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Sample records for bodies close contacts

  1. EDITORIAL: Close contact Close contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-07-01

    The development of scanning probe techniques, such as scanning tunnelling microscopy [1], has often been touted as the catalyst for the surge in activity and progress in nanoscale science and technology. Images of nanoscale structural detail have served as an invaluable investigative resource and continue to fascinate with the fantastical reality of an intricate nether world existing all around us, but hidden from view of the naked eye by a disparity in scale. As is so often the case, the invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope heralded far more than just a useful new apparatus, it demonstrated the scope for exploiting the subtleties of electronic contact. The shrinking of electronic devices has been a driving force for research into molecular electronics, in which an understanding of the nature of electronic contact at junctions is crucial. In response, the number of experimental techniques in molecular electronics has increased rapidly in recent years. Scanning tunnelling microscopes have been used to study electron transfer through molecular films on a conducting substrate, and the need to monitor the contact force of scanning tunnelling electrodes led to the use of atomic force microscopy probes coated in a conducting layer as studied by Cui and colleagues in Arizona [2]. In this issue a collaboration of researchers at Delft University and Leiden University in the Netherlands report a new device architecture for the independent mechanical and electrostatic tuning of nanoscale charge transport, which will enable thorough studies of molecular transport in the future [3]. Scanning probes can also be used to pattern surfaces, such as through spatially-localized Suzuki and Heck reactions in chemical scanning probe lithography. Mechanistic aspects of spatially confined Suzuki and Heck chemistry are also reported in this issue by researchers in Oxford [4]. All these developments in molecular electronics fabrication and characterization provide alternative

  2. SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheet for SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts Format: Select one PDF [256 KB] Recommend on ... that are not now known. What does "close contact" mean? In the context of SARS, close contact ...

  3. Computational Contact Formulations for Soft Body Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Roger A.

    This article gives an overview of adhesive contact for soft bodies and focuses on a general computational framework that is suitable for treating a large class of adhesion problems. The contact formulation is based on a non-linear continuum approach that is capable of describing bodies down to length scales of several nanometers. Several finite element formulations are presented, that introduce various approximations in order to increase the computational efficiency. The approaches are illustrated by several examples throughout the text. These include carbon nanotube interaction, adhesion of spheres, nanoindentation, thin film peeling, gecko adhesion and self-cleaning surface mechanisms.

  4. Direct-contact closed-loop heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature heat exchanger with a closed loop and a heat transfer liquid within the loop, the closed loop having a first horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a first fluid at a first temperature with the heat transfer liquid, a second horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a second fluid at a second temperature with the heat transfer liquid, and means for circulating the heat transfer liquid.

  5. Identifying Initial Suit-Body Contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, Yaritza

    2016-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity EVA suits like the Extravehicular Mobility Unit EMU are the key component used by the crew to perform EVA operations. The crew is trained extensively in the EMU to be able to perform their EVA's effectively. This extensive training can cause problems and even lead to injury if any abnormal forces are used. In the case of a bad design, if the humans movement exceeds the suits design parameters it can result in unusual wear and tear of the suit components, or may result in failed tasks when the human is not able to perform a task the necessary way. This study is intended to quantify suit-body contact and suited range of upper extremity motions while wearing a pressurized EMU suit as compared to their unsuited trials. This study also compares the effect in mobility of the suited subject in free standing versus constrained standing for upper extremity movements.

  6. Direct-contact closed-loop heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, G.F.; Minkov, V.; Petrick, M.

    1981-11-02

    A high temperature heat exchanger is disclosed which has a closed loop and a heat transfer liquid within the loop, the closed loop having a first horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a first fluid at a first temperature with the heat transfer liquid, a second horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a second fluid at a second temperature with the heat transfer liquid, and means for circulating the heat transfer liquid.

  7. The Formation of Contact and Very Close Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kisseleva-Eggleton, L; Eggleton, P P

    2007-08-10

    We explore the possibility that all close binaries, i.e. those with periods {approx}< 3 d, including contact (W UMa) binaries, are produced from initially wider binaries (periods of say 10's of days) by the action of a triple companion through the medium of Kozai Cycles with Tidal Friction (KCTF).

  8. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Close and Contact Binary Systems using Bipolytropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan

    2016-01-01

    I will present the results of hydrodynamic simulations of close and contact bipolytropic binary systems. This project is motivated by the peculiar case of the red nova, V1309 Sco, which is indeed a merger of a contact binary. Both the stars are believed to have evolved off the main sequence by the time of the merger and possess a small helium core. In order to represent the binary accurately, I need a core-envelope structure for both the stars. I have achieved this using bipolytropes or composite polytropes. For the simulations, I use an explicit 3D Eulerian hydrodynamics code in cylindrical coordinates. I will discuss the evolution and merger scenarios of systems with different mass ratios and core mass fractions as well as the effects due to the treatment of the adiabatic exponent.

  9. Dynamic enhancer–gene body contacts during transcription elongation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kiwon; Hsiung, Chris C.-S.; Huang, Peng; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers govern transcription through multiple mechanisms, including the regulation of elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We characterized the dynamics of looped enhancer contacts during synchronous transcription elongation. We found that many distal enhancers form stable contacts with their target promoters during the entire interval of elongation. Notably, we detected additional dynamic enhancer contacts throughout the gene bodies that track with elongating RNAPII and the leading edge of RNA synthesis. These results support a model in which the gene body changes its position relative to a stable enhancer–promoter complex, which has broad ramifications for enhancer function and architectural models of transcriptional elongation. PMID:26443845

  10. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasmosis among People Having Close Contact with Animals.

    PubMed

    Brandon-Mong, Guo-Jie; Che Mat Seri, Nurul Asma Anati; Sharma, Reuben Sunil-Kumar; Andiappan, Hemah; Tan, Tian-Chye; Lim, Yvonne Ai-Lian; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma infection and its risk association among people having close contact with animals. A total of 312 blood samples were collected from veterinary personnel (veterinarian, technicians, and students) and pet owners from veterinary clinics and hospitals in the area of Klang Valley, Malaysia. About 4 cc of blood samples drawn from agreed participants were processed for measurement of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies as well as avidity test of Toxoplasma IgG by ELISA I, II, and III kits. Meanwhile, the demographic profiles and possible risk factors of these participants were also recorded in the standardized data collection sheets. Overall seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis was observed in 62 (19.9%) participants being 7 (18.4%) in veterinarians, 15 (33.3%) in veterinary technicians, 29 (14.9%) in veterinary students, and 11 (31.4%) in pet owners. Of 19.9% Toxoplasma seropositive samples, 18.3% was positive for IgG antibody, 1.0% for IgM antibody, and 0.6% for both IgG and IgM antibodies. Of three different IgG avidity ELISA kits, ELISA III showed high avidity in all five seropositive samples (IgM and IgG/IgM antibodies) indicating chronic Toxoplasma infection which is consistent with no evidence of clinical toxoplasmosis diagnosed during the time of this study. Univariate analysis showed that age group, gender, study population, gardening, task performance, and working duration were significantly associated with Toxoplasma seropositivity. Further analysis by multivariate analysis using logistic regression showed that age group of ≥30 years old (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.18-0.63, p = 0.001) and working or study duration of >10 years having close contact with animals (OR = 5.07, 95% CI = 1.80-14.24, p = 0.002) were identified as significant risks for Toxoplasma infection. Based on the results obtained, a comprehensive Toxoplasma screening and health

  11. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasmosis among People Having Close Contact with Animals

    PubMed Central

    Brandon-Mong, Guo-Jie; Che Mat Seri, Nurul Asma Anati; Sharma, Reuben Sunil-Kumar; Andiappan, Hemah; Tan, Tian-Chye; Lim, Yvonne Ai-Lian; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma infection and its risk association among people having close contact with animals. A total of 312 blood samples were collected from veterinary personnel (veterinarian, technicians, and students) and pet owners from veterinary clinics and hospitals in the area of Klang Valley, Malaysia. About 4 cc of blood samples drawn from agreed participants were processed for measurement of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies as well as avidity test of Toxoplasma IgG by ELISA I, II, and III kits. Meanwhile, the demographic profiles and possible risk factors of these participants were also recorded in the standardized data collection sheets. Overall seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis was observed in 62 (19.9%) participants being 7 (18.4%) in veterinarians, 15 (33.3%) in veterinary technicians, 29 (14.9%) in veterinary students, and 11 (31.4%) in pet owners. Of 19.9% Toxoplasma seropositive samples, 18.3% was positive for IgG antibody, 1.0% for IgM antibody, and 0.6% for both IgG and IgM antibodies. Of three different IgG avidity ELISA kits, ELISA III showed high avidity in all five seropositive samples (IgM and IgG/IgM antibodies) indicating chronic Toxoplasma infection which is consistent with no evidence of clinical toxoplasmosis diagnosed during the time of this study. Univariate analysis showed that age group, gender, study population, gardening, task performance, and working duration were significantly associated with Toxoplasma seropositivity. Further analysis by multivariate analysis using logistic regression showed that age group of ≥30 years old (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.18–0.63, p = 0.001) and working or study duration of >10 years having close contact with animals (OR = 5.07, 95% CI = 1.80–14.24, p = 0.002) were identified as significant risks for Toxoplasma infection. Based on the results obtained, a comprehensive Toxoplasma screening and health

  12. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  13. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  14. Energy and momentum conserving algorithms for rigid body contact

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M.A.; Zywicz, E.

    1998-04-09

    Energy-momentum conserving methods are developed for rigid body dynamics with contact. Because these methods are unconditionally stable, they are not time step dependent and, hence, are well suited for incorporation into structural mechanics finite element codes. Both penalty and Lagrange multiplier methods are developed herein and are the extension of the energy-momentum conserving integration schemes for rigid bodies given by Simo and Wong [1].

  15. Directional close-contact melting in glacier ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Julia; Schüller, Kai

    2015-04-01

    The Saturnian moon Enceladus shows incidence of liquid water underneath a thick ice sheet cover and is thought to be a potential candidate for extraterrestrial life. However, direct exploration of these subglacial aquatic ecosystems is very challenging. Within the scope of the joint research project 'Enceladus Explorer' (EnEx) (consisting of FH Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Universität Bremen, TU Braunschweig und Bundeswehr Universität München), initiated by the German Space Agency, a maneuverable close-contact melting probe has been developed. The force-regulated and heater-controlled probe is able to melt against gravity or even on a curved trajectory. Hence, it offers additional degrees of freedom in its melting motion, e.g. for target oriented melting or obstacle avoidance strategies. General feasibility of the concept has been demonstrated in various field tests. However, in order to optimize its design and to adopt it to extraterrestrial missions a simulation model is needed, capable of determining melting velocity and efficiency at given environmental conditions and system configurations. Within this contribution, the physical situation is abstracted into a quasi-stationary mathematical model description, and a numerical solution strategy is developed to compute melting velocity and temperature distribution within the probe and the surrounding ice. We present an inverse solution approach, in which a background velocity field of the ice mimics the melting velocity. The fundamental balance laws are solved with the corresponding melting rate. Following Newton's laws, the resulting force acting on the probe has to balance the contact force exerted by the probe and can hence be used for convergence. We present both, analytical results to a simplified head geometry, as well as results from a simulation model implemented into the open source software Elmer for arbitrary head geometries. The latter can deal with the full 3d situation

  16. Close binaries in near and shallow contact stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L. Y.; Qian, S. B.; Zejda, M.; Mikulášek, Z.

    2013-02-01

    After a detailed investigation of new observations obtained by small telescopes, we found a group of near and shallow contact binaries with decreasing period including BS Vul, MR Com, EP Cep, ES Cep and V369 Cep. BS Vul and V369 Cep are primary-filling near-contact binaries, while MR Com, EP Cep and ES Cep are shallow contact binaries. With their decrease in period, BS Vul and V369 Cep will evolve to the shallow-contact systems with higher mass ratios, just like ES Cep. The period decease of shallow contact binaries could be caused by the combined effect of the thermal relaxation oscillation (TRO) and variable angular momentum loss (AML). This produces contact binaries in oscillating circles that evolve towards the lower mass ratio direction. That means systems resemble ES Cep will evolve to those systems with lower mass ratio, such as MR Com and EP Cep.

  17. Optical sensor for detection of supercavity-body contact location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Jandron, Michael; Truscott, Tadd

    2013-11-01

    Supercavitating vehicles have been the subject of intense research due to the potential for drag reduction and/or increased speeds. The control of such vehicles depends on accurate knowledge of planing forces generated by partial, transient wetting of afterbody surfaces. Measurement of the supercavity-body contact location, which determines the planing area, is thus critical for vehicle control. A robust sensor capable of measuring supercavity contact location along the length of a body is presented. The sensor operates on the optical principle of total internal reflection to differentiate between liquid and gas phases in contact with the body. An array of photodetectors is used to sense the presence or absence of light from a laser source to map the contact location. The theoretical operation and limitations of the sensor are discussed and several experiments are presented to validate the theory. Also, we present an elegant signal processing method to compensate for in situ changes in ambient light conditions. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  18. Russell bodies in contact-lens-associated giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, A S; Allansmith, M R

    1979-03-01

    Biopsy specimens of the upper tarsal conjunctiva in soft contact lens-associated giant papillary conjunctivitis were taken during (1) chronic exacerbation, (2) brief remission, and (3) intentional exacerbation. Inflammatory cells were quantitated and compared with inflammatory cells in normal upper tarsal conjunctivae. Specimens were evaluated by light and electron microscopy. The most remarkable feature was the presence of diamond-shaped Russell bodies in 20% of the plasma cells of the second biopsy specimen. A few round Russell bodies were seen in the first biopsy specimen and none in the third. We concluded that the brief quiescent phase (second biopsy specimen) was characterized by retention of immunoglobulin to produce Russell bodies, and that the active phases of the disease were marked by migration of mast cells into the epithelium and by the presence of eosinophils and basophils in the substantia propria. PMID:217320

  19. Analysis of effects caused by the irregularity of small bodies: the case of contact binaries and dumbbell-shaped bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    Since a few decades ago, varieties of asteroids have been discovered and observed in detail, stimulating scientists' interests. As for the closed-orbit dynamics about these objects, the dynamics around a simple model and an estimated shape obtained by light curve and radar observations have been actively studied. For the simple model, since the dynamics can easily be understood, several model were sug-gested. Chauvineau et al. (1993) numerically studied orbits on the equilateral plane of a highly elongated body, by using a triaxial ellipsoid model, the two-connected-mass model, and the mass-distribution model. Scheeres (1994) considered the closed-orbit dynamics about a uni-formly rotating triaxial ellipsoid. As for the two-mass-rotating system, Prieto-Llanos et al. (1994) investigated the dynamics around an elongated body in the case of the ratio of the gravitational to centripetal force more than 1 and applied to the Mars-Phobos system. On the other hand, using the same model, Hirabayashi et al. (2010) derived the stability condition about collinear equilibrium points for the ratio less than 1, the fast rotating case, applying it to Asteroid 2000EB14. Analyses with the spherical harmonic function (Kaula, 1966) have also been presented. Scheeres et al. (1996) studied closed orbits to Asteroid Castalia, taking into account coefficients up to order 16 obtained by Hudson and Ostro (1994). They pointed out that for the Castalia case C20 and C22 are important factors. Closed orbits about Toutatis, a non-uniformly rotating asteroid, was also analyzed by Scheeres et al. (1998). Also, Scheeres et al.(2000) studied the dynamics in orbit about Asteroid Eros, a target of NEAR mission. Yoshikawa et al. (1997), on the other hand, suggested the orbital stability around an irregularly shaped body in terms of the inclination angle, considering C20 and C22. The paper studies orbital disturbances around an irregular body such as a contact binary body or a dumbbell shaped body and

  20. Should close contacts of returning travellers with typhoid fever be protected by vaccination?

    PubMed

    Kantele, A

    2015-03-17

    Increasing international travel to areas endemic for typhoid fever correlates with increased risk for travellers to contract the disease. At home, the acutely ill/convalescent patients may pose some risk to their close contacts. In Finland an unofficial guideline suggests vaccination for close contacts of patients with acute typhoid fever; in other developed countries, routine typhoid vaccinations are only recommended to contacts of chronic carriers. This paper discusses the possibilities and limitations of prophylactic/post-exposure typhoid vaccination for contacts of patients with acute disease. PMID:25678244

  1. A survey of close contact regimes between patients undergoing diagnostic radioisotope procedures and children.

    PubMed

    Greaves, C D; Tindale, W B; Flynn, P J

    1996-07-01

    When following diagnostic radioisotope procedures, UK legislation requires that we advise patients to avoid close contact with children [1, 2]. How does this advice affect the average nuclear medicine patient? Over a 4 month period, 90 patients in contact with children were asked about their home circumstances, how they coped with avoidance of close contact and the problems caused. On average, the patients were in contact with two children with a mean age of 7 years. Thirty-nine per cent of patients spent < 5 h per day and 30% between 5 and 10 h per day in close contact. However, 13% spent 20-24 h in close contact with children. For most patients (55%), it is easy to avoid close contact, but 25% found it difficult or very difficult. The average in-patient received one visit a day from children of 0.5-1 h duration and 65% of children sat on the patient's bed. Restriction of visits was a problem for 14% of patients. Initially, over one-third of the out-patients felt a medium level of anxiety or higher regarding close contact with children. Given more detailed written information and the opportunity to discuss any queries with a member of staff (70% wished to do so), the proportion fell to less than one-tenth. We found it important to question patients carefully, because home circumstances and levels of close contact cannot be deduced from the age of the child or the relationship between the child and the patient. PMID:8843113

  2. Two-body and three-body contacts for identical Bosons near unitarity.

    PubMed

    Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2014-03-21

    In a recent experiment with ultracold trapped Rb85 atoms, Makotyn et al. studied a quantum-degenerate Bose gas in the unitary limit where its scattering length is infinitely large. We show that the observed momentum distributions are compatible with a universal relation that expresses the high-momentum tail in terms of the two-body contact C2 and the three-body contact C3. We determine the contact densities for the unitary Bose gas with number density n to be C2 ≈ 20 n(4/3) and C3 ≈ 2n(5/3). We also show that the observed atom loss rate is compatible with that from 3-atom inelastic collisions, which gives a contribution proportional to C3, but the loss rate is not compatible with that from 2-atom inelastic collisions, which gives a contribution proportional to C2. We point out that the contacts C2 and C3 could be measured independently by using the virial theorem near and at unitarity, respectively. PMID:24702333

  3. Typical fast thermalization processes in closed many-body systems

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The lack of knowledge about the detailed many-particle motion on the microscopic scale is a key issue in any theoretical description of a macroscopic experiment. For systems at or close to thermal equilibrium, statistical mechanics provides a very successful general framework to cope with this problem. However, far from equilibrium, only very few quantitative and comparably universal results are known. Here a quantum mechanical prediction of this type is derived and verified against various experimental and numerical data from the literature. It quantitatively describes the entire temporal relaxation towards thermal equilibrium for a large class (in a mathematically precisely defined sense) of closed many-body systems, whose initial state may be arbitrarily far from equilibrium. PMID:26926224

  4. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of contact between deformable bodies of simple geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siang, Kelvin Ng Wei; Nicola, Lucia

    2016-05-01

    A contact mechanical model is presented where both metal bodies can deform by discrete dislocation plasticity. The model intends to improve on previous dislocation dynamics models of contact, where only a plastically deformable body was considered, flattened by a rigid platen. The effect of the rigid platen was mimicked through boundary conditions acting on the deformable body. While the formulation is general, the simulations presented here are only performed for contact between a plastically deforming body with sinusoidal surface and a flat body that is either elastic or rigid. Results show that the contact conditions, i.e. frictionless and full stick, affect the morphology of the contact as well as the contact pressure distribution. This is because dislocations can glide through the frictionless contact and fragment it, but do not penetrate a sticking contact. Average quantities like mean apparent contact pressure and total plastic slip are, instead, independent of contact conditions and of the details of the contact area. A size dependence is observed in relation to the onset of plastic deformation, where surfaces with smaller wavelength and amplitude require a larger contact pressure to yield than self similar surfaces with larger wavelength. The size dependence is very pronounced when the flat body is rigid, but fades when the compliance of the flat body is large.

  5. Rapid cellular translocation is related to close contacts formed between various cultured cells and their substrata.

    PubMed

    Kolega, J; Shure, M S; Chen, W T; Young, N D

    1982-04-01

    Interference-reflection microscopy combined with time-lapse cinemicrography was used to examine the relationship between cell-to-substratum contact patterns and the speeds of translocation for a variety of cell types. Rapid translocation of amphibian leukocytes (average speed = 9.0 micron/min), amphibian epidermal cells (7 micron/min) and teleost epidermal cells (7 micron/min) was found to correlate with patterns of broad grey close contacts. Similar contact patterns were found under freshly seeded (2 h) chick heart fibroblasts (moving 1-3 micron/min), the rapidly advancing (1-5 micron/min) margin of spreading human WI-38 fibroblasts, and isolated MDCK canine epithelial cells (0.5-1.0 micron/min). Conversely, numerous dark streaks of focal contact were found associated with the slow rate of translocation displayed by older cultures (72 h) of chick fibroblasts (less than 0.1 micron/min), well-spread WI-38 cells (less than or equal to 0.3 micron/min) and confluent MDCK cells (less than 0.01 micron/min). It is concluded that close contacts, but not focal contacts, are associated with rapid cellular translocation, and that the build-up of focal contacts is associated with reduced cellular translocation and maintenance of the spread cell shape. PMID:7076724

  6. Selection versus Structure: Explaining Family Type Differences in Contact with Close Kin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bruycker, Trees

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on one aspect of family networks, namely, the frequency of contact with close kin for adults living in different traditional and new family types. Two mechanisms are hypothesized to account for the differences. The first focuses on structural factors such as the number and type of persons in the primary family network,…

  7. 3D BEM for orthotropic frictional contact of piezoelectric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tembleque, Luis; Buroni, Federico C.; Sáez, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    A numerical methodology to model the three-dimensional frictional contact interaction of piezoelectric materials in presence of electric fields is presented in this work. The boundary element method (BEM) is used in order to compute the electro-elastic influence coefficients. The proposed BEM formulation employs an explicit approach for the evaluation of the corresponding fundamental solutions, which are valid for general anisotropic behaviour meanwhile mathematical degeneracies in the context of the Stroh formalism are allowed. The contact methodology is based on an augmented Lagrangian formulation and uses an iterative Uzawa scheme of resolution. An orthotropic frictional law is implemented in this work so anisotropy is present both in the bulk and in the surface. The methodology is validated by comparison with benchmark analytical solutions. Some additional examples are presented and discussed in detail, revealing the importance of considering orthotropic frictional contact conditions in the electro-elastic analysis of this kind of problems.

  8. Water droplet spreading on a soluble polymer: what happens close to the contact line?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talini, Laurence; Dupas, Julien; Verneuil, Emilie; Lequeux, Francois; Forny, Laurent; Ramaioli, Marco

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the spreading of a water droplet on a water soluble substrate. Numerous coupled transfer processes are involved in such a situation, leading to complex wetting dynamics. In particular, previous studies have shown the major role of water evaporation from the droplet associated with water uptake by the substrate. However, the processes at stake close to the contact line, where the substrate properties set the wetting angle, have not been understood. We present an experimental study of the phenomena occurring within distances ranging from 10 to 1000 μm from the contact line of a water droplet spreading on a food polymer layer. We have evidenced a wrinkling pattern inside the droplet close to the contact line, and suggest it results from the swelling of the constrained polymer layer before it dissolves. In addition, using an optical method based on the analysis of Newton's rings, we have measured the hydration profile of the substrate ahead the contact line. We show that the profiles can be understood as a result of the evaporation/water uptake process through air combined with direct water diffusion in the substrate from the liquid wedge.

  9. Near-Contact Binaries (NCB): Close Binary Systems in a Key Evolutionary Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L. Y.; Qian, S. B.

    2007-08-01

    Short-period eclipsing binary systems with EB-type light variations are interesting objects for understanding the evolutionary changes undergone by close binaries. As investigated by many authors (Kalużny, J., Yamasaki, A., Zhai, D. S, Zhang, X. B Hilditch, R. W., McFarlane, T. M, King, D. J, Shaw, J. S., Samec, R. G., Niarchos, P. G., Oh, Kyu-Dong. etc ), a majority of them belong to an important subclass of close binaries called near-contact binaries (NCBs). According to the geometric definition of this subclass, NCBs actually comprise semi-detached, marginal-contact, and marginal-detached systems. They can be in the intermediate stage between detached or semi-detached state and contact state. Therefore, NCBs are the important observational targets which may be lying in key evolutionary states. In this paper, we observed and investigated several NCBs (BL And, GW Tau, RU UMi, GSC3658-0076, UU Lyn, AS Ser, IR Cas, EP Aur). Our results show that the orbital periods of BL And, GW Tau, RU UMi and UU Lyn are decreasing while that of IR Cas is decreasing and oscillating. The mechanisms that could explain the period variations are discussed. Combining the photometric solutions with period variations of these systems, we divide them into four types: BL And is a semi-detached system with the lobe filling primary, RU UMi and EP Aur are the semi-detached system with the lobe filling secondary, GW Tau, UU Lyn and AS Ser are the marginal contact system while GSC3658-0076 is the marginal detached system. Finally, the evolutionary stage of each system is discussed and some statistical relations of NCBs are presented.

  10. Noncontact Friction and Force Fluctuations between Closely Spaced Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Stipe, B. C.; Mamin, H. J.; Stowe, T. D.; Kenny, T. W.; Rugar, D.

    2001-08-27

    Noncontact friction between a Au(111) surface and an ultrasensitive gold-coated cantilever was measured as a function of tip-sample spacing, temperature, and bias voltage using observations of cantilever damping and Brownian motion. The importance of the inhomogeneous contact potential is discussed and comparison is made to measurements over dielectric surfaces. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the force fluctuations are interpreted in terms of near-surface fluctuating electric fields interacting with static surface charge.

  11. Is the Colonisation of Staphylococcus aureus in Pets Associated with Their Close Contact with Owners?

    PubMed Central

    Bierowiec, Karolina; Płoneczka-Janeczko, Katarzyna; Rypuła, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    In human beings and animals, staphylococci constitute part of the normal microbial population. Staphylococcus aureus could be classified as an opportunistic pathogen because the bacteria are noted in clinically healthy individuals, but when the immune system becomes compromised, they can also cause a wide range of infections. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cats who are in close contact with their owners are at the greatest risk of being colonised with S. aureus. Two groups of cats were investigated: single, pet (domestic) cats that do not have outdoor access; and a local population of feral cats living in urban areas. The prevalence of S. aureus in domestic cats was 19.17%, while it’s prevalence in the feral cat population was only 8.3%; which was statistically significant. Analysis of antibiotic resistance, at the genotypic as well as phenotypic level, showed that S. aureus isolates from pet cats were more likely to harbour antibiotic resistant determinants. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in households was 10.21%, while in feral cats it was only 1.4%. In conclusion, this study has revealed a correlation between close contact with humans and a higher risk of the cats being colonised with S. aureus and harbouring the antibiotic resistant determinants. PMID:27227897

  12. Is the Colonisation of Staphylococcus aureus in Pets Associated with Their Close Contact with Owners?

    PubMed

    Bierowiec, Karolina; Płoneczka-Janeczko, Katarzyna; Rypuła, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    In human beings and animals, staphylococci constitute part of the normal microbial population. Staphylococcus aureus could be classified as an opportunistic pathogen because the bacteria are noted in clinically healthy individuals, but when the immune system becomes compromised, they can also cause a wide range of infections. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cats who are in close contact with their owners are at the greatest risk of being colonised with S. aureus. Two groups of cats were investigated: single, pet (domestic) cats that do not have outdoor access; and a local population of feral cats living in urban areas. The prevalence of S. aureus in domestic cats was 19.17%, while it's prevalence in the feral cat population was only 8.3%; which was statistically significant. Analysis of antibiotic resistance, at the genotypic as well as phenotypic level, showed that S. aureus isolates from pet cats were more likely to harbour antibiotic resistant determinants. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in households was 10.21%, while in feral cats it was only 1.4%. In conclusion, this study has revealed a correlation between close contact with humans and a higher risk of the cats being colonised with S. aureus and harbouring the antibiotic resistant determinants. PMID:27227897

  13. Dual Conversations: Body Talk Among Young Women and Their Social Contacts

    PubMed Central

    O’Dougherty, Maureen; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Hearst, Mary O.; Covelli, Michaela; Kurzer, Mindy S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we explore an area little researched within the literature on body dissatisfaction: the content and functions of body talk. We interviewed 60 diverse, college-educated women aged 18 to 30 in the urban United States about how social contacts talked about their bodies. Half the women, and by their reports, half their contacts (N = 295) endorsed some ideal body, most often the thin model. The other half favored a “healthy,” “average” range in body size, shape, and/or appearance. Excepting family members, contacts gave mostly positive comments about women’s bodies or appearance, or made no comments. Many critiqued their own bodies, however, as did nearly half the women participants. We suggest that these women exempted others, but not themselves, from critical body surveillance, rendering contestation of the ideal theoretical. We also suggest that the parallel airing of self-criticism repeatedly circulated through speech, if not through practice, the imperative to regulate one’s own gendered body toward unattainable normativity. PMID:21508251

  14. Sub-discretized surface model with application to contact mechanics in multi-body simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S; Williams, J

    2008-02-28

    The mechanics of contact between rough and imperfectly spherical adhesive powder grains are often complicated by a variety of factors, including several which vary over sub-grain length scales. These include several traction factors that vary spatially over the surface of the individual grains, including high energy electron and acceptor sites (electrostatic), hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites (electrostatic and capillary), surface energy (general adhesion), geometry (van der Waals and mechanical), and elasto-plastic deformation (mechanical). For mechanical deformation and reaction, coupled motions, such as twisting with bending and sliding, as well as surface roughness add an asymmetry to the contact force which invalidates assumptions for popular models of contact, such as the Hertzian and its derivatives, for the non-adhesive case, and the JKR and DMT models for adhesive contacts. Though several contact laws have been offered to ameliorate these drawbacks, they are often constrained to particular loading paths (most often normal loading) and are relatively complicated for computational implementation. This paper offers a simple and general computational method for augmenting contact law predictions in multi-body simulations through characterization of the contact surfaces using a hierarchically-defined surface sub-discretization. For the case of adhesive contact between powder grains in low stress regimes, this technique can allow a variety of existing contact laws to be resolved across scales, allowing for moments and torques about the contact area as well as normal and tangential tractions to be resolved. This is especially useful for multi-body simulation applications where the modeler desires statistical distributions and calibration for parameters in contact laws commonly used for resolving near-surface contact mechanics. The approach is verified against analytical results for the case of rough, elastic spheres.

  15. The Minimum Mass Ratio for Contact Close Binary Systems of W Ursae Majoris-Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbutina, B.

    2012-12-01

    The main research topic of this dissertation are extreme mass ratio contact close binary systems, q ≲ 0.1, of W Ursae Majoris (W UMa) type. These close binaries (CBs) represent an interesting class of objects in which "normal", approximately one solar mass main-sequence star is in contact with a significantly less massive companion, M_2 ˜ 0.1 M_⊙. Earlier theoretical investigations of these systems found that there is a minimum mass ratio q_{min} = M_2/M_1 = 0.085 - 0.095 (obtained for n = 3 polytrope - fully radiative primary) above which these CBs are stable and could be observed. If the mass ratio is lower than q_{min}, or, equivalently, if orbital angular momentum is only about three times larger than the spin angular momentum of a massive primary, a tidal instability develops (Darwin's instability) forcing eventually the stars to merge into a single, rapidly rotating object (such as FK Com-type stars or blue stragglers). However, there appear to be some W UMa-type CBs with empirically obtained values for the mass ratio below the theoretical limit for stability. The aim of this dissertation is to try to resolve the discrepancy between theory and observations by considering rotating polytropes. By including in theory the effects of higher central condensation due to rotation we were able to reduce qmin to the new theoretical value q_{min} = 0.070-0.074, for the overcontact degree f = 0 - 1, which is more consistent with the observed population. Other candidate systems for stellar mergers such as AM CVn-type stars have also been discussed in the dissertation.

  16. Applying the contact hypothesis to anti-fat attitudes: contact with overweight people is related to how we interact with our bodies and those of others.

    PubMed

    Alperin, Anandi; Hornsey, Matthew J; Hayward, Lydia E; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Barlow, Fiona Kate

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the first to apply the contact hypothesis, a social psychological theory of prejudice reduction, to the field of weight bias. It aims to investigate whether contact with overweight people is associated with the extent to which people report weight bias, as well as vigilance around their own bodies. In 2013 we recruited 1176 American participants to complete surveys regarding prejudice toward overweight people, as well as a suite of measures capturing people's relationships with their own weight (fat talk, drive for thinness, and body-checking behavior). Positive contact with overweight people predicted decreased prejudice, regardless of whether participants were overweight (p < .001) or not (p = .003). However, negative contact was a stronger predictor of increased prejudice (p < .001 for both samples). For non-overweight participants, any contact with overweight people (whether positive or negative) predicted increased body-checking behaviors (positive-p = .002, negative-p < .001) and fat talk (positive-p = .047, negative-p < .001), and negative contact predicted increased drive for thinness (p < .001). However, for those who were overweight a different picture emerged. While negative contact predicted increased body-checking behaviors (p < .001) and fat talk (p < .001), positive contact was protective, predicting decreased drive for thinness (p = .001) and body-checking behaviors (p < .001). This paper demonstrates that the interactions we have with overweight people are inherently tied to both our attitudes towards them and our relationship with our own bodies. PMID:25462603

  17. Relationship between anesthetic procedure and contact of anesthesia personnel with patient body fluids.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, M S; Sloth, E; Jensen, T K

    1990-10-01

    We recorded the frequency with which anesthesia personnel came in contact with patient body fluids in order to provide an empirical basis for the recommendation of relevant precautions. Anesthesia personnel completed a questionnaire when performing a range of standardized procedures. The rate of contact with blood was as follows: catheterization of peripheral vein, 18%; insertion of central venous catheter, 87%; arterial puncture, 38%; lumbar puncture, 23%; catheterization of the extradural space, 34%; tracheal intubation, 4%; tracheal extubation, 9%; suction of oral cavity, pharynx, or trachea, 13%; intramuscular injection of drug, 8%; and establishment or discontinuation of drip for blood transfusion, 43%. By using protective gloves, 98% of contacts with patient blood would have been prevented. Blood contact was more frequent in the emergency ward than in the operating room (P less than 0.05). Health care workers were not able to predict when a specific procedure would imply that contact with patient blood would occur. We recommend that specific precautions be adopted for the various procedures and discuss precautions that could have prevented contact with body fluid. PMID:2221430

  18. Occupant seating anthropometry: body ellipses and contact zones for side-impact protection research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Clyde C.; Viano, David C.

    The study has developed an anthropometric description of seated occupants and determined body regions representing major paths in side-impact crashes. The study has identified five major body ellipses defining the head, shoulder, chest, abdomen and pelvis of seated occupants of various sizes, including the six-year-old child. Body contact zones have been determined for front-seated occupants. These templates provide information for the design of side interiors to improve occupant protection in side-impact crashes by load-transfer and energy-absorption characteristics of biocompatible interiors.

  19. Statistical analysis of landing contact conditions for three lifting body research vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The landing contact conditions for the HL-10, M2-F2/F3, and the X-24A lifting body vehicles are analyzed statistically for 81 landings. The landing contact parameters analyzed are true airspeed, peak normal acceleration at the center of gravity, roll angle, and roll velocity. Ground measurement parameters analyzed are lateral and longitudinal distance from intended touchdown, lateral distance from touchdown to full stop, and rollout distance. The results are presented in the form of histograms for frequency distributions and cumulative frequency distribution probability curves with a Pearson Type 3 curve fit for extrapolation purposes.

  20. Online Respondent-Driven Sampling for Studying Contact Patterns Relevant for the Spread of Close-Contact Pathogens: A Pilot Study in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Mart L.; van Steenbergen, Jim E.; Chanyasanha, Charnchudhi; Tipayamongkholgul, Mathuros; Buskens, Vincent; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.; Sabaiwan, Wasamon; Bengtsson, Linus; Lu, Xin; Thorson, Anna E.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Information on social interactions is needed to understand the spread of airborne infections through a population. Previous studies mostly collected egocentric information of independent respondents with self-reported information about contacts. Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a sampling technique allowing respondents to recruit contacts from their social network. We explored the feasibility of webRDS for studying contact patterns relevant for the spread of respiratory pathogens. Materials and Methods We developed a webRDS system for facilitating and tracking recruitment by Facebook and email. One-day diary surveys were conducted by applying webRDS among a convenience sample of Thai students. Students were asked to record numbers of contacts at different settings and self-reported influenza-like-illness symptoms, and to recruit four contacts whom they had met in the previous week. Contacts were asked to do the same to create a network tree of socially connected individuals. Correlations between linked individuals were analysed to investigate assortativity within networks. Results We reached up to 6 waves of contacts of initial respondents, using only non-material incentives. Forty-four (23.0%) of the initially approached students recruited one or more contacts. In total 257 persons participated, of which 168 (65.4%) were recruited by others. Facebook was the most popular recruitment option (45.1%). Strong assortative mixing was seen by age, gender and education, indicating a tendency of respondents to connect to contacts with similar characteristics. Random mixing was seen by reported number of daily contacts. Conclusions Despite methodological challenges (e.g. clustering among respondents and their contacts), applying RDS provides new insights in mixing patterns relevant for close-contact infections in real-world networks. Such information increases our knowledge of the transmission of respiratory infections within populations and can be used to

  1. Closing the hand hygiene gap in the postanesthesia care unit: a body-worn alcohol-based dispenser.

    PubMed

    Petty, William Clayton

    2013-04-01

    Clinicians who work in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), operating room (OR), and intensive care unit (ICU) have a greater opportunity to cross-contaminate patients because of high workloads and frequent patient contact events. Much progress has been made to increase hand hygiene compliance with the introduction of alcohol-based wall, bedside, and pocket dispensers. The introduction of body-worn alcohol-based dispensers to anesthesia and ICU providers has been shown to decrease ICU hospital-acquired infections and ventilator-associated pneumonias, and decrease contamination of the anesthesia workplace. Body-worn alcohol-based dispensers are an improvement in ergonomics, especially for those working in high intensity areas. The unit worn on the belt or scrubs waist is readily accessible, can be activated with one hand, and can be a vital tool to close the gap for hand hygiene. PMID:23522268

  2. Hand-Arm Coordinated Manipulation Using Active Body-Environment Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaiwa, Taisuke; Iwata, Hiroyasu; Sugano, Shigeki

    Human-symbiotic humanoid robots that can perform tasks dexterously with their hands are needed in our homes, welfare facilities, and other places. To improve their performance of tasks, we propose a scheme of controlling motion aimed at appropriately coordinated hand and arm motions. By observing human manual tasks, we identify an active body-environment contact as a kind of human manual skills and devise a motion control scheme based on it. We also analyze the effectiveness of the combination of the active body-environment contact and our proposed scheme in example tasks of the adding/removing constraint task. We validate our motion control scheme through actual tests on a prototype human-symbiotic humanoid robot.

  3. Kepler eclipsing binary stars. IV. Precise eclipse times for close binaries and identification of candidate three-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Kyle E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-02-01

    We present a catalog of precise eclipse times and analysis of third-body signals among 1279 close binaries in the latest Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog. For these short-period binaries, Kepler's 30 minute exposure time causes significant smearing of light curves. In addition, common astrophysical phenomena such as chromospheric activity, as well as imperfections in the light curve detrending process, can create systematic artifacts that may produce fictitious signals in the eclipse timings. We present a method to measure precise eclipse times in the presence of distorted light curves, such as in contact and near-contact binaries which exhibit continuously changing light levels in and out of eclipse. We identify 236 systems for which we find a timing variation signal compatible with the presence of a third body. These are modeled for the light travel time effect and the basic properties of the third body are derived. This study complements J. A. Orosz et al. (in preparation), which focuses on eclipse timing variations of longer period binaries with flat out-of-eclipse regions. Together, these two papers provide comprehensive eclipse timings for all binaries in the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, as an ongoing resource freely accessible online to the community.

  4. Diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis cases and close human contacts.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, T; Kock, M M; Ehlers, M M

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the diversity of Staphylococcus spp. recovered from bovine intramammary infections and humans working in close contact with the animals and to evaluate the susceptibility of the staphylococcal isolates to different antimicrobials. A total of 3,387 milk samples and 79 human nasal swabs were collected from 13 sampling sites in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. In total, 146 Staph. aureus isolates and 102 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were recovered from clinical and subclinical milk samples. Staphylococcusaureus was isolated from 12 (15.2%) of the human nasal swabs and 95 representative CNS were recovered for further characterization. The CNS were identified using multiplex-PCR assays, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and tuf gene sequencing. Seven Staphylococcus spp. were identified among the CNS of bovine origin, with Staph.chromogenes (78.4%) predominating. The predominant CNS species recovered from the human nasal swabs was Staph.epidermidis (80%) followed by Staph.chromogenes (6.3%). The antimicrobial susceptibility of all staphylococcal isolates was evaluated using disk diffusion and was supplemented by screening for specific antimicrobial resistance genes. Ninety-eight (67.1%) Staph.aureus isolates of bovine origin were pansusceptible; 39 (26.7%) isolates were resistant to a single class, and 7 (4.8%) isolates were resistant to 2 classes of antimicrobials. Two Staph. aureus (1.4%) isolates were multidrug-resistant. Resistance to penicillin was common, with 28.8% of the bovine and 75% of the human Staph. aureus isolates exhibiting resistance. A similar observation was made with the CNS, where 37.3% of the bovine and 89.5% of the human isolates were resistant to penicillin. Multidrug-resistance was common among the human CNS, with 39% of the isolates exhibiting resistance to 3 or more classes of antimicrobials. The antimicrobial

  5. Time-Motion Analysis of Health Care Workers’ Contact With Patients and Workers’ Hand Hygiene: Open vs Closed Units

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Babar A.; Hui, Ken Yon; Hui, Siu L.; Gulati, Rajesh; Tricker, Jason; Campbell, Noll L.; Farber, Mark O.; Boustani, Malaz A.; Buckley, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of open (care provided by general medicine teams with a pulmonary intensivist consultant) vs closed (care provided by a dedicated critical care team) intensive care units on health care workers’ contact with patients and their hand hygiene is uncertain. Objective To determine if closed intensive care units have fewer visits of patients by health care providers and greater hand-washing compliance among providers than do open units. Methods Time-motion analysis was used to observe 2 rooms in a medical intensive care unit at a teaching hospital affiliated with Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, for 96 hours before and after closure of the unit. The main outcome measures were frequency of health care providers’ visits and their hand-washing hygiene compliance rates. Results Mean number of visits per room per hour by physicians (1.53 in the open unit vs 1.27 in the closed unit; P = .93) and nurses (3.98 in open unit vs 4.14 in closed unit; P = .60) did not differ. No differences were observed in gold-standard hand washing among physicians (0.00% in open unit vs 2.63% in closed unit; P = .11) or nurses (2.50% in open unit vs 3.49% in closed unit; P = .51). However, hand washing decreased significantly in nurses in the closed unit (40.94% in open unit vs 29.84% in closed unit; P = .002). Conclusion Closing the intensive care unit did not decrease the number of contacts between health care providers and patients nor did it increase the providers’ compliance with hand hygiene. PMID:21532037

  6. Distance of the contact glide in the closing masticatory stroke during mastication of three types of food.

    PubMed

    Rilo, B; Fernández-Formoso, N; Mora, M J; Cadarso-Suárez, C; Santana, U

    2009-08-01

    This study was designed to characterize the distance of the contact glide in the closing masticatory stroke in healthy adult subjects, during chewing of three types of food (crustless bread, chewing gum and peanuts). Mandibular movements (masticatory movements and laterality movements with dental contact) were registered using a gnathograph (MK-6I Diagnostic System) on the right and left side during unilateral chewing of the three food types. Length of dental contact was measured in masticatory cycle, which is defined as where the terminal part of the chewing cycles could be superimposed on the pathways taken by the mandible during lateral excursions with occlusal contacts. The length of dental contact during mastication of chewing gum is 1.46 +/- 1 mm, during chewing of soft bread is 1.38 +/- 0.7 mm and during chewing of peanuts is 1.45 +/- 0.9 mm. There is no significant difference in the lengths of dental contact during mastication of three types of foods that enable direct tooth gliding. PMID:19453848

  7. Close encounters of the third-body kind. [intruding bodies in binary star systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We simulated encounters involving binaries of two eccentricities: e = 0 (i.e., circular binaries) and e = 0.5. In both cases the binary contained a point mass of 1.4 solar masses (i.e., a neutron star) and a 0.8 solar masses main-sequence star modeled as a polytrope. The semimajor axes of both binaries were set to 60 solar radii (0.28 AU). We considered intruders of three masses: 1.4 solar masses (a neutron star), 0.8 solar masses (a main-sequence star or a higher mass white dwarf), and 0.64 solar masses (a more typical mass white dwarf). Our strategy was to perform a large number (40,000) of encounters using a three-body code, then to rerun a small number of cases with a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to determine the importance of hydrodynamical effects. Using the results of the three-body runs, we computed the exchange across sections, sigma(sub ex). From the results of the SPH runs, we computed the cross sections for clean exchange, denoted by sigma(sub cx); the formation of a triple system, denoted by sigma(sub trp); and the formation of a merged binary with an object formed from the merger of two of the stars left in orbit around the third star, denoted by sigma(sub mb). For encounters between either binary and a 1.4 solar masses neutron star, sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.7 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 0.3 sigma(sub ex). For encounters between either binary and the 0.8 solar masses main-sequence star, sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.50 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 1.0 sigma(sub ex). If the main sequence star is replaced by a main-sequence star of the same mass, we have sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.5 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 1.6 sigma(sub ex). Although the exchange cross section is a sensitive function of intruder mass, we see that the cross section to produce merged binaries is roughly independent of intruder mass. The merged binaries produced have semi

  8. The mathematical models of electromagnetic field dynamics and heat transfer in closed electrical contacts including Thomson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Stanislav; Sarsengeldin, Merey; Kassabek, Samat

    2016-08-01

    We represent mathematical models of electromagnetic field dynamics and heat transfer in closed symmetric and asymmetric electrical contacts including Thomson effect, which are essentially nonlinear due to the dependence of thermal and electrical conductivities on temperature. Suggested solutions are based on the assumption of identity of equipotentials and isothermal surfaces, which agrees with experimental data and valid for both linear and nonlinear cases. Well known Kohlrausch temperature-potential relation is analytically justified.

  9. A prospective cohort study of latent tuberculosis in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Hyo; Lee, Seung Jun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Hee Jin; Menzies, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients in Korea. Methods: Adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients were recruited at a regional tertiary hospital in Korea. The participants were tested for LTBI using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and/or QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) test. LTBI patients, who consented to treatment, were randomly assigned to receive isoniazid for 9 months (9INH) or rifampin for 4 months (4RIF). Results: We examined 189 adult close contacts (> 18 years) of 107 active pulmonary TB patients. The TST and QFT-G were positive (≥ 10 mm) in 75/183 (39.7%) and 45/118 (38.1%) tested participants, respectively. Among 88 TST or QFT-G positive LTBI participants, 45 participants were randomly assigned to receive 4RIF (n = 21) or 9INH (n = 24), respectively. The average treatment duration for the 4RIF and 9INH groups was 3.3 ± 1.3 and 6.1 ± 2.7 months, respectively. Treatment was completed in 25 participants (4RIF, n = 16; 9INH, n = 9). LTBI participants who accepted treatment were more likely to be women and have more cavitary lesions on the chest radiographs of index cases and positive TST and QFT-G results compared to those who refused treatment. Conclusions: About 40% of adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients had LTBI; about 50% of these LTBI participants agreed to treatment. PMID:27052266

  10. Interspecies transmission of equine influenza virus (H3N8) to dogs by close contact with experimentally infected horses.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takashi; Nemoto, Manabu; Tsujimura, Koji; Kondo, Takashi; Matsumura, Tomio

    2009-11-18

    In horse populations, influenza A virus subtype H3N8 (equine influenza virus, EIV) is a very important pathogen that leads to acute respiratory disease. Recently, EIV has emerged in dogs, and has become widespread among the canine population in the United States. The interspecies transmission route had thus far remained unclear. Here, we tested whether the interspecies transmission of EIV to dogs could occur as a result of close contact with experimentally EIV-infected horses. Three pairs consisting of an EIV-infected horse and a healthy dog were kept together in individual stalls for 15 consecutive days. A subsequent hemagglutination inhibition test revealed that all three dogs exhibited seroconversion. Moreover, two of the three dogs exhibited virus shedding. However, the dogs exhibited no clinical signs throughout the course of the study. These data suggest that the interspecies transmission of EIV to dogs could occur as a result of close contact with EIV-infected horses without clinical symptoms. Although the interspecies transmission of EIV is unlikely to become an immediate threat to canine hygiene, close contact between EIV-infected horses and dogs should be avoided during an EI epidemic. PMID:19596528

  11. Molecular Detection and Identification of Zoonotic Microsporidia Spore in Fecal Samples of Some Animals with Close-Contact to Human

    PubMed Central

    ASKARI, Zeinab; MIRJALALI, Hamed; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; ZAREI, Zabih; SHOJAEI, Saeideh; REZAEIAN, Tahereh; REZAEIAN, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Microsporidia species are obligatory intracellular agents that can infect all major animal groups including mammals, birds, fishes and insects. Whereas worldwide human infection reports are increasing, the cognition of sources of infection particularly zoonotic transmission could be helpful. We aimed to detect zoonotic microsporidia spore in fecal samples from some animals with closecontact to human. Methods: Overall, 142 fecal samples were collected from animals with closed-contact to human, during 2012-2013. Trichrome – blue staining were performed and DNA was then extracted from samples, identified positive, microscopically. Nested PCR was also carried out with primers targeting SSU rRNA gene and PCR products were sequenced. Results: From 142 stool samples, microsporidia spores have been observed microscopically in 15 (10.56%) samples. En. cuniculi was found in the faces of 3 (15%) small white mice and 1 (10%) laboratory rabbits(totally 2.81%). Moreover, E. bieneusi was detected in 3 (10%) samples of sheep, 2 (5.12%) cattle, 1 (10%) rabbit, 3 (11.53%) cats and 2 (11.76%) ownership dogs (totally 7.74%). Phylogenetic analysis showed interesting data. This is the first study in Iran, which identified E. bieneusi and En. Cuniculi in fecal samples of laboratory animals with closecontact to human as well as domesticated animal and analyzed them in phylogenetic tree. Conclusion: E. bieneusi is the most prevalent microsporidia species in animals. Our results can also alert us about potentially zoonotic transmission of microsporidiosis. PMID:26622293

  12. The effect of body posture on long-range time-to-contact estimation.

    PubMed

    Baurès, Robin; Hecht, Heiko

    2011-01-01

    On Earth, gravity accelerates freely moving objects downward, whereas upward-moving objects are being decelerated. Do humans take internalised knowledge of gravity into account when estimating time-to-contact (TTC, the time remaining before the moving object reaches the observer)? To answer this question, we created a motion-prediction task in which participants saw the initial part of an object's trajectory moving on a collision course prior to an occlusion. Observers had to judge when the object would make contact with them. The visual scene was presented with a head-mounted display. Participants lay either supine (looking up) or prone (looking down), suggestive of the ball either rising up or falling down toward them. Results showed that body posture had a significant effect on time-to-contact estimation, but only when occlusion times were long (2.5 s). The effect was also rather small. This lack of immediacy in the posture effect suggests that TTC estimation is initially robust toward the effect of gravity, which comes to bear only as more time is allowed for post-processing of the visual information. PMID:21936296

  13. Effect of early mother-baby close contact over the duration of exclusive breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Kamala; Sharma, Anna; Dhungel, Sachin

    2005-12-01

    This is a prospective study involving ninety-two lactating mother- infant pairs in the first six months of birth. They were followed-up up to six months for various perinatal factors determining the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Early postpartum mother-baby skin-to-skin contact had a powerful influence (P<0.001) over the duration of exclusive breastfeeding up to 4-6 months and was found to be more significant than early initiation of breastfeeding (P<0.05). Mode of delivery did not have any significant effect (P<0.5) over the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Thus health care centers can easily adopt a policy to allow few minutes of early postpartum mother-baby skin-to-skin contact and early initiation of breastfeeding to all vaginal as well as caesarian deliveries to promote breastfeeding. PMID:16519083

  14. Potential for Non-Contact ACL Injury Between Step-Close-Jump and Hop-Jump Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-I; Gu, Chin-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ling; Chang, Mu-San

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the kinematics and kinetics during the landing of hop-jump and step-close-jump movements in order to provide further inferring that the potential risk of ACL injuries. Eleven elite male volleyball players were recruited to perform hop-jump and step-close-jump tasks. Lower extremity kinematics and ground reaction forces during landing in stop-jump tasks were recorded. Lower extremity kinetics was calculated by using an inverse dynamic process. Step-close-jump tasks demonstrated smaller peak proximal tibia anterior shear forces during the landing phase. In step-close-jump tasks, increasing hip joint angular velocity during initial foot-ground contact decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during the landing phase, which theoretically could reduce the risk of ACL injury. Key points The different landing techniques required for these two stop-jump tasks do not necessarily affect the jump height. Hop-jump decreased the hip joint angular velocity at initial foot contact with ground, which could lead to an increasing peak posterior GRF during the landing phase. Hop-jump decreased hip and knee joint angular flexion displacement during the landing, which could increase the peak vertical loading rate during the landing phase. PMID:24149397

  15. Vibrotactile difference thresholds: effects of vibration frequency, vibration magnitude, contact area, and body location.

    PubMed

    Forta, Nazim Gizem; Griffin, Michael J; Morioka, Miyuki

    2012-01-01

    It has not been established whether the smallest perceptible change in the intensity of vibrotactile stimuli depends on the somatosensory channel mediating the sensation. This study investigated intensity difference thresholds for vibration using contact conditions (different frequencies, magnitudes, contact areas, body locations) selected so that perception would be mediated by more than one psychophysical channel. It was hypothesized that difference thresholds mediated by the non-Pacinian I (NPI) channel and the Pacinian (P) channel would differ. Using two different contactors (1-mm diameter contactor with 1-mm gap to a fixed surround; 10-mm diameter contactor with 2-mm gap to the surround) vibration was applied to the thenar eminence and the volar forearm at two frequencies (10 and 125 Hz). The up-down-transformed-response method with a three-down-one-up rule provided absolute thresholds and also difference thresholds at various levels above the absolute thresholds of 12 subjects (i.e., sensation levels, SLs) selected to activate preferentially either single channels or multiple channels. Median difference thresholds varied from 0.20 (thenar eminence with 125-Hz vibration at 10 dB SL) to 0.58 (thenar eminence with 10-Hz vibration at 20 dB SL). Median difference thresholds tended to be lower for the P channel than the NPI channel. The NPII channel may have reduced difference thresholds with the smaller contactor at 125 Hz. It is concluded that there are large and systematic variations in difference thresholds associated with the frequency, the magnitude, the area of contact, and the location of contact with vibrotactile stimuli that cannot be explained without increased understanding of the perception of supra-threshold vibrotactile stimuli. PMID:22416802

  16. The W Ursae Majoris Binary V781 Tauri: A Close Binary in Shallow Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Kallrath, J.; Breinhorst, R. A.; Schnell, A.; Purgathofer, A.

    2005-05-01

    V781 Tau [= BD+26 971 = HD 248087 = SAO 077615 (G0) is a W UMa system that was among those studied by Zwitter et al., in a larger program to examine the capability of ESO's GAIA emission to produce fundamental data from spectroscopic and eclipsing binary stars. Zwitter, et al. used new ground-based RV data taken near the resolution expected for GAIA ( 12,000), and light curves from the Hipparcos and Tycho missions. Previously unpublished photometry by RAB, AS, and AP were subsequently analyzed along with all existing RV- and light-curves to produce a new solution, which we discuss here. The system has a variable O'Connell Effect. The analyses, carried out mainly by JK, with the WD2002 light curve modeling package, reveal that the apparently cooler component is the larger and more massive; this circumstance and the variable light curve asymmetries are suggestive of W-type W UMa systems. The system has a decreasing period and a low contact parameter (0.205) that indicates that it is near, but not currently in, a broken contact phase. The properties of the system are self-consistent if the secondary (more massive and ostensibly the cooler) is, in fact, also the star with greater surface brightness but heavily obscured presumably with numerous or extensive spot regions, a verifiable hypothesis that we intend to test. We also compare its properties with those of CN And, thought to be at a broken contact phase, by Van Hamme et al. We conclude that V781 Tau may be nearing the end of the primary mass donor stage of thermal relaxation oscillations, and CN And, with properties of an A-Type W UMa system, is near the beginning of this stage. This work has been supported in part by Canadian NSERC grants to EFM.

  17. SDSS J001641-000925: THE FIRST STABLE RED DWARF CONTACT BINARY WITH A CLOSE-IN STELLAR COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E. G.; He, J.-J.; Liao, W.-P.; Wang, J.-J.; Liu, L.; Zhou, X.; Liu, N. P.; Fernández Lajús, E.; Soonthornthum, B.; Rattanasoon, S.; Aukkaravittayapun, S.

    2015-01-10

    SDSS J001641-000925 is the first red dwarf contact binary star with an orbital period of 0.19856 days that is one of the shortest known periods among M-dwarf binary systems. The orbital period was detected to be decreasing rapidly at a rate of P-dot ∼8 s yr{sup −1}. This indicated that SDSS J001641-000925 was undergoing coalescence via a dynamical mass transfer or loss and thus this red dwarf contact binary is dynamically unstable. To understand the properties of the period change, we monitored the binary system photometrically from 2011 September 2 to 2014 October 1 by using several telescopes in the world and 25 eclipse times were determined. It is discovered that the rapid decrease of the orbital period is not true. This is contrary to the prediction that the system is merging driven by rapid mass transfer or loss. Our preliminary analysis suggests that the observed minus calculated (O–C) diagram shows a cyclic oscillation with an amplitude of 0.00255 days and a period of 5.7 yr. The cyclic variation can be explained by the light travel time effect via the presence of a cool stellar companion with a mass of M {sub 3}sin i' ∼ 0.14 M {sub ☉}. The orbital separation between the third body and the central binary is about 2.8 AU. These results reveal that the rarity of red dwarf contact binaries could not be explained by rapidly dynamical destruction and the presence of the third body helps to form the red dwarf contact binary.

  18. SDSS J001641-000925: The First Stable Red Dwarf Contact Binary with a Close-in Stellar Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Fernández Lajús, E.; Soonthornthum, B.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E. G.; He, J.-J.; Liao, W.-P.; Wang, J.-J.; Liu, L.; Rattanasoon, S.; Aukkaravittayapun, S.; Zhou, X.; Liu, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    SDSS J001641-000925 is the first red dwarf contact binary star with an orbital period of 0.19856 days that is one of the shortest known periods among M-dwarf binary systems. The orbital period was detected to be decreasing rapidly at a rate of \\dot{P}˜ {8} s yr-1. This indicated that SDSS J001641-000925 was undergoing coalescence via a dynamical mass transfer or loss and thus this red dwarf contact binary is dynamically unstable. To understand the properties of the period change, we monitored the binary system photometrically from 2011 September 2 to 2014 October 1 by using several telescopes in the world and 25 eclipse times were determined. It is discovered that the rapid decrease of the orbital period is not true. This is contrary to the prediction that the system is merging driven by rapid mass transfer or loss. Our preliminary analysis suggests that the observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram shows a cyclic oscillation with an amplitude of 0.00255 days and a period of 5.7 yr. The cyclic variation can be explained by the light travel time effect via the presence of a cool stellar companion with a mass of M 3sin i' ~ 0.14 M ⊙. The orbital separation between the third body and the central binary is about 2.8 AU. These results reveal that the rarity of red dwarf contact binaries could not be explained by rapidly dynamical destruction and the presence of the third body helps to form the red dwarf contact binary.

  19. Contact-free measurement of the flow field of a liquid metal inside a closed container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinicke, Christiane

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of flow velocities inside metal melts is particularly challenging. Due to the high temperatures of the melts it is impossible to employ measurement techniques that require either mechanical contact with the melt or are only adaptable to translucent fluids. In the past years a number of electromagnetic techniques have been developed that allows a contact-free measurement of volume flows. One of these techniques is the so-called Lorentz Force Velocimetry (LFV) in which the metal flow is exposed to an external, permanent magnetic field. The interaction between the metal and the magnet not only leads to a force on the fluid, but also on the magnet. The force can be measured and is proportional to the velocity of the melt. Moreover, by using a small permanent magnet it is possible to resolve spatial structures inside the flow.We will demonstrate this using a model experiment that has been investigated with different reference techniques previously. The experimental setup is a cylindrical vessel filled with a eutectic alloy which is liquid at room temperature. The liquid metal can be set into motion by means of a propeller at the top of the liquid. Depending on the direction of rotation of the propeller, the flow inside the vessel takes on different states. Beside the vessel, we place a Lorentz Force Flowmeter (LFF) equipped with a small permanent magnet. By measuring the force on the magnet at different positions and different rotation speeds, we demonstrate that we can qualitatively and quantitatively reconstruct the flow field inside the vessel.

  20. Response of a fluid-immersed microcantilever close to a deformable body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, R. J.; Bachtiar, V.; Lee, T. C.; Cater, J. E.; Minton, J.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of hydrodynamics upon the response of a microcantilever immersed in a viscous fluid has been well established [J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 64 (1998); C. A. Eysden and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 044908 (2007)]. It has previously been shown that the presence of a nearby rigid planar surface can significantly alter a microcantilever's non-contact response, through microcantilever-surface hydrodynamic interactions [C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, Phys. Fluids 17, 073102 (2005); C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 114913 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., J. Fluid Mech. 545, 397426 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050801 (2006).]. In cases where the nearby surface is a finite-sized deformable body, such as in noncontact microrheology measurements, we expect to see further changes in the microcantilever's response. Hence, we here compute the thermal spectra of several microcantilevers in the presence of different compliant samples that have the characteristics of soft biological fibres. Our findings demonstrate that the elastohydrodynamic regime can substantially dictate the extent to which the compliance of a given body is evident in the microcantilever's thermal spectra, and suggest that certain nondimensional quantities should lie within particular, ranges for this to be the case. We expect these findings to be of interest in areas such as Atomic Force Microscopy, microsensing, and non-contact microrheology.

  1. Response of a fluid-immersed microcantilever close to a deformable body

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R. J.; Lee, T. C.; Cater, J. E.; Bachtiar, V.; Minton, J.

    2015-03-07

    The importance of hydrodynamics upon the response of a microcantilever immersed in a viscous fluid has been well established [J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 64 (1998); C. A. Eysden and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 044908 (2007)]. It has previously been shown that the presence of a nearby rigid planar surface can significantly alter a microcantilever's non-contact response, through microcantilever–surface hydrodynamic interactions [C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, Phys. Fluids 17, 073102 (2005); C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 114913 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., J. Fluid Mech. 545, 397426 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050801 (2006).]. In cases where the nearby surface is a finite-sized deformable body, such as in noncontact microrheology measurements, we expect to see further changes in the microcantilever's response. Hence, we here compute the thermal spectra of several microcantilevers in the presence of different compliant samples that have the characteristics of soft biological fibres. Our findings demonstrate that the elastohydrodynamic regime can substantially dictate the extent to which the compliance of a given body is evident in the microcantilever's thermal spectra, and suggest that certain nondimensional quantities should lie within particular, ranges for this to be the case. We expect these findings to be of interest in areas such as Atomic Force Microscopy, microsensing, and non-contact microrheology.

  2. An optical sensor for detecting the contact location of a gas-liquid interface on a body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Jandron, Michael

    2014-08-01

    An optical sensor for detecting the dynamic contact location of a gas-liquid interface along the length of a body is described. The sensor is developed in the context of applications to supercavitating bodies requiring measurement of the dynamic cavity contact location; however, the sensing method is extendable to other applications as well. The optical principle of total internal reflection is exploited to detect changes in refractive index of the medium contacting the body at discrete locations along its length. The derived theoretical operation of the sensor predicts a signal attenuation of 18 dB when a sensed location changes from air-contacting to water-contacting. Theory also shows that spatial resolution (d) scales linearly with sensor length (Ls) and a resolution of 0.01Ls can be achieved. A prototype sensor is constructed from simple components and response characteristics are quantified for different ambient light conditions as well as partial wetting states. Three methods of sensor calibration are described and a signal processing framework is developed that allows for robust detection of the gas-liquid contact location. In a tank draining experiment, the prototype sensor resolves the water level with accuracy limited only by the spatial resolution, which is constrained by the experimental setup. A more representative experiment is performed in which the prototype sensor accurately measures the dynamic contact location of a gas cavity on a water tunnel wall.

  3. An optical sensor for detecting the contact location of a gas-liquid interface on a body.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jesse; Jandron, Michael

    2014-08-01

    An optical sensor for detecting the dynamic contact location of a gas-liquid interface along the length of a body is described. The sensor is developed in the context of applications to supercavitating bodies requiring measurement of the dynamic cavity contact location; however, the sensing method is extendable to other applications as well. The optical principle of total internal reflection is exploited to detect changes in refractive index of the medium contacting the body at discrete locations along its length. The derived theoretical operation of the sensor predicts a signal attenuation of 18 dB when a sensed location changes from air-contacting to water-contacting. Theory also shows that spatial resolution (d) scales linearly with sensor length (L(s)) and a resolution of 0.01L(s) can be achieved. A prototype sensor is constructed from simple components and response characteristics are quantified for different ambient light conditions as well as partial wetting states. Three methods of sensor calibration are described and a signal processing framework is developed that allows for robust detection of the gas-liquid contact location. In a tank draining experiment, the prototype sensor resolves the water level with accuracy limited only by the spatial resolution, which is constrained by the experimental setup. A more representative experiment is performed in which the prototype sensor accurately measures the dynamic contact location of a gas cavity on a water tunnel wall. PMID:25173325

  4. How Close Do We Live to Water? A Global Analysis of Population Distance to Freshwater Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kummu, Matti; de Moel, Hans; Ward, Philip J.; Varis, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, people have inhabited places with ready access to fresh water. Today, over 50% of the global population lives in urban areas, and water can be directed via tens of kilometres of pipelines. Still, however, a large part of the world's population is directly dependent on access to natural freshwater sources. So how are inhabited places related to the location of freshwater bodies today? We present a high-resolution global analysis of how close present-day populations live to surface freshwater. We aim to increase the understanding of the relationship between inhabited places, distance to surface freshwater bodies, and climatic characteristics in different climate zones and administrative regions. Our results show that over 50% of the world's population lives closer than 3 km to a surface freshwater body, and only 10% of the population lives further than 10 km away. There are, however, remarkable differences between administrative regions and climatic zones. Populations in Australia, Asia, and Europe live closest to water. Although populations in arid zones live furthest away from freshwater bodies in absolute terms, relatively speaking they live closest to water considering the limited number of freshwater bodies in those areas. Population distributions in arid zones show statistically significant relationships with a combination of climatic factors and distance to water, whilst in other zones there is no statistically significant relationship with distance to water. Global studies on development and climate adaptation can benefit from an improved understanding of these relationships between human populations and the distance to fresh water. PMID:21687675

  5. Complete spin and orbital evolution of close-in bodies using a Maxwell viscoelastic rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, Gwenaël; Correia, Alexandre C. M.; Laskar, Jacques

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a formalism designed to model tidal interaction with a viscoelastic body made of Maxwell material. Our approach remains regular for any spin rate and orientation, and for any orbital configuration including high eccentricities and close encounters. The method is to integrate simultaneously the rotation and the position of the planet as well as its deformation. We provide the equations of motion both in the body frame and in the inertial frame. With this study, we generalize preexisting models to the spatial case and to arbitrary multipole orders using a formalism taken from quantum theory. We also provide the vectorial expression of the secular tidal torque expanded in Fourier series. Applying this model to close-in exoplanets, we observe that if the relaxation time is longer than the revolution period, the phase space of the system is characterized by the presence of several spin-orbit resonances, even in the circular case. As the system evolves, the planet spin can visit different spin-orbit configurations. The obliquity is decreasing along most of these resonances, but we observe a case where the planet tilt is instead growing. These conclusions derived from the secular torque are successfully tested with numerical integrations of the instantaneous equations of motion on HD 80606 b. Our formalism is also well adapted to close-in super-Earths in multiplanet systems which are known to have non-zero mutual inclinations.

  6. Close intramolecular sulfur-oxygen contacts: modified force field parameters for improved conformation generation.

    PubMed

    Lupyan, Dmitry; Abramov, Yuriy A; Sherman, Woody

    2012-11-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) offers an excellent data source to study small molecule conformations and molecular interactions. We have analyzed 130 small molecules from the CSD containing an intramolecular sulfur-oxygen distance less than the sum of their van der Waals (vdW) radii. Close S···O distances are observed in several important medicinal chemistry motifs (e.g. a carbonyl oxygen connected by a carbon or nitrogen linker to a sulfur) and are not treated well with existing parameters in the MMFFs or OPLS_2005 force fields, resulting in suboptimal geometries and energetics. In this work, we develop modified parameters for the OPLS_2005 force field to better treat this specific interaction in order to generate conformations close to those found in the CSD structures. We use a combination of refitting a force field torsional parameter, adding a specific atom pair vdW term, and attenuating the electrostatic interactions to obtain an improvement in the accuracy of geometry minimizations and conformational searches for these molecules. Specifically, in a conformational search 58 % of the cases produced a conformation less than 0.25 Å from the CSD crystal conformation with the modified OPLS force field parameters developed in this work. In contrast, 25 and 37 % produced a conformation less than 0.25 Å with the MMFFs and OPLS_2005 force fields, respectively. As an application of the new parameters, we generated conformations for the tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib (trade name Inlyta) that could be correctly repacked into three observed polymorphic structures, which was not possible with conformations generated using MMFFs or OPLS_2005. The improved parameters can be mapped directly onto physical characteristics of the systems that are treated inadequately with the molecular mechanics force fields used in this study and potentially other force fields as well. PMID:23053737

  7. Understanding the Physical Aging Behavior of Glassy Polystyrene Layers in Close Contact with Rubbery Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Connie; Rauscher, Phil; Pye, Justin; Baglay, Roman

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in synthesis strategies and processing methods have led to new nanostructured polymer blend and block-copolymer materials containing domain sizes less than 100 nm with glassy and rubbery domains in close proximity. Given the outsized role interfacial perturbations have played in causing large changes in the glass transition temperature Tg and physical aging of ultrathin single-layer films, we are interested in studying how the presence of glassy-rubbery interfaces between neighboring polymer domains may alter the local stability and physical aging of confined glassy layers. Using a polystyrene (PS) / poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PnBMA) weakly immiscible system with 7 nm interfacial width, we demonstrate how ellipsometry can be used to isolate the physical aging rate of thin PS layers atop rubbery PnBMA layers. Despite a 25-30 K reduction in the average Tg of 84 nm thick PS layers atop PnBMA as measured by fluorescence, we observe no change in the PS aging rate relative to bulk. These results are in contrast with previous works on single-layer polymer films that have found the local aging rate to often be correlated with local Tg changes. This appears not to be the case for glassy PS layers atop rubbery PnBMA suggesting some additional factor is affecting the structural relaxation occurring near the glassy-rubbery interface.

  8. An efficient formulation based on the Lagrangian method for contact-impact analysis of flexible multi-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Liu, Jin-Yang; Hong, Jia-Zhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an efficient formulation based on the Lagrangian method is presented to investigate the contact-impact problems of flexible multi-body systems. Generally, the penalty method and the Hertz contact law are the most commonly used methods in engineering applications. However, these methods are highly dependent on various non-physical parameters, which have great effects on the simulation results. Moreover, a tremendous number of degrees of freedom in the contact-impact problems will influence the numerical efficiency significantly. With the consideration of these two problems, a formulation combining the component mode synthesis method and the Lagrangian method is presented to investigate the contact-impact problems in flexible multi-body system numerically. Meanwhile, the finite element meshing laws of the contact bodies will be studied preliminarily. A numerical example with experimental verification will certify the reliability of the presented formulation in contact-impact analysis. Furthermore, a series of numerical investigations explain how great the influence of the finite element meshing has on the simulation results. Finally the limitations of the element size in different regions are summarized to satisfy both the accuracy and efficiency.

  9. Finger cooling by contact with cold aluminium surfaces--effects of pressure, mass and whole body thermal balance.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Nilsson, H; Holmér, I

    1994-01-01

    Finger skin temperature change during contact with a cold aluminium surface was studied in 20 subjects (10 men and 10 women). Contact pressure (0.1 N, 5.9 N and 9.8 N), contact material mass (large one, mass 3559 g, small one, mass 108 g), surface temperatures (-7 degrees C, 0 degree C, +7 degrees C) and whole body thermal balance were controlled as independent factors. The contact experiments were performed in a small chamber and only the first section of the index finger of the left hand was in contact with the aluminium surface. The results indicated that all the factors studied had significant effects on the contact skin temperature change with time. The study confirmed that a modified Newtonian model with two components can accurately describe the contact skin temperature change with time. The study resulted in three predictive models for critical skin temperature when in contact with cold aluminium. The results indicated that metal surfaces in contact with bare hands should not be below 4 degrees C surface temperature. Lower temperatures require insulating material or the wearing of protective gloves. PMID:7957157

  10. Closed form expressions for sheet resistance and mobility from Van-der-Pauw measurement on 90° symmetric devices with four arbitrary contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausserlechner, Udo

    2016-02-01

    Sheet resistance and Hall mobility are commonly measured by Van der Pauw's method. Closed form expressions are known for four point-sized contacts. Recently, for devices with fourfold rotational symmetry a closed form expression for the sheet resistance was given for contacts of arbitrary size. In this paper we discuss its accuracy, link it to the equivalent circuit diagram of the device, and add another expression that determines the Hall mobility with 0.02% accuracy.

  11. An in-situ sensor to measure contact area and surface stresses between real tribological bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, M.D.; Fernandez, B.

    1996-11-01

    Many machine components such as rollers (bearings and gears) and sliders (brushes and brakes) have elements with surfaces in contact. Failure is often by fatigue from contact stresses. Measurement of these stresses could reduce maintenance costs and avoid catastrophic failures. Common manufacturing techniques such as extruding, pressing and punching employ dies with surface contact. Direct and real time measurement of contact stresses within the dies could lead to improved process control through real time control feedback. Presented will be the concept of an in-situ sensor to visualize and measure real contact areas and surface stresses at all points within a contact interface. The sensor generates photoelastic fringes (fields of light intensity values) which it converts into surface stresses. First presented will be photoelastic principles and sensor operation; photographs of fringes taken under various contact conditions; measurements of real contact area extracted from these photographs; and calculations that relate the fringes to the contact stresses. These forward calculations map fields of contact stresses (input data) to fields of photoelastic light intensity values (output data). To extract surface stresses from light intensity measurements, Artificial Neural Networks generate an inverse map. Network architectures will be presented and training procedures discussed.

  12. Touch-free measurement of body temperature using close-up thermography of the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Benjamin; Wagner, Heike; Gmoser, Johanna; Wörner, Anja; Löschberger, Anna; Peters, Laura; Frey, Anna; Hofmann, Ulrich; Frantz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In experimental animal research body temperature (BT) is measured for the objective determination of an animals' physiological condition. Invasive, probe-based measurements are stressful and can influence experimental outcome. Alternatively BT can be determined touch-free from the emitted heat of the organism at a single spot using infrared thermometers [1]. To get visual confirmation and find more appropriate surfaces for measurement a hand-held thermal imager was equipped with a self-made, cheap, 3D-printable close-up lens system that reproducibly creates eight-time magnified thermal images and improves sensitivity. This setup was used to establish ocular surface temperature (OST), representing the temperature of the brain-heart axis, as a touch-free alternative for measurement of BT in mice, rats, rabbits and humans.OST measurement after isoflurane exposure and myocardial infarction (MI) experiments in mice revealed high physiological relevance and sensitivity, the possibility to discriminate between MI and sham operations in one hour and even long-term outcome-predictive capabilities of OST after MI. Summarized here we present: •Self-made close-up lens for thermal imaging cameras for eight-time magnification•Establishment of OST for touch-free determination of BT in rodents and humans•Short- and long-term predictive capabilities of OST in experimental MI in mice. PMID:27284532

  13. Sprint running with a body-weight supporting kite reduces ground contact time in well-trained sprinters.

    PubMed

    Kratky, Sascha; Müller, Erich

    2013-05-01

    It is well founded that ground contact time is the crucial part of sprinting because the available time window to apply force to the ground diminishes with growing running velocity. In view of this knowledge, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of body-weight support during full-effort sprints on ground contact time and selected stride parameters in 19 Austrian male elite sprinters. A kite with a lifting effect combined with a towing system to erase drag was used. The subjects performed flying 20-m sprints under 3 conditions: (a) free sprint; (b) body-weight supported sprint-normal speed (BWS-NS); and (c) body-weight supported sprint-overspeed (BWS-OS). Sprint cycle characteristics were recorded during the high-speed phase by an optical acquisition system. Additionally, running velocity was derived from the 20-m sprint time. Compared with the fastest free sprint, running velocity, step length, and step frequency remained unchanged during BWS-NS, whereas ground contact time decreased (-5.80%), and air time increased (+5.79%) (both p < 0.001). Throughout, BWS-OS ground contact time (-7.66%) was reduced, whereas running velocity (+2.72%), air time (+4.92%), step length (+1.98%) (all p < 0.001), and step frequency (+1.05%; p < 0.01) increased. Compared with BWS-NS, BWS-OS caused an increase in running velocity (+3.33%), step length (+1.92%) (both p < 0.001), and step frequency (+1.37%; p < 0.01), whereas ground contact time was diminished (-1.97%; p < 0.001). In summary, sprinting with a body-weight supporting kite appeared to be a highly specific method to simulate an advanced performance level, indicated by higher running velocities requiring reduced ground contact times. The additional application of an overspeed condition led to a further reduction of ground contact time. Therefore, we recommend body-weight supported sprinting as an additional tool in sprint training. PMID:22744303

  14. Contact-free determination of human body segment parameters by means of videometric image processing of an anthropomorphic body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatze, Herbert; Baca, Arnold

    1993-01-01

    The development of noninvasive techniques for the determination of biomechanical body segment parameters (volumes, masses, the three principal moments of inertia, the three local coordinates of the segmental mass centers, etc.) receives increasing attention from the medical sciences (e,.g., orthopaedic gait analysis), bioengineering, sport biomechanics, and the various space programs. In the present paper, a novel method is presented for determining body segment parameters rapidly and accurately. It is based on the video-image processing of four different body configurations and a finite mass-element human body model. The four video images of the subject in question are recorded against a black background, thus permitting the application of shape recognition procedures incorporating edge detection and calibration algorithms. In this way, a total of 181 object space dimensions of the subject's body segments can be reconstructed and used as anthropometric input data for the mathematical finite mass- element body model. The latter comprises 17 segments (abdomino-thoracic, head-neck, shoulders, upper arms, forearms, hands, abdomino-pelvic, thighs, lower legs, feet) and enables the user to compute all the required segment parameters for each of the 17 segments by means of the associated computer program. The hardware requirements are an IBM- compatible PC (1 MB memory) operating under MS-DOS or PC-DOS (Version 3.1 onwards) and incorporating a VGA-board with a feature connector for connecting it to a super video windows framegrabber board for which there must be available a 16-bit large slot. In addition, a VGA-monitor (50 - 70 Hz, horizontal scan rate at least 31.5 kHz), a common video camera and recorder, and a simple rectangular calibration frame are required. The advantage of the new method lies in its ease of application, its comparatively high accuracy, and in the rapid availability of the body segment parameters, which is particularly useful in clinical practice

  15. Thermal contact conductance for cylindrical and spherical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil Kumar, S.; Abilash, P. M.; Ramamurthi, K.

    A prediction methodology based on Monte-Carlo simulation model, developed for flat conforming surfaces in contact, is modified and extended to predict contact conductance between curvilinear surfaces like cylinders and spheres. Experiments are also conducted in vacuum for the measurement of contact conductance between stainless steel and aluminium cylindrical contacts and stainless steel spherical contacts over a range of contact pressures. The contact conductance between cylindrical and spherical bodies is, in general, about an order of magnitude lower than for flat surfaces in contact. Increase of surface roughness and decrease in contact pressure lowers the contact conductance. However, the influence of these parameters is larger than those obtained for flat surfaces. The prediction for different parametric conditions agree closely with those measured in the experiments.

  16. Familiarity breeds contempt: combining proximity loggers and GPS reveals female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) avoiding close contact with neighbors.

    PubMed

    Tosa, Marie I; Schauber, Eric M; Nielsen, Clayton K

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions can influence infectious disease dynamics, particularly for directly transmitted pathogens. Therefore, reliable information on contact frequency within and among groups can better inform disease modeling and management. We compared three methods of assessing contact patterns: (1) space-use overlap (volume of interaction [VI]), (2) direct contact rates measured by simultaneous global positioning system (GPS) locations (<10 m apart), and (3) direct contact rates measured by proximity loggers (PLs; 1-m detection) among female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We calculated the PL∶GPS contact ratios to see whether both devices reveal similar contact patterns and thus predict similar pathogen transmission patterns. Contact rates measured by GPS and PLs were similarly high for two within-group dyads (pairs of deer in the same social groups). Dyads representing separate but neighboring groups (high VI) had PL∶GPS contact ratios near zero, whereas dyads further apart (intermediate VI) had higher PL∶GPS contact ratios. Social networks based on PL contacts showed the fewest connected individuals and lowest mean centrality measures; network metrics were intermediate when based on GPS contacts and greatest when based on VI. Thus, the VI network portrayed animals to be more uniformly and strongly connected than did the PL network. We conclude that simultaneous GPS locations, compared with PLs, substantially underestimate the impact of group membership on direct contact rates of female deer and make networks appear more connected. We also present evidence that deer coming within the general vicinity of each other are less likely to come in close contact if they are in neighboring social groups than deer whose home ranges overlap little if at all. Combined, these results provide evidence that direct transmission of disease agents among female and juvenile white-tailed deer is likely to be constrained both spatially and by social structure, more

  17. Human body impedance and threshold currents for perception and pain for contact hazard analysis in the VLF-MF band

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, I.; Wu, D.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1986-05-01

    The body impedance and threshold currents needed to produce sensations of perception and pain have been measured for 367 human subjects for the frequency range 10 kHz to 3 MHz. A sufficient number of subjects (197 male and 170 female subjects of ages between 18 and 70 years) were utilized in the study to make valid statistical predictions for the general adult population. Various types of contact with metallic electrodes were used to simulate the situation where a human being would be in contact with a large metallic object (car, van, school bus, etc.) in an electromagnetic field in the VLF to MF band. Based on these measurements, it is speculated that the body impedance of a human being is inversely proportional to the body dimensions and the threshold current for perception is directly proportional to the square of the body dimensions. Predictions are made, based on scaling, for the corresponding threshold values for ten-year-old children. The average measured impedance and threshold current values are used to calculate threshold electric fields required to produce sensations of perception and pain in humans in contact with these vehicles. It is concluded from these calculations that many situations can exist in which the present ANSI (American National Standards Institute) recommended standard of 632 V/m for the frequency band 0.3-3 MHz is too high. The usefulness of safety devices like electrical safety shoes and gloves has been evaluated and it is concluded that they offer adequate protection from VLF to MF currents only up to a frequency of 1 MHz and 3 MHz, respectively. The current flowing through the hand of a human in conductive contact with the handle of an ungrounded van is shown to be as high as 879 mA and produces a local SAR in the wrist of about 1045 W/kg.

  18. Navier-Stokes simulation of a close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.

    1991-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow about a coplanar close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration at a transonic Mach number of 0.90 and at angles of attack ranging from 0 to 12 degrees. The influence of the canard on the wing flowfield, including canard-wing vortex interaction and wing vortex breakdown, is investigated. A study of canard downwash and canard leading-edge vortex effects, which are the primary mechanisms of the canard-wing interaction, is emphasized. Comparisons between the computations and experimental measurements of surface pressure coefficients, lift, drag and pitching moment data are favorable. A grid refinement study for configurations with and without canard shows that accurate results are obtained using a refined grid for angles of attack where vortex burst is present. At an angle of attack of approximately 12 deg, favorable canard-wing interaction which delays wing vortex breakdown is indicated by the computations and is in good agreement with experimental findings.

  19. Fingertip contact influences human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface can strongly influence apparent body orientation, as well as the maintenance of upright posture during quiet stance. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postural sway and contact forces at the fingertip while subjects touched a rigid metal bar. Subjects were tested in the tandem Romberg stance with eyes open or closed under three conditions of fingertip contact: no contact, touch contact (< 0.98 N of force), and force contact (as much force as desired). Touch contact was as effective as force contact or sight of the surroundings in reducing postural sway when compared to the no contact, eyes closed condition. Body sway and fingertip forces were essentially in phase with force contact, suggesting that fingertip contact forces are physically counteracting body sway. Time delays between body sway and fingertip forces were much larger with light touch contact, suggesting that the fingertip is providing information that allows anticipatory innervation of musculature to reduce body sway. The results are related to observations on precision grip as well as the somatosensory, proprioceptive, and motor mechanisms involved in the reduction of body sway.

  20. Clonal Differences between Non-Typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) Recovered from Children and Animals Living in Close Contact in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Dione, Michel M.; Ikumapayi, Usman N.; Saha, Debasish; Mohammed, Nuredin I.; Geerts, Stanny; Ieven, Margareta; Adegbola, Richard A.; Antonio, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-Typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) is an important cause of invasive bacterial disease and associated with mortality in Africa. However, little is known about the environmental reservoirs and predominant modes of transmission. Our study aimed to study the role of domestic animals in the transmission of NTS to humans in rural area of The Gambia. Methodology Human NTS isolates were obtained through an active population-based case-control surveillance study designated to determine the aetiology and epidemiology of enteric infections covering 27,567 Gambian children less than five years of age in the surveillance area. Fourteen children infected with NTS were traced back to their family compounds and anal swabs collected from 210 domestic animals present in their households. Identified NTSs were serotyped and genotyped by multi-locus sequencing typing. Principal Findings NTS was identified from 21/210 animal sources in the households of the 14 infected children. Chickens carried NTS more frequently than sheep and goats; 66.6%, 28.6% and 4.8% respectively. The most common NTS serovars were S. Colindale in humans (21.42%) and S. Poona in animals (14.28%). MLST on the 35 NTS revealed four new alleles and 24 sequence types (ST) of which 18 (75%) STs were novel. There was no overlap in serovars or genotypes of NTS recovered from humans or animal sources in the same household. Conclusion Our results do not support the hypothesis that humans and animals in close contact in the same household carry genotypically similar Salmonella serovars. These findings form an important baseline for future studies of transmission of NTS in humans and animals in Africa. PMID:21655353

  1. Body Image, Self-Esteem, and Depression-Proneness: Closing the Gender Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaulay, Marci; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examines gender differences in body image and its relationship to depression-proneness and self-esteem. Findings indicate a preoccupation with body weight and appearance for both men and women, and a relationship between body satisfaction and depression-proneness. (FMW)

  2. Computational investigation of the time-dependent contact behaviour of the human tibiofemoral joint under body weight

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    The knee joint is one of the most common sites for osteoarthritis, the onset and progression of which are believed to relate to the mechanical environment of cartilage. To understand this environment, it is necessary to take into account the complex biphasic contact interactions of the cartilage and menisci. In this study, the time-dependent contact behaviour of an intact and a meniscectomized human tibiofemoral joint was characterized under body weight using a computational model. Good agreement in the contact area and femoral displacement under static loads were found between model predictions of this study and published experimental measurements. The time-dependent results indicated that as loading time progressed, the contact area and femoral vertical displacement of both intact and meniscectomized joints increased. More load was transferred to the cartilage–cartilage interface over time. However, the portions of load borne by the lateral and medial compartments did not greatly vary with time. Additionally, during the whole simulation period, the maximum compressive stress in the meniscectomized joint was higher than that in the intact joint. The fluid pressure in the intact and meniscectomized joints remained remarkably high at the condyle centres, but the fluid pressure at the cartilage–meniscus interface decreased faster than that at the condyle centres as loading time progressed. The above findings provide further insights into the mechanical environment of the cartilage and meniscus within the human knee joint. PMID:25500864

  3. Nuclear density functional theory with a semi-contact 3-body interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Denis; Bennaceur, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Theories combining nuclear density functional approach (DFT) and effects beyond the independent particle/quasi-particle limit have attracted much attention recently. In particular, such theories, generically referred as "beyond mean-field" (BMF) seem unavoidable to account for both single-particle effects and complex quantum internal phenomena in nuclear finite many-body nuclear systems. It has been realized recently that BMF theories might lead to specific difficulties when applied within the nuclear DFT context. An example is the appearance of divergences in configuration mixing approaches. A short summary of the difficulties is given here. One source of problem is the use of energy functional of non-integer powers of the density. We show that such dependence can be mimicked by a suitable choice of a three-body interaction. Application on infinite nuclear matter in various spin-isospin channels will be given.

  4. Prevalence and early attack rate of tuberculosis among close family contacts of tuberculous patients in South India under domiciliary treatment with isoniazid plus PAS or isoniazid alone*

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, C. V.; Andrews, R. H.; Devadatta, S.; Fox, Wallace; Radhakrishna, S.; Somasundaram, P. R.; Velu, S.

    1961-01-01

    The authors present a report from the Tuberculosis Chemotherapy Centre, Madras, on the prevalence and attack rate of tuberculosis among close family contacts of tuberculous patients in South India undergoing domiciliary chemotherapy either with isoniazid plus PAS or with one of three regimens of isoniazid alone. The report gives (a) the prevalence of tuberculosis among the contacts at the time of diagnosis of the disease in the patients and (b) the incidence of tuberculosis in the contacts during the first year of treatment of the patients. The contacts were divided into four series, corresponding to the four chemotherapeutic regimens of the patients. The prevalence of active tuberculosis was found to be particularly high among children under five years of age, being 12.0% as compared with 7.6% for all age-groups combined. The incidence of active tuberculosis during the year of treatment of the patients was also found to be highest in the under five years' age-group—a further indication that child contacts are especially vulnerable to infection. The incidence was considerably higher in the first quarter of the year than in the other quarters, and it was lowest in the last quarter. This finding, together with the fact that the attack rates in the four contact series were not related either to the duration of bacteriological positivity in the patients or to the period of excretion of isoniazid-resistant organisms by the patients, suggests that the major risk to contacts in the first year results from exposure to the patient before treatment rather than from exposure during treatment. These results thus confirm the findings in an earlier study by the Centre of the contacts of patients in a controlled comparison of chemotherapy with isoniazid plus PAS at home and in sanatorium. PMID:14038589

  5. Relativistic closed-form Hamiltonian for many-body gravitating systems in the post-Minkowskian approximation.

    PubMed

    Ledvinka, Tomás; Schäfer, Gerhard; Bicák, Jirí

    2008-06-27

    The Hamiltonian for a system of relativistic bodies interacting by their gravitational field is found in the post-Minkowskian approximation, including all terms linear in the gravitational constant. It is given in a surprisingly simple closed form as a function of canonical variables describing the bodies only. The field is eliminated by solving inhomogeneous wave equations, applying transverse-traceless projections, and using the Routh functional. By including all special relativistic effects our Hamiltonian extends the results described in classical textbooks of theoretical physics. As an application, the scattering of relativistic objects is considered. PMID:18643648

  6. Close proximity spacecraft maneuvers near irregularly shaped small bodies: Hovering, translation, and descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broschart, Stephen B.

    Recently there has been significant interest in sending spacecraft to small-bodies in our solar system, such as asteroids, comets, and small planetary satellites, for the purpose of scientific study. It is believed that the composition of these bodies, unchanged for billions of years, can aid in understanding the formative period of our solar system. However, missions to small-bodies are difficult from a dynamical standpoint, complicated by the irregular shape and gravitational potential of the small-body, strong perturbations from solar radiation pressure and third body gravity, and significant uncertainty in the small-body parameters. This dissertation studies the spacecraft maneuvers required to enable a sampling mission in this unique dynamical environment, including station-keeping (hovering), translation, and descent. The bulk of this work studies hovering maneuvers, where equilibrium is created at an arbitrary position by using thrusters to null the nominal spacecraft acceleration. Contributions include a numerical study of previous results on the stability of hovering, a definition of the zero-velocity surface that exists in the vicinity of hovering spacecraft (for time-invariant dynamics), and a dead-band hovering controller design that ensures the trajectory is bounded within a prescribed region. It is found that bounded hovering near the surface of a small-body can often be achieved using dead-band control on only one direction of motion; altitude measurements alone are often sufficient to implement this control. A constant thrust strategy for translation and descent maneuvers appropriate for autonomous implementation is also presented and shown to accurately complete maneuvers in the vicinity of the initial position. Sensitivity analysis studies the effects of parameter uncertainty on these maneuvers. The theory presented within is supported throughout with numerical analysis (software tools are described within) and test cases using models of real

  7. The Prevalence of Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Smear Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in People with Household Close Contact with Tuberculosis in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Khanjani, Narges; Parsaee, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    One of the recommended strategies for preventing tuberculosis is to screen high-risk populations with respect to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate latent infection and active tuberculosis in people with close household contact. It was a cross-sectional descriptive, analytical study with the sample size of 668 people from homes with one infected resident. In order to diagnose tuberculosis latent infection, the PPD test was done. To determine patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis, three sputum samples were taken from every patient and were examined using direct microscopy and culture. Data was analyzed by SPSS20 software. The prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were 42.8% and 0.9% respectively. The prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in people with close household contact were less than that of other studies. However, smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in people with close household contact was 199.5 times more than that of the general population. PMID:25821296

  8. Negotiating last-minute concerns in closing Korean medical encounters: the use of gaze, body and talk.

    PubMed

    Park, Yujong

    2013-11-01

    Although patients may raise new concerns during any time of the medical visit, the closing phase of the consultation is a critical locus for the negotiation of the topicalization of additional concerns. Using conversation analysis as the primary method of analysis, this study provides an analysis of the structure of consultation "closings" in Korean primary-care encounters and the way in which the organization of closings in this context discourages patients' presentation of additional concerns. Data are drawn from 60 videotaped primary-care encounters collected from Korea, between 2007 and 2008. The rare occasions in which last-minute concerns are raised are closely analyzed to reveal that the organization of gaze and body orientation play an important role in foreclosing the presentation of additional concerns. The results contribute to our understanding of closings in the primary-care interview by investigating a non-western setting that includes an investigation of an understudied subject--that of embodied resources--and shows how these closings serve the doctor's purpose of bringing closure in the face of last-minute concerns broached by the patient. The cultural meaning of gaze in the Korean medical care context is also discussed. The findings have implications for research on nonverbal communication, cultural differences, and interactions in medical care. PMID:24161103

  9. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, G.F.; Minkov, V.; Petrick, M.

    1981-11-02

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system is described in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  10. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  11. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1988-01-05

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  12. Orbital-specific Tunability of Many-Body Effects in Bilayer Graphene by Gate Bias and Metal Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukidome, Hirokazu; Kotsugi, Masato; Nagashio, Kosuke; Sato, Ryo; Ohkochi, Takuo; Itoh, Takashi; Toriumi, Akira; Suemitsu, Maki; Kinoshita, Toyohiko

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, a 2D crystal bonded by π and σ orbitals, possesses excellent electronic properties that are promising for next-generation optoelectronic device applications. For these a precise understanding of quasiparticle behaviour near the Dirac point (DP) is indispensable because the vanishing density of states (DOS) near the DP enhances many-body effects, such as excitonic effects and the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe (AOC) which occur through the interactions of many conduction electrons with holes. These effects renormalize band dispersion and DOS, and therefore affect device performance. For this reason, we have studied the impact of the excitonic effects and the AOC on graphene device performance by using X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy on an actual graphene transistor in operation. Our work shows that the excitonic effect and the AOC are tunable by gate bias or metal contacts, both of which alter the Fermi energy, and are orbital-specific.

  13. Closed-loop Brain-Machine-Body Interfaces for Noninvasive Rehabilitation of Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Broccard, Frédéric D.; Mullen, Tim; Chi, Yu Mike; Peterson, David; Iversen, John R.; Arnold, Mike; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Makeig, Scott; Poizner, Howard; Sejnowski, Terrence; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for neurological rehabilitation of patients affected with movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and essential tremor (ET) consist mainly of oral medication, physical therapy, and botulinum toxin injections. Recently, the more invasive method of deep brain stimulation (DBS) showed significant improvement of the physical symptoms associated with these disorders. In the past several years, the adoption of feedback control theory helped DBS protocols to take into account the progressive and dynamic nature of these neurological movement disorders that had largely been ignored so far. As a result, a more efficient and effective management of PD cardinal symptoms has emerged. In this paper, we review closed-loop systems for rehabilitation of movement disorders, focusing on PD, for which several invasive and noninvasive methods have been developed during the last decade, reducing the complications and side effects associated with traditional rehabilitation approaches and paving the way for tailored individual therapeutics. We then present a novel, transformative, noninvasive closed-loop framework based on force neurofeedback and discuss several future developments of closed-loop systems that might bring us closer to individualized solutions for neurological rehabilitation of movement disorders. PMID:24833254

  14. Body conformal antennas for superficial hyperthermia: the impact of bending contact flexible microstrip applicators on their electromagnetic behavior.

    PubMed

    Correia, Davi; Kok, H Petra; de Greef, Martijn; Bel, Arjan; van Wieringen, Niek; Crezee, Johannes

    2009-12-01

    Hyperthermia is a powerful radiosensitizer for treatment of superficial tumors. This requires body conformal antennas with a power distribution as homogeneous as possible over the skin area. The contact flexible microstrip applicators (CFMA) operating at 434 MHz exist in several sizes, including the large size 3H and 5H. This paper investigates the behavior of the electromagnetic fields for the 3H and 5H CFMA in both flat and curved configurations, and the impact on performance parameters like the penetration depth (PD) and the effective heating depth (EHD). The underlying theory behind the electromagnetic behavior in curved situations is presented as well as numerical simulations of both flat and curved configurations. The results are compared to measurements of the electromagnetic field distributions in a cylindrical patient model. Due to their large size multimode solutions may exist, and our results confirm their existence. These multimode solutions affect both the power distribution and PD/EHD, with a dependence on applicator curvature. Therefore, the performance parameters like PD and EHD need to be carefully assessed when bending large size CFMA applicators to conform to the patient body. This conclusion also holds for other types of large size surface current applicators. PMID:19695983

  15. Extended slow dynamical regime close to the many-body localization transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitz, David J.; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Alet, Fabien

    2016-02-01

    Many-body localization is characterized by a slow logarithmic growth of the entanglement entropy after a global quantum quench while the local memory of an initial density imbalance remains at infinite time. We investigate how much the proximity of a many-body localized phase can influence the dynamics in the delocalized ergodic regime where thermalization is expected. Using an exact Krylov space technique, the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of the random-field Heisenberg chain is studied up to L =28 sites, starting from an initially unentangled high-energy product state. Within most of the delocalized phase, we find a sub-ballistic entanglement growth S (t ) ∝t1 /z with a disorder-dependent exponent z ≥1 , in contrast with the pure ballistic growth z =1 of clean systems. At the same time, anomalous relaxation is also observed for the spin imbalance I (t ) ∝t-ζ with a continuously varying disorder-dependent exponent ζ , vanishing at the transition. This provides a clear experimental signature for detecting this nonconventional regime.

  16. A dimensionless relative trajectory estimation algorithm for autonomous imaging of a small astronomical body in a close distance flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariu, Kaito; Inamori, Takaya; Funase, Ryu; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    2016-08-01

    The world's first micro-spacecraft, "Proximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation" (PROCYON) has the advanced mission to approach an asteroid in dozen km (a one-order closer imaging distance compared with previous probes). In such a close distance encounter, the estimation of the relative trajectory of the target is necessary to perform autonomous imaging. However, the estimation is difficult owing to rapid changes of the line-of-sight direction of the target body. To overcome this problem, a novel dimensionless or direction only relative trajectory estimation algorithm, which uses a least square method, is proposed. The evaluation function for the least square method coincides with the error property of picture information to enable all of its calculations to be recursive and linear. It is suited for the implementation on the limited on-board computer. Numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm should enable the one-order closer flyby observation.

  17. Effect of canard deflection on close-coupled canard-wing-body aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow about a canard-wing-body configuration at transonic Mach numbers of 0.85 and 0.90, angles of attack from -4 to 10 degrees and canard deflection angles from -10 to +10 degrees. Effects of canard deflection on aerodynamic performance, including canard-wing vortex interaction, are investigated. Comparisons with experimental measurements of surface pressures, lift, drag and pitching moments are made to verify the accuracy of the computations. The results of the study show that the deflected canard downwash not only influences the formation of the wing leading-edge vortex, but can cause the formation of an unfavorable vortex on the wing lower surface as well.

  18. Effect of canard position on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically to investigate the effects of canard vertical position on a close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration at a transonic Mach number of 0.90 and angles of attack ranging from -2 to 12 degrees. Canard-wing interactions are investigated for high-, mid- and low-canard positions. The computational results show favorable canard-wing interactions for the high- and mid-canard configurations. The unfavorable lift and drag characteristics for the low-canard configuration are examined by analyses of the low-canard flowfield structure.

  19. Inferring the degree of incipient speciation in secondary contact zones of closely related lineages of Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup).

    PubMed

    Dufresnes, C; Bonato, L; Novarini, N; Betto-Colliard, C; Perrin, N; Stöck, M

    2014-07-01

    Reproductive isolation between lineages is expected to accumulate with divergence time, but the time taken to speciate may strongly vary between different groups of organisms. In anuran amphibians, laboratory crosses can still produce viable hybrid offspring >20 My after separation, but the speed of speciation in closely related anuran lineages under natural conditions is poorly studied. Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup) offer an excellent system to address this question, comprising several lineages that arose at different times and form secondary contact zones. Using mitochondrial and nuclear markers, we previously demonstrated that in Sicily, B. siculus and B. balearicus developed advanced reproductive isolation after Plio-Pleistocene divergence (2.6 My, 3.3-1.9), with limited historic mtDNA introgression, scarce nuclear admixture, but low, if any, current gene flow. Here, we study genetic interactions between younger lineages of early Pleistocene divergence (1.9 My, 2.5-1.3) in northeastern Italy (B. balearicus, B. viridis). We find significantly more, asymmetric nuclear and wider, differential mtDNA introgression. The population structure seems to be molded by geographic distance and barriers (rivers), much more than by intrinsic genomic incompatibilities. These differences of hybridization between zones may be partly explained by differences in the duration of previous isolation. Scattered research on other anurans suggests that wide hybrid zones with strong introgression may develop when secondary contacts occur <2 My after divergence, whereas narrower zones with restricted gene flow form when divergence exceeds 3 My. Our study strengthens support for this rule of thumb by comparing lineages with different divergence times within the same radiation. PMID:24713825

  20. [Transport processes of low-level radioactive liquid effluent of nuclear power station in closed water body].

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Zheng; Xu, Zong-Xue

    2012-07-01

    The transport processes of low-level radioactive liquid effluent of Xianning nuclear power station in the closed water body Fushui Reservoir are simulated using the EFDC model. Six nuclides concentration distribution with different half-lives in the reservoir are analyzed under the condition of 97% guarantee rate incoming water and four-running nuclear power units. The results show that the nuclides concentration distribution is mainly affected by the flow field of the reservoir and the concentration is decided by the half-lives of nuclide and the volume of incoming water. In addition, the influence region is enlarged as increasing of half-life and tends to be stable when the half-life is longer than 5 years. Moreover, the waste water discharged from the outlet of the nuclear power plant has no effect on the water-intake for the outlet located at the upstream of the water-intake and the flow field flows to the dam of the reservoir. PMID:23002624

  1. The Incidence and Types of Physical Contact Associated with Body Checking Regulation Experience in 13–14 Year Old Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Claude; Roy, Thierry-Olivier; Nadeau, Luc; Hamel, Denis; Fortier, Kristine; Emery, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ice hockey has one of the highest sport participation and injury rates in youth in Canada. Body checking (BC) is the predominant mechanism of injury in leagues in which it is permitted. The objectives of this study were to determine whether the incidence and types of physical contact differ for Bantam players (aged 13–14 years) who were exposed to BC at Pee Wee level (aged 11–12 years) in Calgary, Alberta versus Bantam players who were not exposed to BC at Pee Wee level in Québec City, Québec. All teams were exposed to BC at bantam level; Methods: A cohort study was conducted in Québec City and Calgary. Sixteen games for Calgary and 15 for Québec City were randomly selected and analysed with a validated observation system to quantify five intensities of physical contact and to observe different types of physical contact such as slashing and holding; Results: A total of 5610 incidences of physical contact with the trunk and 3429 other types of physical contact were observed. Very light intensity trunk contact was more frequent in Calgary (adjusted incidence RR (ARR): 1.71; 95% CI: 1.28–2.29). Holding (ARR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.02–1.07) and slashing (ARR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.07–1.77) were more frequent in Calgary; Conclusion: Results suggest that players’ physical contacts differ between Bantam leagues in which BC was permitted at Pee Wee level and leagues in which it was not permitted until Bantam level. PMID:27399750

  2. Ion observations close to Phobos: A new type of the solar wind interaction with a planetary body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Holstrom, M.; Nilsson, H.

    2009-04-01

    During the close Phobos flyby on July 23, 2008, ASPERA-3/IMA (Ion Mass Analyser) on board Mars Express (MEX) was carrying out ion observations. The flyby occurred in the upstream solar wind far away from the Martian bow shock where no interference with/from the Martian plasma environment is expected. In the vicinity of Phobos, IMA detected unusual signatures in the proton fluxes. Because MEX do not have a magnetometer on board it is not possible to directly back trace the trajectories of the observed protons. Thus, it is difficult to decide if those protons came from Phobos. However, after careful analyses, we conclude that the origin of these protons is indeed Phobos. The reasons are: 1. The energy of the observed protons is slightly less than the solar wind proton energy, and the energy spectrum have a low energy tail. Therefore, the protons can be interpreted as backscattered solar wind protons as was observed by the Japanese Kaguya mission [Y. Saito et al, GRL, 2008] at the Moon. 2. We conducted test particle backtracing assuming that the protons originate from Phobos under various magnetic field conditions. A unique solution for all independent observations was found. We conclude that the observed protons are solar wind protons backscattered from Phobos. The Kaguya observations at the Moon suggest a backscatter efficiency of 0.1 - 1%. Therefore, Phobos and any other atmosphereless body injects into the solar wind a substantial flux of protons. The interaction of the these ions with the solar wind flow results in a specific type of the interaction.

  3. TROPHIC CLASSIFICATION OF SELECTED ILLINOIS WATER BODIES: LAKE CLASSIFICATION THROUGH AMALGAMATION OF LANDSAT MULTISPECTRAL SCANNER AND CONTACT-SENSED DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A project was initiated to determine the feasibility of assessing and classifying a group of Illinois lakes through the utilization of a combination of contact- and satellite-acquired data. LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) digital multidate data for 145 Illinois lakes were ext...

  4. Non-contact multi-radar smart probing of body orientation based on micro-Doppler signatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiran; Pal, Ranadip; Li, Changzhi

    2014-01-01

    Micro-Doppler signatures carry useful information about body movements and have been widely applied to different applications such as human activity recognition and gait analysis. In this paper, micro-Doppler signatures are used to identify body orientation. Four AC-coupled continuous-wave (CW) smart radar sensors were used to form a multiple-radar network to carry out the experiments in this paper. 162 tests were performed in total. The experiment results showed a 100% accuracy in recognizing eight body orientations, i.e., facing north, northeast, east, southeast, south, southwest, west, and northwest. PMID:25570030

  5. Closely related species of birds differ more in body size when their ranges overlap--in warm, but not cool, climates.

    PubMed

    Bothwell, Emma; Montgomerie, Robert; Lougheed, Stephen C; Martin, Paul R

    2015-07-01

    Differences in body size are widely thought to allow closely related species to coexist in sympatry, but body size also varies as an adaptive response to climate. Here, we use a sister lineage approach to test the prediction that body size differences between closely related species of birds worldwide are greater for species whose ranges are sympatric rather than allopatric. We further test if body size differences among sympatric versus allopatric species vary with geography, evolutionary distance, and environmental temperatures. We find greater differences in size among sympatric compared with allopatric lineages, but only in closely related species that live where mean annual temperatures are above 25°C. These size differences in warm environments declined with the evolutionary distance between sister lineages. In species living in cooler regions, closely related allopatric and sympatric species did not differ significantly in size, suggesting either that colder temperatures constrain the evolutionary divergence of size in sympatry, or that the biotic selective pressures favoring size differences in sympatry are weaker in colder environments. Our results are consistent with suggestions by Wallace, Darwin, and Dobzhansky that climatic selective pressures are more important in cooler environments (e.g., high elevations and latitudes) whereas biotic selective pressures dominate in warm environments (e.g., lowland tropics). PMID:26085317

  6. Association between Body Mass Index and Depressive Symptoms of African American Married Couples: Mediating and Moderating Roles of Couples' Behavioral Closeness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickrama, Thulitha; Bryant, Chalandra M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined (a) associations between body mass index (BMI) and depressive symptoms in African American husbands and wives, (b) transactional associations between husbands and wives in this relationship, and (c) mediating and moderating role of couples' behavioral closeness in this association. Data came from a sample of 450 African…

  7. Lack of Transmission among Close Contacts of Patient with Case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Imported into the United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Breakwell, Lucy; Pringle, Kimberly; Chea, Nora; Allen, Donna; Allen, Steve; Richards, Shawn; Pantones, Pam; Sandoval, Michelle; Liu, Lixia; Vernon, Michael; Conover, Craig; Chugh, Rashmi; DeMaria, Alfred; Burns, Rachel; Smole, Sandra; Gerber, Susan I; Cohen, Nicole J; Kuhar, David; Haynes, Lia M; Schneider, Eileen; Kumar, Alan; Kapoor, Minal; Madrigal, Marlene; Swerdlow, David L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    In May 2014, a traveler from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was the first person identified with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in the United States. To evaluate transmission risk, we determined the type, duration, and frequency of patient contact among health care personnel (HCP), household, and community contacts by using standard questionnaires and, for HCP, global positioning system (GPS) tracer tag logs. Respiratory and serum samples from all contacts were tested for MERS-CoV. Of 61 identified contacts, 56 were interviewed. HCP exposures occurred most frequently in the emergency department (69%) and among nurses (47%); some HCP had contact with respiratory secretions. Household and community contacts had brief contact (e.g., hugging). All laboratory test results were negative for MERS-CoV. This contact investigation found no secondary cases, despite case-patient contact by 61 persons, and provides useful information about MERS-CoV transmission risk. Compared with GPS tracer tag recordings, self-reported contact may not be as accurate. PMID:26079176

  8. Lack of Transmission among Close Contacts of Patient with Case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Imported into the United States, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Breakwell, Lucy; Pringle, Kimberly; Chea, Nora; Allen, Donna; Allen, Steve; Richards, Shawn; Pantones, Pam; Sandoval, Michelle; Liu, Lixia; Vernon, Michael; Conover, Craig; Chugh, Rashmi; DeMaria, Alfred; Burns, Rachel; Smole, Sandra; Gerber, Susan I.; Cohen, Nicole J; Kuhar, David; Haynes, Lia M.; Schneider, Eileen; Kumar, Alan; Kapoor, Minal; Madrigal, Marlene; Swerdlow, David L.

    2015-01-01

    In May 2014, a traveler from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was the first person identified with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in the United States. To evaluate transmission risk, we determined the type, duration, and frequency of patient contact among health care personnel (HCP), household, and community contacts by using standard questionnaires and, for HCP, global positioning system (GPS) tracer tag logs. Respiratory and serum samples from all contacts were tested for MERS-CoV. Of 61 identified contacts, 56 were interviewed. HCP exposures occurred most frequently in the emergency department (69%) and among nurses (47%); some HCP had contact with respiratory secretions. Household and community contacts had brief contact (e.g., hugging). All laboratory test results were negative for MERS-CoV. This contact investigation found no secondary cases, despite case-patient contact by 61 persons, and provides useful information about MERS-CoV transmission risk. Compared with GPS tracer tag recordings, self-reported contact may not be as accurate. PMID:26079176

  9. Electrochemical characterization of AISI 316L stainless steel in contact with simulated body fluid under infection conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Danián Alejandro; Durán, Alicia; Ceré, Silvia Marcela

    2008-05-01

    Titanium and cobalt alloys, as well as some stainless steels, are among the most frequently used materials in orthopaedic surgery. In industrialized countries, stainless steel devices are used only for temporary implants due to their lower corrosion resistance in physiologic media when compared to other alloys. However, due to economical reasons, the use of stainless steel alloys for permanent implants is very common in developing countries. The implantation of foreign bodies is sometimes necessary in the modern medical practice. However, the complex interactions between the host and the can implant weaken the local immune system, increasing the risk of infections. Therefore, it is necessary to further study these materials as well as the characteristics of the superficial film formed in physiologic media in infection conditions in order to control their potential toxicity due to the release of metallic ions in the human body. This work presents a study of the superficial composition and the corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel and the influence of its main alloying elements when they are exposed to an acidic solution that simulates the change of pH that occurs when an infection develops. Aerated simulated body fluid (SBF) was employed as working solution at 37 degrees C. The pH was adjusted to 7.25 and 4 in order to reproduce normal body and disease state respectively. Corrosion resistance was measured by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic polarization curves. PMID:17999036

  10. Experimental Study on Improving Unclamped Inductive Switching Characteristics of the New Power Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor Employing Deep Body Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, In‑Hwan; Choi, Young‑Hwan; Kim, Soo‑Seong; Choi, Yearn‑Ik; Han, Min‑Koo

    2006-04-01

    A new power metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with deep body contact (DBC), which improves the avalanche energy capability, is proposed and verified by experimental results. For the experiment, a 60 V, 1 A power MOSFET employing DBC has been fabricated using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible deep Si trench process. Previous simulations show that DBC alters the direction of the current flow from the edge to the bottom of the p-body under unclamped inductive switching (UIS) conditions. DBC also suppresses the activation of the parasitic bipolar transistor due to the reduction of the current density beneath the n+ source. Experimental results show that the ruggedness of the proposed power MOSFET is improved without sacrificing any other electrical characteristics and increasing device area.

  11. An Alternate Set of Basis Functions for the Electromagnetic Solution of Arbitrarily-Shaped, Three-Dimensional, Closed, Conducting Bodies Using Method of Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.; Baginski, Michael E.; Rao, Sadasiva M.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we present an alternate set of basis functions, each defined over a pair of planar triangular patches, for the method of moments solution of electromagnetic scattering and radiation problems associated with arbitrarily-shaped, closed, conducting surfaces. The present basis functions are point-wise orthogonal to the pulse basis functions previously defined. The prime motivation to develop the present set of basis functions is to utilize them for the electromagnetic solution of dielectric bodies using a surface integral equation formulation which involves both electric and magnetic cur- rents. However, in the present work, only the conducting body solution is presented and compared with other data.

  12. A Close Cut: A Technical Report of Endovascular Removal of a Penetrating Intravascular Foreign Body after a Lawn Mowing Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Tapping, C. R.; Gallo, A.; Silva, R. J. De; Uberoi, R.

    2012-12-15

    We present a case of endovascular retrieval of a penetrating foreign body that was originally lodged in the mediastinum and then migrated to the hepatic vein. The steel nail entered the thorax and traversed the left lung causing a pneumothorax. The patient underwent a thoracotomy, but the foreign body had migrated from its original mediastinal position. A postsurgical CT showed that the object was below the right hemidiaphragm. Diagnostic venogram demonstrated that the object was in the main hepatic vein. Using a double-snare technique, the object was safely and successfully removed from the hepatic vein via the right common femoral vein.

  13. Prevalence of tuberculosis among close family contacts of tuberculous patients in South India, and influence of segregation of the patient on the early attack rate*

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, R. H.; Devadatta, S.; Fox, Wallace; Radhakrishna, S.; Ramakrishnan, C. V.; Velu, S.

    1960-01-01

    The results of a study by the Tuberculosis Chemotherapy Centre, Madras, of the merits of home as compared with sanatorium treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis have indicated that treatment at home is satisfactory in the majority of cases. Before domiciliary chemotherapy can be introduced on a large scale, however, it must be established that it does not expose the patient's contacts to a special risk of infection, avoided by his isolation in a sanatorium. Accordingly, a further study was undertaken by the Centre to determine (a) the prevalence of tuberculosis among the family contacts of patients, and (b) the incidence of clinical tuberculosis and of tuberculous infections in the family contacts of the home and sanatorium groups of patients during the first year of treatment. The findings of this study indicate that the major risk for contacts lies in exposure to the infectious case before diagnosis, whether the patient subsequently remains at home or is isolated in a sanatorium appearing to have little importance, if the patients at home are treated with effective chemotherapy. Children under seven years of age proved to be particularly vulnerable to infection. The management of young contacts by chemoprophylaxis or by BCG vaccination, or by both measures, has been discussed. PMID:13683486

  14. Vibrational and rotational transitions in low-energy electron-diatomic-molecule collisions. I - Close-coupling theory in the moving body-fixed frame. II - Hybrid theory and close-coupling theory: An /l subscript z-prime/-conserving close-coupling approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, B. H.; Poe, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed vibrational-rotational (V-R) close-coupling formulation of electron-diatomic-molecule scattering is developed in which the target molecular axis is chosen to be the z-axis and the resulting coupled differential equation is solved in the moving body-fixed frame throughout the entire interaction region. The coupled differential equation and asymptotic boundary conditions in the body-fixed frame are given for each parity, and procedures are outlined for evaluating V-R transition cross sections on the basis of the body-fixed transition and reactance matrix elements. Conditions are discussed for obtaining identical results from the space-fixed and body-fixed formulations in the case where a finite truncated basis set is used. The hybrid theory of Chandra and Temkin (1976) is then reformulated, relevant expressions and formulas for the simultaneous V-R transitions of the hybrid theory are obtained in the same forms as those of the V-R close-coupling theory, and distorted-wave Born-approximation expressions for the cross sections of the hybrid theory are presented. A close-coupling approximation that conserves the internuclear axis component of the incident electronic angular momentum (l subscript z-prime) is derived from the V-R close-coupling formulation in the moving body-fixed frame.

  15. Secular resonances between bodies on close orbits: a case study of the Himalia prograde group of jovian irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daohai; Christou, Apostolos A.

    2016-06-01

    The gravitational interaction between two objects on similar orbits can effect noticeable changes in the orbital evolution even if the ratio of their masses to that of the central body is vanishingly small. Christou (Icarus 174:215-229, 2005) observed an occasional resonant lock in the differential node Δ Ω between two members in the Himalia irregular satellite group of Jupiter in the N-body simulations (corresponding mass ratio ˜ 10^{-9}). Using a semianalytical approach, we have reproduced this phenomenon. We also demonstrate the existence of two additional types of resonance, involving angle differences Δ ω and Δ (Ω +π) between two group members. These resonances cause secular oscillations in eccentricity and/or inclination on timescales ˜ 1 Myr. We locate these resonances in ( a, e, i) space and analyse their topological structure. In subsequent N-body simulations, we confirm these three resonances and find a fourth one involving Δ π. In addition, we study the occurrence rates and the stability of the four resonances from a statistical perspective by integrating 1000 test particles for 100 Myr. We find ˜ 10 to 30 librators for each of the resonances. Particularly, the nodal resonance found by Christou is the most stable: 2 particles are observed to stay in libration for the entire integration.

  16. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... can be by contact with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps ...

  17. Correlation between tuberculin skin test and IGRAs with risk factors for the spread of infection in close contacts with sputum smear positive in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess the correlation between the tuberculin skin test (TST) and in vitro interferon-gamma released assays (IGRAs) with risk factors for the spread of infection in smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) contacts. Methods We recruited prospective contacts with smear positive pulmonary TB cases. We looked at human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and other conditions of immunosuppression, presence of BCG vaccination and the degree of exposure to the index case. Patients underwent the TST, chest radiography, sputum analysis when necessary, and IGRA assays (QFN-G-IT and T-SPOT.TB). Presence of cough, diagnostic delay (days between first symptoms and TB diagnostic), contact conditions: room size (square meters) and index of overcrowding (square meters per person) were investigated in the index case. Results 156 contacts (119 adults, 37 children) of 66 TB patients were enrolled, 2.4 (1-14) contacts per TB case. The positivity of the TST did not correlate with the risk factors studied: presence of cough (p = 0.929); delayed diagnosis (p = 0.244); room size (p = 0.462); overcrowding (p = 0.800). Both QFN-G-IT and T-SPOT.TB, showed significant association with cough (p = 0.001, and p = 0.007) and room size (p = 0.020, and p = 0.023), respectively. Conclusions Both IGRA associated better than TST with certain host-related risk factors involved in the transmission of disease, such as the presence of cough. PMID:24885850

  18. Closed formulae to determine the angular velocity of a body-segment based on 3D measurements.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, L; Béda, G

    2001-01-01

    This paper suggests a simple method to determine the global coordinates of the angular velocity and the angular acceleration of a body segment determined by the coordinates of minimum three markers. There are commonly used calculations for the angular quantities basing on the "hypothesis" of planar motion. The usage of approximate methods can result in quantitative and qualitative errors that may completely disort the reality. The method mentioned here is theoretically absolutely correct and can be well used for smoothing noisy data. PMID:11811842

  19. Effects of gestational and postnatal age on body temperature, oxygen consumption, and activity during early skin-to-skin contact between preterm infants of 25-30-week gestation and their mothers.

    PubMed

    Bauer, K; Pyper, A; Sperling, P; Uhrig, C; Versmold, H

    1998-08-01

    Temporary skin-to-skin contact between preterm infant and the mother is increasingly used in neonatal medicine to promote bonding. It is not known at which gestational age (GA) and postnatal age skin-to-skin contact outside the incubator is a sufficiently warm environment and is tolerated by preterm infants without a decrease in body temperature, oxygen consumption (VO2) increase, or unrest. We conducted a prospective clinical study of 27 spontaneously breathing preterm infants of 25-30-wk GA. Rectal temperature (Trecta), VO2 (indirect calorimetry), and activity were continuously measured in the incubator (60 min), during skin-to-skin contact (60 min), and back in the incubator (60 min) in wk 1 and 2 of life. In wk 1 the change in Trectal during skin-to-skin contact was related to GA (r=0.585, p=0.0027): infants of 25-27-wk GA lost heat during skin-to-skin contact, whereas infants of 28-30 wk gained heat and their mean Trectal during skin-to-skin contact was 0.3 degrees C higher than before (p < 0.01). No significant changes of VO2 or activity occurred. In wk 2 the infants' VO2 was higher than in wk 1, but VO2 during skin-to-skin contact was the same as in the incubator. Only small fluctuations in Trectal occurred. In wk 2 all infants slept more during skin-to-skin contact than in the incubator (p < 0.02). We conclude that, for preterm infants of 28-30-wk GA, skin-to-skin contact was a sufficiently warm environment as early as postnatal wk 1. For infants of 25-27-wk GA skin-to-skin contact should be postponed until wk 2 of life, when their body temperature remains stable and they are more quiet during skin-to-skin contact than in the incubator. PMID:9702922

  20. An investigation of the simultaneously recorded occlusal contact and surface electromyographic activity of jaw-closing muscles for patients with temporomandibular disorders and a scissors-bite relationship.

    PubMed

    Qi, Kun; Guo, Shao-Xiong; Xu, YiFei; Deng, Qi; Liu, Lu; Li, Baoyong; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Surface electromyographic (SEMG) activity of the masseter and anterior temporalis (TA) muscles has been reported to be associated with occlusion and orofacial pain. However, our recent report did not reveal an association between the side of orofacial pain and the side showing higher or lower level of SEMG activity of masseter or TA. The present purpose was to re-test this association in patients who had unilateral scissors-bite relationship. Thirty-two unilateral scissors-bite femalepatients complaining of unilateral orofacial pain (n=15) or TMJ sounds (n=17) were enrolled to simultaneously record contacts, force distribution of occlusion, and SEMG activity of masseter and TA during centric maximal voluntary clenching (MVC). The results indicated that neither orofacial pain nor the TMJ sounds had an association with the masseter's SEMG values, while scissors-bite had (P<0.05). A lower SEMG value for masseter was found on the scissors-bite side where there was a smaller number of contacts and a lower biting force distribution (P<0.05). No such association was revealed in TA. In conclusion, in patients with unilateral TMD symptom(s) and scissors-bite, the jawclosing muscles' SEMG activity during centric MVC was associated with the scissors-bite rather than the symptoms of orofacial pain or TMJ sounds. PMID:27111032

  1. A contact mechanics based model for partially-closed randomly distributed surface microcracks and their effect on acoustic nonlinearity in Rayleigh surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhardt, Tobias; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2016-02-01

    This research investigates the modeling of randomly distributed surface-breaking microcracks and the dependency of higher harmonic generation in Rayleigh surface waves on microcrack density. The microcrack model is based on micromechanical considerations of rough surface contact. An effective stress-strain relationship is derived to describe the nonlinear behavior of a single microcrack and implemented into a finite-element model via a hyperelastic constitutive law. Finite-element simulations of nonlinear wave propagation in a solid with distributed surface microcracks are performed for a range of microcrack densities. The evolution of fundamental and second harmonic amplitudes along the propagation distance is studied and the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is calculated. The results show that the nonlinearity parameter increases with crack density. While, for small crack densities (dilute concentration of microcracks) a proportionality between crack density and acoustic nonlinearity is observed, this is not valid for higher crack densities, as the microcracks start to interact.

  2. Close, stable homolog juxtaposition during meiosis in budding yeast is dependent on meiotic recombination, occurs independently of synapsis, and is distinct from DSB-independent pairing contacts

    PubMed Central

    Peoples, Tamara L.; Dean, Eric; Gonzalez, Oscar; Lambourne, Lindsey; Burgess, Sean M.

    2002-01-01

    A site-specific recombination system that probes the relative probabilities that pairs of chromosomal loci collide with one another in living cells of budding yeast was used to explore the relative contributions of pairing, recombination, synaptonemal complex formation, and telomere clustering to the close juxtaposition of homologous chromosome pairs during meiosis. The level of Cre-mediated recombination between a pair of loxP sites located at an allelic position on homologous chromosomes was 13-fold greater than that between a pair of loxP sites located at ectopic positions on nonhomologous chromosomes. Mutations affecting meiotic recombination initiation and the processing of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) into single-end invasions (SEIs) reduced the levels of allelic Cre-mediated recombination levels by three- to sixfold. The severity of Cre/loxP phenotypes is presented in contrast to relatively weak DSB-independent pairing defects as assayed using fluorescence in situ hybridization for these mutants. Mutations affecting synaptonemal complex (SC) formation or crossover control gave wild-type levels of allelic Cre-mediated recombination. A delay in attaining maximum levels of allelic Cre-mediated recombination was observed for a mutant defective in telomere clustering. None of the mutants affected ectopic levels of recombination. These data suggest that stable, close homolog juxtaposition in yeast is distinct from pre-DSB pairing interactions, requires both DSB and SEI formation, but does not depend on crossovers or SC. PMID:12101126

  3. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 1: Basic Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems address the basic functionality of the contact algorithms, including the behavior of various kinematic, penalty, and Lagrangian enforcement formulations. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions for each contact algorithm being verified. Most of the contact algorithms currently available in DYNA3D are examined; the exceptions are the Type 4--Single Surface Contact and Type 11--SAND algorithms. It is likely that these algorithms will be removed since their functionality is embodied in other, more robust, contact algorithms. The automatic contact algorithm is evaluated using the Type 12 interface. Two other variations of automatic contact, Type 13 and Type 14, offer additional means to adapt the interface domain, but share the same search and restoration algorithms as Type 12. The contact algorithms are summarized in Table 1. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where one contact surface exists between two

  4. Contact Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Samantha

    2015-05-01

    Recent observations have found that some contact binaries are oriented such that the secondary impacts with the primary at a high inclination. This research investigates the evolution of how such contact binaries came to exist. This process begins with an asteroid pair, where the secondary lies on the Laplace plane. The Laplace plane is a plane normal to the axis about which the pole of a satellites orbit precesses, causing a near constant inclination for such an orbit. For the study of the classical Laplace plane, the secondary asteroid is in circular orbit around an oblate primary with axial tilt. This system is also orbiting the Sun. Thus, there are two perturbations on the secondarys orbit: J2 and third body Sun perturbations. The Laplace surface is defined as the group of orbits that lie on the Laplace plane at varying distances from the primary. If the secondary is very close to the primary, the inclination of the Laplace plane will be near the equator of the asteroid, while further from the primary the inclination will be similar to the asteroid-Sun plane. The secondary will lie on the Laplace plane because near the asteroid the Laplace plane is stable to large deviations in motion, causing the asteroid to come to rest in this orbit. Assuming the secondary is asymmetrical in shape and the bodys rotation is synchronous with its orbit, the secondary will experience the BYORP effect. BYORP can cause secular motion such as the semi-major axis of the secondary expanding or contracting. Assuming the secondary expands due to BYORP, the secondary will eventually reach the unstable region of the Laplace plane. The unstable region exists if the primary has an obliquity of 68.875 degrees or greater. The unstable region exists at 0.9 Laplace radius to 1.25 Laplace radius, where the Laplace radius is defined as the distance from the central body where the inclination of the Laplace plane orbit is half the obliquity. In the unstable region, the eccentricity of the orbit

  5. Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Contact dermatitis Overview Contact dermatitis: Many health care workers ... to touching her face while wearing latex gloves. Contact dermatitis: Overview Almost everyone gets this type of ...

  6. Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez, Alvaro; Rucinski, Slavek; Szkody, P.; Gies, D.; Kang, Y.-W.; Linsky, J.; Livio, M.; Morrell, N.; Hilditch, R.; Nordström, B.; Ribas, I.; Sion, E.; Vrielman, S.

    2007-03-01

    The triennial report from Commission 42 covers various topics like massive binaries, contact systems, cataclysmic variables and low-mass binary stars. We try in a number of sections to provide an update on the current status of the main research areas in the field of close binaries. It is not a formal review, even complete or comprehensive, but an attempt to bring the main topics on recent research to astronomers working in other fields. References are also not comprehensive and simply added to the text to help the reader looking for deeper information on the subject. For this reason, we have chosen to include references (sometimes incomplete for ongoing work) not in a list at the end but integrated with the main text body. Complete references and additional sources can be easily obtained through web access of ADS or SIMBAD. Furthermore, the summary of papers on close-binary research contained in the Bibliography of Close Binaries (BCB) can be accessed from the web site of Commission 42. I would like to express the gratitude of the commission for the careful work of Colin Scarfe as Editor-in-Chief of BCB and Andras Holl and Attila Sragli for maintaining the web pages of the Commission within the structure of Division V. Finally, K. Olah and J. Jurcsik are gratefully acknowledged for their continued support as editors of the Information Bulletin on Variable Stars (IBVS), also accessible through the commission web page.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of highly photoresponsive fullerenyl dyads with a close chromophore antenna–C60 contact and effective photodynamic potential†

    PubMed Central

    Padmawar, Prashant A.; Rogers-Haley, Joy E.; So, Grace; Canteenwala, Taizoon; Thota, Sammaiah; Tan, Loon-Seng; Pritzker, Kenneth; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kurup, Divya Balachandran; Hamblin, Michael R.; Wilson, Brian; Urbas, Augustine

    2010-01-01

    We report the synthesis of a new class of photoresponsive C60–DCE–diphenylaminofluorene nanostructures and their intramolecular photoinduced energy and electron transfer phenomena. Structural modification was made by chemical conversion of the keto group in C60(>DPAF-Cn) to a stronger electron-withdrawing 1,1-dicyanoethylenyl (DCE) unit leading to C60(>CPAF-Cn) with an increased electronic polarization of the molecule. The modification also led to a large bathochromic shift of the major band in visible spectrum giving measureable absorption up to 600 nm and extended the photoresponsive capability of C60–DCE–DPAF nanostructures to longer red wavelengths than C60(>DPAF-Cn). Accordingly, C60(>CPAF-Cn) may allow 2γ-PDT using a light wavelength of 1000–1200 nm for enhanced tissue penetration depth. Production efficiency of singlet oxygen by closely related C60(>DPAF-C2M) was found to be comparable with that of tetraphenylporphyrin photosensitizer. Remarkably, the 1O2 quantum yield of C60(>CPAF-C2M) was found to be nearly 6-fold higher than that of C60(>DPAF-C2M), demonstrating the large light-harvesting enhancement of the CPAF-C2M moiety and leading to more efficient triplet state generation of the C60> cage moiety. This led to highly effective killing of HeLa cells by C60(>CPAF-C2M) via photodynamic therapy (200 J cm−2 white light). We interpret the phenomena in terms of the contributions by the extended π-conjugation and stronger electron-withdrawing capability associated with the 1,1-dicyanoethylenyl group compared to that of the keto group. PMID:20890406

  8. Constructions of contact manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiges, Hansjörg

    1997-05-01

    1. IntroductionIt has been known for some time that contact structures show a high degree of topological flexibility in the sense that many topological operations can be performed on contact manifolds while preserving the contact property. For instance, Martinet [14] used a surgery description of 3-manifolds to show that every closed, oriented 3-manifold admits a contact structure, and alternative proofs of this result were given later by Thurston and Winkelnkemper [18], who based their proof on an open book decomposition, and Gonzalo [8], who used branched covers. These, however, are all strictly 3-dimensional constructions.

  9. Effects of mid-foot contact area ratio on lower body kinetics/kinematics in sagittal plane during stair descent in women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinkyu; Hong, Yoon No Gregory; Shin, Choongsoo S

    2016-07-01

    The mid-foot contact area relative to the total foot contact area can facilitate foot arch structure evaluation. A stair descent motion consistently provides initial fore-foot contact and utilizes the foot arch more actively for energy absorption. The purpose of this study was to compare ankle and knee joint angle, moment, and work in sagittal plane during stair descending between low and high Mid-Foot-Contact-Area (MFCA) ratio group. The twenty-two female subjects were tested and classified into two groups (high MFCA and low MFCA) using their static MFCA ratios. The ground reaction force (GRF) and kinematics of ankle and knee joints were measured while stair descending. During the period between initial contact and the first peak in vertical GRF (early absorption phase), ankle negative work for the low MFCA ratio group was 33% higher than that for the high MFCA ratio group (p<0.05). However, ankle negative work was not significantly different between the two groups during the period between initial contact and peak dorsiflexion angle (early absorption phase+late absorption phase). The peak ankle dorsiflexion angle was smaller in the low MFCA ratio group (p<0.05). Our results suggest that strategy of energy absorption at the ankle and foot differs depending upon foot arch types classified by MFCA. The low MFCA ratio group seemed to absorb more impact energy using strain in the planar fascia during early absorption phase, whereas the high MFCA ratio group absorbed more impact energy using increased dorsiflexion during late absorption phase. PMID:27477715

  10. A novel closed-body model of spinal cord injury caused by high-pressure air blasts produces extensive axonal injury and motor impairments

    PubMed Central

    del Mar, Nobel; von Buttlar, Xinyu; Yu, Angela S.; Guley, Natalie H.; Reiner, Anton; Honig, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is thought to be the basis of the functional impairments stemming from mild traumatic brain injury. To examine how axons are damaged by traumatic events, such as motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports activities, or explosive blasts, we have taken advantage of the spinal cord with its extensive white matter tracts. We developed a closed-body model of spinal cord injury in mice whereby high-pressure air blasts targeted to lower thoracic vertebral levels produce tensile, compressive, and shear forces within the parenchyma of the spinal cord and thereby cause extensive axonal injury. Markers of cytoskeletal integrity showed that spinal cord axons exhibited three distinct pathologies: microtubule breakage, neurofilament compaction, and calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown. The dorsally situated axons of the corticospinal tract primarily exhibited microtubule breakage, whereas all three pathologies were common in the lateral and ventral white matter. Individual axons typically demonstrated only one of the three pathologies during the first 24 h after blast injury, suggesting that the different perturbations are initiated independently of one another. For the first few days after blast, neurofilament compaction was frequently accompanied by autophagy, and subsequent to that, by the fragmentation of degenerating axons. TuJ1 immunolabeling and mice with YFP-reporter labeling each revealed more extensive microtubule breakage than did βAPP immunolabeling, raising doubts about the sensitivity of this standard approach for assessing axonal injury. Although motor deficits were mild and largely transient, some aspects of motor function gradually worsened over several weeks, suggesting that a low level of axonal degeneration continued past the initial wave. Our model can help provide further insight into how to intervene in the processes by which initial axonal damage culminates in axonal degeneration, to improve outcomes after traumatic injury. Importantly

  11. A novel closed-body model of spinal cord injury caused by high-pressure air blasts produces extensive axonal injury and motor impairments.

    PubMed

    del Mar, Nobel; von Buttlar, Xinyu; Yu, Angela S; Guley, Natalie H; Reiner, Anton; Honig, Marcia G

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is thought to be the basis of the functional impairments stemming from mild traumatic brain injury. To examine how axons are damaged by traumatic events, such as motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports activities, or explosive blasts, we have taken advantage of the spinal cord with its extensive white matter tracts. We developed a closed-body model of spinal cord injury in mice whereby high-pressure air blasts targeted to lower thoracic vertebral levels produce tensile, compressive, and shear forces within the parenchyma of the spinal cord and thereby cause extensive axonal injury. Markers of cytoskeletal integrity showed that spinal cord axons exhibited three distinct pathologies: microtubule breakage, neurofilament compaction, and calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown. The dorsally situated axons of the corticospinal tract primarily exhibited microtubule breakage, whereas all three pathologies were common in the lateral and ventral white matter. Individual axons typically demonstrated only one of the three pathologies during the first 24h after blast injury, suggesting that the different perturbations are initiated independently of one another. For the first few days after blast, neurofilament compaction was frequently accompanied by autophagy, and subsequent to that, by the fragmentation of degenerating axons. TuJ1 immunolabeling and mice with YFP-reporter labeling each revealed more extensive microtubule breakage than did βAPP immunolabeling, raising doubts about the sensitivity of this standard approach for assessing axonal injury. Although motor deficits were mild and largely transient, some aspects of motor function gradually worsened over several weeks, suggesting that a low level of axonal degeneration continued past the initial wave. Our model can help provide further insight into how to intervene in the processes by which initial axonal damage culminates in axonal degeneration, to improve outcomes after traumatic injury. Importantly

  12. Retrospective Cohort Study of Bronchial Doses and Radiation-Induced Atelectasis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors Located Close to the Bronchial Tree

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Kristin; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia; Wersäll, Peter; Drugge, Ninni; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Persson, Jan-Olov; Rutkowska, Eva; Tullgren, Owe; Lax, Ingmar

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose–response relationship between radiation-induced atelectasis after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and bronchial dose. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients treated with SBRT for tumors close to main, lobar, or segmental bronchi were selected. The association between incidence of atelectasis and bronchial dose parameters (maximum point-dose and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volume [ranging from 0.1 cm{sup 3} up to 2.0 cm{sup 3}]) was statistically evaluated with survival analysis models. Results: Prescribed doses varied between 4 and 20 Gy per fraction in 2-5 fractions. Eighteen patients (24.3%) developed atelectasis considered to be radiation-induced. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between the incidence of radiation-induced atelectasis and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volumes, of which 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 0.1cm3}) was used for further analysis. The median value of D{sub 0.1cm3} (α/β = 3 Gy) was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 147 Gy{sub 3} (range, 20-293 Gy{sub 3}). For patients who developed atelectasis the median value was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 210 Gy{sub 3}, and for patients who did not develop atelectasis, EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 105 Gy{sub 3}. Median time from treatment to development of atelectasis was 8.0 months (range, 1.1-30.1 months). Conclusion: In this retrospective study a significant dose–response relationship between the incidence of atelectasis and the dose to the high-dose volume of the bronchi is shown.

  13. ELECTRIC CONTACT MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Grear, J.W. Jr.

    1959-03-10

    A switch adapted to maintain electrical connections under conditions of vibration or acceleration is described. According to the invention, thc switch includes a rotatable arm carrying a conductive bar arranged to close against two contacts spaced in the same plane. The firm and continuous engagement of the conductive bar with the contacts is acheived by utilizeing a spring located betwenn the vbar and athe a rem frzme and slidable mounting the bar in channel between two arms suspendef from the arm frame.

  14. Telocyte's contacts.

    PubMed

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TC) are an interstitial cell type located in the connective tissue of many organs of humans and laboratory mammals. By means of homocellular contacts, TC build a scaffold whose meshes integrity and continuity are guaranteed by those contacts having a mechanical function; those contacts acting as sites of intercellular communication allow exchanging information and spreading signals. Heterocellular contacts between TC and a great variety of cell types give origin to mixed networks. TC, by means of all these types of contacts, their interaction with the extracellular matrix and their vicinity to nerve endings, are part of an integrated system playing tissue/organ-specific roles. PMID:26826524

  15. A General Simulation Method for Multiple Bodies in Proximate Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of unsteady aerodynamic simulation for an arbitrary number of independent bodies flying in close proximity are considered. A novel method to efficiently detect collision contact points is described. A method to compute body trajectories in response to aerodynamic loads, applied loads, and inter-body collisions is also given. The physical correctness of the methods are verified by comparison to a set of analytic solutions. The methods, combined with a Navier-Stokes solver, are used to demonstrate the possibility of predicting the unsteady aerodynamics and flight trajectories of moving bodies that involve rigid-body collisions.

  16. Occupational Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis accounts for 90% of all cases of work-related cutaneous disorders. It can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis, which occurs in 80% of cases, and allergic contact dermatitis. In most cases, both types will present as eczematous lesions on exposed parts of the body, notably the hands. Accurate diagnosis relies on meticulous history taking, thorough physical examination, careful reading of Material Safety Data Sheets to distinguish between irritants and allergens, and comprehensive patch testing to confirm or rule out allergic sensitization. This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of occupational contact dermatitis and provides diagnostic guidelines and a rational approach to management of these often frustrating cases. PMID:20525126

  17. Experimental determination of flow-interference effects of wing-mounted, two-dimensional, full-capture propulsion nacelles in close proximity to a vehicle body at a Mach number of 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahl, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental tests have been conducted to determine possible aerodynamic interference effects due to the lateral positioning of two dimensional propulsion nacelles mounted on a wing surface in close proximity to a vehicle body. The tests were conducted at a Mach number of 6 and a Reynolds number 7 million per foot. The angle of attack range for force tests was -9 deg to 9 deg. The model configurations consisted of combinations of rectangular and trapezoidal cross section bodies with a wing swept 65 and a rectangular planform wing. A pair of two dimensional, flow through propulsion nacelles simulated full capture inlet operation.

  18. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  19. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.; Popov, V. L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-11-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed.

  20. A beta-complex statistical four body contact potential combined with a hydrogen bond statistical potential recognizes the correct native structure from protein decoy sets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Deok-Soo; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón

    2013-08-01

    We present a new four-body knowledge-based potential for recognizing the native state of proteins from their misfolded states. This potential was extracted from a large set of protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography using BetaMol, a software based on the recent theory of the beta-complex (β-complex) and quasi-triangulation of the Voronoi diagram of spheres. This geometric construct reflects the size difference among atoms in their full Euclidean metric; property not accounted for in a typical 3D Delaunay triangulation. The ability of this potential to identify the native conformation over a large set of decoys was evaluated. Experiments show that this potential outperforms a potential constructed with a classical Delaunay triangulation in decoy discrimination tests. The addition of a statistical hydrogen bond potential to our four-body potential allows a significant improvement in the decoy discrimination, in such a way that we are able to predict successfully the native structure in 90% of cases. PMID:23568277

  1. Body Fat Measurement Tools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cyberkitchen Fitness Center Shape Up & Drop 10 Body Fat Lab BMI Calculator Pregnancy Weight Gain Children Assessing ... Contact List Request for Support Measurement Tools Body fat has many important functions. It is: a "storage ...

  2. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 2: Multi-Surface Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems use multiple interfaces and a combination of enforcement methods to assess the basic functionality of the contact algorithms. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions during contact. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where multiple bodies interact with each other via multiple interfaces. The test problems focus on whether any ordering issues exist in the contact logic by using a combination of interface types, contact enforcement options (i.e., penalty, Lagrange, and kinematic), and element interactions within each problem. The influence of rigid materials on interface behavior is also examined. The companion report (McMichael, 2006) and associated test problems address the basic contact scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. The test problems are analyzed using version 5.2 (compiled on 12/22/2005) of DYNA3D. The analytical results are used to form baseline solutions for

  3. JKR adhesion in cylindrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Narayan; Farris, T. N.; Chandrasekar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Planar JKR adhesive solutions use the half-plane assumption and do not permit calculation of indenter approach or visualization of adhesive force-displacement curves unless the contact is periodic. By considering a conforming cylindrical contact and using an arc crack analogy, we obtain closed-form indenter approach and load-contact size relations for a planar adhesive problem. The contact pressure distribution is also obtained in closed-form. The solutions reduce to known cases in both the adhesion-free and small-contact solution ( Barquins, 1988) limits. The cylindrical system shows two distinct regimes of adhesive behavior; in particular, contact sizes exceeding the critical (maximum) size seen in adhesionless contacts are possible. The effects of contact confinement on adhesive behavior are investigated. Some special cases are considered, including contact with an initial neat-fit and the detachment of a rubbery cylinder from a rigid cradle. A comparison of the cylindrical solution with the half-plane adhesive solution is carried out, and it indicates that the latter typically underestimates the adherence force. The cylindrical adhesive system is novel in that it possesses stable contact states that may not be attained even on applying an infinite load in the absence of adhesion.

  4. Calculate Your Body Mass Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can! ) Health Professional Resources Calculate Your Body Mass Index Body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based ... to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SEARCH | SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | PRIVACY STATEMENT | FOIA | OIG | CONTACT US National ...

  5. Porous body infiltrating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2002-01-01

    A mixture is formed that comprises at least some to about 10 wt % boron nitride and silicon. A body comprising a component that is wetted by or reacts with silicon is contacted with the mixture and the contacted body is infiltrated with silicon from the mixture.

  6. 76 FR 57768 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the Sharpsburg post office in Sharpsburg, Iowa. The petition...

  7. 76 FR 57767 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the Ionia post office in Ionia, Missouri. The petition was...

  8. 76 FR 49800 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the post office in Masonville, Iowa. The petition was filed...

  9. 76 FR 31645 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... should contact the person identified in FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source for case... determination to close the Valley Falls Station in Cumberland, Rhode Island. The petition was filed online...

  10. 76 FR 48924 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Service's determination to close the post office in Thayer, Iowa. The petition was filed by Mike...

  11. 76 FR 49801 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the post office in Monroe, Arkansas. The petition was filed...

  12. 76 FR 51436 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the post office in Sublime, Texas. The petition was filed...

  13. 76 FR 49799 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the post office in Ulman, Missouri. The petition was filed...

  14. 76 FR 60559 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the Smyrna post office in Smyrna, New York. The petition...

  15. 76 FR 60563 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the Algoma post office in Algoma, Mississippi. The petition...

  16. 76 FR 59452 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the Ellisburg post office in Ellisburg, New York. The...

  17. 76 FR 48923 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Service's determination to close the post office in Hoxie, Arkansas. The petition was filed by...

  18. 76 FR 51435 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the post office in Grant, Iowa. The petition was filed...

  19. Pseudo force acting between bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Abhinav Ray; Deva, Anish; Sarma, Arun

    It has been shown that a non-contact force acts between two macroscopic physical objects held close together, which is not associated with the gravitational and electrostatic force. An experiment was conducted with objects of different mass, material and geometry to find the magnitude and properties of this apparent or pseudo force. The order of magnitude was found to be 10-5 and it remained constant for all types of objects while only the coefficient increased as the distance between the objects reduced. It only started acting at small distances and failed to make a body move if it experienced static friction from any contact surface. The nature of the force was found to be attractive as well as repulsive. Due to gravitation being a solely attractive force, it was eliminated as a possible reason for the pseudo force. The experiment was performed twice, once by grounding the apparatus and then again without grounding. The order of the force remained the same for both cases. As the test objects were held by hand, they were grounded through the human body. Also, none of the objects used were in contact with each other for the duration of this work, preventing any contact electrification. Due to these factors, the force was not considered electrostatic in nature.

  20. Contact modeling for robotics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lafarge, R.A.; Lewis, C.

    1998-08-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the authors are developing the ability to accurately predict motions for arbitrary numbers of bodies of arbitrary shapes experiencing multiple applied forces and intermittent contacts. In particular, the authors are concerned with the simulation of systems such as part feeders or mobile robots operating in realistic environments. Preliminary investigation of commercial dynamics software packages led them to the conclusion that they could use commercial software to provide everything they needed except for the contact model. They found that ADAMS best fit their needs for a simulation package. To simulate intermittent contacts, they need collision detection software that can efficiently compute the distances between non-convex objects and return the associated witness features. They also require a computationally efficient contact model for rapid simulation of impact, sustained contact under load, and transition to and from contact conditions. This paper provides a technical review of a custom hierarchical distance computation engine developed at Sandia, called the C-Space Toolkit (CSTk). In addition, they describe an efficient contact model using a non-linear damping term developed by SNL and Ohio State. Both the CSTk and the non-linear damper have been incorporated in a simplified two-body testbed code, which is used to investigate how to correctly model the contact using these two utilities. They have incorporated this model into the ADAMS software using the callable function interface. An example that illustrates the capabilities of the 9.02 release of ADAMS with their extensions is provided.

  1. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    PubMed

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators. PMID:27387899

  2. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  3. Prioritized Contact Transport Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Walter Lee, Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A detection process, contact recognition process, classification process, and identification process are applied to raw sensor data to produce an identified contact record set containing one or more identified contact records. A prioritization process is applied to the identified contact record set to assign a contact priority to each contact record in the identified contact record set. Data are removed from the contact records in the identified contact record set based on the contact priorities assigned to those contact records. A first contact stream is produced from the resulting contact records. The first contact stream is streamed in a contact transport stream. The contact transport stream may include and stream additional contact streams. The contact transport stream may be varied dynamically over time based on parameters such as available bandwidth, contact priority, presence/absence of contacts, system state, and configuration parameters.

  4. [Current contact allergens].

    PubMed

    Geier, J; Uter, W; Lessmann, H; Schnuch, A

    2011-10-01

    Ever-changing exposure to contact allergens, partly due to statutory directives (e.g. nickel, chromate, methyldibromo glutaronitrile) or recommendations from industrial associations (e.g. hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde), requires on-going epidemiologic surveillance of contact allergy. In this paper, the current state with special focus in fragrances and preservatives is described on the basis of data of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) of the year 2010. In 2010, 12,574 patients were patch tested in the dermatology departments belonging to the IVDK. Nickel is still the most frequent contact allergen. However the continuously improved EU nickel directive already has some beneficial effect; sensitization frequency in young women is dropping. In Germany, chromate-reduced cement has been in use now for several years, leading to a decline in chromate sensitization in brick-layers. Two fragrance mixes are part of the German baseline series; they are still relevant. The most important fragrances in these mixes still are oak moss absolute and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde. However, in relation to these leading allergens, sensitization frequency to other fragrances contained in the mixes seems to be increasing. Among the preservatives, MCI/MI has not lost its importance as contact allergen, in contrast to MDBGN. Sources of MCI/MI sensitization obviously are increasingly found in occupational context. Methylisothiazolinone is a significant allergen in occupational settings, and less frequently in body care products. PMID:21901563

  5. Close proximity gunshot residues.

    PubMed

    Thornton, J I

    1986-04-01

    Intuitively, a hand held in close proximity to a firearm at the instant of discharge will intercept a significant amount of gunshot residue, even though the hand did not actually come into contact with the weapon. There is, however, little information specifically described in the forensic science literature concerning the residue levels which might be encountered in such an instance. The present work confirms that antimony levels consistent with an individual having fired or handled a firearm may be intercepted by a hand held in close proximity. PMID:3711843

  6. Microscale hydrodynamics near moving contact lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garoff, Stephen; Chen, Q.; Rame, Enrique; Willson, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrodynamics governing the fluid motions on a microscopic scale near moving contact lines are different from those governing motion far from the contact line. We explore these unique hydrodynamics by detailed measurement of the shape of a fluid meniscus very close to a moving contact line. The validity of present models of the hydrodynamics near moving contact lines as well as the dynamic wetting characteristics of a family of polymer liquids are discussed.

  7. Contact dynamics math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.; Tobbe, Patrick A.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station Mechanism Test Bed consists of a hydraulically driven, computer controlled six degree of freedom (DOF) motion system with which docking, berthing, and other mechanisms can be evaluated. Measured contact forces and moments are provided to the simulation host computer to enable representation of orbital contact dynamics. This report describes the development of a generalized math model which represents the relative motion between two rigid orbiting vehicles. The model allows motion in six DOF for each body, with no vehicle size limitation. The rotational and translational equations of motion are derived. The method used to transform the forces and moments from the sensor location to the vehicles' centers of mass is also explained. Two math models of docking mechanisms, a simple translational spring and the Remote Manipulator System end effector, are presented along with simulation results. The translational spring model is used in an attempt to verify the simulation with compensated hardware in the loop results.

  8. Body Mass Index Table

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Body Mass Index Table 1 for BMI greater than 35, go ... to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SEARCH | SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | PRIVACY STATEMENT | FOIA | OIG | CONTACT US National ...

  9. Evolution of Close Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K; Eggleton, P

    2005-01-24

    We collected data on the masses, radii, etc. of three classes of close binary stars: low-temperature contact binaries (LTCBs), near-contact binaries (NCBs), and detached close binaries (DCBs). They restrict themselves to systems where (1) both components are, at least arguably, near the Main Sequence, (2) the periods are less than a day, and (3) there is both spectroscopic and photometric analysis leading to reasonably reliable data. They discuss the possible evolutionary connections between these three classes, emphasizing the roles played by mass loss and angular momentum loss in rapidly-rotating cool stars.

  10. Foreign body embedded in anterior chamber angle.

    PubMed

    Graffi, Shmuel; Tiosano, Beatrice; Ben Cnaan, Ran; Bahir, Jonathan; Naftali, Modi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of a metallic foreign body embedded in the anterior chamber angle. After standing in close proximity to a construction worker breaking a tile, a 26-year-old woman using soft contact lens for the correction of mild myopia presented to emergency department for evaluation of a foreign body sensation of her right eye. Methods and Results. Diagnosis was confirmed by gonioscopic examination and a noncontrast CT scan of head and orbits. The foreign body was removed by an external approach without utilizing a magnet. The patient's final outcome was favorable. Discussion. The above is a rare clinical situation, which is impossible to detect on slit-lamp examination without a gonioscopic view. Proper imaging and a specific management are mandatory in order to achieve favorable outcome. PMID:23091762

  11. Thermal contact conductance of pressed contacts at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil Kumar, S.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2004-10-01

    The influence of variations of interface temperature in the range 50-300 K on the thermal contact conductance between aluminium and stainless steel joints was determined. Predictions were done by modeling the deformation at the interface for different values of surface finish and contact pressure over the range of interface temperatures. Both elastic and plastic deformation was considered. Experiments were carried out in a closed loop cryostat and the results were shown to compare well with the predictions. A reduction of the interface temperature resulted in a smaller value of thermal contact conductance. Interfacial pressure variation had much lower influence at the smaller value of temperatures. The role of surface roughness at the contact was also seen to be less significant at lower interface temperatures and the zone of hysteresis was smaller. A correlation was developed for estimating thermal contact conductance at joints over this temperature range. An explicit dependence of contact conductance on temperature was not seen to be necessary as long as the changes in the hardness and thermal conductivity of the material with temperature are incorporated in the correlation.

  12. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  13. A Novel Alpha Cardiac Actin (ACTC1) Mutation Mapping to a Domain in Close Contact with Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to a Variety of Congenital Heart Defects, Arrhythmia and Possibly Midline Defects

    PubMed Central

    Augière, Céline; Mégy, Simon; El Malti, Rajae; Boland, Anne; El Zein, Loubna; Verrier, Bernard; Mégarbané, André; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background A Lebanese Maronite family presented with 13 relatives affected by various congenital heart defects (mainly atrial septal defects), conduction tissue anomalies and midline defects. No mutations were found in GATA4 and NKX2-5. Methods and Results A set of 399 poly(AC) markers was used to perform a linkage analysis which peaked at a 2.98 lod score on the long arm of chromosome 15. The haplotype analysis delineated a 7.7 meganucleotides genomic interval which included the alpha-cardiac actin gene (ACTC1) among 36 other protein coding genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found (c.251T>C, p.(Met84Thr)) in the ACTC1 gene which changed a methionine residue conserved up to yeast. This mutation was absent from 1000 genomes and exome variant server database but segregated perfectly in this family with the affection status. This mutation and 2 other ACTC1 mutations (p.(Glu101Lys) and p.(Met125Val)) which result also in congenital heart defects are located in a region in close apposition to a myosin heavy chain head region by contrast to 3 other alpha-cardiac actin mutations (p.(Ala297Ser),p.(Asp313His) and p.(Arg314His)) which result in diverse cardiomyopathies and are located in a totally different interaction surface. Conclusions Alpha-cardiac actin mutations lead to congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies and eventually midline defects. The consequence of an ACTC1 mutation may in part be dependent on the interaction surface between actin and myosin. PMID:26061005

  14. Irritant Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Irritant Contact Dermatitis Information for adults A A A This ... severe involvement in the patient's armpit. Overview Irritant contact dermatitis is an inflammatory rash caused by direct ...

  15. Contact Lens Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Contact Lens Risks Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... redness blurred vision swelling pain Serious Hazards of Contact Lenses Symptoms of eye irritation can indicate a ...

  16. Contact Lens Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Contact Lens Care Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... 1088, www.fda.gov/medwatch Learn More about Contact Lens Care Other Tips on Contact Lenses Decorative ...

  17. Contact Lens Solution Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Contact Lens Solution Toxicity Information for adults A A A This image shows a reaction to contact lens solution. The prominent blood vessels and redness ...

  18. The treatment of contact problems as a non-linear complementarity problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorkman, G.

    1994-12-31

    Contact and friction problems are of great importance in many engineering applications, for example in ball bearings, bolted joints, metal forming and also car crashes. In these problems the behavior on the contact surface has a great influence on the overall behavior of the structure. Often problems such as wear and initiation of cracks occur on the contact surface. Contact problems are often described using complementarity conditions, w {>=} 0, p {>=} 0, w{sup T}p = 0, which for example represents the following behavior: (i) two bodies can not penetrate each other, i.e. the gap must be greater than or equal to zero, (ii) the contact pressure is positive and different from zero only if the two bodies are in contact with each other. Here it is shown that by using the theory of non-linear complementarity problems the unilateral behavior of the problem can be treated in a straightforward way. It is shown how solution methods for discretized frictionless contact problem can be formulated. By formulating the problem either as a generalized equation or as a B-differentiable function, it is pointed out how Newton`s method may be extended to contact problems. Also an algorithm for tracing the equilibrium path of frictionless contact problems is described. It is shown that, in addition to the {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} bifurcation and limit points, there can be points where the equilibrium path has reached an end point or points where bifurcation is possible even if the stiffness matrix is non-singular.

  19. Fretting fatigue of single crystal/polycrystalline nickel subjected to blade/disk contact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, H.; Garcia, Daniel B.; Matlik, John F.; Farris, Thomas N.

    2005-07-01

    Two bodies are said to be in fretting contact when they are clamped together under the action of a normal force and see an oscillatory motion of small amplitudes at the contact interface due to the effect of shear force and bulk stress. The contact stresses that drive crack nucleation are very sensitive to the shape of the contacting surfaces and the coefficient of friction. To have an understanding of fretting at the contacts in engine components, it is important to simulate similar temperature, load and contact conditions in the laboratory and develop tools to analyze the contact conditions. The efforts made at simulating the temperature and load conditions typical to the engine hardware and the development of a robust mechanics based tool for life prediction are presented. The features of the rig include a combination of an efficient cooling mechanism using water and an insulation mechanism using ceramic blocks and sheets. The rig has been used to conduct an initial set of experiments using single crystal nickel (SCN) specimens and IN100 pads, and was found to function well under the operating temperature and load conditions. Crystallographic orientations contribute significantly to evaluation of the contact stress field. To perform an accurate analysis of anisotropic contact, a clear understanding of the material axes orientations must be maintained. A method for determining axes orientation using a Lauè diffraction method is described. Preliminary fractographic observations revealed that the fracture occurs along the <111> plane. Close observation of the crack initiation site revealed that the crack initiated at the edge of contact on a plane perpendicular to the contact surface.

  20. On the structure of contact binaries. I - The contact discontinuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, F. H.; Lubow, S. H.; Anderson, L.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of the interior structure of contact binaries is reviewed, and a simple resolution of the difficulties which plague the theory is suggested. It is proposed that contact binaries contain a contact discontinuity between the lower surface of the common envelope and the Roche lobe of the cooler star. This discontinuity is maintained against thermal diffusion by fluid flow, and the transition layer is thin to the extent that the dynamical time scale is short in comparison with the thermal time scale. The idealization that the transition layer has infinitesimal thickness allows a simple formulation of the structure equations which are closed by appropriate jump conditions across the discontinuity. The further imposition of the standard boundary conditions suffices to define a unique model for the system once the chemical composition, the masses of the two stars, and the orbital separation are specified.

  1. Surface Contact Model for Comets and Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars James C.; Trease, Brian P.; Acikmese, Behcet; Mandic, Milan; Carson, John M.

    2011-01-01

    A contact force model was developed for use in touch and go (TAG) surface sampling simulations on small celestial bodies such as comets and asteroids. In TAG scenarios, a spacecraft descending toward the surface of a small body comes into contact with the surface for a short duration of time, collects material samples with a sampler device, and then ascends to leave the surface. The surface contact required 6-DOF (degrees of freedom) dynamics models due to coupling of the attitude and translation dynamics during the contact. The model described here is for contact scenarios that utilize a rotating brush wheel sampler (BWS) to collect surface material. The model includes stiffness and damping of the surface material during BWS vertical motion, lateral friction from the BWS dragging across the surface, and lateral shear from the rotating BWS scooping the surface material. This model is useful for any mission to asteroids or comets that incorporates surface sampling operations.

  2. Effects of a contoured articular prosthetic device on tibiofemoral peak contact pressure: a biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Roland; Thermann, Hajo; Paessler, Hans H.; Skrbensky, Gobert

    2007-01-01

    Many middle-aged patients are affected by localized cartilage defects that are neither appropriate for primary, nor repeat biological repair methods, nor for conventional arthroplasty. This in vitro study aims to determine the peak contact pressure in the tibiofemoral joint with a partial femoral resurfacing device (HemiCAP®, Arthrosurface Inc., Franklin, MA, USA). Peak contact pressure was determined in eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens using a Tekscan sensor placed in the medial compartment above the menisci. A closed loop robotic knee simulator was used to test each knee in static stance positions (5°/15°/30°/45°) with body weight ground reaction force (GRF), 30° flexion with twice the body weight (2tBW) GRF and dynamic knee-bending cycles with body weight GRF. The ground reaction force was adjusted to the living body weight of the cadaver donor and maintained throughout all cycles. Each specimen was tested under four different conditions: Untreated, flush HemiCAP® implantation, 1-mm proud implantation and 20-mm defect. A paired sampled t test to compare means (significance, P ≤ 0.05) was used for statistical analysis. On average, no statistically significant differences were found in any testing condition comparing the normal knee with flush device implantation. With the 1-mm proud implant, statistically significant increase of peak contact pressures of 217% (5° stance), 99% (dynamic knee bending) and 90% (30° stance with 2tBW) compared to the untreated condition was seen. No significant increase of peak contact pressure was evaluated with the 20-mm defect. The data suggests that resurfacing with the HemiCAP® does not lead to increased peak contact pressure with flush implantation. However, elevated implantation results in increased peak contact pressure and might be biomechanically disadvantageous in an in vivo application. PMID:17934718

  3. 76 FR 68795 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source for case-related information for advice on alternatives to... received three petitions for review of the Postal Service's determination to close the Rembrandt...

  4. 76 FR 72728 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source for case-related information for advice on alternatives to... petitions for review of the Postal Service's determination to close the Swaledale post office in...

  5. 76 FR 69297 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source for case-related information for advice on alternatives to... received two petitions for review of the Postal Service's determination to close the East Poland...

  6. 76 FR 68793 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source for case-related information for advice on alternatives... Commission received two petitions for review of the Postal Service's determination to close the...

  7. 76 FR 76774 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source for case-related information for advice on alternatives to... received a petition for review of the Postal Service's determination to close the Spring Lake post...

  8. 76 FR 72727 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source for case-related information for advice on alternatives to... received a petition for review of the Postal Service's determination to close the Lafayette post office...

  9. Contact processes in crowded environments.

    PubMed

    Xu, S-L-Y; Schwarz, J M

    2013-11-01

    Periodically sheared colloids at low densities demonstrate a dynamical phase transition from an inactive to active phase as the strain amplitude is increased. The inactive phase consists of no collisions (contacts) between particles in the steady state limit, while in the active phase collisions persist. To investigate this system at higher densities, we construct and study a conserved-particle-number contact process with three-body interactions, which are potentially more likely than two-body interactions at higher densities. For example, consider one active (diffusing) particle colliding with two inactive (nondiffusing) particles such that they become active and consider spontaneous inactivation. In mean field, this system exhibits a continuous dynamical phase transition. Simulations on square lattices also indicate a continuous transition with exponents similar to those measured for the conserved lattice gas (CLG) model. In contrast, the three-body interaction requiring two active particles to activate one inactive particle exhibits a discontinuous transition. Finally, inspired by kinetically constrained models of the glass transition, we investigate the "caging effect" at even higher particle densities to look for a second dynamical phase transition back to an inactive phase. Square lattice simulations suggest a continuous transition with a new set of exponents differing from both the CLG model and what is known as directed percolation, indicating a potentially new universality class for a contact process with a conserved particle number. PMID:24329237

  10. Closing the pseudogap quietly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    The physical properties of hole-doped cuprate high-temperature superconductors are heavily influenced by an energy gap known as the pseudogap whose origin remains a mystery second only to that of superconductivity itself. A key question is whether the pseudogap closes at a temperature T* . The absence of a specific heat anomaly, together with persistent entropy losses up to 300 K, have long suggested that the pseudogap does not vanish at T* . However, amid a growing body of evidence from other techniques pointing to the contrary we revisit this question. Here we investigate if, by adding a temperature dependence to the pseudogap energy and quasiparticle lifetime in the resonating-valence-bond spin-liquid model of Yang, Rice and Zhang, we can close the pseudogap quietly in the specific heat.

  11. Closed cell metal foam method

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Foamed metals and metal alloys which have a closed cellular structure are prepared by heating a metal body containing entrapped inert gas uniformly distributed throughout to a temperature above the melting point of the metal and maintaining the body at this temperature a period of time sufficient to permit the entrapped gas to expand, forming individual cells within the molten metal, thus expanding and foaming the molten metal. After cell formation has reached the desired amount, the foamed molten metal body is cooled to below the melting temperature of the metal. The void area or density of the foamed metal is controlled by predetermining the amount of inert gas entrapped in the metal body and by the period of time the metal body is maintained in the molten state. This method is useful for preparing foamed metals and metal alloys from any metal or other material of which a body containing entrapped inert gas can be prepared.

  12. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  13. Sibling Relationships in Adulthood: Contact Patterns and Motivations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Thomas R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    General contact patterns, obligatory contact motivation, and discretionary contact motivation were examined regarding sibling relationships among 313 urban adults aged 25 or older. Emotional closeness, sibling responsibility expectations, and geographic proximity were most important in explaining dimensions of sibling interaction. (Author/TE)

  14. 7 CFR 1786.105 - Closing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Closing. 1786.105 Section 1786.105 Agriculture... Prepayments on RUS Notes in the Event of a Merger of Certain RUS Electric Borrowers § 1786.105 Closing. (a... bodies and other lenders. (b) The RUS Notes shall be prepaid at a closing to be held in accordance...

  15. 7 CFR 1786.105 - Closing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Closing. 1786.105 Section 1786.105 Agriculture... Prepayments on RUS Notes in the Event of a Merger of Certain RUS Electric Borrowers § 1786.105 Closing. (a... bodies and other lenders. (b) The RUS Notes shall be prepaid at a closing to be held in accordance...

  16. 7 CFR 1786.105 - Closing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Closing. 1786.105 Section 1786.105 Agriculture... Prepayments on RUS Notes in the Event of a Merger of Certain RUS Electric Borrowers § 1786.105 Closing. (a... bodies and other lenders. (b) The RUS Notes shall be prepaid at a closing to be held in accordance...

  17. 7 CFR 1786.105 - Closing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Closing. 1786.105 Section 1786.105 Agriculture... Prepayments on RUS Notes in the Event of a Merger of Certain RUS Electric Borrowers § 1786.105 Closing. (a... bodies and other lenders. (b) The RUS Notes shall be prepaid at a closing to be held in accordance...

  18. 7 CFR 1786.105 - Closing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Closing. 1786.105 Section 1786.105 Agriculture... Prepayments on RUS Notes in the Event of a Merger of Certain RUS Electric Borrowers § 1786.105 Closing. (a... bodies and other lenders. (b) The RUS Notes shall be prepaid at a closing to be held in accordance...

  19. Use of accelerometers for detecting foot-ground contact time during running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Brendan; Channells, Justin; James, Daniel; Barrett, Rod

    2006-01-01

    A biomechanical variable of interest to sprint coaches is foot-ground contact time. Contact time can be easily measured in a laboratory environment using a force platform, but is difficult to measure in the field. The focus of this paper is on the development and validation of an accelerometer-based method for estimating contact time during sprinting that could be used in the field. Tri-axial accelerometers were mounted on the tibia of the right leg of 6 subjects who performed maximal running trials from a stationary start, and running trials at a range of steady state speeds (jog, run and sprint). Ground contact times were measured using a force platform, and estimated from 3D accelerometer data. The mean error between the force plate and accelerometer-based measures of contact time were 0 +/- 12 ms, 2 +/- 3 ms, and 1 +/- 1 ms for the jog, run and sprint. For steps 1, 3 and 5 of the acceleration phase of the maximal sprint the mean errors were 8 +/- 9 ms, 2 +/- 5 ms, and 0 +/- 1 ms respectively. Overall it was concluded from our analysis that close estimates of contact time during running can be obtained using body mounted accelerometers, with the best estimates obtained in conditions associated with the highest accelerations.

  20. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes of allergic contact dermatitis include nickel, chromates, rubber chemicals, and topical antibiotic ointments and creams. Frequent ... construction workers who are in contact with cement. Rubber chemicals are found in gloves, balloons, elastic in ...

  1. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses Without a Prescription Sep. 26, 2013 It ... she first put in a pair of colored contact lenses, Laura Butler of Parkersburg, W.Va., had " ...

  2. Critical behaviours of contact near phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.-Y.; Jiang, Y.-Z.; Guan, X.-W.; Zhou, Qi

    2014-01-01

    A central quantity of importance for ultracold atoms is contact, which measures two-body correlations at short distances in dilute systems. It appears in universal relations among thermodynamic quantities, such as large momentum tails, energy and dynamic structure factors, through the renowned Tan relations. However, a conceptual question remains open as to whether or not contact can signify phase transitions that are insensitive to short-range physics. Here we show that, near a continuous classical or quantum phase transition, contact exhibits a variety of critical behaviours, including scaling laws and critical exponents that are uniquely determined by the universality class of the phase transition, and a constant contact per particle. We also use a prototypical exactly solvable model to demonstrate these critical behaviours in one-dimensional strongly interacting fermions. Our work establishes an intrinsic connection between the universality of dilute many-body systems and universal critical phenomena near a phase transition. PMID:25346226

  3. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Glasses and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > Glasses and Contact Lenses Print A A A Text Size What's ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...

  4. On contact problems of elasticity theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalandiya, A. I.

    1986-01-01

    Certain contact problems are reviewed in the two-dimensional theory of elasticity when round bodies touch without friction along most of the boundary and, therefore, Herz' hypothesis on the smallness of the contact area cannot be used. Fundamental equations were derived coinciding externally with the equation in the theory of a finite-span wing with unkown parameter. These equations are solved using Multhopp's well-known technique, and numerical calculations are performed in specific examples.

  5. Contact lens related corneal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ky; Agarwal, P

    2010-01-01

    A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are: overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. The presenting symptoms of contact lens related corneal ulcers include eye discomfort, foreign body sensation and lacrimation. More serious symptoms are redness (especially circum-corneal injection), severe pain, photophobia, eye discharge and blurring of vision. The diagnosis is established by a thorough slit lamp microscopic examination with fluorescein staining and corneal scraping for Gram stain and culture of the infective organism. Delay in diagnosing and treatment can cause permanent blindness, therefore an early referral to ophthalmologist and commencing of antimicrobial therapy can prevent visual loss. PMID:25606178

  6. Genetics Home Reference: inclusion body myopathy 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions inclusion body myopathy 2 inclusion body myopathy 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Inclusion body myopathy 2 is a condition that primarily affects skeletal muscles , ...

  7. Contact lens in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  8. Direct-Write Contacts: Metallization and Contact Formation; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Curtis, C. J.; Miedaner, A.; Pasquarelli, R. M.; Kaydonova, T.; Hersh, P.; Ginley, D. S.

    2008-05-01

    Using direct-write approaches in photovoltaics for metallization and contact formation can significantly reduce the cost per watt of producing photovoltaic devices. Inks have been developed for various materials, such as Ag, Cu, Ni and Al, which can be used to inkjet print metallizations for various kinds of photovoltaic devices. Use of these inks results in metallization with resistivities close to those of bulk materials. By means of inkjet printing a metallization grid can be printed with better resolution, i.e. smaller lines, than screen-printing. Also inks have been developed to deposit transparent conductive oxide films by means of ultrasonic spraying.

  9. Mathematical model of electrical contact bouncing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Stanislav

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical model of a contact bouncing takes into account elastic-plastic and electrodynamic forces, phase transformations during interaction of electrical arc with the contact surface as a result of increasing temperature. It is based on the integro-differential equations for the contact motion and Stefan problem for the temperature field. These equations describe four consecutive stages of the contact vibration from the impact at contact closing up to opening after bouncing including effects of penetration and restitution. The new method for the solution of the Stefan problem is elaborated, which enables us to get the information about dynamics of zones of elasticity, plasticity and phase transformations during contact vibration. It is shown that the decrement of damping depends on the coefficient of plasticity and the moment of inertia only, while the frequency of vibration depends also on the hardness of contact, its temperature, properties of contact spring, and geometry of rotational mechanism. It is found also from the solution of Stefan problem that the relationship between dynamical zones of plasticity and melting explains the decrease of current density and contact welding. The results of calculations are compared with the experimental data.

  10. Modeling Thermal Contact Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter; Sperans, Joel (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One difficulty in using cryocoolers is making good thermal contact between the cooler and the instrument being cooled. The connection is often made through a bolted joint. The temperature drop associated with this joint has been the subject of many experimental and theoretical studies. The low temperature behavior of dry joints have shown some anomalous dependence on the surface condition of the mating parts. There is also some doubts on how well one can extrapolate from the test samples to predicting the performance of a real system. Both finite element and analytic models of a simple contact system have been developed. The model assumes (a) the contact is dry (contact limited to a small portion of the total available area and the spaces in-between the actual contact patches are perfect insulators), (b) contacts are clean (conductivity of the actual contact is the same as the bulk), (c) small temperature gradients (the bulk conductance may be assumed to be temperature independent), (d) the absolute temperature is low (thermal radiation effects are ignored), and (e) the dimensions of the nominal contact area are small compared to the thickness of the bulk material (the contact effects are localized near the contact). The models show that in the limit of actual contact area much less than the nominal area (a much less than A), that the excess temperature drop due to a single point of contact scales as a(exp -1/2). This disturbance only extends a distance approx. A(exp 1/2) into the bulk material. A group of identical contacts will result in an excess temperature drop that scales as n(exp -1/2), where n is the number of contacts and n dot a is constant. This implies that flat rough surfaces will have a lower excess temperature drop than flat polished surfaces.

  11. Body Hair

    MedlinePlus

    ... girlshealth.gov/ Home Body Puberty Body hair Body hair Even before you get your first period , you ... removing pubic hair Ways to get rid of hair top Removing body hair can cause skin irritation, ...

  12. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  13. Finite Element Modeling of a Cylindrical Contact Using Hertzian Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The turbine blades in the high-pressure fuel turbopump/alternate turbopump (HPFTP/AT) are subjected to hot gases rapidly flowing around them. This flow excites vibrations in the blades. Naturally, one has to worry about resonance, so a damping device was added to dissipate some energy from the system. The foundation is now laid for a very complex problem. The damper is in contact with the blade, so now there are contact stresses (both normal and tangential) to contend with. Since these stresses can be very high, it is not all that difficult to yield the material. Friction is another non-linearity and the blade is made out of a Nickel-based single-crystal superalloy that is orthotropic. A few approaches exist to solve such a problem and computer models, using contact elements, have been built with friction, plasticity, etc. These models are quite cumbersome and require many hours to solve just one load case and material orientation. A simpler approach is required. Ideally, the model should be simplified so the analysis can be conducted faster. When working with contact problems determining the contact patch and the stresses in the material are the main concerns. Closed-form solutions for non-conforming bodies, developed by Hertz, made out of isotropic materials are readily available. More involved solutions for 3-D cases using different materials are also available. The question is this: can Hertzian1 solutions be applied, or superimposed, to more complicated problems-like those involving anisotropic materials? That is the point of the investigation here. If these results agree with the more complicated computer models, then the analytical solutions can be used in lieu of the numerical solutions that take a very long time to process. As time goes on, the analytical solution will eventually have to include things like friction and plasticity. The models in this report use no contact elements and are essentially an applied load problem using Hertzian assumptions to

  14. LY Aurigua: A mass-transferring O-type contact binary with a tertiary stellar companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ergang; Qian, Shengbang; Li, Linjia; He, Jiajia; Liu, Liang; Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    LY Aur is a contact massive close binary with a period of a little more than four days. The first O-C analysis of this early-type binary presented in this paper suggests that the period of the system is increasing continuously at a rate of dP/dt=+7.2×10-7 days/year, while a cyclic oscillation with the period of 12.5 years is obvious. The long-term increasing can be explained by mass transfer from the less massive companion to the more one on the nuclear time-scale of less massive body, which suggests that the contact configuration will be broken and this binary will evolve into a semi-detached system. The periodic oscillation may be the consequence of the light-travel time effect of the third body, whose mass is no less than 3.4 M⊙. It is expected that the third body may play an important role for the origin and evolution of the system by removing angular momentum from the central system, making the eclipsing pairs to have a low angular momentum, while initially it may have had a longer orbital period, with larger angular momentum. The original system may have evolved into the present contact configuration via a case A mass transfer.

  15. Contact rearrangements form coupled networks from local motions in allosteric proteins.

    PubMed

    Daily, Michael D; Upadhyaya, Tarak J; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2008-04-01

    Allosteric proteins bind an effector molecule at one site resulting in a functional change at a second site. We hypothesize that networks of contacts altered, formed, or broken are a significant contributor to allosteric communication in proteins. In this work, we identify which interactions change significantly between the residue-residue contact networks of two allosteric structures, and then organize these changes into graphs. We perform the analysis on 15 pairs of allosteric structures with effector and substrate each present in at least one of the two structures. Most proteins exhibit large, dense regions of contact rearrangement, and the graphs form connected paths between allosteric effector and substrate sites in five of these proteins. In the remaining 10 proteins, large-scale conformational changes such as rigid-body motions are likely required in addition to contact rearrangement networks to account for substrate-effector communication. On average, clusters which contain at least one substrate or effector molecule comprise 20% of the protein. These allosteric graphs are small worlds; that is, they typically have mean shortest path lengths comparable to those of corresponding random graphs and average clustering coefficients enhanced relative to those of random graphs. The networks capture 60-80% of known allostery-perturbing mutants in three proteins, and the metrics degree and closeness are statistically good discriminators of mutant residues from nonmutant residues within the networks in two of these three proteins. For two proteins, coevolving clusters of residues which have been hypothesized to be allosterically important differ from the regions with the most contact rearrangement. Residues and contacts which modulate normal mode fluctuations also often participate in the contact rearrangement networks. In summary, residue-residue contact rearrangement networks provide useful representations of the portions of allosteric pathways resulting from

  16. Precision contact of the fingertip reduces postural sway of individuals with bilateral vestibular loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.; Jeka, J.; Horak, F.; Krebs, D.; Rabin, E.

    1999-01-01

    Contact of the hand with a stationary surface attenuates postural sway in normal individuals even when the level of force applied is mechanically inadequate to dampen body motion. We studied whether subjects without vestibular function would be able to substitute contact cues from the hand for their lost labyrinthine function and be able to balance as well as normal subjects in the dark without finger contact. We also studied the relative contribution of sight of the test chamber to the two groups. Subjects attempted to maintain a tandem Romberg stance for 25 s under three levels of fingertip contact: no contact; light-touch contact, up to 1 N (approximately 100 g) force; and unrestricted contact force. Both eyes open and eyes closed conditions were evaluated. Without contact, none of the vestibular loss subjects could stand for more than a few seconds in the dark without falling; all the normals could. The vestibular loss subjects were significantly more stable in the dark with light touch of the index finger than the normal subjects in the dark without touch. They also swayed less in the dark with light touch than when permitted sight of the test chamber without touch, and less with sight and touch than just sight. The normal subjects swayed less in the dark with touch than without, and less with sight and touch than sight alone. These findings show that during quiet stance light touch of the index finger with a stationary surface can be as effective or even more so than vestibular function for minimizing postural sway.

  17. Forensic Analysis of a Contact Lens in a Murder Case.

    PubMed

    Zwerling, Charles S

    2016-03-01

    Contact lenses have had rare relevance in trials and/or investigations. After 5 years of burial, orbital remnants were retrieved from an exhumed body and subsequently identified as a key piece of material evidence in a murder trial. The exhumed case materials were evaluated under laboratory conditions and were determined to be contact lens remnants. Contact lens fracture and burial simulation studies were performed to provide additional corroboration of the physical findings of the exhumed contact lens remnants. This material evidence was instrumental in providing factual proof refuting the defendant's testimony in the murder trial. A brief history of contact lens composition and use is provided for understanding the methods and observational results. This forensic case study represents the first published documentation of a contact lens from an exhumed body being used in a murder investigation and establishes an operational procedure for future forensic contact lens examinations. PMID:27404629

  18. Colors and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of skin diseases relies on several clinical signs, among which color is of paramount importance. In this review, we consider certain clinical presentations of both eczematous and noneczematous contact dermatitis in which color plays a peculiar role orientating toward the right diagnosis. The conditions that will be discussed include specific clinical-morphologic subtypes of eczematous contact dermatitis, primary melanocytic, and nonmelanocytic contact hyperchromia, black dermographism, contact chemical leukoderma, and others. Based on the physical, chemical, and biologic factors underlying a healthy skin color, the various skin shades drawing a disease picture are thoroughly debated, stressing their etiopathogenic origins and histopathologic aspects. PMID:25000236

  19. Optical contact micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Steven D.

    2014-08-19

    Certain examples provide optical contact micrometers and methods of use. An example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable lenses to receive an object and immobilize the object in a position. The example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable mirrors positioned with respect to the pair of lenses to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses. The example optical contact micrometer includes a microscope to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses via the mirrors; and an interferometer to obtain one or more measurements of the object.

  20. Solutions of contact problems by the assumed stress hybrid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubomura, K.; Pian, T. H. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for contact problems which may be either frictional or frictionless and may involve extensive sliding between deformable bodies. It was based on an assumed stress hybrid approach and on an incremental variational principle for which the Euler's equations of the functional include the equilibrium and compatibility conditions at the contact surface. The tractions at an assumed contact surface were introduced as Lagrangian multipliers in the formulation. It was concluded from the results of several example solutions that the extensive sliding contact between deformable bodies can be solved by the present method.

  1. Adaptive contact elements for three-dimensional explicit transient analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element method was developed for treating the mechanics of contact between deformable bodies. The method uses a family of adaptive interface elements, which were based on the penalty method, to handle the changing contact configurations that can occur between discretized contacting bodies. The nodal connectivity of these interface elements was allowed to change during the computations in order to accommodate finite sliding. The infusion of these elements in the interface satisfies the stress equilibrium condition during contact. Explicit forms for the nodal internal forces are presented. The methodology has been coded and several sample problems are presented. 23 refs., 29 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multi-body knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer’s CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously. PMID:15564115

  3. Language Contact: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Sarah G.

    This book surveys situations in which language contact arises and focuses on what happens to the languages themselves: sometimes nothing, sometimes the incorporation of new words, sometimes the spread of new sounds and sentence structures across many languages and wide swathes of territory. It outlines the origins and results of contact-induced…

  4. Miniature intermittent contact switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, A.

    1972-01-01

    Design of electric switch for providing intermittent contact is presented. Switch consists of flexible conductor surrounding, but separated from, fixed conductor. Flexing of outside conductor to contact fixed conductor completes circuit. Advantage is small size of switch compared to standard switches.

  5. Noneczematous Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Caterina; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Irritant or allergic contact dermatitis usually presents as an eczematous process, clinically characterized by erythematoedematovesicous lesions with intense itching in the acute phase. Such manifestations become erythematous-scaly as the condition progresses to the subacute phase and papular-hyperkeratotic in the chronic phase. Not infrequently, however, contact dermatitis presents with noneczematous features. The reasons underlying this clinical polymorphism lie in the different noxae and contact modalities, as well as in the individual susceptibility and the various targeted cutaneous structures. The most represented forms of non-eczematous contact dermatitis include the erythema multiforme-like, the purpuric, the lichenoid, and the pigmented kinds. These clinical entities must obviously be discerned from the corresponding “pure” dermatitis, which are not associated with contact with exogenous agents. PMID:24109520

  6. Electrical Contacts to Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, P R; Faraby, H; DiBattista, M

    2015-12-01

    The efficient passage of electrical current from an external contact to a nanomaterial is necessary for harnessing characteristics unique to the nanoscale, such as those relevant to energy quantization. However, an intrinsic resistance pertinent to dimensionality crossover and the presence of impurities precludes optimal electrical contact formation. In this review, we first discuss the relevant principles and contact resistance measurement methodologies, with modifications necessary for the nanoscale. Aspects related to the deposition of the contact material are deemed to be crucial. Consequently, the use of focused ion beam (FIB) based deposition, which relies on the ion-induced decomposition of a metallorganic precursor, and which has been frequently utilized for nanoscale contacts is considered in detail. PMID:26682353

  7. Theory of reciprocating contact for viscoelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putignano, Carmine; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    A theory of reciprocating contacts for linear viscoelastic materials is presented. Results are discussed for the case of a rigid sphere sinusoidally driven in sliding contact with a viscoelastic half-space. Depending on the size of the contact, the frequency and amplitude of the reciprocating motion, and on the relaxation time of the viscoelastic body, we establish that the contact behavior may range from the steady-state viscoelastic solution, in which traction forces always oppose the direction of the sliding rigid punch, to a more elaborate trend, which is due to the strong interaction between different regions of the path covered during the reciprocating motion. Practical implications span a number of applications, ranging from seismic engineering to biotechnology.

  8. Shock wave interactions between slender bodies - Some aspects of three-dimensional shock wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooseria, S. J.; Skews, B. W.

    2016-04-01

    A complex interference flowfield consisting of multiple shocks and expansion waves is produced when high-speed slender bodies are placed in close proximity. The disturbances originating from a generator body impinge onto the adjacent receiver body, modifying the local flow conditions over the receiver. This paper aims to uncover the basic gas dynamics produced by two closely spaced slender bodies in a supersonic freestream. Experiments and numerical simulations were used to interpret the flowfield, where good agreement between the predictions and measurements was observed. The numerical data were then used to characterise the attenuation associated with shock wave diffraction, which was found to be interdependent with the bow shock contact perimeter over the receiver bodies. Shock-induced boundary layer separation was observed over the conical and hemispherical receiver bodies. These strong viscous-shock interactions result in double-reflected, as well as double-diffracted shock wave geometries in the interference region, and the diffracting waves progress over the conical and hemispherical receivers' surfaces in "lambda" type configurations. This gives evidence that viscous effects can have a substantial influence on the local bow shock structure surrounding high-speed slender bodies in close proximity.

  9. Kinematic stability of roller pairs in free rolling contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    A set of generalized stability equations was developed for roller pairs in free rolling contact. A symmetric, dual contact model was used. Four possible external contact profiles that possess continuous contacting surfaces were studied. It was found that kinematic stability would be insured if the larger radius of transverse curvature, in absolute value, and the smaller rolling radius both exist on the roller that has the apex of its conical surface outboard of its main body. The stability criteria developed are considered to be useful for assessing axial restraint requirements for a variety of roller mechanisms and in the selection of roller contact geometry for traction drive devices.

  10. Close-range attraction in Lygocoris pabulinus (L.).

    PubMed

    Drijfhout, F P; Groot, A T

    2001-06-01

    Males of the green capsid bug, Lygocoris pabulinus, exhibit a specific courtship behavior, i.e., a vibration of the abdomen. When both live and dead females were offered to males, this vibration behavior was elicited in most of the males tested. When females were dissected into separate body parts, heads, wings, and legs elicited equal responses, while thorax plus abdomen elicited a much lower response. When separate body parts were extracted, the leg extracts elicited significantly stronger responses than any other extract. This suggests that female L. pabulinus legs are either the source of a close-range sex pheromone or that pheromone is accumulated on the legs due to grooming behavior. The leg extracts contained several hydrocarbons such as n-alkenes, n-alkanes, and some methylalkanes. Female extracts contained more (Z)-9-pentacosene and male extracts contained more (Z)-9-heptacosene. Substrates on which females had walked elicited similar responses as female legs, indicating that the pheromone is deposited on the substrate. This enlarges the functional range of low-volatility compounds, which are thought to function only when sexes are in close vicinity or in contact. PMID:11504019

  11. Effect of contact ratio on spur gear dynamic load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Chuen-Huei; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1992-01-01

    A computer simulation is presented which shows how the gear contact ratio affects the dynamic load on a spur gear transmission. The contact ratio can be affected by the tooth addendum, the pressure angle, the tooth size (diametral pitch), and the center distance. The analysis presented was performed using the NASA gear dynamics code, DANST. In the analysis, the contact ratio was varied over the range 1.20 to 2.40 by changing the length of the tooth addendum. In order to simplify the analysis, other parameters related to contact ratio were held constant. The contact ratio was found to have a significant influence on gear dynamics. Over a wide range of operating speeds, a contact ratio close to 2.0 minimized dynamic load. For low contact ratio gears (contact ratio less than 2.0), increasing the contact ratio reduced the gear dynamic load. For high contact ratio gears (contact ratio = or greater than 2.0), the selection of contact ratio should take into consideration the intended operating speeds. In general, high contact ratio gears minimized dynamic load better than low contact ratio gears.

  12. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOEpatents

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    S>Metal jacketed metallic bodies of the type used as feel elements fer nuclear reactors are presented. The fuel element is comprised of a plurality of jacketed cylindrical bodies joined in end to end abutting relationship. The abutting ends of the internal fissionable bodies are provided with a mating screw and thread means for joining the two together. The jacket material is of a corrosion resistant metal and overlaps the abutting ends of the internal bodies, thereby effectively sealing these bodies from contact with exteral reactive gases and liquids.

  13. Coupled thermoelastic analysis of fretting contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Harish

    Fretting fatigue is the contact phenomenon occurring when two bodies in contact experience oscillatory loads. The surface tribology and contact stress evolution in a fretting contact has been studied using coupled thermoelastic analysis. Both, an aluminum and titanium alloy have been studied. Full-field real-time in-situ temperature maps of the contact region and its vicinity have been obtained using a multi-element infrared camera. The distinguishing features of the contact including the sliding regime, partial slip contact, bulk stress effects, boundary conditions effects etc. have been successfully captured using temperature measurement of the order of millikelvin. The coupled thermoclastic response of aluminum and titanium alloy has been successfully characterized, including the mean stress effect. A full coupled thermoelastic finite element model with Coulomb friction, frictional heating and gap conductance, has been used to predict the experimental temperatures. Changes in loads and changes in the coefficient of friction produce changes in different areas of the temperature field. The coupled thermoelastic effect may be used as a powerful tool to guide the march towards the complete understanding of the phenomenon of fretting. The method has been successfully used to guide the finite element analysis of a lap joint specimen.

  14. Telescopic vision contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Eric J.; Beer, R. Dirk; Arianpour, Ashkan; Ford, Joseph E.

    2011-03-01

    We present the concept, optical design, and first proof of principle experimental results for a telescopic contact lens intended to become a visual aid for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), providing magnification to the user without surgery or external head-mounted optics. Our contact lens optical system can provide a combination of telescopic and non-magnified vision through two independent optical paths through the contact lens. The magnified optical path incorporates a telescopic arrangement of positive and negative annular concentric reflectors to achieve 2.8x - 3x magnification on the eye, while light passing through a central clear aperture provides unmagnified vision.

  15. Optical contacting of quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The strength of the bond between optically contacted quartz surfaces was investigated. The Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) experiment to test the theories of general relativity requires extremely precise measurements. The quartz components of the instruments to make these measurements must be held together in a very stable unit. Optical contacting is suggested as a possible method of joining these components. The fundamental forces involved in optical contacting are reviewed and relates calculations of these forces to the results obtained in experiments.

  16. Contacting American Overseas Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, David

    1993-01-01

    Provides contacts for architects or educational consultants who wish to work overseas. Cites a directory, newsletters, newspapers, and associations focused on educators involved with independent overseas schools that are organized around the United States curriculum. (MLF)

  17. 7 CFR 58.731 - Closing and sealing containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Closing and sealing containers. 58.731 Section 58.731... Procedures § 58.731 Closing and sealing containers. Pouches, liners, or containers having product contact surfaces, after filling shall be folded or closed and sealed in a sanitary manner, preferably by...

  18. The impact of contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, B.

    1986-10-01

    Scenarios of the impact on human society of radio contact with an extraterrestrial civilization are presented. Some believe that contact with advanced extraterrestrials would quickly devastate the human spirit, while others believe that these super-intelligent beings would show the inhabitants of the earth how to live in peace. It is proposed that the possible existence of extraterrestrial civilizations and the development of means of studying and communicating with them need to be considered.

  19. Contact dermatitis complicating pinnaplasty.

    PubMed

    Singh-Ranger, G; Britto, J A; Sommerlad, B C

    2001-04-01

    Proflavine allergy is uncommon, occurring in approximately 6% of patients attending contact dermatitis clinics. Proflavine wool is used by many surgeons in the UK as a dressing that can be moulded to conform to the contours of a corrected prominent ear. It may have bacteriostatic properties. We present a case where contact dermatitis in response to proflavine developed after pinnaplasty. This caused diagnostic confusion, a lengthened hospital stay and an unsightly hypertrophic scar. PMID:11254419

  20. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  1. Lettuce contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-02-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and its varieties are important vegetable crops worldwide. They are also well-known, rarely reported, causes of contact allergy. As lettuce allergens and extracts are not commercially available, the allergy may be underdiagnosed. The aims of this article are to present new data on lettuce contact allergy and review the literature. Lettuce is weakly allergenic, and occupational cases are mainly reported. Using aimed patch testing in Compositae-allergic patients, two recent Danish studies showed prevalence rates of positive lettuce reactions of 11% and 22%. The majority of cases are non-occupational, and may partly be caused by cross-reactivity. The sesquiterpene lactone mix seems to be a poor screening agent for lettuce contact allergy, as the prevalence of positive reactions is significantly higher in non-occupationally sensitized patients. Because of the easy degradability of lettuce allergens, it is recommended to patch test with freshly cut lettuce stem and supplement this with Compositae mix. As contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis may present as dermatitis, it is important to perform prick-to-prick tests, and possibly scratch patch tests as well. Any person who is occupationally exposed to lettuce for longer periods, especially atopics, amateur gardeners, and persons keeping lettuce-eating pets, is potentially at risk of developing lettuce contact allergy. PMID:26289653

  2. "Contacting" the Fundamentals: A New Paradigm for Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munjee, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Contact improvisation can serve as a way to access new understandings of Bartenieff Fundamentals. Inherent elements of contact improvisation such as thinking and feeling bodily in the moment, sensitivity to activated weight along with weight sharing and bearing, flow, whole-body organization, and immediacy of embodied presence provide fertile…

  3. Myxobacteria Fruiting Body Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi

    2006-03-01

    Myxobacteria are social bacteria that swarm and glide on surfaces, and feed cooperatively. When starved, tens of thousands of cells change their movement pattern from outward spreading to inward concentration; they form aggregates that become fruiting bodies, inside which cells differentiate into nonmotile, environmentally resistant spores. Traditionally, cell aggregation has been considered to imply chemotaxis, a long-range cell interaction mediated by diffusing chemicals. However, myxobacteria aggregation is the consequence of direct cell-contact interactions. I will review our recent efforts in modeling the fruiting body formation of Myxobacteria, using lattice gas cellular automata models that are based on local cell-cell contact signaling. These models have reproduced the individual phases in Myxobacteria development such as the rippling, streaming, early aggregation and the final sporulation; the models can be unified to simulate the whole developmental process of Myxobacteria.

  4. Ankle Injury Management (AIM): design of a pragmatic multi-centre equivalence randomised controlled trial comparing Close Contact Casting (CCC) to Open surgical Reduction and Internal Fixation (ORIF) in the treatment of unstable ankle fractures in patients over 60 years

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankle fractures account for 9% of all fractures with a quarter of these occurring in adults over 60 years. The short term disability and long-term consequences of this injury can be considerable. Current opinion favours open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) over non-operative treatment (fracture manipulation and the application of a standard moulded cast) for older people. Both techniques are associated with complications but the limited published research indicates higher complication rates of fracture malunion (poor position at healing) with casting. The aim of this study is to compare ORIF with a modification of existing casting techniques, Close Contact Casting (CCC). We propose that CCC may offer an equivalent functional outcome to ORIF and avoid the risks associated with surgery. Methods/Design This study is a pragmatic multi-centre equivalence randomised controlled trial. 620 participants will be randomised to receive ORIF or CCC after sustaining an isolated displaced unstable ankle fracture. Participants will be recruited from a minimum of 20 National Health Service (NHS) acute hospitals throughout England and Wales. Participants will be aged over 60 years and be ambulatory prior to injury. Follow-up will be at six weeks and six months after randomisation. The primary outcome is the Olerud & Molander Ankle Score, a functional patient reported outcome measure, at 6 months. Follow-up will also include assessments of mobility, ankle range of movement, health related quality of life and complications. The six-month follow-up will be conducted face-to-face by an assessor blinded to the allocated intervention. A parallel economic evaluation will consider both a health service and a broader societal perspective including the individual and their family. In order to explore patient experience of their treatment and recovery, a purposive sample of 40 patients will also be interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule between 6-10

  5. Topics in General Relativity theory: Gravitational-wave measurements of black-hole parameters; gravitational collapse of a cylindrical body; and classical-particle evolution in the presence of closed, timelike curves

    SciTech Connect

    Echeverria, F.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the author studies three different topics in General Relativity. The first study investigates the accuracy with which the mass and angular momentum of a black hole can be determined by measurements of gravitational waves from the hole, using a gravitational-wave detector. The black hole is assumed to have been strongly perturbed and the detector measures the waves produced by its resulting vibration and ring-down. The uncertainties in the measured parameters arise from the noise present in the detector. It is found that the faster the hole rotates, the more accurate the measurements will be, with the uncertainty in the angular momentum decreasing rapidly with increasing rotation speed. The second study is an analysis of the gravitational collapse of an infinitely long, cylindrical dust shell. It is found that the collapse evolves into a naked singularity in finite time. Analytical expressions for the variables describing the collapse are found at late times near the singularity. The collapse is also followed, with a numerical simulation, from the start until very close to the singularity. The singularity is found to be strong, in the sense that an observer riding on the shell is infinitely stretched in one direction and infinitely compressed in another. The gravitational waves emitted from the collapse are also analyzed. The last study focuses on the consequences of the existence of closed timelike curves in a wormhole spacetime. Such curves might cause a system with apparently well-posed initial conditions to have no self-consistent evolution. The author studies the case of a classical particle with a hard-sphere potential, focusing attention on initial conditions for which the evolution, if followed naively, is self-inconsistent: The ball travels to the past through the wormhole, colliding with its younger self, preventing itself from entering the wormhole. For all such initial conditions, there are an infinite number of self-consistent solutions.

  6. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Contact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Frank, Juhan; Marcello, Dominic; Motl, Patrick M.; Staff, Jan E.

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for our project is the peculiar case of the 'red nova" V1309 Sco which erupted in September 2008. The progenitor was, in fact, a contact binary system. We are developing a simulation of contact binaries, so that their formation, structural, and merger properties could be studied using hydrodynamics codes. The observed transient event was the disruption of the secondary star by the primary, and their subsequent merger into one star; hence to replicate this behavior, we need a core-envelope structure for both the stars. We achieve this using a combination of Self Consistant Field (SCF) technique and composite polytropes, also known as bipolytropes. So far we have been able to generate close binaries with various mass ratios. Another consequence of using bipolytropes is that according to theoretical calculations, the radius of a star should expand when the core mass fraction exceeds a critical value, resulting in interesting consequences in a binary system. We present some initial results of these simulations.

  7. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Brenda ... on the surface of the eye. They correct vision like eyeglasses do and are safe when used ...

  8. Adaptive contact elements for three-dimensional fluid-structure interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element method is developed for treating the mechanics of contact between two deformable bodies which occurs, for example, at fluid-structure interfaces. The method uses a family of adaptive contact elements, which are based upon the penalty method, to handle all of the possible contact configurations that can occur between the discretized contacting bodies. The contact element's nodal connectivity is allowed to change during the computations in order to accommodate finite sliding. The infusion of these elements in the interface results in satisfying the force equilibrium condition during contact. The methodology has been implemented into the NEPTUNE code. Results are presented for an illustrative problem.

  9. Contact binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochnacki, S. W.

    1981-04-01

    Densities, corrected primary colors, minimum periods, inferred masses, luminosities, and specific angular momenta are computed from data on 37 W Ursae Majoris systems. A-type systems, having lower densities and angular momenta than the W-type systems, are shown to be evolved, and a new class of contact binary is identified, the OO Aquilae systems, whose members have evolved into contact. Evolutionary grids based on the contact condition agree with observation, except in that the evolved A-type systems have lost more angular momentum than predicted by gravitational radiation alone. This is accounted for by stellar wind magnetic braking, which is shown to be effective on a shorter time scale and to be important in other kinds of binaries containing a cool, tidally coupled component.

  10. Shoe allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Erin; Zahir, Amir; Ehrlich, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Foot dermatitis is a widespread condition, affecting men and women of all ages. Because of the location, this condition may present as a debilitating problem to those who have it. Allergic contact dermatitis involving the feet is frequently due to shoes or socks. The allergens that cause shoe dermatitis can be found in any constituent of footwear, including rubber, adhesives, leather, dyes, metals, and medicaments. The goal of treatment is to identify and minimize contact with the offending allergen(s). The lack of product information released from shoe manufacturers and the continually changing trends in footwear present a challenge in treating this condition. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on allergic contact shoe dermatitis; clinical presentation, allergens, patch testing, and management will be discussed. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were used for the search, with a focus on literature updates from the last 15 years. PMID:25000234