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Sample records for blunt traumatic thoracic

  1. Endovascular treatment of blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Georghios

    2009-06-01

    Blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injury (BTTAI) is a lethal injury associated with a prehospital mortality of 80% to 90%. Patients arriving in the emergency room and considered appropriate to undergo emergency open surgical repair still have a mortality rate of 15% to 30% because of severe associated injuries. Conventional open surgical repair requires a left thoracotomy, single lung ventilation, aortic-cross clamping and unclamping, with or without the adjunct use of partial or full cardiopulmonary bypass and systemic heparinization. All this leads to significant physiological stress and surgical trauma resulting in perioperative complications such as major blood loss, coagulopathy, myocardial infarction, stroke, respiratory failure, renal failure, bowel infarction, and paraplegia. Despite advances in anesthesia, critical care medicine, and surgical techniques, a recent meta-analysis showed no definite improvement in operative mortality over the past decade, following open surgical repair in patients with BTTAI. Endovascular repair of BTTAI does not require a thoracotomy, single lung ventilation, aorticcross clamping and unclamping, or systemic heparinization. As a result, endovascular repair of BTTAI has emerged as an effective, minimally invasive treatment alternative, especially in patients with severe concomitant injuries, which may be prohibitive to open surgical repair. Recent published studies have shown that endovascular repair of BTTAI is associated with lower morbidity, mortality, stroke, and paraplegia/paraparesis rates, when compared with open surgical repair of BTTAI. PMID:19617250

  2. Blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Michael J; Fullerton, David A

    2008-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma represents a significant portion of trauma admissions to hospitals in the United States. These injuries are encountered by physicians in many specialities such as emergency medicine, pediatrics, general surgery and thoracic surgery. Accurate diagnosis and treatment improves the chances of favorable outcomes and it is desirable for all treating physicians to have current knowledge of all aspects of blunt thoracic trauma. Cardiothoracic surgeons often treat the most severe forms of blunt thoracic injuries and we review the aspects of blunt thoracic trauma that are pertinent to the practicing cardiothoracic surgeon. PMID:18420123

  3. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory. PMID:23041686

  4. Experience of endovascular repair of thoracic aortic dissection after blunt trauma injury in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic thoracic aortic dissection is uncommon in clinical practice; however, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thoracic aortic dissection is usually caused by sudden deceleration resulting from a traffic accident or fall. Aortic injury after blunt trauma is a critical condition. This study reported the outcomes of endovascular repair of acute traumatic aortic dissection in patients at a district general hospital. Methods In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of eight patients with acute traumatic aortic dissection after a blunt trauma who had undergone thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) between January 2012 and December 2015 at a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The median age of the patients was 49±22 years (range, 20–77 years), and 6 of the 8 (75%) patients were men. Five patients were involved in traffic accidents, and 3 patients had fallen from heights. The injury severity score (ISS) of the patients ranged from 17 to 66. In all patients, the aortic injury was located near the origin of the left subclavian artery (LSA). Four patients had seal ostium of subclavian artery, left. None of the patients developed paraplegia or lower extremity ischemia. Moreover, all patients had concomitant injuries, and no patients died postoperatively. Conclusions Endovascular repair is a rapid and minimally invasive therapy for patients with traumatic aortic injury and is associated with favorable technical results. PMID:27293831

  5. Pneumoscrotum as Complication of Blunt Thoracic Trauma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gkagkalidis, Konstantinos; Varsamis, Nikolaos; Salveridis, Nikolaos; Karageorgiou, Georgios; Kampantais, Spyridon; Pouggouras, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Pneumoscrotum is a rare clinical entity. It presents with swollen scrotal sac and sometimes with palpable crepitus. It has many etiologies. One of them is due to blunt trauma of the thoracic cage, causing pneumothorax and/or pneumomediastinum. Case Presentation. We report the case of an 82-year-old male who was transferred to the Emergency Department with signs of respiratory distress after a blunt chest trauma. A CT scan was obtained, and bilateral pneumothoraces with four broken ribs were disclosed. Subcutaneous emphysema expanding from the eyelids to the scrotum was observed, and a chest tube was inserted on the right side with immediate improvement of the vital signs of the patient. Discussion. Pneumoscrotum has three major etiologies: (a) local introduction of air or infection from gas-producing bacteria, (b) pneumoperitoneum, and (c) air accumulation from lungs, mediastinum, or retroperitoneum. These sources account for most of the cases described in the literature. Treatment should be individualized, and surgical consultation should be obtained in all cases. Conclusion. Although pneumoscrotum itself is a benign entity, the process by which air accumulates in the scrotum must be clarified, and treatment must target the primary cause. PMID:23401836

  6. Endovascular Stent Grafts in Urgent Blunt and Penetrating Thoracic Aortic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kolbeck, Kenneth J.; Kaufman, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A traumatic thoracic aortic injury is fatal in the majority of cases. Surviving the aortic injury in addition to the myriad of associated trauma requires comprehensive medical management from many medical services. Balancing these services and coordinating the medical care requires free and open communication between services. Although one might assume a thoracic aortic injury takes precedence over other injuries, an organized plan of care in which the morbidity of the injury as well as the consequences of treatment of each injury helps provide an appropriate “rank order” in the treatment process. A patient with a thoracic aortic injury can be observed for several days while additional injuries are treated, as long as appropriate blood pressure controls are observed. The treatment order for multiple injuries must be reevaluated on a regular basis to adjust for changes in the overall clinical condition. This rank order to treatment and scheduled treatment plan allows for appropriate imaging, evaluation, and coordination of services in preparation for the placement of a thoracic aortic stent graft. The goal of treatment is to reduce the risk of aortic rupture and subsequent fatal hemorrhage. Choosing an open surgical repair versus an endovascular stent graft depends upon physician expertise and clinical status of the patient. In the appropriate clinical setting, endovascular repair of the thoracic aortic injury has become the treatment of choice at the authors' institution in patients with significant operative risks and extensive comorbid injuries. Specific characteristics of the injured aorta also dictate the type of endovascular device required for repair. Case reviews of a patient with blunt trauma and a patient with penetrating trauma used to demonstrate clinical parameters, imaging options, and details of stent graft choice and placement, are presented followed by a review of the literature. PMID:22379280

  7. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull's leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  8. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull’s leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  9. Endovascular Repair of Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Saratzis, Nikolaos A. Saratzis, Athanasios N.; Melas, Nikolaos; Ginis, Georgios; Lioupis, Athanasios; Lykopoulos, Dimitrios; Lazaridis, John; Dimitrios, Kiskinis

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta secondary to blunt chest trauma is a life-threatening emergency and a common cause of death, usually following violent collisions. The objective of this retrospective report was to evaluate the efficacy of endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions with a single commercially available stent-graft. Methods. Nine men (mean age 29.5 years) were admitted to our institution between January 2003 and January 2006 due to blunt aortic trauma following violent motor vehicle collisions. Plain chest radiography, spiral computed tomography, aortography, and transesophageal echocardiography were used for diagnostic purposes in all cases. All patients were diagnosed with contained extramural thoracic aortic hematomas, secondary to aortic disruption. One patient was also diagnosed with a traumatic thoracic aortic dissection, secondary to blunt trauma. All subjects were poor surgical candidates, due to major injuries such as multiple bone fractures, abdominal hematomas, and pulmonary contusions. All repairs were performed using the EndoFit (LeMaitre Vascular) stent-graft. Results. Complete exclusion of the traumatic aortic disruption and pseudoaneurysm was achieved and verified at intraoperative arteriography and on CT scans, within 10 days of the repair in all patients. In 1 case the deployment of a second cuff was necessary due to a secondary endoleak. In 2 cases the left subclavian artery was occluded to achieve adequate graft fixation. No procedure-related deaths have occurred and no cardiac or peripheral vascular complications were observed within the 12 months (range 8-16 months) follow-up. Conclusions. This is the first time the EndoFit graft has been utilized in the treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions secondary to chest trauma. The repair of such pathologies is technically feasible and early follow-up results are promising.

  10. Simultaneous “traumatic Gerbode” and aortic rupture due to blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Anninos, Hector; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis; Politis, Panagiotis; Gounopoulos, Pantelis; Koroneos, Apostolos; Charitos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The Gerbode defect is characterized by a perimembranous ventricular septal defect between the left ventricle and the right atrium. This intracardiac shunt is a congenital defect but may be iatrogenic after valve surgery or atrioventricular node ablation, may be the result of endocarditis or may be traumatic. It is really rarely encountered as sequelae of non-penetrating heart trauma, and their clinical manifestations may often be unrecognized in the multi-injured patient. However, they are serious complications, and their diagnostic approach is not always feasible. We hereby present a case of a young man with the left ventricle to the right atrium communication after blunt thoracic trauma due to a car accident and concomitant rupture of the thoracic aorta. We present also the case and the ways of treatment according to the international bibliography. PMID:26750699

  11. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future. This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications. A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis highlighted duration of intercostal drain insertion (OR 1.377, P = 0.001) and premorbid cardiac disease (OR 2.624, P = 0.042) and ICU length of stay (OR: 1.146, P < 0.001) as significant predictors of developing pneumonia in this patient group. Examining the different analgesic modes, this study failed to identify a particular analgesic mode that was more effective in preventing pulmonary complications in blunt thoracic injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different

  12. Traumatic injury of the thoracic duct.

    PubMed

    Guzman, A E; Rossi, L; Witte, C L; Smyth, S

    2002-03-01

    Injuries to the thoracic duct are infrequent but may become life-threatening when chylous leakage persists. This report describes 6 patients with such injuries in whom the leakage resolved spontaneously in one, was corrected using microsurgical lymphatic repair or lymphatic-venous anastomosis in two, successfully treated either by ligation of the thoracic duct or insertion of a peritoneovenous shunt in two, and was eventually controlled after bilateral pleurodesis and thoracic duct ligation by insertion of a peritoneo-venous shunt in one. Conventional lymphography is superior to lymphoscintigraphy and is usually required to document disruption of the thoracic duct. PMID:11939572

  13. Death from undetected acute myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery dissection after blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Puanglumyai, Supot; Thamtakerngkit, Somboon; Lekawanvijit, Suree

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma is a common occurrence in automobile accidents. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) caused by coronary dissection following blunt thoracic trauma is rare. We report a case of healthy 24-year-old man with a history of blunt thoracic injury with subsequent undetected AMI who died of acute decompensated heart failure 4 days after the insult. The autopsy findings showed a 90% luminal narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery by dissecting hematoma, 3 cm in length. The myocardium revealed transmural myocardial infarction affecting apex, most part of left ventricular free wall, and interventricular septum. Both lungs were heavy, wet, and noncrepitant. Histological findings of the infarcted myocardium were consistent with 3-5 days post-AMI. Sections from both lungs revealed massive pulmonary edema, reflecting acute decompensated heart failure following a large AMI secondary to coronary dissection. Blunt thoracic trauma may obscure typical chest pain associated with cardiac ischemia especially in cases with a high tolerance for pain. PMID:26454807

  14. Traumatic eye injuries as a result of blunt impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, Chiara; Esposito, Luca; Bonora, Nicola; Limido, Jerome; Lacome, Jean-Luc; Rossi, Tommaso

    2013-06-01

    The detachment or tearing of the retina in the human eye as a result of a collision is a phenomenon that occurs very often. This research is aimed at identifying and understanding the actual dynamic physical mechanisms responsible for traumatic eye injuries accompanying blunt impact, with particular attention to the damage processes that take place at the retina. To this purpose, a numerical and experimental investigation of the dynamic response of the eye during an impact event was performed. Numerical simulation of both tests was performed with IMPETUS-FEA, a general non-linear finite element software which offers NURBS finite element technology for the simulation of large deformation and fracture in materials. Computational results were compared with the experimental results on fresh enucleated porcine eyes impacted with airsoft pellets. The eyes were placed in a container filled with 10 percent ballistic gelatin simulating the fatty tissue surrounding the eye. A miniature pressure transducer was inserted into the eye bulb through the optic nerve in order to measure the pressure of the eye during blunt-projectile impacts. Each test was recorded using a high speed video camera. The ocular injuries observed in the impacted eyes were assessed by an ophthalmologist in order to evaluate the correlation between the pressure measures and the risk of retinal damage.

  15. Blunt traumatic injury in the Arab Middle Eastern populations

    PubMed Central

    Asim, Mohammad; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan; Abdelrahman, Husham; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Trauma represents a global public health concern with an estimated 5 million deaths annually. Moreover, the incidence of blunt traumatic injuries (BTI) particularly road traffic accidents (RTAs) and workplace-related injuries are rising throughout the world-wide. Objectives: We aimed to review the epidemiology and prevention of BTI, in the Arab Middle East. Materials and Methods: A traditional narrative literature review was carried out using PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. We used the keywords “traumatic injuries”, “blunt” “epidemiology”, “Arab Middle East” between December 1972 and March 2013. Results: The most common mechanisms of BTI in our region are RTAs, falls from height, struck by heavy objects and pedestrian motor vehicle trauma crashes. The rate of RTA and occupational injuries are markedly increased in the region due to rapid industrial development, extreme climatic conditions and unfamiliar working environment. However, lack of reliable information on these unintentional injuries is mainly responsible for the underestimation of this trauma burden. This knowledge deficit shields the extent of the problem from policy makers, leading to continued fatalities. These preventable injuries in turn add to the overall financial burden on the society through loss of productivity and greater need of medical and welfare services. Conclusion: In the Arab Middle East, population-based studies on the incidence, mechanism of injury, prevention and outcome of BTI are not well-documented. Therefore, region-specific BTI studies would strengthen surveillance to better understand the burden of these injuries in the region. PMID:24812453

  16. Ruptured intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with blunt thoracic trauma: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez Romero, Diego Felipe; Barrufet, Marta; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Burrel, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm is an extremely unusual condition, with less than 10 reported cases to our knowledge. Most of them have been associated with surgical interventions or blunt thoracic trauma. The bleeding risk in this kind of lesions is considerable, the majority of them presenting as haemothorax. We present a case of an intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm detected after a blunt thoracic trauma in a patient with signs of acute bleeding. The identification of a small artery pseudoaneurysm as the cause of haemothorax requires knowledge of this possible aetiology as well as detailed attention to the CT technique. Embolisation is considered to be the first therapeutic method in the management of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm. To reduce the risk of failure, the anatomic features and adjacent vessels providing collateral branches must be studied and embolised if needed, with important attention to collateral blood supply arising from the musculophrenic and anterior intercostal arteries. PMID:24966257

  17. Extrathoracic chronic heamatoma presenting as a chest wall tumor 2 years after a blunt thoracic injury.

    PubMed

    Kouritas, Vasileios K; Roussakis, Antonios G; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Bellenis, Ion

    2011-01-01

    Chronic expanding heamatomas may present as masses mimicking chest wall tumors. We report the case of a patient who was presented with a giant posterior extrathoracic chest wall tumor. The mass was proven to be a chronic heamatoma possibly developed after a blunt thoracic injury which took place 2 years before presentation and was growing thereafter. Clinicians should have high suspicion of rare entities which mimic tumors and consider any information reported by the patient's history in their diagnostic process. PMID:22112630

  18. Extrathoracic chronic heamatoma presenting as a chest wall tumor 2 years after a blunt thoracic injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic expanding heamatomas may present as masses mimicking chest wall tumors. We report the case of a patient who was presented with a giant posterior extrathoracic chest wall tumor. The mass was proven to be a chronic heamatoma possibly developed after a blunt thoracic injury which took place 2 years before presentation and was growing thereafter. Clinicians should have high suspicion of rare entities which mimic tumors and consider any information reported by the patient's history in their diagnostic process. PMID:22112630

  19. Blunt thoracic aortic injury: old problem and new technology.

    PubMed

    Britt, L D; Campbell, Matthew M

    2003-01-01

    The lethal nature of transmural aortic injuries has remained constant; however, both the diagnostic and therapeutic interventional options have improved. Although aortography is still the "gold standard" against which all other diagnostic modalities are measured, contrast-enhanced spiral thoracic computed tomography has emerged as the diagnostic study that could potentially supplant aortography. The advent of the fast spiral computed tomography scanners offer several advantages, including being less affected by patient motion and volume-averaging artifacts than the earlier generation CT scanners. The operative has broadened from primary repair and interposition prosthetic graft placement (with possible use of shunt or roller vs. centrifugal bypass) to the potential widespread use of endovascular stents. The Eastern Virginia Medical School (EVMS) experience during the first 10-year period (see table below) highlights the majority of patients undergoing interposition prosthetic graft placement. There was no use of shunts during this period. At the midpoint of the second 10-year period (1997-2007), the method of repair is exclusively interposition graft placement. The role of endovascular stent insertion in the management of these injuries is currently being debated. [table: see text] PMID:14649580

  20. Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture. A 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Brathwaite, C E; Rodriguez, A; Turney, S Z; Dunham, C M; Cowley, R

    1990-12-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is associated with a high rate of mortality. A review of the computerized trauma registry (1983 to 1988) identified 32 patients with this injury (ages 19 to 65 years; mean age, 39.5 years; 21 men and 11 women). Twenty-one patients (65.6%) were injured in vehicular crashes, 3 (9.4%) in pedestrian accidents, 3 (9.4%) in motorcycle accidents; 3 (9.4%) sustained crush injury; 1 (3.1%) was injured by a fall; and 1 (3.1%) was kicked in the chest by a horse. Anatomic injuries included right atrial rupture (13[40.6%]), left atrial rupture (8 [25%]), right ventricular rupture (10[31.3%]), left ventricular rupture (4[12.5%]), and rupture of two cardiac chambers (3 [9.4%]). Diagnosis was made by thoracotomy in all 20 patients presenting in cardiac arrest. In the remaining 12 patients, the diagnosis was established in seven by emergency left anterolateral thoracotomy and in five by subxyphoid pericardial window. Seven of these 12 patients (58.3%) had clinical cardiac tamponade and significant upper torso cyanosis. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS), Trauma Score (TS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score were 33.8, 13.2, and 14.3, respectively, among survivors and 51.5, 8.3, and 7.0 for nonsurvivors. The overall mortality rate was 81.3% (26 of 32 patients), the only survivors being those presenting with vital signs (6 of 12 patients [50%]). All patients with rupture of two cardiac chambers or with ventricular rupture died. The mortality rate from myocardial rupture is very high. Rapid prehospital transportation, a high index of suspicion, and prompt surgical intervention contribute to survival in these patients. PMID:2256761

  1. Blunt traumatic infrarenal aortic intimal flap progressing to pseudoaneurysm over 3 months

    PubMed Central

    Carr, John Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Blunt traumatic infrarenal aortic injuries are unusual, and the formation of a delayed pseudoaneurysm of the aorta is even more rare. In this report, a young woman developed a small intimal flap of the infrarenal aorta after a motor vehicle accident which progressed into a 3 cm pseudoaneurysm after 3 months. Operative repair was successful and the patient recovered. This case illustrates the importance of repeat imaging of small blunt aortic injuries since progression can occur. PMID:27252519

  2. Thoracic response to high-rate blunt impacts using an advanced testing platform.

    PubMed

    Wickwire, Alexis C; Merkle, Andrew C; Carneal, Catherine M; Pauson, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    ehind Armor Blunt Trauma (BABT) is a persistent concern for both the military and civil law enforcement. Although personal protective equipment (PPE), including soft and hard body armor, mitigates penetrating injuries from ballistic threats, the impact generates a backface deformation which creates a high-rate blunt impact to the body and potential internal injury (i.e., BABT). A critical need exists to understand the mechanics of the human response and subsequently evaluate the efficacy of current and proposed PPE in mitigating BABT injury risk. Current human surrogate test platforms lack anatomical fidelity or instrumentation for capturing the dynamic transfer of energy during the event. Therefore, we have developed and tested a Human Surrogate Torso Model (HSTM) composed of biosimulants representing soft tissues and skeleton of the human torso. A matrix of pressure transducers were embedded in the soft tissue and a custom displacement sensor was mounted to the skeletal structure to measure sternum displacement. A series of non-penetrating, high energy ballistic tests were performed with the HSTM. Results indicate that both sternum displacement and internal localized pressure are sensitive to impact energy and location. These data provide a spatial and temporal comparison to the current standard (static clay measurements) and a method for evaluating the applicability of thoracic injury metrics, including the Viscous Criterion, for BABT. The HSTM provides an advanced, biomechanically relevant test platform for determining the thoracic response to dynamic loading events due to non-penetrating ballistic impacts. PMID:22846323

  3. Experimental study of the coupling parameters influencing the terminal effects of thoracic blunt ballistic impacts.

    PubMed

    Pavier, Julien; Langlet, André; Eches, Nicolas; Prat, Nicolas; Bailly, Patrice; Jacquet, Jean-François

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study is to better understand how blunt projectile ballistic parameters and material properties influence the events leading to injuries. The present work focuses on lateral thoracic impacts and follows an experimental approach. The projectiles are made with a soft foam nose assembled with a rigid rear plastic part. The dynamic properties of the foams were first determined using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system. The impact forces on a rigid wall were then measured to provide reference load data. Lastly, shots were made on isolated thoraxes of porcine cadavers to investigate the response in the vicinity of the impact (wall displacements, rib accelerations and strains, rib fractures). Results show that the severity of the response appears to be mainly correlated with the impulse and with the pre-impact momentum. PMID:25951500

  4. [Blunt traumatic rupture of the right ventricle, with intrapericardial rupture of the diaphragm. Successful surgical repair (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Le Treut, Y P; Herve, L; Boutboul, R; Cardon, J M; Bricot, R

    1980-12-01

    The authors report a case of blunt traumatic rupture of the right ventricle, diagnosed during a laparotomy. Similar cases were seldom met: too short a time of spontaneous survival, and difficult challenging diagnosis explain it. PMID:7462357

  5. [A case report of emergency surgical repair of traumatic transection of thoracic descending aorta].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, K; Sudo, K; Kodama, J; Unno, T; Hayashi, N; Tadokoro, M; Kokubo, J; Ikeda, K; Mizuno, A; Tanaka, H

    1991-10-01

    The injury to the thoracic aorta caused by blunt chest trauma is often fatal. This case is 22-year-old male suffering from transection of the thoracic descending aorta caused by traffic accident. He was transported to our emergency room by an ambulance 15 minutes after the accident. Hundred fifty minutes after arrival to the hospital, we were rush to bring him to the operation theater suspecting serious injury of the thoracic organs in association with left hemothorax. The left standard thoracotomy disclosed the injury of the thoracic descending aorta. Simple cross clamp was applied to the thoracic descending aorta distal to the left subclavian artery for 20 minutes. Completely transected aorta was reapproximated using monofilament 3-0 polypropylene sutures with running manner. He tolerated the procedure well without any complication. His postoperative course was uneventful. He was followed up at the orthopedic department for associated hip fracture thereafter. PMID:1942696

  6. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta and aortic valve following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Charles, K P; Davidson, K G; Miller, H; Caves, P K

    1977-02-01

    Traumatic rupture of the aorta at the level of the isthmus is a well-recognized injury following blunt chest trauma. By contrast, rupture of the ascending aorta and of the aortic valve in a road traffic accident is rare and does not appear to have been previously reported. The occurrence of such an injury in a 56-year-old man involved in a road traffic accident is reported. The diagnosis was made preoperatively following aortography and successful surgical correction involved aortic valve replacement with resection and grafting of the damaged area of the ascending aorta. The probable mechanisms involved in the production of this unusual injury are discussed. PMID:834060

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Idoguchi, Koji Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-10-15

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  8. Displacement Patterns of Blunt Rib Fractures and Their Relationship to Thoracic Coinjuries: Minimal Displacements Count.

    PubMed

    Bugaev, Nikolay; Breeze, Janis L; Alhazmi, Majid; Anbari, Hassan S; Arabian, Sandra S; Rabinovici, Reuven

    2016-03-01

    Displacement patterns of rib fractures (RF) and their association with thoracic coinjuries and outcomes are unknown. This is a retrospective review of adult patients with blunt closed RF who underwent chest CT at a Level I trauma center (2007-2012). Displacement patterns of RF were compared among the three-dimensional planes using CT images. An analysis of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was performed to identify displacements in each plane most strongly associated with chest coinjuries. Univariate analysis was used to find association of displaced RF with hospital course and outcome. There were 1127 RF (245 patients, most in ribs 3-9, 45 per cent displaced). Axial displacement was the most common, with odds ratios 7.20 and 2.13 compared with cranio-caudal, and impaction-separation (along rib axis) movement, respectively. Axial displacement thresholds performed well with hemothorax (2.8 mm, ROC = 0.74), pneumothorax (2.6 mm, ROC = 0.70), hemopneumothorax (3.1 mm, ROC = 0.77), flail chest (3.4 mm, ROC = 0.80), and chest tube placement (2.8 mm, ROC = 0.75). RF displacement was associated with increased days on mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay. In conclusion, even minimal RF displacement is associated with increased risk of chest coinjuries and chest tube placement, and displacements correlated with increased days on mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay. Future studies are required to investigate these associations, especially in relationship to the indications for rib plating. PMID:27099054

  9. Blunt traumatic aortic rupture of the proximal ascending aorta repaired by resection and direct anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Harmouche, Majid; Slimani, Eric Karim; Heraudeau, Adeline; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Traumatic aortic injury represents 15% of motor vehicle related deaths with death occurring at the scene in 85% of the cases. Aortic disruptions usually occur at the isthmus in a transverse fashion with all three of the aortic layers being involved. Herein, we report the case of a 68-year old man with no prior medical history who was struck by a vehicle while riding his bicycle. The ruptured segment of aorta was resected circumferentially and interrupted horizontal mattress pledgeted prolene sutures were used to ensure full thickness aortic integrity of the proximal and distal aortic segments. The aorta was closed with a single-layer technique using 4/0 prolene suture. There were no postoperative complications and patient was discharged on Day 44. The case here discussed demonstrates a rare presentation of blunt aortic injury. The proximal ascending aorta is an unusual site of transection following blunt trauma with few reports in the literature. We were able to repair the aorta with direct suture, thus avoiding the use of artificial material. PMID:23838337

  10. Missed Traumatic Thoracic Spondyloptosis With no Neurological Deficit: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Farooque, Kamran; Khatri, Kavin; Gupta, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic thoracic spondyloptosis is caused by high energy trauma and is usually associated with severe neurological deficit. Cases presenting without any neurological deficit can be difficult to diagnose and manage. Case Presentation We reported a four-week spondyloptosis of the ninth thoracic vertebra over the tenth thoracic vertebra, in a 20-year-old male without any neurological deficit. The patient had associated chest injuries. The spine injury was managed surgically with in-situ posterior instrumentation and fusion. The patient tolerated the operation well and postoperatively there was no neurological deterioration or surgical complication. Conclusions Patients presenting with spondyloptosis with no neurological deficit can be managed with in-situ fusion via pedicle screws, especially when presenting late and with minimal kyphosis. PMID:27218044

  11. Blunt traumatic superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as gluteal hematoma without bony injury: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Annu; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Pawan; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Atin

    2016-08-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries to the superior gluteal artery are rare in clinic. A majority of injuries present as aneurysms following penetrating trauma, fracture pelvis or posterior dislocation of the hip joint. We reported a rare case of superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt trauma presenting as large expanding right gluteal hematoma without any bony injury. The gluteal hematoma was suspected clinically, confirmed by ultrasound and the arterial injury was diagnosed by CT angiography that revealed a large right gluteal hematoma with a focal contrast leakage forming a pseudoaneurysm within the hematoma. Pseudoaneurysm arose from the superior gluteal branch of right internal iliac artery, which was successfully angioembolized. The patient was discharged on day 4 of hospitalization with resolving gluteal hematoma. This report highlighted the importance of considering an arterial injury following blunt trauma to the buttocks with subsequent painful swelling. Acknowledgment of this rare injury pattern was necessary to facilitate rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:27578385

  12. Ventricular tachycardia from intracardiac hematoma in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Solhpour, Amirreza; Ananaba-Ekeruo, Ijeoma; Memon, Nada B; Kantharia, Bharat K

    2014-01-01

    In the victims of motor vehicle accidents, unrecognized myocardial injuries may pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Herein, we present a case of a 17-year-old man who developed multiple ventricular premature complexes and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of blunt chest trauma from a motor vehicle accident. We discuss significance of the electrocardiographic abnormalities in making an accurate diagnosis of cardiac hematoma and its management. PMID:24581106

  13. Blunt traumatic rupture of the heart and pericardium: a ten-year experience (1979-1989).

    PubMed

    Fulda, G; Brathwaite, C E; Rodriguez, A; Turney, S Z; Dunham, C M; Cowley, R A

    1991-02-01

    Blunt traumatic rupture of the heart and pericardium, rarely diagnosed preoperatively, carries a high mortality rate. From 1979 to 1989, more than 20,000 patients were admitted to a Level I trauma center. A retrospective review identified 59 patients requiring emergency surgery for this condition. Injuries resulted from vehicular accidents (68%), motorcycle crashes (10%), pedestrians being struck by vehicles (7%), falls (5%), crushing (7%), and being struck by a horse (2%) or crane (2%). Seventeen patients (29%) had isolated rupture of the pericardium; 37 (63%) had ruptures of one or more cardiac chambers. All patients had signs of life at the scene or during transportation, but only 29 (49%) had vital signs on admission: 15 with chamber injury, 12 with pericardial rupture, and two with combined injuries. Diagnosis was established by emergency thoracotomy in the 30 patients who arrived in cardiac arrest. In the remaining 29 patients, diagnosis was made by urgent thoracotomy (41%), by subxiphoid pericardial window (34%), during laparotomy (21%), or by chest radiography (3%). The overall mortality rate was 76% (45 patients), but only 52% for those with vital signs on admission. Rapid transportation and expeditious surgical treatment can save many patients with these injuries. PMID:1994075

  14. Traumatic eye injuries as a result of blunt impact: computational issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, C.; Esposito, L.; Bonora, N.; Limido, J.; Lacome, J. L.; Rossi, T.

    2014-05-01

    The detachment or tearing of the retina in the human eye as a result of a collision is a phenomenon that occurs very often. Reliable numerical simulations of eye impact can be very useful tools to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for traumatic eye injuries accompanying blunt impact. The complexity and variability of the physical and mechanical properties of the biological materials, the lack of agreement on their related experimental data as well as the unsuitability of specific numerical codes and models are only some of the difficulties when dealing with this matter. All these challenging issues must be solved to obtain accurate numerical analyses involving dynamic behavior of biological soft tissues. To this purpose, a numerical and experimental investigation of the dynamic response of the eye during an impact event was performed. Numerical simulations were performed with IMPETUS-AFEA, a new general non-linear finite element (FE) software which offers non uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) FE technology for the simulation of large deformation and fracture in materials. IMPETUS code was selected in order to solve hourglass and locking problems typical of nearly incompressible materials like eye tissues. Computational results were compared with the experimental results on fresh enucleated porcine eyes impacted with airsoft pellets.

  15. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Milanchi, S; Makey, I; McKenna, R; Margulies, D R

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. RESULTS: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26) and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58). There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2), or in the early (day 2-7) or late (after day 7) phases of trauma. CONCLUSION: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late), each with different indications. PMID:20040799

  16. Traumatic Pulmonary Herniation at the Diaphragmatic Junction in a Pediatric Patient: A Rare Complication of Blunt Chest Trauma.

    PubMed

    Orlik, Kseniya; Simon, Erin Leslie; Hemmer, Carrie; Ramundo, Maria

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of traumatic intercostal pulmonary herniation in an 11-year-old boy after blunt trauma to the chest, without associated chest wall disruption or pneumothorax. This condition is especially uncommon in children, with only 5 previously reported cases and most occurring after penetrating chest trauma. To date, there are no reports in literature describing traumatic intercostal lung herniation at the diaphragmatic junction with a closed chest cavity in a child. The number of traumatic lung herniation diagnoses may be expanded by a more liberal use of computed tomography when serious injury is suspected. Computed tomography and advanced imaging should be considered in pediatric trauma patients presenting with concern for intrathoracic injury that may not be seen on plain film. Traumatic blunt intrathoracic and intra-abdominal injuries in the pediatric population that are within proximity of diaphragmatic insertion should be thoroughly evaluated to rule out diaphragmatic injury. As in our case, invasive surgical intervention such as thoracoscopy may be necessary. PMID:27380604

  17. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Casandra A; Palmer, Cassandra A; Ney, Arthur L; Becker, Brian; Schaffel, Steven D; Quickel, Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN), was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN). The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit). Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment. PMID:18837992

  18. A thoracic mechanism of mild traumatic brain injury due to blast pressure waves.

    PubMed

    Courtney, A C; Courtney, M W

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. An experiment is proposed which isolates the thoracic mechanism from cranial mechanisms of mTBI due to blast wave exposure. Results have implications for evaluating risk of mTBI due to blast exposure and for developing effective protection. PMID:18829180

  19. Dissection of the right coronary artery following blunt cardiac injury

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, I; Dapcevic, I

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery dissection is a rare complication of blunt thoracic trauma which can become rapidly lethal necessitating prompt diagnosis and treatment. Most reported cases of coronary artery injury, including dissection, involve the left anterior descending coronary artery, given its anatomical location in relation to the impact. Description of case A 72-year-old male, who was involved in a vehicular accident, sustained blunt thoracic trauma which resulted in isolated right coronary artery dissection and acute myocardial infarction. The culprit lesion was found in coronary angiography in the proximal right coronary artery and was successfully repaired with percutaneous coronary intervention and one drug-eluting stent placement. Conclusion Traumatic dissection of coronary arteries must be suspected in blunt thoracic trauma. It can be treated with interventional management and results in a fairly good prognosis. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 278-280. PMID:27418793

  20. Blunt cardiac injury: case report of salvaged traumatic right atrial rupture.

    PubMed

    Al Ayyan, Muna; Aziz, Tanim; El Sherif, Amgad; Bekdache, Omar

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of cardiac rupture following blunt trauma is rare, occurring in 0.3%-0.5% of all blunt trauma patients. It can be fatal at the trauma scene, and is frequently missed in the emergency room setting. The severity of a cardiac trauma is based on the mechanism and degree of the force applied. The objective of this study was to report the case of a 32-year-old male patient who was involved in a motor vehicle collision and presented to the emergency room with signs of hypovolemic shock. The patient was found to have severe chest trauma associated with massive hemothorax requiring immediate intervention. The patient had an emergent thoracotomy revealing a right atrial injury. Repair of the atrial injury reversed the state of shock. The patient was discharged after 35 days of hospitalization in good condition. PMID:27054650

  1. Blunt maxillary fracture and cheek bite: two rare causes of traumatic pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Pasquale; Zanette, Giovanni; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Subcutaneous facial emphysema is a well-known consequence of oral and maxillofacial traumatic injury. In some rare cases, the subcutaneous air collection could spread through the retropharyngeal and paralatero-cervical spaces, reaching the mediastinum. This clinical entity is known as pneumomediastinum and represents a severe and, sometimes, life-threatening condition. Other reported causes of pneumomediastinum are esophageal and tracheal traumatic or iatrogenic rupture. Finally, the so-called spontaneous pneumomediastinum is caused by a sudden increase in alveolar pressure and is usually seen in young men. We present two cases of pneumomediastinum as a consequence of unusual traumatic damage of orofacial tissues, followed by repeated sneezing and Valsalva maneuver. PMID:26134477

  2. Blunt Force Trauma in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ressel, L; Hetzel, U; Ricci, E

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion. Hanging or choking can cause circumferential cervical abrasions, contusions and rupture of hairs, hyoid bone fractures, and congestion of the head. Other special forms of blunt trauma include fractured nails, pressure sores, and dog bites. Ocular blunt trauma causes extraocular and intraocular hemorrhages, proptosis, or retinal detachment. The thoracic viscera are relatively protected from blunt trauma but may develop hemorrhages in intercostal muscles, rib fractures, pulmonary or cardiac contusions or lacerations with subsequent hemothorax, pneumothorax, or cardiac arrhythmia. The abdominal wall is resilient and moveable, yet the liver and spleen are susceptible to traumatic laceration or rupture. Whereas extravasation of blood can occur after death, evidence of vital injury includes leukocyte infiltration, erythrophagocytosis, hemosiderin, reparative lesions of fibroblast proliferation, myocyte regeneration in muscle, and callus formation in bone. Understanding these processes aids in the diagnosis of blunt force trauma including estimation of the age of resulting injuries. PMID:27381403

  3. Noncovered Stent Placement in a Blunt Traumatic Injury of the Right Subclavian Artery

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne; Rousseau, Herve; Otal, Philippe; Joffre, Francis

    1999-09-15

    We report a case of scapulothoracic dissociation with right subclavian artery traumatic injury that was managed by endovascular treatment. Particular features are the use of a flexible self-expandable noncovered stent and simultaneous protection of the right common carotid artery from distal embolization by inflating a balloon catheter.

  4. Traumatic chest injury in children: A single thoracic surgeon's experience in two Nigerian tertiary hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Kelechi Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was to determine the extent and outcome of childhood chest injury in Nigeria, and to compare results with that of other literatures. Patients and Methods: A Prospective study of all children under 18 years of age with chest trauma in two tertiary hospitals in Southern Nigeria from January 2012 to December 2014 was reviewed. The aetiology, type, associated injury, mechanism, treatment and outcome were evaluated. The patients were followed up in the clinic. The data were analysed using SPSS version 20.0 with a significant P < 0.05. Results: Thirty-one patients (12.1%) under 18 years of age of 256 chest trauma patients were managed in the thoracic units. The mean age was 9.78 ± 6.77 years and 27 (87.1%) were male. The aetiology in 13 was from falls, 10 from automobile crashes, 3 from gunshots, 4 from stabbing and 1 from abuse. The highest peak of chest injury was on Saturday of the week and April of the year. The pleural collections are as follows: 15 (71.4%) was haemothorax, 4 (19.1%) pneumothorax, 2 (9.5%) haemopneumothorax and 18 patients had lung contusion in combination or alone with the pleural collections. Seven patients who presented >12-h versus 2 who presented <12-h and 6 of children between 0 and 9 years versus 3 at 10-18 years of age had empyema thoracis (P value not significant). One death was recorded. Conclusion: Chest trauma in children is still not common, and blunt chest injury from falls and automobile accidents are more common than penetrating chest injury. Treatment with tube thoracostomy is the major management modality with empyema thoracis as the most common complication. PMID:26612123

  5. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  6. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  7. Long-Term Results of Blunt Traumatic Renal Artery Dissection Treated by Endovascular Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Memon, Sameer; Cheung, Billy Y.K.

    2005-06-15

    A 20-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department after falling 15 m onto the roof of a car and landing on his back. Imaging by computed tomography (CT) showed delayed perfusion of the right kidney and no excretion of contrast from that kidney on delayed images. Angiography confirmed a localized intimal dissection in the right main renal artery. We inserted a balloon-expandable stent using a transfemoral approach to successfully repair the dissection. At 4 year follow-up, Doppler ultrasound of the right renal artery and renal scintigraphy demonstrated preserved function of the right kidney. Our findings support endovascular stenting as a safe, effective and efficient treatment for blunt renal artery injury.

  8. [Non-surgical management after blunt traumatic liver injuries: A review article].

    PubMed

    Noyola-Villalobos, Héctor Faustino; Loera-Torres, Marco Antonio; Jiménez-Chavarría, Enrique; Núñez-Cantú, Olliver; García-Núñez, Luis Manuel; Arcaute-Velázquez, Fernando Federico

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic trauma is a common cause for admissions in the Emergency Room. Currently, non-surgical management is the standard treatment in haemodynamically stable patients with a success rate of around 85 to 98%. This haemodynamic stability is the most important factor in selecting the appropriate patient. Adjuncts in non-surgical management are angioembolisation, image-guided drainage and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Failure in non-surgical management is relatively rare but potentially fatal, and needs to be recognised and aggressively treated as early as possible. The main cause of failure in non-surgical management is persistent haemorrhage. The aim of this paper is to describe current evidence and guidelines that support non-surgical management of liver injuries in blunt trauma. PMID:27036671

  9. Blunt traumatic internal carotid artery dissection with delayed stroke in a young skydiver.

    PubMed

    Abbo, Michael; Hussain, Kosar; Ali, Mohammad Baqer Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a 33-year-old skydiver who presented to the emergency department after a traumatic landing following a parachuting episode. He initially presented with right knee pain secondary to a tibial plateau fracture. There were no neurological symptoms or signs at the initial assessment. While he was still in the emergency department, he suddenly developed headache and left-sided hemiplegia. An urgent work-up showed right middle cerebral artery thrombosis with right internal carotid thrombosis and dissection. We have discussed some possible mechanism of injury in skydiving that may have predisposed to the occurrence of cervical dissection in our patient. PMID:23559649

  10. Endovascular Surgery for Traumatic Thoracic Aortic Injury: Our Experience with Five Cases, Two of Whom were Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsuyama, Sho; Fukumura, Fumio; Ando, Hiromi; Tanaka, Jiro; Uchida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We present our experience of endovascular surgery for traumatic aortic injury and the results of our procedures. Materials and Methods: From January 2009 to December 2013, we performed endovascular repairs of traumatic thoracic aortic injury on 5 male patients 16–75 years old (mean, 50.8), two of whom were young. Three of the patients had multiple organ injuries. The mean interval time to the operation is 22.0 hours (range, 10–36). All patients underwent endovascular repair with heparinization. The isthmus regions were seen in three cases and all of them were needed left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage. In the two young patients, the deployed stent graft was 22 mm (22.2% oversizing for diameter of aorta) and 26 mm (36.8% oversizing), respectively. Results: The procedures were successful in all patients, with no early mortality, paraplegia or stroke. During 3–63 months (mean, 30.8) follow-up period, no one experienced stent graft-related complications. One patient with LSA coverage experienced arm ischemia but the symptom improved with time. Conclusion: Endovascular surgery for traumatic thoracic aortic injury can be performed safely with low mortality or morbidity even in young small aorta. Accumulation of clinical experience and evaluation of long-term outcomes are necessary. PMID:25298833

  11. Risk factors for traumatic blunt cerebrovascular injury diagnosed by computed tomography angiography in the pediatric population: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Sivakumar, Walavan; Metzger, Ryan R; Bollo, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is frequently used to examine patients for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) after cranial trauma, but the pediatric population at risk for BCVI is poorly defined. Although CTA is effective for BCVI screening in adults, the increased lifetime risk for malignant tumors associated with this screening modality warrants efforts to reduce its use in children. The authors' objective was to evaluate the incidence of BCVI diagnosed by CTA in a pediatric patient cohort and to create a prediction model to identify children at high risk for BCVI. METHODS Demographic, clinical, and radiographic data were collected retrospectively for pediatric patients who underwent CTA during examination for traumatic cranial injury from 2003 through 2013. The primary outcome was injury to the carotid or vertebral artery diagnosed by CTA. RESULTS The authors identified 234 patients (mean age 8.3 years, range 0.04-17 years, 150 [64%] boys) who underwent CTA screening for BCVI. Of these, 24 (10.3%) had a focal neurological deficit, and 153 (65.4%) had intracranial hemorrhage on a head CTA. Thirty-seven BCVIs were observed in 36 patients (15.4%), and 16 patients (6.8%) died. Multivariate regression analysis identified fracture through the carotid canal, petrous temporal bone fracture, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of < 8, focal neurological deficit, and stroke on initial CT scan as independent risk factors for BCVI. A prediction model for identifying children at high risk for BCVI was created. A score of ≤ 2 yielded a 7.9% probability of BCVI and a score of ≥ 3 a risk of 39.3% for BCVI. CONCLUSIONS For cranial trauma in children, fracture of the petrous temporal bone or through the carotid canal, focal neurological deficit, stroke, and a GCS score of < 8 are independent risk factors for BCVI. PMID:25745952

  12. Aggressive operative treatment of isolated blunt traumatic brain injury in the elderly is associated with favourable outcome.

    PubMed

    Wutzler, Sebastian; Lefering, Rolf; Wafaisade, Arasch; Maegele, Marc; Lustenberger, Thomas; Walcher, Felix; Marzi, Ingo; Laurer, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    Outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the elderly has not been fully elucidated. The present retrospective observational study investigates the age-dependent outcome of patients suffering from severe isolated TBI with regard to operative and non-operative treatment. Data were prospectively collected in the TraumaRegister DGU. Anonymous datasets of 8629 patients with isolated severe blunt TBI (AISHead≥3, AISBody≤1) documented from 2002 to 2011 were analysed. Patients were grouped according to age: 1-17, 18-59, 60-69, 70-79 and ≥80 years. Cranial fractures (44.8%) and subdural haematomas (42.6%) were the most common TBIs. Independent from the type of TBI the group of patients with operative treatment declined with rising age. Subgroup analysis of patients with critical TBI (AISHead=5) revealed standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.81 (95% CI 0.75-0.87) in case of operative treatment (n=1201) and 1.13 (95% CI 1.09-1.18) in case of non-operative treatment (n=1096). All age groups ≥60 years showed significantly reduced SMRs in case of operative treatment. Across all age groups the group of patients with low/moderate disability according to the GOS (4 or 5 points) was higher in case of operative treatment. Results of this retrospective observational study have to be interpreted cautiously. However, good outcome after TBI with severe space-occupying haemorrhage is more frequent in patients with operative treatment across all age groups. Age alone should not be the reason for limited care or denial of operative intervention. PMID:25799473

  13. Traumatic rupture of gastric pull-up after apparent mild thoracic trauma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Valle, Joaquin; Srinivasrao, Hanumantha; Snow, David; Asbitt, Mike

    2016-05-01

    While elderly patients account for only 10-12% of all trauma victims, they consume 25% of trauma-related health care resources, with higher rates of mortality and complication. Presently described is the case of an elderly patient who presented to the emergency department (ED) following mild thoracic trauma, with previous history of gastric pull-up surgery. The patient had consulted another facility 48 hours earlier and was prescribed analgesia and x-ray follow-up for a mechanical fall and pain in the lower rib cage. At arrival, the patient complained of increasing dyspnea and pain at the right hemithorax. X-ray showed right hemithorax effusion, and contrast computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a large amount of contrast filling the pleural space and a relatively small point of gastric pull-up rupture in the stomach. The patient was referred to the cardiothoracic unit, but was unresponsive upon arrival and died. The aim of the present report was to raise the index of clinical suspicion of traumatic rupture of the gastric pull-up following traumatic chest injury, and to affirm that contrast CT should be the gold standard for diagnosis. PMID:27598597

  14. Traumatic rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum due to blunt abdominal trauma in a soccer game: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, W.S.; van der Vorst, J.R.; Swank, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction a Meckel’s diverticulum is one of the most common congenital anomalies of the digestive tract. The reported lifetime complication rate is 4%, mostly due to hemorrhage, obstruction, perforation or inflammation. A symptomatic Meckel’s diverticulum due to rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is very rare. We believe this case report is the first reporting a rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum after a low velocity blunt abdominal trauma and outlining the importance of a thorough and complete examination of the patient after blunt abdominal trauma. Presentation of case a 17-year-old male presented with abdominal pain after blunt abdominal trauma during a soccer game. Physical examination showed signs of peritonitis in all quadrants of the abdomen. During admission the patient deteriorated with decreasing blood pressure and raising pulse rate. A CT-scan showed free abdominal fluid. Our patient was scheduled for an emergent laparotomy where a perforated Meckel’s diverticulum with fecal spill was found. A segmental ileal resection was performed. Post-operative, patient developed a pneumonia and also intra-abdominal abscesses treated with percutaneous drainage. After an admission period of 17-days the patient was discharged. Conclusion perforation of a Meckel’s diverticulum is rarely suspected as a cause of acute deterioration following blunt abdominal trauma. This case shows the importance of awareness of this kind of injury especially in male patients. PMID:26701844

  15. Treatment of thoracic hemorrhage due to rupture of traumatic mediastinal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Ling-Fang; Cao, Wei-Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Patients in traffic accidents are usually presented with pain and bleeding due to fractures or soft tissue injury. On some occasions, more severe complications may be triggered by the trauma. A review of the published English language literature reveals no survival case once the traumatic mediastinal hematoma is ruptured. In our case, a 54-year-old man suffering motorcycle accident was admitted to emergency department. Computed tomography scan revealed subdural hematoma combined with posterior mediastinal hematoma. The patient was saved and discharged with a satisfactory outcome. Here we hope to share our treatment experience in dealing with the patient with severe multiple trauma. PMID:27033275

  16. Traumatic spondyloptosis at the cervico-thoracic junction without neurological deficits

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Lozen, Andrew; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Background: There have been rare cases of traumatic cervical spondyloptosis without neurological compromise. We report another case and provide a review of the literature, with a focus on appropriate management. Case Description: A 60-year-old male rode his bicycle into a stationary semi-truck. He reported initial bilateral upper extremity paresthesias that resolved. Imaging demonstrated C7 on T1 spondyloptosis. Traction did not achieve reduction and a halo was applied. Subsequently, he underwent posterior decompression C6-T1, reduction via bilateral complete facetectomies at C7, and fixation from C4 to T2 fixation. Afterward, an anterior C7-T1 fixation occurred, where exposure was performed through a midline sternotomy. Postoperatively, he woke up with baseline motor and sensory examination in his extremities. He did exhibit voice hoarseness due to paralysis of the left vocal cords. He was discharged home 3 days after surgery. At 6 months follow-up, there was a progressive improvement of the left vocal cords to slight paresis; dynamic X-rays demonstrated no instability with good fusion progression. Conclusion: Traumatic cervical spondyloptosis without neurological compromise is a rare and challenging scenario. There is a concern for neurologic compromise with preoperative traction, but if specific posterior elements are fractured, the spinal canal may be wide enough where the concern for disc migration is minimal. For patients who have not been reduced preoperatively, a posterior approach with initial decompression to widen the canal, before reduction, appears safe. This scheme may avoid an initial anterior approach for decompression, necessitating a 3-stage procedure if circumferential stabilization is pursued. PMID:27274411

  17. Efficiency Analysis of Direct Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in Elderly Patients with Blunt Traumatic Hemothorax without an Initial Thoracostomy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Lu, I-Yin; Yang, Chyan; Chou, Yi-Pin; Lin, Hsing-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hemothorax is common in elderly patients following blunt chest trauma. Traditionally, tube thoracostomy is the first choice for managing this complication. The goal of this study was to determine the benefits of this approach in elderly patients with and without an initial tube thoracostomy. Seventy-eight patients aged >65 years with blunt chest trauma and stable vital signs were included. All of them had more than 300 mL of hemothorax, indicating that a tube thoracostomy was necessary. The basic demographic data and clinical outcomes of patients with hemothorax who underwent direct video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without a tube thoracostomy were compared with those who received an initial tube thoracostomy. Patients who did not receive a thoracostomy had lower posttrauma infection rates (28.6% versus 56.3%, P = 0.061) and a significantly shorter length of stay in the intensive care unit (3.13 versus 8.27, P = 0.029) and in the hospital (15.93 versus 23.17, P = 0.01) compared with those who received a thoracostomy. The clinical outcomes in the patients who received direct VATS were more favorable compared with those of the patients who did not receive direct VATS. PMID:27190987

  18. Efficiency Analysis of Direct Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in Elderly Patients with Blunt Traumatic Hemothorax without an Initial Thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Lu, I-Yin; Yang, Chyan; Chou, Yi-Pin; Lin, Hsing-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hemothorax is common in elderly patients following blunt chest trauma. Traditionally, tube thoracostomy is the first choice for managing this complication. The goal of this study was to determine the benefits of this approach in elderly patients with and without an initial tube thoracostomy. Seventy-eight patients aged >65 years with blunt chest trauma and stable vital signs were included. All of them had more than 300 mL of hemothorax, indicating that a tube thoracostomy was necessary. The basic demographic data and clinical outcomes of patients with hemothorax who underwent direct video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without a tube thoracostomy were compared with those who received an initial tube thoracostomy. Patients who did not receive a thoracostomy had lower posttrauma infection rates (28.6% versus 56.3%, P = 0.061) and a significantly shorter length of stay in the intensive care unit (3.13 versus 8.27, P = 0.029) and in the hospital (15.93 versus 23.17, P = 0.01) compared with those who received a thoracostomy. The clinical outcomes in the patients who received direct VATS were more favorable compared with those of the patients who did not receive direct VATS. PMID:27190987

  19. Late Onset Traumatic Diaphragmatic Herniation Leading to Intestinal Obstruction and Pancreatitis: Two Separate Cases

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Although diaphragmatic injuries caused by blunt or penetrating trauma are rare entities, they are the most commonly misdiagnosed injuries in trauma patients and occur in approximately 3–7% of all abdominal or thoracic traumas. Acute pancreatitis secondary to late presenting diaphragmatic hernia is very rare. Here we present two separate cases: one with acute bowel obstruction and the other with acute pancreatitis secondary to late onset traumatic diaphragmatic hernia (three and twenty-eight years after chest trauma, resp.). PMID:26380126

  20. Post-Traumatic Chordae Rupture of Tricuspid Valve

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Kyomars; Ahmadi, Hossein; Zoroufian, Arezoo; Sahebjam, Mohammad; Moshtaghi, Naghmeh; Abbasi, Seyed Hessamedin

    2012-01-01

    Blunt injury to the chest can affect any one or all components of the chest wall and thoracic cavity. The clinical presentation of patients with blunt chest trauma varies widely and ranges from minor reports of pain to florid shock. Traumatic tricuspid valve regurgitation is a rare cardiovascular complication of blunt chest trauma. Tricuspid valve regurgitation is usually begotten by disorders that cause the right ventricle to enlarge. Diagnosis is made by physical examination findings and is confirmed by echocardiography. We report two cases of severe tricuspid regurgitation secondary to the rupture of the chordae tendineae of the anterior leaflet following non-penetrating chest trauma. Both patients had uneventful postoperative courses. PMID:23323081

  1. A minimally invasive technique for stabilizing the diaphragm on the thoracic wall after blunt chest trauma: the "lifting-up method".

    PubMed

    Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Igai, Hitoshi; Kawatani, Natsuko; Ibe, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Most traumatic diaphragmatic tears are located centrally or radially and may be amenable to repair by direct suturing or suturing with a surgical patch. However, diaphragmatic tears, such as those immediately adjacent to the costal margin, are uncommon. We describe how we repaired this type of tear using a needle loop retractor to pass a 2-0 braided suture through the chest wall on both sides of the rib to suture the torn diaphragm to the chest wall. Our technique is more physiologically and anatomically consistent than previously reported techniques. We have termed this technique the "lifting-up method", which we believe to be an easy and useful technique for repairing traumatic diaphragmatic injuries with no seam allowance. PMID:26391998

  2. Cardio-embolic stroke following remote blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sonali; Atreya, Auras R; Penumetsa, Srikanth C; Hiser, William L

    2013-03-01

    A cardio-embolic stroke as a sequela of remote blunt chest trauma is a rare clinical presentation. Blunt chest trauma can cause various acute cardiac complications like arrhythmias, cardiac contusion etc. However, delayed consequences such as left ventricular thrombus resulting in thromboembolic phenomena are reported infrequently. A 30-year-old healthy man presented to an outside facility with transient neurological deficits. An MRI brain showed lesions suggestive of embolic etiology. A trans-thoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed a 1.5 × 1.5 cm mass present in the left ventricular (LV) apex. Patient was transferred to our institution for cardiac surgery evaluation. On detailed questioning, he reported an incident of blunt chest trauma during a martial arts exhibition fight that took place 2 years back. Given this history, a cardiac catheterization was done, which showed 30% stenosis in mid-left anterior descending artery (LAD) without any other significant obstructive lesion. A trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) showed akinesis of the LV apex and confirmed TTE finding of a mass, consistent with an apical thrombus. Surgery was deferred and patient was started on anticoagulation. A cardiac MRI done 2 weeks later showed evidence of apical infarction in the LAD territory. LAD is the most commonly affected coronary vessel by blunt traumatic injuries, likely due to its vulnerable anatomical position on the anterior aspect of the heart. A variety of mechanisms including intimal tear, rupture and spasm have been implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma. PMID:24023477

  3. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    PubMed

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  4. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of an Acute Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta Complicated by a Distal Low-Flow Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bruninx, Guy; Wery, Didier; Dubois, Eric; El Nakadi, Badih; Dueren, Eric van; Verhelst, Guy; Delcour, Christian

    1999-11-15

    We report the case of a patient who suffered major trauma following a motorcycle accident that resulted in multiple fractures, bilateral hemopneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, and an isthmic rupture of the aorta with a pseudoaneurysm compressing the descending aorta. This compression was responsible for distal hypotension and low flow, leading to acute renal insufficiency and massive rhabdomyolysis. Due to the critical clinical status of the patient, which prevented any type of open thoracic surgery, endovascular treatment was performed. An initial stent-graft permitted alleviation of the compression and the re-establishment of normal hemodynamic conditions, but its low position did not allow sufficient coverage of the rupture. A second stent-graft permitted total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm while preserving the patency of the left subclavian artery.

  5. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  6. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients. PMID:26147725

  7. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients. PMID:26147725

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Acute and Chronic Thoracic Aortic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Jan Ferko, Alexander; Lojik, Miroslav; Krajina, Antonin; Harrer, Jan; Dominik, Jan

    2007-11-15

    Our aim is to present midterm results after endovascular repair of acute and chronic blunt aortic injury. Between December 1999 and December 2005, 13 patients were endovascularly treated for blunt aortic injury. Ten patients, 8 men and 2 women, mean age 38.7 years, were treated for acute traumatic injury in the isthmus region of thoracic aorta. Stent-graftings were performed between the fifth hour and the sixth day after injury. Three patients (all males; mean age, 66 years; range, 59-71 years) were treated due to the presence of symptoms of chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta (mean time after injury, 29.4 years, range, 28-32). Fifteen stent-grafts were implanted in 13 patients. In the group with acute aortic injury one patient died due to failure of endovascular technique. Lower leg paraparesis appeared in one patient; the other eight patients were regularly followed up (1-72 months; mean, 35.6 months), without complications. In the group with posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms all three patients are alive. One patient suffered postoperatively from upper arm claudication, which was treated by carotidosubclavian bypass. We conclude that the endoluminal technique can be used successfully in the acute repair of aortic trauma and its consequences. Midterm results are satisfactory, with a low incidence of neurologic complications.

  9. Thoracic venous injuries: an imaging and management overview.

    PubMed

    Haq, Aftab A; Restrepo, Carlos S; Lamus, Daniel; Ocazionez-Trujillo, Daniel; Vargas, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Thoracic venous injuries are predominantly attributed to traumatic and iatrogenic causes. Gunshot wounds and knife stabbings make up the vast majority of penetrating trauma whereas motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of blunt trauma to the chest. Iatrogenic injuries, mostly from central venous catheter complications are being described in growing detail. Although these injuries are rare, they pose a diagnostic challenge as their clinical presentation does not substantially differ from that of arterial injury. Furthermore, the highly lethal nature of some of these injuries provides limited literature for review and probably underestimates their true incidence. The widespread use of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has increased the detection rate of these lesions in hemodynamically stable patients that survive the initial traumatic event. In this article, we will discuss and illustrate various causes of injury to each vein and their supporting CT findings while briefly discussing management. The available literature will be reviewed for penetrating, blunt, and iatrogenic injuries to the vena cava, innominate, subclavian, axillary, azygos, and pulmonary veins. PMID:26965007

  10. [Bronchial rupture in blunt thoracic trauma].

    PubMed

    López Espadas, F; Zabalo, M; Encinas, M; Díaz Regañón, G; Pagola, M A; González Fernández, C

    2000-12-01

    In closed chest trauma, bronchial rupture is an unusual but potentially serious complication, with an associated mortality rate of 30%. Recent decades have seen an increase in incidence parallel to greater use of transport. Eighty percent of injuries are located 2.5 cm from the carina. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, imaging and bronchoscopy. Subcutaneous emphysema and respiratory insufficiency are the most common findings. Images show the presence of pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum or both. Bronchoscopy is the diagnostic method of choice and must be performed early. Treatment consists of reestablishing anatomical continuity of the tracheobronchial tree by surgical repair if the lesion affects more than a third of the circumference and/or pneumothorax is not resolved after two chest drainages. This type of injury should be recognized and treated early, both to restore lung function and to prevent associated complications caused by delay. However, initial findings are seldom specific, requiring the physician to display a high degree of suspicion and explaining why diagnosis often comes late. PMID:11171438

  11. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni; Maadani, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  12. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni

    2016-01-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  13. The Moderation of Blood Alcohol Levels on Higher Odds of Survival among American Indians with Violent, Blunt-Force Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kristen F; Kim, Bum Jung

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the moderation of blood alcohol level (BAL) and American Indian race on survival of patients with violent traumatic brain injury (TBI). An initial logistic regression model indicated that those who were American Indian and insured had higher odds of survival and those with higher injury severity scores and low-medium BAL were less likely to survive. A second logistic regression model including a relationship between American Indians and BAL found that American Indians had a higher odds of survival which tripled when they have no BAL. Low-medium and high BAL were associated with less likelihood of survival among White patients. PMID:26963822

  14. Thoracic trauma in horses.

    PubMed

    Sprayberry, Kim A; Barrett, Elizabeth J

    2015-04-01

    Traumatic injuries involving the thorax can be superficial, necessitating only routine wound care, or they may extend to deeper tissue planes and disrupt structures immediately vital to respiratory and cardiac function. Diagnostic imaging, especially ultrasound, should be considered part of a comprehensive examination, both at admission and during follow-up. Horses generally respond well to diligent monitoring, intervention for complications, and appropriate medical or surgical care after sustaining traumatic wounds of the thorax. This article reviews the various types of thoracic injury and their management. PMID:25770070

  15. Contemporary management of blunt aortic trauma.

    PubMed

    Dubose, J J; Azizzadeh, A; Estrera, A L; Safi, H J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) remains a common cause of death following blunt mechanisms of trauma. Among patients who survive to reach hospital care, significant advances in diagnosis and treatment afford previously unattainable survival. The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) guidelines provide current best-evidence suggestions for treatment of BTAI. However, several key areas of controversy regarding optimal BTAI care remain. These include the refinement of selection criteria, timing for treatment and the need for long-term follow-up data. In addition, the advent of the Aortic Trauma Foundation (ATF) represents an important development in collaborative research in this field. PMID:25868973

  16. Surgical Management of Undiagnosed Laceration of Superior Vena Cava Caused by Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Debbagh, Hassan; Schoell, Thibaut; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Intrapericardial rupture of the superior vena cava resulting from blunt thoracic trauma is a rare and life-threatening condition that has to be ruled out in the presence of signs of cardiac tamponade and a history of blunt thoracic trauma. We report the case of undiagnosed superior vena cava laceration caused by a high-speed road traffic accident in a 25 year-old patient revealed by cardiac tamponade. We highlight the need of urgent surgical exploration in all patients whose condition is unstable in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma regardless of imaging conclusions. PMID:27106431

  17. [Cardiac arrest following blunt chest injury. Emergency thoracotomy without ifs or buts?].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K G; Kirchhoff, C; Bürklein, D; Wismüller, A; Mutschler, W

    2007-10-01

    In German-speaking countries, most serious thoracic injuries are attributable to the impact of blunt force; they are the second most frequent result of injury after head injury in polytrauma patients with multiple injuries. Almost one in every three polytraumatized patients with significant chest injury develops acute lung failure, and one in every four, acute circulatory failure. The acute circulatory arrest following serious chest injury involves a high mortality rate, and in most cases it reflects a tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, or hemorrhagic shock resulting from injury to the heart or one of the large vessels close to it. Brisk drainage of tension pneumothorax and adequate volume restoration are therefore particularly important in resuscitation of multiply traumatized patients, as are rapid resuscitative thoracotomy to allow direct heart massage, drainage of pericardial tamponade, and control of hemorrhage. However the probability of survival described in the literature is very low for patients sustaining severe chest trauma with acute cardiac arrest. The case report presented here describes a female polytrauma patient who suffered an acute cardiac arrest following cardiac tamponade after admission in the emergency department and who survived without neurological deficits after an emergency thoracotomy. Selections from the topical literature can help the treating physician in the emergency department in making decisions on whether an emergency thoracotomy is indicated after a blunt chest injury and on the procedure itself. PMID:17909734

  18. Chronic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Presenting 29 Years following Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sarah; Kumar, Prashant; Van den Bosch, Rene; Khanafer, Adib

    2015-01-01

    Blunt, nonpenetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are uncommon and associated with a high mortality rate within the first hour. Aortic injury is missed in 1-2% of patients that survive to hospital, and a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm may subsequently form. We present a case in which a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed 29 years following a significant motor vehicle accident. We discuss the epidemiology, presentation, and management of this uncommon consequence of blunt, nonpenetrating aortic injury. Our case illustrates an important clinical lesson; a past medical history of trauma should not be overlooked at any patient assessment. PMID:26351610

  19. Thoracic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Worrell, Stephanie G; Demeester, Steven R

    2014-02-01

    This article discusses thoracic emergencies, including the anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, examination, diagnosis, technique, management, and treatment of acute upper airway obstruction, massive hemoptysis, spontaneous pneumothorax, and pulmonary empyema. PMID:24267505

  20. MAIN CONTROVERSIES IN THE NONOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF BLUNT SPLENIC INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; COLLEONI-NETO, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : The nonoperative management of traumatic spleen injuries is the modality of choice in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemodynamic stability. However, there are still questions about the treatment indication in some groups of patients, as well as its follow-up. Aim: Update knowledge about the spleen injury. Method : Was performed review of the literature on the nonoperative management of blunt injuries of the spleen in databases: Cochrane Library, Medline and SciELO. Were evaluated articles in English and Portuguese, between 1955 and 2014, using the headings "splenic injury, nonoperative management and blunt abdominal trauma". Results : Were selected 35 articles. Most of them were recommendation grade B and C. Conclusion : The spleen traumatic injuries are frequent and its nonoperative management is a worldwide trend. The available literature does not explain all aspects on treatment. The authors developed a systematization of care based on the best available scientific evidence to better treat this condition. PMID:27120744

  1. Limitation of imaging in identifying iatrogenic aortic coarctation following thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Rajiv N; Thomaier, Lauren; Qazi, Umair; Verde, Franco; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2015-04-01

    A 21-year-old male suffered blunt trauma from a motor vehicle accident causing thoracic aorta tear. The smallest available stent graft was deployed. Definitive repair was later performed using a 22 × 22 × 116 mm Talent Thoracic Stent Graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. Seventeen months later, he presented with dizziness, chest pain, acute renal failure, malignant hypertension, and troponin elevation. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram and transesophageal echocardiogram did not reveal any dissection, stent stenosis or collapse. Cardiac catheterization showed normal coronary arteries but a 117 mm Hg gradient across the stent graft. Iatrogenic coarctation of the aorta was confirmed with a second measurement during arch angiogram. A Palmaz stent was deployed over the distal end of the previous stent graft with complete resolution of symptoms and gradual normalization of kidney function. This case report demonstrates a need for wider availability and selecting appropriate stent graft in treating traumatic aortic injuries in young patients. It is the first case report of the inability of current imaging modalities in confirming stent collapse. Pressure gradient is a useful tool in confirming stent collapse when clinical scenario does not match CT findings. PMID:25637574

  2. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Tsinoglou, Konstantinos; Tsandiridis, Christos; Papastergiou, Christos; Bintoudi, Antonia

    2007-08-01

    Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst constitutes an uncommon, though well recognized, manifestation of closed chest trauma. It is usually encountered in young patients, whose compliant chest wall permits the transmission of great compressive forces to the lung parenchyma and the laceration of the latter. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is usually detected during the imaging evaluation of multi-injured patients with the use of computed tomography, as it is often not apparent in the initial supine anteroposterior chest radiographs. We present 5 cases of trauma patients, in whom we detected the presence of multiple traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts during the imaging evaluation of blunt chest trauma with the use of computed tomography. PMID:17721334

  3. Pleural abnormalities: thoracic ultrasound to the rescue!

    PubMed Central

    Pathmanathan, Sega; Lakshminarayana, Umesh B.; Avery, Gerard R.; Kastelik, Jack A.; Morjaria, Jaymin B.

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias that are diagnosed in adulthood may be traumatic or congenital in nature. Therefore, respiratory specialists need to be aware of the presentation of patients with these conditions. In this report, we describe a case series of patients with congenital and traumatic diaphragmatic hernias and highlight a varied range of their presentations. Abnormalities were noted in the thorax on the chest radiographs, but it was unclear as to the nature of the anomaly. The findings on thoracic ultrasound conducted by a pulmonologist helped to direct appropriate investigations avoiding unnecessary interventions. Instead of pleural effusions, consolidation or collapse, thoracic computed tomography demonstrated diaphragmatic hernias which were managed either conservatively or by surgery. There is increasing evidence that pulmonary specialists should be trained in thoracic ultrasonography to identify pleural pathology as well as safely conducting pleural-based interventions. PMID:23819018

  4. Pleural abnormalities: thoracic ultrasound to the rescue!

    PubMed

    Aslam, Imran; Pathmanathan, Sega; Lakshminarayana, Umesh B; Avery, Gerard R; Kastelik, Jack A; Morjaria, Jaymin B

    2013-07-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias that are diagnosed in adulthood may be traumatic or congenital in nature. Therefore, respiratory specialists need to be aware of the presentation of patients with these conditions. In this report, we describe a case series of patients with congenital and traumatic diaphragmatic hernias and highlight a varied range of their presentations. Abnormalities were noted in the thorax on the chest radiographs, but it was unclear as to the nature of the anomaly. The findings on thoracic ultrasound conducted by a pulmonologist helped to direct appropriate investigations avoiding unnecessary interventions. Instead of pleural effusions, consolidation or collapse, thoracic computed tomography demonstrated diaphragmatic hernias which were managed either conservatively or by surgery. There is increasing evidence that pulmonary specialists should be trained in thoracic ultrasonography to identify pleural pathology as well as safely conducting pleural-based interventions. PMID:23819018

  5. An uncommon cause of pneumobilia: blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Fahrettin; Coban, Sacit; Terzi, Alpaslan; Cece, Hasan; Uzunkoy, Ali

    2011-07-01

    Pneumobilia is described as occurrence of free air in the gallbladder or biliary tree. There are a number of causes of pneumobilia, including surgically created biliary enteric fistula, instrumentation of the bile duct on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, emphysematous cholecystitis, and pyogenic cholangitis. Pneumobilia has also occurred following blunt abdominal trauma, but to date, no more than five cases of such injury have been reported in the literature. In this report, we present a patient struck by a motor vehicle with traumatic pneumobilia following blunt trauma to the abdomen, which was managed conservatively. PMID:21935838

  6. Traumatic rupture of the right subclavian artery

    PubMed Central

    Girdwood, Robert W.; Holden, Michael P.; Ionescu, Marian I.

    1972-01-01

    The case report of a patient who sustained a traumatic rupture of the right subclavian artery in a motor vehicle accident is presented. The preoperative diagnosis, surgical approach, postoperative management, and indications for angiography in traumatic lesions of the thoracic aorta and great vessels are discussed. The relevant literature is reviewed. Images PMID:5034604

  7. Delayed rupture of thoracic aorta aneurysm following a kick to the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Antonio; De Giorgio, Fabio; Partemi, Sara; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Carbone, Arnaldo

    2009-03-01

    Several theories have been proposed to explain the Blunt Traumatic Aortic Rupture (BTAR) because different mechanical forces act on the aorta, at anatomically susceptible sites, including shearing, torsion and stretching, but the origin, transduction and relative importance of these forces remain uncertain. We report a case of a 74-year-old man injured by a kick to the abdomen. After 2 days he felt chest pain paroxysm and weakness in his left leg. The patient was admitted to an emergency care department where he experienced sudden and severe hemodynamic deterioration, dying rapidly. The autopsy, performed 3 days later, showed haemorragic infarction of hypogastric subcutaneous tissues and revealed an extended dissecting aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with following haemopericardium. In our case we considered that a low energy compression to the abdomen, in presence of underlying atherosclerosis, caused aortic dissection rather than rupture and then the 48h time span after the traumatic event and the cardiac tamponade was enough to complete the aortic retrograde dissection. We finally emphasise the importance of the careful surveillance of any trauma close to the abdomen in view of initially unpredictable, as well as eventful injuries. The finding of early signs of neointima formation in thoracoabdominal portions of aortic dissection strongly supported our interpretation. The forensic interest of this case is correlated to the voluntary character of the inflicted injury. The culprit was thus charged with manslaughter. PMID:18849182

  8. Blunt force trauma to skull with various instruments.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Nur Amirah; Osman, Khairul; Hamzah, Noor Hazfalinda; Amir, Sri Pawita Albakri

    2014-04-01

    Deaths due to blunt force trauma to the head as a result of assault are some of the most common cases encountered by the practicing forensic pathologist. Previous studies have shown inflicting injury to the head region is one of the most effective methods of murder. The important factors that determine severity of trauma include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage and severity of brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of blunt force trauma to the skull produced by different instruments. Nine adult monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) skulls were used as models. Commonly found blunt objects comprising of Warrington hammer, hockey stick and open face helmet were used in this study. A machine calibrated force generator was used to hold the blunt object in place and to hit the skulls at forces of 12.5N and 25N. Resultant traumatic effects and fractures (linear, depressed, basilar, comminuted, and distastic) were analyzed according to type of blunt object used; surface area of contact and absolute force (N/cm(2)) delivered. Results showed that all investigated instruments were capable of producing similar injuries. The severity of trauma was not related to the surface area of contact with the blunt objects. However, only high absolute forces produced comminuted fractures. These findings were observational, as the samples were too small for statistical conclusions. PMID:24763233

  9. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  10. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the ... with high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who ...

  11. Thoracic actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Slade, P. R.; Slesser, B. V.; Southgate, J.

    1973-01-01

    Six cases of pulmonary infection with Actinomyces Israeli and one case of infection with Nocardia asteroides are described. The incidence of thoracic actinomycosis has declined recently and the classical presentation with chronic discharging sinuses is now uncommon. The cases described illustrate some of the forms which the disease may take. Actinomycotic infection has been noted, not infrequently, to co-exist with bronchial carcinoma and a case illustrating this association is described. Sputum cytology as practised for the diagnosis of bronchial carcinoma has helped to identify the fungi in the sputum. Treatment is discussed, particularly the possible use of oral antibiotics rather than penicillin by injection. Images PMID:4568119

  12. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  13. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  14. Laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma-some uncommon indications.

    PubMed

    Dharap, Satish B; Noronha, Jarin; Kumar, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Trauma laparotomy after blunt abdominal trauma is conventionally indicated for patients with features of hemodynamic instability and peritonitis to achieve control of hemorrhage and control of spillage. In addition, surgery is clearly indicated for the repair of posttraumatic diaphragmatic injury with herniation. Some other indications for laparotomy have been presented and discussed. Five patients with blunt abdominal injury who underwent laparotomy for nonroutine indications have been presented. These patients were hemodynamically stable and had no overt signs of peritonitis. Three patients had solid organ (spleen, kidney) infarction due to posttraumatic occlusion of the blood supply. One patient had mesenteric tear with internal herniation of bowel loops causing intestinal obstruction. One patient underwent surgery for traumatic abdominal wall hernia. In addition to standard indications for surgery in blunt abdominal trauma, laparotomy may be needed for vascular thrombosis of end arteries supplying solid organs, internal or external herniation through a mesenteric tear or anterior abdominal wall musculature, respectively. PMID:26957824

  15. Emergency Thoracic US: The Essentials.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Sawatmongkorngul, Sorravit; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2016-01-01

    Acute thoracic symptoms are common among adults visiting emergency departments in the United States. Adults with these symptoms constitute a large burden on the overall resources used in the emergency department. The wide range of possible causes can make a definitive diagnosis challenging, even after clinical evaluation and initial laboratory testing. In addition to radiography and computed tomography, thoracic ultrasonography (US) is an alternative imaging modality that can be readily performed in real time at the patient's bedside to help diagnose many thoracic diseases manifesting acutely and in the trauma setting. Advantages of US include availability, relatively low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. Emergency thoracic US consists of two main parts, lung and pleura US and focused cardiac US, which are closely related. Acoustic mismatches among aerated lungs, pleura, chest wall, and pathologic conditions produce artifacts useful for diagnosis of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema and help in detection of subpleural, pleural, and chest wall pathologic conditions such as pneumonia, pleural effusion, and fractures. Visual assessment of cardiac contractility and detection of right ventricular dilatation and pericardial effusion at focused cardiac US are critical in patients presenting with acute dyspnea and trauma. Additional US examinations of the inferior vena cava for noninvasive volume assessment and of the groin areas for detection of deep venous thrombosis are often performed at the same time. This multiorgan US approach can provide valuable information for emergency treatment of both traumatic and nontraumatic thoracic diseases involving the lungs, pleura, chest wall, heart, and vascular system. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27035835

  16. [Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta].

    PubMed

    Glock, Y; Roux, D; Soula, P; Cerene, A; Fournial, G

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 50 postraumatic aortic rupture (1968-1996, 39 males, mean age: 34.5). Group A is composed of 35 patients with an acute aortic rupture and a prompt diagnosis. Group B includes 13 patients with a chronic rupture. All patients from group A had a severe politraumatism with abdominal, cranial, extremities or hip fractures. Mediastinal thickening with or without hemothorax indicated an angiography or a transesophageal echocardiography lately. In group A, 36 patients have been operated on urgently (12-24 hours); cardiopulmonary bypass was performed on 20 patients; an aorto-aortical bypass was done in 27 cases and a direct suture in the remaining 9. In group B, cardiopulmonary bypass was performed on 9 patients; a aorto-aortical bypass was done in 11 cases and a direct suture in 2. Overall hospital mortality was 16%; 19% in group A and 7.6% in group B. Ischemic paraplejia appeared in 5 patients (10%), all from group A. No false aneurysm developed after 4.5 years of follow-up (3-135 months) in the 38 survivors. The usefulness of transesophageal echocardiography, the importance of medular protection and the utility of several interventionist radiologic techniques are discussed. PMID:9053930

  17. Severe Traumatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Minei, Joseph P.; Schmicker, Robert H.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Bulger, Eileen; Tisherman, Samuel; Hoyt, David B.; Nichol, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The public health implications of regional variation in incidence and outcome of severe traumatic injury remain to be analyzed. The objective of this study was to determine whether the incidence and outcome associated with severe traumatic injury differs across geographic regions of North America. Methods A prospective, observational study was conducted of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium of all patients in 9 North American sites (6 US and 3 Canadian) sustaining severe traumatic injury from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007 followed to hospital discharge. Eligible patients were assessed by organized emergency medical services, and had field-based physiologic criteria including systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg, Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤12, respiratory rate <10 or >29 per minute, advanced airway procedure, or traumatic death in the field. Census data were used to determine rates adjusted for age and sex. The main outcome measures were incidence rate, mortality rate, case fatality rate, and survival to discharge for patients sustaining severe traumatic injury assessed by EMS. Results The total catchment population of 20.5 million yielded 7080 cases of severe traumatic injury. Median age was 36 years and 67% were male. The median incidence of EMS-assessed severe traumatic injury per 100,000 population across sites was 37.4 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24.6 – 69.6); survival ranged from 39.8% to 80.8%, with a median of 64.5% (IQR = 55.5–78.4). About 942 cases were pronounced dead at the scene and 5857 patients were transported to hospital; 4477 (63.2%) were discharged alive. The median incidence of severe trauma due to a blunt mechanism, transported to hospital, was 25.8 (IQR = 13.1–44.3); survival ranged from 52.6% to 87.3%, with a median of 78.0% (IQR = 68.4–83.5). The median incidence of severe penetrating trauma, transported to hospital, was 2.6 (IQR = 1.5–10.4); survival ranged from 37.5% to 84.7%, with a median of 67.5% (IQR = 54.1

  18. [Thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but its definition has been disputed. TOS is differentiated into five distinct disorders: arterial vascular, venous vascular, traumatic neurovascular, true neurologic (TN-TOS), and nonspecific TOS. TN-TOS is caused by compression of the lower plexus (T1>C8 roots and/or lower trunk) by a fibrous band. The most frequent presenting symptoms are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digital flexors. Numbness and sensory loss are usually present, mainly in the ulnar forearm, although severe pain or pain/paresthesia proximal to the elbow can occur; however, sensory symptoms or signs can be absent in some patients. Nerve conduction studies are pathognomonic and show the loss or severe attenuation of the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Additionally, they show a severely depressed median compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and, subsequently, a depressed ulnar CMAP and SNAP. TN-TOS is a rare disorder, although its incidence may be higher than previously believed. Hirayama disease is an important differential diagnosis. Nonspecific TOS, which is mainly diagnosed by provocative maneuvers, corresponds to the classical concept of TOS. However, this concept is now challenged and the existence of nonspecific TOS is doubted. PMID:25475030

  19. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Its Intense Demands New Website from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Puts the Power of Information ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. All rights reserved. Expanded Proprietary ...

  20. Traumatic rupture of the aortic isthmus: program of selective management.

    PubMed

    Pate, J W; Gavant, M L; Weiman, D S; Fabian, T C

    1999-01-01

    Two hypotheses were investigated: (1) helical computed tomography (CT) of the chest on victims of decelerating trauma can yield a diagnosis of, or "rule out," a traumatic rupture of the aorta (TRA) without the need for an aortogram; and (2) selective delay of aortic repair can be safely accomplished through a medical management protocol. Screening helical CT examinations were done on 6169 victims of blunt thoracic trauma; 47 were found to have TRA; in 8, indirect but nondiagnostic findings not clarified by an aortogram led to surgical exploration. The sensitivity of helical CT was higher than that of aortograms, and a "normal" helical CT scan was never associated with a proved TRA. It is estimated that the use of helical CT has resulted in at least a 40% to 50% decrease in the need for aortograms, in addition to yielding rapid, noninvasive valuable information about other injuries. Drugs (beta-blockers +/- vasodilators) to decrease the stress in the aortic wall were used in 93 patients when the diagnosis was suspected and were continued as necessary through the evaluation, stabilization, and until the aorta was cross-clamped at operation. Elective, delayed operation was done between 2 days and 25 months in 15 patients who were deemed to be excessive risks for emergency aortic repair; there were 2 deaths (13. 3%). Eleven patients never had aortic repair. No patient maintained on this protocol, whether repaired emergently, electively, or not at all, developed free rupture of the periaortic hematoma and death from TRA. PMID:9841764

  1. 2. Newer aids in the diagnosis of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, B.

    1977-01-01

    The assessment of a case of blunt abdominal trauma can be complicated by many factors, and the resultant inaccurate or delayed diagnoses have contributed to the unacceptable mortality for this type of injury. Recently several useful diagnostic techniques have been developed that, if applied intelligently, may be instrumental in decreasing the high mortality among patients who present with ambiguous abdominal signs after sustaining blunt trauma. Although hematologic investigation and routine radiography have facilitated detection of intraperitoneal injury, peritoneal lavage has become the single most helpful aid. Scanning procedures are sometimes useful in recognizing splenic and hepatic defects especially; these may be confirmed or clarified by angiography. Although ultrasonography may be no more valuable than scintigraphy in outlining splenic and hepatic abnormalities, it is an important technique, especially in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses of traumatic origin. Laparoscopy also may be helpful in investigation if surgeons become more familiar with the procedure. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:608158

  2. [Traumatic Injury of the Diaphragm].

    PubMed

    Kadokura, Mitsutaka

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic injury (TDI) is relatively rare condition, and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. TDI usually results from blunt trauma and penetrating trauma. The majority causes of blunt TDI are victims of motor vehicle accidents. The incidence rates of TDI is unknown because of it can be overlooked if it is unsuspected with non-specific radiological and clinical findings. The mortality rates associated with blunt and penetrating TDI are affected by the severity of concurrent organ injuries. The diagnoses of TDI are frequently missed in the post-traumatic assessment because of non-specific symptoms or physical findings. When the site of trauma is in the abdomen, there will be high rate of an intra-abdominal organ injury. Furthermore, when the site of trauma is in the chest, there will be the abdominal organ injury in 50%.Surgical operation should be performed as soon as possible for concomitant injuries. Diaphragmatic repair can be performed using laparotomy, thoracotomy, or both approaches. Primary suture of the diaphragm can be performed in the majority of TDI patients. The outcome of post TDI depends on concurrent organ injury. In case of emergency, it is important to take an appropriate diagnosis and treatment for any concomitant injuries. PMID:26197916

  3. A rare case of traumatic posterior phacocele with retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sindal, Manavi D; Mourya, Deepesh

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation of crystalline lens into the anterior subconjunctival or subtenon's space is a rare but known complication of blunt trauma. Dislocation into the posterior subtenon's space is even rarer and can be associated with a complication such as occult scleral tear and retinal detachment. We report a case of traumatic posterior subtenon's dislocation of crystalline lens after blunt trauma and its successful surgical management. PMID:26953031

  4. Isolated posterior capsular rupture following blunt head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; Hamam, Rola N; Maalouf, Fadi C

    2014-01-01

    Closed-globe traumatic cataract is not uncommon in males in the pediatric age group. However, there is a relative paucity of literature on isolated posterior lens capsule rupture associated with closed-globe traumatic cataract. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with white cataract 1 day after blunt trauma to the forehead associated with posterior capsular rupture that was detected by B-scan ultrasonography preoperatively. No stigmata of trauma outside the posterior capsule could be detected by slit-lamp exam, funduscopy, and optical coherence tomography. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implant was performed 24 hours after trauma, with the patient achieving 6/6 visual acuity 1 week and 6 months after surgery. Our case is unique, being the youngest (amblyogenic age) to be reported, with prompt surgical intervention, and with no signs of trauma outside the posterior capsule. PMID:25506201

  5. Endovascular repair of traumatic aortic injury using a modified, commercially available endograft to preserve aortic arch branches.

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Hidetake; Oka, Katsuhiko; Sakai, Osamu; Watanabe, Taiji; Kanda, Keiichi; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    A 25-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital after being involved in a high-speed motorcycle accident. Computed tomography angiography revealed a blunt traumatic aortic injury of the lesser curvature of the distal aortic arch accompanied by splintered fractures of the seventh thoracic vertebra and left clavicle. If the pseudoaneurysm had been treated with open surgical repair, then arch replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass, which was considered to be too invasive, would have been necessary. Therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was preferred as a first-line treatment to prevent pulmonary complications and hemorrhaging. Because the proximal landing zone for TEVAR was insufficient, we used a modified (fenestrated) commercially available endograft to preserve the branches of the aortic arch. Postoperative computed tomography scans confirmed that the pseudoaneurysm had been excluded without the endoleaks, and the aortic arch branches were patent. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged from the hospital to have surgery for a vertebral fracture on postoperative day 6. PMID:24184496

  6. Substance P Mediates Reduced Pneumonia Rates After Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung; Stepien, David; Hanseman, Dennis; Robinson, Bryce; Goodman, Michael D.; Pritts, Timothy A.; Caldwell, Charles C.; Remick, Daniel G.; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Traumatic brain injury results in significant morbidity and mortality and is associated with infectious complications, particularly pneumonia. However, whether traumatic brain injury directly impacts the host response to pneumonia is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the nature of the relationship between traumatic brain injury and the prevalence of pneumonia in trauma patients and investigate the mechanism of this relationship using a murine model of traumatic brain injury with pneumonia. Design Data from the National Trauma Data Bank and a murine model of traumatic brain injury with postinjury pneumonia. Setting Academic medical centers in Cincinnati, OH, and Boston, MA. Patients/Subjects Trauma patients in the National Trauma Data Bank with a hospital length of stay greater than 2 days, age of at least 18 years at admission, and a blunt mechanism of injury. Subjects were female ICR mice 8–10 weeks old. Interventions Administration of a substance P receptor antagonist in mice. Measurements and Main Results Pneumonia rates were measured in trauma patients before and after risk adjustment using propensity scoring. In addition, survival and pulmonary inflammation were measured in mice undergoing traumatic brain injury with or without pneumonia. After risk adjustment, we found that traumatic brain injury patients had significantly lower rates of pneumonia compared to blunt trauma patients without traumatic brain injury. A murine model of traumatic brain injury reproduced these clinical findings with mice subjected to traumatic brain injury demonstrating increased bacterial clearance and survival after induction of pneumonia. To determine the mechanisms responsible for this improvement, the substance P receptor was blocked in mice after traumatic brain injury. This treatment abrogated the traumatic brain injury–associated increases in bacterial clearance and survival. Conclusions The data demonstrate that patients with traumatic

  7. Coronary artery dissection: an unusual cause of hypoxia in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Burns, Brian J; Healy, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    A 41-year-old motocross rider sustained blunt trauma to the chest following a collision with another rider. He was initially hypoxic and was given oxygen with a non-rebreather mask. He complained of chest pain. A prehospital extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma (eFAST) scan was negative for pneumothorax, but demonstrated a hypokinetic left ventricle. An electrocardiogram (ECG) in the emergency department confirmed anterior myocardial infarction, found to be due to a traumatic left anterior descending coronary artery dissection. This case highlights a rare but life-threatening cause of hypoxia in blunt chest trauma. PMID:21495831

  8. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    PubMed

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  9. Thoracic spinal trauma and associated injuries: should early spinal decompression be considered?

    PubMed

    Petitjean, M E; Mousselard, H; Pointillart, V; Lassie, P; Senegas, J; Dabadie, P

    1995-08-01

    The relative benefits of conservative or surgical treatment in thoracic spinal trauma are still controversial. Owing to its anatomic relations, thoracic spinal trauma is specific regarding neurologic prognosis, the high incidence of associated injuries, and surgical management. Over a 30-month period, 49 patients sustained thoracic spinal trauma with neurologic impairment. The authors review population characteristics, associated injuries, and surgical management, and underline the high incidence of associated injuries, in particular, blunt chest trauma. In their opinion, early spinal decompression has no indication in complete paraplegia. Concerning partial paraplegia, early surgery may enhance neurologic recovery. Nevertheless, they suggest three main criteria in deciding whether or not to perform surgery early: the existence of residual spinal compression, the degree of neurologic impairment, and the presence of potential hemorrhagic lesions or blunt chest trauma, especially pulmonary contusion. PMID:7674409

  10. Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia in children: Diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, O.; Mustapha, H.; Ndoye, N. A.; Faye Fall, A. L.; Ngom, G.; Ndoye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia is rare in children. Its diagnosis can be difficult in the acute phase of trauma because its signs are not specific, especially in a poly trauma context. We report two cases of traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia following a blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, highlighting some difficulties in establishing an early diagnosis and the need for a high index of suspicion. PMID:25659563

  11. Thoracic outlet anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal vertebra to the rib. There may be pain in the neck and shoulders, and numbess in the last 3 fingers and inner forearm. Thoracic outlet syndrome is usually treated with physical therapy which helps ...

  12. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) causes pain in the shoulder, arm, and neck. It happens when the nerves or blood vessels just below your ... vein is compressed, your hand might be sensitive to cold, or turn pale or bluish. Your arm ...

  13. Frequency of myocardial injury after blunt chest trauma as evaluated by radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; Driedger, A.A.; Holliday, R.L.; Cheung, H.W.; Sibbald, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Seventy-seven patients who had sustained multisystem trauma, including severe blunt chest injury, were prospectively evaluated to assess the frequency of associated traumatic myocardial injury. Traumatic injury to either the right or left ventricle was defined by the presence of discrete abnormalities of wall motion on electrocardiographically gated cardiac scintigraphy in patients without a clinical history of heart disease. Forty-two patients (55%) (Group 1) had focal abnormalities of wall motion; 27 involved the right ventricle, 7 the left ventricle, 7 were biventricular, and 1 involved only the septum. Both the right and left ventricular ejection fractions were significantly lower (31 +/- 11% and 47 +/- 14%, respectively) than those in the 35 traumatized patients without wall motion abnormalities on scintigraphy (Group 2) (49 +/- 8% and 58 +/- 11%, respectively). Repeat scintigraphic examination in 32 Group 1 patients at a time remote from initial injury showed improvement or resolution of previously defined focal wall motion abnormalities in 27 of 32 patients (84%). The electrocardiogram and serum enzyme tests were insensitive indexes of traumatic myocardial injury when defined by the scintigraphic abnormalities. Thus, severe blunt chest trauma results in a higher frequency of traumatic myocardial injury than heretofore recognized, and frequently involves the anteriorly situated right ventricle.

  14. Right-sided diaphragmatic rupture after blunt trauma. An unusual entity.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Pastor, Vicente; Alvarez, Laura; Charco, Ramon; Armengol, Manel; Navarro, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of the diaphragm remain an entity of difficult diagnosis despite having been recognised early in the history of surgery, especially when it comes to blunt trauma and injuries of the right diaphragm. We report the case of a patient with blunt trauma with right diaphragmatic rupture that required urgent surgical treatment for hepatothorax and iatrogenic severe liver injury. Blunt trauma can cause substantial diaphragmatic rupture. It must have a high index of suspicion for diaphragmatic injury in patients, victims of vehicle collisions, mainly if they have suffered frontal impacts and/or side precipitates in patients with severe thoracoabdominal trauma. The diagnosis can be performed clinically and confirmation should be radiological. The general measures for the management of multiple trauma patients must be applied. Surgery at the time of diagnosis should restore continuity. PMID:21244704

  15. Contrast-enhanced helical computerised tomography in the investigation of thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Beese, R. C.; Allan, R.; Treasure, T.

    2001-01-01

    Aortic angiography is widely considered the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of traumatic thoracic aortic injury. Unfortunately, thoracic aortic angiography has many disadvantages: the technique is invasive but, more importantly, it is not routinely available in all hospitals, necessitating transfer of critically ill patients. Contrast-enhancement helical computerised tomography (CEHCT) of the thorax is rapidly becoming available, especially in more district general hospitals, and has been shown to be as sensitive and specific in detecting aortic trauma as angiography. This technique has the advantage of being non-invasive and is able to demonstrate injuries other than thoracic aortic disruption. We present four cases of traumatic thoracic disruption initially diagnosed using CEHCT in whom surgical repair was performed on the basis of the CEHCT findings. The surgical findings of aortic injury were correlated with CEHCT features. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:11212440

  16. Early and delayed presentation of traumatic small bowel injury.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Andrew; Brown, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic small bowel injury (TSBI) is rare and presents in only 1% of patients following blunt trauma. Delay in diagnosis can result in significant morbidity so a high index of suspicion is required in patients with abdominal injuries and a significant mechanism of injury. We discuss three cases of TSBI with varying presentations, and discuss their investigation and treatment. PMID:26961562

  17. Fatal case of cervical blunt vascular injury with cervical vertebral fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Okura, Toshiaki; Yoshihara, Hisatake; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Ukai, Junichi; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Muramoto, Akio; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) is usually caused by neck trauma that predominantly occurs in high-impact injuries. BCVI may occur due to damage to both the vertebral and carotid arteries, and may be fatal in the absence of appropriate treatment and early diagnosis. Here, we describe a case of cerebral infarction caused by a combination of a lower cervical spinal fracture and traumatic injury to the carotid artery by a direct blunt external force in a 52-year-old man. Initially, there was no effect on consciousness, but 6 hours later loss of consciousness occurred due to traumatic dissection of the carotid artery that resulted in a cerebral infarction. Brain edema was so extensive that decompression by emergency craniectomy and internal decompression were performed by a neurosurgeon, but with no effect, and the patient died on day 7. This is a rare case of cerebral infarction caused by a combination of a lower cervical spinal fracture and traumatic injury to the carotid artery. The case suggests that cervical vascular injury should be considered in a patient with a blunt neck trauma and that additional imaging should be performed. PMID:26412898

  18. Amputation - traumatic

    MedlinePlus

    ... accidents, or from motor vehicle accidents. Natural disasters, war, and terrorist attacks can also cause traumatic amputations. ... bag and place the bag in an ice water bath. Do NOT directly put the body part ...

  19. [Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture with delayed unusual disclosure].

    PubMed

    Thicoïpé, M; Sztark, F; Lassié, P; Tueux, O; Dabadie, P

    1995-01-01

    The authors report the case of a delayed presentation of a traumatic diaphragmatic rupture in a 22-year-old patient admitted to hospital for a minor surgical procedure under general anaesthesia. Nine months before, he had a road traffic accident with a minor thoracic trauma. Three days after surgery, the patient was readmitted for a tension hydrothorax due to the herniation and the perforation of the stomach into the left pleural cavity. Such a delayed presentation of a traumatic diaphragmatic rupture remains uncommon. The peroperative ventilatory factors involved in the development of the hernia are discussed. PMID:8572411

  20. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  1. Understanding Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freischlag, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was once debated in the world of vascular surgery. Today, it is more understood and surprisingly less infrequent than once thought. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is composed of three types: neurogenic, venous, and arterial. Each type is in distinction to the others when considering patient presentation and diagnosis. Remarkable advances have been made in surgical approach, physical therapy, and rehabilitation of these patients. Dedicated centers of excellence with multidisciplinary teams have been developed and continue to lead the way in future research. PMID:25140278

  2. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J

    1993-06-01

    The growing popularity of nonoperative treatment of children with splenic injuries has seduced some physicians into a false sense of security regarding care of the injured child. Although it has been established that hemodynamically stable children with splenic, hepatic, and even renal injuries can safely be treated "expectantly," this concept cannot be applied indiscriminately. Accurate diagnosis and effective care of the child with blunt abdominal trauma is an exercise of clinical precision that demands attention to detail and thorough evaluation. This review addresses this process in light of recent advances in diagnostic imaging and in consideration of recent reports analyzing different protocols for therapeutic decision making. PMID:8374651

  3. Management of Abdominal Solid Organ Injury After Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Jonathan E; Chokshi, Nikunj K

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the solid abdominal organs-liver, spleen, kidney, and pancreas-is one of the most common injury patterns in pediatric blunt trauma. Pediatric trauma centers are becoming increasingly successful in managing these injuries without operative intervention. Well-validated guidelines have been established for liver and spleen injury management, and operative intervention is reserved for patients who show evidence of active bleeding after resuscitation. No such guidelines yet exist for the management of traumatic injury of the kidney or pancreas. Exploratory laparotomy remains the treatment of choice in patients suffering hemodynamic collapse, but interventional radiologic or endoscopic procedures are increasingly used to manage all but the most devastating solid organ injuries. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(7):e241-e246.]. PMID:27403671

  4. Pediatric isolated thoracic and/or lumbar transverse and spinous process fractures.

    PubMed

    Akinpelu, Babatunde J; Zuckerman, Scott L; Gannon, Stephen R; Westrick, Ashly; Shannon, Chevis; Naftel, Robert P

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Isolated transverse and spinous process fractures (TPFx and SPFx) in the thoracic and/or lumbar region have been deemed clinically insignificant in the adult population. This same rule is often applied to the pediatric population; however, little evidence exists in this younger group. The goal of this study was to describe the clinical, radiographic, and long-term data on isolated TPFx and SPFx in an exclusively pediatric population. METHODS A retrospective chart review at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University identified 82 pediatric patients with isolated TPFx and/or SPFx following a traumatic event between January 2000 and December 2013. Patient demographic information, presenting symptoms, radiographic characteristics, and follow-up data were collected. Follow-up was used to determine the outcome (presence of neurological deficits) of such injuries via complete physical examination and, when available, radiographic evidence. RESULTS In the 82 identified patients, the mean age was 15.5 ± 3.1 years (mean is expressed ± SD throughout), with 72 injuries (87.8%) resulting from a motor vehicle, motorcycle, or all-terrain vehicle accident. There was a mean of 1.7 ± 1.0 fractured vertebral levels involved and a mean of 1.8 ± 1.1 fractures was identified per patient. Seventy-one patients (86.6%) needed bedside pain control, 7 (8.5%) were prescribed a brace, and 4 patients (4.9%) received a collar. Physical therapy was recommended for 12 patients (14.6%). A total of 84.1% had follow-up, and the mean length of follow-up was 19 ± 37 months. No patients had true neurological deficits at presentation or follow-up as a result of their isolated fractures, whereas 95.1% had other associated system injuries. CONCLUSIONS These data shows that there is no appreciable long-term complication associated with isolated thoracic and/or lumbar TPFx and/or SPFx in an exclusively pediatric population. Because these fractures are, however, associated

  5. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  6. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Lewis, Jaime; Guitron, Julian; Reed, Michael; Pritts, Timothy; Starnes, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury. PMID:23723618

  7. Severe Mechanical Hemolysis After Transcatheter Closure of a Traumatic Ventricular Septal Defect Using the Amplatzer Atrial Septal Occluder.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Tang, Jian-Jun; Fang, Zhen-Fei; Hu, Xin-Qun; Shen, Xiang-Qian; Zhou, Sheng-Hua

    2016-07-27

    Traumatic ventricular septal defect (VSD) resulting from chest trauma, either penetrating or blunt, is a relatively rare occurrence. Herein, we describe the case of a previously healthy 26-year-old man who presented with congestive heart failure, which was secondary to a large traumatic VSD following violent blunt chest trauma. The traumatic VSD was initially closed percutaneously using an Amplatzer atrial septal defect occluder. Post-device closure, however, the patient developed severe intravascular hemolysis refractory to medical treatment. The patient subsequently underwent surgical removal of the Amplatzer device, with concomitant VSD patch closure. PMID:27357435

  8. Radiology of thoracic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, S.J.; Pugatch, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents the essential clinical and radiologic findings of a wide variety of thoracic diseases. The authors include conventional, CT and MR images of each disease discussed. In addition, they present practical differential diagnostic considerations for most of the radiographic findings or patterns portrayed.

  9. [Thoracic oncology: annual review].

    PubMed

    Sculier, J-P; Berghmans, T; Meert, A-P

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the literature published in 2011-12 in the field of thoracic oncology. Are discussed because of new original publications: epidemiology, screening, pulmonary nodule, diagnosis and assessment, treatment of lung cancer non-small cell, small cell lung cancer, prognosis, palliative care and end of life, organization of care, mesothelioma. PMID:23755717

  10. [Single Port Thoracic Surgery and Reduced Port Thoracic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Onodera, Ken; Noda, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Single port thoracic surgery, reduced port surgery and needlescopic surgery attract attention as one of the minimally invasive surgery in thoracic surgery recently. Single port thoracic surgery was advocated by Rocco in 2004, it was reported usefulness of single port thoracic surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax. The surgical procedure as single (or reduced) port thoracic surgery is roughly divided into the following. One is operated with instruments inserted from the single extended incision, and the other is operated with instruments punctured without extending incision. It is not generally complicated procedures in single port thoracic surgery. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax and biopsy for lung and pleura are considered the surgical indication for single (or reduced) port surgery. It is revealed that single port surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax is less invasive than conventional surgery. Single port and reduced port thoracic surgery will spread furthermore in the future. PMID:27440029

  11. Occult traumatic loculated tension pneumothorax--a sonographic diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Burns, Brian J; Aguirrebarrena, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    This case outlines a rarely seen disease in prehospital emergency care-namely, a traumatic loculated tension pneumothorax. Prehospital thoracic ultrasound as part of a standard extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma (EFAST) algorithm failed to diagnose this life-threatening injury. We have subsequently added scanning the lateral chest wall in the fifth intercostal space to the algorithm. PMID:22920267

  12. Endograft collapse following endovascular repair of traumatic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Ganesan; Cook, Richard; Martin, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The advent of endovascular treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries offers a valuable, minimally invasive alternative to open surgical repair. However, there are limitations of the current endovascular stent graft technology for this group of patients. After endovascular repair meticulous follow-up is required with a high index of suspicion for potential complications including the lethal complication of endograft collapse. PMID:19784919

  13. Management of blunt hepatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Letoublon, C; Amariutei, A; Taton, N; Lacaze, L; Abba, J; Risse, O; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    For the last 20 years, nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt hepatic trauma (BHT) has been the initial policy whenever this is possible (80% of cases), i.e., in all cases where the hemodynamic status does not demand emergency laparotomy. NOM relies upon the coexistence of three highly effective treatment modalities: radiology with contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) and hepatic arterial embolization, intensive care surveillance, and finally delayed surgery (DS). DS is not a failure of NOM management but rather an integral part of the surgical strategy. When imposed by hemodynamic instability, the immediate surgical option has seen its effectiveness transformed by development of the concept of abbreviated (damage control) laparotomy and wide application of the method of perihepatic packing (PHP). The effectiveness of these two conservative and cautious strategies for initial management is evidenced by current experience, but the management of secondary events that may arise with the most severe grades of injury must be both rapid and effective. PMID:27519150

  14. Traumatic unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    Doe, Joseph W; Jay, Walter M

    2006-01-01

    A 23-year-old man was admitted for a closed head injury following a fall from a height of 5 meters from a ladder. Because of a C-7 burst fracture, a halo and halo vest were applied approximately 9 hours following the fall. Approximately 21 hours after the accident, the patient complained of diplopia. On neuro-ophthalmology evaluation, a unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia was noted. MRI of the brain, performed 3 days after application of the halo and vest, showed a small infarct at the posterior aspect of the inferior midbrain, slightly left of midline. At 9.5 weeks there was 90% improvement of the internuclear ophthalmoplegia noted. Of the reported cases in the medical literature of traumatic internuclear ophthalmoplegia, 30 (83.33%) cases were male and 6 (16.67%) were female. The mean age was 31.7. 54% of the cases were bilateral; 46% unilateral. Mechanisms include: motor vehicle accident: 28 (41.79%), fall: 7 (10.45%), blunt trauma: 11 (16.42%), penetrating trauma 1: (1.49%), bike accident 3: (4.48%), other: 1 (1.49%), Unknown: 16 (23.88%). PMID:17182412

  15. Extracorporeal life support in a severe blunt chest trauma with cardiac rupture.

    PubMed

    Yoann, Launey; Erwan, Flecher; Nicolas, Nesseler; Yannick, Malledant; Philippe, Seguin

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case of severe blunt chest trauma secondary to a horse riding accident with resultant free-wall rupture of the left ventricle in association with severe lung contusion. We describe the initial surgical and medical management of the cardiac rupture which was associated with a massive haemoptysis due to severe lung trauma. Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support was initiated and allowed both the acute heart and lung failure to recover. We discuss the successful use and pitfalls of ECMO techniques which are sparsely described in such severe combined cardiac and thoracic trauma. PMID:24829813

  16. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  17. [Thoracic actinomycosis: three cases].

    PubMed

    Herrak, L; Msougar, Y; Ouadnouni, Y; Bouchikh, M; Benosmane, A

    2007-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare condition which, in the thoracic localisation, can mimic cancer or tuberculosis. We report a series of three case of thoracic actinomycosis treated in the Ibn Sina University Thoracic Surgery Unit in Rabat, Morocco. CASE N degrees 1: This 45-year-old patient presented a tumefaction on the left anterior aspect of the chest. Physical examination identified a parietal mass with fistulisation to the skin. Radiography demonstrated a left pulmonary mass. Transparietal puncture led to the pathological diagnosis of actinomycosis. The patient was given medical treatment and improved clinically and radiographically. CASE N degrees 2: This 68-year-old patient presented repeated episodes of hemoptysis. The chest x-ray revealed atelectasia of the middle lobe and bronchial fibroscopy demonstrated the presence of a bud in the middle lobar bronchus. Biopsies were negative. The patient underwent surgery and the histology examination of the operative specimen revealed pulmonary actinomycosis. The patient recovered well clinically and radiographically with antibiotic therapy. CASE N degrees 3: This 56-year-old patient presented cough and hemoptysis. Physical examination revealed a left condensation and destruction of the left lung was noted on the chest x-ray. Left pleuropulmonectomy was performed. Histological analysis of the surgical specimen identified associated Aspergillus and Actinomyces. The outcome was favorable with medical treatment. The purpose of this work was to recall the radiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic, outcome aspects of this condition and to relate the problems of differential diagnosis when can suggest other diseases. PMID:17978739

  18. The Complexity of Biomechanics Causing Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration) is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs, which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs, which isolate a single injury mechanism. PMID:26539158

  19. The Complexity of Biomechanics Causing Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration) is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs, which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs, which isolate a single injury mechanism. PMID:26539158

  20. Pathology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Finnie, John W

    2014-12-01

    Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently encountered in veterinary practice in companion animals, livestock and horses, inflicted head injury is a common method of euthanasia in domestic livestock, and malicious head trauma can lead to forensic investigation, the pathology of TBI has generally received little attention in the veterinary literature. This review highlights the pathology and pathogenesis of cerebral lesions produced by blunt, non-missile and penetrating, missile head injuries as an aid to the more accurate diagnosis of neurotrauma cases. If more cases of TBI in animals that result in fatality or euthanasia are subjected to rigorous neuropathological examination, this will lead to a better understanding of the nature and development of brain lesions in these species, rather than extrapolating data from human studies. PMID:25178417

  1. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wolbrom, Daniel H.; Rahman, Aleef; Tschabrunn, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis) and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma. PMID:26981308

  2. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  3. Nonmalignant Adult Thoracic Lymphatic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Itkin, Maxim; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-09-01

    The thoracic lymphatic disorders are a heterogeneous group of uncommon conditions that are associated with thoracic masses, interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and chylous complications. Accurate diagnosis of the thoracic lymphatic disorders has important implications for the newest approaches to management, including embolization and treatment with antilymphangiogenic drugs. New imaging techniques to characterize lymphatic flow, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiogram, are redefining approaches to disease classification and therapy. PMID:27514588

  4. Pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture following blunt abdominal trauma: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hussein, Bassem; Khammas, Ali; Kaiyasah, Hadiel; Swaleh, Abeer; Al Rifai, Nazim; Al-Mazrouei, Alya; Badri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture (TDR) occurs in 0–5% of patients with major blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, in most of them on the left side, and an early correct diagnosis is made in less than half of the cases (Meyers and McCabe, 1993; Ball et al., 1982). Presentation of the case We report a case of a forty-eight years old man who had a pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture after a high-velocity blunt abdominal trauma that was diagnosed and treated successfully. Discussion Pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture (PDR) is an uncommon problem that poses a diagnostic challenge to surgeons. The incidence of PDR is between 0.2% and 3.3% of cases with TDR (Sharma, 1999 [3]). Conclusion PDR should be suspected in any patient with high velocity thoraco-abdominal trauma. Early diagnosis is essential and needs a high index of suspicion. Early Management is important in decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26773877

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  6. Aging May Blunt Some of Exercise's Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159438.html Aging May Blunt Some of Exercise's Benefits But, that's no excuse for seniors to ... News) -- Aging may dampen some beneficial effects of exercise, a new study suggests. But, that's no reason ...

  7. Antibiotics May Blunt Breast-Feeding's Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159339.html Antibiotics May Blunt Breast-Feeding's Benefits Infants given the drugs were prone to infections ... use of antibiotics may dampen some of the benefits of breast-feeding, a new study suggests. Researchers ...

  8. [Characteristics of duodenal ruptures depending on topographical and anatomical properties of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovin, I A; Chirkov, R N; Dubrovina, I A; Khachaturian, B S; Mosoian, A S; Dallakian, V F

    2013-01-01

    We have studied specific morphological properties of duodenal rupture depending on the topographic and anatomical features of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma suffered in a car crash (with the victim found in the passenger compartment or involved in an automobile-pedestrian accident) and a railway crash (a train-pedestrian accident) or resulting from a blunt-force trauma, a fall from height, a fall on the stomach, and traumatic compression of the body. We took into consideration the anatomical peculiarities of the duodenal rupture, such as its circular, horseshoe, and loop-like shape. The study has demonstrated that the frequency of duodenal injury associated with a blunt abdominal trauma shows a stronger dependence on the topographical and anatomical peculiarities of duodenum than on the circumstances of the case. Specifically, the circular duodenum and especially its descending portion are more readily subjected to the damage than the organs of a different shape. The position of the break with respect to the duodenal axis is an important diagnostic signs allowing to clarify circumstances of the blunt injury. Transverse ruptures are typical of strong impacts associated with the short-term interaction between the damaging object and the affected part of the body whereas longitudinal ruptures more commonly occur as a result the long-term traumatic impact. Bile imbibition of paraduodenal and peripancreatic retroperitoneal adipose tissue may be used as an additional diagnostic sign of duodenal rupture. PMID:24428049

  9. The development of pneumobilia after blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Okan, İsmail; Tali, Servet; Özsoy, Zeki; Deniz, Çağlar; Acu, Berat; Yenidoğan, Erdinç; Kayaoğlu, Hüseyin Ayhan; Şahin, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Pneumobilia is the detection of gas within the biliary system. It usually develops after bilioenteric anastomosis, percutaneous or endoscopic biliary interventions, infections and abscesses. The treatment is surgical, especially in cases with no prior interventions to the biliary system. The development of pneumobilia is quite rare after blunt trauma. Therefore, both the diagnosis and management are challenging for surgeons. Herein, we present the diagnosis and conservative management of a patient with pneumobilia after blunt trauma. PMID:27528818

  10. Intractable epilepsy and craniocerebral trauma: analysis of 163 patients with blunt and penetrating head injuries sustained in war.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Hadi; Hashemi-Fesharaki, Sohrab; Razaghi, Soodeh; Najafi, Masomeh; Kolivand, Peir Hossein; Kovac, Stjepana; Gorji, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Post-traumatic epileptic seizure is a common complication of brain trauma including military injuries. We present clinical characteristics and correlates of post-traumatic epilepsy in 163 head-injured veterans suffering from intractable epilepsy due to blunt or penetrating head injuries sustained during the Iraq-Iran war. The medical records of 163 war veterans who were admitted by the Epilepsy Department of the Shefa Neuroscience Center between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up period after developing epilepsy was 17.2 years. The time interval between the trauma and the first seizure was shorter and the seizure frequency was higher in epileptic patients suffering from penetrating head trauma. There was no difference in seizure type between epileptic patients traumatised by blunt or penetrating injury. Patients with seizure frequency of more than 30 per month mostly had simple partial seizure. Frontal and parietal semiologies were observed more frequently in patients with penetrating trauma, whereas patients with blunt trauma showed a higher temporal semiology. The most common brain lesion observed by CT scan was encephalomalacia followed by porencephaly and focal atrophy. There was no association between intracerebral retained fragments and different characteristic features of epilepsy. Patients with military brain injury carry a high risk of intractable post-traumatic epilepsy decades after their injury, and thus require a long-term medical follow-up. PMID:22763317

  11. Forensic Pathology of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Finnie, J W

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury constitutes a significant proportion of cases requiring forensic examination, and it encompasses (1) blunt, nonmissile head injury, especially involving motor vehicle accidents, and (2) penetrating, missile injury produced by a range of high- and lower-velocity projectiles. This review examines the complex pathophysiology and biomechanics of both types of neurotrauma and assesses the macroscopic and histologic features of component lesions, which may be used to determine the cause and manner of death resulting from an intentional assault or accident. Estimation of the survival time postinjury by pathologic examination is also important where malicious head injury is suspected, in an attempt to ascertain a time at which the traumatic event might have been committed, thereby evaluating the authenticity of statements made by the alleged perpetrator. PMID:26578643

  12. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  13. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  14. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VI

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  15. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    PubMed

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  16. [Acute myocardial infarction after blunt polytrauma -- successful coronary intervention].

    PubMed

    Mauser, M; Schwenk, M; Schmelzeisen, H; Fleischmann, D; Fösel, T

    2003-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma is a well reported but rare finding. Especially in severely injured patients the optimal therapy of the myocardial infarction is not well established, since anticoagulants, platelet aggregation inhibitors or thrombolytics are frequently contraindicated under these conditions. We report a case of a 41-year-old man, who presented with an acute myocardial infarction in combination with a severe polytrauma (multiple rib fractures, hematothorax, pelvic bone fractures, multiple injuries of intestinal organs) after a motorcycle accident with a blunt chest and abdominal trauma. After surgical treatment of the injuries of the bones and the intestinal organs a coronary angiography was immediately performed. The left anterior descending and the circumflex coronary artery were occluded in the mid-portion of the vessels. Coronary recanalization by PTCA and the implantation of coronary stents were successful in both vessels. Despite of a non-optimal blood flow after recanalization and stenting in one vessel (LAD TIMI II flow after recanalization), and a non-optimal accompanying medical therapy, during and after intervention (intravenous heparin starting 8 hours after the coronary intervention and platelet inhibitors starting 4 days after the intervention) the coronary angiogram after 2 months documented both vessels patent without a reocclusion or a restenosis. The case report documents, that in traumatic myocardial infarctions the treating of both, the attending injuries and the myocardial ischemia, is feasible. Early coronary angiography and coronary interventions, with or without stent-implantation, are indicated, even in cases in which an adequate accompanying medical therapy with heparin and platelet inhibitors is contraindicated. PMID:12557122

  17. Traumatic amputations

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Arul

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic amputations remain one of the most emotionally disturbing wounds of conflict, as demonstrated by their frequent use in films to illustrate the horrors of war. Unfortunately, they remain common injuries, particularly following explosions, and, in addition, many survivors require primary amputation for unsalvageable injuries or to save their life. A third group, late amputations, is being increasingly recognised, often as a result of the sequelae of complex foot injuries. This article will look at the epidemiology of these injuries and their acute management, complications and outcome. PMID:26516502

  18. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozoa, Glenn; Alves, Daniel; Fish, David E

    2011-08-01

    Of the many clinical entities involving the neck region, one of the most intriguing is thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). TOS is an array of disorders that involves injury to the neurovascular structures in the cervicobrachial region. A classification system based on etiology, symptoms, clinical presentation, and anatomy is supported by most physicians. The first type of TOS is vascular, involving compression of either the subclavian artery or vein. The second type is true neurogenic TOS, which involves injury to the brachial plexus. Finally, the third and most controversial type is referred to as disputed neurogenic TOS. This article aims to provide the reader some understanding of the pathophysiology, workup, and treatment of this fascinating clinical entity. PMID:21824588

  19. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. PMID:27568153

  20. A Rare and Serious Syndrome That Requires Attention in Emergency Service: Traumatic Asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kaplan, Tevfik; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Baran, Hatice Nurdan; Kazanci, Burak; Kocer, Bulent; Han, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic asphyxia is a rare syndrome caused by blunt thoracoabdominal trauma and characterized by cyanosis, edema, and subconjunctival and petechial hemorrhage on the face, neck, upper extremities, and the upper parts of the thorax. Traumatic asphyxia is usually diagnosed by history and inspection; however, the patient should be monitored more closely due to probable complications of thoracoabdominal injuries. Treatment is conservative, but the prognosis depends on the severity of the associated injuries. Herein we present a traumatic asphyxia due to an elevator accident in a 32-year-old male patient and discuss the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis by reviewing the relevant literature. PMID:26090242

  1. Coronary Thrombosis without Dissection following Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sibel, Michael; Thomas, Peter; Burt, Francis; Cipolla, James; Puleo, Peter; Baker, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest resulting in coronary thrombosis and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a rare but well-described occurrence in adults. Angiography in such cases has generally disclosed complete epicardial coronary occlusion with thrombus, indistinguishable from the findings commonly found in spontaneous plaque rupture due to atherosclerotic disease. In all previously reported cases in which coronary interrogation with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in association with acute revascularization, coronary artery dissection was implicated as the etiology of coronary thrombosis. We present the first case report of blunt trauma-associated coronary thrombosis without underlying atherosclerosis or coronary dissection, as documented by IVUS imaging. PMID:27006836

  2. Adolescent traumatic stress experience results in less robust conditioned fear and post-extinction fear cue responses in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicole L T; Gauchan, Sangeeta; Genovese, Raymond F

    2014-05-01

    Early exposure to a traumatic event may produce lasting effects throughout the lifespan. Traumatic stress during adolescence may deliver a distinct developmental insult compared with more-often studied neonatal or juvenile traumatic stress paradigms. The present study describes the lasting effects of adolescent traumatic stress upon adulthood fear conditioning. Adolescent rats were exposed to a traumatic stressor (underwater trauma, UWT), then underwent fear conditioning during adulthood. Fear extinction was tested over five conditioned suppression extinction sessions three weeks later. The efficacies of two potential extinction-enhancing compounds, endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor AM404 (10mg/kg) and M1 muscarinic positive allosteric modulator BQCA (10mg/kg), were also assessed. Finally, post-extinction fear responses were examined using a fear cue (light) as a prepulse stimulus. Rats traumatically stressed during adolescence showed blunted conditioned suppression on day 1 of extinction training, and AM404 reversed this effect. Post-extinction startle testing showed that fear conditioning eliminates prepulse inhibition to the light cue. Startle potentiation was observed only in rats without adolescent UWT exposure. AM404 and BQCA both ameliorated this startle potentiation, while BQCA increased startle in the UWT group. These results suggest that exposure to a traumatic stressor during adolescence alters developmental outcomes related to stress response and fear extinction compared to rats without adolescent traumatic stress exposure, blunting the adulthood fear response and reducing residual post-extinction fear expression. Efficacy of pharmacological interventions may also vary as a factor of developmental traumatic stress exposure. PMID:24491436

  3. A penetrating dorsal thoracic injury that is lucky from every aspect: A case report

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Mehmet; Gök, Ali Fuat Kaan; Öner, Gizem; Günay, Kayıhan; Ertekin, Cemalettin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Penetrating thoracic trauma management represents a major problem for emergency department staff. In these cases, we reported a patient, who can be deemed very lucky, because of both the trauma mechanism and the provided first aid at scene. Presentation of case A 30-year-old man was transported to the emergency surgery outpatient clinic after being stabbed from his back. A knife entered thorax from the dorsal region paravertebrally between two scapulae. No vascular and thoracic injuries were detected in the CT. The knife was then pulled and removed, and pressure dressing was applied on the wound. He was discharged with full recovery on the second day of admission. Discussion Thoracic traumas may present as blunt or penetrating traumas. Trauma with penetrating dorsal thoracic injuries is usually in the form of stabbing, sharp penetrating object injuries, or firearm injuries. The aim of a successful trauma management is to determine whether a life-threatening condition exists. The general rules of penetrating trauma management are to avoid in-depth exploration for wound site assessment, to avoid removal of penetrating object without accurate diagnosis, and to keep in mind the possibility of intubation for airway security in every moment. Conclusion During the initial care of patients with penetrating trauma, the object should not be removed from its place. Our patient was lucky enough in that no thoracic pathology developed during the accident and he was not subjected to any secondary trauma during ambulance transport. PMID:27100954

  4. Pediatric blunt trauma resulting in major arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Milas, Zvonimir L; Dodson, Thomas F; Ricketts, Richard R

    2004-05-01

    Ten children, aged 4 to 14 years, sustaining blunt arterial trauma from motor vehicle collisions (6), bicycle accidents (2), and falls (2) were identified over a 10-year period. The arteries injured included the common iliac (3), abdominal aorta (2), carotid (2), brachial (2), and the subclavian, renal, and femoral artery (1 each). One patient had three arterial injuries. Six patients had associated injuries including a pelvic and lumbar spine fracture, Horner's syndrome, liver laceration, skull fracture, open humerus fracture, small bowel serosal tear, and a brachial plexus injury. Definitive diagnosis was made using arteriography (6), computed tomography (CT) scan (2), and physical examination (2). The types of arterial injuries found included incomplete transection, complete transection with pseudo-aneurysm formation, traumatic arteriovenous (AV) fistulas, complete occlusion, and dissection. Repair was accomplished by hypogastric artery interposition or bypass grafting, synthetic grafting with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), reverse saphenous vein grafting, or primary repair, depending on the circumstances. An AV fistula between the carotid artery and cavernous sinus was embolized. All grafts remained patent with exception of the aorto-renal bypass graft at follow-up ranging from 1 month to 3 years. The principles for repairing vascular injuries in children are slightly different than those in adults. Every effort should be made to use autogenous tissue such as the hypogastric artery or saphenous vein for repair if possible. If not, PTFE grafts can be used, although the long-term patency of these grafts in growing children is not known. PMID:15156954

  5. Successful closure of large blunt macular chorioretinal rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Takuya; Agawa, Tsuyoshi; Usui, Masahiko; Goto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a rare case of large chorioretinal rupture caused by blunt traumatic injury of the globe. A 22-year-old woman sustained a blunt injury to her left eye. The best-corrected Snellen visual acuity was 2/20 in her left eye, and hyphema and vitreous hemorrhage were noted. The day after the injury occurred the vitreous hemorrhage had disappeared. Fundus examination revealed a crescent-shaped retinal rupture three disc diameters in size near the macula, and a choroidal rupture six disc diameters in size that was over the vascular arcade. Three days after the injury, vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling was performed. Postoperative prone positioning was maintained for 4 days. Five days postoperatively, closure of the ruptured retina was confirmed. The visual acuity improved to 16/20 4 months after surgery and this was maintained over a 48-month period. In conclusion, early vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling after injury was effective for a case involving severe blunt chorioretinal rupture with closed globe injury. PMID:22393282

  6. Intrathoracic esophageal rupture distal to the carina after blunt chest trauma: Case-report

    PubMed Central

    Cedeño, Alex; Echeverría, Karla; Vázquez, Jan; Delgado, Aura; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma is a very rare entity, with an incidence of 0.001%. Eighty two percent of the esophageal perforation secondary to blunt chest trauma occur above the level of the carina, with the lowest reported incidence in the intrathoracic region distal to the carina. Presentation of case We report on the case of a 48-year-old Hispanic male with intrathoracic esophageal rupture. Exploration revealed a right lateral, mid esophageal, longitudinal 1.5 cm perforation. The defect was repaired using a double-layered primary closure reinforced with an intercostal muscle flap. The patient tolerated the procedure and the recovery was complicated by a pneumonic process which was treated accordingly. No leakage was found. Discussion A five-year retrospective review (2009–2013) at our institution identified 5586 trauma cases with only one case with esophageal rupture. This represents a 0.0002% of incidence of blunt esophageal rupture. This estimate is consistent with what has been previously reported in the medical literature. Our case represents a uniquely rare presentation of traumatic esophageal rupture due to the underline mechanism of injury and its anatomical location. A high index of suspicion and early intervention are critical in assuring a favorable outcome. Conclusion Diagnosis and surgical intervention with primary repair completed in the first twenty-four hours after presentation is fundamental to achieve a good outcome after esophageal rupture. PMID:26492358

  7. Symptomatic Thoracic Spinal Cord Herniation: Case Series and Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Wright, Neill M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Importance Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is an uncommon condition located predominantly in the thoracic spine and often associated with a remote history of a major traumatic injury. ISCH has an incompletely described presentation and unknown etiology. There is no consensus on treatment algorithm and surgical technique, and there is little data on clinical outcomes. Clinical Presentation In this case series and technical report, we describe the atypical myelopathy presentation, remote history of traumatic injury, radiographic progression, treatment, and outcomes of 5 patients treated at Washington University for symptomatic ISCH. A video showing surgical repair is presented. In contrast to classic compressive myelopathy symptomology, ISCH patients presented with an atypical myelopathy, characterized by asymmetric motor and sensory deficits and early-onset urinary incontinence. Clinical deterioration correlated with progressive spinal cord displacement and herniation observed on yearly spinal imaging in a patient imaged serially due to multiple sclerosis. Finally compared to compressive myelopathy in the thoracic spine, surgical treatment of ISH led to rapid improvement despite long duration of symptoms. Conclusion Symptomatic ISCH presents with atypical myelopathy and slow temporal progression and can be successfully managed with surgical repair. PMID:24871148

  8. Traumatic globe dislocation into the paranasal sinuses: Literature review and treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marcio Bruno Figueiredo; Nery, André Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic globe dislocation into the paranasal sinuses is rare. Only 24 cases have been reported in the English-language literature indexed in PUBMED. This form of injury frequently occurs as a result of high-energy blunt trauma mainly associated to traffic accidents. Traumatic globe dislocation into the paranasal sinuses can be explained by the mechanism of blowout fracture when strong blunt trauma forces are applied to the globe fracturing the thin orbital walls and displacing the eyeball. Medical and surgical management of severe globe displacement is still controversial. However, the majority of researchers agreed that the globe should be replaced into the orbital cavity as soon as possible. The present study aims to describe a case of traumatic globe dislocation into the maxillary sinus suggesting treatment guidelines based on English-language literature from 1971 to 2015. PMID:26948171

  9. [Post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle. A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed

    Zdichavsky, M; Hüfner, T; Pape, H C; Rosenthal, H; Tscherne, H

    2000-12-01

    The post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle is very infrequent and the etiology and pathology is poorly understood. It is important to consider this possibility for differential diagnosis when continued pain in the acromio-clavicular joint (AC joint) follows blunt shoulder trauma. The course of the disease may result in a 3 cm loss of length of the distal clavicle. Months and years may pass until osteolysis becomes manifest, but the earliest radiological findings are present 4 weeks after trauma. The disease is self-limiting and usually does not leave residues. We report a case of a 35-year-old man with a post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle after blunt shoulder trauma. The diagnosis was determined several months after pain persisted in his shoulder. Using this case we discuss the possible pathogenic mechanism, differential diagnosis and treatment options for the post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle. PMID:11148909

  10. Tetanus after blunt lawn mower trauma

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Camilla; Fostervold, Aasmund; Haarr, Elin; Skontorp, Marie; Berg, Åse

    2015-01-01

    A patient presented with tetanus ten days after blunt trauma with a lawn mower. Our case describes the diagnosis and treatment of this patient with an infectious disease commonly seen in the developing world but rarely seen in the developed world. PMID:26793459

  11. Transpiration Cooling Of Hypersonic Blunt Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Results on analytical approximation and numerical simulation compared. Report presents theoretical study of degree to which transpiration blocks heating of blunt, axisymmetric body by use of injected air. Transpiration cooling proposed to reduce operating temperatures on nose cones of proposed hypersonic aerospace vehicles. Analyses important in design of thermal protection for such vehicles.

  12. Thoracic injuries in professional rugby players: mechanisms of injury and imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daichi; Roemer, Frank W; Kohler, Ryan; Guermazi, Ali; Gebers, Chris; De Villiers, Richard

    2014-07-01

    Professional rugby players are prone to traumatic thoracic injuries due to the use of minimal protective gear to cover the torso. In the 2007 Rugby World Cup, thoracic injuries occurred at a rate of 8.3 cases/1000 player-hours. CT and MRI play an important role in the diagnosis of these injuries. Vital internal organs, such as the heart, lungs, trachea, liver and large blood vessels lie within close proximity to the bony structures and what seems to be a simple rib fracture or clavicular dislocation can have potentially life-threatening complications that are not detected by conventional radiography. Cross-sectional imaging helps to determine the choice of treatment. Ultrasound offers a quick and dynamic imaging examination and allows high-resolution assessment of superficial tissues that complements conventional imaging. In this review article, we (1) presented data on incidence of thoracic injuries in professional rugby players; (2) described the anatomy of the joints comprising the thoracic cage and major muscles attached to the rib cage; (3) discussed indications and relevance for MRI and presented an optimised MRI protocol for assessment of suspected thoracic injury; and (4) illustrated various types of thoracic injuries seen in professional rugby players, including sternal contusion, retrosternal haematoma, manubriosternal disruption, sternoclavicular dislocation, rib fractures and injuries of the pectoralis major muscle. PMID:23962879

  13. Imaging of acute thoracic injury: the advent of MDCT screening.

    PubMed

    Mirvis, Stuart E

    2005-10-01

    Chest radiography remains the primary screening study for the assessment of victims of chest trauma, but computed tomography (CT), particularly multidetector CT (MDCT), has progressively changed the imaging approach to these patients. MDCT acquires thinner sections with greater speed, allowing higher quality axial images and nonaxial reformations than conventional or single-detector helical CT. The speed of MDCT, both in acquiring data and in reconstructing images, makes the performance of total body surveys in the blunt polytrauma patient practicable. In general, CT has been well documented to offer major advantages over chest radiography in both screening for thoracic injuries and in characterizing such injuries. This capacity has been enhanced by the application of multichannel data acquisition. The greater sensitivity of MDCT has been well demonstrated in diagnosing vascular and diaphragmatic injuries. This article reviews current concepts of diagnostic imaging in acute chest trauma from blunt force and penetrating mechanisms emphasizing the spectrum of diagnostic imaging findings for various injuries, based primarily on radiographic and CT appearances. The advantages of MDCT for selected injuries are emphasized. PMID:16274001

  14. Massive epistaxis resulting from an intracavernous internal carotid artery traumatic pseudoaneurysm: complete resolution with overlapping uncovered stents.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Castro, Enrique; Mateo Sierra, Olga; Iza, Begoña; Manuel Garbizu, Jose; Fortea, Fernando; Villoria, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries of the intracranial carotid arteries can result in pseudoaneurysm formation. A pseudoaneurysm of the intracavernous carotid artery may rupture into the cavernous sinus, causing life-threatening epistaxis. We report a case of intracavernous traumatic psedoaneurysm presenting with delayed massive epistaxis. The endovascular treatment with overlapping self-expanding stents achieved complete exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm with preservation of the intracavernous carotid artery. PMID:19350203

  15. [Traumatic dissection of the internal carotid artery by a safety belt: a report of two cases].

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, M; Ballesteros-Sanz, M A; Pérez-Ceballos, A; González-Fernández, C; López-Espadas, F

    2009-10-01

    Traumatic internal carotid artery dissection secondary to blunt trauma is a rare event accounting for 0.08 to 0.4% of all traumatic lesions. The spectrum of traumatic lesions that can affect the internal carotid artery includes minor lesions like spasm, intimal tears, or mural contusions and serious lesions like pseudoaneurysms and complete occlusion. Delayed clinical presentation is typical and can include headache, hemiparesis, partial Horner's syndrome, and cranial nerve palsy. Embolization secondary to the dissection can have devastating effects because it may cause ischemic stroke. Traumatic internal carotid artery dissection after safety belt trauma is very rare; it is usually due to direct cervical trauma on the side of the shoulder fixation point, which causes external bruising along the pathway of the safety belt. We present two cases of traumatic internal carotid artery dissection with concomitant cerebral infarcts caused by safety belts; we discuss the clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of this lesion. PMID:19828398

  16. [Early discharge following major thoracic surgery: identification of related factors].

    PubMed

    de Lima, Nuno Fevereiro Ferreira; Carvalho, André Luís de Aquino

    2003-01-01

    There is a direct relation between hospital costs and hospital length of stay after the operation. In the other hand, reduced stay increases the productivity of the public hospitals with high service demanding. The objective of this study was to identify factors determining the decrease in hospital stay after major thoracic surgery. A two-phase retrospective study was conducted on analysis of medical records. In the first phase, data on length of hospital stay and related factors were collected from a consecutive series of 169 patients divided into group I (n=81)--patients operated on between June 1990 and 1995, and group II (n=88)--1996 through May 2000. In the second phase, data were collected from a consecutive series of 20 patients (group III) starting backwards from March 2002, for analysis and comparison with a internet survey sent to 21 thoracic surgeons. Intensive care unit was avoided for most patients in the immediate post operative period. The mean hospital stay decreased from 7.6 days (median 7) in group I to 5.1 days (median 4) in group II (p<0.001). The more frequent utilization of epidural analgesia and less traumatic thoracotomy in group II reached statistic significance (p<0.001). In group III, the mean hospital stay was 4.2 days (median 4), and there was a more effective use of epidural analgesia (75%) and muscle-sparing thoracotomy (90%). Eight thoracic surgeons answered the survey: the mean hospital stay varied from 5 to 9 days and all patients were sent to intensive care or similar units. Only two surgeons utilize muscle-sparing thoracotomy. This study confirms that pain control and less traumatic surgical approach are important for faster functional recovery of the patients. It suggests that the IC units may be used only for selected patients. PMID:14685631

  17. A Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia Repair: A Laparoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kenneth L.; Rosser, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Traumatic abdominal wall hernias from blunt trauma usually occur as a consequence of motor vehicle collisions where the force is tangential, sudden, and severe. Although rare, these hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Open repairs can be challenging and unsuccessful due to avulsion of muscle directly from the iliac crest, with or without bone loss. A laparoscopic approach to traumatic abdominal wall hernia can aid in the delineation of the hernia and allow for a safe and effective repair. Case Description: A 36-year-old female was admitted to our Level 1 trauma center with a traumatic abdominal wall hernia located in the right flank near the iliac crest after being involved in a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen revealed the presence of an abdominal wall defect that was unapparent on physical examination. The traumatic abdominal wall hernia in the right flank was successfully repaired laparoscopically. One-year follow-up has shown no sign of recurrence. Discussion: A traumatic abdominal wall hernia rarely presents following blunt trauma, but should be suspected following a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Frequently, repair is complicated by the need to have fixation of mesh to bony landmarks (eg, iliac crest). In spite of this challenge, the laparoscopic approach with tension-free mesh repair of a traumatic abdominal wall hernia can be accomplished successfully using an approach similar to that taken for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:23477181

  18. The Accuracy of Urinalysis in Predicting Intra-Abdominal Injury Following Blunt Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Safari, Saeed; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Shirvani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of blunt abdominal traumas, predicting the possible intra-abdominal injuries is still a challenge for the physicians involved with these patients. Therefore, this study was designed, to evaluate the accuracy of urinalysis in predicting intra-abdominal injuries. Methods: Patients aged 15 to 65 years with blunt abdominal trauma who were admitted to emergency departments were enrolled. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan with intravenous contrast and urinalysis were requested for all the included patients. Demographic data, trauma mechanism, the results of urinalysis, and the results of abdominopelvic CT scan were gathered. Finally, the correlation between the results of abdominopelvic CT scan, and urinalysis was determined. Urinalysis was considered positive in case of at least one positive value in gross appearance, blood in dipstick, or red blood cell count. Results: 325 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were admitted to the emergency departments (83% male with the mean age of 32.63±17.48 years). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of urinalysis, were 77.9% (95% CI: 69.6-84.4), 58.5% (95% CI: 51.2-65.5), 56% (95% CI: 48.5-63.3), 79.6% (95% CI: 71.8-85.7), 1.27% (95% CI: 1.30-1.57), and 0.25% (95% CI: 0.18-0.36), respectively. Conclusion: The diagnostic value of urinalysis in prediction of blunt traumatic intra-abdominal injuries is low and it seems that it should be considered as an adjuvant diagnostic tool, in conjunction with other sources such as clinical findings and imaging. PMID:26862543

  19. Blunt splenic injury and severe brain injury: a decision analysis and implications for care

    PubMed Central

    Alabbasi, Thamer; Nathens, Avery B.; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Background The initial nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injuries in hemodynamically stable patients is common. In soldiers who experience blunt splenic injuries with concomitant severe brain injury while on deployment, however, NOM may put the injured soldier at risk for secondary brain injury from prolonged hypotension. Methods We conducted a decision analysis using a Markov process to evaluate 2 strategies for managing hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injuries and severe brain injury — immediate splenectomy and NOM — in the setting of a field hospital with surgical capability but no angiography capabilities. We considered the base case of a 40-year-old man with a life expectancy of 78 years who experienced blunt trauma resulting in a severe traumatic brain injury and an isolated splenic injury with an estimated failure rate of NOM of 19.6%. The primary outcome measured was life expectancy. We assumed that failure of NOM would occur in the setting of a prolonged casualty evacuation, where surgical capability was not present. Results Immediate splenectomy was the slightly more effective strategy, resulting in a very modest increase in overall survival compared with NOM. Immediate splenectomy yielded a survival benefit of only 0.4 years over NOM. Conclusion In terms of overall survival, we would not recommend splenectomy unless the estimated failure rate of NOM exceeded 20%, which corresponds to an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grade III splenic injury. For military patients for whom angiography may not be available at the field hospital and who require prolonged evacuation, immediate splenectomy should be considered for grade III–V injuries in the presence of severe brain injury. PMID:26100770

  20. The unrecognized epidemic of blunt carotid arterial injuries: early diagnosis improves neurologic outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Ryu, R K; Offner, P J; Novak, Z; Coldwell, D M; Franciose, R J; Burch, J M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the benefit of screening for blunt carotid arterial injuries (BCI) in patients who are asymptomatic. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Blunt carotid arterial injuries have the potential for devastating complications. Published studies report 23% to 28% mortality rates, with 48% to 58% of survivors having permanent severe neurologic deficits. Most patients have neurologic deficits when the injury is diagnosed. The authors hypothesized that screening patients who are asymptomatic and instituting early therapy would improve neurologic outcome. METHODS: The Trauma Registry of the author's Level I Trauma Center identified patients with BCI from 1990 through 1997. Beginning in August 1996, the authors implemented a screening for BCI. Arteriography was used for diagnosis. Patients without specific contraindications were anticoagulated. Endovascular stents were deployed in the setting of pseudoaneurysms. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients with BCI were identified among 15,331 blunt-trauma victims (0.24%). During the screening period, 25 patients were diagnosed with BCI among 2902 admissions (0.86%); 13 (52%) were asymptomatic. Overall, eight patients died, and seven of the survivors had permanent severe neurologic deficits. Excluding those dying of massive brain injury and patients admitted with coma and brain injury, mortality associated with BCI was 15%, with severe neurologic morbidity in 16% of survivors. The patients who were asymptomatic at diagnosis had a better neurologic outcome than those who were symptomatic. Symptomatic patients who were anticoagulated showed a trend toward greater neurologic improvement at the time of discharge than those who were not anticoagulated. CONCLUSIONS: Screening allows the identification of asymptomatic BCI and thereby facilitates early systemic anticoagulation, which is associated with improved neurologic outcome. The role of endovascular stents in the treatment of blunt traumatic pseudoaneurysms remains to be defined

  1. Evaluation of blunt pancreatic injury with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in comparison with contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SONG, QING; TANG, JIE; LV, FA-QIN; ZHANG, YAN; JIAO, ZI-YU; LIU, QIANG; LUO, YU-KUN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate acute blunt pancreatic injury using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in comparison with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT). Superficial and deep lesions were established by blunt pancreatic injury in 40 Chinese Guangxi Bama miniature pigs. Conventional ultrasound (US), CEUS and CECT were performed to detect traumatic lesions in the pancreas. A total of 40 lesions were established, including 20 deep lesions and 20 superficial lesions. US identified 21 of the 40 lesions, including 7 of the 20 superficial and 14 of the 20 deep lesions. CEUS identified 34 of the 40 lesions, including 14 of the 20 superficial and 20 of the 20 deep lesions. CECT identified 33 of the 40 lesions, including 13 of the 20 superficial and 20 of the 20 deep lesions. The detection rate of acute blunt pancreatic injury using CEUS was significantly higher compared with that using US (85 vs. 52.5%, P<0.05), however there was no significant difference in the detection rate of pancreatic lesions between CEUS and CECT (85 vs. 82.5%, P>0.05). CEUS improves the diagnostic levels of conventional US and is comparable with CECT scans in the diagnosis of blunt pancreatic injury. PMID:23737899

  2. Mini Transsternal Approach to the Anterior High Thoracic Spine (T1–T4 Vertebrae)

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Bhaskar; Tsoti, Sandra Maria; Anichini, Giulio; Vergani, Francesco; Malik, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The anterior high thoracic spine is one of the most complex segments to be accessed surgically due to anatomical constraints and transitional characteristics. We describe in detail the mini transsternal approach to metastatic, infective, traumatic, and degenerative pathologies of T1 to T4 vertebral bodies. We analyse our surgical series, indications, and outcomes. Methods. Over a 5-year period 18 consecutive patients with thoracic myelopathy due to metastatic, infective, traumatic, and degenerative pathologies with T1 to T4 vertebral bodies involvement received a mini transsternal approach with intraoperative monitoring. Frankel scoring system was used to grade the neurological status. Results. Mean follow-up was 40 months. 78% patients improved in Frankel grade after surgery and 22% patients remained unchanged. Average operation time was 210 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications. One patient developed postoperative pneumonia successfully treated with antibiotics. Conclusion. The mini transsternal is a safe approach for infective, metastatic, traumatic, and degenerative lesions affecting the anterior high thoracic spine and the only one allowing an early and direct visualisation of the anterior theca. This approach overcomes the anatomical constraints of this region and provides adequate room for optimal reconstruction and preservation of spinal alignment in the cervicothoracic transition zone with good functional patient outcomes. PMID:27218104

  3. Mini Transsternal Approach to the Anterior High Thoracic Spine (T1-T4 Vertebrae).

    PubMed

    Brogna, Christian; Thakur, Bhaskar; Fiengo, Leslie; Tsoti, Sandra Maria; Landi, Alessandro; Anichini, Giulio; Vergani, Francesco; Malik, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The anterior high thoracic spine is one of the most complex segments to be accessed surgically due to anatomical constraints and transitional characteristics. We describe in detail the mini transsternal approach to metastatic, infective, traumatic, and degenerative pathologies of T1 to T4 vertebral bodies. We analyse our surgical series, indications, and outcomes. Methods. Over a 5-year period 18 consecutive patients with thoracic myelopathy due to metastatic, infective, traumatic, and degenerative pathologies with T1 to T4 vertebral bodies involvement received a mini transsternal approach with intraoperative monitoring. Frankel scoring system was used to grade the neurological status. Results. Mean follow-up was 40 months. 78% patients improved in Frankel grade after surgery and 22% patients remained unchanged. Average operation time was 210 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications. One patient developed postoperative pneumonia successfully treated with antibiotics. Conclusion. The mini transsternal is a safe approach for infective, metastatic, traumatic, and degenerative lesions affecting the anterior high thoracic spine and the only one allowing an early and direct visualisation of the anterior theca. This approach overcomes the anatomical constraints of this region and provides adequate room for optimal reconstruction and preservation of spinal alignment in the cervicothoracic transition zone with good functional patient outcomes. PMID:27218104

  4. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. PMID:27475512

  5. Prospective Screening for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Preston R.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Croce, Martin A.; Cagiannos, Catherine; Williams, J. Scott; Vang, Meng; Qaisi, Waleed G.; Felker, Richard E.; Timmons, Shelly D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To prospectively examine outcomes associated with an aggressive screening protocol for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI), and to compare the accuracy of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) versus conventional angiography with respect to BCVI diagnosis. Summary Background Data In the past 5 years, BCVI (carotid and vertebral arteries) has been recognized with increasing frequency. Initial studies described blunt carotid injuries and their associated morbidity, while more recent reports have established the devastating potential of blunt vertebral injuries. It has been suggested that early diagnosis and anticoagulation will improve outcomes and that less-invasive diagnostic techniques than conventional angiography are desirable for screening. However, there are neither established screening criteria nor studies comparing optimal diagnostic modalities. Methods The screened population included all patients with cervical spine fractures, LeFort II or III facial fractures, Horner’s syndrome, skull base fractures involving the foramen lacerum, neck soft tissue injury, or neurological abnormalities unexplained by intracranial injuries. Patients underwent screening with four-vessel cerebral angiography. During the first half of the study, patients also underwent helical CTA. Selected patients during this same period underwent MRA. At the time of diagnosis, anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy was instituted unless clinically contraindicated. Results of this screening protocol were compared to a previously published cohort with cerebrovascular injuries (1995–1999) from the authors’ institution. Results Two hundred sixteen patients were screened over a 2-year period (3.5% of all blunt trauma admissions). Angiography identified 24 patients with carotid artery injuries (CAI) and 43 patients with vertebral artery injuries (VAI) for an overall screening yield of 29%. While the incidence of CAI remained similar between

  6. Suicide by blunt head trauma - Two cases with striking similarities.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyejin; Lee, Bongwoo; Yoon, Connie

    2015-10-01

    There have been several forensic pathological studies on the distinction between falls from height and homicidal blows in blunt head trauma, but few studies have focused on suicidal blows. Self-inflicted blunt head trauma is usually a part of a complex suicide with more than one suicidal method applied. Actually, no reports on suicide indicate blunt head trauma to be the singular cause of death in recent publications. Cases with self-inflicted blunt trauma are often challenging for those involved in the investigation because they are confronted with findings that are also found in homicides. A refined guideline to differentiate suicidal blows from homicidal blows in blunt head trauma allows for a more accurate representation of the events surrounding death. This paper presents two cases of suicide by self-inflicted blunt head trauma in which blunt head trauma from repeatedly hitting the decedent's head with a hammer was considered to be the only cause of death. PMID:26304757

  7. Efficacy of Surgical Decompression in the Setting of Complete Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2005-01-01

    Background/Objective: An assessment of neurological improvement after surgical intervention in the setting of traumatic thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A retrospective evaluation of a nonconsecutive cohort of patients with a thoracic SCI from T2 to T11. The analysis included a total of 12 eligible patients. The neurologic and functional outcomes were recorded from the acute hospital admission to the most recent follow-up. Data included patient age, level of injury, neurologic examination according to the Frankel grading system, the performance of surgery, and the mechanism of the time-related SCI decompression. Results: All patients had a complete thoracic SCI. The median interval from injury to surgery was 11 days (range, 1–36 days). Decompression, bone fusion, and instrumentation were the most common surgical procedures performed. The median length of follow-up was 18 months after surgery (range, 9–132 months). Motor functional improvement was seen in 1 patient (Frankel A to C). Conclusion: Surgical decompression and fusion imparts no apparent benefit in terms of neurologic improvement (spinal cord) in the setting of a complete traumatic thoracic SCI. To better define the role of surgical decompression and stabilization in the setting of a complete SCI, randomized, controlled, prospective studies are necessary. PMID:16869088

  8. Blunt impacts to the back: Biomechanical response for model development.

    PubMed

    Forman, Jason; Perry, Brandon; Henderson, Kyvory; Gjolaj, Joseph P; Heltzel, Sara; Lessley, David; Riley, Patrick; Salzar, Robert; Walilko, Tim

    2015-09-18

    The development of advanced injury prediction models requires biomechanical and injury tolerance information for all regions of the body. While numerous studies have investigated injury mechanics of the thorax under frontal impact, there remains a dearth of information on the injury mechanics of the torso under blunt impact to the back. A series of hub-impact tests were performed to the back surface of the mid-thorax of four mid-size male cadavers. Repeated tests were performed to characterize the biomechanical and injury response of the thorax under various impact speeds (1.5m/s, 3m/s and 5.5m/s). Deformation of the chest was recorded with a 59-gage chestband. Subject kinematics were also recorded with a high-speed optoelectronic 3D motion capture system. In the highest-severity tests, peak impact forces ranged from 6.9 to 10.5 kN. The peak change in extension angle measured between the 1st thoracic vertebra and the lumbar spine ranged from 39 to 62°. The most commonly observed injuries were strains of the costovertebral/costotransverse joint complexes, rib fractures, and strains of the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The majority of the rib fractures occurred in the rib neck between the costovertebral and costotransverse joints. The prevalence of rib-neck fractures suggests a novel, indirect loading mechanism resulting from bending moments generated in the rib necks caused by motion of the spine. In addition to the injury information, the biomechanical responses quantified here will facilitate the future development and validation of human body models for predicting injury risk during impact to the back. PMID:26184586

  9. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-04-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma.

  10. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  11. [Thoracic endometriosis and catamenial pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Voskresenskiĭ, O V; Smoliar, A N; Damirov, M M; Galankina, I E; Zhelev, I G

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed own experience of diagnosis and treatment of catamenial (menstrual) pneumothorax and thoracic endometriosis and literature review. It is shown that catamenial pneumothorax has specific clinical and instrumental signs allowing to establish the diagnosis before surgery. It was proposed surgical treatment including the removal of trans diaphragmatic way of pneumothorax development, removal of thoracic endometriosis and the establishment of reliable pleurodesis. It was demonstrated that this volume of surgery can be successfully implemented by using of thoracoscopic access. Relapse prevention includes hormonal therapy for the 6 months after surgery under the supervision of an obstetrician-gynecologist. PMID:25484144

  12. The Blunt Plate In Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baradell, Donald L.; Bertram, Mitchel H.

    1960-01-01

    The sonic-wedge characteristics method has been used to obtain the shock shapes and surface pressure distributions on several blunt two-dimensional shapes in a hypersonic stream for several values of the ratio of specific heats. These shapes include the blunt slab at angle of attack and power profiles of the form yb = a)P, where 0 les than m less than 1, Yb and x are coordinates of the body surface, and a is a constant. These numerical results have been compared with the results of blast-wave theory, and methods of predicting the pressure distributions and shock shapes are proposed in each case. The effects of a free-stream conical-flow gradient on the pressure distribution on a blunt slab in hypersonic flow were investigated by the sonic-wedge characteristics method and were found to be sizable in many cases. Procedures which are satisfactory for reducing pressure data obtained in conical flows with small gradients are presented.

  13. Effects of nose bluntness and shock-shock interactions on blunt bodies in viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the effects of blunt leading edges on the viscous flow field around a hypersonic vehicle such as the proposed National Aero-Space Plane. Attention is focused on two specific regions of the flow field. In the first region, effects of nose bluntness on the forebody flow field are investigated. The second region of the flow considered is around the leading edges of the scramjet inlet. In this region, the interaction of the forebody shock with the shock produced by the blunt leading edges of the inlet compression surfaces is analyzed. Analysis of these flow regions is required to accurately predict the overall flow field as well as to get necessary information on localized zones of high pressure and intense heating. The results for the forebody flow field are discussed first, followed by the results for the shock interaction in the inlet leading edge region.

  14. Delayed Presentation of Traumatic Right-Sided Diaphragmatic Hernia after Abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jadlowiec, Caroline C.; Sakorafas, Lois U.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are rare and challenging to diagnose. Following trauma, diagnosis may occur immediately or in a delayed fashion. It is believed that left traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are more common as a result of the protective right-sided anatomic lie of the liver. If unrecognized, traumatic diaphragmatic injuries are subject to enlarge over time as a result of the normal pressure changes observed between the thoracic and abdominal cavities. Additionally, abrupt changes to the pressure gradients, such as those which occur with positive pressure ventilation or surgical manipulation of the abdominal wall, can act as a nidus for making an asymptomatic hernia symptomatic. We report our experience with a delayed traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia presenting with large bowel incarceration two months after abdominoplasty. In our review of the literature, we were unable to find any reports of delayed presentation of a traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia occurring acutely following abdominoplasty. PMID:24900935

  15. Gender-related traumatic deaths in Transkei: incidence and causes.

    PubMed

    Meel, B L

    2003-07-01

    This study is unique in that it strives to unfold, perhaps for the first time, the problem of female mortality due to trauma in the Transkei region of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. This study was carried out in the Umtata and Ngqeleni magisterial districts which have a combined population of about 400,000. Most of the people have very few resources and have historically relied on money repatriated by migrant workers. The objective was to establish the incidence and the causes of deaths due to gender-related trauma and to formulate recommendations which could probably help prevent or reduce these deaths. The study reviewed cases of female traumatic death during the period January 1993 to December 1999 that were brought to the mortuary in Umtata General Hospital (UGH). There were 1,054 (23%) traumatic deaths recorded in females between 1993 and 1999. Of these 486 (28%) were related to motor vehicle collisions, 219 (18%) due to gunshot injuries, 152 (19%) due to stab wounds and 139 (21%) as a result of blunt trauma. The male to female ratio was 3.3:1 in traumatic deaths. In homicides the male:female ratio was 4.4:1, gunshot 4.5:1, stab 4.2:1 and blunt injuries 3.7:1. In motor vehicle collisions (MVC's) the ratio was 2.5:1. There is an increasing incidence of traumatic deaths in women. Gun shot injuries are the commonest among traumatic deaths in females. This article recommends stricter measures to protect women in the form of legislation. Social uplifting and economic support should be carried out as part of the process of social change. In this case educating the entire community is necessary to safeguard women and their future survival. PMID:12899426

  16. C5aR-antagonist significantly reduces the deleterious effect of a blunt chest trauma on fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Recknagel, Stefan; Bindl, Ronny; Kurz, Julian; Wehner, Tim; Schoengraf, Philipp; Ehrnthaller, Christian; Qu, Hongchang; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Lambris, John D; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2012-04-01

    Confirming clinical evidence, we recently demonstrated that a blunt chest trauma considerably impaired fracture healing in rats, possibly via the interaction of posttraumatic systemic inflammation with local healing processes, the underlying mechanisms being unknown. An important trigger of systemic inflammation is the complement system, with the potent anaphylatoxin C5a. Therefore, we investigated whether the impairment of fracture healing by a severe trauma resulted from systemically activated complement. Rats received a blunt chest trauma and a femur osteotomy stabilized with an external fixator. To inhibit the C5a-dependent posttraumatic systemic inflammation, half of the rats received a C5aR-antagonist intravenously immediately and 12 h after the thoracic trauma. Compared to the controls (control peptide), the treatment with the C5aR-antagonist led to a significantly increased flexural rigidity (three-point-bending test), an improved bony bridging of the fracture gap, and a slightly larger and qualitatively improved callus (µCT, histomorphometry) after 35 days. In conclusion, immunomodulation by a C5aR-antagonist could abolish the deleterious effects of a thoracic trauma on fracture healing, possibly by influencing the function of inflammatory and bone cells locally at the fracture site. C5a could possibly represent a target to prevent delayed bone healing in patients with severe trauma. PMID:21922535

  17. [A case of thoracic actinomycosis].

    PubMed

    Denisova, O A; Cherniavskaia, G M; Beloborodova, É I; Topol'nitskiĭ, E B; Iakimenko, Iu V; Chernogoriuk, G É; Beloborodova, E V; Strezh, Iu A; Vil'danova, L R

    2014-01-01

    A case of thoracic actinomycosis manifest as round shadow in the lung is described. Diagnosis was based on the presence of actinomycetes in a transthoracic lung biopsy sample. Treatment for 3 months resulted in recovery. No relapse was documented during 1 year follow-up period. PMID:25265662

  18. Blunt Liver Injury with Intact Ribs under Impacts on the Abdomen: A Biomechanical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengdong; Wan, Lei; Qin, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ningguo; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhong, Liangwei; Huang, Ping; Chen, Yijiu

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal trauma accounts for nearly 20% of all severe traffic injuries and can often result from intentional physical violence, from which blunt liver injury is regarded as the most common result and is associated with a high mortality rate. Liver injury may be caused by a direct impact with a certain velocity and energy on the abdomen, which may result in a lacerated liver by penetration of fractured ribs. However, liver ruptures without rib cage fractures were found in autopsies in a series of cases. All the victims sustained punches on the abdomen by fist. Many studies have been dedicated to determining the mechanism underlying hepatic injury following abdominal trauma, but most have been empirical. The actual process and biomechanism of liver injury induced by blunt impact on the abdomen, especially with intact ribs remained, are still inexhaustive. In order to investigate this, finite element methods and numerical simulation technology were used. A finite element human torso model was developed from high resolution CT data. The model consists of geometrically-detailed liver and rib cage models and simplified models of soft tissues, thoracic and abdominal organs. Then, the torso model was used in simulations in which the right hypochondrium was punched by a fist from the frontal, lateral, and rear directions, and in each direction with several impact velocities. Overall, the results showed that liver rupture was primarily caused by a direct strike of the ribs induced by blunt impact to the abdomen. Among three impact directions, a lateral impact was most likely to cause liver injury with a minimum punch speed of 5 m/s (the momentum was about 2.447 kg.m/s). Liver injuries could occur in isolation and were not accompanied by rib fractures due to different material characteristics and injury tolerance. PMID:23308111

  19. Grade IV blunt splenic injury – the role of proximal angioembolization. A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gheju, I; Venter, MD; Beuran, M; Gulie, L; Racoveanu, I; Carstea, P; Iftimie Nastase, I; Venter, DP

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The authors present a case of grade IV traumatic spleen rupture (AAST-OIS) and an Injury Severity Score of 21 and a Revised Trauma Score RTS=7.841, which was managed without surgery, but with proximal splenic angioembolization (SAE), with a positive outcome. Indications, types and side-effects of SAE are also discussed with regard to blunt spleen trauma and the benefits of SAE as non-operative treatment approach. It is the first case of a grade IV splenic laceration non-operatively managed to be published in Romania. PMID:24701254

  20. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  1. Paintball-related traumatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Luck, Joshua; Bell, Daniel; Bashir, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Paintball is a popular recreational sport played at both amateur and professional level. Ocular injuries are well recognised, although there is a growing body of literature documenting superficial vascular as well as deep solid organ injuries. An 18-year-old man presented with signs and symptoms consistent with acute appendicitis. Intraoperatively, a grade III liver injury was identified and packed before a relook at 48 h. No further active bleeding was identified; however, follow-up ultrasound at 3 weeks demonstrated non-resolution of a large subcapsular haematoma. The patient was readmitted for a short period of observation and discharged with repeat ultrasound scheduled for 3 months. This represents the first report of paintball-related blunt traumatic injury to the liver. Solid organ injuries of this nature have only been reported three times previously-all in the urological setting. This case also highlights issues surrounding the use of routine follow-up imaging in blunt liver trauma and provides a concise discussion of the relevant literature. PMID:27122206

  2. Endovascular Repair of Blunt Popliteal Arterial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin; Qi, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Results Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Conclusion Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair. PMID:27587969

  3. Differentiation of traumatic and heat-induced dental tissue fractures via SEM analysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Miranda N; Fairgrieve, Scott I

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies have examined the effects of heating on teeth; however, none have identified characteristics that allow analysts to differentiate traumatic from heat-induced fractures. This study examined our ability to discern notable differences in preincineration traumatic fractures and heat-induced fractures in postincineration dentition. Twelve anterior dental specimens were subjected to blunt force trauma while a second set were not. All 24 samples were then incinerated in a muffle furnace at a peak temperature (900°C) consistent with house fires. The specimens were subsequently examined with a scanning electron microscope to identify and compare heat-induced and traumatic fractures. The results obtained during examination yielded no differences between the features displayed by specimens that had been inflicted with preincineration trauma and those that did not. Unlike bone, distinguishing features for the differentiation of traumatic and heat-induced fractures could not be compiled. PMID:21521217

  4. Segmental Renal Infarction due to Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Hamilton, Lauren; Stratu, Natalia; Rix, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Segmental renal infarction is a rare situation which has been reported so far in the form of case reports. It's caused usually by cardiac conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, and systemic diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematous). We are presenting a case of a 31 year old healthy male, who sustained a left segmental renal infarction, following a motorbike accident. We report his presentation, management and outcome. We also review the literature in search of the optimal diagnostic and treatment pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of segmental renal infarction due to blunt trauma. PMID:27175338

  5. Traumatic injuries associated with Segways and personal transporters.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Kyle B; Block, Ernest F J; Black, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Segways and other personal transporters are emerging as alternative modes of transportation that blur the distinction between pedestrian and vehicular traffic. We reviewed the records of four patients who were traumatically injured while piloting personal transporters. All required hospital admission for major blunt force trauma; three were admitted to the intensive care unit. Two intensive care unit admissions were for neurologic monitoring of severe intracranial hemorrhage. The other critically ill patient had an extensive chest wall injury and respiratory failure resulting in a tracheostomy. The fourth patient suffered an open lower extremity fracture requiring extensive reconstructive orthopedic surgery. Surgeons should be aware of the potential serious nature of associated injuries. PMID:19725298

  6. Clinical review: Initial management of blunt pelvic trauma patients with haemodynamic instability

    PubMed Central

    Geeraerts, Thomas; Chhor, Vibol; Cheisson, Gaëlle; Martin, Laurent; Bessoud, Bertrand; Ozanne, Augustin; Duranteau, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic trauma can lead to severe, uncontrollable haemorrhage and death related to prolonged shock and multiple organ failure. Massive retroperitoneal haematoma should be assumed to be present in cases of post-traumatic haemodynamic instability associated with pelvic fracture in the absence of extrapelvic haemorrhagic lesions. This review describes the pathophysiology of retroperitoneal haematoma in trauma patient with blunt pelvic fracture, considering the roles of venous and arterial bleeding. Efficacy and safety of haemostatic procedures are also discussed, and particular attention is given to the efficacy of pelvic angiographic embolization and external pelvic fixation. A decision making algorithm is proposed for the treatment of trauma patients with pelvic fracture that takes haemodynamic status and associated lesions into account. PMID:17300738

  7. Reoperation for thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sessions, R T

    1989-01-01

    The clinical history and operative findings in a group of 60 patients who underwent reoperation for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) are presented. The patients were severely disabled by arm, shoulder, and neck pain and presented with physical findings pointing to scar fixation of the brachial plexus in the neck (upper tract recurrence) or at the thoracic outlet (lower tract recurrence). The causes of recurrence of TOS as discovered at operation are outlined. Basic principles governing the surgical management of recurrent TOS are elimination of the known causes of recurrence, thorough neurolysis of the brachial plexus, and coverage of the nerves with healthy fat. The role of an expanded PTFE surgical membrane (Gortex) as an adjunct to prevent recurrent scarring is discussed. The surgeon who operates on patients with recurrent TOS must be capable of managing the potential intraoperative complications of severe nerve injury and life threatening bleeding. PMID:2745532

  8. Clinical Predictors of Recovery after Blunt Spinal Cord Trauma: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro F.; Attabib, Najmedden; Ball, Jonathon; Bajammal, Sohail; Casha, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Several clinical, imaging, and therapeutic factors affecting recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been described. A systematic review of the topic is still lacking. Our primary aim was to systematically review clinical factors that may predict neurological and functional recovery following blunt traumatic SCI in adults. Such work would help guide clinical care and direct future research. Both Medline and Embase (to April 2008) were searched using index terms for various forms of SCI, paraplegia, or quadri/tetraplegia, and functional and neurological recovery. The search was limited to published articles that were in English and included human subjects. Article selection included class I and II evidence, blunt traumatic SCI, injury level above L1-2, baseline assessment within 72 h of injury, use of American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system for clinical assessment, and functional and neurological outcome. A total of 1526 and 1912 citations were located from Medline and Embase, respectively. Two surgeons reviewed the titles, abstracts, and full text articles for each database. Ten articles were identified, only one of which was level 1 evidence. Age and gender were identified as two patient-related predictors. While motor and functional recovery decreased with advancing age for complete SCI, there was no correlation considering incomplete ones. Therefore, treatment should not be restructured based on age in incomplete SCI. Among injury-related predictors, severity of SCI was the most significant. Complete injuries correlated with increased mortality and worse neurological and functional outcomes. Other predictors included SCI level, energy transmitted by the injury, and baseline electrophysiological testing. PMID:19831845

  9. Pseudopancreatitis on computed tomography in a patient with isolated blunt head trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Computed tomography is commonly used to exclude occult injuries in patients with trauma, but imaging can reveal findings that are of uncertain etiology or clinical significance. We present a case of unsuspected pancreatic abnormality in a female patient with trauma who sustained an isolated blunt head injury. Case presentation A 25-year-old female Caucasian patient sustained massive blunt and penetrating head trauma, secondary to a large object penetrating through the vehicle windshield. Based on the mechanism of injury and clinical evaluation, it was felt to be an isolated head injury. However, computed tomography of her abdomen revealed an occult, intra-abdominal finding of significant pancreatic enlargement and peripancreatic fluid. There was no computed tomography evidence of parenchymal pancreatic laceration. The appearance of her pancreas on computed tomography was identical to that of acute pancreatitis or low-grade pancreatic injury, but her clinical history and laboratory values were not consistent with this, hence the term ‘pseudopancreatitis’. Later surgery for organ donation confirmed diffuse pancreatic and peripancreatic edema, but no hematoma, contusion or other evidence for direct traumatic injury. This was an isolated intra-abdominal abnormality. Conclusion The routine use of computed tomography in patients who have sustained trauma has led to increasing detection of unexpected findings. Clinical information such as mechanism of injury and blood work, along with careful evaluation of ancillary imaging findings (or lack of), is important for the provision of an appropriate differential diagnosis. We discuss the possible mechanism and differential diagnosis of an isolated pancreatic abnormality in the setting of non-abdominal trauma, which includes shock pancreas, overhydration, traumatic pancreatic injury and pancreatitis secondary to other etiologies. PMID:24529327

  10. Conservative management of a case of traumatic pancreatitis in childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dixit, P; Sharma, V; Singh, K R; Thapa, B R; Rathore, M

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is relatively uncommon in pediatric age group. Traumatic injury is an important cause of AP in children. Ductal disruption resulting from pancreatic trauma usually needs surgical intervention. A three-and-a-half year old child presented with complaints of abdominal pain and distension following blunt trauma abdomen. Computed tomography of abdomen revealed presence of grade III pancreatic injury with fluid collection in lesser sac. The patient was managed with antibiotics and pigtail drainage and he improved. Therapy for traumatic pancreatitis in paediatric patients must be individualised. Even high grade injuries can be managed non-operatively. PMID:24992606

  11. Arthralgia and Osteolytic Lesions Associated with Traumatic Pancreatitis in a 10-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Obatake, Masayuki; Yamane, Yusuke; Tokunaga, Takayuki; Taura, Yasuaki; Inamura, Yukio; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    A case of traumatic pancreatitis with subsequent joint pain and osteolytic lesions is presented. A 10-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain caused by blunt epigastric injury. She was diagnosed with traumatic pancreatitis, and multiple pancreatic pseudocysts subsequently developed. Two weeks after admission, she complained of joint pain, and MR revealed osteolytic lesions of both knee joints. On the 58th day, endoscopic transgastric pseudocyst drainage was performed. Joint pain and osteolytic lesions resolved rapidly, in parallel with the decrease in serum amylase level and pseudocyst size. PMID:20041026

  12. [Right atrium rupture due to blunt trauma].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Thuboi, H; Okada, H

    2008-03-01

    We report 2 cases of surgical treatment of blunt cardiac trauma. The postoperative course was uneventful in either case. Pericardial drainage in patients with cardiac rupture should be performed with preparation for thoracotomy. Case 1: A 34-year-old male, hit in the chest by a collapsing 700-kg steel rod, was transported to our hospital via ambulance. The patient was diagnosed as having a cardiac rupture by echocardiography and underwent emergency thoracotomy. The right atrium near the inferior vena cava (IVC) was damaged, though bleeding from the wound had already ceased. No suture hemostusis was needed. Case 2: A 63-year-old female was hit by a car and transported to our hospital due to blunt trauma to the chest. Low blood pressure and chest computed tomography demonstrated cardiac tamponade, and subxiphoid pericardial drainage was performed. Blood pressure was recovered, but persistent hemorrhage necessitated emergency thoracotomy, which revealed a laceration at the right atrium near IVC. The injury was sutured to achieve complete hemostasis. PMID:18323181

  13. Multidetector CT of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2012-12-01

    The morbidity, mortality, and economic costs resulting from trauma in general, and blunt abdominal trauma in particular, are substantial. The "panscan" (computed tomographic [CT] examination of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) has become an essential element in the early evaluation and decision-making algorithm for hemodynamically stable patients who sustained abdominal trauma. CT has virtually replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for the detection of important injuries. Over the past decade, substantial hardware and software developments in CT technology, especially the introduction and refinement of multidetector scanners, have expanded the versatility of CT for examination of the polytrauma patient in multiple facets: higher spatial resolution, faster image acquisition and reconstruction, and improved patient safety (optimization of radiation delivery methods). In this article, the authors review the elements of multidetector CT technique that are currently relevant for evaluating blunt abdominal trauma and describe the most important CT signs of trauma in the various organs. Because conservative nonsurgical therapy is preferred for all but the most severe injuries affecting the solid viscera, the authors emphasize the CT findings that are indications for direct therapeutic intervention. PMID:23175542

  14. H. Julian Allen with Blunt Body Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  15. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma: what's new?

    PubMed

    Potoka, D A; Gaines, B A; Leppäniemi, A; Peitzman, A B

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic injuries are relatively uncommon but present a major challenge to the surgeon in terms of both diagnosis and management. Pancreatic injuries are associated with significant mortality, primarily due to associated injuries, and pancreas-specific morbidity, especially in cases of delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is a key for optimal management, but remains a challenge even with more advanced imaging modalities. For both penetrating and blunt pancreatic injuries, the presence of main pancreatic ductal injury is the major determinant of morbidity and the major factor guiding management decisions. For main pancreatic ductal injury, surgery remains the preferred approach with distal pancreatectomy for most injuries and more conservative surgical management for proximal ductal injuries involving the head of the pancreas. More recently, nonoperative management has been utilized, especially in the pediatric population, with the potential for increased rates of pseudocyst and pancreatic fistulae and the potential for the need for further intervention and increased hospital stay. This review presents recent data focusing on the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of blunt pancreatic injury. PMID:26038029

  16. Radiolucent hair accessories causing depressed skull fracture following blunt cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Syed, Omar N; Hankinson, Todd C; Mack, William J; Feldstein, Neil A; Anderson, Richard C E

    2008-12-01

    Pediatric neurosurgeons frequently care for children with traumatic scalp and skull injury. Foreign objects are often observed on imaging and may influence the clinician's decision-making process. The authors report on 2 cases of poorly visualized hair beads that had become embedded into the skull during blunt trauma. In both cases, skull radiography and CT scanning demonstrated depressed, comminuted fractures with poorly demonstrated spherical radiolucencies in the overlying scalp. The nature of these objects was initially unclear, and they could have represented air that entered the scalp during trauma. In one case, scalp inspection demonstrated no evidence of the bead. In the other case, a second bead was observed at the site of scalp laceration. In both cases, the beads were surgically removed, the fractures were elevated, and the patients recovered uneventfully. Radiolucent fashion accessories, such as hair beads, may be difficult to appreciate on clinical examination and may masquerade as clinically insignificant air following cranial trauma. If they are not removed, these foreign bodies may pose the risk of an infection. Pediatric neurosurgeons should consider hair accessories in the differential diagnosis of foreign bodies that may produce skull fracture following blunt trauma. PMID:19035690

  17. An unusual complication of blunt ocular trauma: A horseshoe-shaped macular tear with spontaneous closure

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Umut; Durukan, Hakan A; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Erdurman, Cuneyt; Hurmeric, Volkan

    2014-01-01

    A case of horseshoe-shaped macular tear after blunt trauma with the course of the tear and the relevant findings obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is described. A 21-year-old man who had suffered blunt trauma 5 days previously visited our clinic complaining of vision loss in his left eye. Ophthalmic examination and SD-OCT images revealed a horseshoe-shaped macular tear. A month later at the second visit, the macular tear was found to have spontaneously closed. There have been many cases reported previously of the spontaneous closure of traumatic macular holes. A horseshoe-shaped macular tear is an atypical clinical presentation. However, the mechanism of spontaneous closure is hypothetically as same as that for a macular hole. High-resolution images and three-dimensional maps taken with SD-OCT can provide more details on macular diseases and are more useful than time-domain OCT images. PMID:24817754

  18. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. PMID:26843431

  19. When backyard fun turns to trauma: risk assessment of blunt ballistic impact trauma due to potato cannons.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Jobski, Oliver; Bockholdt, Britta; Grossjohann, Rico; Stengel, Dirk; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Although potato cannons are an area of great interest among internet users, they are almost completely unknown in the medical community. These simple ballistic devices are made from plastic plumbing pipes and are powered with propellant gas from aerosol cans. By combustion of the gas-oxygen mixture, a high pressure is produced which propels the potato chunks through the barrel. It is the aim of this study to investigate the hazardous potential of these shooting devices. Test shots were performed using three illegally manufactured potato cannons that were confiscated by police authorities. Velocity, impulse, kinetic energy, and energy density were calculated. The risk of head and chest injuries was investigated by using Sturdivan's Blunt Criterion (BC), an energy based five parametric trauma model assessing the vulnerability to blunt weapons, projectile impacts, and behind-body-armor exposures. The probability of lethality due to blunt impact trauma to the chest was assessed using Sturdivan's lethality model. For potential head impacts, all test shots far exceeded the critical BC (head) value which corresponds to a 50% risk of skull fracture. The risk of injury with regard to chest impacts was similar. All but two test shots far exceeded the critical BC (chest) value corresponding to a 50% risk of sustaining a thoracic skeletal injury of Abbreviated Injury Scale 2 or 3. The probability of a lethal injury due to blunt chest impact was as high as 20%. To conclude, this work demonstrates that potato cannons should be considered dangerous weapons rather than as toys used by adventurous adolescents. PMID:21279374

  20. Bone beveling caused by blunt trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Quatrehomme, Gérald; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Buchet, Luc; Alunni, Véronique

    2016-05-01

    The authors report a fatal case of blunt trauma to the skull caused by a rib of a beach umbrella. The skull displayed a round hole in the right temporal bone with typical internal beveling. Blunt trauma mimicking a gunshot wound (round perforation of the skull with internal beveling) is very rarely reported in the forensic literature. PMID:26585737

  1. Non-pulsatile traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the internal maxillary artery following trauma to mandible.

    PubMed

    Soh, Hui Yuh; Muda, Ahmad Sobri; Jabar, Nazimi Abd; Nordin, Rifqah; Nabil, S; Ramli, Roszalina

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic pseudoaneurysm involving the maxillary artery is rare. Owing to its anatomic location, internal maxillary artery is usually protected by its surrounding structures. Formation of pseudoaneurysm usually takes place after several weeks to months of the initial injury. In this case, we reported a pseudoaneurysm arising from left internal maxillary artery following blunt injuries within 3 hours after a road accident and the treatment with endovascular embolization with titanium coils prior to open reduction and internal fixation of the fractured mandibles. PMID:25903486

  2. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm and Arteriovenous Fistula Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; Naughton, P. A.; Leahy, A. L.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-07-15

    We present a case of blunt trauma to the buttock resulting in an inferior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula. The characteristic diagnostic features on CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), along with the emergency percutaneous management of this traumatic vascular injury, are described. A review of the literature demonstrates inferior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition, while successful treatment with glue embolization is previously unreported.

  3. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  4. Thoracic spine sports-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Menzer, Heather; Gill, G Keith; Paterson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although sports-related injuries to the thoracic spine are relatively uncommon, they are among the most feared due to the potential for catastrophic neurologic injury. The increased biomechanical support of the thoracic spine makes injuries in this region particularly rare compared with the cervical and lumbar spine. As a result, thoracic spine injuries can be missed easily, difficult to diagnose, and problematic to treat. Recognition of mechanism and awareness of injury patterns help physicians determine a diagnosis and create an index of suspicion for unstable thoracic spine injuries. Aggressive full-contact sports receive the most attention for spinal injury; however several sports with repetitive loading of the spine can cause severe injuries, including rowing, gymnastics, and golf. The goal of this article was to provide an overview of the unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the thoracic spine and to discuss some of the more common thoracic injuries that can affect athletes. PMID:25574880

  5. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Complete Pancreatic Transection as a Result of Sport-Related Blunt Trauma to the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Andrew J.; Dimarikis, Iannis; Pai, Madhava; Jiao, Long R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Blunt abdominal trauma is a rare but well-recognized cause of pancreatic transection. A delayed presentation of pancreatic fracture following sport-related blunt trauma with the coexisting diagnostic pitfalls is presented. Case Report A 17-year-old rugby player was referred to our specialist unit after having been diagnosed with traumatic pancreatic transection, having presented 24 h after a sporting injury. Despite haemodynamic stability, at laparotomy he was found to have a diffuse mesenteric hematoma involving the large and small bowel mesentery, extending down to the sigmoid colon from the splenic flexure, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma arising from the pancreas. The pancreas was completely severed with the superior border of the distal segment remaining attached to the splenic vein that was intact. A distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation and evacuation of the retroperitoneal hematoma was performed. Discussion/Conclusion Blunt pancreatic trauma is a serious condition. Diagnosis and treatment may often be delayed, which in turn may drastically increase morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic difficulties apply to both paraclinical and radiological diagnostic methods. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in such cases, with a multi-modality diagnostic approach and prompt surgical intervention as required. PMID:21490833

  6. TEVAR: Endovascular Repair of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Nation, David A.; Wang, Grace J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has allowed a minimally invasive approach for management of an array of thoracic aortic pathologies. Initially developed specifically for exclusion of thoracic aortic aneurysms, TEVAR is now used as an alternative to open surgery for a variety of disease pathologies due to the lower morbidity of this approach. Advances in endograft technology continue to broaden the applications of this technique. PMID:26327745

  7. Practical genetics of thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A; Pomianowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    This chapter will provide a practical look at the rapidly evolving field regarding the genetics of thoracic aortic aneurysm. It will start with a look at the history of the genetics of thoracic aortic aneurysm and will then move on to elucidating the discovery of familial patterns of thoracic aortic aneurysm. We will next review the Mendelian genetics of transmission of thoracic aortic aneurysm. We will move on to the molecular genetics at the DNA level and finish with a discussion of the molecular genetics at the RNA level, including a promising investigational "RNA Signature" test that we have been developing at Yale. PMID:23993238

  8. Tracheobronchial injury due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchial avulsion resulting from blunt trauma is a very rare and serious condition, mostly due to high-speed traffic crashes. In this article, we briefly report the case of an 18-year-old man who was injured in a car accident and because of massive persistent air leakage (despite appropriate chest tube drainage), deemed to have a deep tracheobronchial injury. Due to a rapid drop in the patient's O2 saturation, he underwent an anterolateral thoracotomy. Endotracheal intubation was performed under direct visualization. The right mainstem bronchus was disrupted from the carina with a 1.5-cm stump remaining on the carina, and the remainder was crushed to the origin of the right superior lobe bronchus. Hence, a right superior lobectomy was performed and the postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:26157657

  9. Aerothermodynamic shape optimization of hypersonic blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyi, Sinan; Yumuşak, Mine

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a reliable and efficient design tool that can be used in hypersonic flows. The flow analysis is based on the axisymmetric Euler/Navier-Stokes and finite-rate chemical reaction equations. The equations are coupled simultaneously and solved implicitly using Newton's method. The Jacobian matrix is evaluated analytically. A gradient-based numerical optimization is used. The adjoint method is utilized for sensitivity calculations. The objective of the design is to generate a hypersonic blunt geometry that produces the minimum drag with low aerodynamic heating. Bezier curves are used for geometry parameterization. The performances of the design optimization method are demonstrated for different hypersonic flow conditions.

  10. Blunt Abdominal Wall Disruption by Seatbelt Injury; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Maarten Philip; van Buijtenen, Jesse; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Bloemers, Frank; Geeraedts Jr., Leo

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of the use of seatbelts in cars, mortality following motor vehicle crashes has decreased significantly. However, two patterns of injuries, the ‘seatbelt sign’ and ‘seatbelt syndrome’ have emerged. Injuries may consist of traumatic abdominal wall disruption. We present two cases of severe abdominal wall disruption caused by a seatbelt injury and treated with primary repair. A review of the literature is provided. Two patients were brought in after a high velocity Motor Vehicle Collision. Both presented with an acute abdomen and a seatbelt sign upon which the decision was made to perform emergency laparotomies. Both patients had an abdominal wall disruption along the seatbelt sign. These disruptions were primarily closed and during six months of follow-up no complications occurred. A disruption of the abdominal wall is a rare complication. However, it is a diagnosis that may not be missed as patients have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. CT-scanning is an accurate method to detect disruptions. Closure of blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption can be done primarily with sutures or addition of a mesh. In both cases of the severe abdominal wall disruption, primary repair without mesh in the acute phase was successful. When a laparotomy is not indicated, the abdominal wall must be assessed for disruption. If there is a disruption primary repair is a good option. PMID:27331068

  11. Cardiovascular syphilis complicated by Lower thoracic and upper abdominal aneurysm - A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Gayathri, K; Shankar, S Vijay; Venkatesan, S; Kalaivani, S

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old male presented with left lower abdominal pain, visible pulsation below xiphoid process, and tenderness in the left iliac fossa for the past 10 days. Chest X-ray revealed blunting of left cardiophrenic angle. Echocardiogram revealed descending thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the chest and abdomen revealed dissecting aneurysm of lower thoracic and upper abdominal aorta. Thoracoabdominal aortogram revealed erosion of D12 vertebra and infected aneurysm of adjacent thoracoabdominal aorta. Serum venereal disease research laboratory assay was positive in 1:4 dilution Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay was positive. The patient was treated with Injection procaine penicillin for 20 days undercover of steroids. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. Aortic aneurysm repair with reconstruction was done. Histopathology was in favor of syphilitic etiology. This case is being presented as descending thoracic and upper abdominal aortic aneurysm due to syphilis complicated by dissection and erosion of vertebral body is rare and has not been reported nowadays to the best of our knowledge. PMID:27190418

  12. Cardiovascular syphilis complicated by Lower thoracic and upper abdominal aneurysm – A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Gayathri, K.; Shankar, S. Vijay; Venkatesan, S.; Kalaivani, S.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old male presented with left lower abdominal pain, visible pulsation below xiphoid process, and tenderness in the left iliac fossa for the past 10 days. Chest X-ray revealed blunting of left cardiophrenic angle. Echocardiogram revealed descending thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the chest and abdomen revealed dissecting aneurysm of lower thoracic and upper abdominal aorta. Thoracoabdominal aortogram revealed erosion of D12 vertebra and infected aneurysm of adjacent thoracoabdominal aorta. Serum venereal disease research laboratory assay was positive in 1:4 dilution Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay was positive. The patient was treated with Injection procaine penicillin for 20 days undercover of steroids. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. Aortic aneurysm repair with reconstruction was done. Histopathology was in favor of syphilitic etiology. This case is being presented as descending thoracic and upper abdominal aortic aneurysm due to syphilis complicated by dissection and erosion of vertebral body is rare and has not been reported nowadays to the best of our knowledge. PMID:27190418

  13. Traumatic Glaucoma in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Singh Pandav, Surinder

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Young patients are more prone to ocular trauma but most of the published studies describe complicated cataract as a result of trauma with its treatment modality. As a result, little is known about the different causes, common presenting signs and symptoms, visual outcomes, and most frequent management modalities of traumatic glaucoma in children. This review aims to study the demographical profile, presentation, management and outcome of traumatic glaucoma in children as well as the various factors associated with advanced glaucomatous changes. How to cite this article: Kaur S, Kaushik S, Pandav SS. Traumatic Glaucoma in Children. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2014; 8(2):58-62. PMID:26997810

  14. Traumatic avulsion of the tricuspid valve after gas bottle explosion

    PubMed Central

    Krisper, Maximilian; Köhncke, Clemens; Pieske, Burkert

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a very rare example of chronic right heart failure caused by torrent tricuspid regurgitation. Massive right heart dilatation and severe tricuspid regurgitation due to avulsion of the tricuspid valve apparatus occurred as a result of a blunt chest trauma following the explosion of a gas bottle 20 years before admission, when the patient was a young man in Vietnam. After this incident, the patient went through a phase of severe illness, which can retrospectively be identified as an acute right heart decompensation with malaise, ankle edema, and dyspnea. Blunt chest trauma caused by explosives leading to valvular dysfunction has not been reported in the literature so far. It is remarkable that the patient not only survived this trauma, but had been managing his chronic heart failure well without medication for over 20 years. Learning points Thorough clinical and physical examination remains the key to identifying patients with relevant valvulopathies.With good acoustic windows, TTE is superior to TEE in visualizing the right heart.Traumatic avulsion of valve apparatus is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt chest trauma and must be actively sought for. Transthoracic echocardiography remains the method of choice in these patients. PMID:27249554

  15. Severe thoracic impalement injury: Survival in a case with delayed surgical definitive care.

    PubMed

    Lunca, Sorinel; Morosanu, Corneliu; Alexa, Ovidiu; Pertea, Mihaela

    2015-03-01

    Impalement injuries are rare and among the most spectacular and dramatic traumatic lesions. The survival of a patient with a thoracic impalement injury is an extremely rare event. The objective of this study was to present the case of a 24-year-old male patient with a severe thoracic impalement injury successfully treated despite his late arrival in our hospital. A log in 12 cm diameter penetrated his right thorax producing injuries of the right main bronchus, right pulmonary lobe, right subclavian artery as well as extensive parietal lesions. Definitive surgical repair of these lesions was performed more than seven hours after trauma. The management principles contributing to the successful outcome that we would like to emphasize are: rapid transportation and reaction of the trauma team, minimal manipulation of the impaling object, removal of the log as one piece under direct vision in the operating room, ventilatory support, extensive debridement, and lavage associated with appropriate antibiotherapy. PMID:25904279

  16. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Griffith Pearson, F; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. OBJECTIVE: To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. METHOD: Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. RESULTS: Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. CONCLUSIONS: Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  17. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  18. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques. PMID:23775735

  19. The thoracic shape of hominoids.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  20. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities include problems with cognition (thinking, memory, and reasoning), sensory processing (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell), ... barrier. NIH Patient Recruitment for Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. ...

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... a wide range of changes affecting thinking, sensation, language, or emotions. TBI can be associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. People with severe injuries usually need rehabilitation. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  4. Syndrome of fascial incarceration of the long thoracic nerve: winged scapula☆

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jefferson Braga; Gerhardt, Samanta; Pacheco, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results from early intervention surgery in patients with the syndrome of fascial incarceration of the long thoracic nerve and consequent winged scapula. Methods Six patients with a syndrome of nerve trapping without specific nerve strain limitations were followed up. Results The patients achieved improvement of their symptoms 6–20 months after the procedure. The motor symptoms completely disappeared, without any persistent pain. The medial deformity of the winged scapula improved in all cases, without any residual esthetic disorders. Conclusion The approach of early surgical release seems to be a better predictor for recovery from non-traumatic paralysis of the anterior serratus muscle. PMID:26535205

  5. Surgical management of thoracic idiopathic spinal cord herniation. Technical case report and review.

    PubMed

    Payer, Michael; Zumsteg, Dominik; De Tribolet, Nicolas; Wetzel, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is a rare spinal disease, in which chronic cerebrospinal fluid pulsations push the arachnoid and adjacent thoracic spinal cord region through an antero-lateral dural defect of congenital, post-traumatic, or inflammatory/erosive origin. Symptomatic patients commonly present around the 5th decade of life with slowly progressive myelopathy. Diagnosis relies on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Stable mild cases may be observed, whereas in progressive symptomatic situations, surgical spinal cord reposition and dural defect repair with a dural patch is the preferred treatment. We present a case of ISCH at T5/6 and a review the literature. PMID:27221089

  6. Blunt traumatic rupture of the right ventricle, with intrapericardial rupture of the diaphragm: successful surgical repair.

    PubMed

    Le Treut, Y P; Herve, L; Cardon, J M; Boutboul, R; Bricot, R

    1981-07-01

    The authors report a case of chest injury causing rupture of the right ventricle and diaphragm, discovered during laparotomy for haemoperitoneum. This type of injury to the heart has rarely been cited in the literature since survival rates are low and the diagnosis often overlooked. PMID:7319634

  7. Acute myocardial infarction due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, R K; Singh, Arun; Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sinha, Ajay; Saurabh; Kumar, Amit

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of blunt chest injury following a road accident leading to damage of the left main and left anterior descending coronary arteries causing acute myocardial infarction in a young person. PMID:12674188

  8. Blunt force trauma as a rare mechanism for chyluria.

    PubMed

    Rycyna, Kevin J; Casella, Daniel; D'Agostino, Louis

    2016-06-01

    Chyluria is an uncommon clinical entity outside of the tropics. We present a rare case of blunt force trauma leading to the formation of a lymphorenal fistula. This was successfully managed via conservative endoscopic and dietary treatment. PMID:27347629

  9. Duodenal perforation as result of blunt abdominal trauma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Hartholt, Klaas Albert; Dekker, Jan Willem T

    2015-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma may cause severe intra-abdominal injuries, while clinical findings could be mild or absent directly after the trauma. The absence of clinical findings could mislead physicians into underestimating the severity of the injury at the primary survey, and inevitably leads to a delay in the diagnosis. The Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children (BATiC) score may help to identify children who are at a high risk for intra-abdominal injuries in an early stage and requires additional tests directly. A case of a 10-year-old girl with a duodenal perforation after a blunt abdominal trauma is presented. A delay in diagnosis may lead to an increased morbidity and mortality rate. A low admission threshold for children with abdominal pain after a blunt trauma is recommended. PMID:26698210

  10. Traumatic Alterations in Consciousness: Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Brian J.; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) refers to the clinical condition of transient alteration of consciousness as a result of traumatic injury to the brain. The priority of emergency care is to identify and facilitate the treatment of rare but potentially life threatening intra-cranial injuries associated with mTBI through the judicious application of appropriate imaging studies and neurosurgical consultation. Although post-mTBI symptoms quickly and completely resolve in the vast majority of cases, a significant number of patients will complain of lasting problems that may cause significant disability. Simple and early interventions such as patient education and appropriate referral can reduce the likelihood of chronic symptoms. Although definitive evidence is lacking, mTBI is likely to be related to significant long-term sequelae such as Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative processes. PMID:20709244

  11. Partial tearing of the interventricular septum after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    López-Ruiz, Nilson; Ramírez Gil, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac trauma after blunt chest trauma is a rare complication of patients arriving alive to an emergency department. We here present the case of patient who had a partial rupture of the interventricular septum after having had a blunt chest trauma in a traffic accident. As there was no ventricular septal defect, conservative management was deemed appropriate. At 3-year follow-up, the patient was free of right heart failure symptoms suggestive of the septal defect progression. PMID:26031362

  12. Isolated gallbladder injury in a case of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Birn, Jeffrey; Jung, Melissa; Dearing, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of blunt injury to the gallbladder may constitute a significant challenge to the diagnostician. There is often a delay in presentation with non-specific clinical symptoms. In the absence of reliable clinical symptoms, diagnostic imaging becomes an invaluable tool in the rapid identification of gallbladder injury. We present a case of isolated gallbladder injury following blunt abdominal trauma which was diagnosed by computed tomography and subsequently confirmed by cholecystectomy. PMID:22690293

  13. Isolated Gallbladder Injury in a Case of Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Birn, Jeffrey; Jung, Melissa; Dearing, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of blunt injury to the gallbladder may constitute a significant challenge to the diagnostician. There is often a delay in presentation with non-specific clinical symptoms. In the absence of reliable clinical symptoms, diagnostic imaging becomes an invaluable tool in the rapid identification of gallbladder injury. We present a case of isolated gallbladder injury following blunt abdominal trauma which was diagnosed by computed tomography and subsequently confirmed by cholecystectomy. PMID:22690293

  14. [Blunt abdominal trauma.--analysis of 201 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pannenborg, G; Wolf, O; Voigtsberger, P

    1978-01-01

    201 blunt abdominal traumata treated clinically at the surgical department of the Medical Academy in Erfurt from 1967 to 1976 are reported: No increase of blunt abdominal traumata within the period of the report in spite of considerable growth of trafficdensity and industrialization could be observed.--The percentage of severe secundary injuries remained approximately constant, too.--Intestinal lesions, combined hepatolienal ruptures caused the highest mortality especially in combination with severe craniocerebral lesions. PMID:685552

  15. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  16. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-02-28

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  17. Visual Outcome of Traumatic Cataract at a Tertiary Eye Care Centre in North India: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish Kumar; Srivastava, Jai Prakash; Iqbal, Jawed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most common presentations of blunt and penetrating ocular trauma is traumatic cataract. It remains a significant cause of visual impairment and physical disability among adults and children. It is associated with various ocular injuries. Aim To evaluate the associated ocular injuries and final outcome of patients with traumatic cataract along with their demographic features and modes of trauma. Materials and Methods A prospective study done in Department of Ophthalmology in M.L.B. Medical college, Jhansi from February 2010 to July 2011. A total of 48 patients diagnosed as a case of traumatic cataract were subjected to a detailed history, systemic and local examination with relevant investigations. Medical or surgical managements were done accordingly. Patients were subsequently followed-up and visual acuity was recorded. Appropriate statistical tests were applied. Results A 54.2% patients sustained penetrating trauma while 45.8% got blunt injury. Out of total, 79% patients were males while 50% were less than 15 years of age. Causative agents were stone, wood items, stick, metal objects etc. Among blunt trauma cases, 64% of the patients had visual acuity <6/60 while among penetrating trauma cases nobody had acuity >6/18. Anterior segment was more involved as compared to posterior segment. A 38.5% patients had corneal opacity among penetrating injury patients. The interval between trauma and surgery was less than one month among 75% of patients. After three months of surgery, 43.7% patients had visual acuity of >6/18. Conclusion This study provides recent data of patients hospitalized after ocular trauma and diagnosed as a case of traumatic cataract. Traumatic cataract occurs mostly in younger males. Surgical intervention is necessary to improve visual outcome. Good visual outcome was obtained in nearly half of the patients. Traumatic cataract patients can have good visual outcome depending upon proper management. PMID:26894101

  18. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme. PMID:25596394

  19. Ossification of thoracic ligamenta flava

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, S.; Minoru, O.; Russell, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    Although ligamentum flavum ossification (LFO) often occurs in normal persons, there are no reports of its detection on lateral chest radiographs made during screening examinations. Review of 1,744 consecutive lateral chest radiographs identified LFO in 6.2% of males and 4.8% of females. LFO occurred mainly at the intervertebral segments from T9-T10 through T12-L1. Most prevalent was the hook-shaped LFO, protruding inferoirly from the inferior facets into the projections of the intervertabral foramina. Though LFO can cause severe neurologic symptoms, none of the affected persons in this study reported such symptoms. LFO was first visualized radiographically when the subjects were 20-40 years old, and it may be a physiologic condition. The LFO in these cases existed independent of thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and degenerative osteoarthritis.

  20. [Thoracic actinomycosis versus bronchial cancer].

    PubMed

    Brombacher-Frey, I; Wöckel, W; Kreusser, T

    1992-01-01

    We report on 4 thoracic actinomycoses; in three of these four cases a bronchial carcinoma was suspected, and in case No. 2 this carcinoma had been considered to be in a very advanced and inoperable stage. A man of 51 years of age was in a generally run-down condition. He also noticed that his sputum was tinged with blood. The x-ray film showed a large space-occupying growth at the right lung hilus. Repeated perbronchial biopsies of the focus did not yield any diagnosis. Actinomycosis was identified histologically only in the tissue samples obtained via thoracotomy. After a three-month penicillin course the hilar shadow receded. A 61-year old male patient was transferred to our Pneumological Hospital, being strongly suspected of suffering from an extensive bronchial carcinoma, and having multiple intrathoracic space-occupying growths as well as pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and an infiltration of the left thoracic wall with fistula formation; however, histological examination of skin biopsies revealed that he was suffering from actinomycosis. Antibiotic therapy cured him completely in a six-month course. In a man of 32 years of age who had been indulging for many years in a severe abuse of nicotin, we suspected a central bronchial carcinoma on the basis of his x-ray, but histology of the tissue taken from the space-occupying growth via diagnostic thoracotomy revealed that this patient, too, suffered from actinomycosis. Complete recession occurred after several months of antibiotic treatment. A woman of 82 years had been an inpatient for several months in another hospital because of relapsing pleuropneumonias on the right side. She was transferred to us as an outpatient after a renewed relapse. We conducted a transcutaneous fine-needle biopsy of the right indurating pleural effusion. A few actinomyces filaments were seen on histological examination of the purulent exudate. Hence, actinomycosis was confirmed. After antibiotic therapy the finding receded

  1. Thoracic Wall Reconstruction in Advanced Breast Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Daigeler, A.; Harati, K.; Goertz, O.; Hirsch, T.; Behr, B.; Lehnhardt, M.; Kolbenschlag, J.

    2014-01-01

    In advanced mammary tumours, extensive resections, sometimes involving sections of the thoracic wall, are often necessary. Plastic surgery reconstruction procedures offer sufficient opportunities to cover even large thoracic wall defects. Pedicled flaps from the torso but also free flap-plasties enable, through secure defect closure, the removal of large, ulcerated, painful or bleeding tumours with moderate donor site morbidity. The impact of thoracic wall resection on the respiratory mechanism can be easily compensated for and patientsʼ quality of life in the palliative stage of disease can often be improved. PMID:24976636

  2. Effects of Nose Bluntness on Stability of Hypersonic Boundary Layers over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of hypersonic boundary layers are numerically investigated for boundary layer flows over a 5-degree straight cone at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. Generation of instability waves from leading edge region and receptivity of boundary layer to slow acoustic waves are investigated. Computations are performed for a cone with nose radii of 0.001, 0.05 and 0.10 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the nose radii ranging from 650 to 130,000. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of axisymmetric boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a cone with the nose Reynolds number of 65,000 is increased by a factor of 1.82 compared to that for a sharp cone. The receptivity coefficient for a sharp cone is about 4.23 and it is very small, approx.10(exp -3), for large bluntness.

  3. [Endovascular repair for an acute traumatic aortic transection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sanioğlu, Soner; Sahin, Sinan; Aydoğan, Hakki; Barutça, Hakan; Eren, Ergin

    2012-03-01

    A thirty-eight-year-old male patient who suffered from 10th and 11th thoracal vertebrae fractures, paraplegia and acute traumatic aortic transection because of accidental fall was referred to our hospital. Open surgical repair carried a very high risk due to severe coexisting injuries. Transection was treated with 30x100 mm Valiant thoracic endograft, which was deployed just distal to the ostium of the left carotid artery. The patient was transferred to the neurosurgery clinic for treatment of paraplegia after an uneventful recovery. Endovascular repair of acute transection confers substantial advantages in mortality and morbidity compared to surgical repair. However, the long-term durability of thoracic endografts remains unknown. If the long-term results are as satisfactory as the promising mid-term results, this technique may become the gold standard approach for the treatment of acute transection. PMID:22792827

  4. Endograft Collapse After Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bandorski, Dirk Brueck, Martin; Guenther, Hans-Ulrich; Manke, Christoph

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular treatment is an established therapy for thoracic aortic disease. Collapse of the endograft is a potentially fatal complication. We reviewed 16 patients with a thoracic endograft between 2001 and 2006. Medical records of the treated patients were studied. Data collected include age, gender, diagnosis, indication for endoluminal treatment, type of endograft, and time of follow up. All patients (n = 16; mean age, 61 years; range, 21-82 years) underwent computed tomography (CT) for location of the lesion and planning of the intervention. Time of follow-up with CT scan ranged from 1 to 61 months. Indications for endovascular treatment were degenerative aneurysm (n = 7; 44%), aortic dissection (n = 2; 12%), perforated aortic ulcer (n = 4; 25%), and traumatic aortic injury (n = 3; 19%). Three patients suffered from a collapse of the endograft (one patient distal, two patients proximal) between 3 and 8 days after endovascular treatment. These patients were younger (mean age, 37 {+-} 25 years vs. 67 {+-} 16 years; P < 0.05) and showed more oversizing (proximal, 36 {+-} 19.8% vs. 29 {+-} 20.7% [P > 0.05]; distal, 45 {+-} 23.5% vs. 38 {+-} 21.7% [P > 0.05]). Proximal collapse was corrected by placing a bare stent. In conclusion, risk factors for stent-graft collapse are a small lumen of the aorta and a small radius of the aortic arch curvature (young patients), as well as oversizing, which is an important risk factor and is described for different types of endografts and protheses (Gore TAG and Cook Zenith). Dilatation of the collapsed stent-graft is not sufficient. Following therapy implantation of a second stent or surgery is necessary in patients with a proximal endograft collapse. Distal endograft collapse can possibly be treated conservatively under close follow-up.

  5. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  6. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    PubMed Central

    Turner, de Sales; Cox, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth. PMID:15248894

  7. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Traumatic Brain Injury National Data Center (TBINDC) at Kessler Medical Rehabilitation Research and Education Center is the coordinating center for the research and dissemination efforts of the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) program funded by the National Instit...

  8. Vicarious traumatization: concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Pamela Diane

    2011-12-01

    There is growing knowledge of the effects of stress on professionals, including various negative symptoms that may mirror the biopsychosocial effects exhibited by the victims of trauma. Multiple concepts including burn out, compassion fatigue, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and secondary traumatic stress, are terms that have been incorrectly interchanged with the term vicarious traumatization (VT). Clarity of vicarious victimization and understanding contributing factors is imperative in order to facilitate future research and implement timely and effective interventions, as well as sculpt evidence based practice. This concept anaylsis, complete with a concept map, discusses VT; related terminology; symptomology; prevention and relevant interventions; and discusses opportunities for personal/professional growth for nurses and especially forensic nurses working with victims of violence. PMID:22123041

  9. Management of a Left Internal Thoracic Artery Graft Injury during Left Thoracotomy for Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Oates, Matthew; Yadav, Sumit; Saxena, Pankaj

    2016-07-01

    There have been some recent reports on the surgical treatment of lung cancer in patients following previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Use of internal thoracic artery graft is a gold standard in cardiac surgery with superior long-term patency. Left internal thoracic artery graft is usually patent during left lung resection in patients who present to the surgeon with an operable lung cancer. We have presented our institutional experience with left-sided thoracic surgery in patients who have had previous coronary artery surgery with a patent internal thoracic artery graft. PMID:26907619

  10. Modern impact of video assisted thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    With advancement in technology, experience and training over the last two decades, video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has become widely accepted and utilized all over the world. VATS started as a diagnostic tool in the early 1990s, technique of VATS lobectomy evolved and became safer over the next 10-15 years and now it is being used for more advanced and hybrid operations. VATS has contributed to the development of minimally invasive surgical interventions for other thoracic disorders like mediastinal tumors and esophageal cancer as well. This article looks at the advantages of VATS, technique advancements and its applications in other thoracic operations and its influence on the present and future of thoracic surgery. PMID:25379201

  11. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  12. Detection of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Mac Donald, Christine L.; Johnson, Ann M.; Cooper, Dana; Nelson, Elliot C.; Werner, Nicole J.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Witherow, John R.; Fang, Raymond; Flaherty, Stephen F.; Brody, David L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blast-related traumatic brain injuries have been common in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, but fundamental questions about the nature of these injuries remain unanswered. METHODS We tested the hypothesis that blast-related traumatic brain injury causes traumatic axonal injury, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), an advanced form of magnetic resonance imaging that is sensitive to axonal injury. The subjects were 63 U.S. military personnel who had a clinical diagnosis of mild, uncomplicated traumatic brain injury. They were evacuated from the field to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany, where they underwent DTI scanning within 90 days after the injury. All the subjects had primary blast exposure plus another, blast-related mechanism of injury (e.g., being struck by a blunt object or injured in a fall or motor vehicle crash). Controls consisted of 21 military personnel who had blast exposure and other injuries but no clinical diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. RESULTS Abnormalities revealed on DTI were consistent with traumatic axonal injury in many of the subjects with traumatic brain injury. None had detectible intracranial injury on computed tomography. As compared with DTI scans in controls, the scans in the subjects with traumatic brain injury showed marked abnormalities in the middle cerebellar peduncles (P<0.001), in cingulum bundles (P = 0.002), and in the right orbitofrontal white matter (P = 0.007). In 18 of the 63 subjects with traumatic brain injury, a significantly greater number of abnormalities were found on DTI than would be expected by chance (P<0.001). Follow-up DTI scans in 47 subjects with traumatic brain injury 6 to 12 months after enrollment showed persistent abnormalities that were consistent with evolving injuries. CONCLUSIONS DTI findings in U.S. military personnel support the hypothesis that blast-related mild traumatic brain injury can involve axonal injury. However, the contribution of primary blast

  13. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic (VATS) lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Sihoe, Alan D L

    2016-03-01

    Uniportal video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has become one of the most exciting new developments in minimally invasive thoracic surgery in recent years. While the debate over its purported advantages continues, this chapter instead focuses on the technical aspects of performing a lobectomy via the uniportal approach. Using clear medical illustrations to show how each step is performed, the key tips and tricks are laid out for the beginner hoping to learn the technique. PMID:27134841

  14. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic (VATS) lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Uniportal video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has become one of the most exciting new developments in minimally invasive thoracic surgery in recent years. While the debate over its purported advantages continues, this chapter instead focuses on the technical aspects of performing a lobectomy via the uniportal approach. Using clear medical illustrations to show how each step is performed, the key tips and tricks are laid out for the beginner hoping to learn the technique. PMID:27134841

  15. Nonintubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery: general issues

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management for awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is more difficult than under general anesthesia (GA), being technically extremely challenging for the anesthesiologist. Therefore, thorough preparation and vigilance are paramount for successful patient management. In this review, important considerations of nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery are discussed in view of careful patient selection, anesthetic preparation, potential perioperative difficulties and the management of its complications. PMID:26046051

  16. Blunt urogenital trauma in prepubescent female patients: more than meets the eye!

    PubMed

    Lynch, J M; Gardner, M J; Albanese, C T

    1995-12-01

    Blunt traumatic injury to the urogenital region in the prepubescent girl is commonly evaluated in pediatric emergency departments (ED). The purpose of this study is: 1) to establish recommendations for an accurate, painless (both physically and psychologically), and timely diagnosis, and 2) to determine whether the ED examination can accurately determine the extent of the injury. Over a 24-month period (January 1991 through December 1992), 22 girls with blunt trauma to the urogenital region (mean age 5.7 years, range 2-9 years) were retrospectively evaluated. Initial ED evaluations were by both an emergency physician and a pediatric surgeon. All 22 patients underwent an examination under anesthesia (EUA) in the operating room to evaluate the extent of the injury and to repair the injury as needed. Follow-up was obtained in all patients and averaged 18 months. The findings at EUA demonstrated a significant disagreement with the preoperative ED evaluation. In only five patients was there agreement between the preoperative ED assessment and the findings during the EUA (24% concurrence). Thus, 16 patients (76%) had injuries of greater extent than was appreciated during the preoperative examination in the ED. Partial or complete disruption of the perianal sphincters occurred in six patients (27%) and was unrecognized preoperatively in each. Twenty-one of the 22 patients required suture repair of lacerations, the remaining patient did not require surgical therapy. Three patients had contusions or lacerations to the urethral area requiring repair and/or prolonged bladder catheter drainage for two to 14 days (average seven days). The average hospital stay was 19.3 hours. There were three minor wound complications following surgery: two required repeat EUA with suturing or cauterization, and one required no further therapy. This study clearly demonstrates that the ED examination, by both emergency physicians and pediatric surgeons, of young girls who have suffered blunt

  17. Traumatic intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm following a bicycle accident.

    PubMed

    Takamure, A; Nakagawa, T; Kobayashi, A; Morimoto, S; Yamasaki, S; Takase, I; Yamamoto, Y; Nishi, K

    2007-09-01

    In this article we present a fatal case of a ruptured intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm that occurred a number of years after an incident in which the patient suffered a blunt-trauma injury. A long interval between blunt trauma and this type of fatality has rarely been reported. This case discusses a 49-year-old woman who was found dead at her home by her husband and was referred for autopsy because the cause of death was uncertain. Her past medical history was unknown; however, it was learned that she had a bicycle accident 4 years previously and had sustained injuries to the left side of her body. During the autopsy, healed fractures in the bones of the left lower rib cage and a large amount of blood in the left thorax were observed. Furthermore, a hematoma, containing a small rupture was found in the left tenth intercostal space adjacent to the thoracic vertebrae. Histological examinations showed that the wall of the left tenth intercostal artery was ruptured, with recent blood clots including fibrin. Additionally, in the lesion where the tunica adventitia was disrupted, the dissecting cavity was filled with blood. We concluded that the woman died of hemorrhagic shock resulting from a ruptured intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm that formed as a result of the injury incurred from the bicycle accident 4 years before. PMID:25869167

  18. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  19. [Thoracic endometriosis: A difficult diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Hagneré, P; Deswarte, S; Leleu, O

    2011-09-01

    Thoracic endometriosis is a rare disease, which presents in women at a mean age of 35 years, later than for pelvic endometriosis. There are no known predisposing factors for the condition and its pathogenesis is not yet clearly established. The symptoms always appear in connection with the periods of the person affected by the condition, occurring within 24-48 h after the start of menstruation. Catamenial pneumothorax is the most common clinical entity. It is associated with pelvic endometriosis in 30-50% of cases. Thoracoscopy, preferably performed during menstruation, allows full inspection of the diaphragm and the pleural cavity for defects in the diaphragm, endometrial nodules and bullae. The level of CA 125 is often elevated but this is not a reliable or specific marker. Medical treatment is aimed at blocking the action of estrogen on the endometrium and ectopic endometrial implants. GnRH analogues or danazol are the preferred treatments. Surgery to repair and strengthen the diaphragm and/or resect nodules or bullae also has a role, supplemented by pleurodesis to prevent further pneumothorax or effusions. The main risk is recurrence, and thus the current usual practice is to combine surgery, immediately followed by hormone therapy focusing on GnRH analogues. PMID:21943537

  20. Late outcome of very severe blunt head trauma: a 10-15 year second follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, I V

    1984-01-01

    Forty patients with very severe blunt head trauma (post-traumatic amnesia greater than or equal to 1 month) were initially examined at an average of 4.5 months after the injury. The patients were visited in their homes 2.5 years and 10-15 years after the accident and questionnaires were presented to patients, relatives and/or staff. Though physical impairment, dysarthria and defects of memory remained severe in many cases, the psychosocial sequelae presented the most serious problems. Permanent changes in personality and emotion were reported in two thirds and were especially frequent among the youngest patients. The worse overall outcome was seen in cases with severe brainstem involvement or anterior lesions or both. In spite of the great frequency of deficits long-term improvement of functional state was common and several regained at least some work capacity. PMID:6707671

  1. A Nonpolar Blueberry Fraction Blunts NADPH Oxidase Activation in Neuronal Cells Exposed to Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Sally J.; Dunlap, Kriya L.; McGill, Colin M.; Kuhn, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are key to the progressive neuronal degeneration common to chronic pathologies, traumatic injuries, and aging processes in the CNS. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) orchestrates cellular stress by stimulating the production and release of neurotoxic mediators including reactive oxygen species (ROS). NADPH oxidases (NOX), ubiquitously expressed in all cells, have recently emerged as pivotal ROS sources in aging and disease. We demonstrated the presence of potent NOX inhibitors in wild Alaska bog blueberries partitioning discretely into a nonpolar fraction with minimal antioxidant capacity and largely devoid of polyphenols. Incubation of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with nonpolar blueberry fractions obstructed the coalescing of lipid rafts into large domains disrupting NOX assembly therein and abolishing ROS production characteristic for TNF-α exposure. These findings illuminate nutrition-derived lipid raft modulation as a novel therapeutic approach to blunt inflammatory and oxidative stress in the aging or diseased CNS. PMID:22530077

  2. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for imaging blunt abdominal trauma - indications, description of the technique and imaging review.

    PubMed

    Cokkinos, D; Antypa, E; Stefanidis, K; Tserotas, P; Kostaras, V; Parlamenti, A; Tavernaraki, K; Piperopoulos, P N

    2012-02-01

    Patients with blunt abdominal trauma are initially imaged with ultrasound (US) for the evaluation of free abdominal fluid. However, lacerations of solid organs can be overlooked. Although computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard technique for abdominal trauma imaging, overutilization, ionizing radiation, need to transport the patient and potential artifacts are well known disadvantages. Contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) can be used as an imaging tool between the two methods. It can easily and reliably reveal solid abdominal organ injuries in patients with low-energy localized trauma and decrease the number of CT scans performed. It can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside with no need for transportation. There are only very few contraindications and anaphylactoid reactions are extremely rare. Altogether, CEUS has proved to be very helpful for the initial imaging of traumatic lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen, as well as for patient follow-up. PMID:22274907

  3. Occult Mediastinal Great Vessel Trauma: The Value of Aortography Performed During Angiographic Screening for Blunt Cervical Vascular Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Charles E. Bauer, Jason R.; Cothren, C. Clay; Turner, James H.; Moore, Ernest E.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the value of aortography in the assessment of occult aortic and great vessel injuries when routinely performed during screening angiography for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI). Methods. One hundred and one consecutive patients who received both aortography and screening four-vessel angiography over 4 years were identified retrospectively. Angiograms for these patients were evaluated, and the incidence of occult mediastinal vascular injury was determined. Results. Of the 101 patients, 6 (6%) had angiographically documented traumatic aortic injuries. Of these 6 patients, one injury (17%) was unsuspected prior to angiography. Four of the 6 (67%) also had BCVI. One additional patient also had an injury to a branch of the subclavian artery. Conclusion. Routine aortography during screening angiography for BCVI is not warranted due to the low incidence (1%) of occult mediastinal arterial injury. However, in the setting of a BCVI screening study and no CT scan of the chest, aortography may be advantageous.

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A. (2008). Mild traumatic brain injury in U.S. soldiers returning from Iraq. New England Journal of Medicine, 358, 453–463. ... and Spotlights U.S. hospitals miss followup for suspected child abuse Q&A with NICHD Acting Director Catherine ...

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... a concussion may feel dazed and may lose vision or balance for a while after the injury A brain contusion is a bruise of the brain. This ... consciousness Headache Confusion Feeling dizzy or lightheaded Blurry vision ... or severe traumatic brain injury include all of the symptoms listed above ...

  6. High-Energy Traumatic Maxillofacial Injury.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jacob; Sawatari, Yoh; Peleg, Michael

    2015-07-01

    High-energy blunt or penetrating impact leads to great variability in facial injury patterns. Although the mechanism, pattern, and distribution of forces vary, the resultant damage to hard and soft tissues requires dedicated planning and execution of debridement and reconstructive procedures. This article evaluates the initial management of patients sustaining high-energy facial impact injuries resulting in one or more comminuted or displaced facial fractures, with accompanying severe facial lacerations and/or soft tissue defects and avulsion injuries. Seventy-three patients met the criteria for high-energy traumatic injuries at Jackson Memorial/University of Miami Medical Center between 2003 and 2013 and are included in this article. Thirty-nine patients sustained one or more gunshot wounds to the face, and 34 patients were involved in high-speed motor vehicle collisions; all patients met our criteria for high-energy trauma. The treatment protocol for these injuries involves meticulous surgical exploration and assessment, aggressive debridement, early definitive reduction/fixation, and reconstruction as necessary. PMID:26114523

  7. BioGlue for traumatic liver laceration

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Edward; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Advances in diagnostic imaging and monitoring have led to a shift towards primary non-operative management for most blunt liver injuries. Hemostatic biologic agents are a potential adjunct in the treatment of bile leak, especially in patients requiring surgery for drainage of a biloma. Presentation of case We present a 31 year old woman who presented to the hospital after a motor vehicle accident. She was found to have a Grade 4 liver injury causing hemoperitoneum. The patient was taken immediately for an exploratory laparotomy where the laceration was packed with an absorbable hemostatic mesh. On clinic follow-up one week after discharge, the patient was found to have a bile leak. An ERCP was performed and a stent was placed over the location of the leak. The patient underwent laparotomy the following day for evacuation of her bilomas. The liver laceration was identified and remained at the same depth. CryoLife Bioglue was used to seal the laceration. Discussion Given the high volume biloma, it is unlikely this patient would have been successfully treated without laparotomy. As such, this was an ideal opportunity to utilize Bioglue as an adjunct to seal the liver laceration, and thus potentially the area of bile extravasation. The diversion of drainage using ERCP was likely to have reduced the volume of bile leak substantially, which would also have helped increase the efficacy of the procedure. Conclusion The case presented demonstrates a novel and safe option for the delayed repair of traumatic lacerations. PMID:27085105

  8. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Sanket Subhash; Gosavi, Vikas S.; Hamid, Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    With the inventions of faster cars and even more faster motorbikes there is a worldwide increase in road traffic accidents, which has increased the incidence of blunt abdominal trauma but still duodenal injury following a blunt abdominal trauma is uncommon and can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to manage it properly can result in devastating results. It may typically occur in isolation or with pancreatic injury. Here, we report a case of an isolated transection of the third part of the duodenum with normal pancreas following a blunt abdominal trauma. The initial clinical changes in isolated duodenal injury may be extremely subtle before life-threatening, peritonitis develops. Hence, a high index of suspicion, on the basis of mechanism of injury and physical examination is the key in early detection of duodenal injury especially in a rural hospital like ours where the facilities for computed tomography scan are not available. PMID:25598947

  9. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sanket Subhash; Gosavi, Vikas S; Hamid, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    With the inventions of faster cars and even more faster motorbikes there is a worldwide increase in road traffic accidents, which has increased the incidence of blunt abdominal trauma but still duodenal injury following a blunt abdominal trauma is uncommon and can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to manage it properly can result in devastating results. It may typically occur in isolation or with pancreatic injury. Here, we report a case of an isolated transection of the third part of the duodenum with normal pancreas following a blunt abdominal trauma. The initial clinical changes in isolated duodenal injury may be extremely subtle before life-threatening, peritonitis develops. Hence, a high index of suspicion, on the basis of mechanism of injury and physical examination is the key in early detection of duodenal injury especially in a rural hospital like ours where the facilities for computed tomography scan are not available. PMID:25598947

  10. Isolated common femoral artery injury caused by blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Avaro, J P; Biance, N; Savoie, P H; Peycru, T; Bonnet, P M; Balandraud, P

    2008-01-01

    The authors report an isolated common femoral artery injury caused by blunt trauma with dissection and secondary ischaemia. A 21-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being stabbed during acute alcoholic intoxication. He presented with a stab wound on the left leg and blunt trauma in the right groin. The surgical exploration of the left-sided wound did not disclose any vascular injury. After a 12-hour period of observation, the patient was discharged. Six hours later, he came back with severe ischaemia on the right leg caused by a femoral artery dissection. The patient underwent surgical revascularization, and fully recovered. Isolated artery blunt trauma is a rare event. In this observation, the absence of early symptoms resulted in delayed diagnosis. PMID:19241930

  11. Subsonic Static and Dynamic Aerodynamics of Blunt Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Fremaux, Charles M.; Yates, Leslie A.

    1999-01-01

    The incompressible subsonic aerodynamics of four entry-vehicle shapes with variable c.g. locations are examined in the Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel. The shapes examined are spherically-blunted cones with half-cone angles of 30, 45, and 60 deg. The nose bluntness varies between 0.25 and 0.5 times the base diameter. The Reynolds number based on model diameter for these tests is near 500,000. Quantitative data on attitude and location are collected using a video-based data acquisition system and reduced with a six deg-of-freedom inverse method. All of the shapes examined suffered from strong dynamic instabilities which could produced limit cycles with sufficient amplitudes to overcome static stability of the configuration. Increasing cone half-angle or nose bluntness increases drag but decreases static and dynamic stability.

  12. Macular optical coherence tomography findings following blunt ocular trauma

    PubMed Central

    Oladiwura, Dilys; Lim, Lik Thai; Ah-kee, Elliott Yann; Scott, James Angus

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the optical coherence tomography (OCT) results of Berlin’s edema in a male subject following blunt ocular trauma from a soccer ball. A 27-year-old male presented with blurred vision in his left eye following blunt trauma. On admission, he underwent a complete eye examination and an OCT of the macula. Fundoscopy revealed commotio retinae, observed as an abnormal cream-colored discoloration of the fovea. The OCT showed outer photoreceptor segment disruption, retinal pigment epithelium inter-digitation, and intra-retinal edema of the outer nuclear layer. Following initial management, a repeat OCT after 3 months showed near complete resolution. OCT can be a useful adjunct for monitoring the progress of Berlin’s edema secondary to blunt ocular trauma because Berlin’s edema may present similarly clinically to other ocular trauma, but can affect different layers of the retina depending on the type of injury to the eye. PMID:24899795

  13. Effect of blunt trailing edge on rotor broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-T.; George, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The production of high-frequency broadband noise by turbulent vortex shedding from rotor blades with blunt trailing edges is investigated analytically. The derivation of the governing equations, analogous to that of Kim and George (1982) for boundary-layer/trailing-edge noise, is explained, and numerical results are compared with the experimental data of Hubbard et al. (1981) and Lowson et al. (1972) in graphs. It is shown that vortex-shedding noise is a significant component of blunt-trailing-edge rotor broadband noise and that the analytical method employed gives reasonable predictions. The need for a better empirical expression for the normalized spectrum and for more measurements of surface pressure fluctuations near blunt trailing edges is indicated.

  14. Usefulness of transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography in recognition and management of cardiovascular injuries after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Chirillo, F.; Totis, O.; Cavarzerani, A.; Bruni, A.; Farnia, A.; Sarpellon, M.; Ius, P.; Valfrè, C.; Stritoni, P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic potential of transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography for the detection of traumatic cardiovascular injuries in patients suffering from severe blunt chest trauma. DESIGN: Prospective study over a three year period. SETTING: A regional cardiothoracic centre. PATIENTS: 134 consecutive patients (94 M/40 F; mean age 38 (SD 14) years) suffering from severe blunt chest trauma (injury severity score 33.5 (18.2)). Most patients (89%) were victims of motor vehicle accidents. EVALUATION: All patients underwent transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography within 8 h of admission. Aortography was performed in the first 20 patients and in a further five equivocal cases. RESULTS: Transthoracic echocardiography provided suboptimal images in 83 patients, detecting three aortic ruptures, 28 pericardial effusions (one cardiac tamponade), 35 left pleural effusions, and 15 myocardial contusions. Transoesophageal echocardiography was feasible in 131 patients and detected 14 aortic ruptures (13 at the isthmus), 40 pericardial effusions, 51 left pleural effusions, 34 periaortic haematomas, 45 myocardial contusions, right atrial laceration in one patient with cardiac tamponade, one tricuspid valve rupture, and one severe mitral regurgitation caused by annular disruption. For the detection of aortic rupture transoesophageal echocardiography showed 93% sensitivity, 98% specificity, and 98% accuracy. Time to surgery was significantly shorter (30 (12) v 71 (21) min; P < 0.05) for patients operated on only on the basis of transoesophageal echocardiographic findings. CONCLUSIONS: Transthoracic echocardiography has low diagnostic yield in severe blunt chest trauma, while transoesophageal echocardiography provides accurate diagnosis in a short time at the bedside, is inexpensive, minimally invasive, and does not interfere with other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Images PMID:8800997

  15. Effects of Cold Water Immersion on Edema Formation After Blunt Injury to the Hind Limbs of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Michael G.; Thornton, Richard M.; Fish, Dale R.; Mendel, Frank C.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Despite the long history of using cryotherapy to control edema, we found no randomized, controlled studies providing evidence to substantiate this common clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cold water immersion affects edema formation following blunt injuries in rats. Design and Setting: The feet of 16 rats were traumatized after hind limb volumes were determined. Four 30-minute treatments of cold water immersion (12.8°C to 15.6°C, 55°F to 60°F), interspersed with four 30-minute rest periods, began immediately after trauma to one randomly selected hind limb of each rat. The limb remained in a dependent position during all treatments, rest periods, and volumetric measurements. Subjects: Sixteen anesthetized Zucker Lean rats were used in the study. Measurements: Limb volumes were measured after each treatment and rest period for a total of 4 hours. Results: The volume of treated limbs was significantly smaller (p < .05) than the volume of untreated limbs after the first treatment and remained smaller throughout the experiment. Conclusions: Immersing rat limbs in 12.8°C to 15.6°C (55°F to60°F) water immediately after blunt injury was effective in curbing edema formation. ImagesFig 1. PMID:16558455

  16. [Video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and mediastinitis: major issues in thoracic surgery in 2010].

    PubMed

    Borro, José M; Moreno, Ramón; Gómez, Ana; Duque, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the major issues in thoracic surgery relating to the advances made in our specialty in 2010. To do this, the 43(rd) Congress of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery held in La Coruña and the articles published in the Society's journal, Archivos de Bronconeumología, were reviewed. The main areas of interest were related to the development of video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and descending mediastinitis. The new tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification (7(th) edition), presented last year, was still a topical issue this year. The First Forum of Thoracic Surgeons and the Update in Thoracic Surgery together with the Nurses' Area have constituted an excellent teaching program. PMID:21300211

  17. Management of Traumatic Aortic and Splenic Rupture in a Patient With Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Ahmet Can; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Bolukcu, Ahmet; Dagsali, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is rupture of all or part of the aortic wall, mostly resulting from blunt trauma to the chest. The most common site of rupture is the aortic isthmus. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta is rare. A 62-year-old man with a family history of ascending aortic aneurysm was referred to our hospital after a motor vehicle accident. He had symptoms of cardiogenic shock. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed rupture of the proximal ascending aorta and an ascending aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 55 mm at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. Transthoracic echocardiography at the bedside revealed severe aortic valvular insufficiency. We performed a successful Bentall procedure. During postoperative recovery, the patient experienced a cerebrovascular accident. Transesophageal echocardiography did not reveal thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis. The patient's symptoms resolved in time, and he was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 47 without any sequelae. He has been symptom free during a 6-month follow-up period. We suggest that individuals who have experienced blunt trauma to the chest and have symptoms of traumatic aortic rupture and a known medical history of ascending aortic aneurysm should be evaluated for a rupture at the ascending aorta and the aortic isthmus. PMID:27449463

  18. Clinical experience with an active intravascular rewarming technique for near-severe hypothermia associated with traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Kiridume, Kazutaka; Hifumi, Toru; Kawakita, Kenya; Okazaki, Tomoya; Hamaya, Hideyuki; Shinohara, Natsuyo; Abe, Yuko; Takano, Koshiro; Hagiike, Masanobu; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia and acidosis are secondary causes of trauma-related coagulopathy. Here we report the case of a 72-year-old patient with severe trauma who suffered near-severe hypothermia despite the initiation of standard warming measures and was successfully managed with active intravascular rewarming. The patient was involved in a road traffic accident and was transported to a hospital. He was diagnosed with massive right-sided hemothorax, blunt aortic injury, burst fractures of the eighth and ninth thoracic vertebrae, and open fracture of the right tibia. He was referred to our hospital, where emergency surgery was performed to control bleeding from the right hemothorax. During surgery, the patient demonstrated progressive heat loss despite standard rewarming measures, and his temperature decreased to 32.4°C. Severe acidosis was also observed. A Cool Line® catheter was inserted into the right femoral vein and lodged in the inferior vena cava, and an intravascular balloon catheter system was utilized for aggressive rewarming. The automated target core temperature was set at 37°C, and the maximum flow rate was used. His core temperature reached 36.0°C after 125 min of intravascular rewarming. The severe acidosis was also resolved. The main active bleeding site was not identified, and coagulation hemostasis as well as rewarming enabled us to control bleeding from the vertebral bodies, lung parenchyma, and pleura. The total volume of intraoperative bleeding was 5,150 mL, and 20 units of red cell concentrate and 16 units of fresh frozen plasma were transfused. After surgery, he was transferred to the intensive care unit under endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. His hemodynamic condition stabilized after surgery. The rewarming catheter was removed on day 2 of admission, and no bleeding, infection, or thrombosis associated with catheter placement was observed. Extubation was performed on day 40, and his subsequent clinical course was uneventful. He

  19. Thoracoscopic Ligation of the Thoracic Duct

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Julio A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: When nonoperative treatment of chylothorax fails, thoracic duct ligation is usually performed through a thoracotomy. We describe two cases of persistent chylothorax, in a child and an adult, successfully treated with thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct. Methods: A 4-year-old girl developed a right chylothorax following a Fontan procedure. Aggressive nonoperative management failed to eliminate the persistent chyle loss. A 72-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic man was involved in a motor vehicle accident, in which he sustained multiple fractured ribs, a right hemopneumothorax, a right femoral shaft fracture, and a T-11 thoracic vertebral fracture. Subsequently, he developed a right chylothorax, which did not respond to nonoperative management. Both patients were successfully treated with thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct. Results: The child had significant decrease of chyle drainage following surgery. Increased drainage that appeared after the introduction of full feedings five days postoperatively was controlled with the somatostatin analog octreotide. The chest tube was removed two weeks after surgery. After two years' follow-up, she has had no recurrence of chylothorax. The adult had no chyle drainage following surgery. He was maintained on a medium-chain triglyceride diet postoperatively for two weeks. The chest tube was removed four days after surgery. After six months' follow-up, he has had no recurrence of chylothorax. Conclusions: Thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct provides a safe and effective treatment of chylothorax and may avoid thoracotomy and its associated morbidity. PMID:10987402

  20. A traumatic superficial temporal artery aneurysm after a bicycle accident.

    PubMed

    Veen, Egbert J D; Poelmann, Floris B; IJpma, Frank F A

    2014-01-01

    A male cyclist presented with a swelling on the forehead. Six weeks before, he fell of his bike and smashed his head on the ground while wearing a helmet. A smooth lump of 1 cm had evolved on the temporal side of his forehead in a few weeks. Duplex ultrasonography demonstrated a dilated vessel with a minor defect in the luminal wall. Surgical exploration revealed an aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery (STA). The aneurysm was surgically removed and the patient recovered uneventfully. Owing to its superficial course, the STA is vulnerable to blunt head trauma. Traumatic aneurysms of the STA should be a differential diagnostic consideration in patients with a history of trauma and a swelling on their head. PMID:25352578

  1. Peritoneoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture.

    PubMed

    Hammond, J S; Yudd, A; Schwartz, L B; Margiotta, M S; D'Amelio, L F

    1996-12-01

    Current diagnostic modalities for traumatic diaphragmatic hernia (TDH) have limitations. Prior models differ from human injury. This study evaluates peritoneoscintigraphy in a rabbit model of TDH simulating human blunt injury. Ten adult New Zealand rabbits (two control, eight experimental) underwent tracheostomy and left thoracotomy under anesthesia. Experimental animals received a radial phrenotomy (1.0 to 3.5 cm). Incisions were closed over thoracostomy tubes, and ventilation was discontinued. Catheters were inserted intraperitoneally, and radiotracer in saline was injected. A gamma counter was used to take sequential images. Transdiaphraghmatic isotope was seen in only two animals. Both had large injuries; in one, the catheter was directed toward the diaphragmatic defect. We conclude that peritoneoscintigraphy is insensitive in the detection of TDH. It is unlikely to be an effective technique coupled with diagnostic peritoneal lavage. Further efforts to refine diagnostic capability for TDH should be directed elsewhere, such as laparoscopy. PMID:8955248

  2. A traumatic superficial temporal artery aneurysm after a bicycle accident

    PubMed Central

    Veen, Egbert J.D.; Poelmann, Floris B.; IJpma, Frank F.A.

    2014-01-01

    A male cyclist presented with a swelling on the forehead. Six weeks before, he fell of his bike and smashed his head on the ground while wearing a helmet. A smooth lump of 1 cm had evolved on the temporal side of his forehead in a few weeks. Duplex ultrasonography demonstrated a dilated vessel with a minor defect in the luminal wall. Surgical exploration revealed an aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery (STA). The aneurysm was surgically removed and the patient recovered uneventfully. Owing to its superficial course, the STA is vulnerable to blunt head trauma. Traumatic aneurysms of the STA should be a differential diagnostic consideration in patients with a history of trauma and a swelling on their head. PMID:25352578

  3. [Rupture of the interventricular septum after the blunt trauma of thorax].

    PubMed

    Smejkal, K; Parízková, R; Harrer, J; Lukes, A; Koudelka, J; Zvák, I

    2008-02-01

    Authors present the case of little patient with the dissection, pseudoaneurysm and finally a rupture of the interventricular septum after the blunt thracic injury. The patient was smitten as a pedestrian by a car and during the whole period of her stay in the hospital she was showing signs of circulatory instability. Due to the current intraabdominal injuries this circulatory decompensation was first assigned to hemoperitoneum, for which the girl was operated on about 3 hours after admission. Nevertheless, even after the abdminal cavity check, after the treatment of supreficial liver lacerations and intensive volume resuscitation the patient showed signs of insufficiency. Diagnosis was finally determined on the base of the transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), which proved the traumatic rupture of interventricular septum. The operation followed correcting the defect, which was performed with a good result according to the TTE postoperatively. Nevertheless, 27 hours after the admission the patient died due to the electromechanical dissociation. In the discussion the authors then evoke a number of papers concerning the same topic. PMID:18380159

  4. Blunt cerebrovascular injury in rugby and other contact sports: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Trajan A; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Moore, Frederick A

    2014-01-01

    Contact sports have long been a part of human existence. The two earliest recorded organized contact games, both of which still exist, include Royal Shrovetide Football played since the 12(th) century in England and Caid played since 1308 AD in Ireland. Rugby is the premier contact sport played throughout the world with the very popular derivative American football being the premier contact sport of the North American continent. American football in the USA has on average 1,205,037 players at the high school and collegiate level per year while rugby in the USA boasts a playing enrollment of 457,983 at all levels. Recent media have highlighted injury in the context of competitive contact sports including their long-term sequelae such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) that had previously been underappreciated. Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) has become a recognized injury pattern for trauma; however, a paucity of data regarding this injury can be found in the sports trauma literature. We present a case of an international level scrum-half playing Rugby Union at club level for a local non-professional team, in which a player sustained a fatal BCVI followed by a discussion of the literature surrounding sport related BCVI. PMID:24872841

  5. Blunt cerebrovascular injury in rugby and other contact sports: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Contact sports have long been a part of human existence. The two earliest recorded organized contact games, both of which still exist, include Royal Shrovetide Football played since the 12th century in England and Caid played since 1308 AD in Ireland. Rugby is the premier contact sport played throughout the world with the very popular derivative American football being the premier contact sport of the North American continent. American football in the USA has on average 1,205,037 players at the high school and collegiate level per year while rugby in the USA boasts a playing enrollment of 457,983 at all levels. Recent media have highlighted injury in the context of competitive contact sports including their long-term sequelae such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) that had previously been underappreciated. Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) has become a recognized injury pattern for trauma; however, a paucity of data regarding this injury can be found in the sports trauma literature. We present a case of an international level scrum-half playing Rugby Union at club level for a local non-professional team, in which a player sustained a fatal BCVI followed by a discussion of the literature surrounding sport related BCVI. PMID:24872841

  6. Early Results of Endovascular Treatment of the Thoracic Aorta Using the Valiant Endograft

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Matt Ivaz, Stella; Cheshire, Nicholas; Fattori, Rosella; Rousseau, Herve; Heijmen, Robin; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Thony, Frederic; Horne, Gillian; Morgan, Robert; Loftus, Ian

    2007-11-15

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta has been adopted as the first-line therapy for much pathology. Initial results from the early-generation endografts have highlighted the potential of this technique. Newer-generation endografts have now been introduced into clinical practice and careful assessment of their performance should be mandatory. This study describes the initial experience with the Valiant endograft and makes comparisons with similar series documenting previous-generation endografts. Data were retrospectively collected on 180 patients treated with the Valiant endograft at seven European centers between March 2005 and October 2006. The patient cohort consisted of 66 patients with thoracic aneurysms, 22 with thoracoabdominal aneurysms, 19 with an acute aortic syndrome, 52 with aneurysmal degeneration of a chronic dissection, and 21 patients with traumatic aortic transection. The overall 30-day mortality for the series was 7.2%, with a stroke rate of 3.8% and a paraplegia rate of 3.3%. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that mortality differed significantly between different indications; thoracic aneurysms (6.1%), thoracoabdominal aneurysms (27.3%), acute aortic syndrome (10.5%), chronic dissections (1.9%), and acute transections (0%). Adjunctive surgical procedures were required in 63 patients, and 51% of patients had grafts deployed proximal to the left subclavian artery. Comparison with a series of earlier-generation grafts demonstrated a significant increase in complexity of procedure as assessed by graft implantation site, number of grafts and patient comorbidity. The data demonstrate acceptable results for a new-generation endograft in series of patients with diverse thoracic aortic pathology. Comparison of clinical outcomes between different endografts poses considerable challenges due to differing case complexity.

  7. Selective conservatism in the management of thoracic trauma remains appropriate in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Oosthuizen, GV; Clarke, DL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Selective conservatism for thoracic trauma is well established but the emergence of new technologies may cause management strategies to continue to evolve. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on thoracic trauma patients managed in a single institution in South Africa over a 4-year period to determine the appropriateness of our current policy of selective conservatism. Results A total of 1,239 patients were included in the study; 112 required an emergency thoracotomy, 125 were admitted for observation and 1,002 required a tube thoracostomy (TT). Ninety-one per cent of the patients were male and the median age was 24 years. Seventy-five per cent of the cases were penetrating trauma and the remaining were blunt trauma. The indications for TT were pneumothorax (PTX) (n=382, 38%), haemothorax (HTX) (n=300, 30%) and haemopneumothorax (HPTX) (n=320, 32%). A total of 13% (127/1,002) of all chest x-rays (CXR) following tube removal demonstrated residual pathologies that precluded immediate discharge: 32 (8%) in Group A (PTX), 44 (15%) in Group B (HTX) and 51 (16%) in Group C (HPTX). All 32 patients in Group A were simply observed and did not require further intervention. In Group B, 17 patients required repeat TTs and 27 required video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for clearance of residual HTX. Twenty-nine patients in Group C required repeat TTs and twenty-two required VATS. Conclusions The vast majority of patients with thoracic trauma can be managed conservatively with TT alone. Residual pathology appeared to be lowest in patients with a PTX, which seldom requires treatment, while only a minority of patients required repeat TTs or VATS for a retained HTX. Selective conservatism is still appropriate in the current era in a developing world setting. PMID:26263809

  8. Post traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Tiller, J; Kyrios, M; Bennett, P

    1996-10-01

    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs after a person has been exposed to a traumatic event involving actual or threatened death, and has responded with intense fear or helplessness. The event is then persistently re-experienced. The person avoids stimuli associated with the trauma and experiences a numbing of general responsiveness. Symptoms of increased arousal can occur as well as depression and anxiety. PTSD causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. The general practitioner is uniquely placed to identify PTSD and can have a key role in treatment. Cognitive behavioural treatment is a central therapeutic approach and can be carried out in general practice. The issues are to counteract the physiological components, expose the patient to the feared situation and help the patient to relearn that the stimuli are not necessarily associated with danger or threat. Repeated brief consultations over time can facilitate this process. PMID:8936738

  9. Traumatic injuries to the duodenum: a report of 98 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Corley, R D; Norcross, W J; Shoemaker, W C

    1975-01-01

    Data of 98 patients who had sustained traumatic injuries to the duodenum during a recent 7-year period is reviewed. The overall mortality was 23.5%; that of the blunt injury group was 35%, that of the penetrating injury group was 20%. However, after the establishment of a trauma unit, the mortality for duodenal injuries fell from 32% to 12%. Death from duodenal wounds may be reduced by earlier hospitalization, earlier diagnosis and consequently earlier surgical repair. Vigorous treatment of shock is essential. A specialized trauma unit with personnel experienced in the management of shock and trauma problems provides a better environment to carry out the preoperative and postoperative care of the acutely injured patient. Adequate surgical treatment of the blunt injury and missile injury of the duodenum should consist of the following procedures: 1) repair of the duodenal wall utilizing conventional techniques; 2) internal decompression of the repair by afferent jejunostomy; 3) efferent jejunostomy for postoperative feeding; 4) temporary gastrostomy; and 5) external drainage of the repair. In certain selected instances, the simple stab wound of the duodenum may be treated by conventional repair without decompression, but a loop of jujunum should be sutured over the repair to prevent delayed disruption. The majority of patients with injuries to the duodenum have associated organs injured which also require considered surgical judgment and action. PMID:1119875

  10. Penetrating injuries to the thoracic great vessels.

    PubMed

    Demetriades, D

    1997-01-01

    Penetrating injuries to the thoracic great vessels have been diagnosed with increased frequency because of the escalating use of automatic weapons. The overall incidence is 5.3% of gunshot wounds and 2% of stab wounds to the chest. Most of these patients reach the hospital dead or in severe shock. The overall mortality of thoracic aortic injuries is higher than 90% and in subclavian vascular injuries higher than 65%. In the prehospital phase, the "scoop and run" policy offers the best chances of survival and no attempts should be made for any form of stabilization. Investigations should be reserved only for fairly stable patients. Angiography, color flow Doppler, and transesophageal echocardiography may be useful in selected cases. Patients in cardiac arrest or imminent cardiac arrest may benefit from an emergency room thoracotomy. The surgical approach to specific thoracic great vessels is described. PMID:9271743

  11. European institutional accreditation of general thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    To improve standardization of general thoracic surgery (GTS) practice across Europe, the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has implemented a program of Institutional Accreditation. We reviewed the methods and rules of engagement of this program. A composite performance score (CPS) including outcome and process indicators is used to measure institutional performance and assess eligibility for accreditation. Eligible units are invited to participate and accept a local audit performed by an external auditors team composed by data inspectors and thoracic surgeons. In addition to data quality, a series of structural, procedural and qualification characteristics are inspected. Once the visit is complete, the team will produce an audit report to be sent to the members of the database committee for deliberation on the institutional accreditation of that unit. The Database committee will send an executive report to the ESTS Executive Committee for their final decision on the accreditation. PMID:24868447

  12. Acute Shingles after Resection of Thoracic Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Muesse, Jason L.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Harris, Richard L.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes zoster is relatively uncommon after surgery in immunocompetent patients. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of herpes zoster after the resection of a thoracic schwannoma. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman in whom acute shingles developed after the video-assisted thoracic surgical resection of a posterior mediastinal schwannoma adjacent to the 4th thoracic vertebral body. The patient recovered after receiving timely antiviral therapy. Rash and pain are common in patients who have wound infections and contact dermatitis after surgery, so the possible reactivation of varicella virus might not be prominent in the surgeon's mind. This case serves as a reminder that viral infections such as shingles should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative erythema and pain. PMID:22740749

  13. Change of paradigm in thoracic radionecrosis management.

    PubMed

    Dast, S; Assaf, N; Dessena, L; Almousawi, H; Herlin, C; Berna, P; Sinna, R

    2016-06-01

    Classically, muscular or omental flaps are the gold standard in the management of thoracic defects following radionecrosis debridement. Their vascular supply and antibacterial property was supposed to enhance healing compared with cutaneous flaps. The evolution of reconstructive surgery allowed us to challenge this dogma. Therefore, we present five consecutive cases of thoracic radionecrosis reconstructed with cutaneous perforator flaps. In four patients, we performed a free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and one patient had a thoracodorsal perforator (TDAP) flap. Median time healing was 22.6 days with satisfactory cutaneous covering and good aesthetic results. There were no flap necrosis, no donor site complications. We believe that perforator flaps are a new alternative, reliable and elegant option that questions the dogma of muscular flaps in the management of thoracic radionecrosis. PMID:26831037

  14. Sonic-boom minimization with nose-bluntness relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    A procedure which provides sonic-boom-minimizing equivalent area distributions for supersonic cruise conditions is described. This work extends previous analyses to permit relaxation of the extreme bluntness required by conventional low-boom shapes and includes propagation in a real atmosphere. The procedure provides area distributions which minimize either shock strength or overpressure.

  15. Hypersonic, nonequilibrium flow over a cylindrically blunted 6 deg wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    The numerical simulation of hypersonic flow in chemical nonequilibrium over cylindrically blunted 6 degree wedge is described. The simulation was executed on a Cray C-90 with Program LAURA 92-vl. Code setup procedures and sample results, including grid refinement studies and variations of species number are discussed. This simulation relates to a study of wing leading edge heating on transatmospheric vehicles.

  16. Traumatic insemination in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Tatarnic, Nikolai J; Cassis, Gerasimos; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic insemination is a bizarre form of mating practiced by some invertebrates in which males use hypodermic genitalia to penetrate their partner's body wall during copulation, frequently bypassing the female genital tract and ejaculating into their blood system. The requirements for traumatic insemination to evolve are stringent, yet surprisingly it has arisen multiple times within invertebrates. In terrestrial arthropods traumatic insemination is most prevalent in the true bug infraorder Cimicomorpha, where it has evolved independently at least three times. Traumatic insemination is thought to occur in the Strepsiptera and has recently been recorded in fruit fly and spider lineages. We review the putative selective pressures that may have led to the evolution of traumatic insemination across these lineages, as well as the pressures that continue to drive divergence in male and female reproductive morphology and behavior. Traumatic insemination mechanisms and attributes are compared across independent lineages. PMID:24160423

  17. [Effects of traumatic stress].

    PubMed

    Herbst, Gesa; Jaeger, Ulrich; Leichsenring, Falk; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis PTSD does not adequately describe the impact of exposure to childhood trauma of the developing child. The objective of the study was to examine the prevalence of different interpersonal trauma types and to describe the long-term effects of maltreatment and neglect in a clinical sample of 34 adolescents. The majority (62%) of the sample was exposed to two different types of trauma during childhood. Emotional abuse and emotional neglect have been the most common trauma types (59%; 53%). 71% of the traumatized adolescents did not meet the criteria for PTSD. The most common diagnosis in the sample was Borderline Personality Disorder. All average scores at SCL-90-Symptom-Scale were clinical significant. Half of the sample reported suicide attempts and self destructive behavior. One third reported substance abuse and aggressive behavior against others respectively. None of the traumatized adolescents had a positive Self-concept. Altogether the results show that abused children and adolescents have a range of psychological sequelae that are not captured in the PTSD diagnostic criteria. Therefore the results support the necessity for a new and more precise diagnosis for chronically traumatized children and adolescents. PMID:19961125

  18. Traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Risdall, Jane E.; Menon, David K.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of military traumatic brain injury (TBI), and similar injuries are seen in civilians in war zones or terrorist incidents. Indeed, blast-induced mild TBI has been referred to as the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Assessment involves schemes that are common in civilcian practice but, in common with civilian TBI, takes little account of information available from modern imaging (particularly diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging) and emerging biomarkers. The efficient logistics of clinical care delivery in the field may have a role in optimizing outcome. Clinical care has much in common with civilian TBI, but intracranial pressure monitoring is not always available, and protocols need to be modified to take account of this. In addition, severe early oedema has led to increasing use of decompressive craniectomy, and blast TBI may be associated with a higher incidence of vasospasm and pseudoaneurysm formation. Visual and/or auditory deficits are common, and there is a significant risk of post-traumatic epilepsy. TBI is rarely an isolated finding in this setting, and persistent post-concussive symptoms are commonly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, a constellation of findings that has been called the polytrauma clinical triad. PMID:21149359

  19. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  20. Hospital-Based Incidence of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    SHARIF-ALHOSEINI, Mahdi; RAHIMI-MOVAGHAR, Vafa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The goal of this study was to describe the hospital-based incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury in Tehran, Iran. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the hospital records of traumatic spinal cord injury patients, admitted between March 2010 and July 2011 in 61/68 hospitals of Tehran. Results Overall, 138 cases of traumatic spinal cord injury were identified. The majority of patients were male (84.8%). The mean age was 33.2 ± 14.3 years. 54.3% patients were residing in Tehran and the others were referred from other cities. The mean annual incidence of hospitalized traumatic spinal cord injury patients of Tehran was 10.5/1,000,000/year (95% confidence interval: 9-12). Fall was the leading cause of injury (45.7%), followed by road traffic crash (40.6%). The most common cause of tetraplegia (cervical traumatic spinal cord injury) was road traffic crash. The duration of hospital stay for tetraplegia and paraplegia (thoracic and lumbar traumatic spinal cord injury) was 22.7±23.7 and 12.5±7.5, respectively (P<0.001). Early surgery (surgical decompression within 24 h) was done for 19% of the patients. The median day of hospitalization for early and late surgery was 7.5 and 12, respectively (P=0.044). Conclusion Preventing traumatic spinal cord injury should focus on males, age group of 21-30 years, falls and road traffic crash. More studies are suggested to evaluate the incidence of non-hospitalized traumatic spinal cord injury patients. PMID:25988093

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  2. The History of Duke Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter K; Mulvihill, Michael S; D'Amico, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Since 1931, Duke Thoracic Surgery has been defined by excellence in patient care, research, and the education of leaders in surgery. In this work, the history, contributions, historic figures, and current structure of the program are reviewed. The program has cultivated a commitment to surgical investigation and training that persists to the present day. This commitment is manifest by the program's contributions to the field of cardiothoracic surgery, from the fundamental investigation of the coronary circulation and the development of the heat exchanger for myocardial preservation, to large-scale clinical trials in cardiac and thoracic surgery. PMID:26811042

  3. CT of nontraumatic thoracic aortic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Sanjeev; West, O Clark

    2005-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT), especially multidetector row CT (MDCT), is often the preferred imaging test used for evaluation of nontraumatic thoracic aortic abnormalities. Unenhanced images, usually followed by contrast-enhanced arterial imaging, allow for rapid detailed aortic assessment. Understanding the spectrum of acute thoracic aortic conditions which may present similarly (aortic dissection, aneurysm rupture, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, intramural hematoma) will ensure that patients are diagnosed and treated appropriately. Familiarity with imaging protocols and potential mimics will prevent confusion of normal anatomy and variants with aortic disease. PMID:16274000

  4. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery. PMID:26811041

  5. Pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta sustained during exposure to a tornado diagnosed with ECG-synchronized CT aortography.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Amit; von Herrmann, Paul F; Embertson, Ryan E; Landwehr, Kevin P; Winkler, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    A case of a tornado victim with a delayed presentation of injury to the aortic isthmus is discussed. Tornado forces resemble the forces of high energy explosions, and the injuries that can occur as a result of these forces can be bizarre. The patient presented with the unique computed tomography (CT) findings of isolated pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta in the absence of other traumatic injury to the thorax. Equivocal results of the initial CT aortogram (CTA) were confirmed with ECG-synchronized CTA (ECG-CTA), demonstrating the superiority of ECG-CTA as compared to standard CTA. PMID:27317209

  6. [Traumatic lung injury].

    PubMed

    Hara, Hidenori; Yoshimura, Hirokuni

    2004-07-01

    Pulmonary injuries include a wide variety of clinical conditions. Most patients with blunt chest trauma can be managed with conservative treatment. Only about 10 to 15% of patients with severe chest injuries require major thoracotomy. Management of pulmonary contusion, pulmonary laceration, pneumothorax or hemothorax by oxygen inhalation, respirator assist and chest drainage can usually result in complete recovery. However, pulmonary injuries sometimes lapse into fatal condition if they are improperly treated. Open thoracotomy is required in cases with persistent massive air leakage or massive bleeding with the use of chest drainage. It is crucial to evaluate the extent and severity of the injuries based on chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) findings for the proper initial treatment in patients with pulmonary injuries. PMID:15362557

  7. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100% O2.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Katja; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Asfar, Pierre; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Jung, Birgit; Duechs, Matthias; Möller, Peter; Georgieff, Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1) CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2) hyperoxia may attenuate this effect. Immediately after blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma, mice (n=32) with or without 3-4 weeks of CS exposure underwent 4 hours of pressure-controlled, thoraco-pulmonary compliance-titrated, lung-protective mechanical ventilation with air or 100% O2. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and acid-base status were measured together with blood and tissue cytokine and chemokine concentrations, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), activated caspase-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, nitrotyrosine formation, purinergic receptor 2X4 (P2XR4) and 2X7 (P2XR7) expression, and histological scoring. CS exposure prior to chest trauma lead to higher pulmonary compliance and lower PaO2 and Horovitz-index, associated with increased tissue IL-18 and blood MCP-1 concentrations, a 2-4-fold higher inflammatory cell infiltration, and more pronounced alveolar membrane thickening. This effect coincided with increased activated caspase-3, nitrotyrosine, P2XR4, and P2XR7 expression, NF-κB activation, and reduced HIF-1α expression. Hyperoxia did not further affect lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary and systemic cytokine and chemokine concentrations, or histological scoring, except for some patchy alveolar edema in CS exposed mice. However, hyperoxia attenuated tissue HIF-1α, nitrotyrosine, P2XR7, and P2XR4 expression, while it increased HO-1 formation in CS exposed mice. Overall, CS exposure aggravated post-traumatic

  8. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100 % O2

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Katja; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Asfar, Pierre; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Jung, Birgit; Duechs, Matthias; Möller, Peter; Georgieff, Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1) CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2) hyperoxia may attenuate this effect. Immediately after blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma, mice (n=32) with or without 3-4 weeks of CS exposure underwent 4 hours of pressure-controlled, thoraco-pulmonary compliance-titrated, lung-protective mechanical ventilation with air or 100 % O2. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and acid-base status were measured together with blood and tissue cytokine and chemokine concentrations, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), activated caspase-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, nitrotyrosine formation, purinergic receptor 2X4 (P2XR4) and 2X7 (P2XR7) expression, and histological scoring. CS exposure prior to chest trauma lead to higher pulmonary compliance and lower PaO2 and Horovitz-index, associated with increased tissue IL-18 and blood MCP-1 concentrations, a 2-4-fold higher inflammatory cell infiltration, and more pronounced alveolar membrane thickening. This effect coincided with increased activated caspase-3, nitrotyrosine, P2XR4, and P2XR7 expression, NF-κB activation, and reduced HIF-1α expression. Hyperoxia did not further affect lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary and systemic cytokine and chemokine concentrations, or histological scoring, except for some patchy alveolar edema in CS exposed mice. However, hyperoxia attenuated tissue HIF-1α, nitrotyrosine, P2XR7, and P2XR4 expression, while it increased HO-1 formation in CS exposed mice. Overall, CS exposure aggravated post-traumatic

  9. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article. PMID:26772317

  10. Functional chiral asymmetry in descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Frazin, L J; Lanza, G; Vonesh, M; Khasho, F; Spitzzeri, C; McGee, S; Mehlman, D; Chandran, K B; Talano, J; McPherson, D

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether rotational blood flow or chiral asymmetry exists in the human descending thoracic aorta, we established the ability of color Doppler ultrasound to detect rotational flow in a tornado tube model of a vortex descending fluid column. In a model of the human aortic arch with a pulse duplicator, color Doppler was then used to demonstrate that rotational flow occurs first in the transverse arch and then in the proximal descending thoracic aorta. With the use of color Doppler esophageal echocardiography, 53 patients (age range, 25-78 years; mean age, 56.4 years) were prospectively examined for rotational flow in the descending thoracic aorta. At 10 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 22 of 38 patients (58%) revealed rotational flow with obvious diastolic counterclockwise rotation but less obvious systolic clockwise rotation. At 5 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 29 of 46 patients (63%) revealed rotational flow with a tendency toward systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise rotation. At the retro-left ventricular position, 47 of 53 patients (89%) revealed rotational flow, usually of a clockwise direction, occurring in systole. Our data suggest that aortic flow is not purely pulsatile and axial but has a rotational component. Rotational flow begins in the aortic arch and is carried through to the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is chirally asymmetric with systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise components. These data demonstrate an aortic rotational flow component that may have physiological implications for organ perfusion. PMID:2242523

  11. Open Repair Versus Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in Multiple-Injured Patients: Observations From a Level-1 Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Breitenbach, Ingo; Bolzen, Philipp; Petri, Maximilian; Krettek, Christian; Teebken, Omke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blunt trauma of the thoracic aorta is a rare but potentially life-threatening entity. Intimal tears are a domain of non-operative management, whereas all other types of lesions should be repaired urgently. There is now a clear trend favoring minimally invasive stent grafting over open surgical repair. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the mortality and morbidity with either treatment option. Therefore, a retrospective observational study was performed to compare two different treatment methods at two different time periods at one trauma center. Patients and Methods: Between 1977 and 2012, all severely injured patients referred to our level 1 trauma center were screened for blunt aortic injuries. We compared baseline characteristics, 30-day and overall mortality, morbidity, duration of intensive care treatment, procedure time, and transfusion of packed red blood between patients who underwent open surgical or stent repair. Results: During the observation period, 45 blunt aortic injuries were recorded. The average Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 41.8 (range 29 - 68). Twenty-five patients underwent Open Repair (OR), and another 20 patients were scheduled to emergency stent grafting. The 30-day mortality in the surgical and stent groups were 5/25 (20%) and 2/20 (10%), respectively. The average time for open surgery was 151 minutes; the mean time for stent grafting was 67 minutes (P = 0.001). Postoperative stay on the intensive care unit was between one and 59 days (median 10) in group one and between four and 50 days in group two (median 26)(P = 0.03). Patients undergoing OR required transfusion of 6.0 units of packed red cells in median; patients undergoing stent grafting required a median of 2.0 units of packed red cells (P < 0.001). In the stent grafting group, 30-day mortality was 10% (2/20). Conclusions: Due to more sophisticated diagnostic tools and surgical approaches, mortality and morbidity of blunt aortic

  12. Dislocation of the penis: a rare complication after traumatic pelvic injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mei Chin; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Teh, Hui Seong; Teo, Chang Peng Colin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the male external genitalia is frequently encountered, but acute traumatic dislocation of the penile structure is extremely rare, with only a few reports found in the literature. We herein report the case of a 21-year-old man who sustained blunt trauma to the pelvis following a motor vehicle accident, and had features suspicious of penile dislocation. With the use of computed tomography and bedside ultrasonography, a diagnosis of penile dislocation was made, which was subsequently confirmed intraoperatively. Immediate surgical intervention via gentle manipulation of the penile tissue back to its native position was performed in order to restore normal anatomy. The exact mechanism of penile dislocation is not known. However, circumferential laceration around the foreskin causing degloving injury of the penis is suggested in our patient. PMID:25640107

  13. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2-4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7-10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7-10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed - hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in the

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Thoracic Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to review cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and describe its regular and special features. Data Sources: Literature cited in this review was retrieved from PubMed and Medline and was primarily published during the last 10 years. “Cerebrospinal fluid”, “leakage”, “dural tears”, and “thoracic decompression” were the indexed terms. Relevant citations in the retrieved articles were also screened to include more data. Study Selection: All retrieved literature was scrutinized, and four categories were recorded: incidence and risk factors, complications, treatment modalities, and prognosis. Results: CSFL is much more frequent after thoracic decompression than after cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Its occurrence is related to many clinical factors, especially the presence of ossified ligaments and the adhesion of the dural sac. While its impact on the late neurological recovery is currently controversial, CSFL increases the risk of other perioperative complications, such as low intracranial pressure symptoms, infection, and vascular events. The combined use of primary repairs during the operation and conservative treatment postoperatively is generally effective for most CSFL cases, whereas lumbar drains and reoperations should be implemented as rescue options for refractory cases only. Conclusions: CSFL after thoracic decompression has not been specifically investigated, so the present study provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the issue. CSFL is a multi-factor-related complication, and pathological factors play a decisive role. The importance of CSFL is in its impact on the increased risk of other complications during the postoperative period. Methods to prevent these complications are in need. In addition, though the required treatment resources are not special for CSFL after thoracic decompression, most CSFL cases are conservatively curable, and surgeons should be

  15. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  16. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, K.; Soliman, M.H.; Braunstein, P.; Formosa, P.; Cohen, A.J.; Matsuura, P.; Mason, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma.

  17. Traumatic fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Khuwaitir, Tarig S; Al-Moghairi, Abdurahman M; Sherbeeni, Suphia M; Subh, Hamed M

    2002-12-01

    Traumatic fat embolism syndrome occurs most often following fractures of long bones sustained in road traffic accidents and is a common cause of medical consultation from the orthopedic surgery department. The sub-clinical presentation is subtle and expresses itself by the presence of hypoxemia, while the full clinical syndrome compromises respiratory insufficiency, an altered consciousness and a characteristic petechial rash. Recognition is simple once the patient is viewed in the context of his or her clinical setting. Diagnosis is aided further by the presence of hematological and biochemical abnormalities including anemia, thrombocytopenia, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fat macroglobulinemia. Imaging by chest radiograph, computed tomography or magnetic resonance of the brain is used to confirm the extent of the respective organ involvement and to exclude alternative pathologies. The release of free fatty acids into the circulation and their subsequent effects is the key pathological event. Treatment is based on supportive care and high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We report a patient with traumatic fat embolism syndrome who developed the syndromes classical symptoms and signs following fracture of the long bones of his left lower leg. Admission to an intensive care unit, mechanical ventilatory support with positive end-expiratory pressure and corticosteroid therapy lead to his improvement and allowed eventual open reduction and internal fixation and discharge of our patient. Modern therapy offers a relatively good prognosis for patients with traumatic fat embolism syndrome; the optimal dose and timing of corticosteroid therapy in prophylaxis and treatment however, remain the subject of intense debate. PMID:12518208

  18. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery—technical issues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia. PMID:26046050

  19. Inhibition of class I histone deacetylases blunts cardiac hypertrophy through TSC2-dependent mTOR repression.

    PubMed

    Morales, Cyndi R; Li, Dan L; Pedrozo, Zully; May, Herman I; Jiang, Nan; Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Cho, Geoffrey W; Kim, Soo Young; Wang, Zhao V; Rotter, David; Rothermel, Beverly A; Schneider, Jay W; Lavandero, Sergio; Gillette, Thomas G; Hill, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Altering chromatin structure through histone posttranslational modifications has emerged as a key driver of transcriptional responses in cells. Modulation of these transcriptional responses by pharmacological inhibition of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs), a group of chromatin remodeling enzymes, has been successful in blocking the growth of some cancer cell types. These inhibitors also attenuate the pathogenesis of pathological cardiac remodeling by blunting and even reversing pathological hypertrophy. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical sensor and regulator of cell growth that, as part of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), drives changes in protein synthesis and metabolism in both pathological and physiological hypertrophy. We demonstrated through pharmacological and genetic methods that inhibition of class I HDACs suppressed pathological cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of mTOR activity. Mice genetically silenced for HDAC1 and HDAC2 had a reduced hypertrophic response to thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) and showed reduced mTOR activity. We determined that the abundance of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), an mTOR inhibitor, was increased through a transcriptional mechanism in cardiomyocytes when class I HDACs were inhibited. In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, loss of TSC2 abolished HDAC-dependent inhibition of mTOR activity, and increased expression of TSC2 was sufficient to reduce hypertrophy in response to phenylephrine. These findings point to mTOR and TSC2-dependent control of mTOR as critical components of the mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors blunt pathological cardiac growth. These results also suggest a strategy to modulate mTOR activity and facilitate the translational exploitation of HDAC inhibitors in heart disease. PMID:27048565

  20. [Traumatic neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Maurin, O; de Régloix, S; Caballé, D; Arvis, A-M; Perrochon, J-C; Tourtier, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic neurogenic shock is a rare but serious complication of spinal cord injury. It associates bradycardia and hypotension caused by a medullary trauma. It is life-threatening for the patient and it aggravates the neurological deficit. Strict immobilization and a quick assessment of the gravity of cord injury are necessary as soon as prehospital care has begun. Initial treatment requires vasopressors associated with fluid resuscitation. Steroids are not recommended. Early decompression is recommended for incomplete deficit seen in the first 6 hours. We relate the case of secondary spinal shock to a luxation C6/C7 treated in prehospital care. PMID:23566590

  1. [Traumatic disease and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, I I; Nasonkin, O S; Nemchenko, N S; Gol'm, N P; Zimina, Z P

    1984-06-01

    The authors have established that the traumatic disease is accompanied by phasic nonspecific changes of metabolism correlating with the trauma severity as well as with its specific features and outcomes. Within the first 3-7 days catabolic processes are found to prevail and metabolic acidosis develop. Later, anabolic processes become activated in the non-complicated course of the disease. Normalization of most biochemical processes is accomplished within 15-21 days. More pronounced and prolonged disturbances of metabolism are observed in complications and lethal outcomes. PMID:6474706

  2. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  3. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  4. [Missed traumatic diaphragmatic rupture--a legal insurance problem].

    PubMed

    Fabian, W; Reimer, H

    1991-08-01

    Even nowadays traumatic ruptures of the diaphragm cause diagnostic difficulties. Especially diaphragmatic ruptures of the so-called "late-type" are accompanied by uncharacteristic abdominal or cardio-respiratory complaints. These complaints depend on the type and the volume of the prolapsed organs. By hearing the classic previous history and symptoms the expert has to consider the diagnosis. Beside the previous history, the clinical evidents, the thoracic as well as the abdominal survey radiography, further informations can be given by Gastrointestinal passage with Gastrographin, by Colon contrast fluid enema and by abdominal CT. If there are no general contraindications, diaphragmatic ruptures have to be treated by surgery. There after patients are usually without complaints. Insurance-law-problems are unnecessarily created by "not identifying" fresh diaphragmatic ruptures and by "not considering" the possibility of "late-type" ruptures. PMID:1949474

  5. Investigation of shock-induced combustion past blunt projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to simulate shock-induced combustion in premixed hydrogen-air mixtures at various free-stream conditions and parameters. Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A seven-species, seven reactions finite rate hydrogen-air chemical reaction mechanism is used combined with a finite-difference, shock-fitting method to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. The study has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model.

  6. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  7. Severe Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation 40 Years After Blunt Chest Trauma.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, Simon; Heiberg, Johan; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Severe pulmonary valve regurgitation caused by a pulmonary valve tear is a rare complication to a blunt chest trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with pulmonary regurgitation originating from a chest trauma 40 years ago. Possible mechanisms are osseous pinch of the pulmonary valve between the anterior chest wall and the vertebral column, and retrograde blowout from severe compression of the lungs. PMID:26434447

  8. Pancreatic atrophy and diabetes mellitus following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mary J; Crudo, David F; Carlson, Terri L; Pedersen, Anita M; Keller, Laura

    2013-02-01

    Following pancreatic trauma, loss of uninjured parenchyma as a result of surgical management is expected, and atrophy of parenchyma following nonoperative management has been described. While endocrine insufficiency as a sequela of pancreatic trauma has been reported in adults, it is not a described entity in children. We report a case of pancreatic atrophy following blunt injury in an 8 year old boy who presented 3 years later with diabetes mellitus. Further analysis revealed significant genetic predisposition to diabetes. PMID:23414880

  9. Blood transfusion therapy for traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Mitsugi; Tahara, Yoshio; Iwashita, Masayuki; Kosuge, Takayuki; Toyoda, Hiroshi; Arata, Shinju; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion therapy (BTT), which represents transplantation of living cells, poses several risks. Although BTT is necessary for trauma victims with hemorrhagic shock, it may be futile for patients with blunt traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest (BT-CPA). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined the medical records of consecutive patients with T-CPA. The study period was divided into two periods: The first from 1995-1998, when we used packed red cells (PRC) regardless of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and the second from 1999-2004, when we did not use PRC before ROSC. The rates of ROSC, admission to the ICU, and survival-to-discharge were compared between these two periods. Results: We studied the records of 464 patients with BT-CPA (175 in the first period and 289 in the second period). Although the rates of ROSC and admission to the ICU were statistically higher in the first period, there was no statistical difference in the rate of survival-to-discharge between these two periods. In the first period, the rate of ROSC was statistically higher in the non-BTT group than the BTT group. However, for cases in which ROSC was performed and was successful, there were no statistical differences in the rate of admission and survival-to-discharge between the first and second group, and between the BTT and non-BTT group. Conclusion: Our retrospective consecutive study shows the possibility that BTT before ROSC for BT-CPA and a treatment strategy that includes this treatment improves the success rate of ROSC, but not the survival rate. BTT is thought to be futile as a treatment for BT-CPA before ROSC. PMID:23493056

  10. Diagnostic imaging of blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Brunese, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, and blunt trauma accounts for 80-90 % of abdominal injuries. The mechanism of trauma is quite similar to that of the adults, but there are important physiologic differences between children and adults in this field, such as the smaller blood vessels and the high vasoconstrictive response, leading to the spreading of a non-operative management. The early imaging of children undergoing a low-energy trauma can be performed by CEUS, a valuable diagnostic tool to demonstrate solid organ injuries with almost the same sensitivity of CT scans; nevertheless, as for as urinary tract injuries, MDCT remains still the technique of choice, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy, helping to discriminate between an intra-peritoneal form a retroperitoneal urinary leakage, requiring two different managements. The liver is the most common organ injured in blunt abdominal trauma followed by the spleen. Renal, pancreatic, and bowel injuries are quite rare. In this review we present various imaging findings of blunt abdominal trauma in children. PMID:27075018

  11. Right coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Ander; Alvarez-Contreras, Luis; Martín-Yuste, Victoria; Kasa, Gizem; Sabaté, Manel

    2012-04-01

    Chest trauma is a major health problem with a high mortality. Myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection following blunt chest trauma is a rare entity. We describe the case of an inferior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 61-year-old male without any relevant medical history was transported to a hospital after a low-velocity motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient developed severe chest pain and an ECG revealed inferior ST segment elevation. After ruling out aortic dissection with angio-CT, a coronary angiograph depicted a proximal occlusion of the right coronary artery. After thrombectomy, a typical image of coronary artery dissection was observed; the image persisted after several runs of thrombectomy and for that reason a bare metal stent was implanted with a good final angiographic result. Five days after admission the patient was discharged home. Cardiac contusion is not uncommon; however acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma. Thorough evaluation with clinical suspicion can lead to optimal medical care. PMID:24062888

  12. An animal model of emotional blunting in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pietersen, Charmaine Y; Bosker, Fokko J; Doorduin, Janine; Jongsma, Minke E; Postema, Folkert; Haas, Joseph V; Johnson, Michael P; Koch, Tineke; Vladusich, Tony; den Boer, Johan A

    2007-01-01

    Schizophrenia is often associated with emotional blunting--the diminished ability to respond to emotionally salient stimuli--particularly those stimuli representative of negative emotional states, such as fear. This disturbance may stem from dysfunction of the amygdala, a brain region involved in fear processing. The present article describes a novel animal model of emotional blunting in schizophrenia. This model involves interfering with normal fear processing (classical conditioning) in rats by means of acute ketamine administration. We confirm, in a series of experiments comprised of cFos staining, behavioral analysis and neurochemical determinations, that ketamine interferes with the behavioral expression of fear and with normal fear processing in the amygdala and related brain regions. We further show that the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol nor an experimental glutamate receptor 2/3 agonist, inhibits ketamine's effects and retains normal fear processing in the amygdala at a neurochemical level, despite the observation that fear-related behavior is still inhibited due to ketamine administration. Our results suggest that the relative resistance of emotional blunting to drug treatment may be partially due to an inability of conventional therapies to target the multiple anatomical and functional brain systems involved in emotional processing. A conceptual model reconciling our findings in terms of neurochemistry and behavior is postulated and discussed. PMID:18159243

  13. Massive rectal bleeding distant from a blunt car trauma.

    PubMed

    Gruden, E; Ragot, E; Arienzo, R; Revaux, A; Magri, M; Grossin, M; Leroy, C; Msika, S; Kianmanesh, R

    2010-09-01

    Mesenteric trauma is one of the possible injuries caused by the use of seat belts in case of motor vehicle crash. We report here a rare case of rectal bleeding by rupture of a mesosigmoid haematoma. An emergent laparotomy revealed a mesosigmoid haematoma with a centimetric rectal perforation. The wearing of safety belts added some specific blunt abdominal trauma, which directly depends on lap-and-sash belts. Mesenteric injuries are found out up to 5% of blunt abdominal traumas. "Seat belt mark" leads the surgical team to strongly suspect an intra-abdominal trauma. When "seat belt mark" sign is found, in patients with mild to severe blunt car injuries, CT-scan has to be realised to eliminate intra-abdominal complications, including mesenteric and mesosigmoid ones. In case of proved mesenteric haematoma associated to intestinal bleeding, a surgical treatment must be considered as first choice. Conservative approach remains possible in stable patients but surgical exploration remains necessary in unstable patients with active bleeding. PMID:20638207

  14. [Thoracic traumas and wounds in Libreville. Therapeutic aspects. Apropos of 106 cases].

    PubMed

    Ondo N'Dong, F; Rabibinongo, E; Ngo'o Ze, S; Bellamy, J; Mambana, C; Diane, C

    1993-01-01

    106 cases of trauma and chest wounds have been treated at the Jeanne Ebori Foundation from 1980 to 1990. They involved 90 men (85%) and 16 women (16%) with an average age of 35. The prevalent etiology was road accidents 55 (52%), followed by assaults 30 (28%). 22 blade wounds and 12 bullet wounds required coordinated surgical and intensive care at resuscitation. 19 pleuro-mediastinal spills, 8 intra-thoracic lesions with 6 vascular wounds and 1 heart wound. Surgical treatment required 13 immediate thoracotomies and in 3 cases with 1 associated laparotomy. We recorded 8 deaths (7%), 75 healings without consequences (71%) and 23 healings with consequences (22%). We noted the extreme gravity of the penetrating wounds especially bullet wounds, as well as that of the poly-traumatisms. This picture requires complex resuscitation management with surgical relays in a precarious respiratory context. PMID:8253885

  15. Traumatic Hyphema in an Intercollegiate Baseball Player: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stilger, Vincent G.; Alt, Jeromy M.; Robinson, Todd W.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To present the case of a collegiate baseball player struck in the right eye. Background: While attempting a bunt, a 20-year-old collegiate baseball player was hit in the right eye when the ball was deflected off the bat. The athlete bled from the nose, and the right eye swelled shut from eyelid edema. Initial nasal hemorrhage was controlled, and the athlete was referred to the emergency room for further care due to pain in the inferior orbit. Differential Diagnosis: Eyelid contusion, traumatic iritis, or traumatic microhyphema to the right eye secondary to blunt trauma. Treatment: Immediate treatment consisted of controlling the nasal bleeding with sterile gauze pads. Because of palpable tenderness over the inferior orbit, the athlete was immediately transported to the emergency room. Uniqueness: Hyphema is one of the most common sport-related eye injuries: the incidence is 12.2 cases per 100,000 population, with approximately 37% resulting from sports injury. Racquet sports, baseball, and softball account for more than half of all hyphema injuries in athletics. Individuals with traumatic hyphema rarely require surgery; however, proper initial care, treatment, and referral are imperative to a good prognosis. Conclusions: Athletic trainers need to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of hyphema and seek medical evaluation immediately in order to avoid secondary complications. With proper recognition, initial care and referral, and appropriate, well-fitted protective eyewear as needed, hyphema can have minimal complications, and the athlete may be able to compete again within 1 to 2 weeks. Imagesp26-a PMID:16558544

  16. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-01-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows’ leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks

  17. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  18. A rare autopsy case of traumatic rhabdomyolysis associated with intermittent assault.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Fumiko; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Go; Ishii, Namiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Abe, Hiroko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Sakuma, Ayaka; Nagasawa, Sayaka; Saito, Hisako; Yajima, Daisuke; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic rhabdomyolysis generally occurs after severe blunt trauma and is acute in onset, associated with severe disease, and potentially lethal. Accordingly, diagnosis of traumatic rhabdomyolysis in patients without massive subcutaneous or intramuscular hemorrhage is difficult, especially in the postmortem period, which is limited in terms of the availability of biochemical examination tools and accurate history of illness. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of death from traumatic rhabdomyolysis among individuals who did not pursue medical consultation. A previously healthy man in his early sixties had been punched and kicked several times in the previous 2months, but he had not gone to a hospital. He suddenly lost consciousness at his workplace approximately 5days after the most recent assault, and cardiopulmonary arrest occurred when the emergency service arrived. He died the same day, and a medicolegal autopsy was performed. Although several sites of minor subcutaneous and muscle hemorrhage were observed, the cause of death was unclear upon macroscopic assessment. Immunohistochemical staining revealed acute renal failure caused by rhabdomyolysis. We herein report a rare case of fatal traumatic rhabdomyolysis, seemingly associated with minor and apparently nonlethal muscle injury. PMID:27161922

  19. [Specificity of the psychological undertaking of a patient in thoracic oncology].

    PubMed

    Pujol, J-L

    2013-04-01

    The question raised by the title calls for a balanced answer. As a matter of fact, like in many clinical situations in which an illness threatens the patient's survival, the singularity of each case makes any attempt of generalization simplistic. Writing about the speficity of the psychological undertaking in thoracic oncology has to avoid two pitfalls: denying any psychosociological specificity of thoracic cancerology, and thus not providing the reader's understanding with anything which could help them read the most frequent problematics. And secondly turn clinical qualitative data into generalities stuck on each case, and rejecting the singularity of the sick person as a subject. As we attempt to avoid both traps, the three next points will be tackled: the announcement of cancer is prototypical of a trauma, and calls up an intense affect of anguish. This affect can be read through social representations, which intervene within the exchange doctor - sick person. The subjectivation of this relation cannot be understood without taking the environment into account, and especially what the affected person knows about cancer owing to their belonging to a socius. In the traumatic atmosphere thus created, the rereading of the phenomenons - cropping up between a somatic symptom experienced by the patient and a traumatic language revolving around the compulsory term "cancer" - is achieved according recurrent thematic lines. As we do not wish to reach the exhaustiveness of the significant unities, neither their reassembly, we will limit ourselves to the development of one main line: that of the relation to time, to temporality, and to presentism. PMID:23664288

  20. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing. PMID:11567193

  1. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: A Veritable Pandora's Box.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sobha S; Nayar, Jayashree

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in pleura, lung parenchyma, airways, and/or encompasses mainly four clinical entities-catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and lung nodules. The cases were studied retrospectively by reviewing the records at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, for duration of five years i.e., form March 2010-2014 and analysed for the clinical presentation and management of thoracic endometriosis syndrome. Catamenial breathlessness was the main symptom. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion were the findings on investigations. Histopathology report of endometriosis was present in three cases (50%). Conditions with excess oestrogen like endometriosis, fibroid, adenomyosis were diagnosed in these patients by pelvic scan. After the initial supportive treatment with hormones, pleurodesis, hysterectomy and lung decortication were the treatment modalities. Two cases that had multiple recurrences were diagnosed as disseminated TES. They underwent combined treatment of surgery and hormones. PMID:27190904

  2. Thoracic Aortic Dissection: Are Matrix Metalloproteinases Involved?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Shen, Ying H.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection, one of the major diseases affecting the aorta, carries a very high mortality rate. Improving our understanding of the pathobiology of this disease may help us develop medical treatments to prevent dissection and subsequent aneurysm formation and rupture. Dissection is associated with degeneration of the aortic media. Recent studies have shown increased expression and activation of a family of proteolytic enzymes—called matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)—in dissected aortic tissue, suggesting that MMPs may play a major role in this disease. Inhibition of MMPs may be beneficial in reducing MMP-mediated aortic damage associated with dissection. This article reviews the recent literature and summarizes our current understanding of the role of MMPs in the pathobiology of thoracic aortic dissection. The potential importance of MMP inhibition as a future treatment of aortic dissection is also discussed. PMID:19476747

  3. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  4. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cartes-Zumelzu, F; Lammer, J; Kretschmer, G; Hoelzenbein, T; Grabenwöger, M; Thurnher, S

    2000-03-01

    The standard technique for the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is elective open surgical repair with graft interposition. This standard approach, although steadily improving, is associated with high morbidity and substantial mortality rates and implies a major surgical procedure with lateral thoracotomy, use of cardiopulmonary bypass, long operation times and a variety of peri- and postoperative complications. This and the success of the first endoluminal treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms by Parodi et al. prompted the attention to be thrown on the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with endoluminal stent-grafts in many large centres. The aim of this new minimally invasive technique is to exclude the aneurysm from blood flow and in consequence to avoid pressure stress on the aneurysmatic aortic wall, by avoiding a large open operation with significant perioperative morbidity. The potentially beneficial effect of this new treatment approach was evaluated in the course of this study. PMID:10875224

  5. Imaging diagnosis--canine thoracic mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Echandi, Rita L; Morandi, Federica; Newman, Shelley J; Holford, Amy

    2007-01-01

    A 12-year-old neutered female Pembroke Welsh Corgi had a 2-month history of a progressive, productive cough nonresponsive to therapy. Mild pleural effusion, right middle lung lobe collapse, and multiple subpleural nodular lesions were detected in thoracic radiographs and computed tomography (CT) images. Histopathologic diagnosis of the pleural nodules was mesothelioma. Mesothelioma should be considered in patients where pleural masses are detected in radiographs or CT images. PMID:17508511

  6. Thoracic Cavernous Lymphangioma Provoking Massive Chyloptysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Robert; Hodges, Jeffrey; Harness-Brumley, Cayce; Girod, Carlos; Bartolome, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Chyloptysis is a relatively rare embodiment of disease that encompasses a lengthy differential and provides many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Presented here is the case of a young woman with massive chyloptysis due to a thoracic cavernous lymphangioma arising in the peripartum period. The severity of her condition mandated the use of cardiopulmonary bypass to resect her lymphangioma. We believe that the extent of her symptoms, etiology of disease, and surgical management represent a unique scenario in the literature. PMID:26425583

  7. Managing Dissections of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    WONG, DANIEL R.; LEMAIRE, SCOTT A.; COSELLI, JOSEPH S.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, and it requires timely and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Long-term antihypertensive therapy remains critical for the treatment of this disease. Surgical intervention, although still a formidable undertaking, has evolved to better address both acute and chronic dissection, and the results have improved. Basic and clinical research, as well as technological advances, have increased our understanding of this challenging disease state. PMID:18481490

  8. The European general thoracic surgery database project

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the “backbone” of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe. PMID:24868445

  9. The European general thoracic surgery database project.

    PubMed

    Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the "backbone" of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe. PMID:24868445

  10. IL-5 in post-traumatic eosinophilic pleural effusion.

    PubMed Central

    Schandené, L; Namias, B; Crusiaux, A; Lybin, M; Devos, R; Velu, T; Capel, P; Bellens, R; Goldman, M

    1993-01-01

    Thoracic trauma or pneumothorax can result in pleural fluid eosinophilia. In this study we investigated the role of the eosinophilopoietic cytokine IL-5 in three cases of post-traumatic eosinophilic pleural effusions (EPE). Using a specific immunoenzymatic assay, significant levels of IL-5 were found in EPE (range 100-3000 pg/ml), while IL-5 was undetectable (< 25 pg/ml) in corresponding serum samples and in non-eosinophilic pleural fluids. IL-5 present in pleural fluids was found bioactive in a proliferative assay using a mouse CTLL-2 cell line transfected with the cDNA corresponding to the alpha chain of the human IL-5 receptor. Using a reverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, we found IL-5 mRNA expression within pleural mononuclear cells from patients with EPE, but not in corresponding peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), confirming that IL-5 is synthesized locally in the pleural cavity. In the two cases in which pleural CD4+ cells were purified, these cells were identified as the major source of IL-5. Taken together, these data indicate that the development of post-traumatic EPE is related to a local secretion of IL-5 by CD4+ cells present in the pleural cavity. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8100745

  11. Impact of Endografting on the Thoracic Aortic Anatomy: Comparative Analysis of the Aortic Geometry before and after the Endograft Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franc; Pruvo, Jean Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2013-03-13

    PurposeAlthough the widespread acceptance of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) as a first-line treatment option for a multitude of thoracic aortic diseases, little is known about the consequences of the device implantation on the native aortic anatomy. We propose a comparative analysis of the pre- and postoperative geometry on a clinical series of patients and discuss the potential clinical implicationsMethodsCT pre- and postoperative acquisitions of 30 consecutive patients treated by TEVAR for different pathologies (20 thoracic aortic aneurysms, 6 false aneurysms, 3 penetrating ulcers, 1 traumatic rupture) were used to model the vascular geometry. Pre- and postoperative geometries were compared for each patient by pairing and matching the 3D models. An implantation site was identified, and focal differences were detected and described.ResultsSegmentation of the data sets was successfully performed for all 30 subjects. Geometry differences between the pre- and postoperative meshes were depicted in 23 patients (76 %). Modifications at the upper implantation site were detected in 14 patients (47 %), and among them, the implantation site involved the arch (Z0–3) in 11 (78 %).ConclusionModeling the vascular geometry on the basis of imaging data offers an effective tool to perform patient-specific analysis of the vascular geometry before and after the treatment. Future studies will evaluate the consequences of these changes on the aortic function.

  12. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat. For Consumers General Information Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder ( NIMH ) Anxiety Information Stress Information Depression Information St. John's Wort Information See more Research ...

  13. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician September 01, 2000, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000901/1035.html) Post-traumatic Stress Reactions Following ... Physician August 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/990800ap/524.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  14. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder . It can occur after you have gone through an extreme ... Normally, after the event, the body recovers. The stress hormones and chemicals the body releases due to ...

  15. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... some people, but not in others. Your genes, emotions, and family setting may all play roles. Past emotional trauma may increase your risk of PTSD after a recent traumatic event. With PTSD, the body's response to ...

  16. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such ... at different times for different people. Signs of PTSD may start soon after a frightening event and then continue. Other people ...

  17. Traumatic hand amputation while wakeboarding

    PubMed Central

    Woodacre, Timothy; Marshall, Morwena

    2011-01-01

    Wakeboarding is a sport increasing in popularity in the UK and the rest of the world. It is known to be associated with a high incidence of relatively minor injuries to the participating sportsperson. The authors present the case of a traumatic hand amputation to an associated third party and highlight the potential for serious injuries to all those directly involved with the sport. The authors demonstrate the successful application of military principles to a traumatic amputation in a civilian setting. PMID:22693318

  18. Spontaneous closure of macular hole following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Neto, Clovis Arcoverde; Pigosso, Douglas; Pacheco, Katia Delalíbera; Pereira, Viviane Oliveira; Patel, Pranav; Freitas, Luiz Guilherme; Ávila, Marcos Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Ocular trauma can result in macular hole and it can lead to complete loss of central vision. We are reporting a case of traumatic macular hole associated with retinal hemorrhages and choroidal ruptures with spontaneous resolution and total vision recovery. PMID:27433039

  19. Incomplete ventricular septal rupture following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Tsikaderis, D; Dardas, P; Hristoforidis, H

    2000-02-01

    Nonpenetrating cardiac trauma should be considered in the diagnosis of electrocardiographic changes after road traffic accidents. Transesophageal echocardiography is the most useful noninvasive technique for the diagnosis of cardiac trauma. This paper reports the case of a patient with traumatic contusion of the ventricular septum following a fall from a 20 m height onto the roof of a car. PMID:10676607

  20. Mothers' unresolved trauma blunts amygdala response to infant distress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neur...

  1. CT and MRI in the Evaluation of Thoracic Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging examinations to evaluate thoracic aortic diseases because of their high spatial and temporal resolutions, large fields of view, and multiplanar imaging reconstruction capabilities. CT and MRI play an important role not only in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic disease but also in the preoperative assessment and followup after treatment. In this review, the CT and MRI appearances of various acquired thoracic aortic conditions are described and illustrated. PMID:24396601

  2. Thoracic Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Middle Aortic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Taek; Lee, Mina; Kim, Young Sam; Yoon, Yong Han; Baek, Wan Ki

    2016-09-01

    Middle aortic syndrome is a rare disease defined as a segmental narrowing of the distal descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. A thoracoabdominal bypass or endovascular treatment is the choice of treatment. Endovascular therapy consists of a balloon dilatation and stent implantation. Recently, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has been widely used in a variety of aortic diseases. We report a case of middle aortic syndrome treated with a thoracic endovascular stent graft. PMID:27549552

  3. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  4. Blunt pancreatic trauma: experience at a rural referral center.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, G A

    1997-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare mechanism of injury, treatment methods, and outcome of blunt pancreas trauma patients transferred from another hospital to those of patients brought directly from the scene. A retrospective review was conducted of 6078 patients treated at a Level I trauma center from 1/1/90 to 12/31/94. Blunt pancreas injury was found in 39 (0.64%) patients (mean age, 33.2 years). Mechanism of injury included 34 (87%) motor vehicle crashes, 3 (8%) motorcycle crashes, and 2 (5%) other injuries. There were 11 transfer patients (28%), and 28 (72%) admitted directly from the scene. Eighty-two per cent of the motor vehicle crash patients were unrestrained, and 35 per cent had ethanol intoxication. Exploratory laparotomy was performed on 32 (82%); eight (25%) required repair or resection; 22 (69%) had trivial injuries, at most requiring drainage; and two (6.3%) exsanguinated. No patients required Whipple resection or pancreatiocojejunostomy. At operation, an average of 2.5 associated intra-abdominal injuries were found. Overall survival was 35 of 39 (90%). Among the patients brought directly to the trauma center, 93 per cent survived, whereas survival among transferred patients was 82 per cent (chi2 = 0.19; P = 0.66). Blunt pancreatic injuries vary in severity, but radical resection is rarely required. Lack of safety restraint and ethanol use are major risk factors. Despite the high likelihood of associated injuries, survivability is high. No difference in outcome was seen between directly admitted and transferred patients. PMID:9036900

  5. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described. PMID:11307682

  6. Transition and Turbulence Modeling for Blunt-Body Wake Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Robert P.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hassan, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    Aerobraking has been proposed as an efficient means of decelerating spacecraft for planetary missions. Most current aerobrake designs feature a blunt forebody shielding the payload from the intense heat generated during atmospheric entry. Although this forebody will absorb the largest portion of the heat pulse, accurate prediction of heating in the near wake is of great importance, since large local heating values can occur at points of shear-layer impingement. In order to address the various issues associated with these blunt-body wake flowfields, the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) formed Working Group 18 in 1992. One of the objectives of this activity was to examine real-gas effects in high-speed flow fields around a 70 deg. blunted cone. To date, many researchers have conducted experiments using this geometry in various facilities, such as the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel at Cubric/Calspan and the HEG shock tunnel at DLR-Goettingen. Several computational studies have also been conducted in concert with these tests. Many of the experimental results have indicated the possible presence of a transitional shear layer through a large increase in heat transfer downstream of the reattachment point. The presence of transition could in fact lead to much higher peak heating than if the separated flow is entirely laminar or turbulent. In the shock-tunnel tests, however, it is difficult to separate such viscous-flow phenomena from real-gas effects. In order to help make this distinction, Horvath et al. recently conducted a set of experiments in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel, and compared the results to laminar Navier-Stokes calculations. They found heat-transfer distributions similar to those obtained in the high-enthalpy facilities, with the measured peak heating along the sting support markedly greater than that predicted by the laminar computations. These trends point to the need to find transitional and turbulent

  7. Blunt trauma to large vessels: a mathematical study

    PubMed Central

    Ismailov, Rovshan M; Shevchuk, Nikolai A; Schwerha, Joseph; Keller, Lawrence; Khusanov, Higmat

    2004-01-01

    Background Blunt trauma causes short-term compression of some or all parts of the chest, abdomen or pelvis and changes hemodynamics of the blood. Short-term compression caused by trauma also results in a short-term decrease in the diameter of blood vessels. It has been shown that with a sudden change in the diameter of a tube or in the direction of the flow, the slower-moving fluid near the wall stops or reverses direction, which is known as boundary layer separation (BLS). We hypothesized that a sudden change in the diameter of elastic vessel that results from compression may lead not only to BLS but also to other hemodynamic changes that can damage endothelium. Methods We applied Navier-Stokes, multiphase and boundary layer equations to examine such stress. The method of approximation to solve the BL equations was used. Experiments were conducted in an aerodynamic tube, where incident flow velocity and weight of carriage with particles before and after blowing were measured. Results We found that sudden compression resulting from trauma leads to (1) BLS on the curved surface of the vessel wall; (2) transfer of laminar boundary layer into turbulent boundary layer. Damage to the endothelium can occur if compression is at least 25% and velocity is greater than 2.4 m/s or if compression is at least 10% and velocity is greater than 2.9 m/s. Conclusion Our research may point up new ways of reducing the damage from blunt trauma to large vessels. It has the potential for improvement of safety features of motor vehicles. This work will better our understanding of the precise mechanics and critical variables involved in diagnosis and prevention of blunt trauma to large vessels. PMID:15153246

  8. Optimum shape of a blunt forebody in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1989-01-01

    The optimum shape of a blunt forebody attached to a symmetric wedge or cone is determined. The length of the forebody, its semi-thickness or base radius, the nose radius and the radius of the fillet joining the forebody to the wedge or cone are specified. The optimum shape is composed of simple curves. Thus experimental models can be built readily to investigate the utilization of aerodynamic heating for boundary layer control. The optimum shape based on the modified Newtonian theory can also serve as the preliminary shape for the numerical solution of the optimum shape using the governing equations for a compressible inviscid or viscous flow.

  9. An alternative option in the management of blunt splenic injury

    PubMed Central

    Bodansky, David; Jones, Robert; Tucker, Olga N.

    2013-01-01

    Splenic injury is a preventable cause of mortality following blunt trauma. The majority of splenic injuries can be managed conservatively. Laparotomy is indicated in the haemodynamically unstable patient, or those with other intra-abdominal injuries requiring surgery. Angio-embolization can be used to achieve haemostasis and preserve splenic parenchyma. The expertise and experience of the multidisciplinary trauma team and resources of the receiving facility are critical in determining the optimal management approach. We present a patient with a successful outcome following selective angio-embolization for ongoing bleeding from a Grade 4 splenic injury. PMID:24964468

  10. Post-traumatic neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Daniel H; Goldstein, Lee E; Kiernan, Patrick T; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. Concussive and subconcussive forms of closed-head injury due to impact or blast neurotrauma represent the most common types of TBI in civilian and military settings. It is becoming increasingly evident that TBI can lead to persistent, long-term debilitating effects, and in some cases, progressive neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The epidemiological literature suggests that a single moderate-to-severe TBI may be associated with accelerated neurodegeneration and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or motor neuron disease. However, the pathologic phenotype of these post-traumatic neurodegenerations is largely unknown and there may be pathobiological differences between post-traumatic disease and the corresponding sporadic disorder. By contrast, the pathology of CTE is increasingly well known and is characterized by a distinctive pattern of progressive brain atrophy and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau neurofibrillary and glial tangles, dystrophic neurites, 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) neuronal and glial aggregates, microvasculopathy, myelinated axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and white matter degeneration. Clinically, CTE is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory deficits, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and most often progress slowly over decades. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. Critical knowledge gaps include elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms, identification of genetic risk factors, and clarification of relevant variables-including age at exposure to trauma, history of prior and subsequent head trauma, substance use, gender, stress, and comorbidities-all of which may contribute to risk profiles and the development of post-traumatic

  11. Burnei’s anterior transthoracic retropleural approach of the thoracic spine: a new operative technique in the treatment of spinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gavriliu, TS; Japie, EM; Ghiță, RA; Hamei, Ș; Dughilă, C; Țiripa, IL; Elnayef, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Up to the middle of the last century, the thoracic spine, especially in its upper part, has been considered an unapproachable site, a no-man’s land, but the constant evolution of medicine imposed techniques of the spine at these levels in order to solve a large area of pathology (infectious, tumoral, traumatic, and last but not least, deformative). This way, a series of anterior approaches allowed surgeons to gain access to the anterior part of the spine and the posterior mediastinum. The approaches described by Hodgson, Mirbaha or transthoracic transpleural approach (T4-T11), are enumerated. The idea to allow a more visible and extensive approach, but to avoid respiratory issues due to the lesion of the pleura, led to the description of a new anterior approach by Burnei in 2000. Material and method: Burnei’s approach represents an anterior approach to the thoracic spine, being a transthoracic and retropleural one. This approach allows a large area of spinal pathology due to infectious, traumatic, tumoral and degenerative (idiopathic or congenital scoliosis) causes. Statistically, this approach has been performed more frequently in cases of spinal instrumentation after diskectomy, in order to perform a partial correction of severe, rigid idiopathic scoliosis with more than 70 degrees Cobb and in cases of congenital scoliosis for hemivertebra resection and somatic synthesis to correct the scoliotic curve. Results: This kind of anterior approach allows the surgeon a large visibility of the anterior thoracic spine, diskectomies of up to 5 levels to tender the curve of the deformity and to ensure somatic or/ and transpedicular synthesis of up to 6 thoracic vertebrae. By performing a thoracotomy involving the resection of the posterior arches of the ribs, a thoracoplasty is also ensured with functional and aesthetic effects, by ameliorating the thoracic hump due to the scoliotic deformity. Conclusions: Burnei’s approach joins all the other anterior

  12. Injury biomechanics, neuropathology, and simplified physics of explosive blast and impact mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bandak, F A; Ling, G; Bandak, A; De Lanerolle, N C

    2015-01-01

    Explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact to the head are two types of loading shown to result in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). While mTBI from these two causes shares some common features behaviorally, there are distinct differences in the pathophysiology of the underlying injury mechanisms. Various elucidations have been offered in the literature to explain the organic damage associated with mTBI resulting from both types of loading. The current state of understanding in this field is somewhat limited by the degree of appreciation of the physics and biomechanics governing the effects of explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact on the head, which has resulted in the various approaches to the investigation of the operative brain injury "wounding mechanisms". In this chapter we provide a simplified description of terminology associated with forces on the head from explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact, to assist readers in the field in evaluating interpretations of brain injury "wounding" processes. Remarkably, mTBI from either loading is shown generally to result in only a small loss of neurons, with hippocampal neurons appearing to be particularly vulnerable to explosive blast shock waves. Explosive blast studies in large animal models show a unique pattern of periventricular injury, which is different from the classic diffuse axonal injury. Both astrocyte and microglial activation are also seen in explosive blast as well as impact trauma, but this may be a general secondary brain injury response, nonspecific to explosive blast or blunt trauma. Additionally, while moderate to severe impact closed head injuries sometimes result in petechial hemorrhages or hematomas, they do not appear to be associated with explosive blast mTBI even with repeated exposure to blasts. PMID:25702211

  13. The effect of glycyrrhizic acid on traumatic spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sehitoglu, M H; Guven, M; Yüksel, Y; Akman, T; Bozkurt Aras, A; Farooqi, A A; Cosar, M

    2016-01-01

    Spine injury associated with traumatic spinal cord injury eventuates in oxidative stress, inflammation and neuronal apoptosis. The aim of this study is to find out whether the glycyrrhizic acid treatment protects spinal cord from traumatic injuries in rats. To this end, the rats were divided into three groups: group I; control group (no drug or operation, n=8), group II; traumatic spinal cord injury group (TSCI, n=8) and group III; glycyrrhizic acid group (TSCI-GA, 80 mg/kg, n=8). Total laminectomy was performed at T10 level. A balloon angioplasty catheter was inserted into the T9 level thoracic spinal cord extradurally. The rats were evaluated with the Tarlov Scale. After 24 hours, spinal cord tissues were taken for biochemical and histopathological examinations. TSCI effectuates unwanted results on tissues, antioxidant systems and cell membranes. Antioxidant enzyme level decreased and lipid peroxidation increased. However, TSCI led to inflammation and apoptosis. Glycyrrhizic acid treatment provided a significant decrease in lipid peroxidation in group III in comparison with group II. Moreover, nuclear respiratory factor 1 levels and superoxide dismutase activity of group III were significantly higher than group II (p<0.05). The histopathological and immunohistochemical results revealed that the numbers of apoptotic and necrotic neuron, edema, hemorrhage, inflammatory cells, NF-κB and S100B expressions were significantly lower than group II (p<0.05). Our study showed that the glycyrrhizic acid treatment reduced oxidative stress and inflammation, and promoted the neuronal functions in traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:27188862

  14. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended. PMID:25592052

  15. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research. PMID:23314081

  16. Video-Assisted Thoracic Sympathectomy for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Milanez de Campos, Jose Ribas; Kauffman, Paulo; Gomes, Oswaldo; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    By the 1980s, endoscopy was in use by some groups in sympathetic denervation of the upper limbs with vascular indications. Low morbidity, cosmetic results, reduction in the incidence of Horner syndrome, and the shortened time in hospital made video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy (VATS) better accepted by those undergoing treatment for hyperhidrosis. Over the last 25 years, this surgical procedure has become routine in the treatment of hyperhidrosis, leading to a significant increase in the number of papers on the subject in the literature. PMID:27427529

  17. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942

  18. Dynamic thoracoplasty for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kaddoura, I L; Obeid, M Y; Mroueh, S M; Nasser, A A

    2001-11-01

    The life-saving procedures to expand the chests of infants born with Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy provide a static solution incapable of responding to the growth demands of thriving patients. We describe an instrument that provided a dynamic solution for an infant, where an initial methyl methacrylate midsternotomy spacer placed at 4 months of age was followed at 11 months with recurrence of his difficulties. At 8 months after the second operation the patient was stable and thriving with no recurrence of symptoms. The instrument modifications, limitations, and possible complications are described. PMID:11722089

  19. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  20. Supporting the early use of echocardiography in blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This case reports a very unusual mechanism of cardiac rupture following an episode of multiple blunt chest trauma. The patient, a professional jockey, was trampled by horses, and although shocked on hospital admission, he did not present with signs and symptoms that were consistent with cardiogenic shock. This case highlights the difficult and subjective nature of clinical examination in emergency situations when dealing with cases of acute cardiac tamponade. It further emphasises the lack of sensitivity of traditional trauma imaging and investigative approaches such as the standard anteroposterior chest X-ray and electrocardiogram. The diagnosis of acute cardiac tamponade was not made until tertiary-care-centre arrival, when ultrasound technology in the form of bedside echocardiography was used, facilitating emergency surgery to repair a ruptured left ventricle. It is hoped that the sharing of this case will alert fellow clinicians to this uncommon but possible mechanism of cardiac rupture and subsequent tamponade, encourage the early use of echocardiography at the bedside in hypotensive blunt chest trauma cases and reinforce the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support course in treating trauma victims. PMID:22870886

  1. Leading-edge receptivity for blunt-nose bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    This research program investigates boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region for bodies with blunt leading edges. Receptivity theory provides the link between the unsteady distrubance environment in the free stream and the initial amplitudes of the instability waves in the boundary layer. This is a critical problem which must be addressed in order to develop more accurate prediction methods for boundary-layer transition. The first phase of this project examines the effects of leading-edge bluntness and aerodynamic loading for low Mach number flows. In the second phase of the project, the investigation is extended to supersonic Mach numbers. Singular perturbation techniques are utilized to develop an asymptotic theory for high Reynolds numbers. In the first year, the asymptotic theory was developed for leading-edge receptivity in low Mach number flows. The case of a parabolic nose is considered. Substantial progress was made on the Navier-Sotkes computations. Analytical solutions for the steady and unsteady potential flow fields were incorporated into the code, greatly expanding the types of free-stream disturbances that can be considered while also significantly reducing the the computational requirements. The time-stepping algorithm was modified so that the potential flow perturbations induced by the unsteady pressure field are directly introduced throughout the computational domain, avoiding an artificial 'numerical diffusion' of these from the outer boundary. In addition, the start-up process was modified by introducing the transient Stokes wave solution into the downstream boundary conditions.

  2. Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Blunt Body Trim Tab Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Trim tabs are aerodynamic control surfaces that can allow an entry vehicle to meet aerodynamic performance requirements while reducing or eliminating the use of ballast mass and providing a capability to modulate the lift-to-drag ratio during entry. Force and moment data were obtained on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The data were used to parametrically assess the supersonic aerodynamic performance of trim tabs and to understand the influence of tab area, cant angle, and aspect ratio. Across the range of conditions tested (Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5; angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg; angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg), the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than effects from varying tab aspect ratio. Aerodynamic characteristics exhibited variation with Mach number and forebody geometry over the range of conditions tested. Overall, the results demonstrate that trim tabs are a viable approach to satisfy aerodynamic performance requirements of blunt body entry vehicles with minimal ballast mass. For a 70deg sphere-cone, a tab with 3% area of the forebody and canted approximately 35deg with no ballast mass was found to give the same trim aerodynamics as a baseline model with ballast mass that was 5% of the total entry mass.

  3. Direct simulation of hypersonic flows over blunt slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Cuda, V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a numerical study of low-density hypersonic flow about cylindrically blunted wedges and spherically blunted cones with body half angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg are presented. Most of the transitional flow regime encountered during entry between the free molecule and continuum regimes is simulated for a reentry velocity of 7.5 km/s by including freestream conditions of 70 to 100 km. The bodies are at zero angle of incidence and have diffuse and finite catalytic surfaces. Translational, thermodynamic, and chemical nonequilibrium effects are considered in the numerical simulation by utilizing the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The numerical simulations show that noncontinuum effects such as surface temperature jump, and velocity slip are evident for all cases considered. The onset of chemical dissociation occurs at a simulated altitude of 96 km for the two-dimensional configurations. Comparisons between the DSMC and continuum viscous shock-layer calculations highlight the significant difference in flowfield structure predicted by the two methods.

  4. An Animal Model of Emotional Blunting in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pietersen, Charmaine Y.; Bosker, Fokko J.; Doorduin, Janine; Jongsma, Minke E.; Postema, Folkert; Haas, Joseph V.; Johnson, Michael P.; Koch, Tineke; Vladusich, Tony; den Boer, Johan A.

    2007-01-01

    Schizophrenia is often associated with emotional blunting—the diminished ability to respond to emotionally salient stimuli—particularly those stimuli representative of negative emotional states, such as fear. This disturbance may stem from dysfunction of the amygdala, a brain region involved in fear processing. The present article describes a novel animal model of emotional blunting in schizophrenia. This model involves interfering with normal fear processing (classical conditioning) in rats by means of acute ketamine administration. We confirm, in a series of experiments comprised of cFos staining, behavioral analysis and neurochemical determinations, that ketamine interferes with the behavioral expression of fear and with normal fear processing in the amygdala and related brain regions. We further show that the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol nor an experimental glutamate receptor 2/3 agonist, inhibits ketamine's effects and retains normal fear processing in the amygdala at a neurochemical level, despite the observation that fear-related behavior is still inhibited due to ketamine administration. Our results suggest that the relative resistance of emotional blunting to drug treatment may be partially due to an inability of conventional therapies to target the multiple anatomical and functional brain systems involved in emotional processing. A conceptual model reconciling our findings in terms of neurochemistry and behavior is postulated and discussed. PMID:18159243

  5. Left anterior descending coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Ameli, Mohammad Ali; Amiri, Elaheh; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Heidarali, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery dissection is a well-known albeit unusual complication of blunt chest trauma. It is also an uncommon cause of myocardial infarction. Only a few such cases have been reported, probably due to the high rate of sudden death. We report a case of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery dissection in a healthy 38-year-old female caused by blunt chest trauma. The patient was referred to our hospital with a complaint of chest pain. Electrocardiography showed T-wave inversion, echocardiography a revealed circumferential pericardial effusion, and the coronary angiogram demonstrated a thrombotic dissection of the LAD.  Troponin I was the only biomarker with elevated level. CT coronary angiography was performed using the subtotal occlusion of the LAD and illustrated a relatively good LAD run-off, and thallium scintigraphy displayed viable myocardium in this territory. Despite the total occlusion of the LAD in our case, myocardial injury was not significant due to the relatively good LAD run-off. She underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery with an excellent result. PMID:24444069

  6. Trauma scores and neuron-specific enolase, cytokine and C-reactive protein levels as predictors of mortality in patients with blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Sogut, O; Guloglu, C; Orak, M; Sayhan, M B; Gokdemir, M T; Ustundag, M; Akkus, Z

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), cytokine and high-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP) levels, along with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Revised Trauma Score (RTS), as predictors of mortality in the early posttraumatic period, in 100 Turkish patients with blunt head trauma. Overall patient mortality was 27%. There was a significant association between age and mortality, and mortality was negatively correlated with GCS and RTS. Head injury severity (GCS) was significantly related to NSE, hs-CRP, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels. Mortality correlated positively with IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha and hs-CRP levels. NSE, hs-CRP, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha levels were significantly higher in non-survivors compared with survivors. GCS score < or =8, younger age and NSE levels were significant independent predictors of mortality. During the early post-traumatic period, NSE may be an objective alternative criterion to the GCS, in the management of patients with blunt head trauma. PMID:21309485

  7. Door Velocity and Occupant Distance Affect Lateral Thoracic Injury Mitigation with Side Airbag

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, Jason J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between thoracic injury risk and parameters of door velocity and occupant distance was delineated in blunt lateral impact with side airbag deployment. A sled impact model was exercised with the validated MADYMO fiftieth percentile facet occupant model and a generalized finite element torso side airbag. Impact velocity was incremented from 4.0 to 9.0 m/s; occupant-airbag distance (at time of airbag activation) was incremented from 2.0 to 24.0 cm; simulations without airbag were also examined. Using compression, deflection rate, and the Viscous Criterion, airbag performance was characterized with respect to occupant injury risk at three points of interest: occupant distance of most protection, distance of greatest injury risk, and the newly defined critical distance. The occupant distance which demonstrated the most airbag protection, i.e., lowest injury risk, increased with increasing impact velocity. Greatest injury risk resulted when the occupant was nearest the airbag regardless of impact velocity. The critical distance was defined as the farthest distance at which airbag deployment exacerbated injury risk. This critical distance only varied considering chest compression, between 3 and 10 cm from the airbag, but did not vary when the Viscous Criterion were evaluated. At impact velocities less than or equal to 6 m/s, the most protective occupant location was within 2 cm of the critical distance at which the airbag became harmful. Therefore, injury mitigation with torso airbag may be more difficult to achieve at lower ΔV. PMID:21376873

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions Share Tweet Linkedin ... top What to Do if You Suspect Traumatic Brain Injury Anyone with signs of moderate or severe ...

  9. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with post-traumatic stress need early treatment with methods that are used to treat other trauma victims. ... symptoms of post-traumatic stress. The crisis intervention method aims to relieve distress and help the patient ...

  10. Interventional Treatment for Post-traumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Conidi, Francis X

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache (migraine) is the most common symptom of concussion and traumatic brain injury. An expert opinion-based review along with a literature review (PubMed) was conducted looking at known interventional procedures for post-traumatic headache using the keywords post-traumatic headache, post-traumatic migraine headache, concussion, mild traumatic brain injury, and traumatic brain injury and the following categories: mechanism, pathophysiology, treatment, physical therapy, neurostimulation, Botox@/Onabotulinum toxin, and surgical intervention. The results returned a total of 181 articles of which 52 were selected. None of the articles included randomized placebo-controlled studies, and most were either prospective or retrospective case analysis and/or review articles or consensus opinion papers, with most studies yielding positive results. Despite a lack of hard evidence, interventional procedures, alone or in combination, appear to be an effective treatment for post-traumatic headaches. PMID:27130542

  11. Traumatic corneal endothelial rings from homemade explosives.

    PubMed

    Ng, Soo Khai; Rudkin, Adam K; Galanopoulos, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Traumatic corneal endothelial rings are remarkably rare ocular findings that may result from blast injury. We present a unique case of bilateral traumatic corneal endothelial rings secondary to blast injury from homemade explosives. PMID:23474743

  12. Use of Marijuana and Blunts among Adolescents: 2005. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report focuses on past month marijuana and blunt use among youths aged 12 to 17.7 Data are presented by demographic and academic characteristics. All findings are based on data from the 2005 NSDUH. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) includes questions on the use of marijuana and blunts. Respondents who reported lifetime use of…

  13. Availability of Tobacco Products Associated with Use of Marijuana Cigars (Blunts)

    PubMed Central

    Juliet, P. Lee; Morrison, Chris; Bridget, Freisthler

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study examines factors associated with availability of tobacco products for marijuana cigars (i.e., blunts) in 50 non-contiguous mid-sized California communities. Methods The study is based on data collected in 943 tobacco outlets. Neighborhood demographics, community adult marijuana prevalence, medical marijuana policy and access to medical marijuana dispensaries and delivery services were included. Results Multilevel logistic regression analyses indicated that compared with small markets, availability of tobacco products associated with use of blunts was significantly higher in convenience stores, smoke/tobacco shops and liquor stores. None of the neighborhood demographics were associated with availability of blunt wrappers and only a small percent of Whites was positively associated with availability of blunt cigars, small cigars or cigarillos at the store. Controlling for outlet type and neighborhood demographics, higher city prevalence of adult marijuana use was associated with greater availability of blunt wrappers. Also, policy that permits medical marijuana dispensaries or private cultivation was positively associated with availability of tobacco products for blunts. Density of medical marijuana dispensaries and delivery services, however, was negatively associated with greater availability of these products at tobacco outlets. Conclusions Results suggest that availability of tobacco products associated with blunts is similar in neighborhoods with different socioeconomic status and racial and ethnic composition. Results also suggest the important role that community norms that support marijuana use or legalization of medical marijuana and medical marijuana policy may play in increasing availability of tobacco products associated with blunts. PMID:24290366

  14. Laboratory simulation of rocket-borne D-region blunt probe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, L. B.

    1977-01-01

    The flow of weakly ionized plasmas that is similar to the flow that occurs over rocket-borne blunt probes as they pass through the lower ionosphere has been simulated in a scaled laboratory environment, and electron collection D region blunt probe theories have been evaluated.

  15. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  16. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the assessment of polytrauma patient, an accurate diagnostic study protocol with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. Computed Tomography (CT) is the standard reference in the emergency for evaluating the patients with abdominal trauma. Ultrasonography (US) has a high sensitivity in detecting free fluid in the peritoneum, but it does not show as much sensitivity for traumatic parenchymal lesions. The use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) improves the accuracy of the method in the diagnosis and assessment of the extent of parenchymal lesions. Although the CEUS is not feasible as a method of first level in the diagnosis and management of the polytrauma patient, it can be used in the follow-up of traumatic injuries of abdominal parenchymal organs (liver, spleen and kidneys), especially in young people or children. PMID:23902930

  17. [Extracorporeal lung support and endovascular stent in traumatic aortic rupture and severe lung failure].

    PubMed

    Schmid, F X; Philipp, A; Faltermeier, H; Schädinger, U; Link, J; Birnbaum, D

    2002-07-01

    Blunt thoracic injury in association with aortic rupture represents a life-threatening situation. Surgical repair used to be the preferred method of treatment. Because most patients are multiple trauma patients including head injuries, bone fractures and respiratory failure, urgent surgical procedures portend excessively high morbidity and mortality rates. Delay in operative management bears the risk of exsanguinating hemorrhage, secondary complications, prolonged hospital stay with increased costs. We present here an alternative treatment protocol including pumpless extracorporal lung assist and endovascular aortic stent graft placement in a 20-year old traffic accident victim. This procedure may be an especially useful treatment option in managing patients with complex lung and aortic pathology primarily not suitable for transportation or surgery. PMID:12219652

  18. A Case of Traumatic Flail Chest Requiring Stabilization with Surgical Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Evman, Serdar; Kolbas, Ilker; Dogruyol, Talha; Tezel, Cagatay

    2015-01-01

    Background Flail chest is the most serious complication that may occur after thoracic trauma. In this article, we present a case of flail chest caused by blunt chest trauma, which presented dramatic clinical improvement following rib fixation and chest wall reconstruction. Case Description A 53-year-old male patient with flail chest because of the trauma who had been followed in intensive care unit for mechanical ventilatory support underwent chest wall stabilization with titanium reconstruction plate and screws. Conclusion The main objective is surgical stabilization of the chest wall in cases of flail chest with a parenchymal damage because of the severe rib fracture, which need prolonged mechanical ventilation. PMID:26693118

  19. [Acute post-traumatic aortic insufficiency: transesophageal echocardiography in the diagnosis and therapy of the lesions].

    PubMed

    Brandstätt, P; Carlioz, R; Fontaine, B; Hémery, Y; Pats, B; Chapuis, O; Lang-Lazdunsky, L; Jancovici, R; Burlaton, J P; Hvass, U

    1998-10-01

    A 58-year-old car driver suffered a road accident responsible for severe blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma. Transoephageal echocardiography, performed following the secondary development of a diastolic murmur, confirmed the presence of aortic incompetence due to commissural avulsion and guided the surgical treatment, which consisted of commissural suspension under cardiopulmonary bypass via a mini transverse trans-sternal incision. The rarity of acute aortic valve incompetence following non-penetrating thoracic trauma is illustrated by the data of the literature. This lesion is due to either avulsion of a sigmoid cusp or commissure, or laceration of the valvular tissue. Transthoracic echocardiography confirms the reality of aortic incompetence suggested clinically by appearance of a diastolic murmur, but confirmation of the mechanism of the lesions is based on transoesophageal echocardiography which allows perfectly safe and rapid visualization of the mechanism of the valvular lesion, investigation of associated lesions and guidance of therapeutic management. PMID:9809140

  20. Thoracic-pelvic dysostosis: a 'new' autosomal dominant form.

    PubMed Central

    Bankier, A; Danks, D M

    1983-01-01

    A form of thoracic and pelvic dysostosis is reported in a mother and her son. The short ribs caused respiratory distress in the baby and raised the possibility of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD). The radiological features, however, distinguish this benign condition from ATD and other described skeletal dysplasias. Images PMID:6620328

  1. Anomalous azygos vein: a potential danger during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Sieunarine, K; May, J; White, G H; Harris, J P

    1997-08-01

    A report of a patient with an azygos lobe and an associated anomalous azygos vein covering the upper thoracic sympathetic chain. This anomaly poses a significant risk during the procedure of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. A chest X-ray is useful in detecting this anomaly and alerting the surgeon to potential problems. PMID:9287933

  2. Surgical efficacy of minimally invasive thoracic discectomy.

    PubMed

    Elhadi, Ali M; Zehri, Aqib H; Zaidi, Hasan A; Almefty, Kaith K; Preul, Mark C; Theodore, Nicholas; Dickman, Curtis A

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to determine the clinical indications and surgical outcomes for thoracoscopic discectomy. Thoracic disc disease is a rare degenerative process. Thoracoscopic approaches serve to minimize tissue injury during the approach, but critics argue that this comes at the cost of surgical efficacy. Current reports in the literature are limited to small institutional patient series. We systematically identified all English language articles on thoracoscopic discectomy with at least two patients, published from 1994 to 2013 on MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Google Scholar. We analyzed 12 articles that met the inclusion criteria, five prospective and seven retrospective studies comprising 545 surgical patients. The overall complication rate was 24% (n=129), with reported complications ranging from intercostal neuralgia (6.1%), atelectasis (2.8%), and pleural effusion (2.6%), to more severe complications such as pneumonia (0.8%), pneumothorax (1.3%), and venous thrombosis (0.2%). The average reported postoperative follow-up was 20.5 months. Complete resolution of symptoms was reported in 79% of patients, improvement with residual symptoms in 10.2%, no change in 9.6%, and worsening in 1.2%. The minimally invasive endoscopic approaches to the thoracic spine among selected patients demonstrate excellent clinical efficacy and acceptable complication rates, comparable to the open approaches. Disc herniations confined to a single level, with small or no calcifications, are ideal for such an approach, whereas patients with calcified discs adherent to the dura would benefit from an open approach. PMID:26206758

  3. Developing the academic thoracic surgeon: teaching surgery.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Greene, P S

    2000-04-01

    Teaching surgery can be a very gratifying experience for those of us involved in academic thoracic surgery. Fundamentals of a good residency program require that patients should always be placed in the highest priority. However, the residency program should also be committed to teaching as a priority. Creating the proper operating room environment is essential for optimal conduct of the operation. This environment is similar to that of the airline industry, which is known as crew or cockpit resource management. The design of a teaching program needs to have evaluation as one of its key elements. In addition to resident evaluation, it is also important to have faculty evaluation by the residents. The goal of any residency program should be to foster the development of the future leaders in our specialty. The information contained within this article represents the art and science of teaching thoracic surgery as applied by the faculty in the Division of Cardiac Surgery at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. PMID:10727957

  4. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  5. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High-Velocity Penetration, Blunt Impact, and Blast Injuries to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T.; Bocchieri, Robert T.; Walilko, Timothy J.; Burns, Jennie M.; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems. PMID:25999910

  6. When physics meets biology: low and high-velocity penetration, blunt impact, and blast injuries to the brain.

    PubMed

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T; Bocchieri, Robert T; Walilko, Timothy J; Burns, Jennie M; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems. PMID:25999910

  7. Trends in blunt abdominal trauma among hospital in-patients. Developments in a Swedish rural district over 30 years.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D; Hedelin, H

    1979-01-01

    To analyse changes in background factors, injury pattern, and prognosis regarding blunt abdominal trauma in Sweden, the 30-year postwar (1946--75) development was investigated in a rural district. 396 patients were treated, showing a great increase during the last 5 years. The highest frequency was seen in patients aged 11--30 years. Abdominal trauma occurred most commonly during July and August. The growing aetiological importance of road accidents is shown. Equestrian accidents were common early in the period and again towards the end. The incidence of cerebrally confused patients increased. The organs most commonly traumatized were kidney, liver, and spleen. The frequency of multiple intra-abdominal injuries and also associated extra-abdominal injuries increased with time. There was a tendency towards shorter hospital stays. Mortality rates did not change during the period, even though injuries have become increasingly severe (judged by the Injury Severity Score). It is concluded that the improved care of patients compensated precisely for the increased severity of injuries, as reflected in mortality. PMID:432565

  8. The study protocol for the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The utility of advanced prehospital interventions for severe blunt traumatic brain injury (BTI) remains controversial. Of all trauma patient subgroups it has been anticipated that this patient group would most benefit from advanced prehospital interventions as hypoxia and hypotension have been demonstrated to be associated with poor outcomes and these factors may be amenable to prehospital intervention. Supporting evidence is largely lacking however. In particular the efficacy of early anaesthesia/muscle relaxant assisted intubation has proved difficult to substantiate. Methods This article describes the design and protocol of the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT) which is a randomised controlled single centre trial of physician prehospital care (delivering advanced interventions such as rapid sequence intubation and blood transfusion) in addition to paramedic care for severe blunt TBI compared with paramedic care alone. Results Primary endpoint is Glasgow Outcome Scale score at six months post injury. Issues with trial integrity resulting from drop ins from standard care to the treatment arm as the result of policy changes by the local ambulance system are discussed. Conclusion This randomised controlled trial will contribute to the evaluation of the efficacy of advance prehospital interventions in severe blunt TBI. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00112398 PMID:24034628

  9. Memory for Traumatic Experiences in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Ingrid M.; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Sayfan, Liat; Melinder, Annika; Goodman, Gail S.

    2004-01-01

    Traumatic experiences in early childhood raise important questions about memory development in general and about the durability and accessibility of memories for traumatic events in particular. We discuss memory for early childhood traumatic events, from a developmental perspective, focusing on those factors that may equally influence memories for…

  10. Knowledge of Traumatic Brain Injury among Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, William J.; Gallo, Adrienne B.; Sellers, Amanda L.; Mulrine, Jessica; MacNamara, Luciana; Abrahamson, Allison; Kneavel, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine knowledge of traumatic brain injury among educators. Few studies have examined knowledge of traumatic brain injury in this population and fewer still have included a substantial proportion of general education teachers. Examining knowledge of traumatic brain injury in educators is important as the vast…

  11. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J.; Berkowitz, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae;…

  12. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured – A Retrospective Multicentre Study

    PubMed Central

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N.; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. Methods In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Results Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Conclusion Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients’ outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury. PMID:26136126

  13. History and current status of mini-invasive thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianxing

    2011-01-01

    Mini-invasive thoracic technique mainly refers to a technique involving the significant reduction of the chest wall access-related trauma. Notably, thoracoscope is the chief representative. The development of thoracoscope technique is characterized by: developing from direct peep to artificial lighting, then combination with image and video technique in equipments; technically developing from diagnostic to therapeutic approaches; developing from simpleness to complexity in application scope; and usually developing together with other techniques. At present, the widely used mini-invasive thoracic surgery refers to the mini-open thoracic surgery performed mainly by using some instruments to control target tissues and organs based on the vision associated with multi-limb coordination, which may be hand-assisted if necessary. The mini-invasive thoracic surgery consists of three approaches including video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), video-assisted Hybrid and hand-assisted VATS. So far the mini-invasive thoracic technique has achieved great advances due to the development in instruments of mini-invasive thoracic surgery which has the following features: instruments of mini-invasive thoracic surgery appear to be safe and practical, and have successive improvement and diversification in function; the specific instruments of open surgeries has been successively developed into dedicated instruments of endoscopic surgery; the application of endoscopic mechanical suture device generates faster fragmentation and reconstruction of organ tissues; the specific delicated instruments of endoscopic surgery have rapid development and application; and the simple instruments structurally similar to the conventional instruments are designed according to the mini-incison. In addition, the mini-invasive thoracic technique is widely used in five aspects including diseases of pleura membrane and chest wall, lung diseases, esophageal diseases, mediastinal diseases and heart diseases

  14. Traumatic asphyxia: An autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Nursel; Eren, Bülent; Erkol, Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic asphyxia is a form of asphyxia where respiration is prevented by external pressure on the body. A 19-year-old man was found by relatives compressed by motorboat in the garage. The death was investigated by the prosecutor; body was taken to the Morgue Department for performing autopsy. On gross physical examination; the face, neck and upper part of the chest were congested and many petechiae were observed on the conjunctivae, but not in low extremities. Autopsy macroscopic examination of lungs revealed congestion, sub pleural superficial bleeding areas. In the presented case death was reported as traumatic asphyxia by thorax compression without other lethal factors. PMID:26585308

  15. Post-Traumatic Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Edward J.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Visual loss following head trauma is common, and the diagnosis can be challenging for the neurologist called to perform an emergency room assessment. The approach to the patient with post-traumatic visual loss is complicated by a wide range of potential ocular and brain injuries with varying pathophysiology. In addition to direct injuries of the eye and orbit, traumatic optic neuropathies, carotid cavernous fistulas, and damage to the intracranial visual pathways are classic causes of visual loss after head trauma. This review provides an update on the diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:18660739

  16. Thoracic size-selective sampling of fibres: performance of four types of thoracic sampler in laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Jones, A D; Aitken, R J; Fabriès, J F; Kauffer, E; Liden, G; Maynard, A; Riediger, G; Sahle, W

    2005-08-01

    The counting of fibres on membrane filters could be facilitated by using size-selective samplers to exclude coarse particulate and fibres that impede fibre counting. Furthermore, the use of thoracic size selection would also remove the present requirement to discriminate fibres by diameter during counting. However, before thoracic samplers become acceptable for sampling fibres, their performance with fibres needs to be determined. This study examines the performance of four thoracic samplers: the GK2.69 cyclone, a Modified SIMPEDS cyclone, the CATHIA sampler (inertial separation) and the IOM thoracic sampler (porous foam pre-selector). The uniformity of sample deposit on the filter samples, which is important when counts are taken on random fields, was examined with two sizes of spherical particles (1 and 10 microm) and a glass fibre aerosol with fibres spanning the aerodynamic size range of the thoracic convention. Counts by optical microscopy examined fields on a set scanning pattern. Hotspots of deposition were detected for one of the thoracic samplers (Modified SIMPEDS with the 10 microm particles and the fibres). These hotspots were attributed to the inertial flow pattern near the port from the cyclone pre-separator. For the other three thoracic samplers, the distribution was similar to that on a cowled sampler, the current standard sampler for fibres. Aerodynamic selection was examined by comparing fibre concentration on thoracic samples with those measured on semi-isokinetic samples, using fibre size (and hence calculated aerodynamic diameter) and number data obtained by scanning electron microscope evaluation in four laboratories. The size-selection characteristics of three thoracic samplers (GK2.69, Modified SIMPEDS and CATHIA) appeared very similar to the thoracic convention; there was a slight oversampling (relative to the convention) for d(ae) < 7 microm, but that would not be disadvantageous for comparability with the cowled sampler. Only the IOM

  17. Drug-Intake Methods and Social Identity: The Use of Marijuana in Blunts among Southeast Asian Adolescents and Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soller, Brian; Lee, Juliet P.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines why Southeast Asian American adolescents and emerging adults in two urban settings prefer to use "blunts," or hollowed-out cigars filled with marijuana, over other methods of drug intake. Rationales for preferring blunts were both instrumental and social. Blunts allowed users to more easily share marijuana, the preferred drug…

  18. Vorticity interaction effects on blunt bodies. [hypersonic viscous shock layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Wilcox, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the viscous shock layer equations governing laminar and turbulent flows of a perfect gas and radiating and nonradiating mixtures of perfect gases in chemical equilibrium are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cones and hyperboloids. Turbulent properties are described in terms of the classical mixing length. Results are compared with boundary layer and inviscid flowfield solutions; agreement with inviscid flowfield data is satisfactory. Agreement with boundary layer solutions is good except in regions of strong vorticity interaction; in these flow regions, the viscous shock layer solutions appear to be more satisfactory than the boundary layer solutions. Boundary conditions suitable for hypersonic viscous shock layers are devised for an advanced turbulence theory.

  19. Wind tunnel experiments on two blunt cones at Ma6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchi; Li, Cunbiao; State Key LaboratoryTurbulence; Complex Systems Team

    2015-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments are performed on two 5° half-angle blunt cones over Mach 6 flow for 0° and 10° angle of attack. The temperature distributions on both windward and leeward sides are obtained by temperature sensitive painting (TSP) technique and the fluctuation pressure is measured by PCB pressure sensors for 7 meridian lines between the central meridian lines of the windward and the leeward by 30° step. Boundary layer transition is implied by the temperature distribution and power spectral evolution of the fluctuation pressure. It is found there exists a streamwise high-temperature strip near the central meridian line of the leeward side and transition is most likely to occur along the strip (earlier than the windward side and 0° angle of attack). Besides, the radius of the cone tip has an effective influence on the transition location. Transition is more likely to occur on the cone with the sharper tip.

  20. Periorbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Kriwalsky, Marcus Stephan; Schroers, Roland; Stricker, Ingo; Hollstein, Stefan; Kunkel, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The head and neck region is the second most common site for the development of extranodal lymphomas. Richter's syndrome (RS) involves the transformation of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) to an aggressive lymphoma, most commonly, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We report the case of a 62-year-old man who developed DLBCL in the periorbital region 2 months after blunt trauma to the site. The patient lacked other physical symptoms at the time of presentation. Bone marrow biopsy and immunophenotypic analysis revealed a Richter transformation of unknown B-CLL. RS frequently arises in lymph nodes or bone marrow and rarely presents with extranodal involvement. Chemotherapy resulted in total remission of the lymphoma and no relapse was observed in the 6-month follow-up period. This case demonstrates that the clinician must recognize that unresolved soft tissue swelling after a trauma may be caused by NHL. PMID:20451833

  1. Transition and Turbulence Modeling for Blunt-Body Wake Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Robert P.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hassan, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    This study attempts t o improve the modeling and computational prediction of high- speed transitional wake flows. The recently developed kappa - zeta (Enstrophy) turbulence model is coupled with a newly developed transition prediction method and implemented in an implicit flow solver well-suited to hypersonic flows. In this model, transition onset is determined as part of the solution. Results obtained using the new model for a 70- deg blunted cone/sting geometry demonstrate better agreement with experimental heat- transfer measurements when compared to laminar calculations as well as solutions using the kappa - omega model. Results are also presented for the situation where transition onset is preselected. It is shown that, in this case, results are quite sensitive to location of the transition point.

  2. Blunt Abdominal Aortic Injury Associated with L2 Vertebral Fracture.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Yuki; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Takaki; Arase, Hiroki; Araki, Kota

    2016-07-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is very rare. In general, BAAI occurs in high-energy accidents. Here, we present a case of BAAI in a low-energy accident. A 70-year-old female was injured after falling 3 m. Her vital signs were stable. She had lumbar fractures (L1, L2) and BAAI associated with a fragment of the fractured L2 vertebral body. On the fifth posttrauma day, we performed an operation because computed tomography showed a bone fragment of the lumbar fractures (L1, L2) threatening the abdominal aorta. The aortic injury site was transected, and the fragment of the L2 vertebral body was removed. Even in low-energy accidents, BAAI should be considered. BAAI with stable vital signs can be electively treated. PMID:27126715

  3. Blunted Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Experimental Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Parra, Gloria Juliana; Archer, Stephen L.; Bland, Richard D.; Albertine, Kurt H.; Carlton, David P.; Cho, Soo-Chul; Kirby, Beth; Haromy, Al; Eaton, Farah; Wu, Xichen; Thébaud, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD), caused by prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) with O2-rich gas, is the most common cause of long-term hospitalization and recurrent respiratory illness in extremely premature infants. Recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and associated ventilator adjustments often lead to worsening CLD. The mechanism that causes these hypoxemic episodes is unknown. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which is partially controlled by O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, is an important adaptive response to local hypoxia that helps to match perfusion and ventilation in the lung. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that chronic lung injury (CLI) impairs HPV. Methods: We studied preterm lambs that had MV with O2-rich gas for 3 weeks and newborn rats that breathed 95%-O2 for 2 weeks, both of which resulted in airspace enlargement and pulmonary vascular changes consistent with CLD. Measurements and Main Results: HPV was attenuated in preterm lambs with CLI after 2 weeks of MV and in newborn rats with CLI after 2 weeks of hyperoxia. HPV and constriction to the Kv1.x-specific inhibitor, correolide, were preferentially blunted in excised distal pulmonary arteries (dPAs) from hyperoxic rats, whose dPAs exhibited decreased Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA and K+ current. Intrapulmonary gene transfer of Kv1.5, encoding the ion channel that is thought to trigger HPV, increased O2-sensitive K+ current in cultured smooth muscle cells from rat dPAs, and restored HPV in hyperoxic rats. Conclusions: Reduced expression/activity of O2-sensitive Kv channels in dPAs contributes to blunted HPV observed in neonatal CLD. PMID:18511704

  4. Computed tomography for pancreatic injuries in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Almaramhy, Hamdi Hameed; Guraya, Salman Yousuf

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography scan in diagnosing and grading the pattern of pancreatic injuries in children. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study to review medical files of children admitted with blunt pancreatic injuries to the Maternity and Children Hospital Al-Madina Al-Munawwarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The demographic details and mechanisms of injury were recorded. From the database of the Picture Archiving and Communication System of the radiology department, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images of the pancreatic injuries, severity, type of injuries and grading of pancreatic injuries were established. RESULTS: Seven patients were recruited in this study over a period of 5 years; 5 males and 2 females with a mean age of 7 years (age range 5-12 years). Fall from height was the most frequent mechanism of injury, reported in 5 (71%), followed by road traffic accident (1 patient, 14%) and cycle handlebar (1 patient, 14%) injuries. According to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grading system, 1 (14%) patient sustained Grade I, 1 (14%) Grade II, 3 (42%) Grade III and 2 (28%) patients were found to have Grade V pancreatic injuries. This indicated a higher incidence of severe pancreatic injuries; 5 (71.4%) patients were reported to have Grade III and higher on the injury scale. Three (42%) patients had associated abdominal organ injuries. CONCLUSION: Pediatric pancreatic injuries due to blunt abdominal trauma are rare. The majority of the patients sustained extensive pancreatic injuries. MDCT findings are helpful and reliable in diagnosing and grading the pancreatic injuries. PMID:22905284

  5. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J; Berkowitz, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae; however, this topic has been understudied. This review considers the rationale for examining traumatic events and related symptomology in individuals with ASD and summarizes the limited research on this topic. A conceptual framework for understanding the interplay of ASD, trauma and traumatic sequelae is proposed and recommendations for future research presented. PMID:25711547

  6. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  7. Multifocal thoracic chordoma mimicking a paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Conzo, Giovanni; Gambardella, Claudio; Pasquali, Daniela; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Avenia, Nicola; Pietra, Cristina Della; Napolitano, Salvatore; Palazzo, Antonietta; Mauriello, Claudio; Parmeggiani, Domenico; Pettinato, Guido; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Santini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma of thoracic vertebras is a very rare locally invasive neoplasm with low grade malignancy arising from embryonic notochordal remnants. Radical surgery remains the cornerstone of the treatment. We describe a case of multifocal T1-T2 chordoma, without bone and disc involvement, incidentally misdiagnosed as a paraganglioma, occurring in a 47-year-old male asymptomatic patient. Neoplasm was radically removed by an endocrine surgeon through a right extended cervicotomy. A preoperative reliable diagnosis of chordoma, as in the reported case, is often difficult. Radical surgery can provide a favorable outcome but, given the high rates of local recurrence of this neoplasm, a strict and careful follow-up is recommended. Although very rare, chordoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of the paravertebral cervical masses of unknown origin. Spine surgeon consultation and a FNB should be routinely included in the multidisciplinary preoperative work-up of these neoplasms. PMID:24125991

  8. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Ozdemir, Seymen; Arslan, Harun; Gonullu, Edip; Bozkına, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla. PMID:27088028

  9. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Ozdemir, Seymen; Gonullu, Edip; Bozkına, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla. PMID:27088028

  10. Respiratory Displacement of the Thoracic Aorta: Physiological Phenomenon With Potential Implications for Thoracic Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Tim Frederik; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Rengier, Fabian; Geisbuesch, Philipp; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Boeckler, Dittmar; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude and direction of respiratory displacement of the ascending and descending thoracic aorta during breathing maneuvers. In 11 healthy nonsmokers, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging was performed in transverse orientation at the tracheal bifurcation during maximum expiration and inspiration as well as tidal breathing. The magnitude and direction of aortic displacement was determined relatively to resting respiratory position for the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta. To estimate a respiratory threshold for occurrence of distinct respiratory aortic motion, the latter was related to the underlying change in anterior-posterior thorax diameter. Compound displacement between maximum expiration and inspiration was 24.3 {+-} 6.0 mm for the AA in the left anterior direction and 18.2 {+-} 5.5 mm for the DA in the right anterior direction. The mean respiratory thorax excursion during tidal breathing was 8.9 {+-} 2.8 mm. The respiratory threshold, i.e., the increase in thorax diameter necessary to result in respiratory aortic displacement, was estimated to be 15.7 mm. The data suggest that after a threshold of respiratory thorax excursion is exceeded, respiration is accompanied by significant displacement of the thoracic aorta. Although this threshold may not be reached during tidal breathing in the majority of individuals, segmental differences during forced respiration impact on aortic geometry, may result in additional extrinsic forces on the aortic wall, and may be of significance for aortic prostheses designed for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  11. Possibilities of scar treatment after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Maragakis, M; Willital, G H; Michel, G; Görtelmeyer, R

    1995-01-01

    During a ten year observation period it was found that scar formation after thoracic surgery is influenced by various factors: metabolism, operative technique and factors of a general nature. On the basis of these findings, a study was carried out to investigate the effect of the scar-specific Contractubex gel (Merz+Co., D-Frankfurt/Main), containing 10% onion extract, 50 U sodium heparin per g of gel and 1% allantoin, in the treatment of children who underwent thoracic surgery and to evaluate its effect on scar development. Before and during the six-month treatment period, both macromorphology and scar colour were assessed; furthermore, a global evaluation of the therapeutic result was made. Additionally, the scars were characterized after a six-month treatment-free follow-up period. The results of 38 Contractubex-treated and 27 untreated patients were compared. In the treated scars, the global evaluation of the therapeutic result was better than in the untreated scars. In the Contractubex group, the rating was "good" and "very good" in 84% of cases, as compared to 59% of the untreated cases. In the treated group, the increase in scar size was markedly lower than in the untreated patients. The treated scars showed a tendency towards quicker paling than the untreated scars. In the treated group, the conversion of primary physiological scars to unphysiological scars (hypertrophic or keloidal scars) was less frequent than in the untreated group. The tolerability of the product was very good in 37 of the 38 treated patients, and good in one patient. All scar-specific effects of Contractubex continued to persist after the end of treatment. PMID:8846750

  12. Reconsidering Post-Traumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This article serves to challenge the prevailing wisdom that suggests that most trauma is followed by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and is best treated with critical incident stress debriefing (CISD). Instead, recent evidence suggests that many individuals exposed to stress do not experience stress responses. Even those who do, however,…

  13. Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassuk, Ellen L.; Konnath, Kristina; Volk, Katherine T.

    2006-01-01

    The unexpected loss of a loved one, a car accident, or exposure to a violent experience is familiar to many. Everyone reacts to such events, but the responses vary widely, ranging from numbness and withdrawal, to crying, nervousness, and agitation. Because traumatic events are prevalent, cause profound suffering, and may lead to life altering…

  14. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Im, Brian; Schrer, Marcia J.; Gaeta, Raphael; Elias, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can cause multiple medical and functional problems. As the brain is involved in regulating nearly every bodily function, a TBI can affect any part of the body and aspect of cognitive, behavioral, and physical functioning. However, TBI affects each individual differently. Optimal management requires understanding the…

  16. Congenital thoracic lordosis and scoliosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Maris S; Taylor, Jim; Lefbom, Bonnie

    2014-08-01

    A 10-week-old domestic shorthair kitten was referred for intermittent episodes of dyspnea, cyanosis and a suspected congenital thoracic anomaly. Physical examination showed an obvious palpable concavity in the caudal thoracic spine. Thoracic radiographs showed severe caudal thoracic lordosis from T5 to T13 with a Cobb angle of -77°, a centroid lordosis angle of -68°, a vertebral index of 6.3 and a flattened sternum. Severe loss of vital capacity was suspected and surgical correction of the thoracic deformity was to be performed in two separate stages, the first being surgical ventral distraction on the sternum to increase thoracic volume and rigid fixation with an external splint. The second stage, if required, would be surgical correction of the spinal deformity to also increase thoracic volume. The initial stage of surgery was performed and postoperative radiographs showed a vertebral index of 10.3. The kitten suffered a left sided pneumothorax in recovery and died from cardiorespiratory arrest despite immediate pleural drainage and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Treatment recommendations that may benefit future case management are discussed. PMID:24393777

  17. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30–60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  18. A hybrid CFD/characteristics method for fast characterization of hypersonic blunt forebody/inlet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, WenZhi; Li, ZhuFei; Yang, JiMing

    2015-10-01

    A hybrid CFD/characteristic method (CCM) was proposed for fast design and evaluation of hypersonic inlet flow with nose bluntness, which targets the combined advantages of CFD and method of characteristics. Both the accuracy and efficiency of the developed CCM were verified reliably, and it was well demonstrated for the external surfaces design of a hypersonic forebody/inlet with nose bluntness. With the help of CCM method, effects of nose bluntness on forebody shock shapes and the flowfield qualities which dominate inlet performance were examined and analyzed on the two-dimensional and axisymmetric configurations. The results showed that blunt effects of a wedge forebody are more substantial than that of related cone cases. For a conical forebody with a properly blunted nose, a recovery of the shock front back to that of corresponding sharp nose is exhibited, accompanied with a gradually fading out of entropy layer effects. Consequently a simplification is thought to be reasonable for an axisymmetric inlet with a proper compression angle, and a blunt nose of limited radius can be idealized as a sharp nose, as the spillage and flow variations at the entrance are negligible, even though the nose scale increases to 10% cowl lip radius. Whereas for two-dimensional inlets, the blunt effects are substantial since not only the inlet capturing/starting capabilities, but also the flow uniformities are obviously degraded.

  19. Robotic thoracic surgery: The state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Asaf, Belal Bin

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has come a long way. It has rapidly progressed to complex procedures such as lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and resection of mediastinal tumors. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) offered perceptible benefits over thoracotomy in terms of less postoperative pain and narcotic utilization, shorter ICU and hospital stay, decreased incidence of postoperative complications combined with quicker return to work, and better cosmesis. However, despite its obvious advantages, the General Thoracic Surgical Community has been relatively slow in adapting VATS more widely. The introduction of da Vinci surgical system has helped overcome certain inherent limitations of VATS such as two-dimensional (2D) vision and counter intuitive movement using long rigid instruments allowing thoracic surgeons to perform a plethora of minimally invasive thoracic procedures more efficiently. Although the cumulative experience worldwide is still limited and evolving, Robotic Thoracic Surgery is an evolution over VATS. There is however a lot of concern among established high-volume VATS centers regarding the superiority of the robotic technique. We have over 7 years experience and believe that any new technology designed to make minimal invasive surgery easier and more comfortable for the surgeon is most likely to have better and safer outcomes in the long run. Our only concern is its cost effectiveness and we believe that if the cost factor is removed more and more surgeons will use the technology and it will increase the spectrum and the reach of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. This article reviews worldwide experience with robotic thoracic surgery and addresses the potential benefits and limitations of using the robotic platform for the performance of thoracic surgical procedures. PMID:25598601

  20. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  1. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  2. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  3. Trans-arterial Onyx Embolization of a Functional Thoracic Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Quesada, Tatiana; Maud, Alberto; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Torabi, Alireza; Fitzgerald, Tamara; Akle, Nassim; Cruz Flores, Salvador; Trier, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Paragangliomas are rare tumors of the endocrine system. They are highly vascular and in some cases hormonally active, making their management challenging. Although there is strong evidence of the safety and effectiveness of preoperative embolization in the management of spinal tumors, only five cases have been reported in the setting of thoracic paragangliomas. We present the case of a 19-year-old man with a large, primary, functional, malignant paraganglioma of the thoracic spine causing a vertebral fracture and spinal cord compression. To our knowledge this is the first report of preoperative trans-arterial balloon augmented Onyx embolization of a thoracic paraganglioma. PMID:25763296

  4. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Richard K.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  5. Chimeric Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Thoracic Esophageal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Moya, Alejandro; Segura-Sampedro, Juan J; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Carvajo-Pérez, Francisco; Gómez-Cía, Tomás; Vázquez-Medina, Antonio; Ibáñez-Delgado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Gastric pull-up is generally the first choice for a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction. Malfunction of this gastric conduit is uncommon, but devastating when it occurs: it causes marked comorbidity to the patient, preventing oral intake and worsening quality of life. Secondary salvage thoracic esophageal reconstruction surgery is usually performed with free or pedicled jejunum flaps or colon interposition. We present a case of a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction with an externally monitored chimeric anterolateral thigh flap, extending from the cervical esophagus to the retrosternal gastroplasty remnant. Intestinal reconstructive techniques were not an available option for this patient. PMID:26694271

  6. Thoracic and lumbar extradural structure examined by extraduroscope.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y; Shimizu, R; Saitoh, K; Fukuda, H

    1998-08-01

    We examined the extradural space using a flexible extraduroscope in 113 patients undergoing extradural anaesthesia. Patients were classified into two groups to receive either thoracic or lumbar extradural anaesthesia as needed for perioperative analgesia. The extraduroscopy showed that the thoracic extradural space becomes widely patent after injecting a given amount of air and that the amount of fatty and fibrous connective tissue is less in the thoracic extradural space compared with the lumbar extradural space. We suggest that differences between the structure of these two vertebral regions may affect the spread of local anaesthetics in the extradural space. PMID:9813508

  7. Nearly Asymptomatic Eight-Month Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arjun; Kumar, Krishan; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a rare, but lethal, medical condition that is either misdiagnosed as a myocardial infarction or overlooked completely. Though thoracic aortic dissections are commonly diagnosed in patients exhibiting sharp chest pain, there are some notable cases where patients do not report the expected severity of pain. We report a unique case of a patient with a thoracic aortic dissection who was initially nearly asymptomatic for eight months, in order to heighten awareness, highlight diagnosis protocol, and improve prognosis for this commonly misdiagnosed, but fatal, condition. PMID:27257400

  8. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Technique in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine-Tips and Tricks.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The need for spinal fixation in patients who cannot tolerate classical open surgery has led in recent years to the development of minimally invasive approaches. The use of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation offers several advantages, such as less blood loss and postoperative pain due to blunt separation of the muscles with reduction of soft tissue dissection. Medical records and demographic information, diagnosis, and preoperative pain levels of 63 patients who underwent percutaneous minimally invasive thoracolumbar spine stabilization using the Illico® Fixation System (Alphatec Spine, Carlsbad, California) were analysed: a total of 344 screws were implanted. Preoperative and postoperative clinical assessment of the patients were based on a visual analogue scale. Because percutaneous techniques do not allow gross visualization of the vertebra and erroneous placement of the screw may be high in the initial cases, we discuss the techniques for a safe implantation of pedicle screws using a single or double intraoperative fluoroscopy. We report tips and tricks for technical challenges including fixation in osteoporotic patients, percutaneous insertion of long rods, compression/distraction using multiaxial screws turning into monoaxial, and use of minimally invasive retractror for interbody fusion. Recently, indications for minimally invasive percutaneous fixation have expanded and my results support that it may be considered a safe and effective option for the treatment of degenerative and traumatic thoracolumbar spinal diseases. PMID:27121407

  9. Derivation and Validation of Two Decision Instruments for Selective Chest CT in Blunt Trauma: A Multicenter Prospective Observational Study (NEXUS Chest CT)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Robert M.; Langdorf, Mark I.; Nishijima, Daniel; Baumann, Brigitte M.; Hendey, Gregory W.; Medak, Anthony J.; Raja, Ali S.; Allen, Isabel E.; Mower, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs) for selective chest computed tomography (CT) in adult blunt trauma patients. Methods and Findings From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity). In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients—6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1) abnormal chest X-ray, (2) rapid deceleration mechanism, (3) distracting injury, (4) chest wall tenderness, (5) sternal tenderness, (6) thoracic spine tenderness, and (7) scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%–100%), a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%–22.4%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%–100%) for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%–96.9%), a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%–27.5%), and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%–95.8%) for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity

  10. Computed tomography (CT) of bowel and mesenteric injury in blunt abdominal trauma: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian; Mohamed, Siti Kamariah Che

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the diagnostic modality of choice in the evaluation of clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, including the assessment of blunt bowel and mesenteric injuries. CT signs of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries are bowel wall defect, free air, oral contrast material extravasation, extravasation of contrast material from mesenteric vessels, mesenteric vascular beading, abrupt termination of mesenteric vessels, focal bowel wall thickening, mesenteric fat stranding, mesenteric haematoma and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal fluid. This pictorial essay illustrates CT features of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Pitfalls in interpretation of images are emphasized in proven cases. PMID:23082464

  11. Compressibility and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects for a 65 Deg Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    A 65 deg. delta wing has been tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at mean aerodynamic chord Reynolds numbers from 6 million to 120 million at subsonic and transonic speeds. The configuration incorporated a systematic variation of the leading edge bluntness. The analysis for this paper is focused on the compressibility and bluntness effects primarily at a Reynolds number of 6 million from this data set. Emphasis is placed upon on the onset and progression of leading-edge vortex separation, and compressibility is shown to promote this separation. Comparisons with recent publications show that compressibility and Reynolds number have opposite effects on blunt leading edge vortex separation

  12. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Young Patient with Descending Aortic Injury;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    No, Hironari; Nishida, Satoru; Takagi, Takeshi; Mohri, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    A 15-year-old boy was referred to our emergency room due to a penetrating injury of the back. Computed tomography( CT) demonstrated a descending aortic injury at the Th9/10 level, bilateral hemothorax, and spinal cord injury. Although surgical treatment was indicated, multiple organ injury complicated open surgical repair, which required cardiopulmonary bypass with full heparinization. Therefore, the patient was scheduled to undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A 23×33-mm Excluder aortic extension cuff was chosen for the small, 15-mm diameter aorta. The aortic extension was delivered and deployed in the descending aorta. Postoperative CT demonstrated neither endoleak nor collapse of the stent-graft. TEVAR for traumatic aortic aneurysm appears to be safe and effective, and an aortic extension for an abdominal aortic aneurysm may be utilized as an alternative device if the patient is young and the aorta is small. PMID:27476569

  13. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury. PMID:27065055

  14. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  15. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  16. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic Or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Nobuyuki; Abe, Junya; Satoh, Hidetoshi; Arima, Hironori; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-08-15

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  17. Blunt body near wake flow field at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; McGinley, Catherine B.; Hannemann, Klaus

    1996-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a Mach 6 flow to examine the reattachment process of an axisymmetric free shear layer associated with the near wake of a 70 deg. half angle, spherically blunted cone with a cylindrical after body. Model angle of incidence was fixed at 0 deg. and free-stream Reynolds numbers based on body diameter ranged from 0.5 x 10(exp 6) to 4 x 10(exp 6). The sensitivity of wake shear layer transition on reattachment heating was investigated. The present perfect gas study was designed to compliment results obtained previously in facilities capable of producing real gas effects. The instrumented blunted cone model was designed primarily for testing in high enthalpy hypervelocity shock tunnels in both this country and abroad but was amenable for testing in conventional hypersonic blowdown wind tunnels as well. Surface heating rates were inferred from temperature - time histories from coaxial surface thermocouples on the model forebody and thin film resistance gages along the model base and cylindrical after body. General flow feature (bow shock, wake shear layer, and recompression shock) locations were visually identified by schlieren photography. Mean shear layer position and growth were determined from intrusive pitot pressure surveys. In addition, wake surveys with a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer were utilized to qualitatively characterize the state of the shear layer prior to reattachment. Experimental results were compared to laminar perfect gas predictions provided by a 3-D Navier Stokes code (NSHYP). Shear layer impingement on the instrumented cylindrical after body resulted in a localized heating maximum that was 21 to 29 percent of the forebody stagnation point heating. Peak heating resulting from the reattaching shear layer was found to be a factor of 2 higher than laminar predictions, which suggested a transitional shear layer. Schlieren flow visualization and fluctuating voltage time histories and spectra from the hot wire surveys

  18. A Case of Post-Traumatic Pseudocyst in the Spleen Successfully Treated with Alcohol Sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Sang Wook; Lim, Taek-Jin; Hwang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Jeon, Ung Bae

    2015-01-01

    This report details a case of post-traumatic pseudocyst in the spleen that was successfully treated with sclerotherapy using ethanol. A sixteen-year-old boy visited our hospital for a follow-up examination of a splenic cyst. He had experienced blunt trauma to the abdomen three years prior to presentation. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a large cyst of the lower pole of the spleen. The cyst was 6.8×9.5×7.0 cm and conservative management was tried. A follow-up ultrasonographic examination three years later revealed that the size of the cyst was unchanged and another treatment was needed to prevent complications. One session of sclerosis with ethanol (90 mL of 99% ethanol) percutaneously was applied to the cyst. A follow-up after four months revealed that the cyst had completely resolved. PMID:26770903

  19. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions, for adults and children during typical activities during both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of evidence of health effects.

  20. Robotic thoracic surgery: from the perspectives of European chest surgeons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although thoracic surgery is one of the fastest growing programs, the results of robotic thoracic surgery reports are presented very rarely. In this manuscript, the development of robotic thoracic surgery programs in Europe and the initial results are discussed. Several European countries lead the development of robotic surgery in the world, especially for lung cancer surgery and for thymus—thymoma surgery. Yet, we may not recognize any major advantage in the outcome when compared to video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). But, certainly, the superior capabilities of the intraoperative instrumentation of robotic surgery will be beneficial. More experience in robotic surgery may provide superior results in oncological, physiological and life quality measurements. PMID:24868438

  1. Successful treatment of an infected thoracic endovascular stent graft.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Taijiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Katayama, Keijiro; Imai, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    A 70-year-old man with a chronic type B aortic dissection was treated with two stent grafts deployed in the descending thoracic aorta. The patient was re-admitted to the hospital at 16 months after thoracic endovascular stent grafting because of a high fever. A blood culture showed sepsis due to a Staphylococcus species. A CT scan showed an increase in the size of the thrombosed false lumen. Complete excision of the infected descending aortic wall and infected stent graft were performed. The descending thoracic aorta was reconstructed using a rifampicin-bonded Dacron graft and omental wrapping. The combination of in situ graft replacement using a rifampicin-bonded graft and omental wrapping is considered an effective treatment for thoracic stent graft infection. PMID:24990657

  2. Salmonella osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Pandit, A; White, D G; Evans, P D

    2004-02-01

    A case of thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis due to Salmonella enteritidis phage type 2 in an immunocompetent patient is reported. The patient initially presented with abdominal, urinary and chest symptoms, which were followed by a large pleural effusion. The infection was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. This is the only case of salmonella thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent patient reported in the English literature. PMID:14970302

  3. Clinical pathway for thoracic surgery in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm for postoperative care for thoracic surgical patients in the United States has shifted with efforts to reduce hospital length of stay and improve quality of life. The increasing usage of minimally invasive techniques in thoracic surgery has been an important part of this. In this review we will examine our standard practices as well as the evidence behind both general contemporary postoperative care principles and those specific to certain operations. PMID:26941967

  4. Double migration of a schwannoma of thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Robert Ahmed; Rahman, Asifur; Bhandari, Paawan Bahadur; Khan, SIM Khairun Nabi

    2013-01-01

    Mobile intraspinal tumours have rarely been reported. In most cases, mobile tumours such as schwannomas or ependymomas were located in the cauda equina. Perusal of the literature revealed only two reports of mobile schwannomas in the cervical and thoracic regions. We report a case of thoracic schwannoma which migrated twice in successive operations resulting in negative exploration in the expected area. The aim of this report is to remind the surgeons about the possibility of migration of intradural-extramedullary tumour. PMID:23349180

  5. Environmental and Pharmacological Manipulations Blunt the Stress Response of Zebrafish in a Similar Manner.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V V; Abreu, Murilo S; Zanandrea, Rodrigo; Saibt, Natália; Friedrich, Maria Tereza; Koakoski, Gessi; Gusso, Darlan; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide evidence that both pharmacological and environmental manipulations similarly blunt the cortisol release in response to an acute stressor in adult zebrafish. Different groups of fish were maintained isolated or group-housed in barren or enriched tanks, and then exposed or not to diazepam or fluoxetine. Acute stress increased cortisol levels in group-housed zebrafish maintained in barren environment. Single-housed zebrafish displayed a blunted cortisol response to stress. Environmental enrichment also blunted the stress response and this was observed in both isolated and group-housed fish. The same blunting effect was observed in zebrafish exposed to diazepam or fluoxetine. We highlighted environmental enrichment as an alternative and/or complimentary therapeutic for reducing stress and as a promoter of animal welfare. PMID:27351465

  6. Blunted cardiac stress reactors exhibit relatively high levels of behavioural impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Bibbey, Adam; Ginty, Annie T; Brindle, Ryan C; Phillips, Anna C; Carroll, Douglas

    2016-05-15

    Blunted physiological reactions to acute psychological stress are associated with a range of adverse health and behavioural outcomes. This study examined whether extreme stress reactors differ in their behavioural impulsivity. Individuals showing blunted (N=23) and exaggerated (N=23) cardiovascular reactions to stress were selected by screening a healthy student population (N=276). Behavioural impulsivity was measured via inhibitory control and motor impulsivity tasks. Blunted reactors exhibited greater impulsivity than exaggerated reactors on both stop-signal, F(1,41)=4.99, p=0.03, ηp(2)=0.108, and circle drawing, F(1,43)=4.00, p=0.05, η p(2)=0.085, tasks. Individuals showing blunted cardiovascular stress reactions are characterized by greater impulsivity which may contribute to their increased susceptibility to outcomes such as obesity and addiction. PMID:26988282

  7. Environmental and Pharmacological Manipulations Blunt the Stress Response of Zebrafish in a Similar Manner

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V. V.; Abreu, Murilo S.; Zanandrea, Rodrigo; Saibt, Natália; Friedrich, Maria Tereza; Koakoski, Gessi; Gusso, Darlan; Piato, Angelo L.; Barcellos, Leonardo J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide evidence that both pharmacological and environmental manipulations similarly blunt the cortisol release in response to an acute stressor in adult zebrafish. Different groups of fish were maintained isolated or group-housed in barren or enriched tanks, and then exposed or not to diazepam or fluoxetine. Acute stress increased cortisol levels in group-housed zebrafish maintained in barren environment. Single-housed zebrafish displayed a blunted cortisol response to stress. Environmental enrichment also blunted the stress response and this was observed in both isolated and group-housed fish. The same blunting effect was observed in zebrafish exposed to diazepam or fluoxetine. We highlighted environmental enrichment as an alternative and/or complimentary therapeutic for reducing stress and as a promoter of animal welfare. PMID:27351465

  8. [Thoracic duct valves in man and albino rat].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, V M; Kruglov, S V

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the number, structure and position of valves along the whole length of thoracic duct in man and albino rat. The study was performed using the material obtained from 30 human corpses of men and women aged 17 to 60 years with no history of cardiovascular pathology and from 60 outbred albino rats of both sexes aged 5 to 12 months. Material was fixed in 10% neutral formalin. Anterior wall of thoracic duct was longitudinally dissected. Thoracic duct of 30 rats was stained with gallocyanin-chrome alum, in the remaining animals it was studied after its injection with blue Gerota's mass. In most cases, the valves consisted of two semilunar cusps. Thoracic duct was found to contain on the average 14.7+/-0.2 valves in man and 11.9+/-0.2 valves in rat. Most of all valves were found in the upper (anterior) 1/3 of the thoracic duct, least--in its middle part. This seems to be determined by anatomo-topographic features of the different parts of thoracic duct. PMID:15839250

  9. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same magnitude or rate. In most severe cases of untreated progressive early-onset spinal deformities, respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary and cardiac hypertension (cor pulmonale), which characterize thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), can develop, sometimes leading to death. TIS is the inability of the thorax to ensure normal breathing. This clinical condition can be linked to costo-vertebral malformations (e.g., fused ribs, hemivertebrae, congenital bars), neuromuscular diseases (e.g., expiratory congenital hypotonia), Jeune or Jarcho-Levin syndromes or to 50% to 75% fusion of the thoracic spine before seven years of age. Complex spinal deformities alter normal growth plate development, and vertebral bodies become progressively distorted, perpetuating the disorder. Therefore, many scoliotic deformities can become growth plate disorders over time. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of how spinal deformities can affect normal spine and thoracic cage growth. Previous conceptualizations are integrated with more recent scientific data to provide a better understanding of both normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage growth. PMID:24147251

  10. Results of hemivertebrectomy and fusion for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Debnath, U K; McConnell, J R; Sengupta, D K; Mehdian, S M H; Webb, J K

    2003-06-01

    We retrospectively analysed ten consecutive patients (age range 32-77 years) treated surgically from 1994 to 1999 for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation between the 6th and 12th thoracic discs. Clinically, eight patients had varying grades of back pain and eight patients had paraparesis. Radiography showed calcification in 50% of the herniated discs. Two patients had two-level thoracic disc herniation. Hemivertebrectomy followed by discectomy and fusion was carried out in all patients. Instrumentation with cages was performed in eight patients and bone grafting alone in two patients. The average follow-up was 24 months (range 13-36 months). Six patients had an excellent or good outcome, three had a fair outcome and one had a poor outcome. One patient had atelectasis, which recovered within 2 days of surgery. Another patient had developed complete paraplegia, detected at surgery by SSEPs, and underwent resurgery following magnetic resonance (MR) scan with complete corpectomy and instrumented fusion. At 2 years, she had a functional recovery. The patient with poor outcome had undergone a previous discectomy at T9/10. He developed severe back pain and generalised hyper-reflexia following corpectomy and fusion for disc herniation at T10/11. We advocate anterior transthoracic discectomy following partial corpectomy for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation between the 6th and 12th thoracic discs. This procedure offers improved access to the thoracic disc for an instrumented fusion, which is likely to decrease the risk of iatrogenic injury to the spinal cord. PMID:12800003

  11. Donor to recipient sizing in thoracic organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M

    2016-03-24

    Donor-to-recipient organ size matching is a critical aspect of thoracic transplantation. In the United States potential recipients for lung transplant and heart transplant are listed with limitations on donor height and weight ranges, respectively. Height is used as a surrogate for lung size and weight is used as a surrogate for heart size. While these measures are important predictors of organ size, they are crude surrogates that fail to incorporate the influence of sex on organ size. Independent of other measures, a man's thoracic organs are approximately 20% larger than a woman's. Lung size can be better estimated using the predicted total lung capacity, which is derived from regression equations correcting for height, sex and age. Similarly, heart size can be better estimated using the predicted heart mass, which adjusts for sex, age, height, and weight. These refined organ sizing measures perform better than current sizing practice for the prediction of outcomes after transplantation, and largely explain the outcome differences observed after sex-mismatch transplantation. An undersized allograft is associated with worse outcomes. In this review we examine current data pertaining to size-matching in thoracic transplantation. We advocate for a change in the thoracic allocation mechanism from a height-or-weight-based strategy to a size-matching process that utilizes refined estimates of organ size. We believe that a size-matching approach based on refined estimates of organ size would optimize outcomes in thoracic transplantation without restricting or precluding patients from thoracic transplantation. PMID:27011913

  12. Traumatic bone cyst of mandible.

    PubMed

    Surej Kumar, L K; Kurien, Nikhil; Thaha, Khaleel Ahamed

    2015-06-01

    The traumatic bone cyst, an uncommon lesion of the jaws, belongs to the category of 'pseudocyst' owing to its lack of a lining epithelial membrane. It is an asymptomatic lesion, which is often diagnosed accidentally during routine radiological examination commonly present in the posterior mandible as a unilocular radiolucency with scalloping borders. The exact etiopathogenesis of the lesion is still debated, though the role of trauma is often associated. Here we report a rare case of traumatic bone cyst in the anterior mandible, in a 16-year-old female patient with a previous history of trauma to chin; diagnosed and treated successfully in our surgical unit. The case is discussed in relation to its clinical presentation, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, management and prognosis. PMID:26028875

  13. Traumatic andropause after combat injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth Huw; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Sharma, Davendra Murray; Bowley, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    In association with lower extremity amputation, complex genitourinary injuries have emerged as a specific challenge in modern military trauma surgery. Testicular injury or loss has profound implications for the recovering serviceman, in terms of hormone production and future fertility. The initial focus of treatment for patients with traumatic testicular loss is haemostasis, resuscitation and management of concurrent life-threatening injuries. Multiple reoperations are commonly required to control infection in combat wounds; in a review of 300 major lower extremity amputations, 53% of limbs required revisional surgery, with infection the commonest indication. Atypical infections, such as invasive fungal organisms, can also complicate military wounding. We report the case of a severely wounded serviceman with complete traumatic andropause, whose symptomatic temperature swings were initially mistaken for signs of occult sepsis. PMID:26318170

  14. Imaging and transcatheter arterial embolization for traumatic splenic injuries: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Raikhlin, Antony; Baerlocher, Mark Otto; Asch, Murray R.; Myers, Andy

    2008-01-01

    The spleen is the most commonly injured visceral organ in blunt abdominal trauma in both adults and children. Nonoperative management is the current standard of practice for patients who are hemodynamically stable. However, simple observation alone has been reported to have a failure rate as high as 34%; the rate is even higher among patients with high-grade splenic injuries (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma [AAST] grade III–V). Over the past decade, angiography with transcatheter splenic artery embolization, an alternative nonoperative treatment for splenic injuries, has increased splenic salvage rates to as high as 97%. With the help of splenic artery embolization, success rates of more than 80% have also been described for high-grade splenic injuries. We discuss the role of computed tomography and transcatheter splenic artery embolization in the diagnosis and treatment of blunt splenic trauma. We review technical considerations, indications, efficacy and complication rates. We also propose an algorithm to guide the use of angiography and splenic embolization in patients with traumatic splenic injury. PMID:19057735

  15. Is there any role for resuscitative emergency department thoracotomy in blunt trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, Maziar; Skouras, Christos; Shah, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is any role for resuscitative emergency department thoracotomy in severe blunt trauma. Emergency thoracotomy is an accepted intervention for patients with penetrating cardiothoracic trauma. However, its role in blunt trauma has been challenged and has been a subject of considerable debate. Altogether, 186 relevant papers were identified, of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date, country of publication and relevant outcomes are tabulated. The 14 studies comprised 2 systematic reviews and 12 retrospective studies. The systematic review performed by the Trauma Committee of the American College of Surgeons included 42 studies and a cumulative total of 2193 blunt trauma patients who underwent an emergency department thoracotomy, reporting a survival rate of 1.6%. According to this review, 15% of the survivors suffered from neurological sequelae, but survivors from both penetrating and blunt trauma were included. A systematic review comprising 24 studies reported a survival rate of 1.4% among 1047 blunt trauma patients. Of the retrospective studies, 11 report poor survival rates, ranging from 0 to 6%. Only one study reports a higher survival rate (12.2%). Five of the studies reported on the neurological outcome of survivors. The majority of the studies suffered from limitations due to the small number of included cases. The reported survival after an emergency department thoracotomy for blunt trauma is very low in the vast majority of available studies. Furthermore, the neurological sequelae in the few survivors are frequent and severe. Interestingly, some author groups recommend that emergency department thoracotomy should be contraindicated in cases of blunt trauma with no signs of life at the scene of trauma or on arrival at the emergency department. Larger, well-designed series will

  16. Maximum lift/drag ratio of flat plates with bluntness and skin friction at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    Newtonian theory is used to derive a simple expression for the maximum lift/drag ratio of flat plates with bluntness and skin friction at hypersonic speeds. The bluntness drag is assumed to be independent of angle of attack. Because the effect of skin friction is of second order over the angle of attack range for maximum lift/drag ratio, it was assumed constant. As an example, the expression is applied to the Space Shuttle.

  17. The Houdini effect--an unusual case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in perforative appendicitis.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, F; Lim, K T; Hayes, B; Shields, W; Ravi, N; Reynolds, J V

    2012-03-01

    We present a unique case of perforative appendicitis that occurred in an adult following blunt abdominal trauma. This case represents the first such reported case from Ireland. It also represents a modern practical example of Laplace's theory of the effect of increased pressure on colonic wall tension leading to localized perforation, and serves to highlight not only the importance in preoperative imaging for blunt abdominal trauma, but also the importance of considering appendiceal perforation. PMID:22558817

  18. Temporal bone fracture following blunt trauma caused by a flying fish.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D; Karam, M; Danino, J; Flax-Goldenberg, R; Joachims, H Z

    1998-10-01

    Blunt trauma to the temporal region can cause fracture of the skull base, loss of hearing, vestibular symptoms and otorrhoea. The most common causes of blunt trauma to the ear and surrounding area are motor vehicle accidents, violent encounters, and sports-related accidents. We present an obscure case of a man who was struck in the ear by a flying fish while wading in the sea with resulting temporal bone fracture, sudden deafness, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and pneumocephalus. PMID:10211221

  19. Direct numerical simulation of the sea flows around blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushin, Pavel V.; Gushchin, Valentin A.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is the demonstration of the opportunities of the mathematical modeling of the separated flows of the sea water around blunt bodies on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) in the Boussinesq approximation. The 3D density stratified incompressible viscous fluid flows around a sphere have been investigated by means of the direct numerical simulation (DNS) on supercomputers and the visualization of the 3D vortex structures in the wake. For solving of NSE the Splitting on physical factors Method for Incompressible Fluid flows (SMIF) with hybrid explicit finite difference scheme (second-order accuracy in space, minimum scheme viscosity and dispersion, capable for work in wide range of the Reynolds (Re) and the internal Froude (Fr) numbers and monotonous) has been developed and successfully applied. The different transitions in sphere wakes with increasing of Re (10 < Re < 500) and decreasing of Fr (0.005 < Fr < 100) have been investigated in details. Thus the classifications of the viscous fluid flow regimes around a sphere have been refined.

  20. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588