5 to 15mm. Large errors (>2cm) were observed due to the carotid arteries and the dense arterial vasculature in areas such as in the insula or in the medial temporal lobe. Thus, in such predisposed areas, errors caused by neglecting blood vessels can reach similar magnitudes as those previously reported for neglecting white matter anisotropy, the CSF or the dura - structures which are generally considered important components of realistic EEG head models. Our findings thus imply that including a realistic blood vessel compartment in EEG head models will be helpful to improve the accuracy of EEG source analyses particularly when high accuracies in brain areas with dense vasculature are required. PMID:26747748

  12. Acrylic resin injection method for blood vessel investigations.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Fumihiko; Uemura, Mamoru; Takemura, Akimichi; Toda, Isumi; Fang, Yi-Ru; Xu, Yuan Jin; Zhang, Zhi Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The injection of acrylic resin into vessels is an excellent method for macroscopically and microscopically observing their three-dimensional features. Conventional methods can be enhanced by removal of the polymerization inhibitor (hydroquinone) without requiring distillation, a consistent viscosity of polymerized resin, and a constant injection pressure and speed. As microvascular corrosion cast specimens are influenced by viscosity, pressure, and speed changes, injection into different specimens yields varying results. We devised a method to reduce those problems. Sodium hydroxide was used to remove hydroquinone from commercial methylmethacrylate. The solid polymer and the liquid monomer were mixed using a 1 : 9 ratio (low-viscosity acrylic resin, 9.07 ± 0.52 mPa•s) or a 3:7 ratio (high-viscosity resin, 1036.33 ± 144.02 mPa•s). To polymerize the acrylic resin for injection, a polymerization promoter (1.0% benzoyl peroxide) was mixed with a polymerization initiator (0.5%, N, N-dimethylaniline). The acrylic resins were injected using a precise syringe pump, with a 5-mL/min injection speed and 11.17 ± 1.60 mPa injection pressure (low-viscosity resin) and a 1-mL/min injection speed and 58.50 ± 5.75 mPa injection pressure (high-viscosity resin). Using the aforementioned conditions, scanning electron microscopy indicated that sufficient resin could be injected into the capillaries of the microvascular corrosion cast specimens. PMID:24107720

  13. Reduced capacity of tumour blood vessels to produce endothelium-derived relaxing factor: significance for blood flow modification.

    PubMed Central

    Tozer, G. M.; Prise, V. E.; Bell, K. M.; Dennis, M. F.; Stratford, M. R.; Chaplin, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of nitric oxide-dependent vasodilators on vascular resistance of tumours and normal tissue was determined with the aim of modifying tumour blood flow for therapeutic benefit. Isolated preparations of the rat P22 tumour and normal rat hindlimb were perfused ex vivo. The effects on tissue vascular resistance of administration of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and the diazeniumdiolate (or NONO-ate) NOC-7, vasodilators which act via direct release of nitric oxide (NO), were compared with the effects of acetylcholine (ACh), a vasodilator which acts primarily via receptor stimulation of endothelial cells to release NO in the form of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). SNP and NOC-7 effectively dilated tumour blood vessels after preconstriction with phenylephrine (PE) or potassium chloride (KCl) as indicated by a decrease in vascular resistance. SNP also effectively dilated normal rat hindlimb vessels after PE/KCl constriction. Vasodilatation in the tumour preparations was accompanied by a significant rise in nitrite levels measured in the tumour effluent. ACh induced a significant vasodilation in the normal hindlimb but an anomalous vasoconstriction in the tumour. This result suggests that tumours, unlike normal tissues are incapable of releasing NO (EDRF) in response to ACh. Capacity for EDRF production may represent a difference between tumour and normal tissue blood vessels, which could be exploited for selective pharmacological manipulation of tumour blood flow. PMID:8980396

  14. A micro-scale simulation of red blood cell passage through symmetric and asymmetric bifurcated vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Rongin, Uwitije; Xing, Zhongwen

    2016-02-01

    Blood exhibits a heterogeneous nature of hematocrit, velocity, and effective viscosity in microcapillaries. Microvascular bifurcations have a significant influence on the distribution of the blood cells and blood flow behavior. This paper presents a simulation study performed on the two-dimensional motions and deformation of multiple red blood cells in microvessels with diverging and converging bifurcations. Fluid dynamics and membrane mechanics were incorporated. Effects of cell shape, hematocrit, and deformability of the cell membrane on rheological behavior of the red blood cells and the hemodynamics have been investigated. It was shown that the blood entering the daughter branch with a higher flow rate tended to receive disproportionally more cells. The results also demonstrate that red blood cells in microvessels experienced lateral migration in the parent channel and blunted velocity profiles in both straight section and daughter branches, and this effect was influenced by the shape and the initial position of the cells, the hematocrit, and the membrane deformability. In addition, a cell free region around the tip of the confluence was observed. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with existing experimental findings. This study may provide fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of hemodynamic behavior of micro-scale blood flow.

  15. A micro-scale simulation of red blood cell passage through symmetric and asymmetric bifurcated vessels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Rongin, Uwitije; Xing, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Blood exhibits a heterogeneous nature of hematocrit, velocity, and effective viscosity in microcapillaries. Microvascular bifurcations have a significant influence on the distribution of the blood cells and blood flow behavior. This paper presents a simulation study performed on the two-dimensional motions and deformation of multiple red blood cells in microvessels with diverging and converging bifurcations. Fluid dynamics and membrane mechanics were incorporated. Effects of cell shape, hematocrit, and deformability of the cell membrane on rheological behavior of the red blood cells and the hemodynamics have been investigated. It was shown that the blood entering the daughter branch with a higher flow rate tended to receive disproportionally more cells. The results also demonstrate that red blood cells in microvessels experienced lateral migration in the parent channel and blunted velocity profiles in both straight section and daughter branches, and this effect was influenced by the shape and the initial position of the cells, the hematocrit, and the membrane deformability. In addition, a cell free region around the tip of the confluence was observed. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with existing experimental findings. This study may provide fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of hemodynamic behavior of micro-scale blood flow. PMID:26830454

  16. A micro-scale simulation of red blood cell passage through symmetric and asymmetric bifurcated vessels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Rongin, Uwitije; Xing, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Blood exhibits a heterogeneous nature of hematocrit, velocity, and effective viscosity in microcapillaries. Microvascular bifurcations have a significant influence on the distribution of the blood cells and blood flow behavior. This paper presents a simulation study performed on the two-dimensional motions and deformation of multiple red blood cells in microvessels with diverging and converging bifurcations. Fluid dynamics and membrane mechanics were incorporated. Effects of cell shape, hematocrit, and deformability of the cell membrane on rheological behavior of the red blood cells and the hemodynamics have been investigated. It was shown that the blood entering the daughter branch with a higher flow rate tended to receive disproportionally more cells. The results also demonstrate that red blood cells in microvessels experienced lateral migration in the parent channel and blunted velocity profiles in both straight section and daughter branches, and this effect was influenced by the shape and the initial position of the cells, the hematocrit, and the membrane deformability. In addition, a cell free region around the tip of the confluence was observed. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with existing experimental findings. This study may provide fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of hemodynamic behavior of micro-scale blood flow. PMID:26830454

  17. A Microstructurally Motivated Model of the Mechanical Behavior of Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Shannon L. M.; Vaughn, Megann E.; Hu, Jin-Jia; Driessen, Niels J. B.; Baaijens, Frank P. T.; Humphrey, Jay D.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical models have potential to guide the development and use of engineered blood vessels as well as other engineered tissues. This paper presents a microstructurally motivated, pseudoelastic, mechanical model of the biaxial mechanics of engineered vessels in the physiologic pressure range. The model incorporates experimentally measured densities and alignments of engineered collagen. Specifically, these microstructural and associated mechanical inputs were measured directly from engineered blood vessels that were cultured over periods of 5–7.5 weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful application of either a phenomenological or a microstructurally motivated mechanical model to engineered vascular tissues. Model development revealed the need to use novel theoretical configurations to describe the strain history of engineered vessels. The constitutive equations developed herein suggested that collagen remodeled between 5 and 7.5 weeks during a 7.5-week culture period. This remodeling led to strain energies for collagen that differed with alignment, which likely resulted from undulations that varied with alignment. Finally, biaxial data emphasized that axial extensions increase stresses in engineered vessels in the physiologic pressure range, thereby providing a guideline for surgical use: engineered vessels should be implanted at appropriate axial extension to minimize adverse stress responses. PMID:18720007

  18. Podocytes in the blood vessel linings of Phoronis muelleri (Phoronida, Tentaculata).

    PubMed

    Storch, V; Herrmann, K

    1978-07-10

    In several metasomal blood vessels of Phoronis muelleri myofilament-containing podocytes are the predominatnt cell-type. In some regions the podocytes can build a labyrinth resembling e.g. the glomerular epithelium of Enteropneusta and the axial organ of Asteroidea. PMID:688346

  19. The Finite Element Method Applied to a Problem of Blood Flow in Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nu?, Gabriela; Chiorean, Ioana; Cri?an, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We use the finite element method to solve a convection-diffusion equation when convection is dominating, a problem which describes the behavior of the concentration of a solute in a blood vessel. A new technique for computing the discrete problem is used. PMID:22319548

  20. Circulating fibrocytes stabilize blood vessels during angiogenesis in a paracrine manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinqing; Tan, Hong; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Yuejun; Samuelson, Lisa; Li, Xueyong; Cui, Caibin; Gerber, David A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that circulating fibrocytes play important roles in angiogenesis. However, the specific role of fibrocytes in angiogenesis and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we found that fibrocytes stabilized newly formed blood vessels in a mouse wound-healing model by inhibiting angiogenesis during the proliferative phase and inhibiting blood vessel regression during the remodeling phase. Fibrocytes also inhibited angiogenesis in a Matrigel mouse model. In vitro study showed that fibrocytes inhibited both the apoptosis and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) in a permeable support (Transwell) co-culture system. In a three-dimensional collagen gel, fibrocytes stabilized the VEC tubes by decreasing VEC tube density on stimulation with growth factors and preventing VEC tube regression on withdrawal of growth factors. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that fibrocytes expressed many prosurvival factors that are responsible for the prosurvival effect of fibrocytes on VECs and blood vessels. Fibrocytes also expressed angiogenesis inhibitors, including thrombospondin-1 (THBS1). THBS1 knockdown partially blocked the fibrocyte-induced inhibition of VEC proliferation in the Transwell co-culture system and recovered the fibrocyte-induced decrease of VEC tube density in collagen gel. Purified fibrocytes transfected with THBS1 siRNA partially recovered the fibrocyte-induced inhibition of angiogenesis in both the wound-healing and Matrigel models. In conclusion, our findings reveal that fibrocytes stabilize blood vessels via prosurvival factors and anti-angiogenic factors, including THBS1. PMID:24300950

  1. Generation of Functional Blood Vessels from a Single c-kit+ Adult Vascular Endothelial Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shentong; Wei, Jing; Pentinmikko, Nalle; Leinonen, Hannele; Salven, Petri

    2012-01-01

    In adults, the growth of blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis, is essential for organ growth and repair. In many disorders including cancer, angiogenesis becomes excessive. The cellular origin of new vascular endothelial cells (ECs) during blood vessel growth in angiogenic situations has remained unknown. Here, we provide evidence for adult vascular endothelial stem cells (VESCs) that reside in the blood vessel wall endothelium. VESCs constitute a small subpopulation within CD117+ (c-kit+) ECs capable of undergoing clonal expansion while other ECs have a very limited proliferative capacity. Isolated VESCs can produce tens of millions of endothelial daughter cells in vitro. A single transplanted c-kit-expressing VESC by the phenotype lin?CD31+CD105+Sca1+CD117+ can generate in vivo functional blood vessels that connect to host circulation. VESCs also have long-term self-renewal capacity, a defining functional property of adult stem cells. To provide functional verification on the role of c-kit in VESCs, we show that a genetic deficit in endothelial c-kit expression markedly decreases total colony-forming VESCs. In vivo, c-kit expression deficit resulted in impaired EC proliferation and angiogenesis and retardation of tumor growth. Isolated VESCs could be used in cell-based therapies for cardiovascular repair to restore tissue vascularization after ischemic events. VESCs also provide a novel cellular target to block pathological angiogenesis and cancer growth. PMID:23091420

  2. Measurement of streaming potentials of mammalian blood vessels, aorta and vena cava, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, P N; Himmelfarb, E; Lustrin, I; Ziskind, H

    1966-09-01

    Attempts to measure streaming potentials in large rabbit blood vessels in vivo have been carried out. Streaming potentials, V(89), were measured by the introduction of microelectrodes through the wall of the blood vessel at separations greater than 1 cm. The outputs from these electrodes fed through calomel cells were amplified and recorded directly by using an Electronics for Medicine photorecorder (White Plains, N. Y.). "Effective streaming currents" were determined by running the output through a low impedence galvanometer while simultaneously measuring the resistance of the circuit V(8) were, therefore, calculated from two measurements and compared. Flow through vessels studied was measured using two different electromagnetic flowmeters. The results indicate that V(8) present in both aorta and vena cava are of the order of 5 to 10 mv. By using the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation into which flow was reintegrated, the numbers yield zeta potentials approximating 0.1 to 0.4 v in both aorta and vena cava. This number approaches the apparent upper limit for zeta (actually "interfacial potentials") potentials in biological systems. The measured "i.f." potential is considered as the interreaction of several physical and metabolic factors operating at the blood intimal interface. The polarity of the potential suggests that the interface is negative with respect to the blood flowing through the vessel. Interfacial potential and related V(8) are discussed in terms of their possible importance as a mechanism for maintaining vascular homeostasis in the living animal. PMID:5970567

  3. Mass Spectrometry and Antibody-Based Characterization of Blood Vessels from Brachylophosaurus canadensis.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Timothy P; Schroeter, Elena R; Zamdborg, Leonid; Zheng, Wenxia; Lee, Ji Eun; Tran, John C; Bern, Marshall; Duncan, Michael B; Lebleu, Valerie S; Ahlf, Dorothy R; Thomas, Paul M; Kalluri, Raghu; Kelleher, Neil L; Schweitzer, Mary H

    2015-12-01

    Structures similar to blood vessels in location, morphology, flexibility, and transparency have been recovered after demineralization of multiple dinosaur cortical bone fragments from multiple specimens, some of which are as old as 80 Ma. These structures were hypothesized to be either endogenous to the bone (i.e., of vascular origin) or the result of biofilm colonizing the empty osteonal network after degradation of original organic components. Here, we test the hypothesis that these structures are endogenous and thus retain proteins in common with extant archosaur blood vessels that can be detected with high-resolution mass spectrometry and confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two lines of evidence support this hypothesis. First, peptide sequencing of Brachylophosaurus canadensis blood vessel extracts is consistent with peptides comprising extant archosaurian blood vessels and is not consistent with a bacterial, cellular slime mold, or fungal origin. Second, proteins identified by mass spectrometry can be localized to the tissues using antibodies specific to these proteins, validating their identity. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001738. PMID:26595531

  4. Enhanced Bonding Strength of Hydrophobically Modified Gelatin Films on Wet Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Keiko; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2014-01-01

    The bonding behavior between hydrophobically modified alkaline-treated gelatin (hm-AlGltn) films and porcine blood vessels was evaluated under wet conditions. Hexanoyl (Hx: C6), decanoyl (Dec: C10), and stearyl (Ste: C18) chlorides were introduced into the amino groups of AlGltn to obtain HxAlGltn, DecAlGltn, and SteAlGltn, respectively, with various modification percentages. The hm-AlGltn was fabricated into films and thermally crosslinked to obtain water-insoluble films (t-hm-AlGltn). The 42% modified t-HxAlGltn (t-42HxAlGltn) possessed higher wettability than the 38% modified t-DecAlGltn (t-38DecAlGltn) and the 44% modified t-SteAlGltn (t-44SteAlGltn) films, and the t-42HxAlGltn film showed a high bonding strength with the blood vessel compared with all the hm-AlGltn films. Histological observations indicated that t-42HxAlGltn and t-38DecAlGltn remained on the blood vessel even after the bonding strength measurements. From cell culture experiments, the t-42HxAlGltn films showed significant cell adhesion compared to other films. These findings indicate that the Hx group easily interpenetrated the surface of blood vessels and effectively enhanced the bonding strength between the films and the tissue. PMID:24481063

  5. [First successful clinical application of tissue engineered blood vessel].

    PubMed

    Hibino, N; Imai, Y; Shin-oka, T; Aoki, M; Watanabe, M; Kosaka, Y; Matsumura, G; Konuma, T; Toyama, S; Murata, A; Naito, Y; Miyake, T

    2002-05-01

    With this tissue engineering (TE) technique, the peripheral pulmonary artery was successfully reconstructed, using the patient's own venous cells in a 4-year-old girl, 2 years after Fontan procedure. A 4-year-old girl was given a diagnosis of single right ventricle, double-outlet right ventricle and pulmonary atresia. She underwent left modified Blalock-Taussig shunt at a month old, pulmonary artery angioplasty at a year and 3 months old, and bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt at 2 years and a month old. She underwent again pulmonary artery angioplasty and Fontan operation at 3 years and 3 months. An angiographical examination 7 months after the operation revealed total occlusion of the right intermediate pulmonary artery. TE technique using autologous cells was indicated. The application of this procedure was approved by the ethical committee in Tokyo Women's Medical University. The patient's parents were thoroughly informed and signed a consent form. Approximately 2 cm of the peripheral vein was explanted under sterile conditions. The tissue was minced, placed in tissue culture dishes and cultured at 37 degrees C, 100% humidity and a 5% CO2 atmosphere for almost a month. The number of cells substantially increased to reach 12 millions for almost a month. The culture medium was changed every 3 days. The polymer tube that served as a scaffold for cells was composed of the copolymer of PCL-PLA (50:50) with reinforcement by woven PGA. The polymer conduit, 10 mm in diameter, 20 mm in length and 1 mm in thickness, was designated to biodegradate within 8 weeks. The number of seeded cells was approximately a million/cm2. The graft transplantation was performed 10 days after seeding cells. The occlusive right intermediate pulmonary artery was reconstructed with the TE vessel graft under extracorporeal circulation with a pump-oxygenator. The patient followed a satisfactory postoperative course. The postoperative angiography demonstrated that the graft was not constricted and dilated but that it preserved good patency. Long-term follow-up are necessary. We plan to continue to use the TE technique using autologous cells in the low pressure system like venous or pulmonary circulation. Because our results even in early experimental phase were valuable and promising, we believe that the TE approach may play an important role in the near future as an another alternative, together with transplantation and artificial organ, especially in the field of cardiovascular surgery that mostly needs replants. PMID:11995317

  6. A Novel Curvature-Based Algorithm for Automatic Grading of Retinal Blood Vessel Tortuosity.

    PubMed

    Aghamohamadian-Sharbaf, Masoud; Pourreza, Hamid Reza; Banaee, Touka

    2016-03-01

    Tortuosity of retinal blood vessels is an important symptom of diabetic retinopathy or retinopathy of prematurity. In this paper, we propose an automatic image-based method for measuring single vessel and vessel network tortuosity of these vessels. Simplicity of the algorithm, low-computational burden, and an excellent matching to the clinically perceived tortuosity are the important features of the proposed algorithm. To measure tortuosity, we use curvature which is an indicator of local inflection of a curve. For curvature calculation, template disk method is a common choice and has been utilized in most of the state of the art. However, we show that this method does not possess linearity against curvature and by proposing two modifications, we improve the method. We use the basic and the modified methods to measure tortuosity on a publicly available data bank and two data banks of our own. While interpreting the results, we pursue three goals. First, to show that our algorithm is more efficient to implement than the state of the art. Second, to show that our method possesses an excellent correlation with subjective results (0.94 correlation for vessel tortuosity, 0.95 correlation for vessel network tortuosity in diabetic retinopathy, and 0.7 correlation for vessel network tortuosity in retinopathy of prematurity). Third, to show that the tortuosity perceived by an expert and curvature possess a nonlinear relation. PMID:25622332

  7. Measurements of Dynamic Viscoelasticity of Poly (vinyl alcohol) Hydrogel for the Development of Blood Vessel Biomodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosukegawa, Hiroyuki; Mamada, Keisuke; Kuroki, Kanju; Liu, Lei; Inoue, Kosuke; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Makoto

    In vitro blood vessel biomodeling with realistic mechanical properties and geometrical structures is helpful for training in surgical procedures, especial those used in endovascular treatment. Poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA-H), which is made of Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and water, may be useful as a material for blood vessel biomodeling due to its low surface friction resistance and good transparency. In order to simulate the mechanical properties of blood vessels, measurements of mechanical properties of PVA-H were carried out with a dynamic mechanical analyzer, and the storage modulus (G’) and loss modulus (G”) of PVA-H were obtained. PVA-Hs were prepared by the low-temperature crystallization method. They were made of PVA with various concentrations (C) and degrees of polymerization (DP), and made by blending two kinds of PVA having different DP or saponification values (SV). The G’ and G” of PVA-H increased, as the C or DP of PVA increased, or as the proportion of PVA with higher DP or SV increased. These results indicate that it is possible to obtain PVA-H with desirable dynamic viscoelasticity. Furthermore, it is suggested that PVA-H is stable in the temperature range of 0°C to 40°C, indicating that biomodeling made of PVA-H should be available at 37°C, the physiological temperature. The dynamic viscoelasticity of PVA-H obtained was similar to that of the dog blood vessel measured in previous reports. In conclusion, PVA-H is suggested to be useful as a material of blood vessel biomodeling.

  8. Preliminary analysis of the effects of blood vessel movement on blood flow patterns in the coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Moore, J E; Guggenheim, N; Delfino, A; Doriot, P A; Dorsaz, P A; Rutishauser, W; Meister, J J

    1994-08-01

    Blood flow patterns are believed to be involved in the formation and progression of arterial diseases. It is possible that the normal physiologic movement of blood vessels during the cardiac cycle affects blood flow patterns significantly. For example, the contraction of the heart in systole and subsequent relaxation in diastole create movements of the coronary arteries, as evidenced in real-time angiography. The effects of this movement on coronary artery flow patterns have never been previously analyzed. This work was undertaken to provide a preliminary estimate of the importance of the effects of such physiologic movements on blood flow patterns in the coronary arteries. A Womersley-type solution was used to determine the effect of axial movement on the wall shear rate in a simplified model of the coronary arteries. The pulsatile pressure gradient was derived from previously published coronary artery flow waveforms. The axial movement function was obtained from a three-dimensional reconstruction of a biplanar coronary angiogram. Significant changes in wall shear rate were noted when the movement was taken into account. The maximum and minimum wall shear rates were 10 percent smaller and 107 percent larger in magnitude respectively, and the Oscillatory Shear Index (OSI) was doubled. Most of the changes in wall shear rate were observed in systole, when the pressure gradient is minimal and the movement is strongest. The results indicate that blood vessel movement during the cardiac cycle has a significant effect on hemodynamic phenomena which have been associated with the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:7799631

  9. Investigation of blood flow and the effect of vasoactive substances in cutaneous blood vessels of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Škorjanc, Aleš; Belušič, Gregor

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, a preparation of frog skin was presented, which can be used to demonstrate the basic concepts of blood flow regulation in a very clear and attractive way to high school and university students. In a freshly euthanized Xenopus, a patch of abdominal skin was exposed from the internal side and viewed with a USB microscope while it remained connected to a functioning circulatory system. In this way, it was possible to obtain sharp images of arteries and veins and to visualize blood flow. This allows students to learn about the functional differences between arteries and veins and about the complexity of hemodynamics as well as the particularities of the amphibian pulmocutaneous circulation. Students can then quantitatively estimate the effect of norepinephrine and epinephrine on the diameter of blood vessels by simply superfusing the skin patch with a series of solutions of the two substances. They can also test the effect of α-adrenergic receptor blockers, used to treat high blood pressure, on the norepinephrine-induced muscle tonus of blood vessels. PMID:26031724

  10. On ultrasound-induced microbubble oscillation in a capillary blood vessel and its implications for the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemair, W.; Tukovi?, Ž.; Jasak, H.; Poulikakos, D.; Kurtcuoglu, V.

    2012-02-01

    The complex interaction between an ultrasound-driven microbubble and an enclosing capillary microvessel is investigated by means of a coupled, multi-domain numerical model using the finite volume formulation. This system is of interest in the study of transient blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) for drug delivery applications. The compliant vessel structure is incorporated explicitly as a distinct domain described by a dedicated physical model. Red blood cells (RBCs) are taken into account as elastic solids in the blood plasma. We report the temporal and spatial development of transmural pressure (Ptm) and wall shear stress (WSS) at the luminal endothelial interface, both of which are candidates for the yet unknown mediator of BBBD. The explicit introduction of RBCs shapes the Ptm and WSS distributions and their derivatives markedly. While the peak values of these mechanical wall parameters are not affected considerably by the presence of RBCs, a pronounced increase in their spatial gradients is observed compared to a configuration with blood plasma alone. The novelty of our work lies in the explicit treatment of the vessel wall, and in the modelling of blood as a composite fluid, which we show to be relevant for the mechanical processes at the endothelium.

  11. Finite-sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel: Non-Newtonian effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundakrishnan, Karthik; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Eckmann, David M.

    2008-09-01

    We have numerically investigated the axisymmetric motion of a finite-sized nearly occluding air bubble through a shear-thinning Casson fluid flowing in blood vessels of circular cross section. The numerical solution entails solving a two-layer fluid model—a cell-free layer and a non-Newtonian core together with the gas bubble. This problem is of interest to the field of rheology and for gas embolism studies in health sciences. The numerical method is based on a modified front-tracking method. The viscosity expression in the Casson model for blood (bulk fluid) includes the hematocrit [the volume fraction of red blood cells (RBCs)] as an explicit parameter. Three different flow Reynolds numbers, Reapp=?lUmaxd/?app , in the neighborhood of 0.2, 2, and 200 are investigated. Here, ?l is the density of blood, Umax is the centerline velocity of the inlet Casson profile, d is the diameter of the vessel, and ?app is the apparent viscosity of whole blood. Three different hematocrits have also been considered: 0.45, 0.4, and 0.335. The vessel sizes considered correspond to small arteries, and small and large arterioles in normal humans. The degree of bubble occlusion is characterized by the ratio of bubble to vessel radius (aspect ratio), ? , in the range 0.9???1.05 . For arteriolar flow, where relevant, the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effects are taken into account. Both horizontal and vertical vessel geometries have been investigated. Many significant insights are revealed by our study: (i) bubble motion causes large temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the “endothelial cell” (EC) surface lining the blood vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it, and passes it by; (ii) rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress (+ ? - ? +) imparted to the cell surface during bubble motion; (iii) large shear stress gradients together with sign reversals are ascribable to the development of a recirculation vortex at the rear of the bubble; (iv) computed magnitudes of shear stress gradients coupled with their sign reversals may correspond to levels that cause injury to the cell by membrane disruption through impulsive compression and stretching; and (v) for the vessel sizes and flow rates investigated, gravitational effects are negligible.

  12. Automated characterization of blood vessels as arteries and veins in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Mirsharif, Qazaleh; Tajeripour, Farshad; Pourreza, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    In recent years researchers have found that alternations in arterial or venular tree of the retinal vasculature are associated with several public health problems such as diabetic retinopathy which is also the leading cause of blindness in the world. A prerequisite for automated assessment of subtle changes in arteries and veins, is to accurately separate those vessels from each other. This is a difficult task due to high similarity between arteries and veins in addition to variation of color and non-uniform illumination inter and intra retinal images. In this paper a novel structural and automated method is presented for artery/vein classification of blood vessels in retinal images. The proposed method consists of three main steps. In the first step, several image enhancement techniques are employed to improve the images. Then a specific feature extraction process is applied to separate major arteries from veins. Indeed, vessels are divided to smaller segments and feature extraction and vessel classification are applied to each small vessel segment instead of each vessel point. Finally, a post processing step is added to improve the results obtained from the previous step using structural characteristics of the retinal vascular network. In the last stage, vessel features at intersection and bifurcation points are processed for detection of arterial and venular sub trees. Ultimately vessel labels are revised by publishing the dominant label through each identified connected tree of arteries or veins. Evaluation of the proposed approach against two different datasets of retinal images including DRIVE database demonstrates the good performance and robustness of the method. The proposed method may be used for determination of arteriolar to venular diameter ratio in retinal images. Also the proposed method potentially allows for further investigation of labels of thinner arteries and veins which might be found by tracing them back to the major vessels. PMID:23849699

  13. Cardiovascular Patterning as Determined by Hemodynamic Forces and Blood Vessel Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gregory A.; Udan, Ryan S.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Henkelman, R. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular patterning depends on coordinated timing of arteriovenous specification of endothelial cells and the concomitant hemodynamic forces supplied by the onset of cardiac function. Using a combination of 3D imaging by OPT and embryo registration techniques, we sought to identify structural differences between three different mouse models of cardiovascular perturbation. Results Endoglin mutant mice shared a high degree of similarity to Mlc2a mutant mice, which have been shown to have a primary developmental heart defect causing secondary vessel remodeling failures. Dll4 mutant mice, which have well-characterized arterial blood vessel specification defects, showed distinct differences in vascular patterning when compared to the disruptions seen in Mlc2a-/- and Eng-/- models. While Mlc2a-/- and Eng-/- embryos exhibited significantly larger atria than wild-type, Dll4-/- embryos had significantly smaller hearts than wild-type, but this quantitative volume decrease was not limited to the developing atrium. Dll4-/- embryos also had atretic dorsal aortae and smaller trunks, suggesting that the cardiac abnormalities were secondary to primary arterial blood vessel specification defects. Conclusions The similarities in Eng-/- and Mlc2a-/- embryos suggest that Eng-/- mice may suffer from a primary heart developmental defect and secondary defects in vessel patterning, while defects in Dll4-/- embryos are consistent with primary defects in vessel patterning. PMID:26340748

  14. Automated image analysis for measurements of morphological reactions of blood vessels of the microvascular system.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, H J; Mühlig, P; Kühne, C; Läuter, J

    1979-01-01

    Using a modification of the Mg-ATPase reaction, the arterial blood vessels of the microcirculatory bed of the rat including the smallest precapillary vessels are visualized in a grey-level difference against their environment which permits to utilize the automatic image analyser QUANTIMET 720 and the programmable desk-top calculator HEWLETT-PACKARD 9100B. The article describes the method for preparing the sections, the measuring procedure, and the statistical verification of the results by means of the computer assisted two-way analysis of variance as well as studies demonstrating the reliability of the method. It is concluded that the procedure at heart, skeletal muscle and pancreas specimens of the rat demonstrates reliably and effectively changes of the number of vessels and the projected whole vessel wall area as well as differences of enzyme activities. Thus it is possible to detect structural wall reactions and enzyme histochemical changes of arterial blood vessels of the microvasculatory bed including its smallest precapillaries which have been practically inaccessible to histomorphometrical investigations in the past. PMID:157283

  15. A comparison of blood vessel features and local binary patterns for colorectal polyp classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Sebastian; Stehle, Thomas; Behrens, Alexander; Auer, Roland; Aach, Til; Winograd, Ron; Trautwein, Christian; Tischendorf, Jens

    2009-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States of America for both women and men. By means of early detection, the five year survival rate can be up to 90%. Polyps can to be grouped into three different classes: hyperplastic, adenomatous, and carcinomatous polyps. Hyperplastic polyps are benign and are not likely to develop into cancer. Adenomas, on the other hand, are known to grow into cancer (adenoma-carcinoma sequence). Carcinomas are fully developed cancers and can be easily distinguished from adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. A recent narrow band imaging (NBI) study by Tischendorf et al. has shown that hyperplastic polyps and adenomas can be discriminated by their blood vessel structure. We designed a computer-aided system for the differentiation between hyperplastic and adenomatous polyps. Our development aim is to provide the medical practitioner with an additional objective interpretation of the available image data as well as a confidence measure for the classification. We propose classification features calculated on the basis of the extracted blood vessel structure. We use the combined length of the detected blood vessels, the average perimeter of the vessels and their average gray level value. We achieve a successful classification rate of more than 90% on 102 polyps from our polyp data base. The classification results based on these features are compared to the results of Local Binary Patterns (LBP). The results indicate that the implemented features are superior to LBP.

  16. Method to obtain the high contrast images of blood vessel for oxygen saturation calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Chang, Han-Chao; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-06-01

    The skin illuminated of two lights at different wavelength can be applied to detect the oxygen saturation of human blood. Due to the absorption coefficient of oxy- (HbO2) and deoxy- (Hb) hemoglobin are different at the wavelength 660 nm and 890 nm, the transmitted and reflected light within the skin can be used to compute the oxygen saturation image of skin. However, the intensities of skin images illuminated by a 20 mW NIR-LED are too low to determine the position of blood vessel when acquired by the color CCD camera. In order to improve the disadvantages, a mono camera was used and the irradiated distance and angle between LED light and test hand were adjusted to acquire the higher resolution and contrast blood vessel images for the oxygen saturation calculation. In the experiment, we developed the suitable angle to irradiate NIR light is at 75 degrees because the reflected and scattered effect could be generated significantly from both vertical and horizontal direction. In addition, the best contrast vessel images can be obtained when the shutter time is set at 44.030 ms and the irradiated distance was at the range 140-160 mm due to the intensity ratio between tissue and vessel region is the highest and the intensities of image would not be saturated or become too low when these two parameters were adjusted slightly. In future, the proposed parameters and results can be applied to the oxygen saturation measurement in the clinical diagnosis.

  17. On the Role of the Blood Vessel Endothelial Microvilli in the Blood Flow in Small Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, Vladimir; Zueva, Lidia; Sanabria, Priscila; Wessinger, William Dave; Golubeva, Tatiana; Khmelinskii, Igor; Inyushin, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microvilli that protrude into the capillary lumen, although invisible in the optical microscopy, may play an important role in the blood flow control in the capillaries. Because of the plug effects, the width of the gap between the capillary wall and the blood cell is especially critical for the blood flow dynamics in capillaries, while microvilli located on the capillary wall can easily control the velocity of the blood flow. We report that microvilli in the capillaries of different vertebrate species have similar characteristics and density, suggesting similarities between the respective regulation mechanisms. A simplified physical model of the capillary effective diameter control by the microvilli is presented. PMID:26604921

  18. [First aid and initial medical care in injuries of the large blood vessels].

    PubMed

    Cengi?, E

    1997-01-01

    Nowhere as in emergency medicine results of a well done first aid can be more obvious as in the cases of big blood vessels injuries. Properly done first aid and first medical aid at big blood vessels injuries save the life of the patient. The following example is the case of MM patient The patient was received in the Emergency ward after an explosive injury of the big artery vessels and badly done first aid and be was without any signs of life. The patient was treated with: Adrenalin hydrochloride 1 ml intracardial Hydrocortisone amp a 1000 mg i.v. Sol Haemaccel 3 x 500, o ml i.v. Sol Hartman 3 x 500 ml i.v. Na-bicarbonate amp a 40 mg i.v. (2 x 20 mg) 9 bottles of fresh blood (300 ml each) After the intensive cardiopulmonal reanimation the patient after 3 hours he was in a stable general condition and sent to the operation theatre. For proper first aid the methods and activities are very simple but they should be known and implemented. In the opposite case a patient can lose all the blood and die in a hemorrhagic state. PMID:9601782

  19. The Emergence of Blood and Blood Vessels in the Embryo and Its Relevance to Postnatal Biology and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, Tiffany M.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    Blood and blood vessels develop in parallel within mammalian systems, and this temporal and spatial association has led to the confirmation of an endothelial origin of hematopoiesis. The extraembryonic yolk sac and aorto-gonado-mesonephros (AGM) region both contain a specialized population of endothelial cells ("hemogenic endothelium") that function to produce hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, which then differentiate to provide the full complement of blood cells within the developing embryo and furthermore in the adult system. Therefore, this population has great therapeutic potential in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. This chapter reviews the development of the vascular and hematopoietic systems, characterization and function of the hemogenic endothelium within embryonic and embryonic stem cell (ES cell) models, and speculate on the presence of such a population within the adult system. In order to harness this endothelial subtype for clinical application, we must understand both the normal functions of these cells and the potential for misregulation in disease states.

  20. Vascular Patterns in Iguanas and Other Squamates: Blood Vessels and Sites of Thermal Exchange.

    PubMed

    Porter, William Ruger; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    Squamates use the circulatory system to regulate body and head temperatures during both heating and cooling. The flexibility of this system, which possibly exceeds that of endotherms, offers a number of physiological mechanisms to gain or retain heat (e.g., increase peripheral blood flow and heart rate, cooling the head to prolong basking time for the body) as well as to shed heat (modulate peripheral blood flow, expose sites of thermal exchange). Squamates also have the ability to establish and maintain the same head-to-body temperature differential that birds, crocodilians, and mammals demonstrate, but without a discrete rete or other vascular physiological device. Squamates offer important anatomical and phylogenetic evidence for the inference of the blood vessels of dinosaurs and other extinct archosaurs in that they shed light on the basal diapsid condition. Given this basal positioning, squamates likewise inform and constrain the range of physiological thermoregulatory mechanisms that may have been found in Dinosauria. Unfortunately, the literature on squamate vascular anatomy is limited. Cephalic vascular anatomy of green iguanas (Iguana iguana) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection (DCDVI) technique and high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally segmented to create a surface representation of vascular pathways. Known sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in brain and cephalic thermoregulation. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were investigated to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to the dural venous sinuses. Arteries within sites of thermal exchange were found to deliver blood directly and through collateral pathways. The venous drainage was found to have multiple pathways that could influence neurosensory tissue temperature, as well as pathways that would bypass neurosensory tissues. The orbital region houses a large venous sinus that receives cooled blood from the nasal region. Blood vessels from the nasal region and orbital sinus show anastomotic connections to the dural sinus system, allowing for the direct modulation of brain temperatures. The generality of the vascular patterns discovered in iguanas were assessed by firsthand comparison with other squamates taxa (e.g., via dissection and osteological study) as well as the literature. Similar to extant archosaurs, iguanas and other squamates have highly vascularized sites of thermal exchange that likely support physiological thermoregulation that "fine tunes" temperatures attained through behavioral thermoregulation. PMID:26466378

  1. Vascular Patterns in Iguanas and Other Squamates: Blood Vessels and Sites of Thermal Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Porter, William Ruger; Witmer, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamates use the circulatory system to regulate body and head temperatures during both heating and cooling. The flexibility of this system, which possibly exceeds that of endotherms, offers a number of physiological mechanisms to gain or retain heat (e.g., increase peripheral blood flow and heart rate, cooling the head to prolong basking time for the body) as well as to shed heat (modulate peripheral blood flow, expose sites of thermal exchange). Squamates also have the ability to establish and maintain the same head-to-body temperature differential that birds, crocodilians, and mammals demonstrate, but without a discrete rete or other vascular physiological device. Squamates offer important anatomical and phylogenetic evidence for the inference of the blood vessels of dinosaurs and other extinct archosaurs in that they shed light on the basal diapsid condition. Given this basal positioning, squamates likewise inform and constrain the range of physiological thermoregulatory mechanisms that may have been found in Dinosauria. Unfortunately, the literature on squamate vascular anatomy is limited. Cephalic vascular anatomy of green iguanas (Iguana iguana) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection (DCDVI) technique and high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally segmented to create a surface representation of vascular pathways. Known sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in brain and cephalic thermoregulation. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were investigated to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to the dural venous sinuses. Arteries within sites of thermal exchange were found to deliver blood directly and through collateral pathways. The venous drainage was found to have multiple pathways that could influence neurosensory tissue temperature, as well as pathways that would bypass neurosensory tissues. The orbital region houses a large venous sinus that receives cooled blood from the nasal region. Blood vessels from the nasal region and orbital sinus show anastomotic connections to the dural sinus system, allowing for the direct modulation of brain temperatures. The generality of the vascular patterns discovered in iguanas were assessed by firsthand comparison with other squamates taxa (e.g., via dissection and osteological study) as well as the literature. Similar to extant archosaurs, iguanas and other squamates have highly vascularized sites of thermal exchange that likely support physiological thermoregulation that “fine tunes” temperatures attained through behavioral thermoregulation. PMID:26466378

  2. Plasminogen Activator of the Blood Vessels in Tumours and in Carrageenin-induced Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Pick, C. R.; Cater, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    Fibrinolytic activity in tumours was studied by the fibrin slide technique. The tumour cells were inactive and fibrinolysis was seen only in areas with young blood vessels. In carrageenin-induced granulomas at 6 days the fibrinolytic activity was small and confined to mature veins, but from 7-14 days activity was high in zones containing young vessels supplying the terminal capillary buds; these latter showed no activity. In old fibrosed granulomas there was no fibrinolytic activity. The vascular permeability changes of inflammation (detected by the colloidal carbon technique) showed no correlation with fibrinolytic activity, and systemic injection of inflammatory agents had no effect on the fibrinolytic activity of the vessels. These findings are discussed in relationship to tumour vascularization. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 1-4 PMID:5547651

  3. The degree of nonlinearity and anisotropy of blood vessel?elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J.; Fung, Y. C.

    1997-01-01

    Blood vessel elasticity is important to physiology and clinical problems involving surgery, angioplasty, tissue remodeling, and tissue engineering. Nonlinearity in blood vessel elasticity in vivo is important to the formation of solitons in arterial pulse waves. It is well known that the stress–strain relationship of the blood vessel is nonlinear in general, but a controversy exists on how nonlinear it is in the physiological range. Another controversy is whether the vessel wall is biaxially isotropic. New data on canine aorta were obtained from a biaxial testing machine over a large range of finite strains referred to the zero-stress state. A new pseudo strain energy function is used to examine these questions critically. The stress–strain relationship derived from this function represents the sum of a linear stress–strain relationship and a definitely nonlinear relationship. This relationship fits the experimental data very well. With this strain energy function, we can define a parameter called the degree of nonlinearity, which represents the fraction of the nonlinear strain energy in the total strain energy per unit volume. We found that for the canine aorta, the degree of nonlinearity varies from 5% to 30%, depending on the magnitude of the strains in the physiological range. In the case of canine pulmonary artery in the arch region, Debes and Fung [Debes, J. C. & Fung, Y. C.(1995) Am. J. Physiol. 269, H433–H442] have shown that the linear regime of the stress–strain relationship extends from the zero-stress state to the homeostatic state and beyond. Both vessels, however, are anisotropic in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. PMID:9405599

  4. Blood Vessels Pattern Heparan Sulfate Gradients between Their Apical and Basolateral Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Stoler-Barak, Liat; Moussion, Christine; Shezen, Elias; Hatzav, Miki; Sixt, Michael; Alon, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of immune cell trafficking is directional guidance via gradients of soluble or surface bound chemokines. Vascular endothelial cells produce, transport and deposit either their own chemokines or chemokines produced by the underlying stroma. Endothelial heparan sulfate (HS) was suggested to be a critical scaffold for these chemokine pools, but it is unclear how steep chemokine gradients are sustained between the lumenal and ablumenal aspects of blood vessels. Addressing this question by semi-quantitative immunostaining of HS moieties around blood vessels with a pan anti-HS IgM mAb, we found a striking HS enrichment in the basal lamina of resting and inflamed post capillary skin venules, as well as in high endothelial venules (HEVs) of lymph nodes. Staining of skin vessels with a glycocalyx probe further suggested that their lumenal glycocalyx contains much lower HS density than their basolateral extracellular matrix (ECM). This polarized HS pattern was observed also in isolated resting and inflamed microvascular dermal cells. Notably, progressive skin inflammation resulted in massive ECM deposition and in further HS enrichment around skin post capillary venules and their associated pericytes. Inflammation-dependent HS enrichment was not compromised in mice deficient in the main HS degrading enzyme, heparanase. Our results suggest that the blood vasculature patterns steep gradients of HS scaffolds between their lumenal and basolateral endothelial aspects, and that inflammatory processes can further enrich the HS content nearby inflamed vessels. We propose that chemokine gradients between the lumenal and ablumenal sides of vessels could be favored by these sharp HS scaffold gradients. PMID:24465652

  5. Thermal expansion of blood vessels in low cryogenic temperatures Part I: A new experimental device

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rios, Jorge L.; Rabin, Yoed

    2006-01-01

    As part of the ongoing effort to study the mechanical behavior of biological material during cryopreservation processes, the current study focuses on thermal expansion of blood vessels at low cryogenic temperatures. The current paper (Part I) describes a new experimental device for thermal expansion measurements of blood vessels in typical conditions of vitrification, which are associated with rapid cooling rates. For validation purposes, the thermal strain of frozen arteries in the absence of cryoprotectants was measured, and found to be about 10% larger than that of polycrystalline water; this observation agrees with literature data. The companion paper (Part II) reports on experimental results of cryoprotectants permeated with VS55, DP6 and 7.05M DMSO at high cooling rates applicable to vitrification. PMID:16487503

  6. Integrin-Mediated Cell-Matrix Interaction in Physiological and Pathological Blood Vessel Formation

    PubMed Central

    Niland, Stephan; Eble, Johannes A.

    2012-01-01

    Physiological as well as pathological blood vessel formation are fundamentally dependent on cell-matrix interaction. Integrins, a family of major cell adhesion receptors, play a pivotal role in development, maintenance, and remodeling of the vasculature. Cell migration, invasion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are integrin-regulated processes, and the expression of certain integrins also correlates with tumor progression. Recent advances in the understanding of how integrins are involved in the regulation of blood vessel formation and remodeling during tumor progression are highlighted. The increasing knowledge of integrin function at the molecular level, together with the growing repertoire of integrin inhibitors which allow their selective pharmacological manipulation, makes integrins suited as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:21941547

  7. Painting blood vessels and atherosclerotic plaques with an adhesive drug depot

    PubMed Central

    Kastrup, Christian J.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Figueiredo, Jose Luiz; Lee, Haeshin; Kambhampati, Swetha; Lee, Timothy; Cho, Seung-Woo; Gorbatov, Rostic; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Dang, Tram T.; Dutta, Partha; Yeon, Ju Hun; Cheng, Hao; Pritchard, Christopher D.; Vegas, Arturo J.; Siegel, Cory D.; MacDougall, Samantha; Okonkwo, Michael; Thai, Anh; Stone, James R.; Coury, Arthur J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of diseased vasculature remains challenging, in part because of the difficulty in implanting drug-eluting devices without subjecting vessels to damaging mechanical forces. Implanting materials using adhesive forces could overcome this challenge, but materials have previously not been shown to durably adhere to intact endothelium under blood flow. Marine mussels secrete strong underwater adhesives that have been mimicked in synthetic systems. Here we develop a drug-eluting bioadhesive gel that can be locally and durably glued onto the inside surface of blood vessels. In a mouse model of atherosclerosis, inflamed plaques treated with steroid-eluting adhesive gels had reduced macrophage content and developed protective fibrous caps covering the plaque core. Treatment also lowered plasma cytokine levels and biomarkers of inflammation in the plaque. The drug-eluting devices developed here provide a general strategy for implanting therapeutics in the vasculature using adhesive forces and could potentially be used to stabilize rupture-prone plaques. PMID:23236189

  8. In Vivo ?PIV Measurements of Blood Flow in Small Vessels of a Rat Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Conner, Nadine; Russell, John; Legac, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Ongoing research at the University of Wisconsin Medical School is addressing the effects of perfusion of glottal tissue on voice production. Building on the approach developed by Gharib's group at CalTech for embryonic zebra fish, we have modified ?PIV to measure flow in capillaries and small blood vessels in a live rat model. In lieu of seeding particles, the DPIV correlation algorithm tracks the motion of red blood cells moving through these vessels. The methodology will be presented along with a video sequence showing measurements made from muscle tissue laid nominally flat on a microscope stage. Challenges of measurements in three-dimensional geometries, i.e. the throat, will be discussed.

  9. Direct imaging of singlet oxygen luminescence generated in blood vessels during photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lisheng; Lin, Huiyun; Chen, Defu; Chen, Longchao; Wang, Min; Xie, Shusen; Gu, Ying; Wilson, Brian C.; Li, Buhong

    2014-05-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is commonly recognized to be a major phototoxic component for inducing the biological damage during photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study, a novel configuration of a thermoelectrically-cooled near-infrared sensitive InGaAs camera was developed for imaging of photodynamically-generated 1O2 luminescence. The validation of 1O2 luminescence images for solution samples was performed with the model photosensitizer Rose Bengal (RB). Images of 1O2 luminescence generated in blood vessels in vivo in a well-controlled dorsal skinfold window chamber model were also recorded during PDT. This study demonstrated the capacity of the newly-developed imaging system for imaging of 1O2 luminescence, and the first reported images of 1O2 luminescence in blood vessels in vivo. This system has potential for elucidating the mechanisms of vascular targeted PDT.

  10. [Which is right? "Theory of channel" or "Theory of blood vessels"].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Zhong

    2006-10-01

    The ancient medical science of Jingmai (Channel or blood vessel) applied the running sensation along channels of the so-called "Mai" to diagnose and treat diseases. Unfortunately, this had been lost in the Han Dynasty. Related information is recorded in the official history; there are related evidences in the unearthed Mai shu (The Book of Channel) and "Mairen (The Statue of Channel)", including the rediscovery and modern researches on the running sensation along channels; the successful cases of diagnosis and treatment by the method of running sensation along channels. The scholars supported the theory of blood vessel query the above ideas, which need to assemble large numbers of researches of the theory of channel to resolve the problems. PMID:17533700

  11. Angiopoietin-4 increases permeability of blood vessels and promotes lymphatic dilation.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Cristina T; Pereira, Ethel R; Cui, Cheryl H; Nelson, Gregory M; Masuck, David J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P

    2015-09-01

    The angiopoietin (Ang) ligands are potential therapeutic targets for lymphatic related diseases, which include lymphedema and cancer. Ang-1 and Ang-2 functions are established, but those of Ang-4 are poorly understood. We used intravital fluorescence microscopy to characterize Ang-4 actions on T241 murine fibrosarcoma-associated vessels in mice. The diameters of lymphatic vessels draining Ang-4- or VEGF-C (positive control)-expressing tumors increased to 123 and 135 ?m, respectively, and parental, mock-transduced (negative controls) and tumors expressing Ang-1 or Ang-2 remained at baseline (?60 ?m). Ang-4 decreased human dermal lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) monolayer permeability by 27% while increasing human dermal blood endothelial cell (BEC) monolayer permeability by 200%. In vivo, Ang-4 stimulated a 4.5-fold increase in tumor-associated blood vessel permeability compared with control when measured using intravital quantitative multiphoton microscopy. Ang-4 activated receptor signaling in both LECs and BECs, evidenced by tyrosine kinase with Ig and endothelial growth factor homology domains-2 (TIE2) receptor, protein kinase B, and Erk1,2 phosphorylation detectable by immunoblotting. These data suggest that Ang-4 actions are mediated through cell-type-specific networks and that lymphatic vessel dilation occurs secondarily to increased vascular leakage. Ang-4 also promoted survival of LECs. Thus, blocking Ang-4 may prune the draining lymphatic vasculature and decrease interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) by reducing vascular permeability. PMID:25977256

  12. Dual-body magnetic helical robot for drilling and cargo delivery in human blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonseo; Jeon, Seungmun; Nam, Jaekwang; Jang, Gunhee

    2015-05-01

    We propose a novel dual-body magnetic helical robot (DMHR) manipulated by a magnetic navigation system. The proposed DMHR can generate helical motions to navigate in human blood vessels and to drill blood clots by an external rotating magnetic field. It can also generate release motions which are relative rotational motions between dual-bodies to release the carrying cargos to a target region by controlling the magnitude of an external magnetic field. Constraint equations were derived to selectively manipulate helical and release motions by controlling external magnetic fields. The DMHR was prototyped and various experiments were conducted to demonstrate its motions and verify its manipulation methods.

  13. Expansion of bubbles under a pulsatile flow regime in decompressed ovine blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Ran; Marmur, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    After decompression of ovine large blood vessels, bubbles nucleate and expand at active hydrophobic spots on their luminal aspect. These bubbles will be in the path of the blood flow within the vessel, which might replenish the supply of gas-supersaturated plasma in their vicinity and thus, in contrast with our previous estimations, enhance their growth. We used the data from our previous study on the effect of pulsatile flow in ovine blood vessels stretched on microscope slides and photographed after decompression from hyperbaric exposure. We measured the diameter of 46 bubbles in 4 samples taken from 3 blood vessels (pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, and aorta) in which both a "multi-bubble active spot" (MBAS)-which produces several bubbles at a time, and at least one "single-bubble active spot" (SBAS)-which produces a single bubble at a time, were seen together. The linear expansion rate for diameter in SBAS ranged from 0.077 to 0.498mm/min and in MBAS from 0.001 to 0.332mm/min. There was a trend toward a reduced expansion rate for bubbles in MBAS compared with SBAS. The expansion rate for bubbles in an MBAS when it was surrounded by others was very low. Bubble growth is related to gas tension, and under a flow regime, bubbles expand from a diameter of 0.1 to 1mm in 2-24min at a gas supersaturation of 620kPa and lower. There are two phases of bubble development. The slow and disperse initiation of active spots (from nanobubbles to gas micronuclei) continues for more than 1h, whereas the fast increase in size (2-24min) is governed by diffusion. Bubble-based decompression models should not artificially reduce diffusion constants, but rather take both phases of bubble development into consideration. PMID:26592146

  14. Promoting blood vessel growth in ischemic diseases: challenges in translating preclinical potential into clinical success

    PubMed Central

    Dragneva, Galina; Korpisalo, Petra; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenic therapy, which involves the use of an exogenous stimulus to promote blood vessel growth, is an attractive approach for the treatment of ischemic diseases. It has been shown in animal models that the stimulation of blood vessel growth leads to the growth of the whole vascular tree, improvement of ischemic tissue perfusion and improved muscle aerobic energy metabolism. However, very few positive results have been gained from Phase 2 and 3 clinical angiogenesis trials. Many reasons have been given for the failures of clinical trials, including poor transgene expression (in gene-therapy trials) and instability of the vessels induced by therapy. In this Review, we discuss the selection of preclinical models as one of the main reasons why clinical translation has been unsuccessful thus far. This issue has received little attention, but could have had dramatic implications on the expectations of clinical trials. We highlight crucial differences between human patients and animal models with regards to blood flow and pressure, as well as issues concerning the chronic nature of ischemic diseases in humans. We use these as examples to demonstrate why the results from preclinical trials might have overestimated the efficacy of angiogenic therapies developed to date. We also suggest ways in which currently available animal models of ischemic disease could be improved to better mimic human disease conditions, and offer advice on how to work with existing models to avoid overestimating the efficacy of new angiogenic therapies. PMID:23471910

  15. Promoting blood vessel growth in ischemic diseases: challenges in translating preclinical potential into clinical success.

    PubMed

    Dragneva, Galina; Korpisalo, Petra; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-03-01

    Angiogenic therapy, which involves the use of an exogenous stimulus to promote blood vessel growth, is an attractive approach for the treatment of ischemic diseases. It has been shown in animal models that the stimulation of blood vessel growth leads to the growth of the whole vascular tree, improvement of ischemic tissue perfusion and improved muscle aerobic energy metabolism. However, very few positive results have been gained from Phase 2 and 3 clinical angiogenesis trials. Many reasons have been given for the failures of clinical trials, including poor transgene expression (in gene-therapy trials) and instability of the vessels induced by therapy. In this Review, we discuss the selection of preclinical models as one of the main reasons why clinical translation has been unsuccessful thus far. This issue has received little attention, but could have had dramatic implications on the expectations of clinical trials. We highlight crucial differences between human patients and animal models with regards to blood flow and pressure, as well as issues concerning the chronic nature of ischemic diseases in humans. We use these as examples to demonstrate why the results from preclinical trials might have overestimated the efficacy of angiogenic therapies developed to date. We also suggest ways in which currently available animal models of ischemic disease could be improved to better mimic human disease conditions, and offer advice on how to work with existing models to avoid overestimating the efficacy of new angiogenic therapies. PMID:23471910

  16. Accessing the structure and function information of deep skin blood vessels with noninvasive optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhi, Zhongwei; Han, Zhenzhen; Liu, Caihua; Mao, Zongzhen; Wen, Xiang; Zhu, Dan

    2009-02-01

    The occurrence, development and curative effect of many diseases are relative to the structure and function of hypodermic blood vessels. The optical imaging techniques may be available, but suffer from the limited penetration of visible and near infrared light caused by the high scattering of skin. The tissue optical clearing technique based on immersion of tissues into optical clearing agents (OCAs), proposed by Tuchin, can improve the depth to which light penetrates. However, it is still difficult to meet skin in vivo except for OCAs hypodermic injection. In this study, THIAZONE as a new penetration enhancer mixed with polyethylene glycol (PEG-400), was typically applied to rats' skin in vivo. The optical clearing process of skin was monitored with CCD camera, and the deep blood flow information of skin was acquired by using of laser speckle contrast imaging technique. The results show that the skin became transparent after 12 minutes, the vessels were clear. After 40 minutes, acting saline on the interested region, we observed a recovery of the skin. This work is very significant for medical diagnosis since it is able to acquire the structure and function information of blood vessels in deep skin in vivo with non-invasive optical method.

  17. High-resolution in-situ LDV monitoring system for measuring velocity distribution in blood vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Abe, Shotaro; Ishida, Hiroki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Takada, Yogo; Teranishi, Tsunenobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    We herein describe a cross-sectional multiple-point laser Doppler velocimetry (CS-MLDV) system for monitoring blood vessels that are sutured and connected during an operation. In order to observe the condition of a blood vessel during an operation, the previously developed linear MLDV (L-MLDV) system can realize velocity distribution imaging of the carotid artery in a living mouse by means of traverse laser light. We subsequently developed a CS-MLDV system, which can measure the instantaneous two-dimensional (2D) flow velocity, by upgrading the optical components and signal processing used in L-MLDV. The validity of the CS-MLDV results was verified through comparison with the results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The results of the CFD analysis were similar to the experimental results obtained under the same flow field condition. Moreover, an instantaneous 2D velocity distribution can be obtained even for the case of flowing blood. Finally, we carried out in-vivo measurement in a mesenteric vessel of a mouse in order to demonstrate the potential of the CS-MLDV for use in surgery.

  18. Transcranial imaging of functional cerebral hemodynamic changes in single blood vessels using in vivo photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Chin-Teng; Shih, Yen-Yu I; Duong, Timothy Q; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Po-Hsun; Wu, Robby; Tsang, Siny; Chang, Jyh-Yeong; Li, Meng-Lin; Chen, You-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Optical imaging of changes in total hemoglobin concentration (HbT), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) provides a means to investigate brain hemodynamic regulation. However, high-resolution transcranial imaging remains challenging. In this study, we applied a novel functional photoacoustic microscopy technique to probe the responses of single cortical vessels to left forepaw electrical stimulation in mice with intact skulls. Functional changes in HbT, CBV, and SO2 in the superior sagittal sinus and different-sized arterioles from the anterior cerebral artery system were bilaterally imaged with unambiguous 36 × 65-?m2 spatial resolution. In addition, an early decrease of SO2 in single blood vessels during activation (i.e., ‘the initial dip') was observed. Our results indicate that the initial dip occurred specifically in small arterioles of activated regions but not in large veins. This technique complements other existing imaging approaches for the investigation of the hemodynamic responses in single cerebral blood vessels. PMID:22472612

  19. Measuring properties of nanoparticles in embryonic blood vessels: Towards a physicochemical basis for nanotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, Aisling A.; Gregoriou, Yiota; Yaehne, Kristin; Cramb, David T.

    2010-03-01

    The developing field of nanotoxicology aims to relate the physical properties of nanomaterials to potential risk when organisms are exposed to those materials. Regulators are interested in whether a nanoformulation would alter the risk of the native material. It may be that due to the physical nature of embryonic blood vessels (i.e. they are angiogenic and therefore leaky), embryos are at greater risk for bioaccumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) than mature organisms. To study the physicochemical nature of nanoparticle accumulation from embryonic blood vessels, one needs to measure the NP properties in situ, because these properties could be significantly dependent on environment. We have undertaken a study of the dynamics of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and polystyrene nanospheres in the blood vessels of the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). We show proof of principle that fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can be used in this system to determine the concentrations and hydrodynamic radii of NP solutions micro-injected into the CAM.

  20. Sensitivity analysis aimed at blood vessels detection using interstitial optical tomography during brain needle biopsy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Julien; Goyette, Andréanne; Picot, Fabien; Tremblay, Marie-Andrée; Soulez, Gilles; Wilson, Brian C.; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A brain needle biopsy procedure is performed for suspected brain lesions in order to sample tissue that is subsequently analysed using standard histopathology techniques. A common complication resulting from this procedure is brain hemorrhaging from blood vessels clipped off during tissue extraction. Interstitial optical tomography (iOT) has recently been introduced by our group as a mean to assess the presence of blood vessels in the vicinity of the needle. The clinical need to improve safety requires the detection of blood vessels within 2 mm from the outer surface of the needle, since this distance is representative of the volume of tissue that is aspirated durirng tissue extraction. Here, a sensitivity analysis is presented to establish the intrinsic detection limits of iOT based on simulations and experiments using brain tissue phantoms. It is demonstrated that absorbers can be detected with diameters >300 μm located up to >2 mm from the biopsy needle core for bulk optical properties consistent with brain tissue. PMID:26600990

  1. Sensitivity analysis aimed at blood vessels detection using interstitial optical tomography during brain needle biopsy procedures.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Julien; Goyette, Andréanne; Picot, Fabien; Tremblay, Marie-Andrée; Soulez, Gilles; Wilson, Brian C; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    A brain needle biopsy procedure is performed for suspected brain lesions in order to sample tissue that is subsequently analysed using standard histopathology techniques. A common complication resulting from this procedure is brain hemorrhaging from blood vessels clipped off during tissue extraction. Interstitial optical tomography (iOT) has recently been introduced by our group as a mean to assess the presence of blood vessels in the vicinity of the needle. The clinical need to improve safety requires the detection of blood vessels within 2 mm from the outer surface of the needle, since this distance is representative of the volume of tissue that is aspirated durirng tissue extraction. Here, a sensitivity analysis is presented to establish the intrinsic detection limits of iOT based on simulations and experiments using brain tissue phantoms. It is demonstrated that absorbers can be detected with diameters >300 μm located up to >2 mm from the biopsy needle core for bulk optical properties consistent with brain tissue. PMID:26600990

  2. 3-D ultrafast Doppler imaging applied to the noninvasive mapping of blood vessels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Demene, Charlie; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast Doppler imaging was introduced as a technique to quantify blood flow in an entire 2-D field of view, expanding the field of application of ultrasound imaging to the highly sensitive anatomical and functional mapping of blood vessels. We have recently developed 3-D ultrafast ultrasound imaging, a technique that can produce thousands of ultrasound volumes per second, based on a 3-D plane and diverging wave emissions, and demonstrated its clinical feasibility in human subjects in vivo. In this study, we show that noninvasive 3-D ultrafast power Doppler, pulsed Doppler, and color Doppler imaging can be used to perform imaging of blood vessels in humans when using coherent compounding of 3-D tilted plane waves. A customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 3-D ultrafast imaging. Using a 32 × 32, 3-MHz matrix phased array (Vermon, Tours, France), volumes were beamformed by coherently compounding successive tilted plane wave emissions. Doppler processing was then applied in a voxel-wise fashion. The proof of principle of 3-D ultrafast power Doppler imaging was first performed by imaging Tygon tubes of various diameters, and in vivo feasibility was demonstrated by imaging small vessels in the human thyroid. Simultaneous 3-D color and pulsed Doppler imaging using compounded emissions were also applied in the carotid artery and the jugular vein in one healthy volunteer. PMID:26276956

  3. Microcirculation-on-a-Chip: A Microfluidic Platform for Assaying Blood- and Lymphatic-Vessel Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Miwa; Sasaki, Naoki; Ato, Manabu; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Sato, Kiichi; Sato, Kae

    2015-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic model of microcirculation containing both blood and lymphatic vessels for examining vascular permeability. The designed microfluidic device harbors upper and lower channels that are partly aligned and are separated by a porous membrane, and on this membrane, blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were cocultured back-to-back. At cell-cell junctions of both BECs and LECs, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin were detected. The permeability coefficient measured here was lower than the value reported for isolated mammalian venules. Moreover, our results showed that the flow culture established in the device promoted the formation of endothelial cell-cell junctions, and that treatment with histamine, an inflammation-promoting substance, induced changes in the localization of tight and adherens junction-associated proteins and an increase in vascular permeability in the microdevice. These findings indicated that both BECs and LECs appeared to retain their functions in the microfluidic coculture platform. Using this microcirculation device, the vascular damage induced by habu snake venom was successfully assayed, and the assay time was reduced from 24 h to 30 min. This is the first report of a microcirculation model in which BECs and LECs were cocultured. Because the micromodel includes lymphatic vessels in addition to blood vessels, the model can be used to evaluate both vascular permeability and lymphatic return rate. PMID:26332321

  4. Macrophage-Induced Blood Vessels Guide Schwann Cell-Mediated Regeneration of Peripheral Nerves.

    PubMed

    Cattin, Anne-Laure; Burden, Jemima J; Van Emmenis, Lucie; Mackenzie, Francesca E; Hoving, Julian J A; Garcia Calavia, Noelia; Guo, Yanping; McLaughlin, Maeve; Rosenberg, Laura H; Quereda, Victor; Jamecna, Denisa; Napoli, Ilaria; Parrinello, Simona; Enver, Tariq; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Lloyd, Alison C

    2015-08-27

    The peripheral nervous system has remarkable regenerative capacities in that it can repair a fully cut nerve. This requires Schwann cells to migrate collectively to guide regrowing axons across a 'bridge' of new tissue, which forms to reconnect a severed nerve. Here we show that blood vessels direct the migrating cords of Schwann cells. This multicellular process is initiated by hypoxia, selectively sensed by macrophages within the bridge, which via VEGF-A secretion induce a polarized vasculature that relieves the hypoxia. Schwann cells then use the blood vessels as "tracks" to cross the bridge taking regrowing axons with them. Importantly, disrupting the organization of the newly formed blood vessels in vivo, either by inhibiting the angiogenic signal or by re-orienting them, compromises Schwann cell directionality resulting in defective nerve repair. This study provides important insights into how the choreography of multiple cell-types is required for the regeneration of an adult tissue. PMID:26279190

  5. An experimental study to replace the thoracic descending aorta for pigs with a self-made sutureless blood vessel.

    PubMed

    Song, Fenglin; Zhou, Wenwu; Tang, Tao; Li, Xiaobing; Wu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jinfu

    2014-01-01

    To simplify the procedure of blood vessel replacement operation and shorten the vascular anastomosis time, we developed a special artificial blood vessel which can be connected to native blood vessels without suture. The self-made sutureless blood vessel (SMSBV) was made from two titanium connectors and a Gore-Tex graft. To investigate blood compatibility and histocompatibility of the SMSBV, we carried thoracic descending aorta replacement using either SMSBV or Gore-Tex, respectively, in pigs. The aortic clamp time and the operative blood loss in the experimental group (using SMSBV) were less than those in the control group (using Gore-Tex). The whole blood hematocrit, platelet count, plasma soluble P-selectin, plasma free hemoglobin, and interleukins 2, 6 at each time point were not different significantly between the two groups. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy examination showed there were layers of vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells adhered in the inner wall of artificial blood vessel without any signs of thrombosis. Based on the result, we have drawn the conclusion that the application of SMSBV can significantly shorten the vascular anastomosis time, reduce operative blood loss, and show good blood and tissue compatibility. PMID:24696856

  6. An Experimental Study to Replace the Thoracic Descending Aorta for Pigs with a Self-Made Sutureless Blood Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fenglin; Zhou, Wenwu; Tang, Tao; Li, Xiaobing; Wu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jinfu

    2014-01-01

    To simplify the procedure of blood vessel replacement operation and shorten the vascular anastomosis time, we developed a special artificial blood vessel which can be connected to native blood vessels without suture. The self-made sutureless blood vessel (SMSBV) was made from two titanium connectors and a Gore-Tex graft. To investigate blood compatibility and histocompatibility of the SMSBV, we carried thoracic descending aorta replacement using either SMSBV or Gore-Tex, respectively, in pigs. The aortic clamp time and the operative blood loss in the experimental group (using SMSBV) were less than those in the control group (using Gore-Tex). The whole blood hematocrit, platelet count, plasma soluble P-selectin, plasma free hemoglobin, and interleukins 2, 6 at each time point were not different significantly between the two groups. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy examination showed there were layers of vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells adhered in the inner wall of artificial blood vessel without any signs of thrombosis. Based on the result, we have drawn the conclusion that the application of SMSBV can significantly shorten the vascular anastomosis time, reduce operative blood loss, and show good blood and tissue compatibility. PMID:24696856

  7. Lateral deformation and movement effects on flow through distensible tube models of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Delfino, A; Moore, J E; Meister, J J

    1994-01-01

    The fluid flow through a tube with an oscillating elliptical cross-section was analyzed in order to understand better the effects of lateral deformation and movement on flow patterns in large and medium-sized blood vessels. Time-dependent elliptical deformation may be caused by external forces, as is the case for the large vessels near the heart, or by lateral movement of the entire compliant vessel, as in the coronary arteries. An analytic, perturbation-type solution was found for the case of fully developed flow in a tube where the cross-section oscillated periodically from an ellipse to a circle. Analytic expressions were found for all three components of the velocity vector. The effects of the deformation on the axial velocity profile included near-wall fluctuations in velocity that depended on the local wall motion. At higher values of the Womersley parameter, these effects were more pronounced. Secondary flow patterns were established that swirled fluid from the center of the vessel to the walls, then back to the center. It was concluded that these phenomena could be important to flow in the largest vessels, but may not be so important in determining flow patterns in the coronary arteries. PMID:7833456

  8. Preparation and cell affinity of microtubular orientation-structured PLGA(70/30) blood vessel scaffold.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xixue; Shen, Hong; Yang, Fei; Bei, Jianzhong; Wang, Shenguo

    2008-07-01

    In this study, a kind of microtubular orientation-structured blood vessel mimicking natural structure was fabricated with poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(70/30) (PLGA(70/30)) solutions in 1,4-dioxane by an improved thermal-induced phase separation (TIPS) technique. The effect of main factors of the TIPS technique, such as environmental temperature, temperature gradient and concentration of the polymer solution on the structure and morphology of formed vessel scaffold was investigated. It was observed that the outer-wall of the scaffold became thick obviously and the microtubules neighboring the outer-wall became disordered with environmental temperature increasing. The diameter of microtubules of vessel scaffolds reduced with temperature gradient increasing or concentration of the polymer solution increasing. By controlling parameters of the TIPS, the scaffolds with various morphologies could be manufactured, which had different diameters of microtubules. On the other hand, inner-diameter and outer-diameter of the vessel scaffolds could be controlled by adjusting size of the polyethylene mould. Cell affinity of the scaffolds was tested in vitro by using A10 cell as model cells. Results showed that the cells grew well in the vessel scaffolds which were modified by ammonia plasma treatment and then anchored with collagen. The cells could array along the direction of the microtubules. PMID:18439673

  9. Linear and branched perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) isomer patterns differ among several tissues and blood of polar bears.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Alana K; Letcher, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a globally distributed persistent organic pollutant that has been found to bioaccumulate and biomagnify in aquatic food webs. Although principally in its linear isomeric configuration, 21-35% of the PFOS manufactured via electrochemical fluorination is produced as a branched structural isomer. PFOS isomer patterns were investigated in multiple tissues of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland. The liver (n = 9), blood (n = 19), brain (n = 16), muscle (n = 5), and adipose (n = 5) were analyzed for linear PFOS (n-PFOS), as well as multiple mono- and di-trifluoromethyl-substituted branched isomers. n-PFOS accounted for 93.0 ± 0.5% of ?-PFOS isomer concentrations in the liver, whereas the proportion was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the blood (85.4 ± 0.5%). Branched isomers were quantifiable in the liver and blood, but not in the brain, muscle, or adipose. In both the liver and blood, 6-perfluoromethylheptane sulfonate (P6MHpS) was the dominant branched isomer (2.61 ± 0.10%, and 3.26 ± 0.13% of ?-PFOS concentrations, respectively). No di-trifluoromethyl-substituted isomers were detectable in any of the tissues analyzed. These tissue-specific isomer patterns suggest isomer-specific pharmacokinetics, perhaps due to differences in protein affinities, and thus differences in protein interactions, as well transport, absorption, and/or metabolism in the body. PMID:23920361

  10. Spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Masaru; Sato, Shun; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    To realize the non-invasive blood glucose measurement, it will be effective to acquire the spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for eliminating other biological-component's disturbances. Our proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopic imaging can limit the measuring depth into focal plane with high light detection sensitivity. Thus, the proposed method will be suitable for measuring only near the skin surface with detecting weak reflected light from inner biomembrane. But reflectance of skin surface is more than 1000 times larger than inner skin's reflectance. Paying attention on Fresnel reflection, fingers what were illuminated by p-polarized beam from Brewster's angle were observed with crossed-Nicol dark field optics. We successfully acquired spectroscopic characteristics of hemoglobin at vein area near the skin surface.

  11. Spatial resolved diffuse reflection as a tool for determination of size and embedding depth of blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Alexander V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Myllyla, Risto

    2007-07-01

    Spatial resolved diffuse reflectance signals were obtained by Monte Carlo simulation from a cylindrical vessel filled with a suspension of particles mimicking the nonaggregating erythrocytes. The vessel is embedded in a scattering medium with optical properties close to those of human skin. It is shown that due to strong absorption and scattering properties of the blood, a decrease in reflected radiation is maximal directly over the embedded cylinder. This feature makes the technique potentially useful for imaging and sizing the blood vessels. It is also shown that the image blur increases next to linearly with the increase in blood vessel embedding depth. This feature can be used for determining the latter for the vessels with fixed radii and fixed optical properties of the surrounding medium. The optimal position for the laser probe yielding the highest image quality was found.

  12. Advances in probing the blood vessels of the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, E. Mark

    2002-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers a marvelous means to probe the vasculature of the human body non-invasively. The first major advances came when the physics of the effects of motion in MRI were first understood well enough that new methods could be designed to compensate for the motion. This led to the development of MR angiography. The second major advance occurred when a contrast agent was used to enhance the signal from vessels independent of blood flow. This made it possible to image much smaller vessels because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio. The third major advance occurred when the susceptibility of the venous blood was used to create a new contrast unique to veins even in the presence of the contrast agent to enhance their signal. The fourth advance is close behind with the potential to use the susceptibility to measure the local oxygen content. Each of these advances involved some interesting physics and raised questions about local magnetic field effects, some of which remain unanswered yet today. We will show results from the first three levels with hints at how to proceed to the fourth. The development of this technology has important clinical implications. With new higher relaxivity contrast agents and higher field magnets coming on the market, the possibility to image vessels down to on the order of 100 microns may be viable. Each advance has enhanced the range of applications from just imaging vessels to occult vascular disease, trauma, the detection of blood products, and physiologic function of the tissue itself.

  13. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-independent bioactivation of nitroglycerin in porcine and bovine blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Regina; Wölkart, Gerald; Opelt, Marissa; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Hofinger, Marielies; Neubauer, Andrea; Kollau, Alexander; Schmidt, Kurt; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), yielding 1,2-glycerol dinitrate and nitric oxide or a related activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) in rodent and human blood vessels. The essential role of ALDH2 has been confirmed in many studies and is considered as general principle of GTN-induced vasodilation in mammals. However, this view is challenged by an early report showing that diphenyleneiodonium, which we recently characterized as potent ALDH2 inhibitor, has no effect on GTN-induced relaxation of bovine coronary arteries (De La Lande et al., 1996). We investigated this issue and found that inhibition of ALDH2 attenuates GTN-induced coronary vasodilation in isolated perfused rat hearts but has no effect on relaxation to GTN of bovine and porcine coronary arteries. This observation is explained by low levels of ALDH2 protein expression in bovine coronary arteries and several types of porcine blood vessels. ALDH2 mRNA expression and the rates of GTN denitration were similarly low, excluding a significant contribution of ALDH2 to the bioactivation of GTN in these vessels. Attempts to identify the responsible pathway with enzyme inhibitors did not provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of ALDH3A1, cytochrome P450, or GSH-S-transferase. Thus, the present manuscript describes a hitherto unrecognized pathway of GTN bioactivation in bovine and porcine blood vessels. If present in the human vasculature, this pathway might contribute to the therapeutic effects of organic nitrates that are not metabolized by ALDH2. PMID:25576686

  14. Thin and open vessel windows for intra-vital fluorescence imaging of murine cochlear blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaorui; Zhang, Fei; Urdang, Zachary; Dai, Min; Neng, Lingling; Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Normal microvessel structure and function in the cochlea is essential for maintaining the ionic and metabolic homeostasis required for hearing function. Abnormal cochlear microcirculation has long been considered an etiologic factor in hearing disorders. A better understanding of cochlear blood flow (CoBF) will enable more effective amelioration of hearing disorders that result from aberrant blood flow. However, establishing the direct relationship between CoBF and other cellular events in the lateral wall and response to physio-pathological stress remains a challenge due to the lack of feasible interrogation methods and difficulty in accessing the inner ear. Here we report on new methods for studying the CoBF in a mouse model using a thin or open vessel-window in combination with fluorescence intra-vital microscopy (IVM). An open vessel-window enables investigation of vascular cell biology and blood flow permeability, including pericyte (PC) contractility, bone marrow cell migration, and endothelial barrier leakage, in wild type and fluorescent protein-labeled transgenic mouse models with high spatial and temporal resolution. Alternatively, the thin vessel-window method minimizes disruption of the homeostatic balance in the lateral wall and enables study CoBF under relatively intact physiological conditions. A thin vessel-window method can also be used for time-based studies of physiological and pathological processes. Although the small size of the mouse cochlea makes surgery difficult, the methods are sufficiently developed for studying the structural and functional changes in CoBF under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24780131

  15. Vascularization of normal and neoplastic tissues grafted to the chick chorioallantois. Role of host and preexisting graft blood vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Ausprunk, D. H.; Knighton, D. R.; Folkman, J.

    1975-01-01

    Adult, embryonic, and tumor tissues were grafted to the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo to determine whether blood vessels originally within implants were reused in the establishment of a new blood supply. Grafts were examined daily by in vivo stereomicroscopy and in histologic sections. Colloidal carbon injections into the host vasculature served to confirm the precise onset of graft circulation; Preexisting tumor blood vessels disintegrated by 24 hours after implantation and revascularization occurred at 3 days by penetration of proliferating host vessels into the tumor tissue. Adult tissues did not revascularize, and the original graft vasculature progressively disintegrated during the 9 days of observation, Most embryonic tissues revascularized in 1 or 2 days by reperfusion of the existing graft vasculature. Anastomosis of host and graft blood vessels seemed to result from connections between newly formed vascular sprouts arising from both vasculatures. This study indicates that only tumor grafts acquire their blood supply solely by formation of new blood vessels from the host microvasculature. By contrast revascularization of normal tissues, when it does occur, is predominately the result of perfusion of the preexisting graft blood vessels. Images Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 13 Fig 14 Fig 15 Fig 16 Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 PMID:1094838

  16. Quantitative metabolic profiling of NMR spectral signatures of branched chain amino acids in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumita; Sengupta, Arjun; Chandra, Kousik

    2015-10-01

    Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs) are related to different aspects of diseases like pathogenesis, diagnosis and even prognosis. While in some diseases, levels of all the BCAAs are perturbed; in some cases, perturbation occurs in one or two while the rest remain unaltered. In case of ischemic heart disease, there is an enhanced level of plasma leucine and isoleucine but valine level remains unaltered. In 'Hypervalinemia', valine is elevated in serum and urine, but not leucine and isoleucine. Therefore, identification of these metabolites and profiling of individual BCAA in a quantitative manner in body-fluid like blood plasma/serum have long been in demand. (1)H NMR resonances of the BCAAs overlap with each other which complicates quantification of individual BCAAs. Further, the situation is limited by the overlap of broad resonances of lipoprotein with the resonances of BCAAs. The widely used commercially available kits cannot differentially estimate the BCAAs. Here, we have achieved proper identification and characterization of these BCAAs in serum in a quantitative manner employing a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-based technique namely T2-edited Correlation Spectroscopy (COSY). This approach can easily be extended to other body fluids like bile, follicular fluids, saliva, etc. PMID:25991390

  17. Dynamic Quantitative Intravital Imaging of Glioblastoma Progression Reveals a Lack of Correlation between Tumor Growth and Blood Vessel Density

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Clément; Stanchi, Fabio; Rodriguez, Thieric; Amoureux, Marie-Claude; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal and longitudinal monitoring of cellular processes occurring in tumors is critical for oncological research. We focused on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an untreatable highly vascularized brain tumor whose progression is thought to critically depend on the oxygen and metabolites supplied by blood vessels. We optimized protocols for orthotopic GBM grafting in mice that were able to recapitulate the biophysical constraints normally governing tumor progression and were suitable for intravital multiphoton microscopy. We repeatedly imaged tumor cells and blood vessels during GBM development. We established methods for quantitative correlative analyses of dynamic imaging data over wide fields in order to cover the entire tumor. We searched whether correlations existed between blood vessel density, tumor cell density and proliferation in control tumors. Extensive vascular remodeling and the formation of new vessels accompanied U87 tumor cell growth, but no strong correlation was found between local cell density and the extent of local blood vessel density irrespective of the tumor area or time points. The technique moreover proves useful for comparative analysis of mice subjected either to Bevacizumab anti-angiogenic treatment that targets VEGF or to AMD3100, an antagonist of CXCR4 receptor. Bevacizumab treatment massively reduced tumoral vessel densities but only transiently reduced U87 tumor growth rate. Again, there was no correlation between local blood vessel density and local cell density. Moreover, Bev applied only prior to tumor implantation inhibited tumor growth to the same extent as post-grafting treatment. AMD3100 achieved a potent inhibition of tumor growth without significant reduction in blood vessel density. These results indicate that in the brain, in this model, tumor growth can be sustained without an increase in blood vessel density and suggest that GBM growth is rather governed by stromal properties. PMID:24069154

  18. Are Retinal Vessels Calibers Influenced by Blood Pressure Measured at the Time of Retinography Acquisition?

    PubMed Central

    Pakter, Helena M.; Maestri, Marcelo K.; Beltrami-Moreira, Marina; Gus, Miguel; Moreira, Leila B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinal arterial narrowing is associated with higher office blood pressure (BP) and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, but it is still unknown if the vessel caliber is associated with BP measured at the time of retinography acquisition. Methods Retinal arteriolar and venular calibers were measured by the microdensitometric method in 448 patients with hypertension. Participants underwent 24-hours ambulatory blood pressure (24-h ABP) monitoring simultaneously with the retinography acquisition. Association between arteriolar and venular calibers with increase of 10 mmHg in the mean 24-hours, daily, and nightly BP, and with BP measured at the time of retinography, was evaluated by ANOVA and multivariate analyses. Results Mean 24-hours, daytime and nighttime systolic and diastolic BP were inversely associated with the arteriolar caliber, but not with the venular caliber. Arteriolar caliber decreased -0.8 (95% CI -1.4 to -0.2) μm per 10-mmHg increase in 24-hours mean systolic BP, adjusted for age, gender, fellow vessel, and duration of hypertension (P = 0.01). The corresponding decreasing in arteriolar caliber by 10 mmHg of increasing in mean diastolic BP was -1.1 μm (-2.0 to -0.2, P = 0.02). The decrease of arteriolar caliber by the same increasing of BP measured at the time of retinography was lower and not statistically significant, particularly for mean diastolic BP and outer arterioles calibers: -1.0 (-1.8 to -0.2) μm in the daytime BP average versus -0.3 (-0.9 to 0.3) at the moment of retinography acquisition. Conclusions These findings suggest that the caliber of arteriolar retinal vessels in patients with uncontrolled hypertension are not significantly influenced by blood pressure measured at the time of retinography acquisition. PMID:26375034

  19. An accurate, convective energy equation based automated meshing technique for analysis of blood vessels and tissues.

    PubMed

    White, J A; Dutton, A W; Schmidt, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    An automated three-element meshing method for generating finite element based models for the accurate thermal analysis of blood vessels imbedded in tissue has been developed and evaluated. The meshing method places eight noded hexahedral elements inside the vessels where advective flows exist, and four noded tetrahedral elements in the surrounding tissue. The higher order hexahedrals are used where advective flow fields occur, since high accuracy is required and effective upwinding algorithms exist. Tetrahedral elements are placed in the remaining tissue region, since they are computationally more efficient and existing automatic tetrahedral mesh generators can be used. Five noded pyramid elements connect the hexahedrals and tetrahedrals. A convective energy equation (CEE) based finite element algorithm solves for the temperature distributions in the flowing blood, while a finite element formulation of a generalized conduction equation is used in the surrounding tissue. Use of the CEE allows accurate solutions to be obtained without the necessity of assuming ad hoc values for heat transfer coefficients. Comparisons of the predictions of the three-element model to analytical solutions show that the three-element model accurately simulates temperature fields. Energy balance checks show that the three-element model has small, acceptable errors. In summary, this method provides an accurate, automatic finite element gridding procedure for thermal analysis of irregularly shaped tissue regions that contain important blood vessels. At present, the models so generated are relatively large (in order to obtain accurate results) and are, thus, best used for providing accurate reference values for checking other approximate formulations to complicated, conjugated blood heat transfer problems. PMID:10763743

  20. Regulation of Cellular Communication by Signaling Microdomains in the Blood Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Billaud, Marie; Lohman, Alexander W.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Biwer, Lauren A.; Mutchler, Stephanie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the accumulation of proteins in specific regions of the plasma membrane can facilitate cellular communication. These regions, termed signaling microdomains, are found throughout the blood vessel wall where cellular communication, both within and between cell types, must be tightly regulated to maintain proper vascular function. We will define a cellular signaling microdomain and apply this definition to the plethora of means by which cellular communication has been hypothesized to occur in the blood vessel wall. To that end, we make a case for three broad areas of cellular communication where signaling microdomains could play an important role: 1) paracrine release of free radicals and gaseous molecules such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; 2) role of ion channels including gap junctions and potassium channels, especially those associated with the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization mediated signaling, and lastly, 3) mechanism of exocytosis that has considerable oversight by signaling microdomains, especially those associated with the release of von Willebrand factor. When summed, we believe that it is clear that the organization and regulation of signaling microdomains is an essential component to vessel wall function. PMID:24671377

  1. Blood vessel ultrastructural picture in a CADASIL patient diagnosed at an advanced age.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Eliza; Felczak, Paulina; Buczek, Julia; Gramza, Karolina; Rafa?owska, Janina

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of an 84-year-old male patient afflicted by cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) showing minimal symptoms of disease. The patient was diagnosed on the basis of ultrastructural and genetic examinations. Ultrastructurally, a typical vascular pathology was found. However, in abnormal capillary vessel walls no granular osmiophilic material (GOM) was found. In the arteriole there were only a few GOM deposits that revealed various structures, of which only some resembled typical round GOM. The arteriolar walls showed severe damage, including fragmentation, degeneration and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with numerous deposits of elastin, mucosubstances, different granular debris, as well as collagen fibres in the basement membrane. Lysosomal inclusions with fingerprint morphology, atypical for CADASIL, were located in some of the VSMCs. Very old age at the onset of the disease may suggest that morphological changes in blood vessels, described in this report, may be due to both the disease and the patient's age. To our best knowledge it is the first description of pathology of blood vessels and GOM morphology in a CADASIL patient diagnosed at an advanced age. PMID:25574750

  2. Magnetic navigation system for the precise helical and translational motions of a microrobot in human blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, S. M.; Jang, G. H.; Choi, H. C.; Park, S. H.; Park, J. O.

    2012-04-01

    Different magnetic navigation systems (MNSs) have been investigated for the wireless manipulation of microrobots in human blood vessels. Here we propose a MNS and methodology for generation of both the precise helical and translational motions of a microrobot to improve its maneuverability in complex human blood vessel. We then present experiments demonstrating the helical and translational motions of a spiral-type microrobot to verify the proposed MNS.

  3. Understanding How Space Travel Affects Blood Vessels: Arterial Remodeling and Functional Adaptations Induced by Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, Michael; Vasques, Marilyn; Aquilina, Rudy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ever rise quickly from the couch to get something from the kitchen and suddenly feel dizzy? With a low heart rate and relaxed muscles, the cardiovascular system does not immediately provide the resistance necessary to keep enough blood going to your head. Gravity wins, at least for a short time, before your heart and blood vessels can respond to the sudden change in position and correct the situation. Actually, the human cardiovascular system is quite well adapted to the constant gravitational force of the Earth. When standing, vessels in the legs constrict to prevent blood from collecting in the lower extremities. In the space environment, the usual head-to-foot blood pressure and tissue fluid gradients that exist during the upright posture on Earth are removed. The subsequent shift in fluids from the lower to the upper portions of the body triggers adaptations within the cardiovascular system to accommodate the new pressure and fluid gradients. In animal models that simulate microgravity, the vessels in the head become more robust while those in the lower limbs become thin and lax. Similar changes may also occur in humans during spaceflight and while these adaptations are appropriate for a microgravity environment, they can cause problems when the astronauts return to Earth or perhaps another planet. Astronauts often develop orthostatic intolerance which means they become dizzy or faint when standing upright. This dizziness can persist for a number of days making routine activities difficult. In an effort to understand the physiological details of these cardiovascular adaptations, Dr. Michael Delp at Texas A&M University, uses the rat as a model for his studies. For the experiment flown on STS-107, he will test the hypothesis that blood vessels in the rats' hindlimbs become thinner, weaker, and constrict less in response to pressure changes and to chemical signals when exposed to microgravity. In addition, he will test the hypothesis that arteries in the brain become thicker as a result of microgravity-induced fluid shifts toward the head.

  4. Tissue-engineered blood vessels as promising tools for testing drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Truskey, George A; Fernandez, Cristina E

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) is a serious problem in preclinical studies of vasoactive molecules and for survivors of pediatric cancers. DIVI is often observed in rodents and some larger animals, primarily with drugs affecting vascular tone, but not in humans; however, DIVI observed in animal studies often precludes a drug candidate from continuing along the development pipeline. Thus, there is great interest by the pharmaceutical industry to identify quantifiable human biomarkers of DIVI. Small-scale endothelialized tissue-engineered blood vessels using human cells represent a promising approach to screen drug candidates and develop alternatives to cancer therapeutics in vitro. We identify several technical challenges that remain to be addressed, including high-throughput systems to screen large numbers of candidates, identification of suitable cell sources and establishing and maintaining a differentiated state of the vessel wall cells. Adequately addressing these challenges should yield novel platforms to screen drugs and develop new therapeutics to treat cardiovascular disease. PMID:26028128

  5. PERIPHERAL NERVE-DERIVED CXCL12 AND VEGF-A REGULATE THE PATTERNING OF ARTERIAL VESSEL BRANCHING IN DEVELOPING LIMB SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenling; Kohara, Hiroshi; Uchida, Yutaka; James, Jennifer M.; Soneji, Kosha; Cronshaw, Darran G.; Zou, Yong-Rui; Nagasawa, Takashi; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In developing limb skin, peripheral nerves provide a spatial template that controls the branching pattern and differentiation of arteries. Our previous studies indicate that nerve-derived VEGF-A is required for arterial differentiation but not for nerve-vessel alignment. In this study, we demonstrate that nerve-vessel alignment depends on the activity of Cxcl12-Cxcr4 chemokine signaling. Genetic inactivation of Cxcl12-Cxcr4 signaling perturbs nerve-vessel alignment, and abolishes arteriogenesis. Further in vitro assays allow us to uncouple nerve-vessel alignment and arteriogenesis, revealing that nerve-derived Cxcl12 stimulates endothelial cell migration, while nerve-derived VEGF-A is responsible for arterial differentiation. These findings suggest a coordinated sequential action in which nerve-Cxcl12 functions over a distance to recruit vessels to align with nerves and subsequent arterial differentiation presumably requires a local-action of nerve-VEGF-A in the nerve-associated vessels. PMID:23395391

  6. Mechanisms of ATP release and signalling in the blood vessel wall

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Alexander W.; Billaud, Marie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine 5?-triphosphate (ATP) has classically been considered the cell's primary energy currency. Importantly, a novel role for ATP as an extracellular autocrine and/or paracrine signalling molecule has evolved over the past century and extensive work has been conducted to characterize the ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors expressed on almost all cell types in the body. Extracellular ATP elicits potent effects on vascular cells to regulate blood vessel tone but can also be involved in vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. While the effects of purinergic signalling in the vasculature have been well documented, the mechanism(s) mediating the regulated release of ATP from cells in the blood vessel wall and circulation are now a key target of investigation. The aim of this review is to examine the current proposed mechanisms of ATP release from vascular cells, with a special emphasis on the transporters and channels involved in ATP release from vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, circulating red blood cells, and perivascular sympathetic nerves, including vesicular exocytosis, plasma membrane F1/F0-ATP synthase, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, connexin hemichannels, and pannexin channels. PMID:22678409

  7. Correlation mapping method of OCT for visualization blood vessels in brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotova, O. A.; Kalyanov, A. L.; Lychagov, V. V.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.

    2013-11-01

    The burning issue in modern medicine is the diagnosis and treatment of various life-threatening diseases, in particular the diseases of brain. One of them is intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). It occurs especially among newborn babies and is hard-diagnosed. In order to understand the nature of the ICH, the microcirculation of blood, which serves key functions within the body, is analyzed. On this basis a series of experiments was done, in the results of which it was showed, that latent stage of ICH is characterized by decrease of venous blood outflow and the loss of sensitivity of sagittal vein to vasoconstrictor effect of adrenaline. So, stress-related changes of the cerebral venous blood flow (CVBF) can be the source of this disease. In this paper registration CVBF was made with the help of commercially available Thorlabs Swept Source OCT System, using the correlation mapping method. In this method values of correlation coefficient of several images are analyzed. In the result of the algorithm the correlation map was obtained. By the resulting map the diameter of vessels was calculated, which is necessary for examination of effects of adrenalin to the vessels and identification symptoms of ICH.

  8. Launch Conditions Might Affect the Formation of Blood Vessel in the Quail Chorioallantoic Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, M. K.; Unsworth, B. R.; Sychev, B. R.; Guryeva, T. S.; Dadasheva, O. A.; Piert, S. J.; Lagel, K. E.; Dubrovin, L. C.; Jahns, G. C.; Boda, K.; Sabo, V.; Samet, M. M.; Lelkes, P. I.

    1998-01-01

    AS 2 part of the first joint USA-Russian MIR/Shuttle program, fertilized quail eggs were flown on the MIR 18 mission. Post-flight examination indicated impaired survival of both the embryos in space and also of control embryos exposed to vibrational and g-forces simulating the conditions experienced during the launch of Progress 227. We hypothesized that excess mechanical forces and/or other conditions during the launch might cause abnormal development of the blood supply in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) leading to the impaired survival of the embryos. The CAM, a highly vascularized extraembryonic organ, provides for the oxygen exchange across the egg shell and is thus pivotal for proper embryonic development. To test our hypothesis, we compared angiogenesis In CAMS of eggs which were either exposed to the vibration and g-force profile simulating the conditions at launch of Progress 227 (synchronous controls), or kept under routine conditions in a laboratory Incubator (laboratory controls). At various time points during Incubation, the eggs were fixed in paraformaldehyde for subsequent dissection. At the time of dissection, the CAM was carefully lifted from the egg shell and examined as whole mounts by bright-field and fluorescent microscopy. The development or the vasculature (angiogenesis) was assessed from the density of blood vessels per viewing field and evaluated by computer aided image analysis. We observed a significant decrease In blood-vessel density in the synchronous controls versus "normal" laboratory controls beginning from day 10 of Incubation. The decrease in vascular density was restricted to the smallest vessels only, suggesting that conditions during the launch and/or during the subsequent Incubation of the eggs may affect the normal progress of angiogenesis in the CAM. Abnormal angiogenesis In the CAM might contribute to the impaired survival of the embryos observed in synchronous controls as well as in space.

  9. Regional heterogeneity in the reactivity of equine small pulmonary blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Stack, Alice; Derksen, Frederik J; Williams, Kurt J; Robinson, N Edward; Jackson, William F

    2016-03-15

    Regional differences in large equine pulmonary artery reactivity exist. It is not known if this heterogeneity extends into small vessels. The hypothesis that there is regional heterogeneity in small pulmonary artery and vein reactivity to sympathomimetics (phenylephrine and isoproterenol) and a parasympathomimetic (methacholine) was tested using wire myography on small vessels from caudodorsal (CD) and cranioventral (CV) lung of 12 horses [9 mares, 3 geldings, 8.67 ± 0.81 (age ± SE) yr, of various breeds that had never raced]. To study relaxation, vessels were precontracted with U46619 (10(-6) M). Methacholine mechanism of action was investigated using l-nitroarginine methylester (l-NAME, 100 μM) and indomethacin (10 μM). Phenylephrine did not contract any vessels. Isoproterenol relaxed CD arteries more than CV arteries (maximum relaxation 28.18% and 48.67%; Log IC50 ± SE -7.975 ± 0.1327 and -8.033 ± 0.1635 for CD and CV, respectively, P < 0.0001), but not veins. Methacholine caused contraction of CD arteries (maximum contraction 245.4%, Log EC50 ± SE -6.475 ± 0.3341), and relaxation of CV arteries (maximum relaxation 40.14%, Log IC50 ± SE -6.791 ± 0.1954) and all veins (maximum relaxation 50.62%, Log IC50 ± SE -6.932 ± 0.1986) in a nonregion-dependent manner. l-NAME (n = 8, P < 0.0001) and indomethacin (n = 7, P < 0.0001) inhibited methacholine-induced relaxation of CV arteries, whereas indomethacin augmented CD artery contraction (n = 8, P < 0.0001). Our data demonstrate significant regional heterogeneity in small blood vessel reactivity when comparing the CD to the CV region of the equine lung. PMID:26769957

  10. Microglia-blood vessel interactions: a double-edged sword in brain pathologies.

    PubMed

    Dudvarski Stankovic, Nevenka; Teodorczyk, Marcin; Ploen, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Schmidt, Mirko H H

    2016-03-01

    Microglia are long-living resident immune cells of the brain, which secure a stable chemical and physical microenvironment necessary for the proper functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). These highly dynamic cells continuously scan their environment for pathogens and possess the ability to react to damage-induced signals in order to protect the brain. Microglia, together with endothelial cells (ECs), pericytes and astrocytes, form the functional blood-brain barrier (BBB), a specialized endothelial structure that selectively separates the sensitive brain parenchyma from blood circulation. Microglia are in bidirectional and permanent communication with ECs and their perivascular localization enables them to survey the influx of blood-borne components into the CNS. Furthermore, they may stimulate the opening of the BBB, extravasation of leukocytes and angiogenesis. However, microglia functioning requires tight control as their dysregulation is implicated in the initiation and progression of numerous neurological diseases. Disruption of the BBB, changes in blood flow, introduction of pathogens in the sensitive CNS niche, insufficient nutrient supply, and abnormal secretion of cytokines or expression of endothelial receptors are reported to prime and attract microglia. Such reactive microglia have been reported to even escalate the damage of the brain parenchyma as is the case in ischemic injuries, brain tumors, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. In this review, we present the current state of the art of the causes and mechanisms of pathological interactions between microglia and blood vessels and explore the possibilities of targeting those dysfunctional interactions for the development of future therapeutics. PMID:26711460

  11. The effect of complex exercise rehabilitation program on body composition, blood pressure, blood sugar, and vessel elasticity in elderly women with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Ok; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Kozyreva, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify what kind of effects complex exercise rehabilitation program has on body composition of female, blood pressure, blood sugar, blood vessel elasticity and find more effective complex exercise program for elderly females. The subjects are selected 30 females applicants in exercise program in City of G and not restricted in mobility to perform the exercise without any particular disorders. Exercise program is a combination of aerobic and strength training with different ratio, for the first 6 months focused on strength training complex exercise, and for next 6 months focused on aerobic exercise. Except for strength training and aerobic exercise, durations for strength, rest, and wrapping-up are equal. The frequency of experiments is 90 min each, 2 times per a week. Body composition, blood pressure, and blood vessel elasticity are tested pre and post experiment to compare the effectiveness of both complex exercises. As results, in the complex exercise program focused on strength training, weight, percent body fat, fat mass, waist hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic pressure increased. Blood vessel elasticity maintained its level or slightly decreased. In the complex exercise focused on aerobic exercise, weight, percent body fat, fat mass, waist hip ratio, systolic pressure, and diastolic pressure decreased. Blood vessel elasticity on left foot and right foot are slightly different. Therefore, aerobic exercise is more effective than strength training for old obese females. PMID:24409428

  12. The effect of complex exercise rehabilitation program on body composition, blood pressure, blood sugar, and vessel elasticity in elderly women with obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Ok; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Kozyreva, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify what kind of effects complex exercise rehabilitation program has on body composition of female, blood pressure, blood sugar, blood vessel elasticity and find more effective complex exercise program for elderly females. The subjects are selected 30 females applicants in exercise program in City of G and not restricted in mobility to perform the exercise without any particular disorders. Exercise program is a combination of aerobic and strength training with different ratio, for the first 6 months focused on strength training complex exercise, and for next 6 months focused on aerobic exercise. Except for strength training and aerobic exercise, durations for strength, rest, and wrapping-up are equal. The frequency of experiments is 90 min each, 2 times per a week. Body composition, blood pressure, and blood vessel elasticity are tested pre and post experiment to compare the effectiveness of both complex exercises. As results, in the complex exercise program focused on strength training, weight, percent body fat, fat mass, waist hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic pressure increased. Blood vessel elasticity maintained its level or slightly decreased. In the complex exercise focused on aerobic exercise, weight, percent body fat, fat mass, waist hip ratio, systolic pressure, and diastolic pressure decreased. Blood vessel elasticity on left foot and right foot are slightly different. Therefore, aerobic exercise is more effective than strength training for old obese females. PMID:24409428

  13. Prominent expression of sialyl Lewis X-capped core 2-branched O-glycans on high endothelial venule-like vessels in gastric MALT lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Motohiro; Mitoma, Junya; Hoshino, Hitomi; Yu, Shin-Yi; Shimojo, Yasuyo; Suzawa, Kenichi; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Fukuda, Minoru; Nakayama, Jun

    2011-01-01

    High endothelial venule (HEV)-like vessels have been observed in gastric B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type (MALT lymphoma), as well as in its preceding lesion, chronic Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Previously we reported that glycans on HEV-like vessels in the latter lesion served as L-selectin ligands. However, the biochemical and functional nature of glycans on HEV-like vessels in gastric MALT lymphoma remained to be determined. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical analysis for sialyl Lewis X (sLeX)-related glycoepitopes using three monoclonal antibodies MECA-79, HECA-452, and NCC-ST-439, and found that MECA-79?/HECA-452+/NCC-ST-439+ HEV-like vessels preferentially appears in gastric MALT lymphoma compared to chronic H. pylori gastritis, suggesting that appearance of MECA-79?/HECA-452+/NCC-ST-439+ HEV-like vessels marks gastric MALT lymphoma. We then constructed a set of CHO cell lines expressing possible MECA-79?/HECA-452+/NCC-ST-439+ glycans, as well as other sLeX-type glycans, on CD34, and evaluated L-selectin binding to those cells using L-selectin•IgM chimera binding and lymphocyte adhesion assays. L-selectin•IgM chimeras bound to CHO cells expressing 6-sulfo sLeX attached to core 2-branched O-glycans with or without 6-sulfo sLeX attached to extended core 1 O-glycans but only marginally to other CHO cell lines. On the other hand, CHO cells expressing 6-sulfo sLeX attached to extended core 1 and/or core 2-branched O-glycans, and also non-sulfated sLeX attached to core 2-branched O-glycans showed substantial lymphocyte binding, while binding was negligible on cell lines expressing 6-sulfo and non-sulfated sLeX attached to N-glycans and non-sulfated sLeX attached to extended core 1 O-glycans. These results indicate that MECA-79?/HECA-452+/NCC-ST-439+ glycans, namely 6-sulfo and non-sulfated sLeXs attached to core 2-branched O-glycans, expressed on HEV-like vessels in gastric MALT lymphoma, function as L-selectin ligands and likely contribute to H. pylori-specific T-cell recruitment in the progression of gastric MALT lymphoma. PMID:21432854

  14. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Greaby, Robyn; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-28

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis.

  15. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaby, Robyn; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis.

  16. [Paravasal connective tissue of the in-wall blood vessels of the heart during aging].

    PubMed

    Nikel', V V; Kasimtsev, A A; Efremova, V P

    2012-01-01

    The structural organization of the paravasal connective tissue of the in-wall myocardial blood vessels in the stages of postnatal ontogenesis was studied. The study was carried out on preparations of the heart 80 corpses of men in three age groups (the first period of adulthood (n = 20) and elderly (n = 30) and old (n = 30) ages.) The peculiarities of the structure as well as qualitative and quantitative transformation of fibrous component of the paravasal connective tissue in each age period were revealed. PMID:23734505

  17. Localization of calcium stimulated adenosine triphosphatase activity in blood vessels of the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.

    1985-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme found in bone forming cells which decreases in certain bones as a result of hypogravity or non-weight bearing. This enzyme can also hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate. Therefore, an effort was made to localize calcium-stimulated ATPase by cytochemistry to determine whether altered bone cell activity might be related to changing calcium levels which occur during hypogravity. The results indicate that Ca(++)-ATPase is largely found along the endothelium and basal lamina of blood vessels, and not found in bone forming cells. This suggests that calcium regulation in the vicinity of bone formation may be modulated by the vasculature of the area.

  18. Growing A Living Blood Vessel: insights for the second hundred years

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Luke P; Bufallino, Dominick; Ucuzian, Areck; Greisler, Howard P

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death worldwide, and the prevelance of cardiovascular disease has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Not surprisingly this has led to an increasing number of vascular procedures annually. Unfortunately, the success of these procedures over time continues to limit their longterm effects. Biomedical engineering approaches to improve upon current prosthetic grafts, developing new prosthetic grafts, and in creating tissue engineered blood vessels for clinical application offer hope of improving the durability of vascular interventions and improving patients’ treatment for cardiovascular disease. PMID:17706765

  19. A blood vessel model constructed from collagen and cultured vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, C B; Bell, E

    1986-01-24

    A model of a blood vessel was constructed in vitro. Its multilayered structure resembled that of an artery and it withstood physiological pressures. Electron microscopy showed that the endothelial cells lining the lumen and the smooth muscle cells in the wall were healthy and well differentiated. The lining of endothelial cells functioned physically, as a permeability barrier, and biosynthetically, producing von Willebrand's factor and prostacyclin. The strength of the model depended on its multiple layers of collagen integrated with a Dacron mesh. PMID:2934816

  20. Flowing microbubble manipulation in blood vessel phantom using ultrasonic standing wave with stepwise frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Aiwei; Min, Yu; Wan, Mingxi

    2013-10-01

    An approach was demonstrated to gather, fix, and controllably shift flowing microbubbles in a blood vessel phantom. An ultrasonic standing wave field was generated by the superposition of the emission of a 5 MHz conventional transducer and the reflection from a bone surface. The acoustic radiation force gathered flowing microbubbles into the nodes, fixed some accumulated microbubble clusters in the flow condition, and shifted microbubbles to target site with stepwise frequency. The resolution of microbubble shift was approximately 4 ?m, and the low acoustic pressure range was from 4 to 16 kPa to avoid microbubble rupture.

  1. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  2. Disturbance and repair of solitary waves in blood vessels with aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noubissié, S.; Kraenkel, R. A.; Woafo, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of a local increase of radius followed by local variation of the thickness or rigidity of an elastic tube on the behavior of solitary waves. The basic equations for the analysis is a set of Boussinesq-type equations derived from the flow equations in elastic tubes. It is found that the increase in rigidity and thickness reduces the effects of the tube local enlargement on the amplitude of waves. Attention is paid to the aneurysmal affection of blood vessels where there is an increase in rigidity due to calcification or an increase of thickness due to thromboses. It thus comes that those effects contribute to the regeneration of blood waves and can merge the effects of the disease.

  3. Cerebral blood flow quantification using vessel-encoded arterial spin labeling

    PubMed Central

    Okell, Thomas W; Chappell, Michael A; Kelly, Michael E; Jezzard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques are gaining popularity for visualizing and quantifying cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a range of patient groups. However, most ASL methods lack vessel-selective information, which is important for the assessment of collateral flow and the arterial supply to lesions. In this study, we explored the use of vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous ASL (VEPCASL) with multiple postlabeling delays to obtain individual quantitative CBF and bolus arrival time maps for each of the four main brain-feeding arteries and compared the results against those obtained with conventional pseudocontinuous ASL (PCASL) using matched scan time. Simulations showed that PCASL systematically underestimated CBF by up to 37% in voxels supplied by two arteries, whereas VEPCASL maintained CBF accuracy since each vascular component is treated separately. Experimental results in healthy volunteers showed that there is no systematic bias in the CBF estimates produced by VEPCASL and that the signal-to-noise ratio of the two techniques is comparable. Although more complex acquisition and image processing is required and the potential for motion sensitivity is increased, VEPCASL provides comparable data to PCASL but with the added benefit of vessel-selective information. This could lead to more accurate CBF estimates in patients with a significant collateral flow. PMID:23921895

  4. Discrimination between two different grades of human glioma based on blood vessel infrared spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Katia; Forfar, Isabelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2015-09-01

    Gliomas are brain tumours classified into four grades with increasing malignancy from I to IV. The development and the progression of malignant glioma largely depend on the tumour vascularization. Due to their tissue heterogeneity, glioma cases can be difficult to classify into a specific grade using the gold standard of histological observation, hence the need to base classification on a quantitative and reliable analytical method for accurately grading the disease. Previous works focused specifically on vascularization study by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, proving this method to be a way forward to detect biochemical changes in the tumour tissue not detectable by visual techniques. In this project, we employed FTIR imaging using a focal plane array (FPA) detector and globar source to analyse large areas of glioma tumour tissue sections via molecular fingerprinting in view of helping to define markers of the tumour grade. Unsupervised multivariate analysis (hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis) of blood vessel spectral data, retrieved from the FPA images, revealed the fine structure of the borderline between two areas identified by a pathologist as grades III and IV. Spectroscopic indicators are found capable of discriminating different areas in the tumour tissue and are proposed as biomolecular markers for potential future use of grading gliomas. Graphical Abstract Infrared imaging of glioma blood vessels provides a means to revise the pathologists' line of demarcation separating grade III (GIII) from grade IV (GIV) parts. PMID:26168973

  5. Three Dimensional Endoscopic Image of a Blood Vessel Using High Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Kamada, Kumi; Chihara, Kunihiro; Secomski, Wojciech; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a high frequency ultrasound (US) imaging system for observation of small tissues and a virtual endoscopic image of a blood vessel. This system consists of a US probe with a central frequency of 32 MHz, a microscope table designed to collect some slices of US brightness mode (B-mode) images, a transmitter containing control logic and a receiver circuit and a personal computer (PC) with an analog to digital (AD) converter. First, US B-mode images with high spatial resolution were obtained by shifting a measurement plane at a constant step of 0.075 mm. Second, three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction was performed with linear interpolation and a volume rendering technique. Finally, the point of view of the 3-D image was set in the human body and a virtual endoscopic image was presented. The experimental results present a blood vessel as if an ultrasound probe were inserted in it and reveal the anatomical structure under skin.

  6. Scaffold-free, Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youngmee; Ji, HaYeun; Chen, Zaozao; Fai Chan, Hon; Atchison, Leigh; Klitzman, Bruce; Truskey, George; Leong, Kam W.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBV) can serve as vascular grafts and may also play an important role in the development of organs-on-a-chip. Most TEBV construction involves scaffolding with biomaterials such as collagen gel or electrospun fibrous mesh. Hypothesizing that a scaffold-free TEBV may be advantageous, we constructed a tubular structure (1 mm i.d.) from aligned human mesenchymal cell sheets (hMSC) as the wall and human endothelial progenitor cell (hEPC) coating as the lumen. The burst pressure of the scaffold-free TEBV was above 200 mmHg after three weeks of sequential culture in a rotating wall bioreactor and perfusion at 6.8 dynes/cm2. The interwoven organization of the cell layers and extensive extracellular matrix (ECM) formation of the hMSC-based TEBV resembled that of native blood vessels. The TEBV exhibited flow-mediated vasodilation, vasoconstriction after exposure to 1 μM phenylephrine and released nitric oxide in a manner similar to that of porcine femoral vein. HL-60 cells attached to the TEBV lumen after TNF-α activation to suggest a functional endothelium. This study demonstrates the potential of a hEPC endothelialized hMSC-based TEBV for drug screening. PMID:26456074

  7. An Original Approach for Quantification of Blood Vessels on the Whole Tumour Section

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nga Tran; Elie, Nicolas; Plancoulaine, Benoît; Herlin, Paulette; Coster, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Relative abundance of tumour angiogenesis has been shown to be of clinical relevance in cancers of various locations such as the ovary. Nevertheless, several problems are encountered when quantifying tumour microvessels: (i) as many other tumour markers, vascularity pattern is often heterogeneous within the tumour mass and even within the same histological section. As a consequence, an adequate acquisition method must be developed for accurate field sampling. (ii) Manual microvessel counting is long, tedious and subject to poor reproducibility. Introduction in routine practice requires a fast, reproducible and reliable automatic image processing. In this study we present an original procedure combining a slide scanner image acquisition and a fully automatic image analysis sequence. The slide scanner offers the advantage of recording an image of the whole histological section for subsequent automatic blood vessel detection and hot spot area location. Microvessel density and surface fraction were measured for the whole section as well as within hot spots. Different immunostaining methods were tested in order to optimise the procedure. Moreover, the method proposed was submitted to a quality control procedure, with reference to interactive identification of microvessels at scanner level. This experiment showed that 93 to 97% of blood vessels were detected, according to the staining protocol used. Colour figures can be viewed on http://www.esacp.org/acp/2003/25?2/kim.htm. PMID:12632015

  8. Scaffold-free, Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youngmee; Ji, HaYeun; Chen, Zaozao; Fai Chan, Hon; Atchison, Leigh; Klitzman, Bruce; Truskey, George; Leong, Kam W

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBV) can serve as vascular grafts and may also play an important role in the development of organs-on-a-chip. Most TEBV construction involves scaffolding with biomaterials such as collagen gel or electrospun fibrous mesh. Hypothesizing that a scaffold-free TEBV may be advantageous, we constructed a tubular structure (1?mm i.d.) from aligned human mesenchymal cell sheets (hMSC) as the wall and human endothelial progenitor cell (hEPC) coating as the lumen. The burst pressure of the scaffold-free TEBV was above 200?mmHg after three weeks of sequential culture in a rotating wall bioreactor and perfusion at 6.8 dynes/cm(2). The interwoven organization of the cell layers and extensive extracellular matrix (ECM) formation of the hMSC-based TEBV resembled that of native blood vessels. The TEBV exhibited flow-mediated vasodilation, vasoconstriction after exposure to 1??M phenylephrine and released nitric oxide in a manner similar to that of porcine femoral vein. HL-60 cells attached to the TEBV lumen after TNF-? activation to suggest a functional endothelium. This study demonstrates the potential of a hEPC endothelialized hMSC-based TEBV for drug screening. PMID:26456074

  9. Interaction of a dual-wavelength laser system with cutaneous blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaron, Boris; Milani?, Matija; Nelson, J. S.

    2007-07-01

    Our working hypothesis is that a dual-wavelength Nd:YAG laser, emitting simultaneously at 1064 and 532 nm, may induce stronger heating of PWS blood vessels relative to the epidermis than the customary KTP laser, due to conversion of hemoglobin to met-hemoglobin in the target blood vessels and the associated increase in NIR absorption. We apply pulsed photothermal radiometry to determine temperature depth profiles induced in PWS lesions by a dual-wavelength laser at sub-therapeutic radiant exposures. The results indicate no effect at 1 ms pulse duration and low radiant exposures (1-2 J/cm2). Increased radiant exposure (3-4 J/cm2) and extended pulse duration (20-25 ms) result in increased energy deposition. In addition, two PWS lesions and one healthy skin site were irradiated at incrementally increasing radiant exposures, up to 9 J/cm2. Analysis of the laser-induced temperature profiles clearly revealed irreversible changes of tissue properties. Formation of met-hemoglobin and consequent increase of IR absorption was however not reliably detected.

  10. Investigation of the cerebral hemodynamic response function in single blood vessels by functional photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Chin-Teng; Shih, Yen-Yu I.; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Zhao, Wan-Ting; Duong, Timothy Q.; Chang, Jyh-Yeong; Chen, You-Yin; Li, Meng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The specificity of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) is determined spatially by the vascular architecture and temporally by the evolution of hemodynamic changes. Here, we used functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM) to investigate single cerebral blood vessels of rats after left forepaw stimulation. In this system, we analyzed the spatiotemporal evolution of the HRFs of the total hemoglobin concentration (HbT), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2). Changes in specific cerebral vessels corresponding to various electrical stimulation intensities and durations were bilaterally imaged with 36×65-?m2 spatial resolution. Stimulation intensities of 1, 2, 6, and 10 mA were applied for periods of 5 or 15 s. Our results show that the relative functional changes in HbT, CBV, and SO2 are highly dependent not only on the intensity of the stimulation, but also on its duration. Additionally, the duration of the stimulation has a strong influence on the spatiotemporal characteristics of the HRF as shorter stimuli elicit responses only in the local vasculature (smaller arterioles), whereas longer stimuli lead to greater vascular supply and drainage. This study suggests that the current fPAM system is reliable for studying relative cerebral hemodynamic changes, as well as for offering new insights into the dynamics of functional cerebral hemodynamic changes in small animals. PMID:22734740

  11. DSA Image Blood Vessel Skeleton Extraction Based on Anti-concentration Diffusion and Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Wu, Jian; Feng, Daming; Cui, Zhiming

    Serious types of vascular diseases such as carotid stenosis, aneurysm and vascular malformation may lead to brain stroke, which are the third leading cause of death and the number one cause of disability. In the clinical practice of diagnosis and treatment of cerebral vascular diseases, how to do effective detection and description of the vascular structure of two-dimensional angiography sequence image that is blood vessel skeleton extraction has been a difficult study for a long time. This paper mainly discussed two-dimensional image of blood vessel skeleton extraction based on the level set method, first do the preprocessing to the DSA image, namely uses anti-concentration diffusion model for the effective enhancement and uses improved Otsu local threshold segmentation technology based on regional division for the image binarization, then vascular skeleton extraction based on GMM (Group marching method) with fast sweeping theory was actualized. Experiments show that our approach not only improved the time complexity, but also make a good extraction results.

  12. A sandwich tubular scaffold derived from chitosan for blood vessel tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Ao, Qiang; Wang, Aijun; Lu, Guangyuan; Kong, Lijun; Gong, Yandao; Zhao, Nanming; Zhang, Xiufang

    2006-05-01

    Many materials have been investigated in blood vessel tissue engineering, such as PGA, PLGA, P4HB. However, chitosan is not mentioned in the arena. This study aimed to develop a chitosan-based tubular scaffold and examine its feasibility of being applied in this field. Briefly, a knitted chitosan tube was dipped into chitosan solution (2%, w/v) and dried, then its inner and outer surface was mantled with a layer of chitosan/gelatin (4:1, w/w) complex solution, and then freeze-dehydrated. In vitro characterization showed that the scaffold had a wall of 1.0 mm in thickness with a sandwich structure, and a porosity of 81.2%. The pore diameter was 50-150 microm and could be regulated by varying freezing conditions. The scaffold possessed proper swelling property, burst strength of almost 4000 mmHg, and high suture-retention strength. After degradation for 2 months, the scaffold could maintain enough mechanical strength with an average mass loss of 18.7%. Vascular smooth muscle cells could spread and grow very well on the scaffold. This study provided a novel method to fabricate chitosan and its complex into a tubular scaffold and demonstrated the feasibility of the scaffold employed in the field of blood vessel tissue engineering. PMID:16400655

  13. A chemically modified antibody mediates complete eradication of tumours by selective disruption of tumour blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, A; Hauler, F; Dziunycz, P; Schwager, K; Soltermann, A; Pretto, F; Alonso, C; Hofbauer, G F; Boyle, R W; Neri, D

    2011-01-01

    Background: The possibility of eradicating cancer by selective destruction of tumour blood vessels may represent an attractive therapeutic avenue, but most pharmaceutical agents investigated so far did not achieve complete cures and are not completely specific. Antibody conjugates now allow us to evaluate the impact of selective vascular shutdown on tumour viability and to study mechanisms of action. Methods: We synthesised a novel porphyrin-based photosensitiser suitable for conjugation to antibodies and assessed anticancer properties of its conjugate with L19, a clinical-stage human monoclonal antibody specific to the alternatively spliced EDB domain of fibronectin, a marker of tumour angiogenesis. Results: Here we show in two mouse model of cancer (F9 and A431) that L19 is capable of highly selective in vivo localisation around tumour blood vessels and that its conjugate with a photosensitiser allows selective disruption of tumour vasculature upon irradiation, leading to complete and long-lasting cancer eradication. Furthermore, depletion experiments revealed that natural killer cells are essential for the induction of long-lasting complete responses. Conclusions: These results reinforce the concept that vascular shutdown can induce a curative avalanche of tumour cell death. Immuno-photodynamic therapy may be particularly indicated for squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, which we show to be strongly positive for markers of angiogenesis. PMID:21386847

  14. Ultrasonic imaging of foreign inclusions and blood vessels through thick skull bones.

    PubMed

    Shapoori, Kiyanoosh; Sadler, Jeffrey; Ahmed, Zaki; Wydra, Adrian; Maeva, Elena; Malyarenko, Eugene; Maev, Roman

    2015-03-01

    We report a new progress in the development of a portable ultrasonic transcranial imaging system, which is expected to significantly improve the clinical utility of transcranial diagnostic ultrasound. When conventional ultrasonic phased array and Doppler techniques are applied through thick skull bones, the ultrasound field is attenuated, deflected, and defocused, leading to image distortion. To address these deficiencies, the ultrasonic transcranial imaging system implements two alternative ultrasonic methods. The first method improves detection of small foreign objects, such as bone fragments, pieces of shrapnel, or bullets, lodged in the brain tissue. Using adaptive beamforming, the method compensates for phase aberration induced by the skull and refocuses the distorted ultrasonic field at the desired location. The second method visualizes the blood flow through intact human skull using ultrasonic speckle reflections from the blood cells, platelets, or contrast agents. By analyzing these random temporal changes, it is possible to obtain 2D or 3D blood flow images, despite the adverse influence of the skull. Both methods were implemented on an advanced open platform phased array controller driving linear and matrix array probes. They were tested on realistic skull bone and head phantoms with foreign inclusions and blood vessel models. PMID:25747641

  15. In Situ Tissue Engineering of Functional Small-Diameter Blood Vessels by Host Circulating Cells Only.

    PubMed

    Talacua, Hanna; Smits, Anthal I P M; Muylaert, Dimitri E P; van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; Vink, Aryan; Verhaar, Marianne C; Driessen-Mol, Anita; van Herwerden, Lex A; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Kluin, Jolanda; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation is a natural phase of the wound healing response, which can be harnessed for the in situ tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels using instructive, bioresorbable synthetic grafts. This process is dependent on colonization of the graft by host circulating cells and subsequent matrix formation. Typically, vascular regeneration in small animals is governed by transanastomotic cell ingrowth. However, this process is very rare in humans and hence less relevant for clinical translation. Therefore, a novel rat model was developed, in which cell ingrowth from the adjacent tissue is inhibited using Gore-Tex sheathing. Using this model, our aim here was to prove that functional blood vessels can be formed in situ through the host inflammatory response, specifically by blood-borne cells. The model was validated by implanting sex-mismatched aortic segments on either anastomoses of an electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) graft, filled with fibrin gel, into the rat abdominal aorta. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis revealed that after 1 and 3 months in vivo, over 90% of infiltrating cells originated from the bloodstream, confirming the effective shielding of transanastomotic cell ingrowth. Using the validated model, PCL/fibrin grafts were implanted, either or not loaded with monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and cell infiltration and tissue development were investigated at various key time points in the healing cascade. A phased healing response was observed, initiated by a rapid influx of inflammatory cells, mediated by the local release of MCP-1. After 3 months in vivo, the grafts consisted of a medial layer with smooth muscle cells in an oriented collagen matrix, an intimal layer with elastin fibers, and confluent endothelium. This study proves the regenerative potential of cells in the circulatory system in the setting of in situ vascular tissue engineering. PMID:26200255

  16. Myocardial blood flow assessment with 82rubidium-PET imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Andréa; Chalela, William; Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Imada, Rodrigo; Soares, José; Do Val, Renata; Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Izaki, Marisa; Filho, Roberto Kalil; Meneghetti, José C

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Perfusion abnormalities are frequently seen in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) when a left bundle branch block is present. A few studies have shown decreased coronary flow reserve in the left anterior descending territory, regardless of the presence of coronary artery disease. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate rubidium-82 (82Rb) positron emission tomography imaging in the assessment of myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve in patients with left bundle branch block. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with left bundle branch block (GI), median age 63.5 years, 22 (58%) female, 12 with coronary artery disease (?70%; GI-A) and 26 with no evidence of significant coronary artery disease (GI-B), underwent rest-dipyridamole stress 82Rb-positron emission tomography with absolute quantitative flow measurements using Cedars-Sinai software (mL/min/g). The relative myocardial perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction were assessed in 17 segments. These parameters were compared with those obtained from 30 patients with normal 82Rb-positron emission tomography studies and without left bundle branch block (GII). RESULTS: Stress myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve were significantly lower in GI than in GII (p<0.05). The comparison of coronary flow reserve between GI-A and GI-B showed that it was different from the global coronary flow reserve (p<0.05) and the stress flow was significantly lower in the anterior than in the septal wall for both groups. Perfusion abnormalities were more prevalent in GI-A (p=0.06) and the left ventricular ejection fraction was not different between GI-A and GI-B, whereas it was lower in GI than in GII (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The data confirm that patients with left bundle branch block had decreased myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve and coronary flow reserve assessed by 82Rb-positron emission tomography imaging may be useful in identifying coronary artery disease in patients with left bundle branch block. PMID:26602518

  17. Prominent expression of sialyl Lewis X-capped core 2-branched O-glycans on high endothelial venule-like vessels in gastric MALT lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motohiro; Mitoma, Junya; Hoshino, Hitomi; Yu, Shin-Yi; Shimojo, Yasuyo; Suzawa, Kenichi; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Fukuda, Minoru; Nakayama, Jun

    2011-05-01

    High endothelial venule (HEV)-like vessels have been observed in gastric B cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type (MALT lymphoma), as well as in its preceding lesion, chronic Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Previously we reported that glycans on HEV-like vessels in the latter lesion served as L-selectin ligands, although their function is unclear. We have investigated sialyl Lewis X (sLeX)-related glycoepitopes and found that MECA-79(-) /HECA-452(+) /NCC-ST-439(+) HEV-like vessels preferentially mark gastric MALT lymphoma compared to chronic H. pylori gastritis. We then constructed CHO cell lines expressing potential MECA-79(-) /HECA-452(+) /NCC-ST-439(+) glycans, as well as other sLeX-type glycans, on CD34 and evaluated L-selectin binding to those cells, using L-selectin-IgM chimera binding and lymphocyte adhesion assays. L-selectin-IgM chimeras bound to CHO cells expressing 6-sulpho-sLeX attached to core 2-branched O-glycans with or without 6-sulpho-sLeX attached to extended core 1 O-glycans, but only marginally to other CHO cell lines. By contrast, CHO cells expressing 6-sulpho-sLeX attached to extended core 1 and/or core 2-branched O-glycans, as well as non-sulphated sLeX attached to core 2-branched O-glycans, showed substantial lymphocyte binding, while binding was negligible on lines expressing 6-sulpho- and non-sulphated sLeX attached to N-glycans and non-sulphated sLeX attached to extended core 1 O-glycans. These results indicate that MECA-79(-) /HECA-452(+) /NCC-ST-439(+) glycans, specifically, 6-sulpho- and non-sulphated sLeXs attached to core 2-branched O-glycans, expressed on HEV-like vessels in gastric MALT lymphoma function as L-selectin ligands and likely contribute to H. pylori-specific T cell recruitment in the progression of gastric MALT lymphoma. PMID:21432854

  18. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.E. Allen, S.; Chang, A.P.Y.; Henderson, H.; Hobson, G.C.; Karania, B.; Morgan, K.N.; Pek, A.S.Y.; Raghvani, K.; Shee, C.Y.; Shikotra, J.; Street, E.; Abbas, Z.; Ellis, K.; Heer, J.K.; Alexander, S.P.H.

    2013-11-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), a widely-used herbal medicine, has been reported to have a wide range of biological effects, including smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of representative compounds from chamomile (apigenin, luteolin, (−)-α-bisabolol, farnesene, umbelliferone; 3–30 μM) on vascular tone using porcine coronary and splenic arteries mounted for isometric tension recording in isolated tissue baths and precontracted with the thromboxane-mimetic U46619. Apigenin, luteolin, and (−)-α-bisabolol produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in both the coronary and splenic arteries that were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase or potassium channels. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the relaxations to all three compounds, and these compounds also inhibited calcium re-addition-evoked contractions, indicating that the relaxation response may be mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Apigenin and luteolin, but not (−)-α-bisabolol, enhanced the relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, indicating that apigenin and luteolin may act to regulate cyclic GMP levels. Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient relaxation in the splenic artery, but not the coronary artery, that was inhibited by L-NAME and removal of the endothelium, suggesting an influence on nitric oxide production. Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. In conclusion, hydroxylated compounds (apigenin, luteolin and (−)-α-bisabolol) found in chamomile all caused a slow relaxation of isolated blood vessels through an effect on calcium influx. Umbelliferone, on the other hand, produced a rapid, transient relaxation dependent upon release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. - Highlights: • Apigenin, luteolin, and (-)-α-bisabolol are present in chamomile. • They produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in arteries. • These relaxations were associated with an inhibition of calcium entry. • Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. • Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient nitric oxide-dependent relaxation.

  19. Comparison of the number of gingival blood vessels between type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis patients: An immunohistological study

    PubMed Central

    Penmetsa, Gautami Subhadra; Baddam, Satyanarayana; Manyam, Ravikanth; Dwarakanath, Chinni Doraswamy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The relationship between diabetes and periodontitis has been studied for more than 50 years and is generally agreed that the periodontal disease is more prevalent in diabetic patients compared to nondiabetics. Vascular changes like increased thickness of basement membrane in small vessels has been reported in diabetic patients, but the quantity of blood vessels in gingiva of diabetic patients has not been discussed much. The aim of this study was to compare the number of blood vessels in gingiva between chronic periodontitis (CP) patients, CP with diabetes (type 2), and normal healthy gingiva. Materials and Methods: The study included 75 patients, divided into three groups of 25 patients each-Group I with healthy periodontium (HP), Group II with CP, and Group III with CP with diabetes mellitus (CPDM). Gingival biopsies were obtained from the subjects undergoing crown lengthening procedure for Group I, and in patients with CP and in CPDM biopsies were collected from teeth undergoing extraction. Sections were prepared for immune histochemical staining with CD34. Results: Difference was observed in the average number of blood vessels when compared between HP, CP, and CPDM groups. Statistical significant difference was observed when the HP and CP groups and HP and CPDM groups were compared. Conclusion: The results of the study indicated that the number of blood vessels in gingival connective tissue is significantly higher in CP and CPDM patients. PMID:26015666

  20. Low level arsenic promotes progressive inflammatory angiogenesis and liver blood vessel remodeling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Adam C.; Stolz, Donna B.; Vin, Harina; Ross, Mark A.; Soucy, Nicole V.; Klei, Linda R.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2007-08-01

    The vascular effects of arsenic in drinking water are global health concerns contributing to human disease worldwide. Arsenic targets the endothelial cells lining blood vessels, and endothelial cell activation or dysfunction may underlie the pathogenesis of both arsenic-induced vascular diseases and arsenic-enhanced tumorigenesis. The purpose of the current studies was to demonstrate that exposing mice to drinking water containing environmentally relevant levels of arsenic promoted endothelial cell dysfunction and pathologic vascular remodeling. Increased angiogenesis, neovascularization, and inflammatory cell infiltration were observed in Matrigel plugs implanted in C57BL/6 mice following 5-week exposures to 5-500 ppb arsenic [Soucy, N.V., Mayka, D., Klei, L.R., Nemec, A.A., Bauer, J.A., Barchowsky, A., 2005. Neovascularization and angiogenic gene expression following chronic arsenic exposure in mice. Cardiovasc.Toxicol 5, 29-42]. Therefore, functional in vivo effects of arsenic on endothelial cell function and vessel remodeling in an endogenous vascular bed were investigated in the liver. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) became progressively defenestrated and underwent capillarization to decrease vessel porosity following exposure to 250 ppb arsenic for 2 weeks. Sinusoidal expression of PECAM-1 and laminin-1 proteins, a hallmark of capillarization, was also increased by 2 weeks of exposure. LSEC caveolin-1 protein and caveolae expression were induced after 2 weeks of exposure indicating a compensatory change. Likewise, CD45/CD68-positive inflammatory cells did not accumulate in the livers until after LSEC porosity was decreased, indicating that inflammation is a consequence and not a cause of the arsenic-induced LSEC phenotype. The data demonstrate that the liver vasculature is an early target of pathogenic arsenic effects and that the mouse liver vasculature is a sensitive model for investigating vascular health effects of arsenic.

  1. Production of extracellular matrix components in tissue-engineered blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Esguerra, Maricris; Helenius, Gisela; Söderberg, Rigmor; Johansson, Bengt R; Risberg, Bo

    2006-04-01

    Morphology and compliance of tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBV) are dependent on the culture period and production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components in order to increase the strength of the developing tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential of TEBVs to produce an ECM similar to native arteries and veins. Human smooth muscle cells (SMC) were seeded onto the poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) scaffold and placed in bioreactors filled with DMEM supplemented with growth factors. After 6 weeks, the vessels were harvested from the bioreactors and seeded with human endothelial cells at the lumen for another 3 days. Then, the TEBVs were harvested for RNA and protein isolation for further RT-PCR and Western blot. TEBVs had a similar macroscopic appearance to that of native vessels with no visible evidence of the original PGA. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses indicated the presence of high cell density and development of a highly organized structure of ECM. After 6 weeks of culture, there were significantly lower gene expression of SMC-specific markers, such as alpha-actin, caldesmon, and vimentin, and proteoglycans, such as biglycan, decorin, and versican, and other ECM components, such as collagen I and elastin, in TEBVs, with and without pulsatile conditions, compared to that of native arteries. Gene expression of fibronectin was significantly lower in TEBVs grown during pulsatile conditions compared to that of native arteries. No difference was observed in TEBVs grown during non-pulsatile conditions. The presence of alpha-actin, collagen I, decorin, and fibronectin at protein level was demonstrated in TEBVs with and without pulsatile conditions after 6 weeks and in native veins and arteries as well. How this deviation translates into mechanical properties remains to be explored. PMID:16674296

  2. Effects of norplant on endometrial tissue factor expression and blood vessel structure.

    PubMed

    Runic, R; Schatz, F; Wan, L; Demopoulos, R; Krikun, G; Lockwood, C J

    2000-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding after Norplant administration is primarily responsible for the high discontinuation rate of this safe and effective long-acting implantable progestin-only contraceptive agent. Although tissue factor (TF) is the primary initiator of hemostasis, previous studies indicated that Norplant-associated bleeding persists despite relatively high TF levels in the stromal compartment. Recently, we determined that progestin-enhanced TF expression during decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells involves both the epidermal growth factor receptor and progesterone receptor (PR]. The current study evaluated TF levels in endometrial bleeding (BL) and nonbleeding (NBL) sites obtained by camera-guided hysteroscopy during Norplant contraception. After 1 yr of therapy, immunohistochemical TF levels were unexpectedly higher at BL than at NBL sites. Use of immunohistochemistry and Western blotting indicated that both sites displayed elevated epidermal growth factor receptor levels and that the BL sites exhibited high levels of the PR, as well as the PR(A) and the PR(B) isoforms. Microscopic examination of 1-yr biopsies revealed that significantly larger numbers of enlarged, distended vessels were present in BL, compared with NBL sites. Elevated TF levels and abnormally enlarged blood vessels in the BL sites are consistent with the recently discovered angiogenic role of TF. By promoting aberrant angiogenesis, chronic endometrial overexpression of TF could produce fragile vessels, which are at increased risk to bleed. Analysis of endometrial BL and NBL sites, during Norplant contraception, offers the potential of elucidating local mechanisms that control enhanced TF expression, leading to abnormal angiogenesis at specific endometrial sites. PMID:11061549

  3. Imaging of blood vessels with CCD-camera based three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuster, Robert; Slezak, Paul; Paltauf, Guenther

    2014-03-01

    An optical phase contrast full field detection setup in combination with a CCD-camera is presented to record acoustic fields for real-time projection and fast three-dimensional imaging. When recording projection images of the wave pattern around the imaging object, the three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging problem is reduced to a set of two-dimensional reconstructions and the measurement setup requires only a single axis of rotation. Using a 10 Hz pulse laser system for photoacoustic excitation a three dimensional image can be obtained in less than 1 min. The sensitivity and resolution of the detection system was estimated experimentally with 5 kPa mm and 75?m, respectively. Experiments on biological samples show the applicability of this technique for the imaging of blood vessel distributions.

  4. Wrong theories on the origin of blood vessels: Polybus and De Natura Hominis.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios; Ardalan, Mohammad R

    2008-06-01

    Polybus of Cos (approximately 400 B.C.) was the son-in-law and the successor of Hippocrates. He is credited with founding the school of Dogmatism, and writing "The Nature of Man" which was important in advancing the theory of the four body humors (humoralism). Some earlier scholars negated Polybus' role as an independent medical figure. However, Corpus Aristotelicum quoted him as having a unique theory regarding the body vasculature which stated that this system was composed of four pairs of blood vessels originating from the head and that these supplied the whole body. In an interpretation of this theory, we opined that numerological mysticism might have been the common motive for both Hippocrates' humoralism and Polybus' theory of the vasculature. A discussion on this issue is presented. PMID:18164081

  5. Potential Applications of Untethered Microdevices in the Blood Vessels within the Constraints of an MRI System.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, J B; Soulez, G; Martel, S

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents potential medical applications that an untethered microdevice in the cardiovascular system could perform within an MRI system. Recent developments and continuing evolution in micro/nano fabrication and design techniques will enable the development of functional microdevices able to explore the cardiovascular system. The Magnetic Resonance Submarine (MR-Sub) project is a first step towards this goal. Magnetic force generated by the gradient coils of an MRI system provides a propulsion mechanism that simplifies miniaturization and bypasses energetic challenges. Untethered microdevices may play an important complementary role in the next generation of minimally invasive tools. A better efficiency and targetability of the treatments will be achieved when microsystems such as the MR-Sub will allow a more extensive access to smaller blood vessels. PMID:17281328

  6. Heparin functionalized polyaspartamide/polyester scaffold for potential blood vessel regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pitarresi, Giovanna; Fiorica, Calogero; Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio; Giammona, Gaetano

    2014-05-01

    An interesting issue in tissue engineering is the development of a biodegradable vascular graft able to substitute a blood vessel and to allow its complete regeneration. Here, we report a new scaffold potentially useful as a synthetic vascular graft, produced through the electrospinning of ?,?-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl) (2-aminoethylcarbamate)-D,L-aspartamide-graft-polylactic acid (PHEA-EDA-g-PLA) in the presence of polycaprolactone (PCL). The scaffold degradation profile has been evaluated as well as the possibility to bind heparin to electrospun fibers, being it a known anticoagulant molecule able to bind growth factors. In vitro cell compatibility has been investigated using human vascular endothelial cells (ECV 304) and the ability of heparinized PHEA-EDA-g-PLA/PCL scaffold to retain basic fibroblast growth factor has been evaluated in comparison with not heparinized sample. PMID:23733561

  7. Resonant Doppler flow imaging and optical vivisection of retinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Adrian H; Villiger, Martin L; Blatter, Cedric; Lasser, Theo; Leitgeb, Rainer A

    2007-01-22

    For Fourier domain optical coherence tomography any sample movement during camera integration causes blurring of interference fringes and as such reduction of sensitivity for flow detection. The proposed method overcomes this problem by phase-matching a reference signal to the sample motion. The interference fringes corresponding to flow signal will appear frozen across the detector whereas those of static sample structures will be blurred resulting in enhanced contrast for blood vessels. An electro-optic phase modulator in the reference arm, driven with specific phase cycles locked to the detection frequency, allows not only for qualitative but also for quantitative flow detection already from the relative signal intensities. First applications to extract in-vivo retinal flow and to visualize 3D vascularization, i.e. optical vivisection, are presented. PMID:19532258

  8. Biaxial biomechanical properties of self-assembly tissue-engineered blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Zaucha, Michael T.; Gauvin, Robert; Auger, Francois A.; Germain, Lucie; Gleason, Rudolph L.

    2011-01-01

    Along with insights into the potential for graft success, knowledge of biomechanical properties of small diameter tissue-engineered blood vessel (TEBV) will enable designers to tailor the vessels' mechanical response to closer resemble that of native tissue. Composed of two layers that closely mimic the native media and adventitia, a tissue-engineered vascular adventitia (TEVA) is wrapped around a tissue-engineered vascular media (TEVM) to produce a self-assembled tissue-engineered media/adventia (TEVMA). The current study was undertaken to characterize the biaxial biomechanical properties of TEVM, TEVA and TEVMA under physiological pressures as well as characterize the stress-free reference configuration. It was shown that the TEVA had the greatest compliance over the physiological loading range while the TEVM had the lowest compliance. As expected, compliance of the SA-TEBV fell in between with an average compliance of 2.73 MPa?1. Data were used to identify material parameters for a microstructurally motivated constitutive model. Identified material parameters for the TEVA and TEVM provided a good fit to experimental data with an average coefficient of determination of 0.918 and 0.868, respectively. These material parameters were used to develop a two-layer predictive model for the response of a TEVMA which fit well with experimental data. PMID:20554564

  9. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery. PMID:26025507

  10. Angiogenin Expression during Early Human Placental Development; Association with Blood Vessel Formation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Nadine; Guibourdenche, Jean; Degrelle, Séverine A.; Evain-Brion, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is a transient organ essential for fetal development. During human placental development, chorionic villi grow in coordination with a large capillary network resulting from both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Angiogenin is one of the most potent inducers of neovascularisation in experimental models in vivo. We and others have previously mapped angiogenin expression in the human term placenta. Here, we explored angiogenin involvement in early human placental development. We studied, angiogenin expression by in situ hybridisation and/or by RT-PCR in tissues and primary cultured trophoblastic cells and angiogenin cellular distribution by coimmunolabelling with cell markers: CD31 (PECAM-1), vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2), Tie-2, von Willebrand factor, CD34, erythropoeitin receptor (Epo-R), alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD45, cytokeratin 7, and Ki-67. Extravillous and villous cytotrophoblasts, isolated and differentiated in vitro, expressed and secreted angiogenin. Angiogenin was detected in villous trophoblastic layers, and structured and nascent fetal vessels. In decidua, it was expressed by glandular epithelial cells, vascular cells and macrophages. The observed pattern of angiogenin expression is compatible with a role in blood vessel formation and in cross-talk between trophoblasts and endothelial cells. In view of angiogenin properties, we suggest that angiogenin may participate in placental vasculogenesis and organogenesis. PMID:25093183

  11. Extraction of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images Using Four Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mudassar, Asloob Ahmad; Butt, Saira

    2013-01-01

    A variety of blood vessel extraction (BVE) techniques exist in the literature, but they do not always lead to acceptable solutions especially in the presence of anomalies where the reported work is limited. Four techniques are presented for BVE: (1) BVE using Image Line Cross-Sections (ILCS), (2) BVE using Edge Enhancement and Edge Detection (EEED), (3) BVE using Modified Matched Filtering (MMF), and (4) BVE using Continuation Algorithm (CA). These four techniques have been designed especially for abnormal retinal images containing low vessel contrasts, drusen, exudates, and other artifacts. The four techniques were applied to 30 abnormal retinal images, and the success rate was found to be (95 to 99%) for CA, (88–91%) for EEED, (80–85%) for MMF, and (74–78%) for ILCS. Application of these four techniques to 105 normal retinal images gave improved results: (99-100%) for CA, (96–98%) for EEED, (94-95%) for MMF, and (88–93%) for ILCS. Investigations revealed that the four techniques in the order of increasing performance could be arranged as ILCS, MMF, EEED, and CA. Here we demonstrate these four techniques for abnormal retinal images only. ILCS, EEED, and CA are novel additions whereas MMF is an improved and modified version of an existing matched filtering technique. CA is a promising technique.

  12. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  13. Transgenic Quail Production by Microinjection of Lentiviral Vector into the Early Embryo Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zifu; Sun, Peng; Yu, Fuxian; Yan, Li; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Wenxin; Wang, Tao; Wan, Zhiyi; Shao, Qiang; Li, Zandong

    2012-01-01

    Several strategies have been used to generate transgenic birds. The most successful method so far has been the injection of lentiviral vectors into the subgerminal cavity of a newly laid egg. We report here a new, easy and effective way to produce transgenic quails through direct injection of a lentiviral vector, containing an enhanced-green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgene, into the blood vessels of quail embryos at Hamburger-Hamilton stage 13–15 (HH13–15). A total of 80 embryos were injected and 48 G0 chimeras (60%) were hatched. Most injected embryo organs and tissues of hatched quails were positive for eGFP. In five out of 21 mature G0 male quails, the semen was eGFP-positive, as detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), indicating transgenic germ line chimeras. Testcross and genetic analyses revealed that the G0 quail produced transgenic G1 offspring; of 46 G1 hatchlings, 6 were transgenic (6/46, 13.0%). We also compared this new method with the conventional transgenesis using stage X subgerminal cavity injection. Total 240 quail embryos were injected by subgerminal cavity injection, of which 34 (14.1%) were hatched, significantly lower than the new method. From these hatched quails semen samples were collected from 19 sexually matured males and tested for the transgene by PCR. The transgene was present in three G0 male quails and only 4/236 G1 offspring (1.7%) were transgenic. In conclusion, we developed a novel bird transgenic method by injection of lentiviral vector into embryonic blood vessel at HH 13–15 stage, which result in significant higher transgenic efficiency than the conventional subgerminal cavity injection. PMID:23251391

  14. Degradation profile and preliminary clinical testing of a resorbable device for ligation of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Aminlashgari, Nina; Höglund, Odd V; Borg, Niklas; Hakkarainen, Minna

    2013-06-01

    A resorbable device for ligation of blood vessels was developed and tested in vitro to reveal the degradation profile of the device and to predict the clinical performance in terms of adequate mechanical support during a healing period of 1week. In addition, preliminary clinical testing was performed that showed complete hemostasis and good tissue grip of renal arteries in five pigs. The device was made by injection molding of poly(glycolide-co-trimethylene carbonate) triblock copolymer, and it consisted of a case with a locking mechanism connected to a partly perforated flexible band. A hydrolytic degradation study was carried out for 7, 30 and 60days in water and buffer medium, following the changes in mass, water absorption, pH and mechanical properties. A new rapid matrix-free laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) method was developed for direct screening of degradation products released into the degradation medium. The combination of LDI-MS and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analyses enabled the comparison of the degradation product patterns in water and buffer medium. The identified degradation products were rich in trimethylene carbonate units, indicating preferential hydrolysis of amorphous regions where trimethylene units are located. The crystallinity of the material was doubled after 60days of hydrolysis, additionally confirming the preferential hydrolysis of trimethylene carbonate units and the enrichment of glycolide units in the remaining solid matrix. The mechanical performance of the perforated band was followed for the first week of hydrolysis and the results suggest that sufficient strength is retained during the healing time of the blood vessels. PMID:23438863

  15. Electrospun Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Small-Diameter Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Carol Hsiu-Yueh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States with many patients requiring coronary artery bypass grafting. The current standard is using autografts such as the saphenous vein or intimal mammary artery, however creating a synthetic graft could eliminate this painful and inconvenient procedure. Large diameter grafts have long been established with materials such as DacronRTM and TeflonRTM, however these materials have not proved successful in small-diameter (< 6 mm) grafts where thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia are common in graft failure. With the use of a synthetic biodegradable polymer (polycaprolactone) we utilize our expertise in electrospinning and femtosecond laser ablation to create a novel tri-layered tissue engineered blood vessel containing microchannels. The benefits of creating a tri-layer is to mimic native arteries that contain an endothelium to prevent thrombosis in the inner layer, aligned smooth muscle cells in the middle to control vasodilation and constriction, and a mechanically robust outer layer. The following work evaluates the mechanical properties of such a graft (tensile, fatigue, burst pressure, and suture retention strength), the ability to rapidly align cells in laser ablated microchannels in PCL scaffolds, and the biological integration (co-culture of endothelial and smooth muscle cells) with electrospun PCL scaffolds. The conclusions from this work establish that the electrospun tri-layers provide adequate mechanical strength as a tissue engineered blood vessel, that laser ablated microchannels are able to contain the smooth muscle cells, and that cells are able to adhere to PCL fibers. However, future work includes adjusting microchannel dimensions to properly align smooth muscle cells along with perfect co-cultures of endothelial and smooth muscle cells on the electrospun tri-layer.

  16. Blood vessel-based liver segmentation through the portal phase of a CT dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maklad, Ahmed S.; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Utsunomiya, Toru; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2013-02-01

    Blood vessels are dispersed throughout the human body organs and carry unique information for each person. This information can be used to delineate organ boundaries. The proposed method relies on abdominal blood vessels (ABV) to segment the liver considering the potential presence of tumors through the portal phase of a CT dataset. ABV are extracted and classified into hepatic (HBV) and nonhepatic (non-HBV) with a small number of interactions. HBV and non-HBV are used to guide an automatic segmentation of the liver. HBV are used to individually segment the core region of the liver. This region and non-HBV are used to construct a boundary surface between the liver and other organs to separate them. The core region is classified based on extracted posterior distributions of its histogram into low intensity tumor (LIT) and non-LIT core regions. Non-LIT case includes normal part of liver, HBV, and high intensity tumors if exist. Each core region is extended based on its corresponding posterior distribution. Extension is completed when it reaches either a variation in intensity or the constructed boundary surface. The method was applied to 80 datasets (30 Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI) and 50 non-MICCAI data) including 60 datasets with tumors. Our results for the MICCAI-test data were evaluated by sliver07 [1] with an overall score of 79.7, which ranks seventh best on the site (December 2013). This approach seems a promising method for extraction of liver volumetry of various shapes and sizes and low intensity hepatic tumors.

  17. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R E; Allen, S; Chang, A P Y; Henderson, H; Hobson, G C; Karania, B; Morgan, K N; Pek, A S Y; Raghvani, K; Shee, C Y; Shikotra, J; Street, E; Abbas, Z; Ellis, K; Heer, J K; Alexander, S P H

    2013-11-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), a widely-used herbal medicine, has been reported to have a wide range of biological effects, including smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of representative compounds from chamomile (apigenin, luteolin, (-)-α-bisabolol, farnesene, umbelliferone; 3-30 μM) on vascular tone using porcine coronary and splenic arteries mounted for isometric tension recording in isolated tissue baths and precontracted with the thromboxane-mimetic U46619. Apigenin, luteolin, and (-)-α-bisabolol produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in both the coronary and splenic arteries that were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase or potassium channels. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the relaxations to all three compounds, and these compounds also inhibited calcium re-addition-evoked contractions, indicating that the relaxation response may be mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Apigenin and luteolin, but not (-)-α-bisabolol, enhanced the relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, indicating that apigenin and luteolin may act to regulate cyclic GMP levels. Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient relaxation in the splenic artery, but not the coronary artery, that was inhibited by L-NAME and removal of the endothelium, suggesting an influence on nitric oxide production. Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. In conclusion, hydroxylated compounds (apigenin, luteolin and (-)-α-bisabolol) found in chamomile all caused a slow relaxation of isolated blood vessels through an effect on calcium influx. Umbelliferone, on the other hand, produced a rapid, transient relaxation dependent upon release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. PMID:23845591

  18. The Behaviors of Ferro-Magnetic Nano-Particles In and Around Blood Vessels under Applied Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nacev, A.; Beni, C.; Bruno, O.; Shapiro, B.

    2010-01-01

    In magnetic drug delivery, therapeutic magnetizable particles are typically injected into the blood stream and magnets are then used to concentrate them to disease locations. The behavior of such particles in-vivo is complex and is governed by blood convection, diffusion (in blood and in tissue), extravasation, and the applied magnetic fields. Using physical first-principles and a sophisticated vessel-membrane-tissue (VMT) numerical solver, we comprehensively analyze in detail the behavior of magnetic particles in blood vessels and surrounding tissue. For any blood vessel (of any size, depth, and blood velocity) and tissue properties, particle size and applied magnetic fields, we consider a Krogh tissue cylinder geometry and solve for the resulting spatial distribution of particles. We find that there are three prototypical behaviors (blood velocity dominated, magnetic force dominated, and boundary-layer formation) and that the type of behavior observed is uniquely determined by three non-dimensional numbers (the magnetic-Richardson number, mass Péclet number, and Renkin reduced diffusion coefficient). Plots and equations are provided to easily read out which behavior is found under which circumstances (Figures 5, 6, 7, and 8). We compare our results to previously published in-vitro and in-vivo magnetic drug delivery experiments. Not only do we find excellent agreement between our predictions and prior experimental observations, but we are also able to qualitatively and quantitatively explain behavior that was previously not understood. PMID:21278859

  19. Embolization of Hepatic Arterial Branches to Simplify Hepatic Blood Flow Before Yttrium 90 Radioembolization: A Useful Technique in the Presence of Challenging Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Karunanithy, Narayan; Gordon, Fabiana; Hodolic, Marina; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Wasan, Harpreet S.; Habib, Nagy; Tait, Nicholas P.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: In the presence of variant hepatic arterial anatomy, obtaining whole-liver coverage with yttrium 90 (Y90) radioembolization may be challenging. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a technique whereby variant hepatic arterial branches are embolized and then Y90 is administered selectively into one remaining hepatic arterial branch results in whole-liver coverage and effective therapy. A retrospective comparison of treatment response was made between a group of patients who underwent this technique before Y90 administration and a group of patients who received standard Y90 administration as a single dose into the proper hepatic artery or in divided doses into the immediate hepatic artery branches. The rest of the workup and treatment were identical in both groups, including routine embolization of potential nonhepatic, nontarget vessels (e.g., the gastroduodenal artery). Methods: A total of 32 patients (mean age 56.9 years, range 39-77 years) treated with Y90 between June 2004 and March 2008 were analyzed. The primary malignancy was colorectal in 29, breast in 2, and cholangiocarcinoma in 1. Group 1 comprised 20 patients who had no alterations to their hepatic arterial supply. Group 2 comprised 12 cases who had undergone prior embolization of hepatic arterial branches before administration of Y90. The response to treatment was assessed by comparing standardized uptake value (SUV) on the pre- and postprocedure fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic studies of representative lesions within the right and left lobes of the liver. Results: In group 1, significant response (P < 0.001) was seen among right lobe lesions but not among left lobe lesions (P = 0.549). In group 2, there was a significant response among both right (P = 0.028) and left (P = 0.014) lobe lesions. No difference was found in the response of right lobe lesions (P = 0.726) between groups 1 and 2; a significantly greater response was found in group 2 compared to group 1 (P = 0.004) for left lobe lesions. Conclusion: Selective Y90 radioembolization after manipulation of hepatic arterial blood supply leads to an even distribution within the entire liver. When variations in hepatic arterial anatomy exist, this technique allows effective whole-liver radioembolization therapy from a single selective arterial injection.

  20. A Blood-Resistant Surgical Glue for Minimally Invasive Repair of Vessels and Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Nora; Pereira, Maria J.; Lee, Yuhan; Friehs, Ingeborg; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Feins, Eric N.; Ablasser, Klemens; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D.; Xu, Chenjie; Fabozzo, Assunta; Padera, Robert; Wasserman, Steve; Freudenthal, Franz; Ferreira, Lino S.; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no clinically approved surgical glues that are nontoxic, bind strongly to tissue, and work well within wet and highly dynamic environments within the body. This is especially relevant to minimally invasive surgery that is increasingly performed to reduce postoperative complications, recovery times, and patient discomfort. We describe the engineering of a bioinspired elastic and biocompatible hydrophobic light-activated adhesive (HLAA) that achieves a strong level of adhesion to wet tissue and is not compromised by preexposure to blood. The HLAA provided an on-demand hemostatic seal, within seconds of light application, when applied to high-pressure large blood vessels and cardiac wall defects in pigs. HLAA-coated patches attached to the interventricular septum in a beating porcine heart and resisted supraphysiologic pressures by remaining attached for 24 hours, which is relevant to intracardiac interventions in humans. The HLAA could be used for many cardiovascular and surgical applications, with immediate application in repair of vascular defects and surgical hemostasis. PMID:24401941

  1. Angioblast Derived from ES Cells Construct Blood Vessels and Ameliorate Diabetic Polyneuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Hideki; Naruse, Keiko; Cheng, Zhao; Ito, Sachiko; Shibata, Taiga; Kondo, Masaki; Kato, Jiro; Okawa, Tetsuji; Fujiya, Atsushi; Suzuki, Hirohiko; Kito, Tetsutaro; Hamada, Yoji; Oiso, Yutaka; Isobe, Kenichi; Nakamura, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although numerous reports addressing pathological involvements of diabetic polyneuropathy have been conducted, a universally effective treatment of diabetic polyneuropathy has not yet been established. Recently, regenerative medicine studies in diabetic polyneuropathy using somatic stem/progenitor cell have been reported. However, the effectiveness of these cell transplantations was restricted because of their functional and numerical impairment in diabetic objects. Here, we investigated the efficacy of treatment for diabetic polyneuropathy using angioblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. Methods and Results. Angioblast-like cells were obtained from mouse embryonic stem cells and transplantation of these cells improved several physiological impairments in diabetic polyneuropathy: hypoalgesia, delayed nerve conduction velocities, and reduced blood flow in sciatic nerve and plantar skin. Furthermore, pathologically, the capillary number to muscle fiber ratios were increased in skeletal muscles of transplanted hindlimbs, and intraepidermal nerve fiber densities were ameliorated in transplanted plantar skin. Transplanted cells maintained their viabilities and differentiated to endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells around the injection sites. Moreover, several transplanted cells constructed chimeric blood vessels with recipient cells. Conclusions. These results suggest that transplantation of angioblast like cells induced from embryonic stem cells appears to be a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic polyneuropathy. PMID:25977928

  2. Full dimensional computer simulations to study pulsatile blood flow in vessels, aortic arch and bifurcated veins: Investigation of blood viscosity and turbulent effects.

    PubMed

    Sultanov, Renat A; Guster, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    We report computational results of blood flow through a model of the human aortic arch and a vessel of actual diameter and length. A realistic pulsatile flow is used in all simulations. Calculations for bifurcation type vessels are also carried out and presented. Different mathematical methods for numerical solution of the fluid dynamics equations have been considered. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the human blood is investigated together with turbulence effects. A detailed time-dependent mathematical convergence test has been carried out. The results of computer simulations of the blood flow in vessels of three different geometries are presented: for pressure, strain rate and velocity component distributions we found significant disagreements between our results obtained with realistic non-Newtonian treatment of human blood and the widely used method in the literature: a simple Newtonian approximation. A significant increase of the strain rate and, as a result, the wall shear stress distribution, is found in the region of the aortic arch. Turbulent effects are found to be important, particularly in the case of bifurcation vessels. PMID:19964834

  3. Alzheimer's disease and CADASIL are heritable, adult-onset dementias that both involve damaged small blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Vincent T

    2014-03-01

    This essay explores an alternative pathway to Alzheimer's dementia that focuses on damage to small blood vessels rather than late-stage toxic amyloid deposits as the primary pathogenic mechanism that leads to irreversible dementia. While the end-stage pathology of AD is well known, the pathogenic processes that lead to disease are often assumed to be due to toxic amyloid peptides that act on neurons, leading to neuronal dysfunction and eventually neuronal cell death. Speculations as to what initiates the pathogenic cascade have included toxic abeta peptide aggregates, oxidative damage, and inflammation, but none explain why neurons die. Recent high-resolution NMR studies of living patients show that lesions in white matter regions of the brain precede the appearance of amyloid deposits and are correlated with damaged small blood vessels. To appreciate the pathogenic potential of damaged small blood vessels in the brain, it is useful to consider the clinical course and the pathogenesis of CADASIL, a heritable arteriopathy that leads to damaged small blood vessels and irreversible dementia. CADASIL is strikingly similar to early onset AD in that it is caused by germ line mutations in NOTCH 3 that generate toxic protein aggregates similar to those attributed to mutant forms of the amyloid precursor protein and presenilin genes. Since NOTCH 3 mutants clearly damage small blood vessels of white matter regions of the brain that lead to dementia, we speculate that both forms of dementia may have a similar pathogenesis, which is to cause ischemic damage by blocking blood flow or by impeding the removal of toxic protein aggregates by retrograde vascular clearance mechanisms. PMID:24378989

  4. Three-dimensional multi-scale model of deformable platelets adhesion to vessel wall in blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Zhiliang; Kim, Oleg; Alber, Mark

    2014-01-01

    When a blood vessel ruptures or gets inflamed, the human body responds by rapidly forming a clot to restrict the loss of blood. Platelets aggregation at the injury site of the blood vessel occurring via platelet–platelet adhesion, tethering and rolling on the injured endothelium is a critical initial step in blood clot formation. A novel three-dimensional multi-scale model is introduced and used in this paper to simulate receptor-mediated adhesion of deformable platelets at the site of vascular injury under different shear rates of blood flow. The novelty of the model is based on a new approach of coupling submodels at three biological scales crucial for the early clot formation: novel hybrid cell membrane submodel to represent physiological elastic properties of a platelet, stochastic receptor–ligand binding submodel to describe cell adhesion kinetics and lattice Boltzmann submodel for simulating blood flow. The model implementation on the GPU cluster significantly improved simulation performance. Predictive model simulations revealed that platelet deformation, interactions between platelets in the vicinity of the vessel wall as well as the number of functional GPIbα platelet receptors played significant roles in platelet adhesion to the injury site. Variation of the number of functional GPIbα platelet receptors as well as changes of platelet stiffness can represent effects of specific drugs reducing or enhancing platelet activity. Therefore, predictive simulations can improve the search for new drug targets and help to make treatment of thrombosis patient-specific. PMID:24982253

  5. Did antepartum hypoxic insult caused by fetal vessel thrombosis influence the procalcitonin level in umbilical blood? A case report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masatoki; Yamauchi, Aya; Yamashita, Rie; Sato, Yuichiro; Kodama, Yuki; Sameshima, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of marked elevation of the procalcitonin level in umbilical blood and neonatal blood at birth. The mother did not perceive fetal motion. Antepartum fetal heart rate monitoring showed a loss of variability and absence of acceleration. No fetal breathing movement, fetal movement, or fetal tone were observed by ultrasonography. The female neonate was delivered by cesarean section at 25?weeks of gestation, with birthweight 774?g. The umbilical arterial pH value at birth was 7.29. Mild elevation in interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-? in umbilical blood were observed. Cytochrome c showed a high level in umbilical and neonatal blood at birth. Placental histopathology revealed multiple fetal vessel thrombosis in the large stem villi and chorionic vessels. The neonate showed no infectious signs throughout the neonatal period. Computed tomography at 3?months of age revealed atrophy in the cerebrum and cerebellum. At 1?year after birth, the infant showed spastic quadriplegia. In this case, antepartum asphyxia due to fetal vessel thrombosis may have influenced the elevation of procalcitonin level in umbilical blood and neonatal blood at birth. PMID:26420447

  6. Single image correlation for blood flow mapping in complex vessel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, Giuseppe; Sironi, Laura; Bouzin, Margaux; D'Alfonso, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Ceffa, Nicolo'G.; Marquezin, Cassia

    2015-05-01

    Microcirculation plays a key role in the maintenance and hemodynamics of tissues and organs also due to its extensive interaction with the immune system. A critical limitation of state-of-the-art clinical techniques to characterize the blood flow is their lack of the spatial resolution required to scale down to individual capillaries. On the other hand the study of the blood flow through auto- or cross-correlation methods fail to correlate the flow speed values with the morphological details required to describe an intricate network of capillaries. Here we propose to use a newly developed technique (FLICS, FLow Image Correlation Spectroscopy) that, by employing a single raster-scanned xy-image acquired in vivo by confocal or multi-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy, allows the quantitative measurement of the blood flow velocity in the whole vessel pattern within the field of view, while simultaneously maintaining the morphological information on the immobile structures of the explored circulatory system. Fluorescent flowing objects produce diagonal lines in the raster-scanned image superimposed to static morphological details. The flow velocity is obtained by computing the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) of the intensity fluctuations detected in pairs of columns of the image. The whole analytical dependence of the CCFs on the flow speed amplitude and the flow direction has been reported recently. We report here the derivation of approximated analytical relations that allows to use the CCF peak lag time and the corresponding CCF value, to directly estimate the flow speed amplitude and the flow direction. The validation has been performed on Zebrafish embryos for which the flow direction was changed systematically by rotating the embryos on the microscope stage. The results indicate that also from the CCF peak lag time it is possible to recover the flow speed amplitude within 13% of uncertainty (overestimation) in a wide range of angles between the flow and the image scanning direction.

  7. High tissue glucose alters intersomitic blood vessels in zebrafish via methylglyoxal targeting the VEGF receptor signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Jörgens, Kristina; Stoll, Sandra J; Pohl, Jennifer; Fleming, Thomas H; Sticht, Carsten; Nawroth, Peter P; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Kroll, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia causes micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose concentrations lead to increased formation of the highly reactive dicarbonyl methylglyoxal (MG), yet the early consequences of MG for development of vascular complications in vivo are poorly understood. In this study, zebrafish were used as a model organism to analyze early vascular effects and mechanisms of MG in vivo. High tissue glucose increased MG concentrations in tg(fli:EGFP) zebrafish embryos and rapidly induced several additional malformed and uncoordinated blood vessel structures that originated out of existing intersomitic blood vessels (ISVs). However, larger blood vessels, including the dorsal aorta and common cardinal vein, were not affected. Expression silencing of MG-degrading enzyme glyoxalase (glo) 1 elevated MG concentrations and induced a similar vascular hyperbranching phenotype in zebrafish. MG enhanced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 and its downstream target Akt/protein kinase B (PKB). Pharmacological inhibitors for VEGF receptor 2 and Akt/PKB as well as MG scavenger aminoguanidine and glo1 activation prevented MG-induced hyperbranching of ISVs. Taken together, MG acts on smaller blood vessels in zebrafish via the VEGF receptor signaling cascade, thereby describing a new mechanism that can explain vascular complications under hyperglycemia and elevated MG concentrations. PMID:25092676

  8. Analysis of cooling effect by blood vessel on temperature rise due to ultrasound radiation in tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuma; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Fukasawa, Kota; Hatano, Yuichi; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound diagnostic equipment using ultrasound pulse-echo techniques is considered minimally invasive and highly versatile. However, one of the causes of damage due to ultrasound radiation is temperature rise caused by the absorption of sound energy. Therefore, it is very important to estimate the temperature rise caused by the radiation of ultrasound. Sound intensity in a medium is analyzed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the temperature distribution caused by sound is estimated by the heat conduction equation (HCE) method in this study. Because blood vessels keep the temperature constant in tissues, the cooling effect of blood flow has to be taken into account for the precise estimation of temperature rise in human tissues. In general, it is well known that capillary vessels are mainly responsible for the cooling effect in tissues and their effect can be estimated as a function of bloodstream ratio. In this paper, a preliminary study on the cooling effect by a large vessel is described for the precise estimation of temperature rise. Blood flow in blood vessels is analyzed using the Navier-Stokes equation. To confirm the precision of the numerical analysis, the results of the numerical analysis are compared with the experimental results using a soft tissue phantom.

  9. X-ray PIV measurement of blood flow in deep vessels of a rat: An in vivo feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    X-ray PIV measurement is a noninvasive approach to measure opaque blood flows. However, it is not easy to measure real pulsatile blood flows in the blood vessels located at deep position of the body, because the surrounding tissues significantly attenuate the contrast of X-ray images. This study investigated the effect of surrounding tissues on X-ray beam attenuation by measuring the velocity fields of blood flows in deep vessels of a live rat. The decrease in image contrast was minimized by employing biocompatible CO2 microbubbles as tracer particles. The maximum measurable velocity of blood flows in the abdominal aorta of a rat model was found through comparative examination between the PIV measurement accuracy and the level of image contrast according to the input flow rate. Furthermore, the feasibility of using X-ray PIV to accurately measure in vivo blood flows was demonstrated by determining the velocity field of blood flows in the inferior vena cava of a rat. This study may serve as a reference in conducting in vivo X-ray PIV measurements of pulsatile blood flows in animal disease models and investigating hemodynamic characteristics and circulatory vascular diseases. PMID:26777719

  10. X-ray PIV measurement of blood flow in deep vessels of a rat: An in vivo feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    X-ray PIV measurement is a noninvasive approach to measure opaque blood flows. However, it is not easy to measure real pulsatile blood flows in the blood vessels located at deep position of the body, because the surrounding tissues significantly attenuate the contrast of X-ray images. This study investigated the effect of surrounding tissues on X-ray beam attenuation by measuring the velocity fields of blood flows in deep vessels of a live rat. The decrease in image contrast was minimized by employing biocompatible CO2 microbubbles as tracer particles. The maximum measurable velocity of blood flows in the abdominal aorta of a rat model was found through comparative examination between the PIV measurement accuracy and the level of image contrast according to the input flow rate. Furthermore, the feasibility of using X-ray PIV to accurately measure in vivo blood flows was demonstrated by determining the velocity field of blood flows in the inferior vena cava of a rat. This study may serve as a reference in conducting in vivo X-ray PIV measurements of pulsatile blood flows in animal disease models and investigating hemodynamic characteristics and circulatory vascular diseases. PMID:26777719

  11. Endothelialization of over- and undersized flow-diverter stents at covered vessel side branches: An in vivo and in silico study.

    PubMed

    Berg, Philipp; Iosif, Christina; Ponsonnard, Sebastien; Yardin, Catherine; Janiga, Gábor; Mounayer, Charbel

    2016-01-01

    Although flow-diverting devices are promising treatment options for intracranial aneurysms, jailed side branches might occlude leading to insufficient blood supply. Especially differences in the local stent strut compression may have a drastic influence on subsequent endothelialization. To investigate the outcome of different treatment scenarios, over- and undersized stent deployments were realized experimentally and computationally. Two Pipeline Embolization Devices were placed in the right common carotid artery of large white swine, crossing the right ascending pharyngeal artery. DSA and PC-MRI measurements were acquired pre- and post-stenting and after three months. To evaluate the stent strut endothelialization and the corresponding ostium patency, the swine were sacrificed and scanning electron microscopy measurements were carried out. A more detailed analysis of the near-stent hemodynamics was enabled by a realistic virtual stenting in combination with highly resolved Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations using case-specific boundary conditions. The oversizing resulted in an elongated stent deployment with more open stent pores, while for the undersized case a shorter deployment with more condensed pores was present. In consequence, the side branch of the first case remained patent after three months and the latter almost fully occluded. The virtual investigation confirmed the experimental findings by identifying differences between the individual velocities as well as stent shear stresses at the distal part of the ostia. The choice of flow-diverting device and the subsequent deployment strategy strongly influences the patency of jailed side branches. Therefore, careful treatment planning is required, to guarantee sufficient blood supply in the brain territories supplied those branches. PMID:26607220

  12. Detection of blood vessels in human brain 3D magnetic resonance images with the use of mathematical morphology and region growing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankowski, Adam; Materka, Andrzej

    2009-06-01

    Detection and quantitative parameterization of brain blood vessels in magnetic resonance images (MRI) are an important aid to diagnosing neoplasmic diseases, planning surgical operations or detecting the atrophy of blood vessels. Fast and effective computer programs are needed to extract quantitative information from MRI data - to increase objectivity, accuracy and repeatability of the diagnosis. To develop such programs we must use algorithms for 3D images segmentation, necessary to build geometrical models of the blood vessels. These models are then used for vessel tree visualization and quantitative description.

  13. Effect of rheological property on blood flow in vertebral artery branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Taegee; Kim, Myungjoon; Kim, Taesung; Kwon, O.-Ki

    2011-11-01

    Blocking of an artery is one of mechanisms for cerebral stroke development. If an important cerebral artery is occluded by any reason and if there is no sufficient collaterals, tissue ischemia occurs at brain tissues distal to the occluded artery, which is a well known clinical situation. However, in practice, ischemia or hypoperfusion has also been observed through the branches proximal to the occluded artery. The unexpected ``proximal ischemia'' is not yet known, from which patients could suffer serious complications. In the present study, two patient cases are presented to elucidate this phenomenon from the view point of fluid dynamics, especially with emphasis on the role of rheology in hemodynamics.

  14. Numerical modeling of the pulse wave propagation in large blood vessels based on liquid and wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rup, K.; Dró?d?, A.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop a non-linear, one-dimensional model of pulse wave propagation in the arterial cardiovascular system. The model includes partial differential equations resulting from the balance of mass and momentum for the fluid-filled area and the balance equation for the area of the wall and vessels. The considered mathematical model of pulse wave propagation in the thoracic aorta section takes into account the viscous dissipation of fluid energy, realistic values of parameters describing the physicochemical properties of blood and vessel wall. Boundary and initial conditions contain the appropriate information obtained from in vivo measurements. As a result of the numerical solution of the mass and momentum balance equations for the blood and the equilibrium equation for the arterial wall area, time- dependent deformation, respective velocity profiles and blood pressure were determined.

  15. Transport of membrane-bound mineral particles in blood vessels during chicken embryonic bone development.

    PubMed

    Kerschnitzki, Michael; Akiva, Anat; Ben Shoham, Adi; Koifman, Naama; Shimoni, Eyal; Rechav, Katya; Arraf, Alaa A; Schultheiss, Thomas M; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Zelzer, Elazar; Weiner, Stephen; Addadi, Lia

    2016-02-01

    During bone formation in embryos, large amounts of calcium and phosphate are taken up and transported to the site where solid mineral is first deposited. The initial mineral forms in vesicles inside osteoblasts and is deposited as a highly disordered calcium phosphate phase. The mineral is then translocated to the extracellular space where it penetrates the collagen matrix and crystallizes. To date little is known about the transport mechanisms of calcium and phosphate in the vascular system, especially when high transport rates are needed and the concentrations of these ions in the blood serum may exceed the solubility product of the mineral phase. Here we used a rapidly growing biological model, the chick embryo, to study the bone mineralization pathway taking advantage of the fact that large amounts of bone mineral constituents are transported. Cryo scanning electron microscopy together with cryo energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and focused-ion beam imaging in the serial surface view mode surprisingly reveal the presence of abundant vesicles containing small mineral particles in the lumen of the blood vessels. Morphologically similar vesicles are also found in the cells associated with bone formation. This observation directly implicates the vascular system in solid mineral distribution, as opposed to the transport of ions in solution. Mineral particle transport inside vesicles implies that far larger amounts of the bone mineral constituents can be transported through the vasculature, without the danger of ectopic precipitation. This introduces a new stage into the bone mineral formation pathway, with the first mineral being formed far from the bone itself. PMID:26481471

  16. Rapid sealing and cutting of porcine blood vessels, ex vivo, using a high-power, 1470-nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Giglio, Nicholas C; Hutchens, Thomas C; Perkins, William C; Latimer, Cassandra; Ward, Arlen; Nau, William H; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2014-03-01

    Suture ligation with subsequent cutting of blood vessels to maintain hemostasis during surgery is time consuming and skill intensive. Energy-based electrosurgical and ultrasonic devices are often used to replace sutures and mechanical clips to provide rapid hemostasis and decrease surgery time. Some of these devices may create undesirably large collateral zones of thermal damage and tissue necrosis, or require separate mechanical blades for cutting. Infrared lasers are currently being explored as alternative energy sources for vessel sealing applications. In a previous study, a 1470-nm laser was used to seal vessels 1 to 6 mm in diameter in 5 s, yielding burst pressures of ?500??mmHg. The purpose of this study was to provide vessel sealing times comparable with current energy-based devices, incorporate transection of sealed vessels, and demonstrate high vessel burst pressures to provide a safety margin for future clinical use. A 110-W, 1470-nm laser beam was transmitted through a fiber and beam shaping optics, producing a 90-W linear beam 3.0 by 9.5 mm for sealing (400??W/cm2), and 1.1 by 9.6 mm for cutting (1080??W/cm2). A two-step process sealed and then transected ex vivo porcine renal vessels (1.5 to 8.5 mm diameter) in a bench top setup. Seal and cut times were 1.0 s each. A burst pressure system measured seal strength, and histologic measurements of lateral thermal spread were also recorded. All blood vessels tested (n=55 seal samples) were sealed and cut, with total irradiation times of 2.0 s and mean burst pressures of 1305±783??mmHg. Additional unburst vessels were processed for histological analysis, showing a lateral thermal spread of 0.94±0.48??mm (n=14 seal samples). This study demonstrated that an optical-based system is capable of precisely sealing and cutting a wide range of porcine renal vessel sizes and, with further development, may provide an alternative to radiofrequency- and ultrasonic-based vessel sealing devices. PMID:24658792

  17. Comparing Two-Stent Strategies for Bifurcation Coronary Lesions: Which Vessel Should be Stented First, the Main Vessel or the Side Branch?

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Ho; Park, Kyung Woo; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Oh, Il-Young; Seo, Jae-Bin; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Jeong, Myung-Ho; Seong, In-Whan; Rha, Seung Woon; Yang, Ju-Young; Park, Seung-Jung; Yoon, Jung Han; Han, Kyoo-Rok; Park, Jong-Sun; Hur, Seung-Ho; Tahk, Seung-Jea

    2011-01-01

    This study compared two-stent strategies for treatment of bifurcation lesions by stenting order, 'main across side first (A-family)' vs 'side branch first (S-family). The study population was patients from 16 centers in Korea who underwent drug eluting stent implantation with two-stent strategy (A-family:109, S-family:140 patients). The endpoints were cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), stent thrombosis (ST), and target lesion revascularization (TLR) during 3 years. During 440.8 person-years (median 20.2 months), there was 1 cardiac death, 4 MIs (including 2 STs), and 12 TLRs. Cumulative incidence of cardiac death, MI and ST was lower in A-family (0% in A-family vs 4.9% in S-family, P = 0.045). However, TLR rates were not different between the two groups (7.1% vs 6.2%, P = 0.682). Final kissing inflation (FKI) was a predictor of the hard-endpoint (hazard ratio 0.061; 95% CI 0.007-0.547, P = 0.013), but was not a predictor of TLR. The incidence of hard-endpoint of S-family with FKI was comparable to A-family, whereas S-family without FKI showed the poorest prognosis (1.1% vs 15.9%, retrospectively; P = 0.011). In conclusion, 'A-family' seems preferable to 'S-family' if both approaches are feasible. When two-stent strategy is used, every effort should be made to perform FKI, especially in 'S-family'. PMID:21860553

  18. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor Treatment Promotes VEGF-A-Driven Blood Vessel Growth and Vascular Leakage but Disrupts Neovascular Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalén, Mattias; Nitzsche, Anja; Weber, Holger; Esser, Norbert; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Hellström, Mats

    2011-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is essential for normal development due to its role in control of cell differentiation, proliferation and survival. It is also critically involved in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. A key enzyme in the activation of Notch signaling is the gamma-secretase protein complex and therefore, gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs)—originally developed for Alzheimer's disease—are now being evaluated in clinical trials for human malignancies. It is also clear that Notch plays an important role in angiogenesis driven by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A)—a process instrumental for tumor growth and metastasis. The effect of GSIs on tumor vasculature has not been conclusively determined. Here we report that Compound X (CX), a GSI previously reported to potently inhibit Notch signaling in vitro and in vivo, promotes angiogenic sprouting in vitro and during developmental angiogenesis in mice. Furthermore, CX treatment suppresses tumor growth in a mouse model of renal carcinoma, leads to the formation of abnormal vessels and an increased tumor vascular density. Using a rabbit model of VEGF-A-driven angiogenesis in skeletal muscle, we demonstrate that CX treatment promotes abnormal blood vessel growth characterized by vessel occlusion, disrupted blood flow, and increased vascular leakage. Based on these findings, we propose a model for how GSIs and other Notch inhibitors disrupt tumor blood vessel perfusion, which might be useful for understanding this new class of anti-cancer agents. PMID:21533193

  19. A New Device for Mechanical Testing of Blood Vessels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rios, Jorge L.; Rabin, Yoed

    2008-01-01

    As part of an ongoing program to study the thermo-mechanical effects associated with cryopreservation via vitrification (vitreous in Latin means glassy), the current study focuses on the development of a new device for mechanical testing of blood vessels at cryogenic temperatures. This device is demonstrated on a bovine carotid artery model, permeated with the cryoprotectant cocktail VS55 and a reference solution of 7.05M DMSO, below glass transition. Results are also presented for crystallized specimens, in the absence of cryoprotectants. Results indicate that the elastic modulus of a specimen with no cryoprotectant, at about ?140°C (8.6°C and 15.5°C below the glass transition temperature of 7.05M DMSO and VS55, respectively), is 1038.8 ± 25.2 MPa, which is 8% and 3% higher than that of a vitrified specimen permeated with 7.05M DMSO and VS55, respectively. The elastic modulus of a crystallized material at ?50°C is lower by ~20% lower from that at ?140°C. PMID:18958183

  20. Infrared tomography for diagnostic imaging of port wine stain blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.

    1994-11-15

    The objective of this work is the development of Infrared Tomography (IRT) for detecting and characterizing subsurface chromophores in human skin. Characterization of cutaneous chromophores is crucial for advances in the laser treatment of pigmented lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks and tatoos). Infrared tomography (IRT) uses a fast infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) to detect temperature rises in a substrate induced by pulsed radiation. A pulsed laser is used to produce transient heating of an object. The temperature rise, due to the optical absorption of the pulsed laser light, creates an increase in infrared emission which is measured by the IR-FPA. Although the application of IRT to image subsurface cracks due to metal fatigue is a topic of great interest in the aircraft industry, the application to image subsurface chromophores in biological materials is novel. We present an image recovery method based on a constrained conjugate gradient algorithm that has obtained the first ever high quality images of port wine blood vessels.

  1. Rupture Properties of Blood Vessel Walls Measured by Pressure-Imposed Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Toshiro; Sugita, Syukei; Matsumoto, Takeo; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Akimoto, Hiroji; Tabayashi, Koichi; Sato, Masaaki

    It is expected to be clinically useful to know the mechanical properties of human aortic aneurysms in assessing the potential for aneurysm rupture. For this purpose, a newly designed experimental setup was fabricated to measure the rupture properties of blood vessel walls. A square specimen of porcine thoracic aortas is inflated by air pressure at a rate of 10mmHg/s (≈1.3MPa/s) until rupture occurs. Mean breaking stress was 1.8±0.4 MPa (mean±SD) for the specimens proximal to the heart and 2.3±0.8MPa for the distal specimens, which are not significantly different to those values obtained longitudinally from conventional tensile tests. Moreover, the local breaking stretch ratio in the longitudinal direction was significantly higher at the ruptured site (2.7±0.5) than at the unruptured site (2.2±0.4). This testing system for studying the rupture properties of aortic walls is expected to be applicable to aortic aneurysms. Experimental verification of the present technique for the homogeneous, isotropic material is also presented.

  2. Regulation of signaling interactions and receptor endocytosis in growing blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Pitulescu, Mara E; Adams, Ralf H

    2014-01-01

    Blood vessels and the lymphatic vasculature are extensive tubular networks formed by endothelial cells that have several indispensable functions in the developing and adult organism. During growth and tissue regeneration but also in many pathological settings, these vascular networks expand, which is critically controlled by the receptor EphB4 and the ligand ephrin-B2. An increasing body of evidence links Eph/ephrin molecules to the function of other receptor tyrosine kinases and cell surface receptors. In the endothelium, ephrin-B2 is required for clathrin-dependent internalization and full signaling activity of VEGFR2, the main receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor. In vascular smooth muscle cells, ephrin-B2 antagonizes clathrin-dependent endocytosis of PDGFR? and controls the balanced activation of different signal transduction processes after stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor. This review summarizes the important roles of Eph/ephrin molecules in vascular morphogenesis and explains the function of ephrin-B2 as a molecular hub for receptor endocytosis in the vasculature. PMID:25482636

  3. Noncoding RNAs regulate NF-κB signaling to modulate blood vessel inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henry S.; Njock, Makon-Sébastien; Khyzha, Nadiya; Dang, Lan T.; Fish, Jason E.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, which include heart attack and stroke, occur several decades after initiation of the disease and become more severe with age. Inflammation of blood vessels plays a prominent role in atherogenesis. Activation of the endothelium by inflammatory mediators leads to the recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells, which drives atherosclerotic plaque formation and progression. Inflammatory signaling within the endothelium is driven predominantly by the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-κB. Interestingly, activation of NF-κB is enhanced during the normal aging process and this may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Importantly, studies utilizing mouse models of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis are uncovering a network of noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs, which impinge on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Here we summarize the literature regarding the control of vascular inflammation by microRNAs, and provide insight into how these microRNA-based pathways might be harnessed for therapeutic treatment of disease. We also discuss emerging areas of endothelial cell biology, including the involvement of long noncoding RNAs and circulating microRNAs in the control of vascular inflammation. PMID:25540650

  4. Formation of an artificial blood vessel: adhesion force measurements with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoener, Gregor; Campbell, Julie H.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2004-10-01

    We are investigating the formation of a tissue capsule around a foreign body. This tissue capsule can be used as an autologous graft for the replacement of diseased blood vessels or for bypass surgery. The graft is grown in the peritoneal cavity of the recipient and the formation starts with the adhesion of cells to the foreign body. We identify the cell type and measure the adhesion of these cells to foreign materials using optical tweezers. Cell adhesion to macroscopic samples and microspheres is investigated. No difference in the adhesion force was measurable for polyethylene, silicon and Tygon on a scale accessible to optical tweezers. The density of adherent cells was found to vary strongly, being highest on polyethylene. The mean rupture forces for cell-microsphere adhesion ranged from 24 to 39 pN and changed upon preadsorption of bovine serum albumin. For plain microspheres, the highest mean rupture force was found for PMMA, which also showed the highest adhesion probability for the cell-microsphere interaction.

  5. Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (Arteriolosclerosis) in Brains of Older People

    PubMed Central

    Khoong, Cheryl H.L.; Poon, Wayne; Esiri, Margaret M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Hainsworth, Atticus H.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects brain tissue from potentially harmful plasma components. Small vessel disease ([SVD], arteriolosclerosis) is common in the brains of older people and is associated with lacunar infarcts, leukoaraiosis and vascular dementia. To determine whether plasma extravasation is associated with SVD, we immunolabeled the plasma proteins fibrinogen and IgG, which are assumed to reflect BBB dysfunction, in deep grey matter (anterior caudate-putamen, [DGM]) and deep subcortical white matter (DWM) in the brains of a well-characterized patient cohort with minimal Alzheimer disease pathology (Braak stage 0-II) (n = 84; age ≥65 years). Morphometric measures of fibrinogen labeling were compared between people with neuropathologically defined SVD and aged control subjects. Parenchymal cellular labeling with fibrinogen and IgG was detectable in DGM and DWM in many subjects (>70%). Quantitative measures of fibrinogen were not associated with SVD in DGM or DWM; SVD severity was correlated between DGM and DWM (p < 0.0001). Fibrinogen in DGM showed a modest association with a history of hypertension; DWM fibrinogen was associated with dementia and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (all p < 0.05). In DWM, SVD was associated with leukoaraiosis identified in life (p < 0.05), but fibrinogen was not. Our data suggest that in aged brains plasma extravasation and hence local BBB dysfunction is common but do not support an association with SVD. PMID:25289893

  6. Preliminary investigation of the feasibility of magnetic propulsion for future microdevices in blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Martel, Sylvain; Yahia, L'Hocine; Soulez, Gilles; Beaudoin, Gilles

    2005-01-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Submarine (MR-Sub) project is a first attempt to validate a new propulsion method for future small magnetically controlled microdevices suited for minimally invasive applications in blood vessels. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system provides the driving force in three dimensions to a ferromagnetic core that could be embedded onto a specialised microdevice. The paper describes preliminary tests made to match the magnetic force induced by an MRI system on a ferromagnetic sphere with the drag force it encompasses in a cylindrical tube. These tests provide a proof of concept demonstrating that this new method of propulsion is very promising within the constraints of such types of operations. This conclusion is based on specific measurements showing that 1010/1020 carbon steel spheres (3.175 mm and 2.381 mm in diameter) can withstand a maximum flow of 0.370 +/- 0.0064 l/min (19.5 cm/s) and 0.311 +/- 0.01209 l/min (16.4 cm/s) respectively when placed inside a 6.35 mm diameter PMMA tube and subjected to a 18 mT/m magnetic field gradient. PMID:16179757

  7. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha targets intratumoral blood vessels, improving chemotherapy in human xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Tóvári, József; Gilly, Réka; Rásó, Erzsébet; Paku, Sándor; Bereczky, Bíborka; Varga, Norbert; Vágó, Agnes; Tímár, József

    2005-08-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is widely used for correction of hemoglobin level in cancer patients. However, apart from hematopoiesis, rHuEPO reportedly has an effect on endothelial cells. We describe here how rHuEPOalpha can modulate tumor vasculature in human squamous cell (A431) and colorectal carcinoma (HT25) xenograft models. In vivo rHuEPO treatment of xenografts at human-equivalent dose significantly increased the proliferation index of the tumor-associated endothelial cells and the size of CD31-positive intratumoral blood vessels, whereas the pericyte coverage became fragmented. Moreover, rHuEPO administration resulted in decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor both by cancer cells and tumor stroma, measured by quantitative PCR. Due to the morphologic alterations in tumoral microvessels, DNA-binding agents (Hoechst and Doxorubicin) labeled significantly larger areas in the tumor mass. Furthermore, rHuEPO treatment led to a significantly improved efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy in the case of both tumor xenografts. Meanwhile, rHuEPO had no effect on the in vitro proliferation of erythropoietin receptor-positive tumor cells, and did not interfere with the effects of 5-FU either. These data reveal a new effect of rHuEPO administration: remodeling tumoral microvessels, suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor expression, thereby augmenting antitumor effects of a cancer drug, 5-FU, even in erythropoietin receptor-positive human cancer xenografts. PMID:16103069

  8. Electrospun tecophilic/gelatin nanofibers with potential for small diameter blood vessel tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Vatankhah, Elham; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Semnani, Dariush; Razavi, Shahnaz; Morshed, Mohammad; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-12-01

    Tissue engineering techniques particularly using electrospun scaffolds have been intensively used in recent years for the development of small diameter vascular grafts. However, the development of a completely successful scaffold that fulfills multiple requirements to guarantee complete vascular regeneration remains challenging. In this study, a hydrophilic and compliant polyurethane namely Tecophilic (TP) blended with gelatin (gel) at a weight ratio of 70:30 (TP(70)/gel(30)) was electrospun to fabricate a tubular composite scaffold with biomechanical properties closely simulating those of native blood vessels. Hydrophilic properties of the composite scaffold induced non-thrombogenicity while the incorporation of gelatin molecules within the scaffold greatly improved the capacity of the scaffold to serve as an adhesive substrate for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), in comparison to pure TP. Preservation of the contractile phenotype of SMCs seeded on electrospun TP(70)/gel(30) was yet another promising feature of this scaffold. The nanostructured TP(70)/gel(30) demonstrated potential feasibility toward functioning as a vascular graft. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 101: 1165-1180, 2014. PMID:25042000

  9. Software-assisted live visualization system for subjacent blood vessels in endonasal endoscopic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, Ch.; Maschke, R.; Gruening, J.; Ernstberger, M.; Basan, F.; Baselt, T.; Grunert, R.; Hartmann, P.

    2013-02-01

    Minimal invasive surgery methods have received growing attention in recent years. In vital important areas, it is crucial for the surgeon to have a precise knowledge of the tissue structure. Especially the visualization of arteries is desirable, as the destruction of the same can be lethal to the patient. In order to meet this requirement, the study presents a novel assistance system for endoscopic surgery. While state-of-the art systems rely on pre-operational data like computer-tomographic maps and require the use of radiation, the goal of the presented approach is to provide the clarification of subjacent blood vessels on live images of the endoscope camera system. Based on the transmission and reflection spectra of various human tissues, a prototype system with a NIR illumination unit working at 808 nm was established. Several image filtering, processing and enhancement techniques have been investigated and evaluated on the raw pictures in order to obtain high quality results. The most important were increasing contrast and thresholding by difference of Gaussian method. Based on that, it is possible to rectify a fragmented artery pattern and extract geometrical information about the structure in terms of position and orientation. By superposing the original image and the extracted segment, the surgeon is assisted with valuable live pictures of the region of interest. The whole system has been tested on a laboratory scale. An outlook on the integration of such a system in a clinical environment and obvious benefits are discussed.

  10. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) Stabilizes Nascent Blood Vessels*

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo, Sarah Melissa P.; Kazlauskas, Andrius

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that VEGF-A and IGF-1 differ in their ability to stabilize newly formed blood vessels and endothelial cell tubes. Although VEGF-A failed to support an enduring vascular response, IGF-1 stabilized neovessels generated from primary endothelial cells derived from various vascular beds and mouse retinal explants. In these experimental systems, destabilization/regression was driven by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Because previous studies have established that Erk antagonizes LPA-mediated regression, we considered whether Erk was an essential component of IGF-dependent stabilization. Indeed, IGF-1 lost its ability to stabilize neovessels when the Erk pathway was inhibited pharmacologically. Furthermore, stabilization was associated with prolonged Erk activity. In the presence of IGF-1, Erk activity persisted longer than in the presence of VEGF or LPA alone. These studies reveal that VEGF and IGF-1 can have distinct inputs in the angiogenic process. In contrast to VEGF, IGF-1 stabilizes neovessels, which is dependent on Erk activity and associated with prolonged activation. PMID:25564613

  11. Potential Approaches to Enhance the Effects of Estrogen on Senescent Blood Vessels and Postmenopausal Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in postmenopausal than premenopausal women, suggesting vascular protective effects of estrogen. Vascular estrogen receptors ER?, ER? and a transmembrane estrogen-binding protein GPR30 have been described. Also, experimental studies have demonstrated vasodilator effects of estrogen on the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle and extracellular matrix. However, randomized clinical trials have not supported vascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), possibly due to the subjects' advanced age and age-related changes in estrogen synthesis and metabolic pathways, the vascular ERs number, distribution and integrity, and the post-ER vascular signaling pathways. Current MHT includes natural estrogens such as conjugated equine estrogen, as well as synthetic and semi-synthetic estrogens. New estrogenic formulations and hormone combinations have been developed. Phytoestrogens is being promoted as an alternative MHT. Specific ER modulators (SERMs), and selective agonists for ER? such as PPT, ER? such as DPN, and GPR30 such as G1 are being evaluated. In order to enhance the vascular effectiveness of MHT, its type, dose, route of administration and timing may need to be customized depending on the subject's age and pre-existing CVD. Also, the potential interaction of estrogen with progesterone and testosterone on vascular function may need to be considered in order to maximize the vascular benefits of MHT on senescent blood vessels and postmenopausal CVD. PMID:20210774

  12. Mast Cells Present Protrusions into Blood Vessels upon Tracheal Allergen Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Cheng, Laurence E.; McDonald, Donald M.; Caughey, George H.; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) and myeloid dendritic cells (DC) act proximally in detecting and processing antigens and immune insults. We sought to understand their comparative dynamic behavior with respect to the airway epithelium in the steady state and in response to an allergic stimulus in mouse trachea. We devised methods to label MC in living trachea and to demonstrate that MC and DC occupy distinct layers of the tracheal mucosa, with DC being closer to the lumen. DC numbers doubled after allergen challenge, but MC numbers remained stable. MC and DC migrated minimally in either steady state or allergen-challenge conditions, and their interactions with one another appeared to be stochastic and relatively infrequent. While DC, unlike MC, exhibited probing behaviors involving dendrites, these projections did not cross the epithelium into the airway lumen. MC typically were located too far from the epithelial surface to contact the tracheal lumen. However, MC had protrusions toward and into blood vessels, likely to load with IgE. Thus, DC and MC occupy distinct niches and engage in sessile surveillance in the mouse trachea. Little or no access of these cell types to the airway lumen suggests that trans-epithelial transport of proteins in the steady state would be required for them to access luminal antigens. PMID:25789765

  13. Evaluation of local density enhancement of microcapsules in artificial blood vessel during exposure to focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Masuda, Kohji; Watarai, Nobuyuki; Taguchi, Yuto; Kato, Toshikazu; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Chiba, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    We have proposed a physical DDS (Drug Delivery System) which makes use of microcapsules of ?m size, which may contain a specified drug and also are easily affected by ultrasound exposure near their resonant frequency, to release various kinds of medications. These capsules are easily detected and actuated by ultrasound. However, because of the diffusion of capsules after injection into human body, it was difficult to enhance the efficiency of drug delivery. Thus we have considered a method for controlling the density of capsules in flow which uses acoustic radiation force, which moves the capsules to balance flow resistance. We have experimented with trapping microcapsules or microbubbles in flow of an artificial blood vessel. We have evaluated the effect of radiation force by measuring the trapped area of capsules or bubbles for various frequencies, sound pressures, and exposure times of sinusoidal ultrasound. The trapped area of capsules or bubbles increased with sound pressure and exposure time, and decreased with frequency. From those results, we have derived optimal conditions for trapping the capsules or bubbles.

  14. Thermal expansion of vitrified blood vessels permeated with DP6 and synthetic ice modulators.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, David P; Taylor, Michael J; Jimenez-Rios, Jorge L; Rabin, Yoed

    2014-06-01

    This study provides thermal expansion data for blood vessels permeated with the cryoprotective cocktail DP6, when combined with selected synthetic ice modulators (SIMs): 12% polyethylene glycol 400, 6% 1,3-cyclohexanediol, and 6% 2,3-butanediol. The general classification of SIMs includes molecules that modulate ice nucleation and growth, or possess properties of stabilizing the amorphous state, by virtue of their chemical structure and at concentrations that are not explained on a purely colligative basis. The current study is part of an ongoing effort to characterize thermo-mechanical effects on structural integrity of cryopreserved materials, where thermal expansion is the driving mechanism to thermo-mechanical stress. This study focuses on the lower part of the cryogenic temperature range, where the cryoprotective agent (CPA) behaves as a solid for all practical applications. By combining results obtained in the current study with literature data on the thermal expansion in the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range, unified thermal expansion curves are presented. PMID:24769313

  15. Thermal Expansion of Vitrified Blood Vessels Permeated with DP6 and Synthetic Ice Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, David P.; Taylor, Michael J.; Jimenez-Rios, Jorge L.; Rabin, Yoed

    2014-01-01

    This study provides thermal expansion data for blood vessels permeated with the cryoprotective cocktail DP6, when combined with selected synthetic ice modulators (SIMs): 12% polyethylene glycol 400, 6% 1,3-cyclohexanediol, and 6% 2,3-butanediol. The general classification of SIMs includes molecules that modulate ice nucleation and growth, or possess properties of stabilizing the amorphous state, by virtue of their chemical structure and at concentrations that are not explained on a purely colligative basis. The current study is part of an ongoing effort to characterize thermo-mechanical effects on structural integrity of cryopreserved materials, where thermal expansion is the driving mechanism to thermo-mechanical stress. This study focuses on the lower part of the cryogenic temperature range, where the cryoprotective agent (CPA) behaves as a solid for all practical applications. By combining results obtained in the current study with literature data on the thermal expansion in the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range, unified thermal expansion curves are presented. PMID:24769313

  16. The Relationship of Retinal Vessel Diameters and Fractal Dimensions with Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaowei; Yuan, Yin; Gao, Zhonghai; Chen, Falin

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the correlation between quantitative retinal vascular parameters such as central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) and retinal vascular fractal dimension (D(f)), and cardiovascular risk factors in the Chinese Han population residing in the in islands of southeast China. Methodology/Principle Findings In this cross-sectional study, fundus photographs were collected and semi-automated analysis software was used to analyze retinal vessel diameters and fractal dimensions. Cardiovascular risk factors such as relevant medical history, blood pressure (BP), lipids, and blood glucose data were collected. Subjects had a mean age of 51.9±12.0 years and included 812 (37.4%) males and 1,357 (62.6%) females. Of the subjects, 726 (33.5%) were overweight, 226 (10.4%) were obese, 272 (12.5%) had diabetes, 738 (34.0%) had hypertension, and 1,156 (53.3%) had metabolic syndrome. After controlling for the effects of potential confounders, multivariate analyses found that age (β = 0.06, P = 0.008), sex (β = 1.33, P = 0.015), mean arterial blood pressure (β = −0.12, P<0.001), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (β = −0.22, P = 0.008), and CRVE (β = 0.23, P<0.001) were significantly associated with CRAE. Age (β = −0.0012, P<0.001), BP classification (prehypertension: β = −0.0075, P = 0.014; hypertension: β = −0.0131, P = 0.002), and hypertension history (β = −0.0007, P = 0.009) were significantly associated with D(f). Conclusions/Significance D(f) exhibits a stronger association with BP than CRAE. Thus, D(f) may become a useful indicator of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25188273

  17. Investigation of source-detector separation optimization for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor for liver blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J. S.; Akl, T. J.; Coté, G. L.; Wilson, M. A.; Ericson, M. N.

    2011-03-01

    An implanted system is being developed to monitor transplanted liver health during the critical 7-10 day period posttransplantation. The unit will monitor organ perfusion and oxygen consumption using optically-based probes placed on both the inflow and outflow blood vessels, and on the liver parenchymal surface. Sensing probes are based on a 3- wavelength LED source and a photodiode detector. Sample diffuse reflectance is measured at 735, 805, and 940 nm. To ascertain optimal source-to-photodetector spacing for perfusion measurement in blood vessels, an ex vivo study was conducted. In this work, a dye mixture simulating 80% blood oxygen saturation was developed and perfused through excised porcine arteries while collecting data for various preset probe source-to-photodetector spacings. The results from this study demonstrate a decrease in the optical signal with decreasing LED drive current and a reduction in perfusion index signal with increasing probe spacing. They also reveal a 2- to 4-mm optimal range for blood vessel perfusion probe source-to-photodetector spacing that allows for sufficient perfusion signal modulation depth with maximized signal to noise ratio (SNR). These findings are currently being applied to guide electronic configuration and probe placement for in vivo liver perfusion porcine model studies.

  18. Investigation of source-detector separation optimization for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor for liver blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Akl, Tony; Cote, Gerard L.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance

    2011-01-01

    An implanted system is being developed to monitor transplanted liver health during the critical 7-10 day period posttransplantation. The unit will monitor organ perfusion and oxygen consumption using optically-based probes placed on both the inflow and outflow blood vessels, and on the liver parenchymal surface. Sensing probes are based on a 3- wavelength LED source and a photodiode detector. Sample diffuse reflectance is measured at 735, 805, and 940 nm. To ascertain optimal source-to-photodetector spacing for perfusion measurement in blood vessels, an ex vivo study was conducted. In this work, a dye mixture simulating 80% blood oxygen saturation was developed and perfused through excised porcine arteries while collecting data for various preset probe source-to-photodetector spacings. The results from this study demonstrate a decrease in the optical signal with decreasing LED drive current and a reduction in perfusion index signal with increasing probe spacing. They also reveal a 2- to 4-mm optimal range for blood vessel perfusion probe source-to-photodetector spacing that allows for sufficient perfusion signal modulation depth with maximized signal to noise ratio (SNR). These findings are currently being applied to guide electronic configuration and probe placement for in vivo liver perfusion porcine model studies.

  19. Intramedullary blood vessels of the spinal cord express V1a vasopressin receptors: visualization by a biotinylated ligand.

    PubMed

    Sermasi, E; Howl, J; Pyner, S; Wheatley, M; Coote, J H

    1995-12-01

    The neurohypophysial peptide hormone [Arg8]vasopressin (AVP) has well documented pressor effects in the periphery. These are mediated by vasopressin receptors (VPRs) of the V1a subtype, expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, which induce vascular contraction when activated. AVP also has effects on the vasculature of the brain, where it has been reported to induce both vasodilation and vasoconstriction. The responsiveness of blood vessels of the spinal cord, however, has received little attention. To determine the morphology and distribution of blood vessels within the spinal cord, vessels were vizualised using a mouse anti-rat smooth muscle alpha actin IgG as primary antibody and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti-mouse IgG secondary antibodies. A complementary vizualisation strategy which detected the endogenous peroxidase activity of red blood cells within vessels was also utilised. The characteristics of the structures observed using both visualisation strategies were typical of blood vessels. VPRs were localized using recently characterized high affinity biotinylated analogue of AVP (PhAcAL(Btn)VP), which is selective for the V1a subtype of VPR. PhAcAL(Btn)VP:VPR complexes were subsequently visualized by avidin-Texas red. The pharmacological characteristics of these sites were established using selective analogues of vasopressin and oxytocin. This confirmed that V1a receptors were indeed being visualized. The structures observed following visualization of VPRs had the same morphology as the vasculature revealed by the anti smooth muscle alpha-actin antibody. It can therefore be concluded that the blood vessels of the spinal cord express VPRs and are potentially responsive to AVP. Furthermore, VPRs were detected on capillaries of the microvasculature. As these capillaries are devoid of smooth muscle, VPRs must be expressed by endothelial cells as well as by smooth muscle cells. This distribution of VPRs would enable AVP to regulate local blood flow. The source of the AVP could be the general circulation, or perhaps more likely, to be local release from vasopressinergic hypothalamic neurones which are known to innervate specific regions of the spinal cord. PMID:8751290

  20. Analysis by NASA's VESGEN Software of Retinal Blood Vessels Before and After 70-Day Bed Rest: A Retrospective Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghunandan, Sneha; Vyas, Ruchi J.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Taibbi, Giovanni; Zanello, Susana B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment associated with increased intracranial pressure (VIIP) are incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions. Impairments include decreased near visual acuity, posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, optic disc edema and cotton wool spots. We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within the retinal blood vessels that precede development of visual and other ocular impairments. Potential contributions of retinal vascular remodeling to VIIP etiology are therefore being investigated by NASAs innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software for two studies: (1) head-down tilt in human subjects before and after 70 days of bed rest, and (2) U.S. crew members before and after ISS missions. VESGEN analysis in previous research supported by the US National Institutes of Health identified surprising new opportunities to regenerate retinal vessels during early-stage, potentially reversible progression of the visually impairing and blinding disease, diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Ovarian angiogenesis. Phenotypic characterization of endothelial cells in a physiological model of blood vessel growth and regression.

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, H. G.; Braun, K.; Telemenakis, I.; Modlich, U.; Kuhn, W.

    1995-01-01

    Angiogenesis occurs during embryogenesis and is a down-regulated process in the healthy adult that is almost exclusively linked to pathological conditions such as tumor growth, wound healing, and inflammation. Physiological angiogenic processes in the adult are restricted to the female reproductive system where they occur cyclically during the ovarian and uterine cycle as well as during pregnancy. By systematically analyzing the phenotypic changes of endothelial cells during bovine corpus luteum (CL) formation and regression, we have established a physiological model of blood vessel growth and regression. Quantitation of vessel density, percentage of vessels with lumen, and ratio of Bandeiraea simplicifolia-I to von Willebrand Factor-positive endothelial cells were established as parameters of angiogenesis. Sprouting endothelial cells invade the growing CL and continue to grow throughout the first third of the ovarian cycle. Thereafter the mature CL is characterized by a dense network of vessels with gradually decreasing vessel density. During luteolysis and for several weeks thereafter (regressing and residual CL) all newly formed vessels regress, which is accompanied by gradual foreshortening and rounding of endothelial cells and subsequent detachment. Based on histochemical detection of nucleosomal fragmentation products physiological blood vessel regression in the cyclic CL does not appear to involve endothelial cell apoptosis. Lectin histochemical analysis revealed a distinct alteration of endothelial cell glycoconjugate expression during ovarian angiogenesis comparable with the distinct pattern of hyperglycosylation of cultured migrating endothelial cells (up-regulation of binding sites for Lycopersicon esculentum lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, neuraminidase-treated peanut agglutinin, and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I on sprouting ECs). Northern blot analysis of glycosyltransferases during the different stages of angiogenesis revealed an up-regulation of beta-galactoside alpha 2,6-sialyltransferase and alpha 1,3-galactosyltransferase mRNA expression during the angiogenic stages of CL formation. These data establish the ovarian angiogenesis model as a suitable experimental system to study the functional and phenotypic properties of endothelial cells in sprouting and regressing blood vessels and provide additional evidence for the importance of endothelial cell surface glycoconjugates during angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7543733

  2. Ex vivo bubble production from ovine large blood vessels: size on detachment and evidence of "active spots".

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Marmur, A

    2014-08-15

    Nanobubbles formed on the hydrophobic silicon wafer were shown to be the source of gas micronuclei from which bubbles evolved during decompression. Bubbles were also formed after decompression on the luminal surface of ovine blood vessels. Four ovine blood vessels: aorta, pulmonary vein, pulmonary artery, and superior vena cava, were compressed to 1013 kPa for 21 h. They were then decompressed, photographed at 1-s intervals, and bubble size was measured on detachment. There were certain spots at which bubbles appeared, either singly or in a cluster. Mean detachment diameter was between 0.7 and 1.0 mm. The finding of active spots at which bubbles nucleate is a new, hitherto unreported observation. It is possible that these are the hydrophobic spots at which bubbles nucleate, stabilise, and later transform into the gas micronuclei that grow into bubbles. The possible neurological effects of these large arterial bubbles should be further explored. PMID:24933644

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of soft grains: Malaria-infected red blood cells motion within obstructed 2-D capillary vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, L.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.; Viridi, S.

    2014-02-01

    Molecular dynamics has been widely used to numerically solve equation of motion of classical many-particle system. It can be used to simulate many systems including biophysics, whose complexity level is determined by the involved elements. Based on this method, a numerical model had been constructed to mimic the behaviour of malaria-infected red blood cells within capillary vessel. The model was governed by three forces namely Coulomb force, normal force, and Stokes force. By utilizing two dimensional four-cells scheme, theoretical observation was carried out to test its capability. Although the parameters were chosen deliberately, all of the quantities were given arbitrary value. Despite this fact, the results were quite satisfactory. Combined with the previous results, it can be said that the proposed model were sufficient enough to mimic the malaria-infected red blood cells motion within obstructed capillary vessel.

  4. Study on the Dynamic Compound Structure Composed of Mast Cells, Blood Vessels, and Nerves in Rat Acupoint

    PubMed Central

    Mingfu, Luo; Xiaotong, Dong; Xiaojing, Song; Jin, Jiang; Jinling, Zhann; Ying, Han

    2013-01-01

    Background. Circulation system, immunity system, and nervous system have a close relationship with meridian phenomen. However, there is still lack of the results of dynamic changes of these structures in acupoint. The aim of this study is to explore the interrelationship by composite staining techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings. Twenty rats were separated into electroacupuncture group (EA) and control group (Con) randomly. In EA group, the Zusanli and Weishu were stimulated with the 0.1?mA for 25?min. The tissue of these acupoints was double-stained with acetylcholinesterase and Toluidine blue. The compound structure of mast cells, nervous fibers, and mast cells in the acupoint was observed. Conclusions/Significance. The blood vessels, mast cells and acetylcholinesterase responded nerves were clearly observed in acupoint tissues. EA can result in the mast cell recruitment and migration along the blood vessels and nervous bundle, which conformed the dynamic compound structure and played important roles in acupuncture. PMID:23878591

  5. Antagonism and synergy between extracellular BMP modulators Tsg and BMPER balance blood vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Heinke, Jennifer; Juschkat, Maria; Charlet, Anne; Mnich, Leonie; Helbing, Thomas; Bode, Christoph; Patterson, Cam; Moser, Martin

    2013-07-15

    Growth and regeneration of blood vessels are crucial processes during embryonic development and in adult disease. Members of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family are growth factors known to play a key role in vascular development. The BMP pathway is controlled by extracellular BMP modulators such as BMP endothelial cell precursor derived regulator (BMPER), which we reported previously acts proangiogenically on endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Here, we explore the function of other BMP modulators, especially Tsg, on endothelial cell behaviour and compare them to BMPER. In Matrigel assays, BMP modulators chordin and noggin had no stimulatory effect; however, gremlin and Tsg enhanced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) sprouting. As the activation dynamics of Tsg were similar to those of BMPER, we further investigated the proangiogenic effect of Tsg on endothelial cells. Tsg enhanced endothelial cell ingrowth in the mouse Matrigel plug assay as well as HUVEC sprouting, migration and proliferation in vitro, dependent on Akt, Erk and Smad signalling pathway activation in a concentration-dependent manner. Surprisingly, silencing of Tsg also increased HUVEC sprouting, migration and proliferation, which is again associated with Akt, Erk and Smad signalling pathway activation. Furthermore, we reveal that Tsg and BMPER interfere with each other to enhance proangiogenic events. However, in vivo the presence of Tsg as well as of BMPER is mandatory for regular development of the zebrafish vasculature. Taken together, our results suggest that BMPER and Tsg maintain a fine-tuned equilibrium that controls BMP pathway activity and is necessary for vascular cell homeostasis. PMID:23641068

  6. Relation of Blood Pressure to Retinal Vessel Diameter in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Zinman, Bernard; Gardiner, Robert; Suissa, Samy; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Donnelly, Sandra M.; Goodyer, Paul; Strand, Trudy; Mauer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of blood pressure (BP) and use of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) to retinal vessel diameter in normotensive, normoalbuminuric persons with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Participants Persons with T1DM and gradable fundus photographs both at baseline (n=147) and 5-year follow-up (n=124). Methods Clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BPs (ABP) were measured. Retinal arteriolar and venular diameters were measured using a computer-assisted technique. Individual arteriolar and venular measurements were combined into summary indices that reflect the average retinal arteriolar (central retinal arteriolar equivalent [CRAE]) and venular (central retinal venular equivalent [CRVE]) diameter of an eye, respectively. Main Outcome Measures CRAE and CRVE. Results While controlling for age, study site, glycosylated hemoglobin and ambulatory pulse rate, daytime ambulatory systolic (-0.29 ?m effect per 1mmHg, P=.02) and daytime ambulatory diastolic (-0.44 ?m effect per 1mmHg, P=.04), nighttime ambulatory systolic (-0.27 ?m effect per 1mmHg, P=.03), and 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP (-0.31 ?m effect per 1mmHg, P=.03) were cross-sectionally associated with a smaller CRAE. While controlling for age, study site, glycosylated hemoglobin, ambulatory pulse rate and baseline CRAE, no BP measure was associated with a change in CRAE or CRVE over 5 years of follow-up. Treatment with losartan or enalapril was not associated with a statistically significant change in CRAE or CRVE. Conclusions ACEI or ARB therapy does not affect retinal arteriolar or venular diameter in normotensive persons with T1DM. PMID:20142543

  7. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of estrogen in the aging blood vessels and thereby enhancing the efficacy and safety of MHT in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:19442151

  8. Effects of viscosity and constraints on the dispersion and dissipation of waves in large blood vessels. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E.; Anliker, M.; Chang, I.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of blood viscosity on dissipation as well as dispersion of small waves in arteries and veins by means of a parametric study. A linearized analysis of axisymmetric waves in a cylindrical membrane that contains a viscous fluid indicates that there are two families of waves: a family of slow waves and one of fast waves. The faster waves are shown to be more sensitive to variations in the elastic properties of the medium surrounding the blood vessels and at high values of the frequency parameter alpha. At low values of alpha the effects of viscosity on attenuation are reversed.

  9. Filtering properties of an adaptive trend operator and the application for determining the arterial blood velocity in retinal vessels.

    PubMed

    Baresová, E; Grieszbach, G; Schack, B; Vilser, W; Bräuer-Burchardt, C; Senff, I

    This study deals with methods focused on estimating blood velocity. The estimation of the linear trend function of a non-stationary signal based on the adaptive recursive estimation of the mean value function is used for the determination of the time delay of two indicator dilution curves. The filter property of this trend operator depends on the choice of a constant parameter c, the so-called adaptation factor. The functional connection between the filter property and the adaptation factor is considered in such a way that an objective calculation of arterial blood velocity in retinal vessels is possible. PMID:8776709

  10. Laser-optical method of visualization the local net of tissue blood vessels and its biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, M. M.; Asimov, R. M.; Rubinov, A. N.

    2007-06-01

    New approach in laser-optical diagnostic methods of cell metabolism based on visualization the local net of tissue blood vessels is proposed. Optical model of laser - tissue interaction and algorithm of mathematical calculation of optical signals is developed. Novel technology of local tissue hypoxia elimination based on laser-induced photodissosiation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels is developed. Method of determination of oxygen diffusion coefficient into tissue on the base of kinetics of tissue oxygenation TcPO II under the laser irradiation is proposed. The results of mathematical modeling the kinetic of oxygen distribution into tissue from arterial blood are presented. The possibility of calculation and determination of the level of TcPO II in zones with the disturbed blood microcirculation is demonstrated. The increase of the value of oxygen release rate more than for times under the irradiation by laser light is obtained. It is shown that the efficiency of laser-induced oxygenation by means of increasing oxygen concentration in blood plasma is comparable with the method of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) at the same time gaining advantages in local action. Different biomedical applications of developing method are discussed.

  11. Precise manipulation of a microrobot in the pulsatile flow of human blood vessels using magnetic navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, S. M.; Jang, G. H.; Choi, J. H.; Park, S. H.; Park, J. O.

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a method to precisely manipulate a microrobot in the pulsatile flow that simulates the flow characteristics of human blood vessels by utilizing the electromagnetic transfer function of a magnetic navigation system (MNS). The frequency response characteristics of the MNS were utilized so that the input voltages in each coil can precisely generate the required time-varying magnetic force of a microrobot. An experiment which successfully anchoring a microrobot in a pulsatile flow was conducted to verify the proposed method.

  12. Cdc42 is required for cytoskeletal support of endothelial cell adhesion during blood vessel formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Barry, David M; Xu, Ke; Meadows, Stryder M; Zheng, Yi; Norden, Pieter R; Davis, George E; Cleaver, Ondine

    2015-09-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases has been shown to be required in endothelial cells (ECs) during blood vessel formation. However, the underlying cellular events controlled by different GTPases remain unclear. Here, we assess the cellular mechanisms by which Cdc42 regulates mammalian vascular morphogenesis and maintenance. In vivo deletion of Cdc42 in embryonic ECs (Cdc42(Tie2KO)) results in blocked lumen formation and endothelial tearing, leading to lethality of mutant embryos by E9-10 due to failed blood circulation. Similarly, inducible deletion of Cdc42 (Cdc42(Cad5KO)) at mid-gestation blocks angiogenic tubulogenesis. By contrast, deletion of Cdc42 in postnatal retinal vessels leads to aberrant vascular remodeling and sprouting, as well as markedly reduced filopodia formation. We find that Cdc42 is essential for organization of EC adhesion, as its loss results in disorganized cell-cell junctions and reduced focal adhesions. Endothelial polarity is also rapidly lost upon Cdc42 deletion, as seen by failed localization of apical podocalyxin (PODXL) and basal actin. We link observed failures to a defect in F-actin organization, both in vitro and in vivo, which secondarily impairs EC adhesion and polarity. We also identify Cdc42 effectors Pak2/4 and N-WASP, as well as the actomyosin machinery, to be crucial for EC actin organization. This work supports the notion of Cdc42 as a central regulator of the cellular machinery in ECs that drives blood vessel formation. PMID:26253403

  13. BLOOD VESSELS IN GANGLIA IN HUMAN ESOPHAGUS MIGHT EXPLAIN THE HIGHER FREQUENCY OF MEGAESOPHAGUS COMPARED WITH MEGACOLON

    PubMed Central

    Adad, Sheila Jorge; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Jammal, Alessandro Adad

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the existence of blood vessels within ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the human esophagus and colon. At necropsy, 15 stillborns, newborns and children up to two years of age, with no gastrointestinal disorders, were examined. Rings of the esophagus and colon were analyzed and then fixed in formalin and processed for paraffin. Histological sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin, Giemsa and immunohistochemistry for the characterization of endothelial cells, using antibodies for anti-factor VIII and CD31. Blood vessels were identified within the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, and no blood vessels were found in any ganglia of the colon. It was concluded that the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus are vascularized, while the ganglia of the colon are avascular. Vascularization within the esophageal ganglia could facilitate the entrance of infectious agents, as well as the development of inflammatory responses (ganglionitis) and denervation, as found in Chagas disease and idiopathic achalasia. This could explain the higher frequency of megaesophagus compared with megacolon. PMID:25351549

  14. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Baras, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (A?) deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of A? in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of A? from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of A? from the brain. PMID:26448331

  15. Gain-of-function somatic mutations contribute to inflammation and blood vessel damage that lead to Alzheimer dementia: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Vincent T

    2016-02-01

    Amyloid deposits are a characteristic feature of advanced Alzheimer dementia (AD), but whether they initiate the disease or are a consequence of it remains an unsettled question. To explore an alternative pathogenic mechanism, I propose that the triggering events that begin the pathogenic cascade are not amyloid deposits but damaged blood vessels caused by inflammatory reactions that lead to ischemia, amyloid accumulation, axonal degeneration, synaptic loss, and eventually irreversible neuronal cell death. Inflammation and blood vessel damage are well recognized complications of AD, but what causes them and why the cerebral microvasculature is affected have never been adequately addressed. Because heritable autosomal dominant mutations of NLRP3, APP, TREX1, NOTCH3, and Col4A1 are known to provoke inflammatory reactions and damage the brain in a wide variety of diseases, I propose that one or more low abundant, gain-of-function somatic mutations of the same 5 gene families damage the microvasculature of the brain that leads to dementia. This implies that the pathogenic triggers that lead to AD are derived not from external invaders or amyloid but from oxidative damage of our own genes.-Marchesi, V. T. Gain-of-function somatic mutations contribute to inflammation and blood vessel damage that lead to Alzheimer dementia: a hypothesis. PMID:26527064

  16. Active induction of in vivo microbubbles by acoustic radiation force at the bifurcation of blood vessel and its evaluation.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kohji; Koido, Jun; Miyazawa, Shinya; Wada, Hikaru; Hosaka, Naoto; Mochizuki, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Alhough the development of drug delivery system using microbubbles and ultrasound is expected, because microbubbles diffuse in bloodstream, we have so far reported our attempts for active control of the microbubbles in flow by acoustic radiation force in order to increase local concentration of the microbubbles. However, there was no evidence that in vivo microbubbles act as similar as in vitro experiments, because there were limitations for reproduction of in vivo conditions. In this study, we have elucidated the relationship between brightness variation and microbubbles concentration in the suspension to estimate the absolute concentration in an invisible condition considering in vivo experiment. Then we conducted an experiment of active induction of microbubbles in a Y-form bifurcation of artificial blood vessel, where experimental conditions were with focused ultrasound, the central frequency of 5 MHz, flow velocity of 30 mm/s, and maximum sound pressure of 300 kPa-pp, respectively. Then we applied the conditions for active induction of in vivo microbubbles to compare with in vitro experiments. We used a bifurcation of blood vessel in an ear of a rabbit because the bifurcation shape in its blood vessel is visible. As the results of the experiment, the microbubbles concentration in the induced path was almost two times higher than that in the other path, which agrees with the results from in vitro experiments. PMID:26736523

  17. Comparative analysis of the development of collateral vessels in macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion following grid laser or ranibizumab treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kokolaki, Afroditi Eleni; Georgalas, Ilias; Koutsandrea, Chryssanthi; Kotsolis, Athanasios; Niskopoulou, Maria; Ladas, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the differences in the development of collateral vessels in patients with macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) after treatment with either grid laser or ranibizumab (RNB). Methods Comparative study including patients with macular edema due to acute BRVO and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) between 20/40 and 20/200. The sample was divided into two groups according to the treatment applied: laser group, including eyes treated with Argon laser when retinal hemorrhages were sufficiently absorbed to perform the treatment, and RNB group, including patients treated initially with one monthly intravitreal injection for a period of 3 months of RNB and more injections according to need thereafter. Before treatment patients in both groups, received a complete ophthalmic examination, including BCVA, fundus examination, optical coherence tomography, fundus color photography, and fundus fluorescein angiography (FA). This same protocol of examination was repeated in every visit after treatment, except FA that was only repeated every 3 months. The detection of the collateral vessels was done by two experienced examiners based on the analysis of the early phase of the FA. If there was a discrepancy in their judgment, the criterion of a third examiner evaluating the FA was considered. Results Mean baseline BCVA was 0.86±0.26 and 0.82±0.25 (logMAR [logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution]) in the RNB and laser groups, respectively (P=0.83). At the end of the follow-up, mean BCVA was 0.38±0.18 and 0.64±0.33 (logMAR) in the RNB and laser groups, respectively. The difference in the final BCVA between both groups was statistically significant (P=0.002). Collaterals developed in both groups; 66.67% of patients (14 out of 21 patients) developed collaterals at a mean time of 6.14±2.60 months after diagnosis in the RNB group, and 68.18% (16 out of 22 patients) developed collaterals in the laser group at a mean time of 6.2±1.97 months after diagnosis. No statistically significant differences between groups were found in the number of cases developing collateral vessels (P=1.00) as well as in the time required for such development (P=0.947). Conclusion The use of RNB for the treatment of macular edema due to BRVO does not seem to alter the development of collateral vessels. Future studies with larger samples are required to confirm these outcomes. PMID:26366053

  18. Bubble size on detachment from the luminal aspect of ovine large blood vessels after decompression: The effect of mechanical disturbance.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Ran; Arieli, Uri; Marmur, Abraham

    2015-09-15

    Bubbles nucleate and develop after decompression at active spots on the luminal aspect of ovine large blood vessels. Series of bubbles were shown to detach from the active spot with a mean diameter of 0.7-1.0mm in calm conditions. The effect of mechanical disturbance (striking the bowl containing the vessel or tangential flow) was studied on ovine blood vessels stretched on microscope slides and photographed after hyperbaric exposure. Diameter on detachment after a heavy blow to the bowl was 0.87 ± 0.43 mm (mean ± SD), no different from bubbles which detached without striking the bowl (0.86 ± 0.28 mm). Bubble diameter on detachment during pulsatile tangential flow at 234 cm/min, 0.99 ± 0.36 mm, was not smaller than that seen in the same blood vessels in calm conditions (0.81 ± 0.34 mm). The active spots were stained for lipids, proving their hydrophobicity. The most abundant active spots, which produced only a few bubbles, did not stain for lipids thereafter. The possibility that phospholipids were removed along with detached bubbles may correlate with acclimation to diving. The finding of bubble production at the active spots matches observed phenomena in divers: variable sensitivity to decompression, acclimation to diving, the effect of elevated gas load on increased bubble formation, a higher bubble score in the second dive on the same day, and unexplained neurological symptoms after decompression. Large bubbles released from the arterial circulation give serious cause for concern. PMID:26003848

  19. Intercapillary bridging cells: immunocytochemical characteristics of cells that connect blood vessels in the retina.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Jorge, Luísa; Llombart, Cristina; Ramos, David; López-Luppo, Mariana; Valença, Andreia; Nacher, Victor; Navarro, Marc; Carretero, Ana; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Rodriguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Ruberte, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    Intervascular bridges are fibrous strands that connect neighboring capillaries. These strands present associated cells, intervascular bridging cells (IBCs), whose nature and functional significance remains controversial. The aim of this study was to characterize the immunophenotype of IBCs, and contribute to understand their mechanical and intercellular communication properties in the retina. Quantification and retinal distribution of IBCs were also determined. For this purpose, C57BL/6N and nestin-GFP transgenic mice, as well as human retinas, were used. Whole-mount retinas were studied by means of immunohistochemistry and cytochemistry, and isolation of retinal vasculature was achieved by trypsin/pepsin digest technique. PAS reaction and the immunolabeling with anti-collagen IV and laminin antibodies revealed that IBCs were completely surrounded by a basement membrane, connecting two or more neighboring capillaries. IBCs were scarce and their number decreased with age. They were preferentially localized in the deep vascular plexus. In a murine model of experimental glaucoma, methylcellulose injected eyes showed retinal neovascularization and increased number of IBCs in the deep vascular plexus. IBCs were marked with anti-NG2, anti-PDGFR-β and anti-CD34 antibodies, and with tomato lectin, and were negative for PECAM-1. IBCs expressed nestin and filamentous actin, but desmin and α-smooth muscle actin were not detected. Moreover, these cells expressed the gap junction protein connexin 43. These results showed that IBCs had a pericytic nature since they expressed NG2 and the receptor for PDGF-B, and they were negative for PECAM-1. However, they were marked with CD34 and the tomato lectin, suggesting that they constitute a special subtype of pericytes, sharing characteristics with endothelial cells. IBCs presumably present mechanical functions due to the presence of filamentous actin. Connexin 43 was found in IBCs, suggesting that these cells allow intercellular communication between adjacent capillaries. This may represent an advantage for vasomotor tone integration and coordination in blood vessels without innervation, such as those of the retina. PMID:22484557

  20. Dynamic monitoring of platelet deposition on severely damaged vessel wall in flowing blood. Effects of different stenoses on thrombus growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, R.; Badimon, J.J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Badimon, L. )

    1990-03-01

    The formation of an arterial thrombus is a dynamic process that depends upon the characteristics of blood flow, the triggering substrate, and the blood components. We have developed and characterized a sensitive and specific computer-assisted nuclear scintigraphic method to study the dynamics of platelet deposition on severely damaged vessels both in vitro and in vivo in nonstenotic and stenotic flow conditions. Heparinized pig blood with Indium-111-labeled platelets was perfused for 50 minutes. Method variability in both static and flowing conditions was evaluated by Indium-111-labeled transferrin and Indium-111-labeled platelets. Positive scintigrams were obtained mainly in the presence of severe high grade stenoses on a thrombogenic substrate. Since the method is highly sensitive, computer-assisted axial dependence analysis was performed on the scintigraphic images to locate the thrombotic accumulation with respect to the area of the stenosis and to monitor the dynamic changes in platelet accumulation over time. Both in vitro and in vivo the highest level of platelet deposition occurred at the apex of the 80% stenosis, where embolization could be usually detected after 30 minutes of perfusion. This study is the first to assess the dynamics of thrombus growth in nonparallel flow streamlines such as are encountered in stenotic vessels. This method provides a new experimental tool with which to study factors affecting thrombus formation and stability.

  1. Effects of electrical stunning frequency and voltage combinations on the presence of engorged blood vessels in goose liver.

    PubMed

    Turcsán, Zs; Varga, L; Szigeti, J; Turcsán, J; Csurák, I; Szalai, M

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nine electrical stunning methods using various frequency and voltage combinations on the occurrence of engorged blood vessels in goose liver. Two hundred seventy Gourmaud geese (liver-type line SI 14) were slaughtered at 12 wk of age, in groups of 90 at three different times. Thirty birds each were subjected to one of the nine stunning methods. Neck cutting was performed immediately after stunning. The duration of exsanguination was 11 min. After completion of bleeding, the birds were scalded, defeathered manually, and kept refrigerated. At 1 d postmortem, the carcasses were eviscerated and cut up. From the slaughterhouse, the livers chilled in ice were transported to the cannery where they were weighed and graded at 2 d postmortem and were further processed. All of the veins and capillaries full of blood were removed from livers, because their presence was a hazard to product quality by causing discoloration of the canned liver, and the percentage of liver weight loss was then determined. The loss in liver weight due to removal of engorged blood vessels was reduced (P < 0.05) at 350 Hz, 70 to 90 V, and 80 to 85 mA when compared to the results obtained with any other stunning method tested. It was concluded that the use of high-frequency currents for electrical stunning of liver geese might have considerable commercial advantages. PMID:14653479

  2. Automatic extraction of blood vessels in the retinal vascular tree using multiscale medialness.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Mariem; Malek, Jihene; Azar, Ahmad Taher; Montesinos, Philippe; Belmabrouk, Hafedh; Esclarín Monreal, Julio; Krissian, Karl

    2015-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for vessel extraction in retinal images. The first step consists of applying anisotropic diffusion filtering in the initial vessel network in order to restore disconnected vessel lines and eliminate noisy lines. In the second step, a multiscale line-tracking procedure allows detecting all vessels having similar dimensions at a chosen scale. Computing the individual image maps requires different steps. First, a number of points are preselected using the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix. These points are expected to be near to a vessel axis. Then, for each preselected point, the response map is computed from gradient information of the image at the current scale. Finally, the multiscale image map is derived after combining the individual image maps at different scales (sizes). Two publicly available datasets have been used to test the performance of the suggested method. The main dataset is the STARE project's dataset and the second one is the DRIVE dataset. The experimental results, applied on the STARE dataset, show a maximum accuracy average of around 94.02%. Also, when performed on the DRIVE database, the maximum accuracy average reaches 91.55%. PMID:25977682

  3. Automatic Extraction of Blood Vessels in the Retinal Vascular Tree Using Multiscale Medialness

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Jihene; Montesinos, Philippe; Belmabrouk, Hafedh; Esclarín Monreal, Julio; Krissian, Karl

    2015-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for vessel extraction in retinal images. The first step consists of applying anisotropic diffusion filtering in the initial vessel network in order to restore disconnected vessel lines and eliminate noisy lines. In the second step, a multiscale line-tracking procedure allows detecting all vessels having similar dimensions at a chosen scale. Computing the individual image maps requires different steps. First, a number of points are preselected using the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix. These points are expected to be near to a vessel axis. Then, for each preselected point, the response map is computed from gradient information of the image at the current scale. Finally, the multiscale image map is derived after combining the individual image maps at different scales (sizes). Two publicly available datasets have been used to test the performance of the suggested method. The main dataset is the STARE project's dataset and the second one is the DRIVE dataset. The experimental results, applied on the STARE dataset, show a maximum accuracy average of around 94.02%. Also, when performed on the DRIVE database, the maximum accuracy average reaches 91.55%. PMID:25977682

  4. EMC viral infection of the coronary blood vessels in newborn mice: viral vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Burch, G. E.; Rayburn, P.

    1977-01-01

    The coronary arteries, veins and capillaries of newborn mice experimentally infected with encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus were studied histologically and electronmicroscopically. Damage to these coronary vessels was patchy. Some lesions were extensive, particularly when adjacent to areas of myocardial damage. The histological findings consisted of swelling of adventitial and endothelial cells pyknosis, and polymorphonuclear leucocyte and round cell infiltration. Histological and ultrastructural changes occurred in all three layers of the vessels. EMC viral crystals were found electronmicroscopically in the adventitia of the coronary arteries and veins. Ultrastructural lesions typical of virocytonecrosis were frequently noted in association with viral crystals, establishing the viral etiology of the lesions. These findings lend support to the concept that the patchy atherosclerotic and arteriosclerotic lesions found in the coronary vessels of man may represent healed lesions of previous viral damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:201264

  5. Effect of Blood Vessel Segmentation on the Outcome of Electroporation-Based Treatments of Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mar?an, Marija; Kos, Bor; Miklav?i?, Damijan

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation-based treatments rely on increasing the permeability of the cell membrane by high voltage electric pulses applied to tissue via electrodes. To ensure that the whole tumor is covered with sufficiently high electric field, accurate numerical models are built based on individual patient anatomy. Extraction of patient's anatomy through segmentation of medical images inevitably produces some errors. In order to ensure the robustness of treatment planning, it is necessary to evaluate the potential effect of such errors on the electric field distribution. In this work we focus on determining the effect of errors in automatic segmentation of hepatic vessels on the electric field distribution in electroporation-based treatments in the liver. First, a numerical analysis was performed on a simple 'sphere and cylinder' model for tumors and vessels of different sizes and relative positions. Second, an analysis of two models extracted from medical images of real patients in which we introduced variations of an error of the automatic vessel segmentation method was performed. The results obtained from a simple model indicate that ignoring the vessels when calculating the electric field distribution can cause insufficient coverage of the tumor with electric fields. Results of this study indicate that this effect happens for small (10 mm) and medium-sized (30 mm) tumors, especially in the absence of a central electrode inserted in the tumor. The results obtained from the real-case models also show higher negative impact of automatic vessel segmentation errors on the electric field distribution when the central electrode is absent. However, the average error of the automatic vessel segmentation did not have an impact on the electric field distribution if the central electrode was present. This suggests the algorithm is robust enough to be used in creating a model for treatment parameter optimization, but with a central electrode. PMID:25941806

  6. Effect of blood vessel segmentation on the outcome of electroporation-based treatments of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Mar?an, Marija; Kos, Bor; Miklav?i?, Damijan

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation-based treatments rely on increasing the permeability of the cell membrane by high voltage electric pulses applied to tissue via electrodes. To ensure that the whole tumor is covered with sufficiently high electric field, accurate numerical models are built based on individual patient anatomy. Extraction of patient's anatomy through segmentation of medical images inevitably produces some errors. In order to ensure the robustness of treatment planning, it is necessary to evaluate the potential effect of such errors on the electric field distribution. In this work we focus on determining the effect of errors in automatic segmentation of hepatic vessels on the electric field distribution in electroporation-based treatments in the liver. First, a numerical analysis was performed on a simple 'sphere and cylinder' model for tumors and vessels of different sizes and relative positions. Second, an analysis of two models extracted from medical images of real patients in which we introduced variations of an error of the automatic vessel segmentation method was performed. The results obtained from a simple model indicate that ignoring the vessels when calculating the electric field distribution can cause insufficient coverage of the tumor with electric fields. Results of this study indicate that this effect happens for small (10 mm) and medium-sized (30 mm) tumors, especially in the absence of a central electrode inserted in the tumor. The results obtained from the real-case models also show higher negative impact of automatic vessel segmentation errors on the electric field distribution when the central electrode is absent. However, the average error of the automatic vessel segmentation did not have an impact on the electric field distribution if the central electrode was present. This suggests the algorithm is robust enough to be used in creating a model for treatment parameter optimization, but with a central electrode. PMID:25941806

  7. Multi-scale finite element analyses for stress and strain evaluations of braid fibril artificial blood vessel and smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Uchida, Takahiro; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed a multi-scale finite element (FE) analysis code to obtain the stress and strain that occurred in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) at micro-scale, which was seeded in the real fabricated braid fibril artificial blood vessel. This FE code can predict the dynamic response of stress under the blood pressure loading. We try to establish a computer-aided engineering (CAE)-driven scaffold design technique for the blood vessel regeneration. Until now, there occurred the great progresses for the endothelial cell activation and intima layer regeneration in the blood vessel regeneration study. However, there remains the difficulty of the SMC activation and media layer regeneration. Therefore, many researchers are now studying to elucidate the fundamental mechanism of SMC activation and media layer regeneration by using the biomechanical technique. As the numerical tool, we used the dynamic-explicit FE code PAM-CRASH, ESI Ltd. For the material models, the nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive law was adapted for the human blood vessel, SMC and the extra-cellular matrix, and the elastic law for the polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber. Through macro-FE and micro-FE analyses of fabricated braid fibril tubes by using PGA fiber under the combined conditions of the orientation angle and the pitch of fiber, we searched an appropriate structure for the stress stimulation for SMC functionalization. Objectives of this study are indicated as follows: 1. to analyze the stress and strain of the human blood vessel and SMC, and 2. to calculate stress and strain of the real fabricated braid fibril artificial blood vessel and SMC to search an appropriate PGA fiber structure under combined conditions of PGA fiber numbers, 12 and 24, and the helical orientation angles of fiber, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 degrees. Finally, we found a braid fibril tube, which has an angle of 15 degree and 12 PGA fibers, as a most appropriate artificial blood vessel for SMC functionalization. PMID:24599892

  8. Pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous blood vessels using a third grade non-Newtonian fluids model.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Pooria

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the unsteady pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous arteries concerning the influence of externally imposed periodic body acceleration and a periodic pressure gradient are numerically simulated. Blood is taken into account as the third-grade non-Newtonian fluid. Besides the numerical solution, for small Womersley parameter (such as blood flow through arterioles and capillaries), the analytical perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear governing equations. Consequently, analytical expressions for the velocity profile, wall shear stress, and blood flow rate are obtained. Excellent agreement between the analytical and numerical predictions is evident. Also, the effects of body acceleration, magnetic field, third-grade non-Newtonian parameter, pressure gradient, and porosity on the flow behaviors are examined. Some important conclusions are that, when the Womersley parameter is low, viscous forces tend to dominate the flow, velocity profiles are parabolic in shape, and the center-line velocity oscillates in phase with the driving pressure gradient. In addition, by increasing the pressure gradient, the mean value of the velocity profile increases and the amplitude of the velocity remains constant. Also, when non-Newtonian effect increases, the amplitude of the velocity profile. PMID:26792174

  9. Investigation of Blood Flow and the Effect of Vasoactive Substances in Cutaneous Blood Vessels of "Xenopus Laevis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Škorjanc, Aleš; Belušic, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a preparation of frog skin was presented, which can be used to demonstrate the basic concepts of blood flow regulation in a very clear and attractive way to high school and university students. In a freshly euthanized "Xenopus," a patch of abdominal skin was exposed from the internal side and viewed with a USB…

  10. Investigation of Blood Flow and the Effect of Vasoactive Substances in Cutaneous Blood Vessels of "Xenopus Laevis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Škorjanc, Aleš; Belušic, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a preparation of frog skin was presented, which can be used to demonstrate the basic concepts of blood flow regulation in a very clear and attractive way to high school and university students. In a freshly euthanized "Xenopus," a patch of abdominal skin was exposed from the internal side and viewed with a USB…

  11. [Indications for contrast medium administration in MR-angiography of cerebral blood vessels].

    PubMed

    Petersen, D; Klose, U

    1997-07-01

    Time-of-flight MR-angiography of large volumes is limited by the occurrence of saturation effects, which lead to low signal in both veins and arteries. Alternatively to a number of other MRA-techniques, intravenous application of paramagnetic contrast media in combination with 3D-pulse sequences with or without flow refocussing allows the depiction of slow vessels in large volumes without technical extra expenses. The main intracranial indication is anatomical 3D-imaging of normal and dysplastic cerebral veins with high spatial resolution, and the additional depiction of the venous drainage in AVMs, when unenhanced MRA shows only the arteriel supply and the nidus. In large cerebral aneurysms, bridging veins and venous sinuses, partial thromboses can easily be differentiated from slow flow. Contrast-enhancing tumors can be depicted together with normal or displaced vessels. Improvements of arterial signal due to contrast media with currently used routine MRA techniques are clinically not significant. Signal loss due to spin dephasing in vessels with complex flow is not influences by contrast media. Results of contrast-enhanced MRA are determined by the timing of injection. Since arteries and veins are both imaged with high signal intensity, improvements of postprocessing procedures for secondary vessel segmentation are necessary. PMID:9340684

  12. 3D cryo-section/imaging of blood vessel lesions for validation of MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvado, Olivier; Roy, Debashish; Heinzel, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot; Wilson, David

    2006-03-01

    Vascular disease is a leading cause of death and disability in the western world. Diagnosis and staging of atherosclerosis is a challenge, especially with regards to the identification of plaque vulnerability. We are developing imaging methods based upon MRI and intravascular microcoils. In order to rigorously validate our MRI imaging methods and algorithms, we have developed a new cryo-imaging system that allows one to alternately section and image the block face of tissue. We obtain 3D pathology of vessel segments excised from cadaver and we characterize the tissues of atheroma using episcopic autofluorescence and bright field microscopy images. After embedding the vessel, the block is frozen, and block face microscopic images are taken every 200?m with an image resolution of 30?m×30?m. The series of images is then corrected for uneven illumination, serially registered to one another, and the 3D vessel segment is reconstructed. Some sections are recovered and processed with histological staining for validation. Seven tissue types can be readily identified from the cryo-images: necrotic core, calcification, lipid pool, media, adventitia, fibrosis, thrombus, and normal intima. Since the whole vessel segment is available, we could register 3D data to images from MR, or other modalities, for validation. In addition, visualization tools such as multi-planar reformatting 3D rendering can be used to study 3D plaque morphology, in microscopic detail.

  13. A small diameter elastic blood vessel wall prepared under pulsatile conditions from polyglycolic acid mesh and smooth muscle cells differentiated from adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Cen, Lian; Yin, Shuo; Liu, Qihai; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Cui, Lei

    2010-02-01

    Smooth muscle layer plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of blood vessels, thus generating a functional smooth muscle layer is a prerequisite for successful construction of blood vessels via tissue-engineering approach. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of constructing an elastic vessel wall in small diameter (less than 6 mm) using smooth muscle cells (SMCs) differentiated from human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) under pulsatile stimulation in a bioreactor. With the induction of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) in combination for 7 days, hASCs were found to acquire an SMC phenotype characterized by the expression of SMC-related markers including smooth muscle alpha actin (alpha-SMA), calponin, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The SMCs derived from hASCs were seeded in polyglycolic acid (PGA) unwoven mesh and the cell-scaffold complex were subjected to pulsatile stimulation in a bioreactor for 8 weeks. The vessel walls engineered under the dynamic stimulation for 8 weeks showed a dense and well-organized structure similar to that of native vessels. The differentiated hASCs with dynamic loading were found to maintain their SMC phenotype within 3-dimensional PGA scaffold with a high level of collagen deposition close to that of native ones. Vessels constructed in the static condition showed a loose histological structure with less expression of contractile proteins. More importantly, the engineered vessel under pulsatile stimulation exhibited significant improvement in biomechanical properties over that generated from static conditions. Our results demonstrated that hASCs can serve as a new cell source for SMCs in blood vessel engineering, and an elastic small-diameter vessel wall could be engineered by in vitro culture of SMC-differentiated hASCs on the PGA scaffold with matchable biomechanical strength to that of normal blood vessels under pulsatile stimulation. PMID:19819545

  14. Study to prevent the density of microcapsules from diffusing in blood vessel by local acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kohji; Watarai, Nobuyuki; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Kim, Keri; Chiba, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    We have already reported our attempt to constrain direction of microcapsules in flow owing to an acoustic radiation force. However, the diameter of capsules was too large not to be applied in vivo. Furthermore, acoustic radiation force affected only in focal area because focused ultrasound was used. Thus we have improved our experiment by using microcapsules as small as blood cells and introducing a plane wave of ultrasound. We prepared an artificial blood vessel including a Y-form bifurcation established two observation areas. Then we newly defined the induction index to evaluate the difference of capsule density in two paths of downstream. As the result, optimum angle of ultrasound emission to induce to desired path was derived. And the induction index increased in proportion to the central frequency of ultrasound, which is affected by forming aggregation of capsules to receive more radiation force. PMID:21096532

  15. Simulation of one-dimensional blood flow in networks of human vessels using a novel TVD scheme.

    PubMed

    Huang, P G; Muller, L O

    2015-05-01

    An extension of a total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme to solve one-dimensional (1D) blood flow for human circulation is proposed. This method is simple as it involves only a few modifications to existing shock-capturing TVD schemes. We have applied the method to a wide range of test cases including a complete simulation of the human vascular network. Excellent solutions have been demonstrated for problems involving varying and discontinuous mechanical properties of blood vessels. For 1D network simulations, the method has been shown to agree well with the reported computational results. Finally, the method has been demonstrated to compare favorably with in vivo experiments set up to study the impact of circle of Willis anomalies on flow patterns in the cerebral arterial system. PMID:25529823

  16. Angiogenesis in the Developing Spinal Cord: Blood Vessel Exclusion from Neural Progenitor Region Is Mediated by VEGF and Its Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Teruaki; Takase, Yuta; Yoshino, Takashi; Saito, Daisuke; Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels in the central nervous system supply a considerable amount of oxygen via intricate vascular networks. We studied how the initial vasculature of the spinal cord is formed in avian (chicken and quail) embryos. Vascular formation in the spinal cord starts by the ingression of intra-neural vascular plexus (INVP) from the peri-neural vascular plexus (PNVP) that envelops the neural tube. At the ventral region of the PNVP, the INVP grows dorsally in the neural tube, and we observed that these vessels followed the defined path at the interface between the medially positioned and undifferentiated neural progenitor zone and the laterally positioned differentiated zone. When the interface between these two zones was experimentally displaced, INVP faithfully followed a newly formed interface, suggesting that the growth path of the INVP is determined by surrounding neural cells. The progenitor zone expressed mRNA of vascular endothelial growth factor-A whereas its receptor VEGFR2 and FLT-1 (VEGFR1), a decoy for VEGF, were expressed in INVP. By manipulating the neural tube with either VEGF or the soluble form of FLT-1, we found that INVP grew in a VEGF-dependent manner, where VEGF signals appear to be fine-tuned by counteractions with anti-angiogenic activities including FLT-1 and possibly semaphorins. These results suggest that the stereotypic patterning of early INVP is achieved by interactions between these vessels and their surrounding neural cells, where VEGF and its antagonists play important roles. PMID:25585380

  17. Robust MR assessment of cerebral blood volume and mean vessel size using SPION-enhanced ultrashort echo acquisition.

    PubMed

    Han, S H; Cho, J H; Jung, H S; Suh, J Y; Kim, J K; Kim, Y R; Cho, G; Cho, H

    2015-05-15

    Intravascular superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)-enhanced MR transverse relaxation rates (?R2(?) and ?R2) are widely used to investigate in vivo vascular parameters, such as the cerebral blood volume (CBV), microvascular volume (MVV), and mean vessel size index (mVSI, ?R2(?)/?R2). Although highly efficient, regional comparison of vascular parameters acquired using gradient-echo based ?R2(?) is hampered by its high sensitivity to magnetic field perturbations arising from air-tissue interfaces and large vessels. To minimize such demerits, we took advantage of the dual contrast property of SPION and both theoretically and experimentally verified the direct benefit of replacing gradient-echo based ?R2(?) measurement with ultra-short echo time (UTE)-based ?R1 contrast to generate the robust CBV and mVSI maps. The UTE acquisition minimized the local measurement errors from susceptibility perturbations and enabled dose-independent CBV measurement using the vessel/tissue ?R1 ratio, while independent spin-echo acquisition enabled simultaneous ?R2 measurement and mVSI calculation of the cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb, which are animal brain regions typified by significant susceptibility-associated measurement errors. PMID:25818683

  18. Improvement of regional cerebral blood flow after oral intake of branched-chain amino acids in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mika; Iwasa, Motoh; Matsumura, Kaname; Nakagawa, Yuri; Fujita, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Kaito, Masahiko; Takeda, Kan; Adachi, Yukihiko

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of oral intake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) on brain perfusion in patients with liver cirrhosis. METHODS: Single photon emission computed tomography scans were performed in 43 patients with cirrhosis and in 15 age-matched healthy subjects. Twenty-nine out of forty-three patients were randomly treated with either BCAA granules or placebo, and single photon emission computed tomography was performed before and after the treatment. We measured the regional cerebral blood flow values using a three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest template. RESULTS: Cirrhotic patients had regions of significant hypoperfusion in the bilateral central (right P = 0.039, P<0.05; left P = 0.006 P<0.01), parietal (right P = 0.018, P<0.05; left P = 0.009, P<0.01), angular (right P = 0.039, P<0.05; left P = 0.008, P<0.01), and left pericallosal segments (P = 0.038 P<0.05) as compared with healthy subjects. A significant increase in cerebral perfusion was observed 70 min after the oral intake of BCAA in the angular (right P = 0.012, P<0.05; left P = 0.049, P<0.05), temporal (right P = 0.012, P<0.05; left P=0.038, P<0.05), pericallosal segments (right P = 0.025, P<0.05; left P = 0.049, P<0.05) and left precentral (P = 0.044, P<0.05), parietal (P = 0.040, P<0.05) and thalamus (P = 0.033, P<0.05). No significant change in perfusion was observed in the placebo group. CONCLUSION: Administration of BCAA rapidly improves cerebral perfusion. PMID:16425386

  19. Erythropoietin-enhanced endothelial progenitor cell recruitment in peripheral blood and renal vessels during experimental acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cakiroglu, Figen; Enders-Comberg, Sora Maria; Pagel, Horst; Rohwedel, Jürgen; Lehnert, Hendrik; Kramer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Beneficial effects of erythropoietin (EPO) have been reported in acute kidney injury (AKI) when administered prior to induction of AKI. We studied the effects of EPO administration on renal function shortly after ischemic AKI. For this purpose, rats were subjected to renal ischemia for 30?min and EPO was administered at a concentration of 500?U/kg either i.v. as a single shot directly after ischemia or with an additional i.p. dose until 3 days after surgery. The results were compared with AKI rats without EPO application and a sham-operated group. Renal function was assessed by measurement of serum biochemical markers, histological grading, and using an isolated perfused kidney (IPK) model. Furthermore, we performed flow cytometry to analyze the concentration of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the peripheral blood and renal vessels. Following EPO application, there was only a statistically non-significant tendency of serum creatinine and urea to improve, particularly after daily EPO application. Renal vascular resistance and the renal perfusion rate were not significantly altered. In the histological analysis, acute tubular necrosis was only marginally ameliorated following EPO administration. In summary, we could not demonstrate a significant improvement in renal function when EPO was applied after AKI. Interestingly, however, EPO treatment resulted in a highly significant increase in CD133- and CD34-positive EPC both in the peripheral blood and renal vessels. PMID:26616141

  20. Tissue-engineered vascular grafts transform into mature blood vessels via an inflammation-mediated process of vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Jason D.; Sawh-Martinez, Rajendra; Brennan, Matthew P.; Jay, Steven M.; Devine, Lesley; Rao, Deepak A.; Yi, Tai; Mirensky, Tamar L.; Nalbandian, Ani; Udelsman, Brooks; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Saltzman, W. Mark; Snyder, Edward; Kyriakides, Themis R.; Pober, Jordan S.; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds seeded with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are the earliest tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) to be used clinically. These TEVGs transform into living blood vessels in vivo, with an endothelial cell (EC) lining invested by smooth muscle cells (SMCs); however, the process by which this occurs is unclear. To test if the seeded BMCs differentiate into the mature vascular cells of the neovessel, we implanted an immunodeficient mouse recipient with human BMC (hBMC)-seeded scaffolds. As in humans, TEVGs implanted in a mouse host as venous interposition grafts gradually transformed into living blood vessels over a 6-month time course. Seeded hBMCs, however, were no longer detectable within a few days of implantation. Instead, scaffolds were initially repopulated by mouse monocytes and subsequently repopulated by mouse SMCs and ECs. Seeded BMCs secreted significant amounts of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and increased early monocyte recruitment. These findings suggest TEVGs transform into functional neovessels via an inflammatory process of vascular remodeling. PMID:20207947

  1. Computational geometry for patient-specific reconstruction and meshing of blood vessels from MR and CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Antiga, Luca; Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2003-05-01

    Investigation of three-dimensional (3-D) geometry and fluid-dynamics in human arteries is an important issue in vascular disease characterization and assessment. Thanks to recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT), it is now possible to address the problem of patient-specific modeling of blood vessels, in order to take into account interindividual anatomic variability of vasculature. Generation of models suitable for computational fluid dynamics is still commonly performed by semiautomatic procedures, in general based on operator-dependent tasks, which cannot be easily extended to a significant number of clinical cases. In this paper, we overcome these limitations making use of computational geometry techniques. In particular, 3-D modeling was carried out by means of 3-D level sets approach. Model editing was also implemented ensuring harmonic mean curvature vectors distribution on the surface, and model geometric analysis was performed with a novel approach, based on solving Eikonal equation on Voronoi diagram. This approach provides calculation of central paths, maximum inscribed sphere estimation and geometric characterization of the surface. Generation of adaptive-thickness boundary layer finite elements is finally presented. The use of the techniques presented here makes it possible to introduce patient-specific modeling of blood vessels at clinical level. PMID:12846436

  2. Platelets from flowing blood attach to the inflammatory chemokine CXCL16 expressed in the endothelium of the human vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Meyer Dos Santos, S; Blankenbach, K; Scholich, K; Dörr, A; Monsefi, N; Keese, M; Linke, B; Deckmyn, H; Nelson, K; Harder, S

    2015-08-01

    Endothelial chemokine CXC motif ligand 16 (CXCL16) expression is associated with atherosclerosis, while platelets, particularly those attaching to atherosclerotic plaque, contribute to all stages of atherosclerotic disease. This investigation was designed to examine the role of CXCL16 in capturing platelets from flowing blood. CXCL16 was expressed in human atherosclerotic plaques, and lesion severity in human carotid endarterectomy specimens was positively correlated with CXCL16 levels. CXCL16 expression in plaques was co-localised with platelets deposited to the endothelium. Immobilised CXCL16 promoted CXCR6-dependent platelet adhesion to the human vessel wall, endothelial cells and von Willebrand factor during physiologic flow. At low shear, immobilised CXCL16 captured platelets from flowing blood. It also induced irreversible platelet aggregation and a rise in intra-platelet calcium levels. These results demonstrate that endothelial CXCL16's action on platelets is not only limited to platelet activation, but that immobilised CXCL16 also acts as a potent novel platelet adhesion ligand, inducing platelet adhesion to the human vessel wall. PMID:25904061

  3. Tenascin-W is a specific marker of glioma-associated blood vessels and stimulates angiogenesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Enrico; Degen, Martin; Rüegg, Curzio; Merlo, Adrian; Lino, Maddalena M.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Brellier, Florence

    2010-01-01

    The microenvironment hosting a tumor actively participates in regulating tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Among the extracellular matrix proteins enriched in the stroma of carcinomas are the tenascin family members tenascin-C and tenascin-W. Whereas tenascin-C overexpression in gliomas is known to correlate with poor prognosis, the status of tenascin-W in brain tumors has not been investigated so far. In the present study, we analyzed protein levels of tenascin-W in 38 human gliomas and found expression of tenascin-W in 80% of the tumor samples, whereas no tenascin-W could be detected in control, nontumoral brain tissues. Double immunohistochemical staining of tenascin-W and von Willebrand factor revealed that tenascin-W is localized around blood vessels, exclusively in tumor samples. In vitro, the presence of tenascin-W increased the proportion of elongated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and augmented the mean speed of cell migration. Furthermore, tenascin-W triggered sprouting of HUVEC spheroids to a similar extent as the proangiogenic factor tenascin-C. In conclusion, our study identifies tenascin-W as a candidate biomarker for brain tumor angiogenesis that could be used as a molecular target for therapy irrespective of the glioma subtype.—Martina, E., Degen, M., Rüegg, C., Merlo, A., Lino, M. M., Chiquet-Ehrismann, R., Brellier, F. Tenascin-W is a specific marker of glioma-associated blood vessels and stimulates angiogenesis in vitro. PMID:19884327

  4. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling promotes morphogenesis of blood vessels, wound epidermis, and actinotrichia during fin regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Thorimbert, Valentine; König, Désirée; Marro, Jan; Ruggiero, Florence; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Zebrafish fin regeneration involves initial formation of the wound epidermis and the blastema, followed by tissue morphogenesis. The mechanisms coordinating differentiation of distinct tissues of the regenerate are poorly understood. Here, we applied pharmacologic and transgenic approaches to address the role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling during fin restoration. To map the BMP transcriptional activity, we analyzed the expression of the evolutionarily conserved direct phospho-Smad1 target gene, id1, and its homologs id2a and id3. This analysis revealed the BMP activity in the distal blastema, wound epidermis, osteoblasts, and blood vessels of the regenerate. Blocking the BMP function with a selective chemical inhibitor of BMP type I receptors, DMH1, suppressed id1 and id3 expression and arrested regeneration after blastema formation. We identified several previously uncharacterized functions of BMP during fin regeneration. Specifically, BMP signaling is required for remodeling of plexus into structured blood vessels in the rapidly growing regenerate. It organizes the wound epithelium by triggering wnt5b expression and promoting Collagen XIV-A deposition into the basement membrane. BMP represents the first known signaling that induces actinotrichia formation in the regenerate. Our data reveal a multifaceted role of BMP for coordinated morphogenesis of distinct tissues during regeneration of a complex vertebrate appendage. PMID:26148971

  5. [Pulsatile flow model with elastic blood vessels for duplex ultrasound studies].

    PubMed

    Petrick, J; Schlief, R; Zomack, M; Langholz, J; Urbank, A

    1992-12-01

    Using ultrasound duplex technique flow phenomena in patients' circulation can be examined. For the interpretation of these examinations it is necessary to have extensive knowledge on flow influencing parameters. This can be easily obtained from simplified flow models. This article describes the components of a flow model that allows examination of ultrasonic contrast media flowing through an artificial heart and vessel mimicking tubes. The artificial heart is the drive which pumps a water glycerol cellulose mixture through the circulation in a pulsatile manner. The shape of the ventricle, the compliance of the aorta, the viscosity of the flow medium and the wall elasticity of the examination vessel were taken into account. The attenuation caused by the surrounding tissue is simulated by a variable layer of castor oil. The flow model is suitable to produce flow profiles that are very similar to physiological profiles. PMID:1290089

  6. Computational blood flow and vessel wall modeling in a CT-based thoracic aorta after stent-graft implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, Dilana; Stoll, Markus; Schmidt, Eduard; Richter, Goetz-M.; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2010-03-01

    Abnormal blood flow conditions and structural fatigue within stented vessels may lead to undesired failure causing death to the patient. Image-based computational modeling provides a physical and realistic insight into the patientspecific biomechanics and enables accurate predictive simulations of development, growth and failure of cardiovascular diseases as well as associated risks. Controlling the efficiency of an endovascular treatment is necessary for the evaluation of potential complications and predictions on the assessment of the pathological state. In this paper we investigate the effects of stent-graft implantation on the biomechanics in a patient-specific thoracic aortic model. The patient geometry and the implanted stent-graft are obtained from morphological data based on a CT scan performed during a controlling routine. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structure mechanics (CSM) simulations are conducted based on the finite volume method (FVM) and on the finite element method (FEM) to compute the hemodynamics and the elastomechanics within the aortic model, respectively. Physiological data based on transient pressure and velocity profiles are used to set the necessary boundary conditions. Further, the effects of various boundary conditions and definition of contact interactions on the numerical stability of the blood flow and the vessel wall simulation results are also investigated. The quantification of the hemodynamics and the elastomechanics post endovascular intervention provides a realistic controlling of the state of the stented vessel and of the efficiency of the therapy. Consequently, computational modeling would help in evaluating individual therapies and optimal treatment strategies in the field of minimally invasive endovascular surgery.

  7. Effect of gravitation stress and hypokinesia on blood vessels of the testicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazhchenko, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbits were exposed to single maximum endurable stresses of cranio-caudal direction, hypokinesia for periods of one to eight weeks, and hypokinesia followed by gravitation stresses. The stresses caused dilatation of vessels, greater sinuosity, and occasional ruptures of the walls and extravasation. The greater part of the capillaries were dilated; the greatest part constricted. In hypokinesia there was an increasing atrophy of the testes. Significant results are reported.

  8. Automated detection of kinks from blood vessels for optic cup segmentation in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D. W. K.; Liu, J.; Lim, J. H.; Li, H.; Wong, T. Y.

    2009-02-01

    The accurate localization of the optic cup in retinal images is important to assess the cup to disc ratio (CDR) for glaucoma screening and management. Glaucoma is physiologically assessed by the increased excavation of the optic cup within the optic nerve head, also known as the optic disc. The CDR is thus an important indicator of risk and severity of glaucoma. In this paper, we propose a method of determining the cup boundary using non-stereographic retinal images by the automatic detection of a morphological feature within the optic disc known as kinks. Kinks are defined as the bendings of small vessels as they traverse from the disc to the cup, providing physiological validation for the cup boundary. To detect kinks, localized patches are first generated from a preliminary cup boundary obtained via level set. Features obtained using edge detection and wavelet transform are combined using a statistical approach rule to identify likely vessel edges. The kinks are then obtained automatically by analyzing the detected vessel edges for angular changes, and these kinks are subsequently used to obtain the cup boundary. A set of retinal images from the Singapore Eye Research Institute was obtained to assess the performance of the method, with each image being clinically graded for the CDR. From experiments, when kinks were used, the error on the CDR was reduced to less than 0.1 CDR units relative to the clinical CDR, which is within the intra-observer variability of 0.2 CDR units.

  9. Effect of gravitational overloads, hypokinesia and hypodynamia on the vessels of the pulmonary blood circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasimtsev, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Vessels of the pulmonary circuit are studied under normal conditions, in exposure to single stress or continuous threshold endurable chestspine gravitational stresses, and one to eight weak hypokinesia and hypodynamic effects followed by stress. Examination methods include rentgenography and microrentgenography, clearing, and histology. In exposure to gravitational stress the distal portions of the arterial vessels of the 3 and 4 orders constrict, while all veins dilate. Sinuosity of all vessels is noted. The volume of the capillary bed increases and signs of perivascular edema occur. Due to hypokinesia and hypodynamia the arteries constricted and the arterial bed becomes poor. The veins of all orders dilate and the volume of the capillary bed increases. The changes grew greater the longer the terms of hypodyamic effects. Successive combination of hypokinesia and hypodynamia and gravitational stresses cause more pronounced changes than separate effects of these two factors and result in great deformity of the vascular walls, including their rupture and penetration of formed elements beyond the limits of the vascular bed.

  10. Endothelial Cell Hyperproliferation and Stratification in Uteroplacental Blood Vessels of the Black Mastiff Bat, Molossus rufus

    PubMed Central

    Rasweiler IV, J.J.; Badwaik, N.K.; Salame, G.; Abulafia, O.

    2011-01-01

    Placentation was studied histologically and immunocytochemically in black mastiff bats obtained at frequent intervals throughout pregnancy. These were bred in a captive colony or collected from a reproductively-synchronized wild population. During late pregnancy, the single fetus was largely sustained by a discoidal, hemochorial placenta located at the cranial end of the right uterine horn. This invariant positioning was determined by a vascular tuft that developed there both during early pregnancy and non-pregnant cycles. This provided a scaffold for early placental morphogenesis. As development proceeded, small arterioles and venules serving the tuft were converted to large uteroplacental vessels. Within the base of the placenta, these became lined by an unusual vascular epithelium composed of intermingled patches of multilayered endothelial cells and cytotrophoblast. Initially, the endothelium became multilayered by hypertrophy, proliferation, and infolding of its basal lamina. These created endothelial bilayers usually insinuated between basal laminae. The development of temporary gaps in the laminae then permitted further enlargement of the vessels and proliferation of the endothelial cells as monolayer sheets or chains. The latter were interconnected, forming a complex, stratified, cellular network associated with a prominent meshwork of basal laminae. Throughout much of pregnancy, these endothelial cells were cuboidal to columnar and possessed an abundance of basal glycoprotein granules presumably containing basal lamina precursors. The cells also expressed vimentin and frequently von Willebrand factor, but not cytokeratins or desmin. Pronounced thickening of the endothelia and amplification of their basal laminae likely evolved to greatly strengthen the walls of the uteroplacental vessels. PMID:21764447

  11. Synthetic reconstruction of dynamic blood flow in cortical arteries using optical coherence tomography for the evaluation of vessel compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraghis, Edward; Bolduc, Virginie; Gillis, Marc-Antoine; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Thorin, Éric; Boudoux, Caroline; Lesage, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has recently been used to produce 3D angiography of microvasculature in the rodent brain in-vivo and blood flow maps of large vessels. Key enabling developments were novel algorithms for detecting Doppler shifts produced by moving scatterers and new scanning protocols tailored to increase sensitivity to small flow speeds. These progresses were pushed by the need for a non invasive imaging modality to monitor quantitative blood flow at a higher resolution and a greater depth than could be achieved by other means. The rationale for this work originates from new hypotheses regarding the role of blood regulation in neurodegenerative diseases and from current investigations of animal models of vascular degeneration. In this work we demonstrate the synthetic reconstruction of dynamic blood flow in mice over the course of a single cardiac cycle in an 800μm wide by ~ 3mm deep B-Frame slice with a lateral resolution of 10μm and a depth resolution of 7μm. Images were taken using a cranial window over the exposed parietal bone of mice skull. Electrocardiography (ECG) recordings were co registered with the OCT A lines at high temporal resolution. QRS peak detection was then used to locate the time value of each A-line in the cardiac cycle and to reconstruct a synthetic temporal frame over one cardiac cycle. Doppler speed in this cardiac cycle was used to measure temporal variations of flow inside arteries and of their area. Three dimensional volume scans yielded measurements of quantitative blood flow on the same arteries. Using these informations a measure of compliance could be established. Comparing measures between atherosclerotic (ATX) and wild type (WT) mice revealed higher blood flow in WT mice, suggested lower systemic compliance in the ATX group but higher compliance of cerebral vasculature on these mice. These results are consistent with expectations showing that OCT is a potential tool for in-vivo arterial compliance evaluation.

  12. The influence of red blood cell scattering in optical pathways of retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, Serge Emile

    The ability to measure the oxygen saturation, oximetry, of retinal blood both non-invasively and in-vivo has been a goal of eye research for years. Retinal oximetry can in principle be achieved from the measurement of the reflectance spectrum of the ocular fundus. Oximetry calculations are however complicated by the scattering of red blood cells, the different pathways of light through blood and the ocular tissues that light interacts with before exiting the eye. The goal of this thesis was to investigate the influence of red blood cell scattering for different light paths relevant to retinal oximetry. Results of in-vitro whole blood experiments found calculated oxygen saturation differences between blood samples measured under different retinal light paths, and these differences did not depend on the absorbance path length. We also showed that the calculated oxygen saturation value determined by a multiple linear regression Beer-Lambert absorbance model depended on the wavelength range chosen for analysis. The wavelength dependency on the calculated oxygen saturation value is due in part to the correlation that exists between the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin extinction coefficient spectra and to errors in the assumptions built into the Beer-Lambert absorbance model. A wavelength region with low correlation between the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin extinction coefficients was found that is hypothesized to be a good range to calculate oxygen saturation using a multiple linear regression approach.

  13. A new fundamental bioheat equation for muscle tissue--part II: Temperature of SAV vessels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Xu, Lisa X; He, Qinghong; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2002-02-01

    In this study, a new theoretical framework was developed to investigate temperature variations along countercurrent SAV blood vessels from 300 to 1000 microm diameter in skeletal muscle. Vessels of this size lie outside the range of validity of the Weinbaum-Jiji bioheat equation and, heretofore, have been treated using discrete numerical methods. A new tissue cylinder surrounding these vessel pairs is defined based on vascular anatomy, Murray's law, and the assumption of uniform perfusion. The thermal interaction between the blood vessel pair and surrounding tissue is investigated for two vascular branching patterns, pure branching and pure perfusion. It is shown that temperature variations along these large vessel pairs strongly depend on the branching pattern and the local blood perfusion rate. The arterial supply temperature in different vessel generations was evaluated to estimate the arterial inlet temperature in the modified perfusion source term for the s vessels in Part I of this study. In addition, results from the current research enable one to explore the relative contribution of the SAV vessels and the s vessels to the overall thermal equilibration between blood and tissue. PMID:11871598

  14. Low-dose 2D X-ray angiography enhancement using 2-axis PCA for the preservation of blood-vessel region and noise minimization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Geun; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kang, Ho Chul

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing 2D angiography while maintaining a low radiation dose has become an important research topic. However, it is difficult to enhance images while preserving vessel-structure details because X-ray noise and contrast blood vessels in 2D angiography have similar intensity distributions, which can lead to ambiguous images of vessel structures. In this paper, we propose a novel and fast vessel-enhancement method for 2D angiography. We apply filtering in the principal component analysis domain for vessel regions and background regions separately, using assumptions based on energy compaction. First, we identify an approximate vessel region using a Hessian-based method. Vessel and non-vessel regions are then represented sparsely by calculating their optimal bases separately. This is achieved by identifying periodic motion in the vessel region caused by the flow of the contrast medium through the blood vessels when viewed on the time axis. Finally, we obtain noise-free images by removing noise in the new coordinate domain for the optimal bases. Our method was validated for an X-ray system, using 10 low-dose sets for training and 20 low-dose sets for testing. The results were compared with those for a high-dose dataset with respect to noise-free images. The average enhancement rate was 93.11±0.71%. The average processing time for enhancing video comprising 50-70 frames was 0.80±0.35s, which is much faster than the previously proposed technique. Our method is applicable to 2D angiography procedures such as catheterization, which requires rapid and natural vessel enhancement. PMID:26483302

  15. Endoglin is required in Pax3-derived cells for embryonic blood vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Young, K; Krebs, L T; Tweedie, E; Conley, B; Mancini, M; Arthur, H M; Liaw, L; Gridley, T; Vary, Cph

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in endoglin, a TGF?/BMP coreceptor, are causal for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Endoglin-null (Eng-/-) mouse embryos die at embryonic day (E)10.5-11.5 due to defects in angiogenesis. In part, this is due to an absence of vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation and vessel investment. Prior studies from our lab and others have shown the importance of endoglin expression in embryonic development in both endothelial cells and neural crest stem cells. These studies support the hypothesis that endoglin may play cell-autonomous roles in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell precursors. However, the requirement for endoglin in vascular cell precursors remains poorly defined. Our objective was to specifically delete endoglin in neural crest- and somite-derived Pax3-positive vascular precursors to understand the impact on somite progenitor cell contribution to embryonic vascular development. Pax3Cre mice were crossed with Eng+/- mice to obtain compound mutant Pax3(Cre/+);Eng+/- mice. These mice were then crossed with homozygous endoglin LoxP-mutated (Eng(LoxP/LoxP)) mice to conditionally delete the endoglin gene in specific lineages that contribute to endothelial and smooth muscle constituents of developing embryonic vessels. Pax3(Cre/+);Eng(LoxP/)(-) mice showed a variety of vascular defects at E10.5, and none of these mice survived past E12.5. Embryos analyzed at E10.5 showed malformations suggestive of misdirection of the intersomitic vessels. The dorsal aorta showed significant dilation with associated vascular smooth muscle cells exhibiting disorganization and enhanced expression of smooth muscle differentiation proteins, including smooth muscle actin. These results demonstrate a requirement for endoglin in descendants of Pax3-expressing vascular cell precursors, and thus provides new insight into the cellular basis underlying adult vascular diseases such as HHT. PMID:26481065

  16. Unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through a tapered overlapping stenosed catheterized vessel.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Zaman, A; Sajid, M; Nieto, J J; Torres, A

    2015-11-01

    The unsteady flow characteristics of blood in a catheterized overlapping stenosed artery are analyzed in presence of body acceleration and magnetic field. The stenosed arterial segment is modeled as a rigid constricted tube. An improved shape of stenosis in the realm of the formulation of the arterial narrowing caused by atheroma is integrated in the present study. The catheter inside the artery is approximated by a thin rigid tube of small radius while the streaming blood in the artery is characterized by the Carreau model. Employing mild stenosis condition, the governing equation of the flow is derived which is then solving numerically using finite difference scheme. The variation of axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impendence and wall shear stress is shown graphically for various parameters of interest. The flow patterns illustrating the global behavior of blood are also presented. PMID:26361287

  17. In vivo ?PIV measurements of blood velocity in small vessels of a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Chia Min; Russell, John; Connor, Nadine; Honkanen, Markus; Wei, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    Aging-related muscular changes have been shown to affect voice production. There is correlation between muscular changes and changes in capillary hemodynamics and structure with aging. Alterations in oxygen transport to cells and tissues at the capillary level has been hypothesized as one of the key factors that causes muscular changes thus voice production. Since oxygen transport is related to hemodynamics, we start by measuring blood velocity in capillaries of cremaster muscle of a living rat. The ?PIV technique is adapted for measuring blood velocity where red blood cells are used as `seeding particles'. The accuracy of the ?PIV measurements are determined by comparison with results obtained using other techniques such as particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Finally, challenges in measuring flow through three-dimensional larynx geometry will be discussed.

  18. Evaluation of sildenafil pressurized metered dose inhalers as a vasodilator in umbilical blood vessels of chicken egg embryos.

    PubMed

    Sawatdee, Somchai; Hiranphan, Phetai; Laphanayos, Kampanart; Srichana, Teerapol

    2014-01-01

    Sildenafil citrate is a selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor used for the treatment for erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. The delivery of sildenafil directly to the lung could have several advantages over conventional treatments for pulmonary hypertension because of the local delivery, a more rapid onset of response, and reduced side effects. The major problem of sildenafil citrate is its limited solubility in water. Sildenafil citrate was complexed with cyclodextrins (CDs) to enhance its water solubility prior to development as an inhaled preparation. Four sildenafil citrate inhaled formulations were prepared with the aid of HP-β-CD (#1), α-CD (#2) and γ-CD (#3) and their effects were compared with the formulations without CDs (#4). The sildenafil citrate pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI) used ethanol as a solvent, PEG400 as a stabilizing agent, sorbitan monooleate as a surfactant and HFA-134a as a propellant. All formulations consisted of sildenafil citrate equivalent to a sildenafil content of 20μg/puff. These products were evaluated according to a standard guideline of inhalation products. Vasodilation testing was performed to investigate the efficacy of sildenafil pMDIs in relieving a vasoconstricted umbilical blood vessel of the chicken egg embryo. The sildenafil contents of the pMDI formulations #1-#3 were within the acceptance criteria (80-120%). The emitted doses (ED) were 102.3±11.5%, the fine particle fractions (FPF) were 60.5±5.6% and the mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) were 2.3±0.3μm. The vasodilatory activity of those formulations reduced umbilical blood pressure by 67.1-73.7% after treatment by intravenous injection whereas only a 50.1-58.0% reduced blood pressure was obtained after direct spraying of the sildenafil pMDI containing CDs. With sildenafil formulations of a pMDI without CD the blood pressure was reduced by only 39.0% (P-value<0.05). The available sildenafil in the blood vessels of chicken egg embryos after spraying sildenafil-CDs pMDIs was within the range of 751-825ng/mL which was much higher than that of a sildenafil only pMDI. PMID:24036276

  19. Large particulate allergens can elicit mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis without exit from blood vessels as efficiently as do small soluble allergens.

    PubMed

    LiHua, Li; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Ohta, Takuya; Horiguchi, Kayo; Kawano, Yohei; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Karasuyama, Hajime

    2015-11-01

    Anaphylaxis is a rapid-onset, life-threatening allergic reaction in that IgE, mast cells and histamine are commonly involved. It can be experimentally induced in IgE-sensitized animals by intravenous injection of corresponding allergens, and the sign of anaphylactic reaction can be detected within minutes after allergen challenge. However, it remains puzzling why the anaphylactic reaction can be initiated in vivo so quickly, considering that allergens are delivered into the blood circulation while mast cells reside within peripheral tissues but not in the blood circulation. To address this issue, we compared two different forms of the same allergen, small soluble and large particulate ones, in their ability to induce anaphylaxis in IgE-sensitized mice. In contrast to our expectation, particulate allergens could induce anaphylaxis as quickly and efficiently as did soluble allergens, even though they remained inside of blood vessels. In vivo imaging analysis suggested the direct interaction of intravascular particulate allergens and perivascular mast cells across the capillary wall. Taken together with previous report that perivascular mast cells can capture IgE in the blood circulation by extending cell processes across the vessel wall, our findings imply that blood-circulating allergens, regardless of their size, can stimulate mast cells without exit from blood vessels, by means of cross-linking IgE on mast cell processes inserted into the vessel lumen, and hence initiate anaphylactic reaction so quickly. PMID:26410536

  20. Tumor-Induced Local and Systemic Impact on Blood Vessel Function

    PubMed Central

    Cedervall, J.; Dimberg, A.; Olsson, A-K.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction plays a role in several processes that contribute to cancer-associated mortality. The vessel wall serves as a barrier for metastatic tumor cells, and the integrity and activation status of the endothelium serves as an important defense mechanism against metastasis. In addition, leukocytes, such as cytotoxic T-cells, have to travel across the vessel wall to enter the tumor tissue where they contribute to killing of cancer cells. Tumor cells can alter the characteristics of the endothelium by recruitment of leukocytes such as neutrophils and macrophages, which further stimulate inflammation and promote tumorigenesis. Recent findings also suggest that leukocyte-mediated effects on vascular function are not limited to the primary tumor or tissues that represent metastatic sites. Peripheral organs, such as kidney and heart, also display impaired vascular function in tumor-bearing individuals, potentially contributing to organ failure. Here, we discuss how vascular function is altered in malignant tissue and distant organs in individuals with cancer and how leukocytes function as potent mediators of these tumor-induced effects. PMID:26770016

  1. Dynamic and Precise Visualization of Contrast Agent in Blood Vessels with Motion Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hideki; Azuma, Takashi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Kawabata, Ken‑ichi; Umemura, Shin‑ichiro

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a new ultrasound imaging method for the visualization of vascularity with less than 500 μm in width applicable to tissues naturally moving caused by respiration or heart beats. In our method, we utilize the least square method based on tissue-motion measurement method previously reported, which divides an image into extremely small regions so that the loss of correlation caused by tissue motion can be virtually ignored. We averaged images of tissues with contrast agents after correcting for the tissue motion on the basis of measurement results. In vivo results of experiments using rabbit kidneys revealed that the vascularity including peripheral vessels, e.g., those in the renal cortex, could be clearly imaged without any motion artifact by averaging more than 30 frames. Moreover, it was indicated that a pseudo-three-dimensional imaging of small vessels can be achieved by this method utilizing slight tissue motions in the slice direction during obtaining frames to be averaged. In another experiment using tumor-implanted rabbits, it was also found that neovascularity in a tumor tissue could be identified more clearly on a time-averaged image than on a conventional image.

  2. Simulation of blood flow in deformable vessels using subject-specific geometry and spatially varying wall properties

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guanglei; Figueroa, C. Alberto; Xiao, Nan; Taylor, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Simulation of blood flow using image-based models and computational fluid dynamics has found widespread application to quantifying hemodynamic factors relevant to the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases and for planning interventions. Methods for creating subject-specific geometric models from medical imaging data have improved substantially in the last decade but for many problems, still require significant user interaction. In addition, while fluid–structure interaction methods are being employed to model blood flow and vessel wall dynamics, tissue properties are often assumed to be uniform. In this paper, we propose a novel workflow for simulating blood flow using subject-specific geometry and spatially varying wall properties. The geometric model construction is based on 3D segmentation and geometric processing. Variable wall properties are assigned to the model based on combining centerline-based and surface-based methods. We finally demonstrate these new methods using an idealized cylindrical model and two subject-specific vascular models with thoracic and cerebral aneurysms. PMID:21765984

  3. The Location of The Inferior and Superior Temporal Blood Vessels and Inter-Individual Variability of The Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Donald C.; Salant, Jennifer A.; Arthur, Stella N.; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if adjusting for blood vessel location can decrease the inter-subject variability of retinal nerve fiber (RNFL) thickness measured with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Subjects and Methods One eye of 50 individuals with normal vision was tested with OCT and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). The SLP and OCT RNFL thickness profiles were determined for a peripapillary circle 3.4 mm in diameter. The midpoints between the superior temporal vein and artery (STva) and the inferior temporal vein and artery (ITva) were determined at the location where the vessels cross the 3.4 mm circle. The average OCT and SLP RNFL thicknesses for quadrants and arcuate sectors of the lower and upper optic disc were obtained before and after adjusting for blood vessel location. This adjustment was done by shifting the RNFL profiles based upon the locations of the STva and ITva relative to the mean locations of all 50 individuals. Results Blood vessel locations ranged over 39° (STva) and 33° (ITva) for the 50 eyes. The location of the leading edge of the OCT and SLP profiles was correlated with the location of the blood vessels for both the superior [r=0.72 (OCT) and 0.72(SLP)] and inferior [r=0.34 and 0.43] temporal vessels. However, the variability in the OCT and SLP thickness measurements showed little change due to shifting. After shifting, the difference in the coefficient of variation ranged from ?2.1% (shifted less variable) to +1.7% (unshifted less variable). Conclusion The shape of the OCT and SLP RNFL profiles varied systematically with the location of the superior and inferior superior veins and arteries. However, adjusting for the location of these major temporal blood vessels did not decrease the variability for measures of OCT or SLP RNFL thickness. PMID:19661824

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor expression during embryogenesis and tissue repair suggests a role in endothelial differentiation and blood vessel growth.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, K G; De Vries, C; Williams, L T

    1993-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a polypeptide mitogen that stimulates the growth of endothelial cells in vitro and promotes the growth of blood vessels in vivo. We have recently shown that the fms-like receptor tyrosine kinase (flt) is a receptor for VEGF. Here we used in situ hybridization to show that, in adult mouse tissues, the pattern of flt expression was consistent with localization in endothelium. We also show that flt was expressed in endothelium during neovascularization of healing skin wounds and during early vascular development in mouse embryos. Moreover, flt was expressed in populations of embryonic cells from which endothelium is derived such as early yolk sac mesenchyme. The expression of flt in the endothelium of both developing and mature blood vessels suggests that VEGF might regulate endothelial differentiation, blood vessel growth, and vascular repair. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7692439

  5. 5-HT1B-receptors and vascular reactivity in human isolated blood vessels: assessment of the potential craniovascular selectivity of sumatriptan

    PubMed Central

    Razzaque, Z; Pickard, J D; Ma, Q-P; Shaw, D; Morrison, K; Wang, T; Longmore, J

    2002-01-01

    Aims 5-HT1B-receptor mediated vasoconstriction of cranial arteries is a potential mechanism by which 5-HT1B/1D-receptor agonists such as sumatriptan produce their antimigraine effects. 5-HT1B-receptors exist in other blood vessels which may give rise to unwanted vascular effects. Therefore we examined the distribution of 5-HT1B-receptor immunoreactivity (i.r.) in human blood vessels (including target and nontarget vessels) and confirmed the functionality of this receptor protein, by comparing the vasoconstrictor effects of sumatriptan and 5-HT (the endogenous ligand) in isolated vessels. Methods Blood vessels (middle meningeal, pial, temporal and uterine arteries and saphenous veins) were obtained from surgical patients (with consent). Sections of the vessels were prepared for routine immunohistochemical studies using specific 5-HT1B- and 5-HT1D-receptor antibodies. For functional studies, ring segments of the vessels were mounted in organ baths for isometric tension recording. Results 5-HT1B-receptor i.r. was detected on the smooth muscle layer in middle meningeal, pial and uterine arteries and in saphenous vein and sumatriptan produced contractions in these vessels with potency values (mean pEC50) of 7.00, 7.08, 6.44 and 6.61, respectively, the magnitude of contraction was greatest in the cranial arteries with Emax values of 100.7, 60.3, 23.0 and 35.9%, respectively (expressed as a percentage of the reference agonist 45 mm KCl). 5-HT1B-receptor i.r. was not detected in temporal artery and sumatriptan had no effect in this artery. 5-HT1D-receptor i.r. was not detected in any of the vessels studied. Conclusions Sumatriptan can evoke vasoconstriction in antimigraine target vessels and also in nontarget vessels through an action at 5-HT1B-rcceptors. Sumatriptan acts preferentially to cause contraction in human cranial arteries compared with the other blood vessels we examined and this effect is likely to be shared by other drugs of this class. PMID:11874390

  6. Iodine imaging using spectral analysis. [radiography for visualization of small blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macovski, A.

    1978-01-01

    Existing radiographic imaging systems provide images which represent an integration or averaging over the energy spectrum. In order to provide noninvasive angiography it is necessary to image the relatively small amounts of iodine which are available following an intravenous administration. This is accomplished by making use of the special spectral characteristics of iodine. Two methods will be presented. One involves a special grating for encoding the iodine information in the form of a fine line pattern. This is subsequently decoded to provide images of iodinated structures which are otherwise almost invisible. The second method utilizes a scanned X-ray beam which is rapidly switched in the high energy region. In this region, iodine experiences significant variations in the attenuation coefficient while bone and soft tissue do not. An efficient and accurate X-ray detector can be used with scanned X-ray beams. This provides a high degree of sensitivity enabling the visualization of small vessels containing relatively dilute iodine.

  7. Trophoblast Invasion and Blood Vessel Remodeling Are Altered in a Rat Model of Lifelong Maternal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Emily K.; Tessier, Daniel R.; Percival, Michael E.; Holloway, Alison C.; Petrik, Jim J.; Gruslin, Andree

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of a number of pregnancy complications, including fetal demise, which may be linked to impaired placental development as a result of altered trophoblast invasion and vessel remodeling. Therefore, we examined these parameters in pregnant rats fed a control (normal weight) or high fat (HF) diet (obese) at 2 critical times of rat placental development. Early trophoblast invasion was increased by approximately 2-fold in HF-fed dams with a concomitant increase in the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 protein, a mediator of tissue remodeling and invasion. Furthermore, we observed significantly higher levels of smooth muscle actin surrounding the placental spiral arteries of HF-fed dams, suggesting impaired spiral artery remodeling. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that altered placental development is an important contributor to the poor pregnancy outcomes and increased fetal demise in our model of lifelong maternal obesity. PMID:24155067

  8. [Reactivity of blood vessels: the role of mechanical stimulation and initial tone].

    PubMed

    DvoretskiÄ­, D P; OsadchiÄ­, L I

    2000-01-01

    We have studied hemodynamic and some other correlates of the myogenic and endothelium-dependent control of vessel tone and reactivity in experiments with anesthetized cats and rats, as well as in vitro experiments with isolated segments of the mesenteric and tail artery of the rats. We present evidence for the important role of mechanical stimulation of endotheliocytes in the formation of vasodilation in skeletal muscles in response to increased amplitude of the pulse pressure, as well as in response to their active or passive contractions. Interference between mechanical, neurohumoral, and metabolic effects on vascular tone were studied. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, endothelium-dependent vasodilation initiated by increased oscillations of pulse pressure is diminished. We also describe relationships between systemic hemodynamic responses and the initial arterial tone. PMID:10780115

  9. Combination probe for optically assisted ultrasonic velocity-change imaging aimed at detecting unstable blood vessel plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, Shohei; Mano, Kazune; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2015-12-01

    Blood vessel plaque with a large lipid core is at risk of becoming thrombus and is likely to induce acute heart disease. To prevent this, it is necessary to determine not only the plaque's size but also its chemical composition. We, therefore, made the prototype of a combination probe to diagnose carotid artery plaque. It is used to differentiate propagation characteristics between light spectra and ultrasonic images. By propagating light and ultrasound along a common direction, it is possible to effectively warm the diagnosis domain. Moreover, the probe is thought to be compact and be easy to use for diagnosing human carotid artery plaque. We applied the combination probe to a carotid artery phantom with a lipid area and obtained an image of the ultrasonic velocity change in the fatty area.

  10. New approach to carbon monoxide poisoning treatment by laser-induced photodissociation of carboxyhemoglobin of cutaneous blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, Mustafo M.; Asimov, Rustam M.; Gisbrecht, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    A new approach to carbon monoxide poisoning treatment based on laser-induced photodissociation of the carboxyhemoglobin is proposed. Using the simple model of laser tissue interaction the action spectra of laser radiation on carboxyhemoglobin of cutaneous blood vessels has been calculated. The results of the calculatoins indicate that there is a relatively narrow spectral range in the visible region where one could effectively irradiate carboxyhemoglobin through the tissue not in a deep distances. In the case of deeper penetration, the action spectra of laser radiation shifts toward the longer wavelength region. Despite the similarity of the carboxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin action spectra, the significant difference in quantum yields of photodissociation makes possible to develop an effective method of carbon monoxide poisoning treatment.

  11. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Lattice Boltzmann simulation of behaviour of particles moving in blood vessels under the rolling massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Cai-Feng; Li, Hua-Bing

    2009-07-01

    The rolling massage is one of the most important manipulations in Chinese massage, which is expected to eliminate many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on a pair of particles moving in blood vessels under rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulated results show that the motion of each particle is considerably modified by the rolling massage, and it depends on the relative rolling velocity, the rolling depth, and the distance between particle position and rolling position. Both particles' translational average velocities increase almost linearly as the rolling velocity increases, and obey the same law. The increment of the average relative angular velocity for the leading particle is smaller than that of the trailing one. The result is helpful for understanding the mechanism of the massage and to further develop the rolling techniques.

  12. The corn snake yolk sac becomes a solid tissue filled with blood vessels and yolk-rich endodermal cells.

    PubMed

    Elinson, Richard P; Stewart, James R

    2014-01-01

    The amniote egg was a key innovation in vertebrate evolution because it supports an independent existence in terrestrial environments. The egg is provisioned with yolk, and development depends on the yolk sac for the mobilization of nutrients. We have examined the yolk sac of the corn snake Pantherophis guttatus by the dissection of living eggs. In contrast to the familiar fluid-filled sac of birds, the corn snake yolk sac invades the yolk mass to become a solid tissue. There is extensive proliferation of yolk-filled endodermal cells, which associate with a meshwork of blood vessels. These novel attributes of the yolk sac of corn snakes compared with birds suggest new pathways for the evolution of the amniote egg. PMID:24402715

  13. The corn snake yolk sac becomes a solid tissue filled with blood vessels and yolk-rich endodermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Elinson, Richard P.; Stewart, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The amniote egg was a key innovation in vertebrate evolution because it supports an independent existence in terrestrial environments. The egg is provisioned with yolk, and development depends on the yolk sac for the mobilization of nutrients. We have examined the yolk sac of the corn snake Pantherophis guttatus by the dissection of living eggs. In contrast to the familiar fluid-filled sac of birds, the corn snake yolk sac invades the yolk mass to become a solid tissue. There is extensive proliferation of yolk-filled endodermal cells, which associate with a meshwork of blood vessels. These novel attributes of the yolk sac of corn snakes compared with birds suggest new pathways for the evolution of the amniote egg. PMID:24402715

  14. A Phenomenological Model for Mechanically Mediated Growth, Remodeling, Damage, and Plasticity of Gel-Derived Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Raykin, Julia; Rachev, Alexander I.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to dramatically improve mechanical and functional properties of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs). Adjusting factors such as cell source, type of extracellular matrix, cross-linking, magnitude, frequency, and time course of mechanical stimuli (among many other factors) make interpretation of experimental results challenging. Interpretation of data from such multifactor experiments requires modeling. We present a modeling framework and simulations for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, plasticity, and damage of gel-derived TEBVs that merge ideas from classical plasticity, volumetric growth, and continuum damage mechanics. Our results are compared with published data and suggest that this model framework can predict the evolution of geometry and material behavior under common experimental loading scenarios. PMID:19831486

  15. Spectrophotometric measurements of human tissues for the detection of subjacent blood vessels in an endonasal endoscopic surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Markus; Boeswetter, Pascal; Baselt, Tobias; Ebert, Frank; Basan, Fabiola; Steinke, Hanno; Hammer, Niels; Grunert, Ronny; Hartmann, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Thin slices of human tissues are characterized concerning reflection and transmission in a wavelength range from 400 to 1700 nm. The results are primarily useful to find a wavelength for the detection of subjacent blood vessels during surgical procedures, especially neurological surgery. The measurements have been conducted using a customized measuring station, utilizing two halogen bulb lamps and two spectrometers. This paper focuses on creating a data base with the optical properties of artery, brain, bone, nasal mucosa, and nerve. The spectral distributions are compared among each other, similarities and differences are pointed out. Each tissue has got unique spectral characteristics, whereas typical absorption bands can be found in the overall tissues, especially hemoglobin and water absorption bands. The reflectivity maxima are typically located in the red or near-infrared. All the transmission maxima are located between 1075 nm and 1100 nm. The measurements have been conducted at the Institute of Anatomy at the University of Leipzig. PMID:22778075

  16. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Accumulate in Peripheral Blood Vessels and Compromise Organ Function in Tumor-Bearing Animals.

    PubMed

    Cedervall, Jessica; Zhang, Yanyu; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Lei; Femel, Julia; Dimberg, Anna; Olsson, Anna-Karin

    2015-07-01

    Cancer produces a variety of collateral effects in patients beyond the malignancy itself, including threats to distal organ functions. However, the basis for such effects, associated with either primary or metastatic tumors, are generally poorly understood. In this study, we show how heart and kidney vascular function is impaired by neutrophils that accumulate in those tissues as a result of tumor formation in two different transgenic mouse models of cancer (RIP1-Tag2 model of insulinoma and MMTV-PyMT model of breast cancer). Neutrophil depletion by systemic administration of an anti-Gr1 antibody improved vascular perfusion and prevented vascular leakage in kidney vessels. We also observed the accumulation of platelet-neutrophil complexes, a signature of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET), in the kidneys of tumor-bearing mice that were completely absent from healthy nontumor-bearing littermates. NET accumulation in the vasculature was associated with upregulation of the proinflammatory adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin, as well as the proinflammatory cytokines IL1β, IL6, and the chemokine CXCL1. Administering DNase I to dissolve NETs, which have a high DNA content, restored perfusion in the kidney and heart to levels seen in nontumor-bearing mice, and also prevented vessel leakage in the blood vasculature of these organs. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that NETs mediate the negative collateral effects of tumors on distal organs, acting to impair vascular function, and to heighten inflammation at these sites. PMID:26071254

  17. Quantitative Ex-Vivo Micro-Computed Tomographic Imaging of Blood Vessels and Necrotic Regions within Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Charlene M.; Singla, Arvind K.; Villemaire, Michelle L.; Buie, Helen R.; Boyd, Steven K.; Jirik, Frank R.

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for visualizing and quantifying the microvasculature of tumors are essential not only for studying angiogenic processes but also for monitoring the effects of anti-angiogenic treatments. Given the relatively limited information that can be gleaned from conventional 2-D histological analyses, there has been considerable interest in methods that enable the 3-D assessment of the vasculature. To this end, we employed a polymerizing intravascular contrast medium (Microfil) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) in combination with a maximal spheres direct 3-D analysis method to visualize and quantify ex-vivo vessel structural features, and to define regions of hypoperfusion within tumors that would be indicative of necrosis. Employing these techniques we quantified the effects of a vascular disrupting agent on the tumor vasculature. The methods described herein for quantifying whole tumor vascularity represent a significant advance in the 3-D study of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of novel therapeutics, and will also find potential application in other fields where quantification of blood vessel structure and necrosis are important outcome parameters. PMID:22848565

  18. Vessel-specific quantification of blood oxygenation with T2-Relaxation-Under-Phase-Contrast (TRU-PC) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Lisa C.; Liu, Peiying; Ge, Yulin; Lu, Hanzhang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Measurement of venous oxygenation (Yv) is a critical step toward quantitative assessment of brain oxygen metabolism, a key index in many brain disorders. The present study aims to develop a non-invasive, rapid, and reproducible method to measure Yv in a vessel-specific manner. Theory The method, T2-Relaxation-Under-Phase-Contrast (TRU-PC) MRI, utilizes complex subtraction of phase-contrast to isolate pure blood signal, applies non-slice-selective T2-preparation to measure T2, and converts T2 to oxygenation using a calibration plot. Methods Following feasibility demonstration, several technical aspects were examined, including validation with an established global Yv technique, test-retest reproducibility, sensitivity to detect oxygenation changes due to hypoxia and caffeine challenges, applicability of EPI acquisition to shorten scan duration, and ability to study veins with a caliber of 1–2 mm. Results TRU-PC was able to simultaneously measure Yv in all major veins in the brain, including sagittal sinus, straight sinus, great vein, and internal cerebral vein. TRU-PC results showed an excellent agreement with the reference technique, high sensitivity to oxygenation changes, and test-retest variability of 3.5±1.0%. The use of segmented-EPI was able to reduce the scan duration to 1.5 minutes. It was also feasible to study pial veins and deep veins. Conclusion TRU-PC MRI is a promising technique for vessel-specific oxygenation measurement. PMID:23568830

  19. Vessel Segmentation and Blood Flow Simulation Using Level-Sets and Embedded Boundary Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, T; Schwartz, P; Trebotich, D; Colella, P; Saloner, D; Malladi, R

    2004-12-09

    In this article we address the problem of blood flow simulation in realistic vascular objects. The anatomical surfaces are extracted by means of Level-Sets methods that accurately model the complex and varying surfaces of pathological objects such as aneurysms and stenoses. The surfaces obtained are defined at the sub-pixel level where they intersect the Cartesian grid of the image domain. It is therefore straightforward to construct embedded boundary representations of these objects on the same grid, for which recent work has enabled discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluids. While most classical techniques require construction of a structured mesh that approximates the surface in order to extrapolate a 3D finite-element gridding of the whole volume, our method directly simulates the blood-flow inside the extracted surface without losing any complicated details and without building additional grids.

  20. Basement Membrane-Rich Organoids with Functional Human Blood Vessels Are Permissive Niches for Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Molina-Privado, Irene; Rojo, Federico; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Zazo, Sandra; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Sánchez-Martín, David; Álvarez-Méndez, Ana M.; Sanz, Laura; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Metastasic breast cancer is the leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Tumor metastasis is a multistep process encompassing local invasion of cancer cells at primary tumor site, intravasation into the blood vessel, survival in systemic circulation, and extravasation across the endothelium to metastasize at a secondary site. However, only a small percentage of circulating cancer cells initiate metastatic colonies. This fact, together with the inaccessibility and structural complexity of target tissues has hampered the study of the later steps in cancer metastasis. In addition, most data are derived from in vivo models where critical steps such as intravasation/extravasation of human cancer cells are mediated by murine endothelial cells. Here, we developed a new mouse model to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying late steps of the metastatic cascade. We have shown that a network of functional human blood vessels can be formed by co-implantation of human endothelial cells and mesenchymal cells, embedded within a reconstituted basement membrane-like matrix and inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The ability of circulating cancer cells to colonize these human vascularized organoids was next assessed in an orthotopic model of human breast cancer by bioluminescent imaging, molecular techniques and immunohistological analysis. We demonstrate that disseminated human breast cancer cells efficiently colonize organoids containing a functional microvessel network composed of human endothelial cells, connected to the mouse circulatory system. Human breast cancer cells could be clearly detected at different stages of the metastatic process: initial arrest in the human microvasculature, extravasation, and growth into avascular micrometastases. This new mouse model may help us to map the extravasation process with unprecedented detail, opening the way for the identification of relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23951338

  1. Changes in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 expression in rat blood vessels during glyceryl trinitrate tolerance development and reversal

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Y; Dowlatshahi, S; Bennett, BM

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent studies have suggested an essential role for aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the bioactivation of organic nitrates such as glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). In the present study, we utilized an in vivo GTN tolerance model to further investigate the role of ALDH2 in GTN bioactivation and tolerance. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We assessed changes in aortic ALDH activity, and in ALDH2 protein expression in various rat blood vessels (aorta, vena cava, femoral artery and femoral vein) during continuous GTN exposure (0.4 mg·h?1 for 6, 12, 24 or 48 h) or after a 1-, 3- or 5-day drug-free period following a 48 h exposure to GTN, in relation to changes in vasodilator responses to GTN and in vascular GTN biotransformation. KEY RESULTS A decrease was observed in both ALDH2 protein expression (80% in tolerant veins and 30% in tolerant arteries after 48 h exposure to GTN) and aortic ALDH activity, concomitant with decreased vasodilator responses to GTN and decreased aortic GTN biotransformation. However, after a 24 h drug-free period following 48 h of GTN exposure, vasodilator responses to GTN and aortic GTN biotransformation activity had returned to control values, whereas vascular ALDH2 expression and aortic ALDH activity were still significantly depressed, and remained so for 3–5 days following cessation of GTN exposure. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The dissociation of reduced ALDH activity and ALDH2 expression from the duration of the impaired vasodilator and biotransformation responses to GTN in nitrate-tolerant blood vessels, suggests that factors other than changes in ALDH2-mediated GTN bioactivation contribute to nitrate tolerance. PMID:21506955

  2. Early Generation of New PrPSc on Blood Vessels after Brain Microinjection of Scrapie in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, James; Rangel, Alejandra; Phillips, Katie; Hughson, Andrew; Caughey, Byron; Race, Brent

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aggregation of misfolded host proteins in the central nervous system is believed to be important in the pathogenic process in several neurodegenerative diseases of humans, including prion diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. In these diseases, protein misfolding and aggregation appear to expand through a process of seeded polymerization. Prion diseases occur in both humans and animals and are experimentally transmissible orally or by injection, thus providing a controllable model of other neurodegenerative protein misfolding diseases. In rodents and ruminants, prion disease has a slow course, lasting months to years. Although prion infectivity has been detected in brain tissue at 3 to 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.), the details of early prion replication in the brain are not well understood. Here we studied the localization and quantitation of PrPSc generation in vivo starting at 30 min postmicroinjection of scrapie into the brain. In C57BL mice at 3 days p.i., generation of new PrPSc was detected by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot assays, and at 7 days p.i., new generation was confirmed by real-time quaking-induced conversion assay. The main site of new PrPSc generation was near the outer basement membrane of small and medium blood vessels. The finding and localization of replication at this site so early after injection have not been reported previously. This predominantly perivascular location suggested that structural components of the blood vessel basement membrane or perivascular astrocytes might act as cofactors in the initial generation of PrPSc. The location of PrPSc replication at the basement membrane also implies a role for the brain interstitial fluid drainage in the early infection process. PMID:26396245

  3. Careful treatment planning enables safe ablation of liver tumors adjacent to major blood vessels by percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE)

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Bor; Voigt, Peter; Miklavcic, Damijan; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a tissue ablation method, which relies on the phenomenon of electroporation. When cells are exposed to a sufficiently electric field, the plasma membrane is disrupted and cells undergo an apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Although heating effects are known IRE is considered as non-thermal ablation technique and is currently applied to treat tumors in locations where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. Materials and methods. The manufacturer of the only commercially available pulse generator for IRE recommends a voltage-to-distance ratio of 1500 to 1700 V/cm for treating tumors in the liver. However, major blood vessels can influence the electric field distribution. We present a method for treatment planning of IRE which takes the influence of blood vessels on the electric field into account; this is illustrated on a treatment of 48-year-old patient with a metastasis near the remaining hepatic vein after a right side hemi-hepatectomy. Results Output of the numerical treatment planning method shows that a 19.9 cm3 irreversible electroporation lesion was generated and the whole tumor was covered with at least 900 V/cm. This compares well with the volume of the hypodense lesion seen in contrast enhanced CT images taken after the IRE treatment. A significant temperature raise occurs near the electrodes. However, the hepatic vein remains open after the treatment without evidence of tumor recurrence after 6 months. Conclusions Treatment planning using accurate computer models was recognized as important for electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. An important finding of this study was, that the surface of the electrodes heat up significantly. Therefore the clinical user should generally avoid placing the electrodes less than 4 mm away from risk structures when following recommendations of the manufacturer. PMID:26401128

  4. Investigating the effect of excess caffeine exposure on placental angiogenesis using chicken 'functional' placental blood vessel network.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zheng-Lai; Wang, Guang; Lu, Wen-Hui; Cheng, Xin; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-02-01

    It is now known that over-consumption of caffeine by pregnant mothers could have detrimental effects on normal fetal development. However, it remains obscure how caffeine's harmful effect impacts directly or indirectly on the developing embryo/fetus through damaging placenta development. In this study, we demonstrated the morphological similarities between the yolk sac and chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) of chick embryos and the villi of the mammalian placenta. Using the chick yolk sac and the CAM as a model, we found that 5-15?µmol per egg of caffeine exposure inhibited angiogenesis. Under the same condition, cell proliferation in extraembryonic mesoderm was reduced while apoptosis was enhanced. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that caffeine treatment down-regulated VEGF, VEGFR2, PIGF, IGF2 and NRP1 expression, but up-regulated Ang1 and Ang2 expression. We performed in situ hybridization to show VE-cadherin expression and as to demonstrate the blood vessels in the CAM and yolk sac membranes. This distribution of the VE-cadherin(+) blood vessels was determined to be reduced after caffeine treatment. Furthermore, MDA activity was induced after caffeine exposure, but GSH-PX activity was inhibited after caffeine exposure; SOD activity was unchanged as compared with the control. In summary, our results suggest that caffeine exposure could negatively impact on angiogenesis in the chick yolk sac and CAM by targeting angiogenesis-related genes. Some of these genes are also involved in regulating excess ROS generation. The results implied that the negative impact of caffeine on fetal development was partly attributed to impaired placental angiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26179615

  5. Optical monitoring of complex dynamics of blood sedimentation and lymph flow in vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-05-01

    In this paper a few examples of the complex behavior of biological systems detected by optical techniques are described. All examples are related to cell suspensions behavior in in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro studies performing investigation of a fine structure of blood sedimentation process and establishing nonlinear features of blood sedimentation as disease prognostic parameters are overviewed. Three optical techniques: OCT, CW laser beam transverse synchronized transillumination method and spatially-modulated laser beam transillumination method were considered. In blood sedimentation studied by OCT the regular or irregular oscillations of the RBC/plasma boundary were observed. The functional properties of erythrocytes in patients with coronary heart disease by mean of spatially-modulated laser beam transillumination method to reveal the stages of the acute coronary syndrome formation are discussed. The laser speckle and intravital TV-microscopic techniques applied to in vivo studies of lymph flow in microvessels are overviewed. The hypothesis on the alternating-translation (shuttle-stream) character of lymph flow is discussed.

  6. The fine structure of blood vessels in ethylnitrosourea-induced tumours of the rat nervous system: with special reference to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D. J.; Pilkington, G. J.; Lantos, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The fine structure of capillaries in and around ethylnitrosourea-induced tumours, gliomas and schwannomas, was examined in rats. A great variation was observed in the severity of changes: the degree of abnormality depended on the histological type and size of the tumour and on the site of the capillaries within the neoplasm. Endothelial cells, basement membranes and pericytes all demonstrated changes in their fine structure. The most striking alterations occurred in the endothelial cells: luminal cell membranes, tight junctions and pinocytotic activity were all modified. The widened extracellular spaces, particularly around capillaries, were frequently seen to contain proteinaceous material and haematogenous cells. Invasion of these spaces by neoplastic cells, however, rarely occurred. Formation of new capillaries was indicated by the mitotic activity of endothelial cells. These changes in the blood vessels of cerebral tumours have an important role in the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3a Fig. 3b Fig. 4a Fig. 4b Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:183804

  7. Platelet Activation Receptor CLEC-2 Regulates Blood/Lymphatic Vessel Separation by Inhibiting Proliferation, Migration, and Tube Formation of Lymphatic Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Makoto; Inoue, Osamu; Ding, Guo; Shirai, Toshiaki; Ichise, Hirotake; Hirayama, Kazuyoshi; Takano, Katsuhiro; Yatomi, Yutaka; Hirashima, Masanori; Fujii, Hideki; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    The platelet activation receptor CLEC-2 plays crucial roles in thrombosis/hemostasis, tumor metastasis, and lymphangiogenesis, although its role in thrombosis/hemostasis remains controversial. An endogenous ligand for CLEC-2, podoplanin, is expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). We and others have reported that CLEC-2-deficiency is lethal at mouse embryonic/neonatal stages associated with blood-filled lymphatics, indicating that CLEC-2 is essential for blood/lymphatic vessel separation. However, its mechanism, and whether CLEC-2 in platelets is necessary for this separation, remains unknown. We found that specific deletion of CLEC-2 from platelets leads to the misconnection of blood/lymphatic vessels. CLEC-2+/+ platelets, but not by CLEC-2?/? platelets, inhibited LEC migration, proliferation, and tube formation but had no effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Additionally, supernatants from activated platelets significantly inhibited these three functions in LECs, suggesting that released granule contents regulate blood/lymphatic vessel separation. Bone morphologic protein-9 (BMP-9), which we found to be present in platelets and released upon activation, appears to play a key role in regulating LEC functions. Only BMP-9 inhibited tube formation, although other releasates including transforming growth factor-? and platelet factor 4 inhibited proliferation and/or migration. We propose that platelets regulate blood/lymphatic vessel separation by inhibiting the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of LECs, mainly because of the release of BMP-9 upon activation by CLEC-2/podoplanin interaction. PMID:22556408

  8. Structure of steroids and their diffusion through blood vessel walls in a counter-current system

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, J.A.; Schramm, W.; Einer-Jensen, N.

    1984-03-01

    Several substances including prostaglandin F2 alpha, progesterone and /sup 85/krypton have been shown to be transferred from the venous side to the arterial side of the circulation in the ovarian vascular pedicle. Experiments were therefore carried out to study the transfer of three pairs of steroids (progesterone and 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone, C-21; androstenedione and testosterone, C-19; and estrone and estradiol-17 beta, C-18) in which each member of a pair differed by one hydroxyl group. Each pair of steroids, one labeled with /sup 3/H and the other with /sup 14/C, were infused in sequence for 30 minutes into a side branch of an ovarian vein near the hilus of the ovary with a rest period of 90 minutes between infusions. An increase in radioactivity in ovarian arterial plasma compared to the radioactivity in an equal volume of aortic plasma sampled simultaneously was used as the index for a direct transfer of steroids from the ovarian vein to the adjacent ovarian artery. All six steroids showed such a transfer which began 3 to 6 minutes after the start of each infusion and decreased rapidly after the infusion was stopped. The results of this study also showed that a larger quantity of the less polar (ketonic) form of each steroid pair examined was transferred than its hydroxyl counterpart.

  9. Nampt/PBEF/visfatin serum levels: a new biomarker for retinal blood vessel occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Kaja, Simon; Shah, Anna A; Haji, Shamim A; Patel, Krishna B; Naumchuk, Yuliya; Zabaneh, Alexander; Gerdes, Bryan C; Kunjukunju, Nancy; Sabates, Nelson R; Cassell, Michael A; Lord, Ron K; Pikey, Kevin P; Poulose, Abraham; Koulen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to quantify serum levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt/pre-B-Cell colony-enhancing factor 1/visfatin) in subjects with a history of retinal vascular occlusions (RVOs), disease conditions characterized by pronounced ischemia, and metabolic energy deficits. A case–control study of 18 subjects with a history of RVO as well as six healthy volunteers is presented. Serum Nampt levels were quantified using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Serum Nampt levels were 79% lower in patients with a history of RVO compared with that in healthy volunteers (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference among the types of RVOs, specifically branch retinal vein occlusions (n=7), central retinal vein occlusions (n=5), hemiretinal vein occlusions (n=3), and central retinal artery occlusions (n=3; P=0.69). Further studies are needed to establish the temporal kinetics of Nampt expression and to determine whether Nampt may represent a novel biomarker to identify at-risk populations, or whether it is a druggable target with the potential to ameliorate the long-term complications associated with the condition, ie, macular edema, macular ischemia, neovascularization, and permanent loss of vision. PMID:25897200

  10. DNA Methylation is Altered in Maternal Blood Vessels of Women With Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Ahmad A.; Archer, Kellie J.; Cappello, Renato; Estrada-Gutierrez, Guadalupe; Isaacs, Christine R.; Strauss,, Jerome F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed 27 578 CpG sites that map to 14 495 genes in omental arteries of normal pregnant and preeclamptic women for DNA methylation status using the Illumina platform. We found 1685 genes with a significant difference in DNA methylation at a false discovery rate of <10% with many inflammatory genes having reduced methylation. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed natural clustering by diagnosis and methylation status. Of the genes with significant methylation differences, 236 were significant at a false discovery rate of <5%. When data were analyzed more stringently to a false discovery rate of <5% and difference in methylation of >0.10, 65 genes were identified, all of which showed reduced methylation in preeclampsia. When these genes were mapped to gene ontology for molecular functions and biological processes, 75 molecular functions and 149 biological processes were overrepresented in the preeclamptic vessels. These included smooth muscle contraction, thrombosis, inflammation, redox homeostasis, sugar metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. We speculate that reduced methylation may contribute to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and that alterations in DNA methylation resulting from preeclampsia may increase maternal risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. PMID:22902744

  11. A cellular nonlinear network: real-time technology for the analysis of microfluidic phenomena in blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapuppo, F.; Bucolo, M.; Intaglietta, M.; Fortuna, L.; Arena, P.

    2006-02-01

    A new approach to the observation and analysis of dynamic structural and functional parameters in the microcirculation is described. The new non-invasive optical system is based on cellular nonlinear networks (CNNs), highly integrated analogue processor arrays whose processing elements, the cells, interact directly within a finite local neighbourhood. CNNs, thanks to their parallel processing feature and spatially distributed structure, are widely used to solve high-speed image processing and recognition problems and in the description and modelling of biological dynamics through the solution of time continuous partial differential equations (PDEs). They are therefore considered extremely suitable for spatial-temporal dynamic characterization of fluidic phenomena at micrometric to nanometric scales, such as blood flow in microvessels and its interaction with the cells of the vessel wall. A CNN universal machine (CNN-UM) structure was used to implement, via simulation and hardware (ACE16k), the algorithms to determine the functional capillarity density (FCD) and red blood cell velocity (RBCV) in capillaries obtained by intravital microscopy during in vivo experiments on hamsters. The system exploits the moving particles to distinguish the functional capillaries from the stationary background. This information is used to reconstruct a map and to calculate the velocity of the moving objects.

  12. Arginase reciprocally regulates nitric oxide synthase activity and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in aging blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, Dan E.; White, Ron; Li, Dechun; Minhas, Khalid M.; Cernetich, Amy; Kim, Soonyul; Burke, Sean; Shoukas, Artin A.; Nyhan, Daniel; Champion, Hunter C.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although abnormal L-arginine NO signaling contributes to endothelial dysfunction in the aging cardiovascular system, the biochemical mechanisms remain controversial. L-arginine, the NO synthase (NOS) precursor, is also a substrate for arginase. We tested the hypotheses that arginase reciprocally regulates NOS by modulating L-arginine bioavailability and that arginase is upregulated in aging vasculature, contributing to depressed endothelial function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Inhibition of arginase with (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine, HCl (BEC) produced vasodilation in aortic rings from young (Y) adult rats (maximum effect, 46.4+/-9.4% at 10(-5) mol/L, P<0.01). Similar vasorelaxation was elicited with the additional arginase inhibitors N-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). This effect required intact endothelium and was prevented by 1H-oxadiazole quinoxalin-1-one (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. DFMO-elicited vasodilation was greater in old (O) compared with Y rat aortic rings (60+/-6% versus 39+/-6%, P<0.05). In addition, BEC restored depressed L-arginine (10(-4) mol/L)-dependent vasorelaxant responses in O rings to those of Y. Arginase activity and expression were increased in O rings, whereas NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were decreased. BEC and DFMO suppressed arginase activity and restored NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels in O vessels to those of Y. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that arginase modulates NOS activity, likely by regulating intracellular L-arginine availability. Arginase upregulation contributes to endothelial dysfunction of aging and may therefore be a therapeutic target.

  13. Lytic and mechanical stability of clots composed of fibrin and blood vessel wall components

    PubMed Central

    Rottenberger, Z; Komorowicz, E; Szabó, L; Bóta, A; Varga, Z; Machovich, R; Longstaff, C; Kolev, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases expressed in atherosclerotic plaque lesions generate collagen fragments, release glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin sulfate [CS] and dermatan sulfate [DS]) and expose extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (e.g. decorin) at sites of fibrin formation. Objective Here we address the effect of these vessel wall components on the lysis of fibrin by the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasminogen system and on the mechanical stability of clots. Methods and results MMP-8-digested collagen fragments, isolated CS, DS, glycosylated decorin and its core protein were used to prepare mixed matrices with fibrin (additives present at a 50-fold lower mass concentration than fibrinogen). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the presence of ECM components resulted in a coarse fibrin structure, most pronounced for glycosylated decorin causing an increase in the median fiber diameter from 85 to 187 nm. Rheological measurements indicated that these structural alterations were coupled to decreased shear resistance (1.8-fold lower shear stress needed for gel/fluid transition of the clots containing glycosylated decorin) and rigidity (reduction of the storage modulus from 54.3 to 33.2 Pa). The lytic susceptibility of the modified fibrin structures was increased. The time to 50% lysis by plasmin was reduced approximately 2-fold for all investigated ECM components (apart from the core protein of decorin which produced a moderate reduction of the lysis time by 25%), whereas fibrin-dependent plasminogen activation by tPA was inhibited by up to 30%. Conclusion ECM components compromise the chemical and mechanical stability of fibrin as a result of changes in its ultrastructure. PMID:23279194

  14. Functional photoacoustic micro-imaging of cerebral hemodynamic changes in single blood vessels after photo-induced brain stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Lun-De; Chen, You-Yin; Lin, Chin-Teng; Li, Meng-Lin

    2013-03-01

    Studying the functional hemodynamic roles of individual cerebral cortical arterioles in maintaining both the structure and function of cortical regions during and after brain stroke in small animals is an important issue. Recently, functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM) has been proved as a reliable imaging technique to probe the total hemoglobin concentration (HbT), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) in single cerebral blood vessels of rats. Here, we report the application of fPAM associated with electrophysiology recordings to investigating functional hemodynamic changes in single cortical arterioles of rats with electrical forepaw stimulation after photo-induced ischemic stroke. Because of the weak optical focusing nature of our fPAM system, photo-induced ischemic stroke targeting single cortical arterioles can be easily conducted with simple adaptation. Functional HbT, CBV and SO2 changes associated with the induced stroke in selected arterioles from the anterior cerebral artery system were imaged with 36 x 65-μm spatial resolution. Experimental results showed that after photo-occlusion of a single arteriole, the functional changes of nearby arterioles in cerebral cortex only can be observed immediately after the stroke. After a few minutes of stroke onset, there are no significant functional changes under the forepaw stimulation, suggesting that alternate blood flow routes are not actively recruited. The fPAM with electrophysiology recordings complements existing imaging techniques and has the potential to offer a favorable tool for explicitly studying cerebral hemodynamics in small animal models of photo-indcued ischemic stroke.

  15. Histological assessment of selected blood vessels of the phocid seals (northern elephant and harbour seals).

    PubMed

    Smodlaka, H; Khamas, W; Tkalcic, S; Golub, T; Palmer, L

    2010-06-01

    Phocid seals exhibit vascular adaptations that allow them to undertake prolonged deep dives. These vascular adaptations are either unique to phocids, or are modified vascular equivalents to those present in terrestrial mammals. One such adaptation, the aortic bulb, is a spherical enlargement of the ascending aorta specific to phocid seals. Its histological make-up consists of a reinforced tunica media with circular and longitudinal layers of elastic fibres. This reinforcement enables multi-axial deformation of the aortic bulb, thus complementing its function as a prominent elastic reservoir or 'windkessel'. A second adaptation, the hepatic sinus, is an asymmetrical dilation of the abdominal portion of the caudal vena cava and accompanying hepatic veins. The hepatic sinus is comprised of a relatively thin tunica media, with a scant smooth muscle component. The bulk of the sinus wall is comprised of tunica adventitia. A third vascular adaptation distinctive to the phocids is the pericardial venous plexus, composed of convoluted veins circumnavigating the perimeter of the heart. Microscopically, these veins have a thick tunica media and also contain valves. Smaller arteries, venules and distinct capillary beds are observed interspersed in-between these veins. It can be hypothesized, that in seals, certain vascular embryonic development may be arrested at an earlier embryonic stage, resulting in these unusual vascular formations. These modifications play a vital role in blood pressure regulation and distribution of oxygenated blood during prolonged deep diving. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the histological aspects of these unique vascular modifications and relate them to specific function. PMID:20331589

  16. LWR Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program. NRC Metallurgy and Materials Research Branch LWR-PV Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program review graphics

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, W.N.; Carlson, K.W.; Davis, A.I.; Gold, R.; Guthrie, G.L.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; Matsumoto, W.Y.; Preston, C.C.; Roberts, J.H.

    1980-10-01

    Aging light water reactor pressure vessels (LWR-PV) are accumulating significant neutron fluence exposures, with consequent changes in their steel fracture toughness and embrittlement characteristics. Recognizing that accurate and validated measurement and data analysis procedures are needed to periodically evaluate the metallurgical condition of these reactor vessels, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established the LWR-PV Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program. The primary concern of this program is to improve, standardize, and maintain dosimetry, damage correlation, and the associated reactor analysis procedures used for predicting the integrated effect of neutron exposure to LWR pressure vessels and suport structures.

  17. Real-time intraoperative full-range complex FD-OCT guided cerebral blood vessel identification and brain tumor resection in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kang; Huang, Yong; Pradilla, Gustavo; Tyler, Betty; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-03-01

    This work utilized an ultra-high-speed full-range complex-conjugate-free optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system to perform real-time intraoperative imaging to guide two common neurosurgical procedures: the cerebral blood vessel identification and the brain tumor resection. The cerebral blood vessel identification experiment is conducted ex vivo on human cadaver specimen. Specific cerebral arteries and veins in different positions of the specimen are visualized and the spatial relations between adjacent vessels are indentified through real-time 3D visualization. The brain tumor resection experiment is conducted in vivo on 9L gliomas established in rat brains. The normal brain-tumor margin can be clearly identified in depth of the tissue from sagittal, coronal and axial slices of the intraoperatively acquired 3D data set. The real-time full-range FD-OCT guided in vivo rat flank tumor resection is also conducted.

  18. Development of a Practical Nonlinear Imaging Technique for Transcranial Visualization of Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Jeffrey; Malyarenko, Eugene; Shapoori, Kiyanoosh; Maev, Roman Gr.

    The focus of this paper is to outline the ongoing development of a nonlinear ultrasonic imaging (NLI) method for the visualization of flowing liquids surrounded by inhomogeneous media. The particular interest of our study is the in-vivo transcranial visualization of the blood flow where many existing ultrasonic approaches fail due to strong attenuation, scattering, and distortion by the skull bones. In general, the approach of Nonlinear Imaging (NLI) is to average out multiple ultrasonic exposures, and examine the differences between successive exposures. By selectively processing for these differences, the region of random acoustic scattering by the flowing media is obtained, while any constant field is removed. Results outlined in this paper show that NLI is able to produce 2D and 3D images of the flowing region, while eliminating those regions of constant acoustic sources. This is done for the ideal case of water (with scatterers) flowing through plastic tubing, as well as using a standard Doppler phantom of a major human artery containing a bifurcation and stenosis.

  19. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  20. Coronary vessel cores from 3D imagery: a topological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Andrzej; Tannenbaum, Allen; Mischaikow, Konstantin

    2005-04-01

    We propose a simple method for reconstructing thin, low-contrast blood vessels from three-dimensional greyscale images. Our algorithm first extracts persistent maxima of the intensity on all axis-aligned two-dimensional slices through the input volume. Those maxima tend to concentrate along one-dimensional intensity ridges, in particular along blood vessels. Persistence (which can be viewed as a measure of robustness of a local maximum with respect to perturbations of the data) allows to filter out the `unimportant' maxima due to noise or inaccuracy in the input volume. We then build a minimum forest based on the persistent maxima that uses edges of length smaller than a certain threshold. Because of the distribution of the robust maxima, the structure of this forest already reflects the structure of the blood vessels. We apply three simple geometric filters to the forest in order to improve its quality. The first filter removes short branches from the forest's trees. The second filter adds edges, longer than the edge length threshold used earlier, that join what appears (based on geometric criteria) to be pieces of the same blood vessel to the forest. Such disconnected pieces often result from non-uniformity of contrast along a blood vessel. Finally, we let the user select the tree of interest by clicking near its root (point from which blood would flow out into the tree). We compute the blood flow direction assuming that the tree is of the correct structure and cut it in places where the vessel's geometry would force the blood flow direction to change abruptly. Experiments on clinical CT scans show that our technique can be a useful tool for segmentation of thin and low contrast blood vessels. In particular, we successfully applied it to extract coronary arteries from heart CT scans. Volumetric 3D models of blood vessels can be obtained from the graph described above by adaptive thresholding.

  1. CGKRK-modified nanoparticles for dual-targeting drug delivery to tumor cells and angiogenic blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quanyin; Gao, Xiaoling; Kang, Ting; Feng, Xingye; Jiang, Di; Tu, Yifan; Song, Qingxiang; Yao, Lei; Jiang, Xinguo; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy shows great advantages in clinical cancer treatment while no overall survival has been achieved. The compromised results were mainly contributed by intrinsic/acquired antiangiogenic drug resistance and increased local invasion or distant metastasis after antiangiogenic therapy. Here we constructed a CGKRK peptide-modified PEG-co-PCL nanoparticulate drug delivery system (DDS), aiming at targeting both tumor angiogenic blood vessels and tumor cells to achieve enhanced anti-tumor activity as well as holding a great potential to overcome the drawbacks of antiangiogenic therapy alone. The obtained CGKRK-functionalized PEG-co-PCL nanoparticles (CGKRK-NP) with a particle size of 117.28 ± 10.42 nm and zeta potential of -15.7 ± 3.32 mV, exhibited an enhanced accumulation via an energy-dependent, lipid raft/caveolae-mediated endocytosis with the involvement of microtubules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and an energy-dependent, lipid raft/caveolae-mediated endocytosis with the participation of Golgi apparatus in human U87MG cells. Using coumarin-6 as the fluorescence probe, in vitro U87MG tumor spheroids assays showed that CGKRK-NP effectively penetrated into the tumor spheroids. Selective accumulation and extensive bio-distribution of CGKRK-NP at tumor site was confirmed by in vivo imaging and tumor section analysis. After drug loading, CGKRK-NP enhanced cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction activity of the loaded PTX on both HUVEC cells and U87MG cells and improved its inhibition effect on the growth of U87MG tumor spheroids. The smallest tumor volume was achieved by those mice bearing subcutaneous U87MG tumor following the treatment of PTX-loaded CGKRK-NP. The findings here indicated that CGKRK peptide-functionalized nanoparticulate DDS could be used as an effective tumor angiogenic blood vessels and tumor cells dual-targeting DDS and might provide a great promising approach for reducing the disadvantages of antiangiogenic therapy alone. PMID:24054848

  2. Branched-chain amino acids increase arterial blood ammonia in spite of enhanced intrinsic muscle ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord; Ott, Peter; Buhl, Mads; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby; Schousboe, Arne; Møller, Niels; Sørensen, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are used in attempts to reduce blood ammonia in patients with cirrhosis and intermittent hepatic encephalopathy based on the hypothesis that BCAA stimulate muscle ammonia detoxification. We studied the effects of an oral dose of BCAA on the skeletal muscle metabolism of ammonia and amino acids in 14 patients with cirrhosis and in 7 healthy subjects by combining [(13)N]ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) of the thigh muscle with measurements of blood flow and arteriovenous (A-V) concentrations of ammonia and amino acids. PET was used to measure the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia and the A-V measurements were used to measure the total ammonia metabolism across the thigh muscle. After intake of BCAA, blood ammonia increased more than 30% in both groups of subjects (both P < 0.05). Muscle clearance of blood-supplied ammonia (PET) was unaffected (P = 0.75), but the metabolic removal rate (PET) increased significantly because of increased blood ammonia in both groups (all P < 0.05). The total ammonia clearance across the leg muscle (A-V) increased by more than 50% in both groups, and the flux (A-V) of ammonia increased by more than 45% (all P < 0.05). BCAA intake led to a massive glutamine release from the muscle (cirrhotic patients, P < 0.05; healthy subjects, P = 0.12). In conclusion, BCAA enhanced the intrinsic muscle metabolism of ammonia but not the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia in both the patients with cirrhosis and in the healthy subjects. PMID:21636533

  3. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mata, Karina M; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-11-15

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT-, DPN-, or G1-induced relaxation in other vessels, suggesting endothelium-independent mechanisms. E2, PPT, DPN, and G1 caused relaxation of Ca(2+) entry-dependent KCl contraction, and the effect of PPT was greater in the mesenteric artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. Thus, during pregnancy, an increase in ERα expression in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle layers of the aorta and mesenteric artery is associated with increased ERα-mediated relaxation via endothelium-derived vasodilators and inhibition of Ca(2+) entry into vascular smooth muscle, supporting a role of aortic and mesenteric arterial ERα in pregnancy-associated vasodilation. GPER may contribute to aortic relaxation while enhanced ERβ expression could mediate other genomic vascular effects during pregnancy. PMID:26408543

  4. Assessment of implanted stent coverage of side-branches in intravascular optical coherence tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Eggermont, J.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Dekker, N.; de Koning, P. J. H.; Dijkstra, J.

    2013-02-01

    Coronary stents improve the blood flow by keeping narrowed vessels open, but small stent cells that overlay a side branch may cause restenosis and obstruct the blood flow to the side branch. There are increasing demands for precise measurement of the stent coverage of side branches for outcome evaluation and clinical research. Capturing micrometerresolution images, intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) allows proper visualization of the stent struts, which subsequently can be used for the coverage measurement purpose. In this paper, a new approach to compute the stent coverage of side branches in IVOCT image sequences is presented. The amount of the stent coverage of a side branch is determined by the ostial area of the stent cells that cover this side branch. First, the stent struts and the guide wires are detected to reconstruct the irregular stent surface and the stent cell contours are generated to segment their coverage area on the stent surface. Next, the covered side branches are detected and their lumen contours are projected onto the stent surface to specify the side branch areas. By assessing the common parts between the stent cell areas and the side branch areas, the stent cell coverage of side branches can be computed. The evaluation based on a phantom data set demonstrated that the average error of the stent coverage of side branches is 8.9% +/- 7.0%. The utility of the presented approach for in-vivo data sets was also proved by the testing on 12 clinical IVOCT image sequences.

  5. Crosstalk between adipose tissue and blood vessels in cardiometabolic syndrome: implication of steroid hormone receptors (MR/GR).

    PubMed

    Even, Sarah Elisabeth Louise; Dulak-Lis, Maria Gabriela; Touyz, Rhian M; Dinh Cat, Aurelie Nguyen

    2014-08-01

    Crosstalk between adipose tissue and blood vessels is vital to vascular homeostasis and is disturbed in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) refers to the clustering of obesity-related metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, glucose and lipid profile alterations, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Mechanisms underlying these associations remain unclear. Adipose tissue associated with the vasculature [known as perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT)] has been shown to produce myriads of adipose tissue-derived substances called adipokines, including hormones, cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which actively participate in the regulation of vascular function and local inflammation by endocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. As a result, the signaling from PVAT to the vasculature is emerging as a potential therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes-related vascular dysfunction. Accumulating evidence supports a shift in our understanding of the crucial role of elevated plasma levels of aldosterone in obesity, promoting insulin resistance and hypertension. In obesity, aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling induces an abnormal secretion of adipokines, ROS production and systemic inflammation, which in turn contribute to impaired insulin signaling, reduced endothelial-mediated vasorelaxation, and associated cardiovascular abnormalities. Thus, aldosterone excess exerts detrimental metabolic and vascular effects that participate to the development of the CMS and its associated cardiovascular abnormalities. In this review, we focus on the physiopathological roles of corticosteroid receptors in the interplay between PVAT and the vasculature, which underlies their potential as key regulators of vascular function. PMID:25390018

  6. Capture of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Simulated Blood Vessels: Effects of Proteins and Coating with Poly(ethylene glycol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee; Brazel, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have applications in cancer treatment as they can be captured and localized to a diseased site by use of an external magnetic field. After localization, cancer treatments such as magnetically targeted chemotherapy and localized hyperthermia can be applied. Previously, our lab has shown that the percent capture of MNPs is significantly reduced when MNPs are dispersed in protein solutions compared to water or aqueous polymer solutions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of proteins on capture efficiency and to investigate the ability of poly(ethylene glycol), PEG, coatings to reduce aggregation of MNPs with proteins, allowing for a greater capture of MNPs in flow. Using Tygon® tubing to simulate blood vessels, a maghemite nanoparticle solution was pumped through a capture zone, where a magnetic field was applied. After passing through the capture zone, the fluid flowed to a spectrophotometer, which measured the absorbance of the solution. The introduction of proteins into the nanoparticle solution reduced the percent capture of MNPs. However, coating the MNPs with PEG aided in preventing aggregation and led to higher capture efficiencies in protein solutions. Additionally, the effects of capture length and protein exposure time were examined. It was found that a higher percent capture is attainable with a longer capture length. Furthermore, on a scale of hours, the percent capture is not affected by the protein exposure time. Funded by NSF REU Grant 1062611 and NIH NCI R21CA 141388.

  7. Smooth Muscle Cell Alignment and Phenotype Control by Melt Spun Polycaprolactone Fibers for Seeding of Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Animesh; Lee, Bae Hoon; Irvine, Scott A.; An, Jia; Bhuthalingam, Ramya; Singh, Vaishali; Low, Kok Yao; Chua, Chee Kai; Venkatraman, Subbu S.

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed to induce and retain a contractile phenotype for vascular smooth muscle cells, as the first step towards the development of a biomimetic blood vessel construct with minimal compliance mismatch. Melt spun PCL fibers were deposited on a mandrel to form aligned fibers of 10??m in diameter. The fibers were bonded into aligned arrangement through dip coating in chitosan solution. This formed a surface of parallel grooves, 10??m deep by 10??m across, presenting a surface layer of chitosan to promote cell surface interactions. The aligned fiber surface was used to culture cells present in the vascular wall, in particular fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. This topography induced “surface guidance” over the orientation of the cells, which adopted an elongated spindle-like morphology, whereas cells on the unpatterned control surface did not show such orientation, assuming more rhomboid shapes. The preservation of VSMC contractile phenotype on the aligned scaffold was demonstrated by the retention of ?-SMA expression after several days of culture. The effect was assessed on a prototype vascular graft prosthesis fabricated from polylactide caprolactone; VSMCs aligned longitudinally along a fiberless tube, whereas, for the aligned fiber coated tubes, the VSMCs aligned in the required circumferential orientation. PMID:26413093

  8. A Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor complex promotes formation of lateral filopodia and blood vessel lumen morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sabu; Scarcia, Margherita; Bagshaw, Richard D.; McMahon, Kathryn; Grant, Gary; Harvey, Tracey; Yeo, Maggie; Esteves, Filomena O.G.; Thygesen, Helene H.; Jones, Pamela F.; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M.; Selby, Peter J.; Lorger, Mihaela; Dear, T. Neil; Pawson, Tony; Marshall, Christopher J.; Mavria, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    During angiogenesis, Rho-GTPases influence endothelial cell migration and cell–cell adhesion; however it is not known whether they control formation of vessel lumens, which are essential for blood flow. Here, using an organotypic system that recapitulates distinct stages of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, we show that lumen formation requires early cytoskeletal remodelling and lateral cell–cell contacts, mediated through the RAC1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) DOCK4 (dedicator of cytokinesis 4). DOCK4 signalling is necessary for lateral filopodial protrusions and tubule remodelling prior to lumen formation, whereas proximal, tip filopodia persist in the absence of DOCK4. VEGF-dependent Rac activation via DOCK4 is necessary for CDC42 activation to signal filopodia formation and depends on the activation of RHOG through the RHOG GEF, SGEF. VEGF promotes interaction of DOCK4 with the CDC42 GEF DOCK9. These studies identify a novel Rho-family GTPase activation cascade for the formation of endothelial cell filopodial protrusions necessary for tubule remodelling, thereby influencing subsequent stages of lumen morphogenesis. PMID:26129894

  9. Nicotiflorin reduces cerebral ischemic damage and upregulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase in primarily cultured rat cerebral blood vessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Runping; Guo, Meili; Zhang, Ge; Xu, Xiongfei; Li, Quan

    2006-08-11

    Nicotiflorin is a flavonoid glycoside extracted from a traditional Chinese medicine Flos Carthami. In the current study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of nicotiflorin on a transient focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion model in rats. Nicotiflorin (2.5-10 mg/kg) administered after onset of ischemia markedly reduced brain infarct volume by 24.5-63.2% and neurological deficits. Also the effect of nicotiflorin on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, mRNA and protein expression after hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R) treatment was investigated in an in vitro model mimic cerebrum ischemia-reperfusion in vivo. After total 4 h hypoxia and 12 h reoxygenation, eNOS activity, mRNA and protein levels in the primarily cultured rat cerebral blood vessel endothelial cells treated with nicotiflorin (25-100 microg/ml) 2 h after onset of hypoxia were significantly higher than eNOS activity, mRNA and protein levels in the pure H-R cells and also higher than eNOS activity, mRNA and protein levels in cells cultured under normoxic conditions. The results demonstrated that nicotiflorin had a protective effect against cerebral ischemic damage. The results also gave an important elucidation for the mechanism underlying the protective effect at the cellular level. PMID:16806761

  10. A Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor complex promotes formation of lateral filopodia and blood vessel lumen morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sabu; Scarcia, Margherita; Bagshaw, Richard D; McMahon, Kathryn; Grant, Gary; Harvey, Tracey; Yeo, Maggie; Esteves, Filomena O G; Thygesen, Helene H; Jones, Pamela F; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M; Selby, Peter J; Lorger, Mihaela; Dear, T Neil; Pawson, Tony; Marshall, Christopher J; Mavria, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    During angiogenesis, Rho-GTPases influence endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion; however it is not known whether they control formation of vessel lumens, which are essential for blood flow. Here, using an organotypic system that recapitulates distinct stages of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, we show that lumen formation requires early cytoskeletal remodelling and lateral cell-cell contacts, mediated through the RAC1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) DOCK4 (dedicator of cytokinesis 4). DOCK4 signalling is necessary for lateral filopodial protrusions and tubule remodelling prior to lumen formation, whereas proximal, tip filopodia persist in the absence of DOCK4. VEGF-dependent Rac activation via DOCK4 is necessary for CDC42 activation to signal filopodia formation and depends on the activation of RHOG through the RHOG GEF, SGEF. VEGF promotes interaction of DOCK4 with the CDC42 GEF DOCK9. These studies identify a novel Rho-family GTPase activation cascade for the formation of endothelial cell filopodial protrusions necessary for tubule remodelling, thereby influencing subsequent stages of lumen morphogenesis. PMID:26129894

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the neuroretina and retinal blood vessels after retinal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Håkansson, Gisela; Gesslein, Bodil; Gustafsson, Lotta; Englund-Johansson, Ulrica

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ischemia arises from circulatory failure. As the retinal blood vessels are key organs in circulatory failure, our aim was to study the retinal vasculature separately from the neuroretina to elucidate the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1? and 1? and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in retinal ischemia. Retinal ischemia was induced in porcine eyes by applying an intraocular pressure, followed by 12 h of reperfusion. HIF-1? mRNA expression was not affected by ischemia, while immunofluorescence staining was higher after ischemia in the neuroretina. HIF-1? immunoreactivity and mRNA expression were unaffected. VEGF protein levels in the vitreous humor and VEGF staining in the neuroretina were more pronounced in eyes subjected to ischemia than in the sham eyes. VEGF may be activated downstream of HIF-1 and is known to stimulate retinal neovascularization, which causes sight-threatening complications. These results emphasize the need for pharmacological treatment to block the HIF and VEGF signaling pathways in retinal ischemia. PMID:21139705

  12. Osteoblast Precursors, but Not Mature Osteoblasts, Move into Developing and Fractured Bones along with Invading Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Christa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Selig, Martin K.; Torrekens, Sophie; Roth, Sanford I.; Mackem, Susan; Carmeliet, Geert; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY During endochondral bone development, the first osteoblasts differentiate in the perichondrium surrounding avascular cartilaginous rudiments; the source of trabecular osteoblasts inside the later bone is, however, unknown. Here, we generated tamoxifen-inducible transgenic mice bred to Rosa26R-LacZ reporter mice to follow the fates of stage-selective subsets of osteoblast lineage cells. Pulse-chase studies showed that osterix-expressing osteoblast precursors, labeled in the perichondrium prior to vascular invasion of the cartilage, give rise to trabecular osteoblasts, osteocytes, and stromal cells inside the developing bone. Throughout the translocation, some precursors were found to intimately associate with invading blood vessels, in pericyte-like fashion. A similar coinvasion occurs during endochondral healing of bone fractures. In contrast, perichondrial mature osteoblasts did not exhibit perivascular localization and remained in the outer cortex of developing bones. These findings reveal the specific involvement of immature osteoblast precursors in the coupled vascular and osteogenic transformation essential to endochondral bone development and repair. PMID:20708594

  13. Placental Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Blood Vessels or Avascular Tissues: What Is the Better Choice to Support Endothelial Cell Function?

    PubMed Central

    König, Julia; Weiss, Gregor; Rossi, Daniele; Wankhammer, Karin; Reinisch, Andreas; Kinzer, Manuela; Huppertz, Berthold; Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Parolini, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for therapeutic revascularization of ischemic tissues and for support of vessel formation in engineered tissue constructs. Recently, we could show that avascular-derived MSCs from placental amnion release soluble factors that exhibit survival-enhancing effects on endothelial cells (ECs). We hypothesize that MSCs derived from placental blood vessels might have even more potent angiogenic effects. Therefore, we isolated and characterized MSCs from placental chorionic blood vessels (bv-MSCs) and tested their angiogenic potential in comparison to amnion-derived avascular MSCs (av-MSCs). bv-MSCs express a very similar surface marker profile compared with av-MSCs and could be differentiated toward the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. bv-MSCs exert immunosuppressive properties on peripheral blood mononuclear cells, suggesting that they are suitable for cell transplantation settings. Conditioned medium (Cdm) from av-MSCs and bv-MSCs significantly enhanced EC viability, whereas only Cdm from bv-MSCs significantly increased EC migration and network formation (Matrigel assay). Angiogenesis array analysis of av- and bv-MSC-Cdm revealed a similar secretion pattern of angiogenic factors, including angiogenin, interleukins-6 and -8, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 2. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis showed that, in contrast to av-MSCs, bv-MSCs secreted vascular endothelial growth factor. In direct coculture with bv-MSCs, ECs showed a significantly increased formation of vessel-like structures compared with av-MSCs. With regard to therapeutic treatment, bv-MSCs and particularly their Cdm might be valuable to stimulate angiogenesis especially in ischemic tissues. av-MSCs and their Cdm could be beneficial in conditions when it is required to promote the survival and stabilization of blood vessels without the risk of unmeant angiogenesis. PMID:25244528

  14. Visualizing the path of blood flow in static vessel images for image guided surgery of cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sean Jy-Shyang; Kersten-Oertel, Marta; Drouin, Simon; Collins, D. Louis

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a type of vascular anomaly consisting of large intertwined vascular growth (the nidus) that are prone to serious hemorrhaging and can result in patient death if left untreated. Intervention through surgical clipping of feeding and draining vessels to the nidus is a common treatment. However, identification of which vessels to clip is challenging even to experienced surgeons aided by conventional image guidance systems. In this work, we describe our methods for processing static preoperative angiographic images in order to effectively visualize the feeding and draining vessels of an AVM nidus. Maps from level-set front propagation processing of the vessel images are used to label the vessels by colour. Furthermore, images are decluttered using the topological distances between vessels. In order to aid the surgeon in the vessel clipping decision-making process during surgery, the results are displayed to the surgeon using augmented virtuality.

  15. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  16. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  17. Remote non-invasive stereoscopic imaging of blood vessels: first in-vivo results of a new multispectral contrast enhancement technology.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, F P; Mastik, F; Cate, F J Ten; Neumann, H A M; van der Steen, A F W

    2006-12-01

    We describe a contactless optical technique selectively enhancing superficial blood vessels below variously pigmented intact human skin by combining images in different spectral bands. Two CMOS-cameras, with apochromatic lenses and dual-band LED-arrays, simultaneously streamed Left (L) and Right (R) image data to a dual-processor PC. Both cameras captured color images within the visible range (VIS, 400-780 nm) and grey-scale images within the near infrared range (NIR, 910-920 nm) by sequentially switching between LED-array emission bands. Image-size-settings of 1280 x 1024 for VIS & 640 x 512 for NIR produced 12 cycles/s (1 cycle = 1 VIS L&R-pair + 1 NIR L&R-pair). Decreasing image-size-settings (640 x 512 for VIS and 320 x 256 for NIR) increased camera-speed to 25 cycles/s. Contrasts from below the tissue surface were algorithmically distinguished from surface shadows, reflections, etc. Thus blood vessels were selectively enhanced and back-projected into the stereoscopic VIS-color-image using either a 3D-display or conventional shutter glasses. As a first usability reconnaissance we applied this custom-built mobile stereoscopic camera for several clinical settings:* blood withdrawal;* vein inspection in dark skin;* vein detection through iodide;* varicose vein and nevi pigmentosum inspection. Our technique improves blood vessel visualization compared to the naked eye, and supports depth perception. PMID:17048103

  18. Blood

    MedlinePLUS

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  19. Blood

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and arteries is called whole blood . Whole blood contains three types of blood cells: red blood cells ... fluid called plasma . Plasma is 90% water and contains nutrients, proteins, hormones, and waste products. Whole blood ...

  20. Regression of blood vessels in the ventral velum of Xenopus laevis Daudin during metamorphosis: light microscopic and transmission electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    BARTEL, H.; LAMETSCHWANDTNER, A.

    2000-01-01

    Structural changes of the ventral velum of Xenopus laevis tadpoles from late prometamorphosis (stage 58) to the height of metamorphic climax (stage 62) were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Special emphasis was given to the blood vessel regression. Early changes of velar capillaries were formation of luminal and abluminal endothelial cell processes, vacuolation, and cytoplasmic and nuclear chromatin condensation. At the height of metamorphic climax, transmission electron microscopy revealed apoptotic endothelial cells with nuclear condensation and fragmentation, intraluminal bulging of rounded endothelial cells which narrowed or even plugged the capillary, and different stages of endothelial cell detachment (‘shedding’) into the vessel lumen. These changes explain the ‘miniaturisation’ of the velar microvascular bed as well as the typical features found in resin-casts of regressing velar vessels which have been observed in a previous scanning electron microscopy study of the ventral velum. PMID:11005708

  1. Blood vessel maturation in a 3-dimensional spheroidal coculture model: direct contact with smooth muscle cells regulates endothelial cell quiescence and abrogates VEGF responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Korff, T; Kimmina, S; Martiny-Baron, G; Augustin, H G

    2001-02-01

    Paracrine interactions between endothelial cells (EC) and mural cells act as critical regulators of vessel wall assembly, vessel maturation and define a plasticity window for vascular remodeling. The present study was aimed at studying blood vessel maturation processes in a novel 3-dimensional spheroidal coculture system of EC and smooth muscle cells (SMC). Coculture spheroids differentiate spontaneously in a calcium-dependent manner to organize into a core of SMC and a surface layer of EC, thus mimicking the physiological assembly of blood vessels with surface lining EC and underlying mural cells. Coculture of EC with SMC induces a mature, quiescent EC phenotype as evidenced by 1) a significant increase in the number of junctional complexes of the EC surface layer, 2) a down-regulation of PDGF-B expression by cocultured EC, and 3) an increased resistance of EC to undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, EC cocultured with SMC become refractory to stimulation with VEGF (lack of CD34 expression on VEGF stimulation; inability to form capillary-like sprouts in a VEGF-dependent manner in a 3-dimensional in gel angiogenesis assay). In contrast, costimulation with VEGF and Ang-2 induced sprouting angiogenesis originating from coculture spheroids consistent with a model of Ang-2-mediated vessel destabilization resulting in VEGF responsiveness. Ang-2 on its own was able to stimulate endothelial cells in the absence of Ang-1 producing SMC, inducing lateral sheet migration as well as in gel sprouting angiogenesis. Taken together, the data establish the spheroidal EC/SMC system as a powerful cell culture model to study paracrine interactions in the vessel wall and provide functional evidence for smooth muscle cell-mediated quiescence effects on endothelial cells. PMID:11156960

  2. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  3. Biomimetic Branched Hollow Fibers Templated by Self-assembled Fibrous Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) Structures in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Penghe; Mao, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    Branched hollow fibers are common in nature, but to form artificial fibers with a similar branched hollow structure is still a challenge. We discovered that polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) could self-assemble into branched hollow fibers in an aqueous solution after aging the PVP solution for about two weeks. Based on this finding, we demonstrated two approaches by which the self-assembly of PVP into branched hollow fibers could be exploited to template the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers. First, inorganic material such as silica with high affinity against the PVP could be deposited on the surface of the branched hollow PVP fibers to form branched hollow silica fibers. To extend the application of PVP self-assembly in templating the formation of hollow branched fibers, we then adopted a second approach where the PVP molecules bound to inorganic nanoparticles (using gold nanoparticles as a model) co-self-assemble with the free PVP molecules in an aqueous solution, resulting in the formation of the branched hollow fibers with the nanoparticles embedded in the PVP matrix constituting the walls of the fibers. Heating the resultant fibers above the glass transition temperature of PVP led to the formation of branched hollow gold fibers. Our work suggests that the self-assembly of the PVP molecules in the solution can serve as a general method for directing the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers. The branched hollow fibers may find potential applications in microfluidics, artificial blood vessel generation, and tissue engineering. PMID:20158250

  4. Tissue engineering of blood vessels: characterization of smooth-muscle cells for culturing on collagen-and-elastin-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Buijtenhuijs, Paula; Buttafoco, Laura; Poot, Andre A; Daamen, Willeke F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Dijkstra, Pieter J; de Vos, Rob A I; Sterk, Lotus M Th; Geelkerken, Bob R H; Feijen, Jan; Vermes, Istvan

    2004-04-01

    Tissue engineering offers the opportunity to develop vascular scaffolds that mimic the morphology of natural arteries. We have developed a porous three-dimensional scaffold consisting of fibres of collagen and elastin interspersed together. Scaffolds were obtained by freeze-drying a suspension of insoluble type I collagen and insoluble elastin. In order to improve the stability of the obtained matrices, they were cross-linked by two different methods. A water-soluble carbodi-imide, alone or in combination with a diamine, was used for this purpose: zero- or non-zero-length cross-links were obtained. The occurrence of cross-linking was verified by monitoring the thermal behaviour and the free-amino-group contents of the scaffolds before and after cross-linking. Smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) were cultured for different periods of time and their ability to grow and proliferate was investigated. SMCs were isolated from human umbilical and saphenous veins, and the purity of the cultures obtained was verified by staining with a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb). Cultured cells were also identified by mAbs against muscle actin and vimentin. After 14 days, a confluent layer of SMCs was obtained on non-cross-linked scaffolds. As for the cross-linked samples, no differences in cell attachment and proliferation were observed between scaffolds cross-linked using the two different methods. Cells cultured on the scaffolds were identified with an anti-(alpha-smooth-muscle actin) mAb. The orientation of SMCs resembled that of the fibres of collagen and elastin. In this way, it may be possible to develop tubular porous scaffolds resembling the morphological characteristics of native blood vessels. PMID:15032734

  5. Selenoprotein S Is Highly Expressed in the Blood Vessels and Prevents Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells From Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yali; Fu, Fen; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Jie; Liu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent one of the greatest threats to human health worldwide. The protection of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from apoptosis in the plaque has become an important therapeutic target for atherosclerotic plaque stabilization. A significant association of selenoprotein S (SelS) gene polymorphism with atherosclerotic CVD has been reported in epidemiologic studies, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this paper, SelS expression in the thoracic aorta and its role in the protection of VSMCs from apoptosis have been studied. Western blot analysis showed that SelS was highly expressed in rat thoracic aorta. SelS gene silence by small interference RNA (siRNA) rendered VSMCs more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide- or tunicamycin- induced injury and apoptosis, as determined by MTT assay, Hoechst staining, and annexin V/propidium iodide staining. SelS silence aggravated hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in VSMCs. Furthermore, SelS silence enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by hydrogen peroxide or tunicamycin, as showed by the increased protein levels of ER chaperone 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), ER stress transducer phosphorylated protein kinase RNA like ER kinase (PERK), and the proapoptotic transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). In conclusion, the present study suggested that SelS highly expressed in the blood vessel might protect VSMCs from apoptosis by inhibiting oxidative stress and ER stress. Our finding provided mechanistic insights for the potential preventive role of SelS in atherosclerotic CVD. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 106-117, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26058460

  6. Nitric oxide production and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation ameliorated by N1-methylnicotinamide in human blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Domagala, Teresa B; Szeffler, Agata; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Dropinski, Jerzy; Polanski, Stanis?aw; Leszczynska-Wiloch, Magdalena; Kotula-Horowitz, Katarzyna; Wojciechowski, Jacek; Wojnowski, Leszek; Szczeklik, Andrzej; Kalinowski, Leszek

    2012-04-01

    N(1)-methylnicotinamide (MNA(+)) has until recently been thought to be a biologically inactive product of nicotinamide metabolism in the pyridine nucleotides pathway. However, the latest observations imply that MNA(+) may exert antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects through direct action on the endothelium. We examined both in vivo and in vitro whether the compound might induce vasorelaxation in human blood vessels through the improvement of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and a reduction of oxidative stress mediated by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) function. MNA(+) treatment (100 mg/m(2) orally) in healthy normocholesterolemic and hypercholesterolemic subjects increased the l-arginine (l-NMMA)-inhibitable flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of brachial artery responses that also positively correlated with MNA(+) plasma concentrations (r=0.73 for normocholesterolemics and r=0.78 for hypercholesterolemics; P<0.0001). MNA(+) increased FMD at the same concentration