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Sample records for body fluid volumes

  1. Distribution of body fluids: local mechanisms guarding interstitial fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Aukland, K

    1984-01-01

    The plasma volume is determined by fluid influx through drinking and outflux by renal excretion. Both fluxes are regulated according to plasma volume and composition through arterial pressure, osmoreceptors and vascular stretch receptors. As to the remaining part of the extracellular volume, the interstitial space, there is no evidence that its volume (IFV), pressure or composition are sensed in such a way as to influence water intake or excretion. Nevertheless, IFV is clearly regulated, often pari passu with the regulation of plasma volume. However, there are many exceptions to parallel changes of the two compartments, indicating the existence of automatic, local mechanisms guarding the net transfer of fluid between plasma and interstitium. Thus, a rise in arterial and/or venous pressure, tending to increase capillary pressure and net filtration, is counteracted by changes in the "Starling forces": hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressures of capillary blood and interstitial fluid. These "oedemapreventing mechanisms" (A. C. Guyton) may be listed as follows: Vascular mechanisms, modifying capillary pressure or interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Increased transmural vascular pressure elicits precapillary constriction and thereby reduces the rise in capillary pressure. Counteracts formation of leg oedema in orthostasis. Venous expansion transmits pressure to the interstitium in encapsulated organs (brain, bone marrow, rat tail). Mechanisms secondary to increased net filtration, A rise in IFV will increase IFP, and thereby oppose further filtration. Favoured by lowcompliant interstitium. Reduction of interstitial COP through dilution and/or washout of interstitial proteins. A new steady state depends on increased lymph flow. Increased lymph flow permits a rise in net capillary filtration pressure. Low blood flow and high filtration fraction will increase local capillary COP. PMID:6399307

  2. Regulation of body fluid volume and electrolyte concentrations in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Krauhs, J. M.; Leach, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Despite a number of difficulties in performing experiments during weightlessness, a great deal of information has been obtained concerning the effects of spaceflight on the regulation of body fluid and electrolytes. Many paradoxes and questions remain, however. Although body mass, extracellular fluid volume, and plasma volume are reduced during spaceflight and remain so at landing, the changes in total body water are comparatively small. Serum or plasma sodium and osmolality have generally been unchanged or reduced during the spaceflight, and fluid intake is substantially reduced, especially during the first of flight. The diuresis that was predicted to be caused by weightlessness, has only rarely been observed as an increased urine volume. What has been well established by now, is the occurrence of a relative diuresis, where fluid intake decreases more than urine volume does. Urinary excretion of electrolytes has been variable during spaceflight, but retention of fluid and electrolytes at landing has been consistently observed. The glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated during the SLS missions, and water and electrolyte loading tests have indicated that renal function is altered during readaptation to Earth's gravity. Endocrine control of fluid volumes and electrolyte concentrations may be altered during weightlessness, but levels of hormones in body fluids do not conform to predictions based on early hypotheses. Antidiuretic hormone is not suppressed, though its level is highly variable and its secretion may be affected by space motion sickness and environmental factors. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone are generally elevated at landing, consistent with sodium retention, but inflight levels have been variable. Salt intake may be an important factor influencing the levels of these hormones. The circadian rhythm of cortisol has undoubtedly contributed to its variability, and little is known yet about the influence of spaceflight on circadian

  3. Regulation of body fluid volume and electrolyte concentrations in spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Krauhs, J M; Leach, C S

    1997-01-01

    Despite a number of difficulties in performing experiments during weightlessness, a great deal of information has been obtained concerning the effects of spaceflight on the regulation of body fluid and electrolytes. Many paradoxes and questions remain, however. Although body mass, extracellular fluid volume, and plasma volume are reduced during spaceflight and remain so at landing, the changes in total body water are comparatively small. Serum or plasma sodium and osmolality have generally been unchanged or reduced during the spaceflight, and fluid intake is substantially reduced, especially during the first of flight. The diuresis that was predicted to be caused by weightlessness, has only rarely been observed as an increased urine volume. What has been well established by now, is the occurrence of a relative diuresis, where fluid intake decreases more than urine volume does. Urinary excretion of electrolytes has been variable during spaceflight, but retention of fluid and electrolytes at landing has been consistently observed. The glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated during the SLS missions, and water and electrolyte loading tests have indicated that renal function is altered during readaptation to Earth's gravity. Endocrine control of fluid volumes and electrolyte concentrations may be altered during weightlessness, but levels of hormones in body fluids do not conform to predictions based on early hypotheses. Antidiuretic hormone is not suppressed, though its level is highly variable and its secretion may be affected by space motion sickness and environmental factors. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone are generally elevated at landing, consistent with sodium retention, but inflight levels have been variable. Salt intake may be an important factor influencing the levels of these hormones. The circadian rhythm of cortisol has undoubtedly contributed to its variability, and little is known yet about the influence of spaceflight on circadian

  4. Blood volume and body fluid compartments in lambs with aortopulmonary left-to-right shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Gratama, J W; Dalinghaus, M; Meuzelaar, J J; Gerding, A M; Koers, J H; Zijlstra, W G; Kuipers, J R

    1992-01-01

    A left-to-right shunt is accompanied by an increased plasma and blood volume. Since this is likely realized through renin/aldosterone-mediated salt and water retention, other body fluid compartments may be changed too. Therefore, we studied blood volume and body fluid compartments by a single-injection, triple-indicator dilution technique in nine 8-wk-old lambs with an aortopulmonary left-to-right shunt (55 +/- 3% of left ventricular output; mean +/- SEM) and in 11 control lambs, 2.5 wk after surgery. Systemic blood flow was maintained at the same level as in control lambs, but the aortic pressure of the shunt lambs was lower. Blood volume in shunt lambs was larger than in control lambs (110 +/- 6 vs. 84 +/- 7 ml/kg, P < 0.001) through an increase in plasma volume, which correlated significantly with the magnitude of the left-to-right shunt (r = 0.81, P < 0.01). Red blood cell volume was equal to that of control lambs. Evidence was obtained that the increase in plasma volume was induced by a transient increase in renin (8.0 +/- 2.2 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.2 nmol.l-1.h-1; P < 0.02) and aldosterone (0.51 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.24 +/- 0.09 nmol/liter) concentrations. Interstitial water volume, however, was not significantly different from that in control lambs. The amount of intravascular protein was significantly higher than in control lambs (5.0 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.5 +/- 0.2 g/kg body mass, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in intracellular and total body water volumes between the two groups. We conclude that the increased amount of intravascular protein confines the fluid retained by the kidneys to the vascular compartment. PMID:1430202

  5. DETERMINATION OF THE VOLUME OF THE EXTRACELLULAR FLUID OF THE BODY WITH RADIOACTIVE SODIUM.

    PubMed

    Kaltreider, N L; Meneely, G R; Allen, J R; Bale, W F

    1941-11-30

    A method for measuring the volume of fluid available for the distribution of sodium (sodium space) by the use of its radioactive isotope (Na(24)) has been described and the accuracy of the method has been discussed. Simultaneous determinations of the plasma volume by means of the blue dye T-1824 and the volume of the extracellular fluid by employing radiosodium and sodium thiocyanate have been made in normal subjects. Repeated measurements were made at varying periods of time in the same individuals. In order to establish the rate of diffusion equilibrium for the radioactive isotope of sodium and thiocyanate between serum and serous effusions, simultaneous samples of both were obtained at varying intervals after the intravenous injection of these substances. Since evidence in the literature indicates that there is an excess of sodium mainly limited to bone, which cannot be attributed to the extracellular phase, experiments on dogs and man were so devised that the ratio of tissue concentration to plasma concentration for radiosodium and chemically determined chloride could be calculated. The following conclusions may be drawn from the results of this investigation: 1. Radiosodium after intravenous administration spreads rapidly during the first 3 hours from the plasma into a volume of fluid which represents approximately 25 per cent of the body weight of man. Thereafter for 6 hours it diffuses more slowly into certain tissue spaces-the central nervous system and probably the skeleton. The plasma volume and interstitial fluid represent 15 and 85 per cent of the sodium space respectively. 2. Diffusion equilibrium for both radiosodium and thiocyanate is not established between serum and transudates in edematous patients until from 9 to 12 hours after the intravenous injection of these substances. 3. Until more complete information is available, it is concluded that unless the difference between repeated observations on the same individual exceeds +/-1.38 liters there

  6. Paradoxes of body fluid volume regulation in health and disease. A unifying hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, R W; Niederberger, M

    1994-01-01

    The body's normal homeostasis is maintained by the integrity of the excretory capacity of the kidneys. In advanced cardiac failure, however, the avidity of the renal sodium and water retention contributes to the occurrence of pulmonary congestion and peripheral edema. In patients with advanced cirrhosis, the kidneys again fail to excrete the amounts of sodium and water ingested, thus leading to ascites and peripheral edema. The signals for this renal retention of sodium and water in a patient with cirrhosis must be extrarenal because when the same kidneys are transplanted into persons with normal liver function, renal sodium and water retention no longer occurs; rather, the kidneys maintain normal fluid and electrolyte balance. Excessive sodium and water retention by the kidneys also occurs during pregnancy despite a 30% to 50% increase in plasma volume, cardiac output, and glomerular filtration rate. What are the afferent and efferent signals whereby normal kidneys retain sodium and water so that total extracellular, interstitial, and intravascular volumes expand far beyond those limits observed in normal subjects? These dilemmas are the subject of this review, in which a "unifying hypothesis of body fluid volume regulation" is presented. PMID:7817551

  7. Dynamics of transcapillary fluid transfer and plasma volume during lower body negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Lundvall, J; Bjerkhoel, P; Edfeldt, H; Ivarsson, C; Länne, T

    1993-02-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) is a stimulus frequently used to study reflex circulatory responses in humans. Studies have provided data on LBNP-induced blood pooling; however, the possibility that LBNP also might be associated with an important loss of plasma fluid has attracted little attention. Therefore this problem was analysed in male volunteers exposed to prolonged (10 min) high (70-75 mmHg) LBNP. Data on LBNP-induced blood pooling that were more reliable than in previous literature were also provided. LBNP caused early pooling of more than 870 ml of blood. Rapid filtration of plasma into the exposed tissues occurred throughout LBNP. The cumulative oedema in the legs and buttocks averaged as much as 460 ml, and additional quite large volumes of plasma apparently accumulated in other parts of the lower body. Concomitantly, there was compensatory absorption of extravascular fluid in the upper body. The net decrease in plasma volume (PV) was still large and averaged 491 +/- 29(SE) ml. Two aspects of the demonstrated process of transcapillary fluid fluxes and PV decline may be emphasized. Firstly, in conjunction with the primary large redistribution of intravascular volume, it certainly implies that LBNP is a potent stimulus as also indicated by a progressive increase in heart rate (HR) and a progressive decline in systolic pressure throughout experimental intervention. In fact, LBNP-induced circulatory stress clearly has bearings on the extreme hypovolaemic situation provided by the pressure-bottle haemorrhage technique used in animals. Secondly, it not only offers an interesting example of the dynamics of PV but appears to have more general validity with regard to states characterized by gravitational shifts of blood (hydrostatic load), like upright exercise and quiet standing. PMID:8475742

  8. Body Fluids Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siconolfi, Steven F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are described for determining volumes of body fluids in a subject using bioelectrical response spectroscopy. The human body is represented using an electrical circuit. Intra-cellular water is represented by a resistor in series with a capacitor; extra-cellular water is represented by a resistor in series with two parallel inductors. The parallel inductors represent the resistance due to vascular fluids. An alternating, low amperage, multifrequency signal is applied to determine a subject's impedance and resistance. From these data, statistical regression is used to determine a 1% impedance where the subject's impedance changes by no more than 1% over a 25 kHz interval. Circuit component, of the human body circuit are determined based on the 1% impedance. Equations for calculating total body water, extra-cellular water, total blood volume, and plasma volume are developed based on the circuit components.

  9. Effect of a central redistribution of fluid volume on response to lower-body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaselli, Clare M.; Frey, Mary A. B.; Kenney, Richard A.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe

    1990-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were studied following 1 hour of 6-deg head-down tilt to determine whether a redistribution of blood volume toward the central circulation modifies the subsequent response to orthostatic stress. Responses of 12 men, ages 30-39 years, were evaluated by electrocardiography, impedance cardiography, sphygmomanometry, and measurement of calf circumference. During the LBNP that followed head-down tilt, as compared with control LBNP (no preceding head-down tilt) subjects, had smaller stroke volume and cardiac output, greater total peripheral resistance, and less calf enlargement. These differences reflect differences in the variables immediately preceding LBNP. Magnitudes of the responses from pre-LBNP to each pressure stage of the LBNP procedure did not differ between protocols. Mean and diastolic arterial pressures were slightly elevated after LBNP-control, but they fell slightly during LBNP post-tilt.

  10. Effect of a central redistribution of fluid volume on response to lower-body negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, C M; Frey, M A; Kenney, R A; Hoffler, G W

    1990-01-01

    We studied cardiovascular responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) following 1 hour (h) of 6 degrees head-down tilt to determine whether a redistribution of blood volume toward the central circulation modifies the subsequent response to orthostatic stress. Responses of 12 men, ages 30-39 years, were evaluated by electrocardiography, impedance cardiography, sphygmomanometry, and measurement of calf circumference. During the LBNP that followed head-down tilt--as compared with control LBNP (no preceding head-down tilt)--subjects had smaller stroke volume and cardiac output, greater total peripheral resistance, and less calf enlargement. These differences reflect differences in the variables immediately preceding LBNP. Magnitudes of the responses from pre-LBNP to each pressure stage of the LBNP procedure did not differ between protocols. Mean and diastolic arterial pressures were slightly elevated after LBNP-control, but they fell slightly during LBNP post-tilt. These cardiovascular responses to simulated gravitational stress following head-down tilt may reflect the manner in which adaptation to microgravity affects subsequent responses to orthostatic stress on return to Earth. PMID:2302125

  11. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  12. Relationships among One-Minute Oscillations in Oxygen Saturation Level of Blood and Hemoglobin Volume in Calf Muscular Tissue and One-Minute Wave in Body Fluid Volume Change during Upright Standing in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Kinsaku; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi

    2005-08-01

    One-minute oscillations in the oxygen saturation level of blood and the hemoglobin volume in calf muscular tissue were found during upright standing in humans. Spectral analyses indicated that one source of the one-minute wave in body fluid volume change is the spontaneous constriction of blood vessels triggered by an elevation of transmural pressure when blood pooling is evoked.

  13. Smart fast blood counting of trace volumes of body fluids from various mammalian species using a compact custom-built microscope cytometer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Gao, Tingjuan; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Carrade-Holt, Danielle; Lane, Stephen M.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Dwyre, Denis M.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Cell counting in human body fluids such as blood, urine, and CSF is a critical step in the diagnostic process for many diseases. Current automated methods for cell counting are based on flow cytometry systems. However, these automated methods are bulky, costly, require significant user expertise, and are not well suited to counting cells in fluids other than blood. Therefore, their use is limited to large central laboratories that process enough volume of blood to recoup the significant capital investment these instruments require. We present in this talk a combination of a (1) low-cost microscope system, (2) simple sample preparation method, and (3) fully automated analysis designed for providing cell counts in blood and body fluids. We show results on both humans and companion and farm animals, showing that accurate red cell, white cell, and platelet counts, as well as hemoglobin concentration, can be accurately obtained in blood, as well as a 3-part white cell differential in human samples. We can also accurately count red and white cells in body fluids with a limit of detection ~3 orders of magnitude smaller than current automated instruments. This method uses less than 1 microliter of blood, and less than 5 microliters of body fluids to make its measurements, making it highly compatible with finger-stick style collections, as well as appropriate for small animals such as laboratory mice where larger volume blood collections are dangerous to the animal's health.

  14. Smart and Fast Blood Counting of Trace Volumes of Body Fluids from Various Mammalian Species Using a Compact, Custom-Built Microscope Cytometer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tingjuan; Smith, Zachary J; Lin, Tzu-yin; Carrade Holt, Danielle; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Dwyre, Denis M; Hood, James; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    We report an accurate method to count red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells, as well as to determine hemoglobin in the blood of humans, horses, dogs, cats, and cows. Red and white blood cell counts can also be performed on human body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and peritoneal fluid. The approach consists of using a compact, custom-built microscope to record large field-of-view, bright-field, and fluorescence images of samples that are stained with a single dye and using automatic algorithms to count blood cells and detect hemoglobin. The total process takes about 15 min, including 5 min for sample preparation, and 10 min for data collection and analysis. The minimum volume of blood needed for the test is 0.5 μL, which allows for minimally invasive sample collection such as using a finger prick rather than a venous draw. Blood counts were compared to gold-standard automated clinical instruments, with excellent agreement between the two methods as determined by a Bland-Altman analysis. Accuracy of counts on body fluids was consistent with hand counting by a trained clinical lab scientist, where our instrument demonstrated an approximately 100-fold lower limit of detection compared to current automated methods. The combination of a compact, custom-built instrument, simple sample collection and preparation, and automated analysis demonstrates that this approach could benefit global health through use in low-resource settings where central hematology laboratories are not accessible. PMID:26496235

  15. Diffuse volume transport in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Howard

    2010-10-01

    The diffuse flux of volume j in a single-component liquid or gas, the subject of this paper, is a purely molecular quantity defined as the difference between the flux of volume n and the convective flux of volume nvˆ carried by the flowing mass, with n the mass flux, vˆ=1/ρ the specific volume, and ρ the mass density. Elementary statistical-mechanical arguments are used to derive the linear constitutive equation j=DS∇lnρ, valid in near-equilibrium fluids from which body forces are absent. Here, DS is the fluid’s self-diffusion coefficient. The present derivation is based on Einstein’s mesoscopic Brownian motion arguments, albeit applied here to volume- rather than particle-transport phenomena. In contrast to these mesoscale arguments, all prior derivations were based upon macroscale linear irreversible thermodynamic (LIT) arguments. DS replaces the thermometric diffusivity α as the phenomenological coefficient appearing in earlier, ad hoc, derivations. The prior scheme based on α, which had been shown to accord with Burnett’s well-known gas-kinetic constitutive data for the heat flux and viscous stress, carries over intact to now show comparable accord of DS with these same data, since for gases the dimensionless Lewis number Le=α/DS is essentially unity. On the other hand for most liquids, where Le≫1, use of DS in place of α is shown to agree much better with existing experimental data for liquids. For the case of binary mixtures it is shown for the special case of isothermal, isobaric, force-free, Fick’s law-type molecular diffusion processes that j=D∇lnρ, where D is the binary diffusion coefficient. In contrast with the preceding use in the single-component case of both mesoscopic and LIT models to obtain a constitutive equation for j, the corresponding mixture result is derived here without use of any physical model whatsoever. Rather, the derivation effectively requires little more than the respective definitions of the diffuse volume

  16. Body Fluid Regulation and Hemopoiesis in Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JA2, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Bodymass and Fluid Distribution During Longterm Spaceflight with and without Countermeasures; Plasma Volume, Extracellular Fluid Volume, and Regulatory Hormones During Long-Term Space Flight; Effect of Microgravity and its Ground-Based Models on Fluid Volumes and Hemocirculatory Volumes; Seventeen Weeks of Horizontal Bed Rest, Lower Body Negative Pressure Testing, and the Associated Plasma Volume Response; Evaporative Waterloss in Space Theoretical and Experimental Studies; Erythropoietin Under Real and Simulated Micro-G Conditions in Humans; and Vertebral Bone Marrow Changes Following Space Flight.

  17. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  18. Hypothalamic integration of body fluid regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Denton, D A; McKinley, M J; Weisinger, R S

    1996-01-01

    The progression of animal life from the paleozoic ocean to rivers and diverse econiches on the planet's surface, as well as the subsequent reinvasion of the ocean, involved many different stresses on ionic pattern, osmotic pressure, and volume of the extracellular fluid bathing body cells. The relatively constant ionic pattern of vertebrates reflects a genetic "set" of many regulatory mechanisms--particularly renal regulation. Renal regulation of ionic pattern when loss of fluid from the body is disproportionate relative to the extracellular fluid composition (e.g., gastric juice with vomiting and pancreatic secretion with diarrhea) makes manifest that a mechanism to produce a biologically relatively inactive extracellular anion HCO3- exists, whereas no comparable mechanism to produce a biologically inactive cation has evolved. Life in the ocean, which has three times the sodium concentration of extracellular fluid, involves quite different osmoregulatory stress to that in freshwater. Terrestrial life involves risk of desiccation and, in large areas of the planet, salt deficiency. Mechanisms integrated in the hypothalamus (the evolutionary ancient midbrain) control water retention and facilitate excretion of sodium, and also control the secretion of renin by the kidney. Over and above the multifactorial processes of excretion, hypothalamic sensors reacting to sodium concentration, as well as circumventricular organs sensors reacting to osmotic pressure and angiotensin II, subserve genesis of sodium hunger and thirst. These behaviors spectacularly augment the adaptive capacities of animals. Instinct (genotypic memory) and learning (phenotypic memory) are melded to give specific behavior apt to the metabolic status of the animal. The sensations, compelling emotions, and intentions generated by these vegetative systems focus the issue of the phylogenetic emergence of consciousness and whether primal awareness initially came from the interoreceptors and vegetative

  19. Fluid volumes changes induced by spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P C

    1979-10-01

    The blood volume (BV), plasma volume (PV), and extracellular fluid volume changes produced in crewmembers during spaceflights of 11-84 days were compared to changes after 14 or 28 days of bedrest. Spaceflight and bedrest produce approximately equal BV changes but the recorded PV change after spaceflight was less. However, the diurnal change in PV may explain the smaller decreases recorded after spaceflight. The cardiovascular deconditioning caused by spaceflight and bedrest was compared using the mean heart rate response to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) testing at -50 mmHg pressure. These tests show approximately equal LBNP produced heart rate changes after bedrest and spaceflight. A countermeasure which includes 4 hr of LBNP treatment at -30 mmHg and the ingestion of one l. of saline was studied and found capable of returning the heart rate response and the PV of bedrested subjects to control (prebedrest) levels suggesting that it would be useful to the crewmembers after a spaceflight. PMID:11902176

  20. Sonographic pleural fluid volume estimation in cats.

    PubMed

    Shimali, Jerry; Cripps, Peter J; Newitt, Anna L M

    2010-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether a recently published study used to objectively monitor pleural fluid volumes in dogs could be successfully employed in cats and secondly to assess its accuracy. Eleven feline cadavers were selected. Using the trans-sternal view employed in dogs, linear measurements from the pleural surface of the midline of the sternebra at the centre of the heart to the furthest ventro-lateral point of both right and left lung edges were recorded. Isotonic saline was injected using ultrasound guidance into both right and left pleural spaces and the measurements were repeated using standard increments until 400 ml total volume was reached. The mean measurement increased in a linear relationship with the cube root of fluid volume for all cats individually. An equation was produced to predict the volume of fluid from the mean linear measurement for all cats combined: Volume=[-3.75+2.41(mean)](3)(P<0.001) but variability in the slope of the curve for individual cats limited the accuracy of the combined equation. Equations were derived to predict the constant and slope of the curve for individual cats using the thoracic measurements made, but the residual diagnostic graphs demonstrated considerable variability. As in dogs, good correlation was found between the ultrasonographic measurement and fluid volume within individual cats. An accurate equation to predict absolute pleural fluid volume was not identified. Further analysis with reference to thoracic measurements did not increase accuracy. In conclusion, this study does provide a method of estimating absolute pleural fluid volume in cats, which may be clinical useful for pleural fluid volume monitoring but this is yet to be validated in live cats. PMID:19744872

  1. Apparatus enables automatic microanalysis of body fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, G. A.; Stuart, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Apparatus will automatically and quantitatively determine body fluid constituents which are amenable to analysis by fluorometry or colorimetry. The results of the tests are displayed as percentages of full scale deflection on a strip-chart recorder. The apparatus can also be adapted for microanalysis of various other fluids.

  2. Guiding principles of fluid and volume therapy.

    PubMed

    Aditianingsih, Dita; George, Yohanes W H

    2014-09-01

    Fluid therapy is a core concept in the management of perioperative and critically ill patients for maintenance of intravascular volume and organ perfusion. Recent evidence regarding the vascular barrier and its role in terms of vascular leakage has led to a new concept for fluid administration. The choice of fluid used should be based on the fluid composition and the underlying pathophysiology of the patient. Avoidance of both hypo- and hypervolaemia is essential when treating circulatory failure. In daily practice, the assessment of individual thresholds in order to optimize cardiac preload and avoid hypovolaemia or deleterious fluid overload remains a challenge. Liberal versus restrictive fluid management has been challenged by recent evidence, and the ideal approach appears to be goal-directed fluid therapy. PMID:25208960

  3. Body fluid dynamics: back to the future.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Gautam; Neilson, Eric G

    2011-12-01

    Pioneering investigations conducted over a half century ago on tonicity, transcapillary fluid exchange, and the distribution of water and solute serve as a foundation for understanding the physiology of body fluid spaces. With passage of time, however, some of these concepts have lost their connectivity to more contemporary information. Here we examine the physical forces determining the compartmentalization of body fluid and its movement across capillary and cell membrane barriers, drawing particular attention to the interstitium operating as a dynamic interface for water and solute distribution rather than as a static reservoir. Newer work now supports an evolving model of body fluid dynamics that integrates exchangeable Na(+) stores and transcapillary dynamics with advances in interstitial matrix biology. PMID:22034644

  4. Body Fluid Dynamics: Back to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Gautam; Neilson, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering investigations conducted over a half century ago on tonicity, transcapillary fluid exchange, and the distribution of water and solute serve as a foundation for understanding the physiology of body fluid spaces. With passage of time, however, some of these concepts have lost their connectivity to more contemporary information. Here we examine the physical forces determining the compartmentalization of body fluid and its movement across capillary and cell membrane barriers, drawing particular attention to the interstitium operating as a dynamic interface for water and solute distribution rather than as a static reservoir. Newer work now supports an evolving model of body fluid dynamics that integrates exchangeable Na+ stores and transcapillary dynamics with advances in interstitial matrix biology. PMID:22034644

  5. Aptamer-Based Screens of Human Body Fluids for Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Albaba, Dania; Soomro, Sanam; Mohan, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, aptamers have come to replace antibodies in high throughput multiplexed experiments. The aptamer-based biomarker screening technology, which kicked off in 2010, is capable of interrogating thousands of proteins in a very small sample volume. With this new technology, researchers hope to find clinically appropriate biomarkers for a myriad of illnesses by screening human body fluids. In this work, we have reviewed a total of eight studies utilizing aptamer-based biomarker screens of human body fluids, and have highlighted novel protein biomarkers discovered. PMID:27600232

  6. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  7. Bioimpedance Measurement of Segmental Fluid Volumes and Hemodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Leslie D.; Wu, Yi-Chang; Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Gerth, Wayne A.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Bioimpedance has become a useful tool to measure changes in body fluid compartment volumes. An Electrical Impedance Spectroscopic (EIS) system is described that extends the capabilities of conventional fixed frequency impedance plethysmographic (IPG) methods to allow examination of the redistribution of fluids between the intracellular and extracellular compartments of body segments. The combination of EIS and IPG techniques was evaluated in the human calf, thigh, and torso segments of eight healthy men during 90 minutes of six degree head-down tilt (HDT). After 90 minutes HDT the calf and thigh segments significantly (P < 0.05) lost conductive volume (eight and four percent, respectively) while the torso significantly (P < 0.05) gained volume (approximately three percent). Hemodynamic responses calculated from pulsatile IPG data also showed a segmental pattern consistent with vascular fluid loss from the lower extremities and vascular engorgement in the torso. Lumped-parameter equivalent circuit analyses of EIS data for the calf and thigh indicated that the overall volume decreases in these segments arose from reduced extracellular volume that was not completely balanced by increased intracellular volume. The combined use of IPG and EIS techniques enables noninvasive tracking of multi-segment volumetric and hemodynamic responses to environmental and physiological stresses.

  8. Amniotic fluid index: correlation with amniotic fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, I A; McGovern, P G; Ordorica, S A; Frieden, F J; Young, B K

    1992-01-01

    We calculated the amniotic fluid indexes (AFIs) of 310 women on 459 occasions. Normative data were analyzed and compared with data in several high-risk groups. In the normal gestations there was a progressive increase in AFI with advancing gestation until 32 weeks, after which there was a decline. The mean AFIs in abnormal gestations varied with the clinical diagnoses. These values were compared to those obtained by assessing amniotic fluid volume (AFV), that is a pocket more than 2 cm. There were 51 patients with abnormal AFVs. Forty-two had decreased fluid, six also had decreased AFIs; nine had increased AFVs and five (all with diabetes) also had increased AFIs. Thus, AFIs in normal pregnancies showed an orderly pattern of change with gestational age, and there was no accurate correlation between AFI and AFV. Thus, using AFV alone may lead to false interpretations of amniotic fluid status. PMID:1418123

  9. Fluid intake and changes in limb volumes in male ultra-marathoners: does fluid overload lead to peripheral oedema?

    PubMed

    Bracher, Alexia; Knechtle, Beat; Gnädinger, Markus; Bürge, Jolanda; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    An increase in body mass due to oedema has been previously described. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential association between both fluid and electrolyte intake and the formation of peripheral oedemas. Fluid and electrolyte intakes and the changes in limb volumes in 50 male 100-km ultra-marathoners were measured. Pre- and post-race serum sodium concentration ([Na(+)]), serum aldosterone concentration, serum copeptin concentration, serum and urine osmolality and body mass were determined. Fluid intake, renal function parameters and urinary output, as well as the changes of volume in the extremities, were measured. The changes of volume in the limbs were measured using plethysmography. Serum [Na(+)] increased by 1.6%; body mass decreased by 1.9 kg. Serum copeptin and aldosterone concentrations were increased. The change in serum copeptin concentration and the change in serum [Na(+)] correlated positively; the change in serum [Na(+)] and body mass correlated negatively. A mean fluid intake of 0.58 L/h was positively related to running speed and negatively to post-race serum [Na(+)]. Total fluid intake was positively related to the changes in both arm and lower leg volumes. Running speed was positively associated with the changes in arm and lower leg volumes; race time was related to the changes in serum copeptin or aldosterone concentrations. To conclude, fluid intake was related to the changes in limb volumes, where athletes with an increased fluid intake developed an increase in limb volumes. PMID:21720884

  10. Physiologic mechanisms of circulatory and body fluid losses in weightlessness identified by mathematical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Charles, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Central volume expansion due to fluid shifts in weightlessness is believed to activate adaptive reflexes which ultimately result in a reduction of the total circulating blood volume. However, the flight data suggests that a central volume overdistention does not persist, in which case some other factor or factors must be responsible for body fluid losses. We used a computer simulation to test the hypothesis that factors other than central volume overdistention are involved in the loss of blood volume and other body fluid volumes observed in weightlessness and in weightless simulations. Additionally, the simulation was used to identify these factors. The results predict that atrial volumes and pressures return to their prebedrest baseline values within the first day of exposure to head down tilt (HDT) as the blood volume is reduced by an elevated urine formation. They indicate that the mechanisms for large and prolonged body fluid losses in weightlessness is red cell hemoconcentration that elevates blood viscosity and peripheral resistance, thereby lowering capillary pressure. This causes a prolonged alteration of the balance of Starling forces, depressing the extracellular fluid volume until the hematocrit is returned to normal through a reduction of the red cell mass, which also allows some restoration of the plasma volume. We conclude that the red cell mass becomes the physiologic driver for a large 'undershoot' of the body fluid volumes after the normalization of atrial volumes and pressures.

  11. Edemagenic gain and interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Quick, C M; Stewart, R H; Drake, R E; Cox, C S; Laine, G A

    2008-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, interstitial fluid volume is tightly regulated by balancing microvascular filtration and lymphatic return to the central venous circulation. Even though microvascular filtration and lymphatic return are governed by conservation of mass, their interaction can result in exceedingly complex behavior. Without making simplifying assumptions, investigators must solve the fluid balance equations numerically, which limits the generality of the results. We thus made critical simplifying assumptions to develop a simple solution to the standard fluid balance equations that is expressed as an algebraic formula. Using a classical approach to describe systems with negative feedback, we formulated our solution as a "gain" relating the change in interstitial fluid volume to a change in effective microvascular driving pressure. The resulting "edemagenic gain" is a function of microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)), effective lymphatic resistance (R(L)), and interstitial compliance (C). This formulation suggests two types of gain: "multivariate" dependent on C, R(L), and K(f), and "compliance-dominated" approximately equal to C. The latter forms a basis of a novel method to estimate C without measuring interstitial fluid pressure. Data from ovine experiments illustrate how edemagenic gain is altered with pulmonary edema induced by venous hypertension, histamine, and endotoxin. Reformulation of the classical equations governing fluid balance in terms of edemagenic gain thus yields new insight into the factors affecting an organ's susceptibility to edema. PMID:18056984

  12. After an exposure to sharps or body fluids

    MedlinePlus

    ... htm After an exposure to sharps or body fluids To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Being exposed to sharps (needles) or body fluids means that another person's blood or other body ...

  13. Soluble HLA in human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Aultman, D; Adamashvili, I; Yaturu, K; Langford, M; Gelder, F; Gautreaux, M; Ghali, G E; McDonald, J

    1999-03-01

    There is a growing body of information about the soluble forms of HLA in serum but there are only a few reports discussing sHLA in other body fluids. We quantitated sHLA-I and sHLA-II concentrations in sweat, saliva and tear samples from five normal individuals with known HLA-phenotypes. We also studied sweat samples from an additional 12 normal nonphenotyped subjects, as well as in CSF of 20 subjects with different illnesses, using solid phase enzyme linked immunoassay. Sweat, saliva and tears from normal subjects were found to contain very low or nondetectable amounts of sHLA-I. In contrast, sHLA-II molecules were found in each of these body fluids, although, with considerable variation between individuals. The presence of sHLA-II in saliva was further confirmed by Western-blotting. It was observed that sHLA-II having molecular mass of 43,900 and 18,100 daltons was comparable with that found in serum from normal individuals. In addition, no association of sHLA-II levels with allospecificities in either body fluid or in serum was apparent. The results of CSF sHLA concentrations in different diseases were as follows: (1) High CSF SHLA-I levels were measured during viral encephylitis (n = 3), while none of these patients contained sHLA-II in CSF; (2) The levels of sHLA-II, but not sHLA-I were elevated in CSF of patients during seizure (n = 6) and of patients with neonatal hepatitis (1 of 2) or with connective tissue disease accompanied with viral infection (n = 2); (3) No CSF sHLA-I or sHLA-II could be detected at polyneuropathy (n = 2), or in patients with syphilis (n = 3), or leukemia (n = 2) with evidence of neurologic involvement of central nervous system. Taken together, it may be concluded that the presence of sHLA in several body fluids is physiologically normal. It appears that sHLA-II is the predominant class of HLA molecules present in different body fluids. We propose that the system responsible for sHLA-II production in various body fluids must involve

  14. Wakes of Maneuvering Bodies in Stratified Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Fernando, H. J.

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of experimental/theoretical studies on large momentum eddies generated in late wakes of unsteady moving self-propelled bodies in stratified fluids. The experiments were conducted with scaled submarine model at high Reynolds numbers (50,000), corresponding to the fully turbulent flow regime. Dye visualization and PIV were used for flow diagnostics. When a self-propelled body makes a maneuver, e.g. accelerates, it imparts net momentum on the surrounding fluid. We show that in a stratified fluid this leads to impulsive momentum wakes with large, long-lived coherent vortices in the late flows, which may be used as a signature for identification of submarine wakes in oceanic thermocline. First, we consider dynamics and properties of such wakes in a linearly stratified fluid and present a model that permits to predict the main flow characteristics. Second, we consider wakes in a two layer stratified fluid (analog of the upper ocean) and show that such wakes may penetrate to the water surface; we present a model for this phenomenon and propose criteria for the penetration of wake signatures to the water surface in terms of main governing parameters (signature contrast versus confinement number). Finally, we consider the evolution of such momentum wake eddies in the field of decaying background turbulence, which mimics the oceanic thermocline, and show that for the flow configuration studied the contrast number remains sufficiently large and detectable wake imprints survive for a long period of time. Some pertinent estimates for submarines cruising in the upper ocean are also given. For more details see [1-3]. This study was supported by grant from the Office of Naval Research. 1. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S., Smirnov S.A. & Morrison R.J. 2006. On surface signatures generated by submersed momentum sources. Phys. Fluids, under revision. 2. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S. & Morrison R.J. 2006. Dipolar eddies in a stratified turbulent flow. J. Fluid

  15. Solute partial molal volumes in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.; Ziger, D.H.; Johnston, K.P.; Kim, S.

    1986-06-05

    A novel technique is described for the measurement of the partial molal volume at infinite dilution of solutes in supercritical fluids. Results are reported for five systems from 2/sup 0/C above the solvent critical temperature up to 15/sup 0/C above, at pressures from just above the critical pressure to 350 bars. The solute partial molal volumes are small and positive at high pressures, but very large and negative in the highly compressible near-critical region. The results are interpreted in terms of solvent structure and intermolecular forces.

  16. Passenger fluid volumes measured before and after a prolonged commercial jet flight.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.; Carpentier, W. R.; Driscoll, T. B.; Lapinta, C. K.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Interstitial and intracellular fluid volumes were calculated from measured plasma volume, extracellular volume and total body water of six subjects before and after a 24-hour commercial overseas flight. No change occurred in these spaces or in peripheral hematocrit or total serum protein concentration. The subjective feeling of dehydration and the actual swelling of the lower extremities characteristically found among passengers at the end of a long trip of this type seems to represent a shift in body fluids to the dependent portions of the body rather than water retention or a decrease in the intravascular water volume.

  17. Physiologic mechanisms effecting circulatory and body fluid losses in weightlessness as shown by mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Simanonok, K E; Srinivasan, R S; Charles, J B

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms causing large body water losses in weightlessness are not clear. It has long been considered that a central volume expansion drives the physiologic adaptation to a reduced total blood volume, with normal blood composition eventually regained. However, inflight venous pressure measures suggest that central volume expansion in weightlessness may be very transient, or that considerable cardiovascular adaptation to fluid shifts occurs on the ground while astronauts wait in the semi-supine pre-launch position. If a central volume stimulus does not persist, other mechanisms must drive the adaptation of circulation to a reduced blood volume and account for body fluid losses. Recent results from the SLS-1 mission suggest that body fluid volumes do not simply decline to new equilibria but that they decrease to a low point, then undergo some recovery. Similar "under-shoots" of body fluid volumes have also been shown in computer simulations, providing confidence in the validity of the model. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms which could explain the loss of body fluids in weightlessness and how a cardiovascular preadaptation countermeasure we previously tested ameliorated body fluid losses. It is assumed that the physiology of head down tilt (HDT) provides a reasonably accurate analog of weightless exposure. PMID:11537415

  18. Analysing body condition: mass, volume or density?

    PubMed

    Moya-Laraño, Jordi; Macías-Ordóñez, Rogelio; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Fernández-Montraveta, Carmen

    2008-11-01

    1. Body condition (defined as the relative amount of energy reserves in the body) is an animal trait with strong ecological implications. In some animal taxa (e.g. arthropods), the external volume of the body part in which most nutrients are stored (e.g. abdomen) is used interchangeably with body mass to estimate body condition, making the implicit assumption that abdomen residual volume is a good surrogate of residual mass. However, the degree of correlation between these two measures should largely depend on the density of the nutrients stored. 2. We simulated two food-supplemented experimental groups of animals, each storing a slightly different amount of lipids either in their abdomens or in their entire bodies, and explored (i) how different estimates of condition were able to detect fixed differences between the groups; and (ii) how the amount of lipids stored could affect the outcome of non-intrusive measures of condition on a dichotomous variable (e.g. survival, mating success). We found that density body condition (body mass statistically controlled for structural body size and body volume) has much greater power to detect differences between experimental groups or effects on binary response variables than do classic mass/size or volume/size condition indices. 3. Using data on Lycosa tarantula (L.), a burrowing wolf spider, we report dramatic differences among these three indices in their ability to detect sex differences in the effect of feeding treatment on body condition at maturity. In particular, a plot of residual mass against residual volume reflecting nutrient density suggests that poorly fed spiders are nutritionally unbalanced, since well-fed spiders invest in nutrients of very different density. 4. Furthermore, using data on Scathophaga stercoraria (L.), the yellow dung fly, we found that an index of density condition was better at distinguishing condition differences among three populations than were mass or volume condition estimates alone. 5

  19. [Estimation of normal body volumes in children by the measurement of total electrical impedance (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Peyramond, D; Tholly, F; Bertoye, A

    1980-03-01

    The theoretical fluid volume of 41 normal children (mean age 8 years 9 months) was estimated from anthropometric data: height, weight, wrist circumference, and body surface. The correlation between this method and the conventional methods of determining total body water using tritiated water or of extracellular fluid volume using stable bromide or bromide 82 is very good. The real fluid volumes have been measured using total body electrical impedance at low frequency (Z5 kHz) and high frequency (Z1 MHz). The correlation of these results with those obtained by anthropometry is very satisfactory (r = 0.89; p < 0,001). PMID:7469697

  20. Body fluid identification by integrated analysis of DNA methylation and body fluid-specific microbial DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ajin; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Hwan Young

    2014-01-01

    Identification of body fluids found at crime scenes provides important information that can support a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. Previous studies have reported that DNA methylation analysis at several tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs) enables successful identification of semen, and the detection of certain bacterial DNA can allow for identification of saliva and vaginal fluid. In the present study, a method for detecting bacterial DNA was integrated into a previously reported multiplex methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-polymerase chain reaction. The developed multiplex PCR was modified by the addition of a new semen-specific marker and by including amplicons for the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of saliva- and vaginal fluid-specific bacteria to improve the efficacy to detect a specific type of body fluid. Using the developed multiplex system, semen was distinguishable by unmethylation at the USP49, DACT1, and PFN3 tDMRs and by hypermethylation at L81528, and saliva could be identified by detection of saliva-specific bacteria, Veillonella atypica and/or Streptococcus salivarius. Additionally, vaginal fluid and menstrual blood were differentiated from other body fluids by hypomethylation at the PFN3 tDMR and the presence of vaginal fluid-specific bacteria, Lactobacillus crispatus and/or Lactobacillus gasseri. Because the developed multiplex system uses the same biological source of DNA for individual identification profiling and simultaneously analyses various types of body fluid in one PCR reaction, this method will facilitate more efficient body fluid identification in forensic casework. PMID:24052059

  1. Computational fluid dynamic studies of certain ducted bluff-body flowfields relevant to turbojet combustors. Volume 2: Time-averaged flowfield predictions for a proposed centerbody combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, M. S.; Krishnamurthy, L.

    1986-07-01

    The near-wake region in a ducted bluff-body combustor was investigated by finite-difference computations. The numerical predictions are based upon the time-independent, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the k-epsilon turbulence model. The steady-state calculations address both nonreacting and reacting flowfields in a novel configuration to more realistically simulate some of the essential features of the primary zone of a gas turbine combustion chamber. This configuration is characterized by turbulent mixing and combustion in the recirculating near-wake region downstream of an axisymmetric bluff body due to two annular air streams--an outer swirl-free flow and an inner swirling flow--and a central fuel jet. The latter contains propane for reacting flows and carbon dioxide for nonreacting flows. In view of the large number of geometrical and flow parameters involved, the reported results are concerned with only a limited parametric examination with the major emphasis being on nonreacting flows. Questions addressed for a particular set of geometric parameters include the effects of variation of mass flow rates in all three streams and the influence of swirl in the middle stream. Reacting computations investigate the influence of swirl on combustion, as well as that of combustion on the flowfield.

  2. Computer simulation of preflight blood volume reduction as a countermeasure to fluid shifts in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R.; Charles, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Fluid shifts in weightlessness may cause a central volume expansion, activating reflexes to reduce the blood volume. Computer simulation was used to test the hypothesis that preadaptation of the blood volume prior to exposure to weightlessness could counteract the central volume expansion due to fluid shifts and thereby attenuate the circulatory and renal responses resulting in large losses of fluid from body water compartments. The Guyton Model of Fluid, Electrolyte, and Circulatory Regulation was modified to simulate the six degree head down tilt that is frequently use as an experimental analog of weightlessness in bedrest studies. Simulation results show that preadaptation of the blood volume by a procedure resembling a blood donation immediately before head down bedrest is beneficial in damping the physiologic responses to fluid shifts and reducing body fluid losses. After ten hours of head down tilt, blood volume after preadaptation is higher than control for 20 to 30 days of bedrest. Preadaptation also produces potentially beneficial higher extracellular volume and total body water for 20 to 30 days of bedrest.

  3. Body fluid biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huan; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2015-04-01

    A heterogeneous and slowly progressive disease with extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits and intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau protein aggregates, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is already a hard nut to crack, featured with cognitive decline and memory lapse. Body fluid biomarkers are proved to be useful in exploring further study of AD, might benefit for a full comprehension of the etiopathogenesis, an improved precision of the prognosis and diagnosis, and a positive response of treatments. The cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers Aβ, total tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau reflect the main pathologic changes of AD. We also review data from several novel biomarkers, such as, β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, soluble amyloid precursor proteins α and β, soluble Aβ oligomers and so on, which are associated with the occurrence and deterioration of this disease and couldn't be ignored. The rationale for the clinical use of those biomarkers, the challenges faced with and the properties of the most appropriate biomarkers are also summarized in the paper. We aim to find several ideal biomarkers to improve the diagnosis and optimize the treatment respectively. PMID:25992369

  4. Unified method for serial study of body fluid compartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spears, C. P.; Hyatt, K. H.; Vogel, J. M.; Langfitt, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Methods for the simultaneous determination of equilibrium space of I-125/RISA(radio-iodinated serum albumin) (plasma volume), Cr-51 red cell mass, Br-82 space (extracellular fluid volume), and tritiated water space (total body water) are described. Determinations were made on two occasions separated by a 1 week interval in 43 healthy young men who were on a strict metabolic diet. Hourly samples were taken for 6 hours after injection of the radionuclides. Correlation of these values to the inscribed exponential disappearance curve was high. In 15 subjects, earlier and more-frequent sampling led to no improvement in the accuracy of estimation of the I-125/RISA space. Use of this method gave results in 12 subjects for Br-82 space and in 11 subjects for tritiated water space which were not significantly different from those obtained by correction for urine loss.

  5. System and Method for Wirelessly Determining Fluid Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and method are provided for determining the volume of a fluid in container. Sensors are positioned at distinct locations in a container of a fluid. Each sensor is sensitive to an interface defined by the top surface of the fluid. Interfaces associated with at least three of the sensors are determined and used to find the volume of the fluid in the container in a geometric process.

  6. Molecular Graphics of Convex Body Fluids.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Adrian T; Meyer, Timm; Germano, Guido

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained modeling of molecular fluids is often based on nonspherical convex rigid bodies like ellipsoids or spherocylinders representing rodlike or platelike molecules or groups of atoms, with site-site interaction potentials depending both on the distance among the particles and the relative orientation. In this category of potentials, the Gay-Berne family has been studied most extensively. However, conventional molecular graphics programs are not designed to visualize such objects. Usually the basic units are atoms displayed as spheres or as vertices in a graph. Atomic aggregates can be highlighted through an increasing amount of stylized representations, e.g., Richardson ribbon diagrams for the secondary structure of proteins, Connolly molecular surfaces, density maps, etc., but ellipsoids and spherocylinders are generally missing, especially as elementary simulation units. We fill this gap providing and discussing a customized OpenGL-based program for the interactive, rendered representation of large ensembles of convex bodies, useful especially in liquid crystal research. We pay particular attention to the performance issues for typical system sizes in this field. The code is distributed as open source. PMID:26620787

  7. Constitutive secretion of soluble interleukin-2 receptor by human T cell lymphoma xenografted into SCID mice. Correlation of tumor volume with concentration of tumor-derived soluble interleukin-2 receptor in body fluids of the host mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, M. A.; Sioutos, N.; Tuttle, M.; Butmarc, J. R.; Kaplan, W. D.; Kadin, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    sIL-2R in patients with lymphoid tumors. In addition, our data further support monitoring sIL-2R concentration in body fluids as a sensitive method to detect change in tumor volume in such patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8178932

  8. Body Fluid Identification Using mRNA Profiling.

    PubMed

    Roeder, Amy D; Haas, Cordula

    2016-01-01

    RNA analysis is a valuable tool for the identification of the forensically relevant body fluids, saliva, blood, menstrual blood, cervicovaginal fluid, and semen. Multiple human mRNA and bacterial RNA markers have been identified for each of these body fluids. RNA and DNA can be coextracted from the same portion of a sample and RNA markers for different body fluids can be multiplexed in a single PCR, thereby maximizing the number of analyses that can be performed with limited sample material. PMID:27259728

  9. Development of a prototype fluid volume measurement system. [for urine volume measurement on space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, H. F.; Sabin, C. M.; Meckel, P. T.

    1974-01-01

    The research is reported in applying the axial fluid temperature differential flowmeter to a urine volume measurement system for space missions. The fluid volume measurement system is described along with the prototype equipment package. Flowmeter calibration, electronic signal processing, and typical void volume measurements are also described.

  10. On the motion of a heavy rigid body in an ideal fluid with circulation.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Alexey V; Mamaev, Ivan S

    2006-03-01

    We consider Chaplygin's equations [Izd. Akad. Nauk SSSR 3, 3 (1933)] describing the planar motion of a rigid body in an unbounded volume of an ideal fluid while circulation around the body is not zero. Hamiltonian structures and new integrable cases are revealed; certain remarkable partial solutions are found and their stability is examined. The nonintegrability of the system describing the motion of a body in the field of gravity is proved and the chaotic behavior of the system is illustrated. PMID:16599749

  11. Standard biobanking conditions prevent evaporation of body fluid samples.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Eline A J; Koel-Simmelink, Marleen J A; Durieux-Lu, Sisi; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Teunissen, Charlotte E

    2015-03-10

    Pre-analytical variation in biobanking procedures, e.g., long-term storage, could confound biomarker outcomes. We investigated evaporation in various body fluids at different storage temperatures and storage durations. Biobank sample tubes (Sarstedt 72.694.007) filled with water in different volumes (50, 100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250, 1500μl) were stored at different temperatures (-80°C, -20°C, 4°C, room temperature (RT)) for 4.5years and weighed at regular intervals. Next, saliva, serum, plasma, and CSF were stored in different volumes (50, 250, 500, 1000μl) at different temperatures (-80°C, -20°C, 4°C, RT) for 2years. An extra set of CSF was stored in tubes with safe-lock cap (Eppendorf 0030 120.086) instead of a screw cap with o-ring. No evaporation of water stored in biobanking tubes at -80°C or -20°C occurred over 4.5years. Storage of saliva, serum, plasma, and CSF at -80°C or -20°C, monitored over 2years, protected these samples from evaporation too. At 4°C, evaporation was minor, approximately 1.5% (50μl) or 0% (1ml) yearly, where at RT it ranged from 38% (50μl) to 2% (1ml). Differences were observed neither between different body fluids, nor between tube caps. Our data provide support for long-term biobanking conform current biobanking guidelines, encouraging retrospective use of clinical cohorts. PMID:25661086

  12. Sonographic estimation of pleural fluid volume in dogs.

    PubMed

    Newitt, Anna L M; Cripps, Peter J; Shimali, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find an ultrasonographic method to estimate pleural fluid volume in dogs. Nine canine cadavers of mixed breed were studied. Using a transsternal view, linear measurements from the pleural surface of the midline of the sternebra at the center of the heart to the furthest ventrolateral point of both right and left lung edges were recorded. Isotonic saline was injected using ultrasound guidance into both right and left pleural spaces and the measurements were repeated using standard increments until 1000 ml total volume was reached. No relationship was identified between mean distance and injected volume up to 100 ml. Thereafter, the mean distance increased in an approximately linear relationship with the cube root of fluid volume. There was a high correlation (r > or = 0.899) between the ultrasonographic measurement and fluid volume within individual dogs, but it was not possible to produce a useful equation to calculate absolute pleural fluid volume for new subjects. Nevertheless, ultrasonography may be used to semiquantitatively monitor pleural fluid volume, so that a decrease in the mean linear measurement obtained reflects a decrease in the total fluid volume. PMID:19241761

  13. Dissolvable bridges for manipulating fluid volumes in paper networks

    PubMed Central

    Houghtaling, Jared; Liang, Tinny; Thiessen, Gregory; Fu, Elain

    2013-01-01

    A capability that is key to increasing the performance of paper microfluidic devices is control of fluid transport in the devices. We present dissolvable bridges as a novel method of manipulating fluid volumes within paper-based devices. We demonstrate and characterize the operation of the bridges, including tunability of the volumes passed from 10 to 80 μL using parameters such as geometry and composition. We further demonstrate the utility of dissolvable bridges in the important context of automated delivery of different volumes of a fluid from a common source to multiple locations in a device for simple device loading and activation. PMID:24228812

  14. Noninvasive estimation of fluid shifts between body compartments by measurement of bioelectric characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip A.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research has established that bioelectrical characteristics of the human body reflect fluid status to some extent. It has been previously assumed that changes in electrical resistance (R) and reactance (X) are associated with changes in total body water (TBW). The purpose of the present pilot investigation was to assess the correspondence between body R and X and changes in estimated TBW and plasma volume during a period of bedrest (simulated weightlessness). R and X were measured pre-, during, and post- a 13 day bedrest status. Although a clear relationship was not elucidated, evidence was found suggesting that R and X reflect plasma volume rather than TBW. Indirect evidence provided by previous studies which investigated other aspects of the electrical/fluid relationship, also suggests the independence of TBW and electrical properties. With further research, a bioelectrical technique for noninvasively tracking fluid changes consequent to space flight may be developed.

  15. Effects of isotonic fluid load on plasma water and extracellular fluid volumes in the rat.

    PubMed

    Larsson, M; Ware, J

    1983-01-01

    An isotonic fluid load was given to rats by infusing 12 ml saline i.v. in 60 min. The plasma water and extracellular fluid volumes of the whole animal and selected tissues were subsequently studied with 125I human serum albumin and 51Cr EDTA. The fluid infused was equivalent to 130% of the plasma water volume. The total extracellular fluid volume increased by 17%, while the total plasma water measured with RIHSA remained unchanged. The regional extracellular fluid volumes increased in the lung (14%), the gastric fundus (15%), large intestine (21%) and skin (28%). The results illustrate the selective distribution of an isotonic fluid overload, those tissues being effected having high compliances. PMID:6617709

  16. A noninvasive method to study regulation of extracellular fluid volume in rats using nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Phillips, Pamela M; Johnstone, Andrew F M

    2016-03-01

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed %fluid, and is a measure of unbound water in the vascular and extracellular spaces. We hypothesized that injecting a bolus of fluid into the peritoneal cavity would lead to an abrupt increase in %fluid and the rate of clearance monitored with TD-NMR would provide a noninvasive assessment of the free water homeostasis in an awake rat. Several strains of laboratory rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 ml/kg isotonic or hypertonic saline and %fluid was monitored repeatedly with a Bruker "Minispec" TD-NMR body composition system. Following isotonic saline, %fluid increased immediately by 0.5% followed by a recovery over ∼6 h. Injecting hypertonic (3 times normal saline) resulted in a significantly greater rise in %fluid and longer recovery. Intraperitoneal and subcutaneous fluid injection led to similar rates of clearance. The Wistar-Kyoto rat strain displayed significantly slower recovery to fluid loads compared with Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley strains. Rats exercised chronically showed significant increases in %fluid, but the rate of clearance of fluid was similar to that of sedentary animals. We conclude that this technique could be used to study vascular and extracellular volume homeostasis noninvasively in rats. PMID:26697983

  17. Fluid volume control during short-term space flight and implications for human performance.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, D E

    2001-09-01

    Space flight exerts substantial effects on fluid volume control in humans. Cardiac distension occurs during the first 1-2 days of space flight relative to supine and especially upright 1g conditions. Plasma volume contraction occurs quickly in microgravity, probably as a result of transcapillary fluid filtration into upper-body interstitial spaces. No natriuresis or diuresis has been observed in microgravity, such that diuresis cannot explain microgravity-induced hypovolemia. Reduction of fluid intake occurs irrespective of space motion sickness and leads to hypovolemia. The fourfold elevation of urinary antidiuretic hormone (ADH) levels on flight day 1 probably results from acceleration exposures and other stresses of launch. Nevertheless, it is fascinating that elevated ADH levels and reduced fluid intake occur simultaneously early in flight. Extracellular fluid volume decreases by 10-15% in microgravity, and intracellular fluid volume appears to increase. Total red blood cell mass decreases by approximately 10% within 1 week in space. Inflight Na(+) and volume excretory responses to saline infusion are approximately half those seen in pre-flight supine conditions. Fluid volume acclimation to microgravity sets the central circulation to homeostatic conditions similar to those found in an upright sitting posture on Earth. Fluid loss in space contributes to reduced exercise performance upon return to 1g, although not necessarily in flight. In-flight exercise training may help prevent microgravity-induced losses of fluid and, therefore, preserve the capacity for upright exercise post-flight. Protection of orthostatic tolerance during space flight probably requires stimulation of orthostatic blood pressure control systems in addition to fluid maintenance or replacement. PMID:11581336

  18. Small acoustically forced symmetric bodies in viscous fluids.

    PubMed

    Nadal, François; Lauga, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The total force exerted on a small rigid body by an acoustic field in a viscous fluid is addressed analytically in the limit where the typical size of the particle is smaller than both the viscous diffusion length scale and the acoustic wavelength. In this low-frequency limit, such a force can be calculated provided the effect of the acoustic steady streaming is negligible. Using the Eulerian linear expansion of Lagrangian hydrodynamic quantities (velocity and pressure), the force on a small solid sphere free to move in an acoustic field is first calculated in the case of progressive and standing waves, and it is compared to past results. The proposed method is then extended to the case of more complex shapes with three planes of symmetry. For a symmetric body oriented with one of its axis along the wave direction, the acoustic force exerted by a progressive wave is affected by the particle shape at leading order. In contrast, for a standing wave (with the same orientation), the force experienced by the particle at leading order is the same as the one experienced by a sphere of same volume and density. PMID:27036245

  19. Volume transport and generalized hydrodynamic equations for monatomic fluids.

    PubMed

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, the effects of volume transport on the generalized hydrodynamic equations for a pure simple fluid are examined from the standpoint of statistical mechanics and, in particular, kinetic theory of fluids. First, we derive the generalized hydrodynamic equations, namely, the constitutive equations for the stress tensor and heat flux for a single-component monatomic fluid, from the generalized Boltzmann equation in the presence of volume transport. Then their linear steady-state solutions are derived and examined with regard to the effects of volume transport on them. The generalized hydrodynamic equations and linear constitutive relations obtained for nonconserved variables make it possible to assess Brenner's proposition [Physica A 349, 11 (2005); Physica A 349, 60 (2005)] for volume transport and attendant mass and volume velocities as well as the effects of volume transport on the Newtonian law of viscosity, compression/dilatation (bulk viscosity) phenomena, and Fourier's law of heat conduction. On the basis of study made, it is concluded that the notion of volume transport is sufficiently significant to retain in irreversible thermodynamics of fluids and fluid mechanics. PMID:19045107

  20. Annual review of fluid mechanics. Volume 19

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, J.L.; Van dyke, M.; Reed, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    The present evaluation of the status of fluid mechanical research gives attention to confined vortices in flow machinery, turbulent secondary flows, upstream blocking and airflow over mountains, critical point concept descriptions of eddying motions and flow patterns, viscoelastic flows through contractions, the theory of solute transport by groundwater, tsunamis, turbulent premixed flame behavior, and viscous fingering in porous media. Also treated are the computation of flows with shocks, the use of spectral methods in fluid dynamics, the dynamics of tornadic thunderstorms, thermocapillary instabilities, the behavior of magnetic fluids, Von Karman swirling flows, the use of isolated eddy models in geophysics, recent developments in rapid distortion theory, and rarefaction waves in liquid and gas-liquid media.

  1. Inactivation of human interferon by body fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesario, T. C.; Mandell, A.; Tilles, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the effects of human feces, bile, saliva, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid on interferon activity. It is shown that crude interferon is inactivated by at least 50% more than with the control medium used, when incubated for 4 hr in vitro in the presence of serum, saliva, or cerebrospinal liquid, and by close to 100% when incubated with stool extract or bile.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid volume measurements in hydrocephalic rats.

    PubMed

    Basati, Sukhraaj; Desai, Bhargav; Alaraj, Ali; Charbel, Fady; Linninger, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Object Experimental data about the evolution of intracranial volume and pressure in cases of hydrocephalus are limited due to the lack of available monitoring techniques. In this study, the authors validate intracranial CSF volume measurements within the lateral ventricle, while simultaneously using impedance sensors and pressure transducers in hydrocephalic animals. Methods A volume sensor was fabricated and connected to a catheter that was used as a shunt to withdraw CSF. In vitro bench-top calibration experiments were created to provide data for the animal experiments and to validate the sensors. To validate the measurement technique in a physiological system, hydrocephalus was induced in weanling rats by kaolin injection into the cisterna magna. At 28 days after induction, the sensor was implanted into the lateral ventricles. After sealing the skull using dental cement, an acute CSF drainage/infusion protocol consisting of 4 sequential phases was performed with a pump. Implant location was confirmed via radiography using intraventricular iohexol contrast administration. Results Controlled CSF shunting in vivo with hydrocephalic rats resulted in precise and accurate sensor measurements (r = 0.98). Shunting resulted in a 17.3% maximum measurement error between measured volume and actual volume as assessed by a Bland-Altman plot. A secondary outcome confirmed that both ventricular volume and intracranial pressure decreased during CSF shunting and increased during infusion. Ventricular enlargement consistent with successful hydrocephalus induction was confirmed using imaging, as well as postmortem. These results indicate that volume monitoring is feasible for clinical cases of hydrocephalus. Conclusions This work marks a departure from traditional shunting systems currently used to treat hydrocephalus. The overall clinical application is to provide alternative monitoring and treatment options for patients. Future work includes development and testing of a chronic

  3. Determination of gas volume trapped in a closed fluid system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. F.; Jolley, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Technique involves extracting known volume of fluid and measuring system before and after extraction, volume of entrapped gas is then computed. Formula derived from ideal gas laws is basis of this method. Technique is applicable to thermodynamic cycles and hydraulic systems.

  4. A volume of fluid method for simulating fluid/fluid interfaces in contact with solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Kondic, Lou

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to model the fluid/solid interaction forces in a direct solver of the Navier-Stokes equations based on the volume of fluid interface tracking method. The key ingredient of the model is the explicit inclusion of the fluid/solid interaction forces into the governing equations. We show that the interaction forces lead to a partial wetting condition and in particular to a natural definition of the equilibrium contact angle. We present two numerical methods to discretize the interaction forces that enter the model; these two approaches differ in complexity and convergence. To validate the computational framework, we consider the application of these models to simulate two-dimensional drops at equilibrium, as well as drop spreading. We demonstrate that the model, by including the underlying physics, captures contact line dynamics for arbitrary contact angles. More generally, the approach permits novel means to study contact lines, as well as a diverse range of phenomena that previously could not be addressed in direct simulations.

  5. Changes in body fluid compartments on re-induction to high altitude and effect of diuretics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Tyagi, A. K.; Bhagat, Maj J. K.; Parshad, R.; Divekar, H. M.

    1988-03-01

    Studies were carried out in 29 healthy young adults in the Indian Army stationed in the plains and posted at an elevation of 3500 m for more than 6 months. After exposure to a low elevation in Delhi (260 m) for 3 weeks they were reinduced to a height of 3500 m. The subjects were divided into three groups, each of which was treated with either placebo or acetazolamide or spironolactone. The drug treatment was started immediately after their landing at high altitude and continued for 2 days only. Total body water, extracellular fluid, intracellular fluid, plasma volume, blood pH, PaO2, PaCO2 and blood viscosity were determined on exposure at Delhi and on re-induction to high altitude. Plasma volume was increased after the descent from high altitude and remained high for up to 21 day's study. This increased plasma volume may have some significance in the pathogenesis of pulmonary oedema. Total body water and intracellular fluid content were increased at 260 m elevation, while extracellular fluid decreased. On re-induction there was a decrease in total body water with no change in the extracellular fluid content.

  6. Lunar Fluid Core and Solid-Body Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2-5] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening has been improving [3,5] and now seems significant. This strengthens the case for a fluid lunar core.

  7. The Effect of Tobacco Smoking on Gingival Crevicular Fluid Volume

    PubMed Central

    Üstün, Kemal; Alptekin, Nilgün Ö.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The negative effects of smoking on periodontal health are well known. But the mechanism is not clear yet. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of smoking on gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) volume. Methods The study included 26 age and gender matched periodontally healthy males. Half of the participants were smokers and the others were non-smokers. After periodontal measures were taken GCF samples were collected from 4 teeth of the subjects. The GCF volume was measured with an electronical device. Results The mean plaque index (PI) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) volumes were significantly lower in non-smokers (P = .019 and P = .027, respectively). The other parameters did not show significant differences. Conclusions Smoking significantly increased GCF volume compared to non-smoking subjects. This may contribute to the negative effects of smoking on periodontal tissues. PMID:19212473

  8. Measurement of net whole-body transcapillary fluid transport and effective vascular compliance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, D. E.; Gaffney, F. A.; Schneider, S. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Net whole-body transcapillary fluid transport (TFT) between the circulation and the interstitial (extravascular) space may be calculated as: IV - deltaPV - UV - IL, where IV=infused or ingested volume (when applicable), deltaPV = change in plasma volume, UV=urine volume, and IL=insensible loss. RESULTS: Infusion of 30 mL/kg isotonic saline over 25 minutes increased supine TFT from a basal capillary reabsorption of -106+/-24 mL/h (mean+/-SE) to a net filtration of 1,229+/-124 mL/h. One hour after infusion, reabsorption of -236+/-102 mL/h was seen, and control reabsorption levels returned by 3 hours. Four hours of 30 mm Hg lower body negative pressure (LBNP) elicited no net TFT, probably because of upper body reabsorptive compensation for lower body capillary filtration. When ingestion of 1 L of isotonic saline accompanied LBNP, filtration of 145+/-10 mL/h occurred. Reabsorption of extravascular fluid into the circulation always followed LBNP. CONCLUSION: Application of this technique could aid understanding of physiologic conditions, experimental interventions, disease states, and therapies that cause or are influenced by fluid shifts between intravascular and interstitial compartments.

  9. Space shuttle inflight and postflight fluid shifts measured by leg volume changes.

    PubMed

    Moore, T P; Thornton, W E

    1987-09-01

    This is a study of the inflight and postflight leg volume changes associated with spaceflight on Space Shuttle missions. The results of this study show an inflight volume loss of 2 L from lower extremities, 1 L from each leg, representing an 11.6% volume change. The vast majority of this change appears to be a shift in body fluids, both intravascular and extravascular. The fluid shift occurs rapidly on Mission Day 1 (MD-1), with it being essentially complete by 6 to 10 h. The regional origin of shift and leg volume change shows a far greater absolute volume (708 ml vs. 318 ml) and percentage (69% vs. 31%) of the total change coming from the thigh as compared to the lower leg. Postflight, the return of fluid to the lower extremities occurs rapidly with the majority of volume return complete within 1.5 h postlanding. At 1 week postflight there is a residual leg volume decrement of 283 ml or 3.2% that is probably due to tissue loss secondary to atrophic deconditioning and weight loss. PMID:3675513

  10. Space Shuttle inflight and postflight fluid shifts measured by leg volume changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas P.; Thornton, William E.

    1987-01-01

    This is a study of the inflight and postflight leg volume changes associated with spaceflight on Space Shuttle missions. The results show an inflight volume loss of 2 l from the lower extremities, 1 l from each leg, representing an 11.6 percent volume change. The vast majority of this change appears to be a shift in body fluids, both intravascular and extravascular. The fluid shift occurs mostly on Mission Day One and is essentially complete by 6 to 10 hr. The regional origin of shift and leg volume changes shows a far greater absolute volume (708 ml vs. 318 ml) and percentage (69 percent vs. 31 percent) of the total change coming from the higher as compared to the lower leg. Postflight, the return of fluid to the lower extremities occurs rapidly with the majority of volume return complete within 1.5 hr postlanding. At 1 week postflight, there is a residual leg volume decrement of 283 ml or 3.2 percent that is probably due to tissue loss secondary to atrophic deconditioning and weight loss.

  11. Stationarity of extremum entropy fluid bodies in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffrin, Joshua Seth

    We consider perfect fluid bodies ("stars'') in general relativity that are axisymmetric, asymptotically flat, and that admit a maximal hypersurface. We show that configurations that extremize the total entropy at fixed ADM mass, ADM angular momentum, and total particle number are stationary with circular flow. For such stars, this establishes that thermodynamic equilibrium implies dynamic equilibrium.

  12. Stationarity of extremum entropy fluid bodies in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffrin, Joshua S.

    2015-09-01

    We consider perfect fluid bodies (‘stars’) in general relativity that are axisymmetric, asymptotically flat, and that admit a maximal hypersurface. We show that configurations that extremize the total entropy at fixed ADM mass, ADM angular momentum, and total particle number are stationary with circular flow. For such stars, this establishes that thermodynamic equilibrium implies dynamic equilibrium.

  13. Capacitance probe for fluid flow and volume measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a microgravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  14. Capacitance Probe for Fluid Flow and Volume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a micro-gravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  15. Modeling surface tension using a ghost fluid technique within a volume of fluid formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, M. M.; Kothe, D. B.; Cummins, S. J.

    2004-01-01

    Ghost fluid methods (GFM) are a viable approach for imposing sharp boundary conditions on interfaces that are arbitrarily embedded within the computational mesh. All GFM to date are formulated with an interface distance function that resides within a level-set (LS) framework. Recently we proposed a technique for reconstructing distance functions from volume fractions. This technique enables the exploitation of GFM within a volume of fluid formulation for modeling an interfacial phenomenon like surface tension. Combining GFM with a volume of fluid (VOF) formulation is attractive because of the VOF method's superior mass conservation and because of the ability of GFM to maintain sharp jump conditions. The continuum surface tension force (CSF) method, however, has the propensity to produce smooth jump. In the following, the combined VOF-GFM and more classical VOF-CSF formulations are compared and contrasted. Static and dynamic numerical results are used to illustrate our findings and support our claims.

  16. Normalizing Oral Fluid Hydrocodone Data Using Calculated Blood Volume.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Oneka T; Morris, Ayodele A; Enders, Jeffrey R; McIntire, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Oral fluid testing to assist in the assessment of treatment adherence for chronic pain patients is attractive for a number of reasons. However, efforts focused on interpreting patient results have been modest when compared to urine drug testing. This work details a retrospective approach developed to transform and normalize oral fluid testing results to provide a historical picture of patient values in this important test fluid. Using this approach, a model was developed using data from 6,800 independent patients who were both prescribed hydrocodone and tested positive (with limitations: reporting cutoff < X < upper limit of quantitation) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Patient demographic data were used to calculate the relevant parameters (e.g., calculated blood volume (CBV)) used in the transformation and normalization of the oral fluid data. The crucial normalizing factor in oral fluids was found to be the CBV which parallels the use of creatinine to normalize drug concentration levels in urine and is consistent with the view that oral fluid samples reflect plasma concentrations of the respective drugs. The resulting near Gaussian distribution is dose independent and as such should be of value to physicians in quickly assessing whether their patient is consistent with this historical population in the broad terms of this model. While this comparison alone is not definitive for adherence with a treatment regimen, together with patient interviews, prescription history and other clinical criteria, it can add an idea of expected patient values from oral fluid testing. PMID:27405365

  17. Amniotic fluid volume and fetal swallowing rate in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoda, S.; Brace, R.A.; Longo, L.D.

    1985-07-01

    To investigate amniotic fluid (AF) dynamics and volume regulatory mechanisms, the authors measured the concentration of radioiodinated (/sup 125/I) serum albumin (RISA), /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cells (Cr-RBC), and /sup 103/Ru-labeled microspheres after injection into the amniotic cavity and determined AF volume and fetal swallowing rate in 22 singleton pregnant sheep. Under normal conditions 2-3 h were required for complete mixing of RISA and Cr-RBC within AF; however, when the fetus was dead only 3-5 h were required. AF volume of 17 sheep on the 5th postoperative day averaged 975 +/- 128 ml by RISA and 986 +/- 130 ml by Cr-RBC. AF volume determined with RISA and Cr-RBC correlated well. In contrast, AF volume measurement with microspheres produced erratic results. The disappearance rate of the labels in 17 ewes on the 5th postoperative day averaged 4.9 +/- 0.7%/h for RISA and 5.5 +/- 0.7 for Cr-RBC, and the calculated rates of fetal swallowing were 935 +/- 78 ml/day by RISA and 1,085 +/- 102 by Cr-RBC. In dead fetuses the disappearance rates were almost zero, suggesting that the labels disappear mainly by swallowing. Absolute volume swallowed and swallowed volume per fetal weight correlated with gestational age. AF volume correlated with fetal weight. Radiolabeled albumin or red blood cells may be used to simultaneously measure amniotic fluid volume and the rate of fetal swallowing. Furthermore it appears that fetal swallowing increases with gestational age.

  18. Three-body interactions in complex fluids: Virial coefficients from simulation finite-size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, Douglas J.; Wilding, Nigel B.

    2014-06-28

    A simulation technique is described for quantifying the contribution of three-body interactions to the thermodynamical properties of coarse-grained representations of complex fluids. The method is based on a new approach for determining virial coefficients from the measured volume-dependent asymptote of a certain structural function. By comparing the third virial coefficient B{sub 3} for a complex fluid with that of an approximate coarse-grained model described by a pair potential, three body effects can be quantified. The strategy is applicable to both Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation. Its utility is illustrated via measurements of three-body effects in models of star polymers and in highly size-asymmetrical colloid-polymer mixtures.

  19. Inclusion of fluid-solid interaction in Volume of Fluid to simulate spreading and dewetting for large contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Kondic, Lou

    2014-11-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) interaction between molecules is of fundamental importance in determining the behavior of three phase systems in fluid mechanics. This interaction gives rise to interfacial energies, and thus the contact angle for a droplet on a solid surface, and additionally leads to instability of very thin liquid films. We develop a hybrid method for including a Lennard-Jones type vdW interaction in a finite volume, Volume of Fluid (VoF) based solver for the full two-phase Navier-Stokes equations. This method includes the full interaction between each fluid phase and the solid substrate via a finite-volume approximation of the vdW body force. Our work is distinguished from conventional VoF based implementations in that the contact angle arises from simulation of the underlying physics, as well as successfully treating vdW induced film rupture. At the same time, it avoids the simplifications of calculations based on disjoining-pressure, where the vdW interaction is included as a pressure jump across the interface which is derived under the assumption of a flat film. This is especially relevant in the simulation of nanoscale film ruptures involving large contact angles, which have been studied recently in the context of bottom-up nanoparticle fabrication. This work is partially supported by the Grants NSF DMS-1320037 and CBET-1235710.

  20. [Determination of body fluid based on analysis of nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Korabečná, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent methodological approaches of molecular genetics allow isolation of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from negligible forensic samples. Analysis of these molecules may be used not only for individual identification based on DNA profiling but also for the detection of origin of the body fluid which (alone or in mixture with other body fluids) forms the examined biological trace. Such an examination can contribute to the evaluation of procedural, technical and tactical value of the trace. Molecular genetic approaches discussed in the review offer new possibilities in comparison with traditional spectrum of chemical, immunological and spectroscopic tests especially with regard to the interpretation of mixtures of biological fluids and to the confirmatory character of the tests. Approaches based on reverse transcription of tissue specific mRNA and their subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragmentation analysis are applicable on samples containing minimal amounts of biological material. Methods for body fluid discrimination based on examination of microRNA in samples provided so far confusing results therefore further development in this field is needed. The examination of tissue specific methylation of nucleotides in selected gene sequences seems to represent a promising enrichment of the methodological spectrum. The detection of DNA sequences of tissue related bacteria has been established and it provides satisfactory results mainly in combination with above mentioned methodological approaches. PMID:26419517

  1. A comprehensive Guyton model analysis of physiologic responses to preadapting the blood volume as a countermeasure to fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Myrick, E. E.; Blomkalns, A. L.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Guyton model of fluid, electrolyte, and circulatory regulation is an extensive mathematical model capable of simulating a variety of experimental conditions. It has been modified for use at NASA to simulate head-down tilt, a frequently used analog of weightlessness. Weightlessness causes a headward shift of body fluids that is believed to expand central blood volume, triggering a series of physiologic responses resulting in large losses of body fluids. We used the modified Guyton model to test the hypothesis that preadaptation of the blood volume before weightless exposure could counteract the central volume expansion caused by fluid shifts, and thereby attenuate the circulatory and renal responses that result in body fluid losses. Simulation results show that circulatory preadaptation, by a procedure resembling blood donation immediately before head-down bedrest, is effective in damping the physiologic responses to fluid shifts and reducing body fluid losses. After 10 hours of head-down tilt, preadaptation also produces higher blood volume, extracellular volume, and total body water for 20 to 30 days of bedrest, compared with non-preadapted control. These results indicate that circulatory preadaptation before current Space Shuttle missions may be beneficial for the maintenance of reentry and postflight orthostatic tolerance in astronauts. This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the simulation results pertaining to changes in relevant physiologic variables produced by blood volume reduction before a prolonged head-down tilt. The objectives were to study and develop the countermeasure theoretically, to aid in planning experimental studies of the countermeasure, and to identify potentially disadvantageous physiologic responses that may be caused by the countermeasure.

  2. Whole body acid-base and fluid-electrolyte balance: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew B

    2013-10-15

    A cellular compartment was added to our previous mathematical model of steady-state acid-base and fluid-electrolyte chemistry to gain further understanding and aid diagnosis of complex disorders involving cellular involvement in critically ill patients. An important hypothesis to be validated was that the thermodynamic, standard free-energy of cellular H(+) and Na(+) pumps remained constant under all conditions. In addition, a hydrostatic-osmotic pressure balance was assumed to describe fluid exchange between plasma and interstitial fluid, including incorporation of compliance curves of vascular and interstitial spaces. The description of the cellular compartment was validated by close comparison of measured and model-predicted cellular pH and electrolyte changes in vitro and in vivo. The new description of plasma-interstitial fluid exchange was validated using measured changes in fluid volumes after isoosmotic and hyperosmotic fluid infusions of NaCl and NaHCO3. The validated model was used to explain the role of cells in the mechanism of saline or dilutional acidosis and acid-base effects of acidic or basic fluid infusions and the acid-base disorder due to potassium depletion. A module was created that would allow users, who do not possess the software, to determine, for free, the results of fluid infusions and urinary losses of water and solutes to the whole body. PMID:23884137

  3. Microfluidic flow switching design using volume of fluid model.

    PubMed

    Chein, Reiyu; Tsai, S H

    2004-03-01

    In this study, a volume of fluid (VOF) model was employed for microfluidic switch design. The VOF model validity in predicting the interface between fluid streams with different viscosities co-flowing in a microchannel was first verified by experimental observation. It was then extended to microfluidic flow switch design. Two specific flow switches, one with a guided fluid to one of five desired outlet ports, and another with a guided fluid flows into one, two, or three outlet ports equally distributed along the outlet channel of a Y-shaped channel. The flow switching was achieved by controlling the flow rate ratios between tested and buffer fluids. The numerical results showed that the VOF model could successfully predict the flow switching phenomena in these flow switches. The numerical results also showed that the flow rate ratio required for flow switching depends on the viscosity ratio between the tested and buffer fluids. The numerical simulation was verified by experimental study and the agreement was good. PMID:15307449

  4. Caffeine, body fluid-electrolyte balance, and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Lawrence E

    2002-06-01

    Recreational enthusiasts and athletes often are advised to abstain from consuming caffeinated beverages (CB). The dual purposes of this review are to (a) critique controlled investigations regarding the effects of caffeine on dehydration and exercise performance, and (b) ascertain whether abstaining from CB is scientifically and physiologically justifiable. The literature indicates that caffeine consumption stimulates a mild diuresis similar to water, but there is no evidence of a fluid-electrolyte imbalance that is detrimental to exercise performance or health. Investigations comparing caffeine (100-680 mg) to water or placebo seldom found a statistical difference in urine volume. In the 10 studies reviewed, consumption of a CB resulted in 0-84% retention of the initial volume ingested, whereas consumption of water resulted in 0-81% retention. Further, tolerance to caffeine reduces the likelihood that a detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalance will occur. The scientific literature suggests that athletes and recreational enthusiasts will not incur detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalances if they consume CB in moderation and eat a typical U.S. diet. Sedentary members of the general public should be a less risk than athletes because their fluid losses via sweating are smaller. PMID:12187618

  5. Cronic effects of vasopressin on fluid volume distribution in conscious dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.C.; Cowley, A.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that acute elevations of arginine vasopressin (AVP) may result in an extravascular to intravascular shift of fluid independent of any change in total body H/sub 2/O (TBW). The present studies examined the chronic influence of elevated AVP on fluid volume distribution in five splenectomized, sodium-deprived conscious dogs. During 4 days of continuous intravenous AVP infusion the computerized average 24-h total body weight was maintained within 110 g of the control value by means of a sensitive servo-controlled scale device. Urine flow and urine osmolality averaged 335 +/- 52 ml/day and 637 +/- 36 mosmol/kg during the preinfusion period and changed to levels averaging 151 +/- 14 and 1377 +/- 121 with elevated AVP. Chromium-51-labeled red cell volume (/sup 51/Cr RBC), plasma volume (Evans blue), TBW (/sup 3/H/sub 2/O), calculated total blood volume (using /sup 51/Cr RBC and Hct), and mean arterial pressure remained unchanged during the AVP infusion period. Plasma protein, sodium, and osmolality also remained unchanged with elevated AVP. The authors conclude from the present studies that AVP has minimal or chronic influence on internal volume redistribution.

  6. Increased digitalis-like activity in human cerebrospinal fluid after expansion of the extracellular fluid volume

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, J.A.; Martin, A.M.; Malave, S.

    1985-08-12

    The present study was designed to determine whether acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume influenced the digitalis-like activity of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), previously described. Human CSF samples, drawn before and 30 minutes after the intravenous infusion of 1 liter of either saline or glucose solutions, were assayed for digitalis-like activity by inhibition of either the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into human erythrocytes or by the activity of a purified Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase. The CSF inhibitory activity on both systems significantly increased after the infusion of sodium solutions but did not change after the infusion of glucose. These results indicate that the digitalis-like factor of human CSF might be involved in the regulation of the extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte content and thereby in some of the physiological responses to sodium loading. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  7. Fluid and salt supplementation effect on body hydration and electrolyte homeostasis during bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Kuznetsov, Nikolai A.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Bed rest (BR) induces significant urinary and blood electrolyte changes, but little is known about the effect of fluid and salt supplements (FSS) on catabolism, hydration and electrolytes. The aim was to measure the effect of FSS on catabolism, body hydration and electrolytes during BR. Studies were done during 7 days of a pre-bed rest period and during 30 days of a rigorous bed rest period. Thirty male athletes aged, 24.6±7.6 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided into three groups: unsupplemented ambulatory control subjects (UACS), unsupplemented bed rested subjects (UBRS) and supplemented bed rested subjects (SBRS). The UBRS and SBRS groups were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 30 days. The SBRS daily took 30 ml water per kg body weight and 0.1 sodium chloride per kg body weight. Plasma sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) levels, urinary Na, K, Ca and Mg excretion, plasma osmolality, plasma protein level, whole blood hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) level increased significantly ( p≤0.05), while plasma volume (PV), body weight, body fat, peak oxygen uptake, food and fluid intake decreased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the UBRS group when compared with the SBRS and UACS groups. In contrast, plasma and urinary electrolytes, osmolality, protein level, whole blood Hct and Hb level decreased significantly ( p≤0.05), while PV, fluid intake, body weight and peak oxygen uptake increased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the SBRS group when compared with the UBRS group. The measured parameters did not change significantly in the UACS group when compared with their baseline control values. The data indicate that FSS stabilizes electrolytes and body hydration during BR, while BR alone induces significant changes in electrolytes and body hydration. We conclude that FSS may be used to prevent catabolism and normalize body hydration status and electrolyte values during BR.

  8. Changes in body fluid compartments during a 28-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Hyatt, Kenneth H.; Davis, John E.; Vogel, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Serial isotope measurements were used to obtain measurements of the body fluid responses of 10 22-29-year-old men during 28 d of simulated microgravity (bed rest). The subjects were maintained on a controlled metabolic diet for 7 d before the study, during 14 d of ambulatory control, 28 d of horizontal bed rest, and 14 d of ambulant recovery. Fluid compartments were measured on control days 1 and 9, bed rest days 2, 14, and 28, and recovery days 7 and 14. By day 2 of bed rest, plasma volume and extracellular volume (ECV) decreased significantly by an average 209 and 533 ml, respectively. Red cell volume and total body water (TBW) decreased more slowly, with average losses of 128 and 1316 ml, respectively, after 28 d of bed rest. Early in the bed rest, TBW loss was mostly from the ECV. Thereafter, the TBW deficit was derived from the intracellular compartment, which decreased an average of 838 ml after 28 d. These results suggest losses from all fluid compartments during bed rest, with no evidence of restoration of ECV after 1-2 weeks.

  9. Balance point characterization of interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Laine, G A; Stewart, R H; Quick, C M

    2009-07-01

    The individual processes involved in interstitial fluid volume and protein regulation (microvascular filtration, lymphatic return, and interstitial storage) are relatively simple, yet their interaction is exceedingly complex. There is a notable lack of a first-order, algebraic formula that relates interstitial fluid pressure and protein to critical parameters commonly used to characterize the movement of interstitial fluid and protein. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to develop a simple, transparent, and general algebraic approach that predicts interstitial fluid pressure (P(i)) and protein concentrations (C(i)) that takes into consideration all three processes. Eight standard equations characterizing fluid and protein flux were solved simultaneously to yield algebraic equations for P(i) and C(i) as functions of parameters characterizing microvascular, interstitial, and lymphatic function. Equilibrium values of P(i) and C(i) arise as balance points from the graphical intersection of transmicrovascular and lymph flows (analogous to Guyton's classical cardiac output-venous return curves). This approach goes beyond describing interstitial fluid balance in terms of conservation of mass by introducing the concept of inflow and outflow resistances. Algebraic solutions demonstrate that P(i) and C(i) result from a ratio of the microvascular filtration coefficient (1/inflow resistance) and effective lymphatic resistance (outflow resistance), and P(i) is unaffected by interstitial compliance. These simple algebraic solutions predict P(i) and C(i) that are consistent with reported measurements. The present work therefore presents a simple, transparent, and general balance point characterization of interstitial fluid balance resulting from the interaction of microvascular, interstitial, and lymphatic function. PMID:19420292

  10. Body fluid status on induction, reinduction and prolonged stay at high altitude of human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Tyagi, A. K.

    1990-06-01

    Studies on adaptation to high altitude (HA) of 3500 m in the Himalayas were conducted in three phases, each including 10 normal and healthy males normally resident at sea-level. Phase I subjects had no previous experience of HA, phase II subjects after 4 6 months at HA were airlifted to sea-level and phase III subjects stayed continuously for 6 months at 3500 m. Body fluid compartments and blood gases were determined in all three groups. Plasma volume was highly elevated in the phase II subjects on reinduction to sea-level from HA. In comparison to phase I subjects, the retention of fluid in extracellular compartment was increased at HA leading to increased susceptibility to high altitude illness. Phase III subjects were hyperhydrated with decreased plasma volume and increased PO2 in comparison to the other two groups.

  11. Bioimpedance spectroscopy for clinical assessment of fluid distribution and body cell mass.

    PubMed

    Earthman, Carrie; Traughber, Diana; Dobratz, Jennifer; Howell, Wanda

    2007-08-01

    Body composition assessment has been used to evaluate clinical interventions in research trials, and has the potential to improve patient care in the clinical setting. Body cell mass (BCM) is an important indicator of nutrition status; however, its measurement in the clinic has been limited. BCM can be estimated by the measurement of intracellular water (ICW). The assessment of extracellular water (ECW) is also important because many clinical populations undergo alterations in fluid distribution, particularly individuals with wasting, those receiving dialysis, and obese individuals. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is a unique bioimpedance approach that differs in underlying basis from the more readily recognized single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (SF-BIA) in that it does not require the use of statistically derived, population-specific prediction equations. It has the potential advantage of not only measuring total body water (TBW), as does SF-BIA, but also offering the unique capacity to differentiate between ECW and ICW and, thus, to provide an estimate of BCM. This literature review was conducted to compare available BIS devices to multiple dilution for measuring fluid compartments or BCM in a number of populations. Variable results regarding the ability of BIS to measure absolute volumes, as well as the observation of wide limits of variation, make BIS problematic for individual assessment in the clinic, particularly in populations with abnormal fluid distribution or body geometry. BIS has been found to be more accurate for measuring changes in fluid volumes or BCM, particularly in post-surgical and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. It is certainly possible that population-specific adjustments may improve the accuracy of BIS for assessing individuals in the clinical setting; however, additional research and development is needed before the method can be accepted for routine clinical use. PMID:17644693

  12. Size heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor in human body fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Pesonen, K.; Viinikka, L.; Koskimies, A.; Banks, A.R.; Nicolson, M.; Perheentupa, J.

    1987-06-29

    The authors measured the concentration of immunoreactive (IR) hEGF in various body fluids by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and evaluated its size heterogeneity by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography combined with RIA or with time-resolved immunofluorometric assay (TR-IFMA). Mean concentration was 80 ng/ml in urine, 65 ng/ml in milk, 50 ng/ml in seminal plasma, 25 ng/ml in armpit sweat, 1 ng/ml in breast sweat, 0.3 ng/ml in third-trimester amniotic fluid, 3 ng/ml in saliva, 1.5 ng/ml in tears and 0.3 ng/ml in gastric juice. All the fluids except armpit sweat and gastric juice contained two to five molecular sizes of IR-hEGF. As well as the 6200-dalton (6.2kDa) hEGF the authors found at least four other different molecular sizes with approximate weights of greater than or equal to300, 150, 70 and 20 kDa. The authentic 6.2kDa form made up >90% of the total IR-hEGF in all except the amniotic fluid where its proportion was 71%, and the seminal plasma where the proportion could not be determined. 18 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  13. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  15. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  18. Theoretical treatment of fluid flow for accelerating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Irvy M. A.; Roohani, Hamed; Forsberg, Karl; Eliasson, Peter; Skews, Beric W.; Nordström, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Most computational fluid dynamics simulations are, at present, performed in a body-fixed frame, for aeronautical purposes. With the advent of sharp manoeuvre, which may lead to transient effects originating in the acceleration of the centre of mass, there is a need to have a consistent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrarily moving frame. These expressions should be in a form that allows terms to be transformed between non-inertial and inertial frames and includes gravity, viscous terms, and linear and angular acceleration. Since no effects of body acceleration appear in the inertial frame Navier-Stokes equations themselves, but only in their boundary conditions, it is useful to investigate acceleration source terms in the non-inertial frame. In this paper, a derivation of the energy equation is provided in addition to the continuity and momentum equations previously published. Relevant dimensionless constants are derived which can be used to obtain an indication of the relative significance of acceleration effects. The necessity for using computational fluid dynamics to capture nonlinear effects remains, and various implementation schemes for accelerating bodies are discussed. This theoretical treatment is intended to provide a foundation for interpretation of aerodynamic effects observed in manoeuvre, particularly for accelerating missiles.

  19. Apparatus for measuring rat body volume: a methodological proposition.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Rodrigo; de Oliveira, Renato Buscariolli; Vaz de Macedo, Denise; Brenzikofer, René

    2007-03-01

    We propose a communicating-vessels system to measure body volume in live rats through water level detection by hydrostatic weighing. The reproducibility, accuracy, linearity, and reliability of this apparatus were evaluated in two tests using previously weighed water or six aluminum cylinders of known volume after proper system calibration. The applicability of this apparatus to measurement of live animals (Wistar rats) was tested in a transversal experiment with five rats, anesthetized and nonanesthetized. We took 18 measurements of the volume under each condition (anesthetized and nonanesthetized), totaling 90 measurements. The addition of water volumes (50-700 ml) produced a regression equation with a slope of 1.0006 +/- 0.0017, intercept of 0.75 +/- 0.81 (R(2) = 0.99999, standard error of estimate = 0.58 ml), and bias of approximately 1 ml. The differences between cylinders of known volumes and volumes calculated by the system were <0.4 ml. Mean volume errors were 0.01-0.07%. Among the live models, the difference between the volumes obtained for anesthetized and nonanesthetized rats was 0.31 +/- 2.34 (SD) ml (n = 90). These data showed that animal movement does not interfere with the volume measured by the proposed apparatus, and neither anesthesia nor fur shaving is needed for this procedure. Nevertheless, some effort should be taken to eliminate air bubbles trapped in the apparatus or the fur. The proposed apparatus for measuring rat body volume is inexpensive and may be useful for a range of scientific purposes. PMID:17082370

  20. Production and delivery of a fluid mixture to an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Bland, Ronald Gene; Foley, Ron Lee; Bloys, James B.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Daniel, John M.; Robinson, Ian M.; Carpenter, Robert B.

    2012-01-24

    The methods described herein generally relate to preparing and delivering a fluid mixture to a confined volume, specifically an annular volume located between two concentrically oriented casing strings within a hydrocarbon fluid producing well. The fluid mixtures disclosed herein are useful in controlling pressure in localized volumes. The fluid mixtures comprise at least one polymerizable monomer and at least one inhibitor. The processes and methods disclosed herein allow the fluid mixture to be stored, shipped and/or injected into localized volumes, for example, an annular volume defined by concentric well casing strings.

  1. Application of Control Volume Analysis to Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Cohen, Benjamin; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is among the most common birth defects and may not be prevented nor cured. Afflicted individuals face serious issues, which at present are too complicated and not well enough understood to treat via systematic therapies. This talk outlines the framework and application of a control volume methodology to clinical Phase Contrast MRI data. Specifically, integral control volume analysis utilizes a fundamental, fluid dynamics methodology to quantify intracranial dynamics within a precise, direct, and physically meaningful framework. A chronically shunted, hydrocephalic patient in need of a revision procedure was used as an in vivo case study. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements within the patient's aqueduct were obtained in four biomedical state and were analyzed using the methods presented in this dissertation. Pressure force estimates were obtained, showing distinct differences in amplitude, phase, and waveform shape for different intracranial states within the same individual. Thoughts on the physiological and diagnostic research and development implications/opportunities will be presented.

  2. Instantaneous stroke volume in man during lower body negative pressure /LBNP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Richards, K. L.; Greene, E. R.; Eldridge, M. W.; Hoekenga, D. E.; Venters, M. D.; Luft, U. C.

    1982-01-01

    Results of an examination of the instantaneous time course of the stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (Q) in response to the onset and release of -50 torr lower body negative pressure (LBNP) are reported. Six male subjects were sealed into a LBNP box up to the iliac crest while being monitored by echocardiograph for centerlamina blood velocity, fluid displacement, stroke volume, heart rate, and leg volume. Particular use was made of pulsed ultrasonic Doppler velocity meters for measuring the blood velocities and flow dynamics. Measurements were made of the subjects continuously beginning from 20 sec prior to and one min after LBNP onset and release. A linear fall in the SV was observed with LBNP at 49% of the baseline value after 33 sec. A 62% drop, the lowest, was detected after 8 min of LBNP. The leg volume was inversely related to Q for the duration of the experiment.

  3. Fluid structure interaction solver coupled with volume of fluid method for two-phase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerroni, D.; Fancellu, L.; Manservisi, S.; Menghini, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose to study the behavior of a solid elastic object that interacts with a multiphase flow. Fluid structure interaction and multiphase problems are of great interest in engineering and science because of many potential applications. The study of this interaction by coupling a fluid structure interaction (FSI) solver with a multiphase problem could open a large range of possibilities in the investigation of realistic problems. We use a FSI solver based on a monolithic approach, while the two-phase interface advection and reconstruction is computed in the framework of a Volume of Fluid method which is one of the more popular algorithms for two-phase flow problems. The coupling between the FSI and VOF algorithm is efficiently handled with the use of MEDMEM libraries implemented in the computational platform Salome. The numerical results of a dam break problem over a deformable solid are reported in order to show the robustness and stability of this numerical approach.

  4. Many-Body Effects on the Thermodynamics of Fluids, Mixtures, and Nanoconfined Fluids.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2015-11-10

    Using expanded Wang-Landau simulations, we show that taking into account the many-body interactions results in sharp changes in the grand-canonical partition functions of single-component systems, binary mixtures, and nanoconfined fluids. The many-body contribution, modeled with a 3-body Axilrod-Teller-Muto term, results in shifts toward higher chemical potentials of the phase transitions from low-density phases to high-density phases and accounts for deviations of more than, e.g., 20% of the value of the partition function for a single-component liquid. Using the statistical mechanics formalism, we analyze how this contribution has a strong impact on some properties (e.g., pressure, coexisting densities, and enthalpy) and a moderate impact on others (e.g., Gibbs or Helmholtz free energies). We also characterize the effect of the 3-body terms on adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamic properties, thereby providing a full picture of the effect of the 3-body contribution on the thermodynamics of nanoconfined fluids. PMID:26574329

  5. Cardiovascular and Body Fluid Adjustments During Bed Rest and Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Although a few scientific bed rest (BR) studies were conducted soon after World War II, advent of the space program provided impetus for utilizing prolonged (days-months) BR, which employed the horizontal or 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) body positions, to simulate responses of healthy people to microgravity. Shorter (hours) HDT protocols were used to study initial mechanisms of the acclimation-deconditioning (reduction of physical fitness) syndromes. Of the major physiological factors modified during BR, reduced force on bones, ligaments, and muscles, and greatly reduced hydrostatic pressure within the cardiovascular system, the latter: which involves shifts of blood from the lower extremities into the upper body, increase in central venous pressure, and diuresis, appears to be the initial stimulus for acclimation. Increase in central venous pressure occurs in subjects during weightless parabolic flight, but not in astronauts early during orbital flight. But significant reduction in total body water (hypohydration) and plasma volume (hypovolemia) occurs in subjects during both BR and microgravity. Response of interstitial fluid volume is not as clear, It has been reported to increase during BR, and it may have increased in Skylab II and IV astronauts. Reduction of total body water, and greater proportional reduction of extracellular volume, indicates increased cellular volume which may contribute to inflight cephalic edema. Cerebral pressure abates after a few days of HDT, but not during flight. accompanied by normal (eugravity) blood constituent concentrations suggesting some degree of acclimation had occurred. But during reentry, with moderately increased +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration and gravitational force, the microgravity "euhydration" becomes functional progressive dehydration contributing to the general reentry syndrome (GRS) which, upon landing the Shuttle, can and often results in gastrointestinal distress, disorientation, vertigo, fatigue, and

  6. Hippocampal volume predicts fluid intelligence in musically trained people.

    PubMed

    Oechslin, Mathias S; Descloux, Céline; Croquelois, Alexandre; Chanal, Julien; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Lazeyras, François; James, Clara E

    2013-07-01

    Recently, age-related hippocampal (HP) volume loss could be associated with a decrease in general fluid intelligence (gF). In the present study we investigated whether and how extensive musical training modulates human HP volume and gF performance. Previously, some studies demonstrated positive effects of musical training on higher cognitive functions such as learning and memory, associated with neural adaptations beyond the auditory domain. In order to detect possible associations between musical training and gF, we bilaterally segmented the HP formation and assessed the individual gF performance of people with different levels of musical expertise. Multiple regression analyses revealed that HP volume predicts gF in musicians but not in nonmusicians; in particular, bilaterally enhanced HP volume is associated with increased gF exclusively in musically trained people (amateurs and experts). This result suggests that musical training facilitates the recruitment of cognitive resources, which are essential for gF and linked to HP functioning. Musical training, even at a moderate level of intensity, can thus be considered as a potential strategy to decelerate age-related effects of cognitive decline. PMID:23519979

  7. Many-fluid Onsager density functional theories for orientational ordering in mixtures of anisotropic hard-body fluids.

    PubMed

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George; Varga, Szabolcs

    2008-10-14

    The extension of Onsager's second-virial theory [L. Onsager, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 51, 627 (1949)] for the orientational ordering of hard rods to mixtures of nonspherical hard bodies with finite length-to-breadth ratios is examined using the decoupling approximations of Parsons [Phys. Rev. A 19, 1225 (1979)] and Lee [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 6567 (1987); 89, 7036 (1988)]. Invariably the extension of the Parsons-Lee (PL) theory to mixtures has in the past involved a van der Waals one-fluid treatment in which the properties of the mixture are approximated by those of a reference one-component hard-sphere fluid with an effective diameter which depends on the composition of the mixture and the molecular parameters of the various components; commonly this is achieved by equating the molecular volumes of the effective hard sphere and of the components in the mixture and is referred to as the PL theory of mixtures. It is well known that a one-fluid treatment is not the most appropriate for the description of the thermodynamic properties of isotropic fluids, and inadequacies are often rectified with a many-fluid (MF) theory. Here, we examine MF theories which are developed from the virial theorem and the virial expansion of the Helmholtz free energy of anisotropic fluid mixtures. The use of the decoupling approximation of the pair distribution function at the level of a multicomponent hard-sphere reference system leads to our MF Parsons (MFP) theory of anisotropic mixtures. Alternatively the mapping of the virial coefficients of the hard-body mixtures onto those of equivalent hard-sphere systems leads to our MF Lee (MFL) theory. The description of the isotropic-nematic phase behavior of binary mixtures of hard Gaussian overlap particles is used to assess the adequacy of the four different theories, namely, the original second-virial theory of Onsager, the usual PL one-fluid theory, and the MF theories based on the Lee (MFL) and Parsons (MFP) approaches. A comparison with the

  8. Fluid-structure interaction of two bodies in an inviscid fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchieu, A. A.; Crowdy, D.; Leonard, A.

    2010-10-01

    The interaction of two arbitrary bodies immersed in a two-dimensional inviscid fluid is investigated. Given the linear and angular velocities of the bodies, the solution of the potential flow problem with zero circulation around both bodies is reduced to the determination of a suitable Laurent series in a conformally mapped domain that satisfies the boundary conditions. The potential flow solution is then used to determine the force and moment acting on each body by using generalized Blasius formulas. The current formulation is applied to two examples. First, the case of two rigid circular cylinders interacting in an unbounded domain is investigated. The forces on two cylinders with prescribed motion (forced-forced) is determined and compared to previous results for validation purposes. We then study the response of a single "free" cylinder due to the prescribed motion of the other cylinder (forced-free). This forced-free situation is used to justify the hydrodynamic benefits of drafting in aquatic locomotion. In the case of two neutrally buoyant circular cylinders, the aft cylinder is capable of attaining a substantial propulsive force that is the same order of magnitude of its inertial forces. Additionally, the coupled interaction of two cylinders given an arbitrary initial condition (free-free) is studied to show the differences of perfect collisions with and without the presence of an inviscid fluid. For a certain range of collision parameters, the fluid acts to deflect the cylinder paths just enough before the collision to drastically affect the long time trajectories of the bodies. In the second example, the flapping of two plates is explored. It is seen that the interactions between each plate can cause a net force and torque at certain instants in time, but for idealized sinusoidal motions in irrotational potential flow, there is no net force and torque acting at the system center.

  9. Pulmonary responses to lower body negative pressure and fluid loading during head-down tilt bedrest.

    PubMed

    Hillebrecht, A; Schulz, H; Meyer, M; Baisch, F; Beck, L; Blomqvist, C G

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity redistributes body fluids with important secondary effects on cardiovascular function. We tested the hypothesis that the fluid shifts also affect pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity was simulated in six male volunteers by a 10-day period of bedrest at 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT). Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and intravenous saline loading superimposed acute changes in fluid distribution on the prolonged effects of HDT. HDT produced relative dehydration and hypovolemia with decreased pulmonary blood flow and diffusing capacity. Before bedrest, pulmonary blood flow decreased by 24% during LBNP and diffusing capacity by 7%, while functional residual capacity increased by 14% (p less than 0.05). Intravenous saline loading caused a 24% increase in pulmonary blood-flow (p less than 0.05). Functional residual capacity decreased by 10% and diffusing capacity by 6% (p less than 0.05). Lung tissue volume did not change significantly. Head-down tilt had only minor effects on the responses to LBNP and saline loading. We conclude that LBNP and intravenous saline loading produce major changes in pulmonary blood-flow and minor effects on pulmonary gas exchange, and that the response to acute changes in fluid distribution is not significantly altered during simulated microgravity. PMID:1509892

  10. Collisions of smooth bodies in viscous fluids: A mathematical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesla, Todd Inman

    Conventional wisdom holds that smoothly bounded rigid bodies cannot collide in an incompressible Newtonian fluid. We consider this proposition from the mathematical point of view. First we consider the ODE which arises from the equation of motion of a circular body ("disk") above a flat horizontal wall in two dimensions when the force is approximated using lubrication theory. If the disk is neutrally buoyant (and "thrown" toward the wall), we find that for large times t its distance h( t) from the wall decreases to a positive limit h min at an exponential rate; that is, ht˜hmin +ae-at. If it is negatively buoyant, then ht˜bt-2 . Lubrication theory thus supports the conventional belief. We then consider the exact system of equations governing the coupled fluid-body motion. For a single disk in a circular container in two dimensions, we show that ht≥ hmin,disk neutrallybuoyant,b t-2,disknegatively buoyant (different hmin and b ), a result we call the no-collision theorem. Thus, rigorous theory essentially shows that the disk cannot approach the wall any faster than predicted by lubrication theory. The proof is based on a combined fluid-body weak equation of motion. When the gap between the converging surfaces is sufficiently narrow, the viscous term dominates the acceleration terms, leading to a differential inequality which can be integrated to obtain the result. Physically this occurs because the Reynolds number based on gap width---the ratio of the acceleration to viscous terms---becomes very small. When there are two or more disks in a circular container, the analogous result can be proved---but only if the boundary of the configuration space has no cusps. This essentially means that no combination of disks can "jam" into a rigid configuration between the container walls. Since this is possible only if the radii of the disks and container satisfy a certain condition, it follows that for "generic" multiple-disk systems, the no-collision theorem can be proved.

  11. Cellwise conservative unsplit advection for the volume of fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-02-01

    We present a cellwise conservative unsplit (CCU) advection scheme for the volume of fluid method (VOF) in 2D. Contrary to other schemes based on explicit calculations of the flux balances, the CCU advection adopts a cellwise approach where the pre-images of the control volumes are traced backwards through the flow map. The donating regions of the fluxes are calculated via the streaklines of the grid intersections, represented as polygonal chains whose vertices are determined by backward tracing of particles injected in the flow at different times. High order accuracy is obtained from the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, where intermediate velocities along pathlines are determined with quadratic temporal and bicubic spatial interpolations. The volumes of the donating regions are corrected in order to fulfill the discrete continuity of incompressible flows. Consequently, the calculation produces non-overlapping donating regions and pre-images with conforming edges to their neighbors, resulting in the conservativeness and the boundedness (liquid volume fraction inside the interval [ 0 , 1 ]) of the CCU advection scheme. Finally, the update of the liquid volume fractions is computed from the intersections of the pre-image polygons with the reconstructed interfaces. The CCU scheme is tested on several benchmark tests for the VOF advection, together with the standard piecewise linear interface calculation (PLIC). The geometrical errors of the CCU compare favorably with other unsplit VOF-PLIC schemes. Finally, potential improvements of the VOF method with the use of more precise interface representation techniques and the future extension of the CCU scheme to 3D are discussed.

  12. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re{sub max}, Re{sub W}, and A{sub R}, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA`s Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  13. Tissue weights and adaptation response of the toad after 96 hours of exposure to simulated high altitude — A body fluid and hematological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, H. M.; Boral, M. C.

    1985-12-01

    Adult male toads were exposed to simulated high altitude of 24,000 feet for 96 hrs of continuous exposure in a decompression chamber. The animals were sacrificed immediately after the exposure period. Significant increase of the weight of the ventricle and spleen is observed in altitude exposed animals. Red blood cell, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit ratio and red cell mass are significantly increased in high altitude exposed animals in comparison to control. MCV (mean corpuscular volume) and MCH (mean corpuscular hemoglobin) are decreased in altitude exposed group. Plasma volume, blood volume, extracellular fluid volume, intracellular fluid volume and total body water are decreased significantly after altitude exposure for 96 hrs. These physiological changes are thought to be due to dehydration of this animal at simulated high altitude and it is highly affected after 96 hrs of exposure as evidenced by the significant reduction of total body water and intracellular fluid volume.

  14. Fluid-loading solutions and plasma volume: Astro-ade and salt tablets with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Seinmann, Laura; Young, Joan A.; Hoskin, Cherylynn N.; Barrows, Linda H.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading with salt and water is a countermeasure used after space flight to restore body fluids. However, gastrointestinal side effects have been frequently reported in persons taking similar quantities of salt and water in ground-based studies. The effectiveness of the Shuttle fluid-loading countermeasure (8 gms salt, 0.97 liters of water) was compared to Astro-ade (an isotonic electrolyte solution), to maintain plasma volume (PV) during 4.5 hrs of resting fluid restriction. Three groups of healthy men (n=6) were studied: a Control Group (no drinking), an Astro-ade Group, and a Salt Tablet Group. Changes in PV after drinking were calculated from hematocrit and hemoglobin values. Both the Salt Tablet and Astro-ade Groups maintained PV at 2-3 hours after ingestion compared to the Control Group, which had a 6 percent decline. Side effects (thirst, stomach cramping, and diarrhea) were noted in at least one subject in both the Astro-ade and Salt Tablet Groups. Nausea and vomiting were reported in one subject in the Salt Tablet Group. It was concluded that Astro-ade may be offered as an alternate fluid-loading countermeasure but further work is needed to develop a solution that is more palatable and has fewer side effects.

  15. Chronic effects of vasopressin on fluid volume distribution in conscious dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.C.; Cowley, A.W. Jr.; Skelton, M.M.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have suggested that acute elevations of vasopressin (AVP) may result in an extravascular to intravascular shift of fluid independent of any change in total body H/sub 2/O (TBW). The present studies examined the chronic influence of elevated AVP on fluid volume distribution in splenectomized, sodium-deprived conscious dogs (18.9 +/- 0.7 kg) (n=5). During 4 days of continuous i.v. AVP infusion (0.36 ng/kg/min) the computerized average 24-hr total body weight was maintained within 110 gm of the control value by means of a sensitive servocontrolled scale device. Urine flow and urine osmolality averaged 335 +/- 52 ml/day and 637 +/- 36 mOsm/kg during the preinfusion period and changed to levels averaging 151 +/- 14 and 1377 +/- 121 with elevated AVP (p < .05). Red cell volume (Cr/sup 51/RBC), plasma volume, TBW (H/sub 2/O), calculated total blood volume (using Cr/sup 51/RBC and Hct) and mean arterial pressure averaged 22 +/- 1 ml/kg, 54 +/- 7 ml/kg, 0.62 +/- 0.04 L/kg, 68 +/- 3 ml/kg and 99 +/- 3 mmHg respectively during the control period and remained unchanged during the AVP infusion period. Plasma protein, Na and osmolality averaged 6.4 +/- 0.1 g/dl, 145.7 +/- 0.8 mEq/L, and 295.0 +/- 1.5 mOsm/kg during the pre-infusion period and also remained unchanged with elevated AVP. They conclude from the present studies that AVP has minimal or no chronic influence on internal volume redistribution.

  16. Computational fluid dynamic studies of certain ducted bluff-body flowfields relevant to turbojet combustors. Volume 1: Time-dependent calculations with the k-epsilon turbulence model for an existing centerbody combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, M. S.; Krishnamurthy, L.

    1986-07-01

    A numerical investigation of the near-wake region in a ducted bluff-body combustor by finite-difference computations is reported. The numerical predictions are based upon the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations and the k-epsilon turbulence model. The standard k-epsilon turbulence model was modified to account for the nonstationary terms. The time-dependent calculations predictions addressed the nonreacting near-wake flow field of the centerbody combustor with only the annular air stream present. Flowfield predictions for a combustor inlet mass flow of 2 kg/s with the time-dependent formulation incorporating the k-epsilon turbulence model show the attainment of a steady-state recirculating flow in the near wake. The slow axial migration of the recirculation vortex towards the exit boundary which was noticed in the earlier time-dependent calculations without a turbulence model is not longer present. Present results have thus eliminated the appearance of reverse flow at the exit boundary with the consequent incompatibility of the boundary conditions, and thereby the spu rious shedding-like behavior observed previously. The steady-state results in the present study demonstrate internal consistency with the time-averaged measurements and predictions for the locations of the vortex center and the centerline rear stagnation point.

  17. Body shaping and volume restoration: the role of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Hedén, Per; Sellman, Gabriella; von Wachenfeldt, Mats; Olenius, Michael; Fagrell, Dan

    2009-05-01

    Driven by the rising popularity of minimally invasive techniques, the demand for cosmetic procedures is increasing. Cosmetic body-shaping procedures can be categorized into those that remove tissue and those that add volume. This review focuses on the latter of these categories, particularly on the use of resorbable hyaluronic acid gels specifically developed for minimally invasive volume enhancement. Pilot studies of hyaluronic acid involving its injection to contour various body deformities and its recent use in female breast augmentation are discussed. Injectable hyaluronic acid is effective and well tolerated. It represents an attractive treatment option for volume restoration or augmentation by providing predictable long-lasting results after minimally invasive administration. Alternative treatment options for volume enhancement also are summarized including fat transfer, silicone implants, and the use of injectable nonresorbable products such as silicone, polyalkylimide, and polyacrylamide gels. As patients continue to opt for nonsurgical procedures that offer predictable results, the development of minimally invasive products such as hyaluronic acid is increasingly important. PMID:19280248

  18. Volume-energy parameters for heat transfer to supercritical fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumakawa, A.; Niino, M.; Hendricks, R. C.; Giarratano, P. J.; Arp, V. D.

    1986-01-01

    Reduced Nusselt numbers of supercritical fluids from different sources were grouped by several volume-energy parameters. A modified bulk expansion parameter was introduced based on a comparative analysis of data scatter. Heat transfer experiments on liquefied methane were conducted under near-critical conditions in order to confirm the usefulness of the parameters. It was experimentally revealed that heat transfer characteristics of near-critical methane are similar to those of hydrogen. It was shown that the modified bulk expansion parameter and the Gibbs-energy parameter grouped the heat transfer data of hydrogen, oxygen and methane including the present data on near-critical methane. It was also indicated that the effects of surface roughness on heat transfer were very important in grouping the data of high Reynolds numbers.

  19. Casimir microsphere diclusters and three-body effects in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, Jaime; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-04-15

    Our previous paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 060401 (2010)] predicted that Casimir forces induced by the material-dispersion properties of certain dielectrics can give rise to stable configurations of objects. This phenomenon was illustrated via a dicluster configuration of nontouching objects consisting of two spheres immersed in a fluid and suspended against gravity above a plate. Here, we examine these predictions from the perspective of a practical experiment and consider the influence of nonadditive, three-body, and nonzero-temperature effects on the stability of the two spheres. We conclude that the presence of Brownian motion reduces the set of experimentally realizable silicon-teflon spherical diclusters to those consisting of layered microspheres, such as the hollow core (spherical shells) considered here.

  20. Improved analysis of malondialdehyde in human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, A M; Bachmann, H; Fürst, P; Biesalski, H K

    1996-01-01

    The widely used TBA assay for lipid peroxidation was modified to minimize artefactual oxidative degradation of lipids during the assay. Formation of the TBA-MDA condensation product was studied with and without exclusion of oxygen, and the concentration effect of BHT addition was examined. Oxygen was depleted from the reaction mixture by extensive argon gassing. Exclusion of oxygen resulted in decreased TBARS production in plasma but not in standard solutions. High BHT concentrations resulted in a similar effect. At concentrations higher than 3 mmol/l BHT exclusion of oxygen had no additional effect. By measuring n-butanol extracts in a multititer plate reader this modified method was made suitable as a preliminary screening assay of human body fluids for lipid peroxidation. PMID:8746446

  1. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  2. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re sub max, Re sub w, and A sub R, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation, and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphics).

  3. Residual gastric fluid volume and chewing gum before surgery.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Renate C; Ponnamma, Chandra M; Freyle, David; Wang, Shu-Ming; Kain, Zeev N

    2006-02-01

    In this study we sought to determine if chewing gum preoperatively increases gastric fluid volume (GFV) and changes gastric acidity. Children, 5-17 yr old, were randomized to one of three groups: a control group that was not given any gum, a group that was given sugarless bubble gum, and a group that was given sugared bubble gum. Patients in the two gum groups were instructed to chew their gum for a period of 30 min. After induction of anesthesia and tracheal intubation, the stomach was suctioned with a salem sump orogastric tube. We found that children who did not chew gum had significantly smaller GFV as compared with children who chewed sugared and sugarless gum (0.35 [0.2-0.5] mL/kg versus 0.88 [0.6-1.4] mL/kg versus 0.69 [0.4-1.6] mL/kg; P = 0.0001). Children who did not chew gum also had a significantly lower gastric fluid pH as compared with children chewing sugared and sugarless gum (geometric mean, 1.91 versus 2.25 versus 2.19; P = 0.007). We conclude that children who present for surgery while chewing gum have significantly larger GFV and higher pH. PMID:16428535

  4. Body fluid biomarkers in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huan; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Jiang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    A heterogeneous and slowly progressive disease with extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits and intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau protein aggregates, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is already a hard nut to crack, featured with cognitive decline and memory lapse. Body fluid biomarkers are proved to be useful in exploring further study of AD, might benefit for a full comprehension of the etiopathogenesis, an improved precision of the prognosis and diagnosis, and a positive response of treatments. The cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers Aβ, total tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau reflect the main pathologic changes of AD. We also review data from several novel biomarkers, such as, β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, soluble amyloid precursor proteins α and β, soluble Aβ oligomers and so on, which are associated with the occurrence and deterioration of this disease and couldn’t be ignored. The rationale for the clinical use of those biomarkers, the challenges faced with and the properties of the most appropriate biomarkers are also summarized in the paper. We aim to find several ideal biomarkers to improve the diagnosis and optimize the treatment respectively. PMID:25992369

  5. Effects of regional hemoconcentration during LBNP on plasma volume determinations. [Lower Body Negative Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Kobayashi, Y.; Venters, M. D.; Luft, U. C.

    1979-01-01

    Blood samples were obtained from forearm vein or artery with indwelling cannula (1) before, (2) during the last min, and (3) about 2 min after lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 16 experiments to determine whether plasma volume (PV) estimates were affected by regional hemoconcentration in the lower body. Total hemoglobin (THb) was estimated with the CO method prior to LBNP. Hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) values from (2) gave only a 3% (87 ml) loss in PV due to LBNP, assuming no change in THb. However, Hb and Hct values from (3) showed an 11% loss in PV (313 ml). This 72% underestimation of PV loss with (2) must have resulted from the sequestration of blood and subsequent hemoconcentration in the lower body during LBNP. The effects of LBNP on PV should be estimated 1-3 min after exposure, after mixing but before extravascular fluid returns to the circulation.

  6. Effect of fluid and salt supplementation on body hydration of athletes during prolonged hypokinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Petrov, Kirill L.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Popov, Vladimir K.; Deogeneov, Viktor A.

    Body hydration decreases significantly during hypokinesia (HK) (diminished movement), but little is known about the effect of fluid and salt supplements (FSS) on body hydration during HK. The aim of this study was to measure the effect of FSS on body hydration during HK. Studies were done during 30 days pre HK period and 364 days HK period. Thirty male athletes aged 24.5±6.6 yr were chosen as subjects. They were equally divided into three groups: unsupplemented ambulatory control subjects (UACS), unsupplemented hypokinetic subjects (UHKS) and supplemented hypokinetic subjects (SHKS). Hypokinetic subjects were limited to an average walking distance of 0.7 km day -1. The SHKS group took daily 30 ml of water/kg body weight and 0.1 g of sodium chloride (NaCl)/kg body weight. Control subjects experienced no changes in their professional training and routine daily activities. Plasma volume (PV), urinary and plasma sodium (Na) and potassium (K), plasma osmolality, plasma protein, whole blood hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct), plasma renin activity (PRA) plasma aldosterone (PA) levels, physical characteristics, food and fluid intakes were measured. Plasma osmolality, plasma protein, urinary and plasma Na and K, whole blood Hct and Hb, PRA and PA levels decreased significantly ( p⩽0.01), while PV and body weight increased significantly ( p⩽0.01) in the SHKS group when compared with the UHKS group and did not change when compared with the UACS group. Plasma osmolality, plasma protein, urinary and plasma Na and K, PRA and PA, whole blood Hb and Hct levels increased significantly ( p⩽0.01), while PV body weight, food and fluid intakes decreased significantly ( p⩽0.01) in UHKS group when compared with the SHKS and UACS groups. The measured parameters did not change in the UACS group when compared with their baseline control values. It was shown that during HK body hydration decreased significantly, while during HK and FSS body hydration increased significantly. It

  7. A finite volume method for fluctuating hydrodynamics of simple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Kiran; Samtaney, Ravi; Moran, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics accounts for stochastic effects that arise at mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. We present a finite volume method for numerical solutions of the fluctuating compressible Navier Stokes equations. Case studies for simple fluids are demonstrated via the use of two different equations of state (EOS) : a perfect gas EOS, and a Lennard-Jones EOS for liquid argon developed by Johnson et al. (Mol. Phys. 1993). We extend the fourth order conservative finite volume scheme originally developed by McCorquodale and Colella (Comm. in App. Math. & Comput. Sci. 2011), to evaluate the deterministic and stochastic fluxes. The expressions for the cell-centered discretizations of the stochastic shear stress and stochastic heat flux are adopted from Espanol, P (Physica A. 1998), where the discretizations were shown to satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. A third order Runge-Kutta scheme with weights proposed by Delong et al. (Phy. Rev. E. 2013) is used for the numerical time integration. Accuracy of the proposed scheme will be demonstrated. Comparisons of the numerical solution against theory for a perfect gas as well as liquid argon will be presented. Regularizations of the stochastic fluxes in the limit of zero mesh sizes will be discussed. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Demonstration of Rigid Bodies in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarena, Ernesto; Vu, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    The Design Analysis Branch (NE-Ml) at the Kennedy Space Center has not had the ability to accurately couple Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). OVERFLOW-D is a flow solver that has been developed by NASA to have the capability to analyze and simulate dynamic motions with up to six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF). Two simulations were prepared over the course of the internship to demonstrate 6DOF motion of rigid bodies under aerodynamic loading. The geometries in the simulations were based on a conceptual Space Launch System (SLS). The first simulation that was prepared and computed was the motion of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) as it separates from its core stage. To reduce computational time during the development of the simulation, only half of the physical domain with respect to the symmetry plane was simulated. Then a full solution was prepared and computed. The second simulation was a model of the SLS as it departs from a launch pad under a 20 knot crosswind. This simulation was reduced to Two Dimensions (2D) to reduce both preparation and computation time. By allowing 2-DOF for translations and 1-DOF for rotation, the simulation predicted unrealistic rotation. The simulation was then constrained to only allow translations.

  9. Relationships between three-body and two-body interactions in fluids and solids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Sadus, Richard J

    2006-10-14

    Molecular dynamics data are reported for two-body and three-body interactions in noble gases at densities covering the gas, liquid, and solid phases. The data indicate that simple relationships exist between three- and two-body interactions in both fluid and solid phases. The relationship for liquids has a simple density dependence with only one external parameter. In contrast, the solid phase relationship depends both on density and on the square of density and requires the evaluation of two parameters. The relationships are tested for both system-size and temperature dependences. The values of the relationship parameters are only sensitive to system size when a small number of atoms are involved. For 500 or more atoms, they remain nearly constant. The relationships are valid for both subcritical and slightly supercritical temperatures. A practical benefit of the relationships is that they enable the use of two-body intermolecular potentials for the prediction of the properties of real systems without the computational expense of three-body calculations. PMID:17042611

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Whole-Body Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh

    1999-01-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics for whole-body aircraft flowfield simulations is described. Recent advances in geometry modeling, surface and volume grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to accurate flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics has emerged as a crucial enabling technology for the design and development of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of transport and fighter aircraft flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future, inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology, and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  11. COMPARISON BETWEEN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING ESTIMATES OF EXTRACRANIAL CEREBROSPINAL FLUID VOLUME AND PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, László Z; Bajzik, Gábor; Garamvölgyi, Rita; Petneházy, Örs; Lassó, András; Abonyi-Tóth, Zsolt; Lőrincz, Borbála; Sótonyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Dosages for myelography procedures in dogs are based on a hypothetical proportional relationship between bodyweight and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume. Anecdotal radiographic evidence and recent studies have challenged the existence of such a defined relationship in dogs. The objectives of this prospective cross-sectional study were to describe CSF volumes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a group of clinically healthy dogs, measure the accuracy of MRI CSF volumes, and compare MRI CSF volumes with dog physical measurements. A sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolution MRI examination of the central nervous system was carried out on 12 healthy, male mongrel dogs, aged between 3 and 5 years with a bodyweight range of 7.5-35.0 kg. The images were processed with image analysis freeware (3D Slicer) in order to calculate the volume of extracranial CSF. Cylindrical phantoms of known volume were included in scans and used to calculate accuracy of MRI volume estimates. The accuracy of MRI volume estimates was 99.8%. Extracranial compartment CSF volumes ranged from 20.21 to 44.06 ml. Overall volume of the extracranial CSF increased linearly with bodyweight, but the proportional volume (ml/bodyweight kilograms) of the extracranial CSF was inversely proportional to bodyweight. Relative ratios of volumes in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions were constant. Findings indicated that the current standard method of using body weight to calculate dosages of myelographic contrast agents in dogs may need to be revised. PMID:26311617

  12. Role for Lower Extremity Interstitial Fluid Volume Changes in the Development of Orthostasis after Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Summers, Richard L.; Martin, David S.; Meck, Janice V.; Coleman, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    vein diameter and stroke volume upon tilting in contrast to the observations made before bed rest (54 vs 23% respectively). Compliance in the calf increased by an average of 36% by day 27 of bedrest. A systems analysis using a computer model of cardiovascular physiology suggests that microgravity induced interstitial volume depletion results in an accentuation of venous blood volume sequestration and is the initiating event in reentry orthostasis. This hypothesis was tested in volunteer subjects using a ground-based spaceflight analog model that simulated the body fluid redistribution induced by microgravity exposure. Measurements of changes in the interstitial spaces and observed responses of the anterior tibial vein with tilt, together with the increase in calf compliance, were consistent with our proposed mechanism for the initiation of postflight orthostasis often seen in astronauts.

  13. Vibrational relaxation in fluids: A many body scattering formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dardi, Peter S.; Cukier, R. I.

    1987-02-01

    We derive an expression for the vibrational energy relaxation rate constant for dilute diatomic molecules in a structureless fluid. Our approach is based on a many-body scattering formalism within the Markov approximation. Using a quantum scattering formalism allows us to formally separate the inelastic part of the problem from the bath dynamics. We assume that the vibrational transition rate is small, and accordingly we treat the inelastic potential as a perturbation. Also, we assume that the translational motion of the diatom and the bath can be treated classically. The separation of the inelastic interaction from the bath dynamics allows the bath motion to be written in terms of a classical time correlation function of the bath density relative to the diatom. The bath, though, evolves under two Hamiltonians; one with the diatom in its initial state and the other with the diatom in its final state. A method is introduced to approximate this time correlation function in terms of single Hamiltonian correlation functions. We discuss the approximations inherent in our method and also those in the independent binary collision (IBC) model.

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B.; Monteith, Rachael; Perry, Elaine K.

    2010-01-01

    More than 750,000 of the UK population suffer from some form of cognitive impairment and dementia. Of these, 5–20% will have Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Clinico-pathological studies have shown that it is the low frequency of DLB clinical core features that makes the DLB diagnosis hardly recognisable during life, and easily misdiagnosed for other forms of dementia. This has an impact on the treatment and long-term care of the affected subjects. Having a biochemical test, based on quantification of a specific DLB biomarker within Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) could be an effective diagnostic method to improve the differential diagnosis. Although some of the investigated DLB CSF biomarkers are well within the clinical criteria for sensitivity and specificity (>90%), they all seem to be confounded by the contradictory data for each of the major groups of biomarkers (α-synuclein, tau and amyloid proteins). However, a combination of CSF measures appear to emerge, that may well be able to differentiate DLB from other dementias: α-synuclein reduction in early DLB, a correlation between CSF α-synuclein and Aβ42 measures (characteristic for DLB only), and t-tau and p-tau181 profile (differentiating AD from DLB). PMID:21048932

  15. Use of sodium dichloroisocyanurate granules for spills of body fluids.

    PubMed

    Coates, D; Wilson, M

    1989-04-01

    The use of chlorine-containing granules for disinfecting body fluid spills has been evaluated by hospital trials and laboratory tests. Hospital trials were carried out by nurses using 'Presept' disinfectant granules according to a protocol. In general they preferred using granules to bleach and, in 50 tests using granules on natural and artificial spills in wards, no organisms were recovered from the floor by contact plates after using the granules. Laboratory tests were carried out on 'Haz-Tab' granules, 'Biospot' disinfectant powder, 'Presept' disinfectant granules, 'Virusorb' absorbent powder and 'Titan' Sanitizer SU 357 using a standardized surface test. Available chlorine levels varied from 57.8% to 1.0% and the performance of products in the surface test varied with the chlorine level present. Granules containing a relatively high level of chlorine have the advantages that spilled material is contained and that a contact time of only 2-3 min is required before the spill can be safely removed. PMID:2567753

  16. Corrosion and tribocorrosion of hafnium in simulated body fluids.

    PubMed

    Rituerto Sin, J; Neville, A; Emami, N

    2014-08-01

    Hafnium is a passive metal with good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, however, little is known about its resistance to wear and corrosion in biological environments. The corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of hafnium and commercially pure (CP) titanium in simulated body fluids were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Cyclic polarization scans and open circuit potential measurements were performed in 0.9% NaCl solution and 25% bovine calf serum solution to assess the effect of organic species on the corrosion behavior of the metal. A pin-on-plate configuration tribometer and a three electrode electrochemical cell were integrated to investigate the tribocorrosion performance of the studied materials. The results showed that hafnium has good corrosion resistance. The corrosion density currents measured in its passive state were lower than those measured in the case of CP titanium; however, it showed a higher tendency to suffer from localized corrosion, which was more acute when imperfections were present on the surface. The electrochemical breakdown of the oxide layer was retarded in the presence of proteins. Tribocorrosion tests showed that hafnium has the ability to quickly repassivate after the oxide layer was damaged; however, it showed higher volumetric loss than CP titanium in equivalent wear-corrosion conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 1157-1164, 2014. PMID:24376175

  17. Fluid Volume Overload and Congestion in Heart Failure: Time to Reconsider Pathophysiology and How Volume Is Assessed.

    PubMed

    Miller, Wayne L

    2016-08-01

    Volume regulation, assessment, and management remain basic issues in patients with heart failure. The discussion presented here is directed at opening a reassessment of the pathophysiology of congestion in congestive heart failure and the methods by which we determine volume overload status. Peer-reviewed historical and contemporary literatures are reviewed. Volume overload and fluid congestion remain primary issues for patients with chronic heart failure. The pathophysiology is complex, and the simple concept of intravascular fluid accumulation is not adequate. The dynamics of interstitial and intravascular fluid compartment interactions and fluid redistribution from venous splanchnic beds to central pulmonary circulation need to be taken into account in strategies of volume management. Clinical bedside evaluations and right heart hemodynamic assessments can alert clinicians of changes in volume status, but only the quantitative measurement of total blood volume can help identify the heterogeneity in plasma volume and red blood cell mass that are features of volume overload in patients with chronic heart failure and help guide individualized, appropriate therapy-not all volume overload is the same. PMID:27436837

  18. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  19. Evaluation of Human Body Fluids for the Diagnosis of Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Because the etiologic agents of these infections are abundant in nature, their isolation from biopsy material or sterile body fluids is needed to document infection. This review evaluates and discusses different human body fluids used to diagnose fungal infections. PMID:23984401

  20. Does temporary socket removal affect residual limb fluid volume of trans-tibial amputees?

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, JE; Hartley, TL; Phillips, RH; Ciol, MA; Hafner, BJ; Allyn, KJ; Harrison, DS

    2015-01-01

    Background Lower-limb prosthesis users typically experience residual limb volume losses over the course of the day that can detrimentally affect socket fit. Objectives To determine if temporarily doffing the prosthesis encouraged residual limb fluid volume recovery and if the recovered fluid was maintained. Study Design Experimental design. Methods Residual limb fluid volume was monitored on sixteen participants in three test sessions each. Participants conducted six cycles of resting/standing/walking. Between the third and fourth cycles, participants sat for 30 minutes with the prosthesis and liner: donned (ON), the prosthesis doffed but the liner donned (LINER), or the prosthesis and liner doffed (OFF). Results Percentage fluid volume gain and retention were greatest for the OFF condition followed by the LINER condition. Participants experienced fluid volume losses for the ON condition. Conclusion Doffing the prosthesis and/or liner during rest improved residual limb fluid volume retention compared with leaving the prosthesis and liner donned. Clinical Relevance Practitioners should advise patients who undergo high daily limb volume losses to consider temporarily doffing their prosthesis. Fluid volume retention during subsequent activity will be highest if both the prosthesis and liner are doffed. PMID:25710944

  1. Detection of pathogenic organisms in food, water, and body fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, William H.; Henley, Michael V.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2002-06-01

    The construction of specific bioluminescent bacteriophage for detection of pathogenic organism can be developed to overcome interferences in complex matrices such as food, water and body fluids. Detection and identification of bacteria often require several days and frequently weeks by standard methods of isolation, growth and biochemical test. Immunoassay detection often requires the expression of the bacterial toxin, which can lead to non-detection of cells that may express the toxin under conditions different from testing protocols. Immunoassays require production of a specific antibody to the agent for detection and interference by contaminants frequently affects results. PCR based detection may be inhibited by substances in complex matrices. Modified methods of the PCR technique, such as magnetic capture-hybridization PCR (MCH-PCR), appear to improve the technique by removing the DNA products away from the inhibitors. However, the techniques required for PCR-based detection are slow and the procedures require skilled personnel working with labile reagents. Our approach is based on transferring bioluminescence (lux) genes into a selected bacteriophage. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that are widespread in nature and often are genus and species specific. This specificity eliminates or reduces false positives in a bacteriophage assay. The phage recognizes a specific receptor molecule on the surface of a susceptible bacterium, attaches and then injects the viral nucleic acid into the cell. The injected viral genome is expressed and then replicated, generating numerous exact copies of the viral genetic material including the lux genes, often resulting in an increase in bioluminescence by several hundred fold.

  2. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry–based body volume measurement for 4-compartment body composition123

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Joseph P; Mulligan, Kathleen; Fan, Bo; Sherman, Jennifer L; Murphy, Elizabeth J; Tai, Viva W; Powers, Cassidy L; Marquez, Lorena; Ruiz-Barros, Viviana

    2012-01-01

    Background: Total body volume (TBV), with the exclusion of internal air voids, is necessary to quantify body composition in Lohman's 4-compartment (4C) model. Objective: This investigation sought to derive a novel, TBV measure with the use of only dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) attenuation values for use in Lohman's 4C body composition model. Design: Pixel-specific masses and volumes were calculated from low- and high-energy attenuation values with the use of first principle conversions of mass attenuation coefficients. Pixel masses and volumes were summed to derive body mass and total body volume. As proof of concept, 11 participants were recruited to have 4C measures taken: DXA, air-displacement plethysmography (ADP), and total body water (TBW). TBV measures with the use of only DXA (DXA-volume) and ADP-volume measures were compared for each participant. To see how body composition estimates were affected by these 2 methods, we used Lohman's 4C model to quantify percentage fat measures for each participant and compared them with conventional DXA measures. Results: DXA-volume and ADP-volume measures were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99) and showed no statistically significant bias. Percentage fat by DXA volume was highly correlated with ADP-volume percentage fat measures and DXA software-reported percentage fat measures (R2 = 0.96 and R2 = 0.98, respectively) but were slightly biased. Conclusions: A novel method to calculate TBV with the use of a clinical DXA system was developed, compared against ADP as proof of principle, and used in Lohman's 4C body composition model. The DXA-volume approach eliminates many of the inherent inaccuracies associated with displacement measures for volume and, if validated in larger groups of participants, would simplify the acquisition of 4C body composition to a single DXA scan and TBW measure. PMID:22134952

  3. The consequences of sudden fluid shifts on body composition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Estimation of body composition as fat-free mass (FFM) is subjected to many variations caused by injury and stress conditions in the intensive care unit (ICU). Body cell mass (BCM), the metabolically active part of FFM, is reported to be more specifically correlated to changes in nutritional status. Bedside estimation of BCM could help to provide more valuable markers of nutritional status and may promote understanding of metabolic consequences of energy deficit in the ICU patients. We aimed to quantify BCM, water compartments and FFM by methods usable at the bedside for evaluating the impact of sudden and massive fluid shifts on body composition in ICU patients. Methods We conducted a prospective experimental study over an 6 month-period in a 18-bed ICU. Body composition of 31 consecutive hemodynamically stable patients requiring acute renal replacement therapy for fluid overload (ultrafiltration ≥5% body weight) was investigated before and after the hemodialysis session. Intra-(ICW) and extracellular (ECW) water volumes were calculated from the raw values of the low- and high-frequency resistances measured by multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance. BCM was assessed by a calculated method recently developed for ICU patients. FFM was derived from BCM and ECW. Results Intradialytic weight loss was 3.8 ± 0.8 kg. Percentage changes of ECW (-7.99 ± 4.60%) and of ICW (-7.63 ± 5.11%) were similar, resulting ECW/ICW ratio constant (1.26 ± 0.20). The fall of FFM (-2.24 ± 1.56 kg, -4.43 ± 2.65%) was less pronounced than the decrease of ECW (P < 0.001) or ICW (P < 0.001). Intradialytic variation of BCM was clinically negligible (-0.38 ± 0.93 kg, -1.56 ± 3.94%) and was significantly less than FFM (P < 0.001). Conclusions BCM estimation is less driven by sudden massive fluid shifts than FMM. Assessment of BCM should be preferred to FFM when severe hydration disturbances are present in ICU patients. PMID

  4. Restricted versus Standard Maintenance Fluid Volume in Management of Transient Tachypnea of Newborn: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dehdashtian, Masoud; Aramesh, Mohammad-Reza; Melekian, Arash; Aletayeb, Mohammad-Hasan; Ghaemmaghami, Anahita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of Transient Tachypnea of Newborn (TTN) is higher in infants born by cesarean section than with  vaginal delivery. Treatment of transient tachypnea of newborn is supportive. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of restricted fluid volume intake on the course of respiratory distress in patients with TTN. Methods: This is a quasi-experimental clinical trial of 83 neonates diagnosed with TTN admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in south west Iran. In this study the effect of restriction of maintenance fluid volume in the course of respiratory distress in newborns with transient tachypnea was assessed. Findings: In the standard fluid volume intake group 18 (42.8%) cases needed nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) and one (2.38%) case mechanical ventilation, and in restricted fluid volume intake group 13 (32.5%) cases needed NCPAP and two (5%) cases mechanical ventilation. 54.82% of cases were supported with oxyhood in the standard fluid volume and 62.5% in the restricted fluid volume intake group. Differences in duration of the needed NCPAP and oxygen hood between the two groups were significant. Fluid restriction had no adverse effect on the urine specific gravity or weight loss of the studied newborns. Conclusion: Limited fluid administered to newborns with transient tachypnea of newborn is safe and resulted in shorter duration of respiratory support. PMID:25793064

  5. Preliminary investigation of residual-limb fluid volume changes within one day

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Joan E.; Allyn, Katheryn J.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Myers, Timothy R.; Ciol, Marcia A.; Tsai, Elaine C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate rates of residual limb fluid volume change within a day on people with transtibial limb loss. Rates of fluid volume change during 30-minute test sessions of sitting, standing, and walking activities were measured twice a day on twelve regular prosthesis users, once in the morning and once in the afternoon, using bioimpedance analysis. Between test sessions all subjects consumed food and drink, and subject activity ranged from low to high. The rate of fluid volume change within sessions ranged from −8.5%/h to +5.9%/h with a median of −2.3%/h. The rate of fluid volume change between sessions ranged from −2.6%/h to 1.2%/h with a median of −1.0%/h. The between-session rate of fluid volume change was highly correlated with afternoon within-session rates of change (r=0.9) but not well-correlated with morning within-session rates of change (r=0.8). Subjects with peripheral arterial complications showed greater fluid volume loss rates during test sessions than between sessions. Rate of fluid volume change may be affected by sitting, standing, and walking activities; presence of peripheral arterial complications; being a female; time since amputation; and maintaining the socket without doffing for extended periods. PMID:23516051

  6. Body Composition Changes Resulting from Fluid Ingestion and Dehydration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girandola, Robert N.

    1977-01-01

    It is recommended that when obtaining measures of body density by hydrostatic weighing, the subjects normal level of hydration be ascertained, since variance in body fat calculation from the hyperhydrated to the hydrated state can amount to twenty percent (two percent in actual body fat). (MB)

  7. Fluid-Structure Interactions with Flexible and Rigid Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David Jesse

    Fluid structure interactions occur to some extent in nearly every type of fluid flow. Understanding how structures interact with fluids and visa-versa is of vital importance in many engineering applications. The purpose of this research is to explore how fluids interact with flexible and rigid structures. A computational model was used to model the fluid structure interactions of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. The model simulated the coupling of the fluid and solid domains using a fluid-structure interface boundary condition. The fluid domain used a slightly compressible flow solver to allow for the possibility of acoustic coupling with the subglottal geometry and vibration of the vocal fold model. As the subglottis lengthened, the frequency of vibration decreased until a new acoustic mode could form in the subglottis. Synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV) is a three-dimensional particle tracking technique. SAPIV was used to image the jet of air that emerges from vibrating human vocal folds (glottal jet) during phonation. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the glottal jet found faint evidence of flow characteristics seen in previous research, such as axis-switching, but did not have sufficient resolution to detect small features. SAPIV was further applied to reconstruct the smaller flow characteristics of the glottal jet of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. Two- and four-layer synthetic vocal fold models were used to determine how the glottal jet from the synthetic models compared to the glottal jet from excised human vocal folds. The two- and four-layer models clearly exhibited axis-switching which has been seen in other 3D analyses of the glottal jet. Cavitation in a quiescent fluid can break a rigid structure such as a glass bottle. A new cavitation number was derived to include acceleration and pressure head at cavitation onset. A cavitation stick was used to validate the cavitation number by filling it with different depths and hitting

  8. Management of meningitis in children with oral fluid restriction or intravenous fluid at maintenance volumes: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Mokela, David; Frank, Dale; Michael, Audrey; Paulo, Theresa; Mgone, Joyce; Kurubi, Jonah

    2002-06-01

    A multi-centre randomised open trial was done to determine whether moderate oral fluid restriction or intravenous fluid at full maintenance volumes would result in a better outcome for children with bacterial meningitis in Papua New Guinea, and what clinical signs could guide fluid management. Children with clinical signs and cerebrospinal fluid suggestive of bacterial meningitis received either breast milk by nasogastric tube at 60% of normal maintenance volumes (n = 172) or intravenous half-normal saline and 5% dextrose at 100% of normal maintenance volumes (n = 174) for the 1st 48 hrs of treatment. An adverse outcome was death or severe neurological sequelae, and a good outcome was defined as intact survival or survival with at worst mild-to-moderate neurological sequelae. The probability of an adverse outcome was 24.7% in the intravenous group and 33.1% in the oral-restricted group, but the difference was not statistically significant (RR 0.75, 0.53-1.04, p = 0.08). Sunken eyes or reduced skin turgor at presentation were risk factors for an adverse outcome (OR 5.70, 95% CI 2.87-11.29) and were most strongly associated with adverse outcome in the fluid-restricted group. Eyelid oedema during treatment was also a risk factor for an adverse outcome (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.36-4.75) and eyelid oedema was much more common in the intravenous group (26%) than in the restricted group (5%). For many children with bacterial meningitis in less developed countries, moderate fluid restriction is unnecessary and will be harmful; a normal state of hydration should be achieved but over-hydration should be avoided. Giving 100% of normal maintenance fluids, especially with intravenous hypotonic fluid, will lead to oedema in up to one quarter of children with bacterial meningitis. If additional intravenous fluids are required for children with meningitis, an isotonic solution should be used. PMID:12070950

  9. On the identifiability of a rigid body moving in a stationary viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conca, Carlos; Schwindt, Erica L.; Takahashi, Takéo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a geometrical inverse problem associated with a fluid-structure system. More precisely, we consider the interaction between a moving rigid body and a viscous and incompressible fluid. Assuming a low Reynolds regime, the inertial forces can be neglected and, therefore, the fluid motion is modelled by the Stokes system. We first prove the well posedness of the corresponding system. Then we show an identifiability result: with one measure of the Cauchy forces of the fluid on one given part of the boundary and at some positive time, the shape of a convex body and its initial position are identified.

  10. Post-doffing residual limb fluid volume change in people with trans-tibial amputation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Joan E; Harrison, Daniel S; Cagle, John C; Myers, Timothy R; Ciol, Marcia A; Allyn, Katheryn J

    2014-01-01

    Background Residual limb volume may change after doffing, affecting the limb shape measured and used as a starting point for socket design. Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare residual limb fluid volume changes after doffing for different test configurations. Study Design The study was a repeated measures experimental design with three conditions (Sit, Liner, and Walk). Methods Residual limb fluid volume on 30 people with trans-tibial amputation was measured using bioimpedance analysis. Three tests were conducted – Sit: sit for 10 minutes, remove the prosthesis, socks and liner, sit for 10 minutes; Liner: sit for 10 minutes, remove the prosthesis and socks but not the liner, sit for 10 minutes; Walk: conduct sit, stand and walk activities for 30 minutes, remove the prosthesis, socks and liner, sit for 10 minutes. Results The percentage fluid volume increase after doffing was significantly higher for Walk (2.8%) than for Sit (1.8%) (p = 0.03). The time to achieve a maximum or stable fluid volume was shorter for Liner (4.3 min) than for Sit (6.6 min) (p = 0.03). Conclusions Activity before doffing intensified the post-doffing limb fluid volume increase. Maintaining a liner after doffing caused limb fluid volume to stabilize faster than removing the liner. PMID:22588848

  11. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by ionizing radiation in body fluids and serological evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, P.D.; Sarin, P.S.; Humphreys, J.C.; Eubanks, W.G.; Sun, D.; Hocken, D.G.; Thornton, A.; Adams, D.E.; Simic, M.G. )

    1989-11-01

    A method to use ionizing radiation to inactivate HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) in human body fluids was studied in an effort to reduce the risk of accidental infection to forensic science laboratory workers. Experiments conducted indicate that an X-ray absorbed dose of 25 krad was required to completely inactivate HIV. This does not alter forensically important constituents such as enzymes and proteins in body fluids. This method of inactivation of HIV cannot be used on body fluids which will be subjected to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) typing.

  12. The relationships between breast volume, breast dense volume and volumetric breast density with body mass index, body fat mass and ethnicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariyah, N.; Pathy, N. B.; Taib, N. A. M.; Rahmat, K.; Judy, C. W.; Fadzil, F.; Lau, S.; Ng, K. H.

    2016-03-01

    It has been shown that breast density and obesity are related to breast cancer risk. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships of breast volume, breast dense volume and volumetric breast density (VBD) with body mass index (BMI) and body fat mass (BFM) for the three ethnic groups (Chinese, Malay and Indian) in Malaysia. We collected raw digital mammograms from 2450 women acquired on three digital mammography systems. The mammograms were analysed using Volpara software to obtain breast volume, breast dense volume and VBD. Body weight, BMI and BFM of the women were measured using a body composition analyser. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors of increased overall breast volume, breast dense volume and VBD. Indians have highest breast volume and breast dense volume followed by Malays and Chinese. While Chinese are highest in VBD, followed by Malay and Indian. Multivariable analysis showed that increasing BMI and BFM were independent predictors of increased overall breast volume and dense volume. Moreover, BMI and BFM were independently and inversely related to VBD.

  13. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

  14. HOW DOES ADDING AND REMOVING LIQUID FROM SOCKET BLADDERS AFFECT RESIDUAL LIMB FLUID VOLUME?

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, JE; Cagle, JC; Harrison, DS; Myers, TR; Allyn, KJ

    2015-01-01

    Adding and removing liquid from socket bladders is a means for people with limb loss to accommodate residual limb volume change. Nineteen people with trans-tibial amputation using their regular prosthetic socket fitted with fluid bladders on the inside socket surface underwent cycles of bladder liquid addition and removal. In each cycle, subjects sat, stood, and walked for 90s with bladder liquid added and then sat, stood, and walking for 90s again with the bladder liquid removed. The amount of bladder liquid added was increased in each cycle. Bioimpedance analysis was implemented to measure residual limb fluid volume. Results showed that the preferred bladder liquid volume was 16.8 mL (s.d.8.4), corresponding to 1.7% (s.d.0.8%) of the average socket volume between the bioimpedance voltage-sensing electrodes. Limb fluid volume driven out of the residual limb when bladder liquid was added was typically not recovered upon subsequent bladder liquid removal. Fifteen of nineteen subjects experienced a gradual limb fluid volume loss over the test session. Care should be taken when implementing adjustable socket technologies in people with limb amputation. Reducing socket volume may accentuate limb fluid volume loss. PMID:24203546

  15. Modelling of fluid-structure interaction with multiphase viscous flows using an immersed-body method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Xiang, J.; Fang, F.; Pavlidis, D.; Latham, J.-P.; Pain, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    An immersed-body method is developed here to model fluid-structure interaction for multiphase viscous flows. It does this by coupling a finite element multiphase fluid model and a combined finite-discrete element solid model. A coupling term containing the fluid stresses is introduced within a thin shell mesh surrounding the solid surface. The thin shell mesh acts as a numerical delta function in order to help apply the solid-fluid boundary conditions. When used with an advanced interface capturing method, the immersed-body method has the capability to solve problems with fluid-solid interfaces in the presence of multiphase fluid-fluid interfaces. Importantly, the solid-fluid coupling terms are treated implicitly to enable larger time steps to be used. This two-way coupling method has been validated by three numerical test cases: a free falling cylinder in a fluid at rest, elastic membrane and a collapsing column of water moving an initially stationary solid square. A fourth simulation example is of a water-air interface with a floating solid square being moved around by complex hydrodynamic flows including wave breaking. The results show that the immersed-body method is an effective approach for two-way solid-fluid coupling in multiphase viscous flows.

  16. General-relativistic rotation laws in rotating fluid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, Patryk; Malec, Edward

    2015-06-01

    We formulate new general-relativistic extensions of Newtonian rotation laws for self-gravitating stationary fluids. They have been used to rederive, in the first post-Newtonian approximation, the well-known geometric dragging of frames. We derive two other general-relativistic weak-field effects within rotating tori: the recently discovered dynamic antidragging and a new effect that measures the deviation from the Keplerian motion and/or the contribution of the fluids self-gravity. One can use the rotation laws to study the uniqueness and the convergence of the post-Newtonian approximations as well as the existence of the post-Newtonian limits.

  17. Measurement of bone cyst fluid volume using k-means clustering.

    PubMed

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Menten, Renaud; Cartiaux, Olivier; Francq, Bernard; Banse, Xavier

    2009-12-01

    We designed a semiautomatic segmentation method to easily measure the volume of a bone cyst (simple or aneurysmal) from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This method only considers the fluid part of the cyst, even when there are several fluid intensities (fluid-fluid levels) or the cyst is multi-loculated. The nonhomogeneity phenomenon inherent in MRI was handled by a k-means clustering algorithm that classified all of the voxels corresponding to the cyst fluid as the same voxel intensity. Level-set segmentation was expanded into the whole cyst volume and the resulting segmented volume provided the measured cyst volume. The semiautomatic method was compared with the usual manual method (manual contour tracing) in terms of its ability to measure a known volume of water (gold standard) as well as the volume of 29 bone cysts. Both methods were equivalent with regards to the gold standard, but the semiautomatic method was more accurate. In terms of the experimental measurements, the semiautomatic method was more repeatable and reproducible, and less time-consuming and fastidious than the manual method. Our semiautomatic method uses only freeware and can be used routinely whenever measurement of a bone cyst volume is needed. PMID:19553051

  18. Volume and density changes of biological fluids with temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal expansion of human blood, plasma, ultrafiltrate, and erythrocycte concentration at temperatures in the range of 4-48 C is studied. The mechanical oscillator technique which has an accuracy of 1 x 10 to the -5 th g/ml is utilized to measure fluid density. The relationship between thermal expansion, density, and temperature is analyzed. The study reveals that: (1) thermal expansion increases with increasing temperature; (2) the magnitude of the increase declines with increasing temperature; (3) thermal expansion increases with density at temperatures below 40 C; and (4) the thermal expansion of intracellular fluid is greater than that of extracellular fluid in the temperature range of 4-10 C, but it is equal at temperatures greater than or equal to 40 C.

  19. A simple model of fluid flow and electrolyte balance in the body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.; Neal, L.

    1973-01-01

    The model is basically a three-compartment model, the three compartments being the plasma, interstitial fluid and cellular fluid. Sodium, potassium, chloride and urea are the only major solutes considered explicitly. The control of body water and electrolyte distribution is affected via drinking and hormone levels. Basically, the model follows the effect of various oral input water loads on solute and water distribution throughout the body.

  20. Identification of body fluid-specific DNA methylation markers for use in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Lyul; Kwon, Oh-Hyung; Kim, Jong Hwan; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Lee, Han-Chul; Woo, Kwang-Man; Kim, Seon-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Yong Sung

    2014-11-01

    DNA methylation, which occurs at the 5'-position of the cytosine in CpG dinucleotides, has great potential for forensic identification of body fluids, because tissue-specific patterns of DNA methylation have been demonstrated, and DNA is less prone to degradation than proteins or RNA. Previous studies have reported several body fluid-specific DNA methylation markers, but DNA methylation differences are sometimes low in saliva and vaginal secretions. Moreover, specific DNA methylation markers in four types of body fluids (blood, saliva, semen, and vaginal secretions) have not been investigated with genome-wide profiling. Here, we investigated novel DNA methylation markers for identification of body fluids for use in forensic science using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450K bead array, which contains over 450,000 CpG sites. Using methylome data from 16 samples of blood, saliva, semen, and vaginal secretions, we first selected 2986 hypermethylated or hypomethylated regions that were specific for each type of body fluid. We then selected eight CpG sites as novel, forensically relevant DNA methylation markers: cg06379435 and cg08792630 for blood, cg26107890 and cg20691722 for saliva, cg23521140 and cg17610929 for semen, and cg01774894 and cg14991487 for vaginal secretions. These eight selected markers were evaluated in 80 body fluid samples using pyrosequencing, and all showed high sensitivity and specificity for identification of the target body fluid. We suggest that these eight DNA methylation markers may be good candidates for developing an effective molecular assay for identification of body fluids in forensic science. PMID:25128690

  1. Theoretical study of three-body correlations in atomic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sane, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical study of triplet correlations in simple classical fluids has been made from two distinct approaches. In one approach the first order terms in the h-bond expansion for triplet correlations as given by Abe is accurately evauluated numerically for the Lennard-Jones fluid using a technique developed by Barker and Monoghan. Results are otain,ed for a range of fluid densities and comparisons are made to the accurate data obtained through Monte Carlo computer simulations by Raveche, Mountain, and Streett. These comparisons indicate that the first order term is inadequate near and beyond the trip point of the system. In the other approach the description of triplet correlations is discussed in terms of fitting computer generated data to a truncated expansion in orthonormal functions. A novel set of functions that are orthonormal over a finite triangular domain is introduced. The expansion method is illustrated with an application to the rigid sphere model. This second approach could lead to the best method of describing triplet correlations in simple fluids.

  2. Bioassay of body fluids, experiment M073. [biochemical changes caused by space flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Body fluids were assayed in this experiment to demonstrate changes which might have occurred during the 56-day chamber study in fluid and electrolyte balance, in regulation of calcium metabolism, in overall physiological and emotional adaptation to the environment, and in regulation of metabolic processes.

  3. A new model of reaction-driven cracking: fluid volume consumption and tensile failure during serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenbaum-Pikser, J. M.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Kelemen, P. B.; Wilson, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive fluid flow plays an important role in a wide range of geodynamic processes, such as melt migration, formation of hydrous minerals on fault surfaces, and chemical weathering. These processes are governed by the complex coupling between fluid transport, reaction, and solid deformation. Reaction-driven cracking is a potentially critical feedback mechanism, by which volume change associated with chemical reaction drives fracture in the surrounding rock. It has been proposed to play a role in both serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite, motivating consideration of its application to mineral carbon sequestration. Previous studies of reactive cracking have focused on the increase in solid volume, and as such, have considered failure in compression. However, if the consumption of fluid is considered in the overall volume budget, the reaction can be net volume reducing, potentially leading to failure in tension. To explore these problems, we have formulated and solved a 2-D model of coupled porous flow, reaction kinetics, and elastic deformation using the finite element model assembler TerraFERMA (Wilson et al, G3 2013 submitted). The model is applied to the serpentinization of peridotite, which can be reasonably approximated as the transfer of a single reactive component (H2O) between fluid and solid phases, making it a simple test case to explore the process. The behavior of the system is controlled by the competition between the rate of volume consumption by the reaction, and the rate of volume replacement by fluid transport, as characterized by a nondimensional parameter χ, which depends on permeability, reaction rate, and the bulk modulus of the solid. Large values of χ correspond to fast fluid transport relative to reaction rate, resulting in a low stress, volume replacing regime. At smaller values of χ, fluid transport cannot keep up with the reaction, resulting in pore fluid under-pressure and tensile solid stresses. For the range of χ relevant

  4. Messenger RNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification: research and applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Su-hua; Di, Zhou; Zhao, Shu-min; Li, Cheng-tao

    2013-10-01

    Identifying the origin of body fluids left at a crime scene can give a significant insight into crime scene reconstruction by supporting a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. However, the conventional body fluid identification methods are prone to various limitations, such as time consumption, intensive labor, nonparallel manner, varying degrees of sensitivity and limited specificity. Recently, the analysis of cell-specific messenger RNA expression (mRNA profiling) has been proposed to supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification. Since 2011, the collaborative exercises have been organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in order to evaluate the robustness and reproducibility of mRNA profiling for body fluid identification. The major advantages of mRNA profiling, compared to the conventional methods, include higher sensitivity, greater specificity, the ability of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction, and compatibility with current DNA extraction and analysis procedure. In the current review, we provided an overview of the present knowledge and detection methodologies of mRNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification and discussed its possible practical application to forensic casework. PMID:24466779

  5. Genome-wide methylation profiling and a multiplex construction for the identification of body fluids using epigenetic markers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; An, Ja Hyun; Jung, Sang-Eun; Oh, Yu Na; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Ajin; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2015-07-01

    The identification of body fluids found at crime scenes can contribute to solving crimes by providing important insights into crime scene reconstruction. In the present study, body fluid-specific epigenetic marker candidates were identified from genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of 42 body fluid samples including blood, saliva, semen, vaginal fluid and menstrual blood using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. A total of 64 CpG sites were selected as body fluid-specific marker candidates by having more than 20% discrepancy in DNA methylation status between a certain type of body fluid and other types of body fluids and to have methylation or unmethylation pattern only in a particular type of body fluid. From further locus-specific methylation analysis in additional samples, 1 to 3 CpG sites were selected for each body fluid. Then, a multiplex methylation SNaPshot reaction was constructed to analyze methylation status of 8 body fluid-specific CpG sites. The developed multiplex reaction positively identifies blood, saliva, semen and the body fluid which originates from female reproductive organ in one reaction, and produces successful DNA methylation profiles in aged or mixed samples. Although it remains to be investigated whether this approach is more sensitive, more practical than RNA- or peptide-based assays and whether it can be successfully applied to forensic casework, the results of the present study will be useful for the forensic investigators dealing with body fluid samples. PMID:25796047

  6. Numerical Simulation of the Sedimentation of a Tripole-like Body in an Incompressible Viscous Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, L H.; Glowinski, R; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2002-08-01

    In this note, we discuss the application of a methodology combining distributed Lagrange multiplier based fictitious domain techniques, finite-element approximations and operator splitting, to the numerical simulation of the motion of a tripole-like rigid body falling in a Newtonian incompressible viscous fluid. The motion of the body is driven by the hydrodynamical forces and gravity. The numerical simulation shows that the distribution of mass of this rigid body and added moment of inertia compared to a simple cylinder (circular or elliptic) plays a significant role on the particle-fluid interaction. Apparently, for the parameters examined, the action of the moving rigid body on the fluid is stronger than the hydrodynamic forces acting on the rigid body.

  7. Interactions between internal forces, body stiffness, and fluid environment in a neuromechanical model of lamprey swimming

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Eric D.; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Williams, Thelma L.; Cohen, Avis H.; Fauci, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal movements result from a complex balance of many different forces. Muscles produce force to move the body; the body has inertial, elastic, and damping properties that may aid or oppose the muscle force; and the environment produces reaction forces back on the body. The actual motion is an emergent property of these interactions. To examine the roles of body stiffness, muscle activation, and fluid environment for swimming animals, a computational model of a lamprey was developed. The model uses an immersed boundary framework that fully couples the Navier–Stokes equations of fluid dynamics with an actuated, elastic body model. This is the first model at a Reynolds number appropriate for a swimming fish that captures the complete fluid-structure interaction, in which the body deforms according to both internal muscular forces and external fluid forces. Results indicate that identical muscle activation patterns can produce different kinematics depending on body stiffness, and the optimal value of stiffness for maximum acceleration is different from that for maximum steady swimming speed. Additionally, negative muscle work, observed in many fishes, emerges at higher tail beat frequencies without sensory input and may contribute to energy efficiency. Swimming fishes that can tune their body stiffness by appropriately timed muscle contractions may therefore be able to optimize the passive dynamics of their bodies to maximize peak acceleration or swimming speed. PMID:21037110

  8. Endocrine, electrolyte, and fluid volume changes associated with Apollo missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Alexander, W. C.; Johnson, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The endocrine and metabolic results obtained before and after the Apollo missions and the results of the limited in-flight sampling are summarized and discussed. The studies were designed to evaluate the biochemical changes in the returning Apollo crewmembers, and the areas studied included balance of fluids and electrolytes, regulation of calcium metabolism, adaptation to the environment, and regulation of metabolic processes.

  9. Self-propulsion of a body with rigid surface and variable coefficient of lift in a perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramodanov, Sergey M.; Tenenev, Valentin A.; Treschev, Dmitry V.

    2012-11-01

    We study the system of a 2D rigid body moving in an unbounded volume of incompressible, vortex-free perfect fluid which is at rest at infinity. The body is equipped with a gyrostat and a so-called Flettner rotor. Due to the latter the body is subject to a lifting force (Magnus effect). The rotational velocities of the gyrostat and the rotor are assumed to be known functions of time (control inputs). The equations of motion are presented in the form of the Kirchhoff equations. The integrals of motion are given in the case of piecewise continuous control. Using these integrals we obtain a (reduced) system of first-order differential equations on the configuration space. Then an optimal control problem for several types of the inputs is solved using genetic algorithms.

  10. Fluid volume displacement at the oval and round windows with air and bone conduction stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenfelt, Stefan; Hato, Naohito; Goode, Richard L.

    2004-02-01

    The fluids in the cochlea are normally considered incompressible, and the fluid volume displacement of the oval window (OW) and the round window (RW) should be equal and of opposite phase. However, other channels, such as the cochlear and vestibular aqueducts, may affect the fluid flow. To test if the OW and RW fluid flows are equal and of opposite phase, the volume displacement was assessed by multiple point measurement at the windows with a laser Doppler vibrometer. This was done during air conduction (AC) stimulation in seven fresh human temporal bones, and with bone conduction (BC) stimulation in eight temporal bones and one human cadaver head. With AC stimulation, the average volume displacement of the two windows is within 3 dB, and the phase difference is close to 180° for the frequency range 0.1 to 10 kHz. With BC stimulation, the average volume displacement difference between the two windows is greater: below 2 kHz, the volume displacement at the RW is 5 to 15 dB greater than at the OW and above 2 kHz more fluid is displaced at the OW. With BC stimulation, lesions at the OW caused only minor changes of the fluid flow at the RW.

  11. Visualization of scattering strength of elastic bodies in a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenck, H. A.; Fales, J. L.

    1992-07-01

    As Part of the Submarine Technology Program, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) recently sponsored a Low-Frequency Structural Acoustics Benchmark Exercise. The purpose of the exercise was to test and validate several major computational codes that have been developed to solve acoustic scattering problems of elastic objects in a fluid. This report describes some of the visualization techniques and procedures that were developed to review, compare, and analyze the large amount of computational data generated in the exercise.

  12. Stabilization of a fluid-rigid body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Takéo; Tucsnak, Marius; Weiss, George

    2015-12-01

    We consider the mathematical model of a rigid ball moving in a viscous incompressible fluid occupying a bounded domain Ω, with an external force acting on the ball. We investigate in particular the case when the external force is what would be produced by a spring and a damper connecting the center of the ball h to a fixed point h1 ∈ Ω. If the initial fluid velocity is sufficiently small, and the initial h is sufficiently close to h1, then we prove the existence and uniqueness of global (in time) solutions for the model. Moreover, in this case, we show that h converges to h1, and all the velocities (of the fluid and of the ball) converge to zero. Based on this result, we derive a control law that will bring the ball asymptotically to the desired position h1 even if the initial value of h is far from h1, and the path leading to h1 is winding and complicated. Now, the idea is to use the force as described above, with one end of the spring and damper at h, while other end is jumping between a finite number of points in Ω, that depend on h (a switching feedback law).

  13. Fluid Redistribution and Heart Rate in Humans During Whole-Body Tilting, G(z) Centrifugation, and Lower Body Negative Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Ballard, R. E.; Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Gravity creates blood pressure gradients which redistribute body fluids towards the feet. Positive G(z) centrifugation and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) have been proposed to simulate these and other effects of gravity during long-term existence in microgravity. We hypothesized that the magnitude of upper-to-lower body fluid redistribution would increase according to the following order: short-arm centrifugation (SAC), long-arm centrifugation (LAC), head-up tilt (HUT), and LBNP. To test this hypothesis, we employed strain gauge plethysmography of the neck, thigh and calf during HUT and supine SAC and LAC up to lG(z) at the feet, and during supine LBNP to 100 mm Hg. Supine 100 mm Hg LBNP generates footward force and produces transmural blood pressures in the foot approximately equal to 1 G(z) (90 deg) HUT. Heart rate was measured via cardiotachometry. Control measurements were made while supine. SAC and LAC elicited similar increases in thigh volume at 1 G(z) (2.3 +/- 0.4 and 2.1 +/- 0.1%, respectively; mean +/- se, n greater than or equal to 7). At 100 mm Hg LBNP, thigh volume increased (3.4 +/- 0.3%) significantly more than during l G(z) centrifugation (p less than 0.05). Surprisingly, due to a paradoxical 0.6% reduction of thigh volume between 0.8 and 1.0 G(z) HUT, thigh volume was increased only 0.6 +/- 0.3% at 1 G(z) HUT. The calf demonstrated similar, although less definitive, responses to the various gravitational stimuli. Neck volume tended to decrease less during HUT than during the other stimuli. Heart rate increased similarly during HUT (18 +/- 2 beats/min) and LAC (12 +/- 2 beats/min), and exhibited still greater elevation during LBNP (29 +/- 4 beats/min), yet did not increase during SAC. These results suggest upright posture activates mechanisms that counteract footward fluid redistribution which are not activated during supine applications of simulated gravity. LAC more closely approximated effects of normal gravity (HUT) than LBNP. Therefore

  14. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of body temperature of 33 degrees C, the F(i)O(2) could be further reduced with unchanged PEEP. The infusion of large volume, ice-cold fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  15. Seals/Secondary Fluid Flows Workshop 1997; Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 1997 Conference provided discussions and data on (a) program overviews, (b) developments in seals and secondary air management systems, (c) interactive seals flows with secondary air or fluid flows and powerstream flows, (d) views of engine externals and limitations, (e) high speed engine research sealing needs and demands, and (f) a short course on engine design development margins. Sealing concepts discussed include, mechanical rim and cavity seals, leaf, finger, air/oil, rope, floating-brush, floating-T-buffer, and brush seals. Engine externals include all components of engine fluid systems, sensors and their support structures that lie within or project through the nacelle. The clean features of the nacelle belie the minefield of challenges and opportunities that lie within. Seals; Secondary air flows; Rotordynamics; Gas turbine; Aircraft; CFD; Testing; Turbomachinery

  16. Simulations of dipolar fluids using effective many-body isotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Sindt, Julien O; Camp, Philip J

    2015-07-14

    The partition function of a system with pairwise-additive anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions is equal to that of a hypothetical system with many-body isotropic interactions [G. Stell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 32, 286 (1974)]. The effective many-body interactions contain n-body contributions of all orders. Each contribution is known as an expansion in terms of the particle-particle distances r, and the coefficients are temperature dependent. The leading-order two-body term is the familiar -r(-6) attraction, and the leading-order three-body term is equivalent to the Axilrod-Teller interaction. In this work, a fluid of particles with the leading-order two-body and three-body interactions is compared to an equivalent dipolar soft-sphere fluid. Molecular simulations are used to determine the conditions under which the effective many-body interactions reproduce the fluid-phase structures of the dipolar system. The effective many-body interaction works well at moderately high temperatures but fails at low temperatures where particle chaining is expected to occur. It is shown that an adjustment of the coefficients of the two-body and three-body terms leads to a good description of the structure of the dipolar fluid even in the chaining regime, due primarily to the ground-state linear configuration of the three-body Axilrod-Teller interaction. The vapor-liquid phase diagrams of systems with different Axilrod-Teller contributions are determined. As the strength of the three-body interaction is increased, the critical temperature and density both decrease and disappear completely above a threshold strength, where chaining eventually suppresses the condensation transition. PMID:26178112

  17. Mechanisms of proximal tubule sodium transport regulation that link extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Alicia A

    2010-04-01

    One-hundred years ago, Starling articulated the interdependence of renal control of circulating blood volume and effective cardiac performance. During the past 25 years, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the interdependence of blood pressure (BP), extracellular fluid volume (ECFV), the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) have begun to be revealed. These variables all converge on regulation of renal proximal tubule (PT) sodium transport. The PT reabsorbs two-thirds of the filtered Na(+) and volume at baseline. This fraction is decreased when BP or perfusion pressure is increased, during a high-salt diet (elevated ECFV), and during inhibition of the production of ANG II; conversely, this fraction is increased by ANG II, SNS activation, and a low-salt diet. These variables all regulate the distribution of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and the Na(+)-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi2), along the apical microvilli of the PT. Natriuretic stimuli provoke the dynamic redistribution of these transporters along with associated regulators, molecular motors, and cytoskeleton-associated proteins to the base of the microvilli. The lipid raft-associated NHE3 remains at the base, and the nonraft-associated NaPi2 is endocytosed, culminating in decreased Na(+) transport and increased PT flow rate. Antinatriuretic stimuli return the same transporters and regulators to the body of the microvilli associated with an increase in transport activity and decrease in PT flow rate. In summary, ECFV and BP homeostasis are, at least in part, maintained by continuous and acute redistribution of transporter complexes up and down the PT microvilli, which affect regulation of PT sodium reabsorption in response to fluctuations in ECFV, BP, SNS, and RAS. PMID:20106993

  18. Measurement of lung fluid volumes and albumin exclusion in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Pou, N.A.; Roselli, R.J.; Parker, R.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Harris, T.R. )

    1989-10-01

    A radioactive tracer technique was used to determine interstitial diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and albumin distribution volume in sheep lungs. {sup 125}I- and/or {sup 131}I-labeled albumin were injected intravenously and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled DTPA and {sup 51}Cr-labeled erythrocytes were injected and allowed to equilibrate (2 h and 15 min, respectively) before a lethal dose of thiamylal sodium. Two biopsies (1-3 g) were taken from each lung and the remaining tissue was homogenized for wet-to-dry lung weight and volume calculations. Estimates of distribution volumes from whole lung homogenized samples were statistically smaller than biopsy samples for extravascular water, interstitial {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA, and interstitial albumin. The mean fraction of the interstitium (Fe), which excludes albumin, was 0.68 +/- 0.04 for whole lung samples compared with 0.62 +/- 0.03 for biopsy samples. Hematocrit may explain the consistent difference. To make the Fe for biopsy samples match that for homogenized samples, a mean hematocrit, which was 82% of large vessel hematocrit, was required. Excluded volume fraction for exogenous sheep albumin was compared with that of exogenous human albumin in two sheep, and no difference was found at 24 h.

  19. Effects of exercise on fluid exchange and body composition in man during 14-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.; Morse, J. T.; Staley, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of an investigation in which body composition, fluid intake, and fluid and electrolyte losses were measured in seven normal, healthy men during three 2-wk bed-rest periods, separated by two 3-wk recovery periods. During bed rest the subjects remained in the horizontal position continuously. During the dietary control periods, body mass decreased significantly with all three regimens, including no exercise, isometric exercise, and isotonic excercise. During bed rest, body mass was essentially unchanged with no exercise, but decreased significantly with isotonic and isometric exercise. With one exception, there were no statistically significant changes in body density, lean body mass, or body fat content by the end of each of the three bed-rest periods.

  20. Effects of 10 days 6 degrees head-down tilt on the responses to fluid loading and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisch, F.; Heer, M.; Beck, L.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Kropp, J.; Schulz, H.; Hillebrecht, A.; Meyer, M.

    1991-01-01

    In an international collaborative project six normal male subjects were studied before, during and after 10 days 6 degrees HDT. Fluid intake was controlled at 40 ml/(kgbw day). Urine volume and body weight were determined daily. Fluid loading and LBNP were performed in all three phases of the study. Body weight diminished by 2.6% because of fluid loss. Blood volume diminished by 13%. The responses to fluid loading were similar in the three phases of the study. Sixty minutes after end of infusion only 5.5% of the infused saline remained in the intravascular compartment. Excess interstitial fluid was eliminated in the next 24 hs but a negative balance was recorded also in the following day. The compliance of the lower limbs expressed as the rate of limb volume change/unit LBNP change was increased at the end of the HDT phase and during the post HDT phase. The set point of intravascular volume was defended, as shown by the response to FL. HDT increased the compliance of the lower limbs.

  1. Effects of 10 days 6° head-down tilt on the responses to fluid loading and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisch, F.; Heer, M.; Beck, L.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Kropp, J.; Schulz, H.; Hillebrecht, A.; Meyer, M.

    In an international collaborative project six normal male subjects were studied before, during and after 10 days 6° HDT. Fluid intake was controlled at 40 ml/(kg bw·day). Urine volume and body weight were determined daily. Fluid loading and LBNP were performed in all three phases of the study. Body weight diminished by 2.6% because of fluid loss. Blood volume diminished by 13%. The responses to fluid loading were similar in the three phases of the study. Sixty minutes after end of infusion only 5.5% of the infused saline remained in the intravascular compartment. Excess interstitial fluid was eliminated in the next 24 hs but a negative balance was recorded also in the following day. The compliance of the lower limbs expressed as the rate of limb volume change/unit LBNP change was increased at the end of the HDT phase and during the post HDT phase. The set point of intravascular volume was defended, as shown by the response to FL. HDT increased the compliance of the lower limbs.

  2. Stroke Volume Variation for Prediction of Fluid Responsiveness in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Lin, Fu-qing; Fu, Shu-kun; Chen, Guo-qiang; Yang, Xiao-hu; Zhu, Chun-yan; Zhang, Li-jun; Li, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stroke volume variation (SVV) has been shown to be a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness. However, the predictive role of SVV measured by FloTrac/Vigileo system in prediction of fluid responsiveness was unproven in patients undergoing ventilation with low tidal volume. Methods: Fifty patients undergoing elective gastrointestinal surgery were randomly divided into two groups: Group C [n1=20, tidal volume (Vt) = 8 ml/kg, frequency (F) = 12/min] and Group L [n2=30, Vt= 6 ml/kg, F=16/min]. After anesthesia induction, 6% hydroxyethyl starch130/0.4 solution (7 ml/kg) was intravenously transfused. Besides standard haemodynamic monitoring, SVV, cardiac output, cardiac index (CI), stroke volume (SV), stroke volume index (SVI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) were determined with the FloTrac/Vigileo system before and after fluid loading. Results: After fluid loading, the MAP, CVP, SVI and CI increased significantly, whereas the SVV and SVR decreased markedly in both groups. SVI was significantly correlated to the SVV, CVP but not the HR, MAP and SVR. SVI was significantly correlated to the SVV before fluid loading (Group C: r = 0.909; Group L: r = 0.758) but not the HR, MAP, CVP and SVR before fluid loading. The largest area under the ROC curve (AUC) was found for SVV (Group C, 0.852; Group L, 0.814), and the AUC for other preloading indices in two groups ranged from 0.324 to 0.460. Conclusion: SVV measured by FloTrac/Vigileo system can predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing ventilation with low tidal volumes during gastrointestinal surgery. PMID:23329886

  3. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation to predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Mi; Choi, Soo Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Park, Mi Hye; Heo, Burn Young

    2013-01-01

    Background During carotid endarterectomy (CEA), hemodynamic stability and adequate fluid management are crucial to prevent perioperative cerebral stroke, myocardial infarction and hyperperfusion syndrome. Both pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV), dynamic preload indices derived from the arterial waveform, are increasingly advocated as predictors of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of PPV and SVV for predicting fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing CEA. Methods Twenty seven patients undergoing CEA were enrolled in this study. PPV, SVV and cardiac output (CO) were measured before and after fluid loading of 500 ml of hydroxyethyl starch solution. Fluid responsiveness was defined as an increase in CO ≥ 15%. The ability of PPV and SVV to predict fluid responsiveness was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Both PPV and SVV measured before fluid loading are associated with changes in CO caused by fluid expansion. The ROC analysis showed that PPV and SVV predicted response to volume loading (area under the ROC curve = 0.854 and 0.841, respectively, P < 0.05). A PPV ≥ 9.5% identified responders (Rs) with a sensitivity of 71.4% and a specificity of 90.9%, and a SVV ≥ 7.5% identified Rs with a sensitivity of 92.9% and a specificity of 63.6%. Conclusions Both PPV and SVV values before volume loading are associated with increased CO in response to volume expansion. Therefore, PPV and SVV are useful predictors of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing CEA. PMID:24101958

  4. A penalty immersed boundary method for a rigid body in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongsam; Peskin, Charles S.

    2016-03-01

    We extend the penalty immersed boundary (pIB) method to the interaction between a rigid body and a surrounding fluid. The pIB method is based on the idea of splitting an immersed boundary, which here is a rigid body, notionally into two Lagrangian components: one is a massive component carrying all mass of the rigid body and the other is massless. These two components are connected by a system of stiff springs with 0 rest length. The massless component interacts with the surrounding fluid: it moves at the local fluid velocity and exerts force locally on the fluid. The massive component has no direct interaction with the surrounding fluid and behaves as though in a vacuum, following the dynamics of a rigid body, in which the acting forces and torques are generated from the system of stiff springs that connects the two Lagrangian components. We verify the pIB method by computing the drag coefficients of a cylinder and ball descending though a fluid under the influence of gravity and also by studying the interaction of two such descending cylinders and likewise the interaction of two such descending balls. The computational results are quite comparable to those in the literature. As a further example of an application, we include a freely falling maple seed with autorotation.

  5. Blood volume reduction counteracts fluid shifts in water immersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, Karl E.; Bernauer, Edmund

    1993-01-01

    Six healthy men were bled by 15 percent of their total blood volume (TBV) before 7 h of seated water immersion, to test the hypothesis that some of the major physiological responses to an expansion of central blood volume can be counteracted by prior reduction of TBV. Subjects were their own controls under two conditions: seated dry in air and seated immersed to the suprasternal notch in water. Immersion without prior reduction of TBV Wet Control (WC) caused a statistically significant 22-percent increase in cardiac output (CO), 368-percent increase in urine production, and 200-percent increase in sodium excretion relative to dry control (DC) sessions. When TBV was reduced before immersion, CO was the same as during DC sessions; however there were significant increases above DC in urine flow (+73 percent) and sodium excretion (+120 percent), although they were significantly reduced from WC values. Potassium excretion was similar during DC and WC sessions, but was significantly increased (+75 percent) when subjects were immersed after 15-percent reduction of TBV.

  6. Dynamically coupled fluid body interactions in vorticity-based numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2008-11-01

    A novel method is presented for robustly simulating coupled dynamics in fluid-body interactions with vorticity-based flow solvers. In this work, the fluid dynamics are simulated with a viscous vortex particle method. In the first substep of each time increment, the fluid convective and diffusive processes are treated, while a predictor is used to independently advance the body configuration. An iterative corrector is then used to simultaneously remove the spurious slip - via vorticity flux - and compute the end-of-step body configuration. Fluid inertial forces are isolated and combined with body inertial terms to ensure robust treatment of dynamics for bodies of arbitrary mass. The method is demonstrated for dynamics of articulated rigid bodies, including a falling cylinder, flow-induced vibration of a circular cylinder and free swimming of a three-link 'fish'. The error and momentum conservation properties of the method are explored. In the case of the vibrating cylinder, comparison with previous work demonstrates good agreement.

  7. A theoretical study of the moment on a body in a compressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carl

    1939-01-01

    The extension to a compressible fluid of Lagally's theorem on the moment on a body in an incompressible fluid and Poggi's method of treating the flow of compressible fluids are employed for the determination of the effect of compressibility on the moment of an arbitrary body. Only the case of the two-dimensional subsonic flow of an ideal compressible fluid is considered. As examples of the application of the general theory, two well-known systems of profiles are treated; namely the elliptic profile and the symmetrical Joukowski profiles with sharp trailing edges. The effect of compressibility on the position of the center of pressure is also discussed. Several numerical examples of both the elliptic and the Joukowski profiles are given.

  8. The interaction between a solid body and viscous fluid by marker-and-cell method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    A computational method for solving nonlinear problems relating to impact and penetration of a rigid body into a fluid type medium is presented. The numerical techniques, based on the Marker-and-Cell method, gives the pressure and velocity of the flow field. An important feature in this method is that the force and displacement of the rigid body interacting with the fluid during the impact and sinking phases are evaluated from the boundary stresses imposed by the fluid on the rigid body. A sample problem of low velocity penetration of a rigid block into still water is solved by this method. The computed time histories of the acceleration, pressure, and displacement of the block show food agreement with experimental measurements. A sample problem of high velocity impact of a rigid block into soft clay is also presented.

  9. Fluid flow volume measurements using a capacitance/conductance probe system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, T. X.; Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    A probe system has been developed to measure the flow volume of a single fluid passing through an orifice or flow line. The system employs both capacitance and a conductance probe at the orifice, together with phase detection and data acquisition circuitry to measure flow volume and salinity under low or zero gravity conditions. A wide variety of frequencies can be used for the radio frequency (RF) signal source which is chosen primarily by the capacitance of the orifice probe and the fluid passing through the orifice. Rapid measurements are made using the reflected signal from the orifice probe to determine the 'instantaneous' permittivity of the fluid/gas mixture passing through. The 'instantaneous' measurements are integrated over time to determine flow volume. Analysis reveals that a narrow orifice helps to reduce non-linearities caused by differing flow rates. The geometry of 'deflectors' and 'directors' for the flowing fluid are important in obtaining linearity. Measured data shows that a volume measurement accuracy of approximately four percent can be consistently achieved. The prototype hardware system and associated software have been optimized and are available for further applications. The system has immediate application in low or zero gravity environments for measurements of urine or other liquid volumes.

  10. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  11. The Influence of Body Position on Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Gradient and Movement in Cats with Normal and Impaired Craniospinal Communication

    PubMed Central

    Radoš, Milan; Erceg, Gorislav; Petošić, Antonio; Jurjević, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a severe therapeutic problem, as there is insufficient knowledge about the physiology of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. In this paper a new CSF pressure regulation hypothesis is proposed. According to this hypothesis, the CSF pressure depends on the laws of fluid mechanics and on the anatomical characteristics inside the cranial and spinal space, and not, as is today generally believed, on CSF secretion, circulation and absorption. The volume and pressure changes in the newly developed CSF model, which by its anatomical dimensions and basic biophysical features imitates the craniospinal system in cats, are compared to those obtained on cats with and without the blockade of craniospinal communication in different body positions. During verticalization, a long-lasting occurrence of negative CSF pressure inside the cranium in animals with normal cranio-spinal communication was observed. CSF pressure gradients change depending on the body position, but those gradients do not enable unidirectional CSF circulation from the hypothetical site of secretion to the site of absorption in any of them. Thus, our results indicate the existence of new physiological/pathophysiological correlations between intracranial fluids, which opens up the possibility of new therapeutic approaches to intracranial hypertension. PMID:24748150

  12. Estimating the body portion of CT volumes by matching histograms of visual words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feulner, Johannes; Zhou, S. Kevin; Seifert, Sascha; Cavallaro, Alexander; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-02-01

    Being able to automatically determine which portion of the human body is shown by a CT volume image offers various possibilities like automatic labeling of images or initializing subsequent image analysis algorithms. This paper presents a method that takes a CT volume as input and outputs the vertical body coordinates of its top and bottom slice in a normalized coordinate system whose origin and unit length are determined by anatomical landmarks. Each slice of a volume is described by a histogram of visual words: Feature vectors consisting of an intensity histogram and a SURF descriptor are first computed on a regular grid and then classified into the closest visual words to form a histogram. The vocabulary of visual words is a quantization of the feature space by offline clustering a large number of feature vectors from prototype volumes into visual words (or cluster centers) via the K-Means algorithm. For a set of prototype volumes whose body coordinates are known the slice descriptions are computed in advance. The body coordinates of a test volume are computed by a 1D rigid registration of the test volume with the prototype volumes in axial direction. The similarity of two slices is measured by comparing their histograms of visual words. Cross validation on a dataset of 44 volumes proved the robustness of the results. Even for test volumes of ca. 20cm height, the average error was 15.8mm.

  13. Methylation Markers for the Identification of Body Fluids and Tissues from Forensic Trace Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Forat, Sophia; Huettel, Bruno; Reinhardt, Richard; Fimmers, Rolf; Haidl, Gerhard; Denschlag, Dominik; Olek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The identification of body fluids is an essential tool for clarifying the course of events at a criminal site. The analytical problem is the fact that the biological material has been very often exposed to detrimental exogenous influences. Thereby, the molecular substrates used for the identification of the traces may become degraded. So far, most protocols utilize cell specific proteins or RNAs. Instead of measuring these more sensitive compounds this paper describes the application of the differential DNA-methylation. As a result of two genome wide screenings with the Illumina HumanMethylation BeadChips 27 and 450k we identified 150 candidate loci revealing differential methylation with regard to the body fluids venous blood, menstrual blood, vaginal fluid, saliva and sperm. Among them we selected 9 loci as the most promising markers. For the final determination of the methylation degree we applied the SNuPE-method. Because the degree of methylation might be modified by various endogenous and exogenous factors, we tested each marker with approximately 100 samples of each target fluid in a validation study. The stability of the detection procedure is proved in various simulated forensic surroundings according to standardized conditions. We studied the potential influence of 12 relatively common tumors on the methylation of the 9 markers. For this purpose the target fluids of 34 patients have been analysed. Only the cervix carcinoma might have an remarkable effect because impairing the signal of both vaginal markers. Using the Illumina MiSeq device we tested the potential influence of cis acting sequence variants on the methylation degree of the 9 markers in the specific body fluid DNA of 50 individuals. For 4 marker loci we observed such an influence either by sole SNPs or haplotypes. The identification of each target fluid is possible in arbitrary mixtures with the remaining four body fluids. The sensitivity of the individual body fluid tests is in the same range

  14. Methylation Markers for the Identification of Body Fluids and Tissues from Forensic Trace Evidence.

    PubMed

    Forat, Sophia; Huettel, Bruno; Reinhardt, Richard; Fimmers, Rolf; Haidl, Gerhard; Denschlag, Dominik; Olek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The identification of body fluids is an essential tool for clarifying the course of events at a criminal site. The analytical problem is the fact that the biological material has been very often exposed to detrimental exogenous influences. Thereby, the molecular substrates used for the identification of the traces may become degraded. So far, most protocols utilize cell specific proteins or RNAs. Instead of measuring these more sensitive compounds this paper describes the application of the differential DNA-methylation. As a result of two genome wide screenings with the Illumina HumanMethylation BeadChips 27 and 450k we identified 150 candidate loci revealing differential methylation with regard to the body fluids venous blood, menstrual blood, vaginal fluid, saliva and sperm. Among them we selected 9 loci as the most promising markers. For the final determination of the methylation degree we applied the SNuPE-method. Because the degree of methylation might be modified by various endogenous and exogenous factors, we tested each marker with approximately 100 samples of each target fluid in a validation study. The stability of the detection procedure is proved in various simulated forensic surroundings according to standardized conditions. We studied the potential influence of 12 relatively common tumors on the methylation of the 9 markers. For this purpose the target fluids of 34 patients have been analysed. Only the cervix carcinoma might have an remarkable effect because impairing the signal of both vaginal markers. Using the Illumina MiSeq device we tested the potential influence of cis acting sequence variants on the methylation degree of the 9 markers in the specific body fluid DNA of 50 individuals. For 4 marker loci we observed such an influence either by sole SNPs or haplotypes. The identification of each target fluid is possible in arbitrary mixtures with the remaining four body fluids. The sensitivity of the individual body fluid tests is in the same range

  15. Isolated microvesicles from peripheral blood and body fluids as observed by scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Mrvar-Brecko, Anita; Sustar, Vid; Jansa, Vid; Stukelj, Roman; Jansa, Rado; Mujagić, Emir; Kruljc, Peter; Iglic, Ales; Hägerstrand, Henry; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika

    2010-04-15

    Microvesicles are sub-micron structures shed from the cell membrane in a final step of the budding process. After being released into the microenvironment they are free to move and carry signaling molecules to distant cells, thereby they represent a communication system within the body. Since all cells shed microvesicles, it can be expected that they will be found in different body fluids. The potential diagnostic value of microvesicles has been suggested, however, a standardized protocol for isolation has not yet been agreed upon. It is unclear what is the content of the isolates and whether the isolated microvesicles were present in vivo or-have they been created within the isolation procedure. To present evidence in this direction, in this work we focus on the visualization of the material obtained by the microvesicle isolation procedure. We present scanning electronic microscope images of microvesicles isolated from blood, ascites, pleural fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, postoperative drainage fluid and chyloid fluid acquired from human and animal patients. Vesicular structures sized from 1microm downto 50nm are present in isolates of all considered body fluids, however, the populations differ in size and shape reflecting also the composition of the corresponding sediments. Isolates of microvesicles contain numerous cells which indicates that methods of isolation and determination of the number of microvesicles in the peripheral blood are to be elaborated and improved. PMID:20199878

  16. Response of local vascular volumes to lower body negative pressure stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolthuis, R. A.; Leblanc, A.; Carpentier, W. A.; Bergman, S. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The present study involved an intravenous injection of radioactive iodinated serum albumin, equilibration of this isotope within the vascular space, and the continuous measurement of isotope activity over selected anatomical areas before, during and following multiple human LBNP tests. Both rate and magnitude of vascular pooling were distinctly different within each of five selected lower body anatomical areas. In the upper body, all areas except the abdomen showed depletions from their resting vascular volumes during LBNP. The presence of uniquely different pooling patterns in the lower body, the apparent stability of abdominal vascular volumes, and a possible decrease in cerebral blood volume during LBNP represent the major findings of this study.

  17. Monitoring body fluid distribution in microgravity using impedance tomography (APT (applied potential tomography)).

    PubMed

    Lindley, E J; Brown, B H; Barber, D C; Grundy, D; Knowles, R; McArdle, F J; Wilson, A J

    1992-01-01

    For an astronaut, the excitement of going into orbit is accompanied by a shift of 1 to 1.5 l of fluid from the legs into the upper body. Information on the way the redistributed fluid is handled by the body is very useful to space physiologists studying the process of adaptation to zero-gravity. Applied potential tomography (APT) can be used to image changes in fluid distribution. To ensure that the technique was capable of measuring fluid shifts induced by changing gravitational forces on the body, a standard Sheffield APT system was used to study several subjects during the eight ESA parabolic flight campaign. The results clearly demonstrated the feasibility of using APT for monitoring fluid redistribution during space flight. A battery-powered, body-worn APT system has now been developed for use in space. The equipment was tested on the eleventh parabolic flight campaign. The data collected with the miniaturised system was comparable to that obtained in the earlier experiment. Ergonomic tests indicated that the equipment is no more difficult to operate and maintain under weightless conditions than on earth. The system is undergoing space qualification tests in Munich. If no problems arise it will be used by German astronauts on missions to MIR and Skylab. PMID:1587097

  18. Discriminant Analysis of Raman Spectra for Body Fluid Identification for Forensic Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Virkler, Kelly; Lednev, Igor K.

    2010-01-01

    Detection and identification of blood, semen and saliva stains, the most common body fluids encountered at a crime scene, are very important aspects of forensic science today. This study targets the development of a nondestructive, confirmatory method for body fluid identification based on Raman spectroscopy coupled with advanced statistical analysis. Dry traces of blood, semen and saliva obtained from multiple donors were probed using a confocal Raman microscope with a 785-nm excitation wavelength under controlled laboratory conditions. Results demonstrated the capability of Raman spectroscopy to identify an unknown substance to be semen, blood or saliva with high confidence. PMID:22319277

  19. Effect of lower-body positive pressure on postural fluid shifts in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Kravik, S. E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) on the orthostatic fluid and protein shifts were investigated in five men during combined tilt-table/antigravity suit inflation and deflation experiments. Changes in the mass densities of venous blood and plasma were measured and the values were used to calculate the densities of erythrocytes, whole-body blood, and shifted fluid. It was found that the application of 60 mm Hg LBPP during 60-deg head-up tilt prevented about half of the postural hemoconcentration occurring during passive head-up tilt.

  20. Whole body and tissue blood volumes of two strains of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss )

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.; Pityer, R.A.; Rach, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    1. Estimates of apparent packed cell, plasma and total blood volumes for the whole body and for 13 selected tissues were compared between Kamloops and Wytheville strains of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by the simultaneous injection of two vascular tracers, radiolabeled trout erythrocytes (51Cr-RBC) and radioiodated bovine serum albumin (125I-BSA). 2. Whole body total blood volume, plasma volume and packed cell volume were slightly, but not significantly greater in the Wytheville trout, whereas, the apparent plasma volumes and total blood volumes in 4 of 13 tissues were significantly greater in the Kamloops strain. 3. Differences were most pronounced in highly perfused organs, such as the liver and kidney and in organs of digestion such as the stomach and intestines. 4. Differences in blood volumes between the two strains may be related to the greater permeability of the vascular membranes in the Kamloops strain fish.

  1. Flow cytometry for the microscopy of body fluids in patients with suspected infection.

    PubMed

    Bignardi, Giuseppe Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Automating the microscopy of body fluids is challenging, due to the wider range and lower concentrations of cells in these fluids, as opposed to blood, while the viscous nature of some of these fluids can also be problematic. This review shows that there have been major improvements and that newer flow cytometers can have remarkably low limits of quantitation for WBCs. Accurate counting of RBCs is still problematic with many flow cytometers, but this is of no clinical significance. Many flow cytometers can give reasonably accurate WBC differential counts, but detection of eosinophils and neoplastic or other nucleated cells which are not blood cells can still be problematic, hence fail-safe measures are recommended. Cerebrospinal fluid is the most challenging body fluid as it requires the ability to count and differentiate WBCs down to a 'normal range', which is much lower than the diagnostic cut-off values used for serous fluids; precision at or around the cerebrospinal fluid WBC normal range is reduced even with the best flow cytometers, but manual microscopy is even less precise. PMID:26188055

  2. An improved penalty immersed boundary method for fluid-flexible body interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Xi; Chang, Cheong Bong; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-06-01

    An improved penalty immersed boundary (pIB) method has been proposed for simulation of fluid-flexible body interaction problems. In the proposed method, the fluid motion is defined on the Eulerian domain, while the solid motion is described by the Lagrangian variables. To account for the interaction, the flexible body is assumed to be composed of two parts: massive material points and massless material points, which are assumed to be linked closely by a stiff spring with damping. The massive material points are subjected to the elastic force of solid deformation but do not interact with the fluid directly, while the massless material points interact with the fluid by moving with the local fluid velocity. The flow solver and the solid solver are coupled in this framework and are developed separately by different methods. The fractional step method is adopted to solve the incompressible fluid motion on a staggered Cartesian grid, while the finite element method is developed to simulate the solid motion using an unstructured triangular mesh. The interaction force is just the restoring force of the stiff spring with damping, and is spread from the Lagrangian coordinates to the Eulerian grids by a smoothed approximation of the Dirac delta function. In the numerical simulations, we first validate the solid solver by using a vibrating circular ring in vacuum, and a second-order spatial accuracy is observed. Then both two- and three-dimensional simulations of fluid-flexible body interaction are carried out, including a circular disk in a linear shear flow, an elastic circular disk moving through a constricted channel, a spherical capsule in a linear shear flow, and a windsock in a uniform flow. The spatial accuracy is shown to be between first-order and second-order for both the fluid velocities and the solid positions. Comparisons between the numerical results and the theoretical solutions are also presented.

  3. George E. Brown memorial lecture. Role of atrial peptides in body fluid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ballermann, B J; Brenner, B M

    1986-05-01

    Extracts of mammalian atria, but not ventricles, induce marked diuresis, natriuresis, and reduction in blood pressure when infused systemically in rats and dogs. These extracts also inhibit aldosterone biosynthesis and renal renin release. Natriuretic peptides, 21 amino acids and longer, have been isolated from atria of rodents and man, and share a nearly homologous amino acid sequence at the carboxyterminus. Natriuretic activity resides in a 17-amino acid ring formed by a disulfide bridge, and the C-terminal Phe-Arg appears necessary for full biological potency. The deoxyribonucleic acid-encoding atrial natriuretic peptides have been cloned and the gene structure elucidated. Reduction of the diuretic and natriuretic responses to an acute volume load by right atrial appendectomy first suggested a role for atrial peptides in the physiological response to plasma volume expansion. Subsequently, release of peptides with natriuretic and spasmolytic properties from isolated heart preparations in response to right atrial distension was demonstrated by bioassay and radioimmunoassay. The presence of these peptides in normal rat and human plasma in concentrations of 20-100 pM, and the findings of increased levels in response to acute and chronic plasma volume expansion, rapid atrial tachyarrhythmias, systemic hypertension, congestive heart failure, and renal insufficiency imply that they play an important role in body fluid homeostasis. The mechanisms by which atrial peptides increase renal salt and water excretion are as yet unclear. Renal vascular effects have been consistently demonstrated, and limited evidence for direct actions on tubule ion transport has also been reported recently. In vitro, these peptides cause precontracted vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle to relax, mediated by a direct action on smooth muscle cells. Specific receptors for these peptides have been characterized in crude membranes prepared from whole kidney homogenates and adrenal glomerulosa

  4. Extracellular fluid and plasma volumes during water immersion in nephrectomized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, K.; Hajduczok, G.; Hong, S.K.; Krasney, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Extracellular fluid volume (ECF, (/sup 125/I)iothalamate space), blood volume (BV), /sup 51/Cr-labeled erythrocyte space), and hematocrit were measured continuously to study the kinetics of fluid movements between intracellular, interstitial, and plasma compartments during water immersion (WI) at 38/sup 0/C in seven splenetomized and acutely nephrectomized dogs. ECF and plasma volume (PV) increased linearly during WI above the control level by 120 min of WI. The authors estimate that 83% of the fluid entering the intravascular compartment is derived from the intracellular space at 120 min of WI. The results of this study indicate that WI leads to a sustained fluid movement of intracellular fluid toward the intravascular compartment. The increase in interstitial hydrostatic pressure (wick method) by 28.5 mmHg from the control level at 5 min of WI in response to the external water pressure exceeds the increase in mean capillary pressure by 10-11 mmHg relative to the control level. They postulate that this negative hydrostatic pressure gradient across the capillary wall leads to an increase in PV during WI.

  5. Water Metabolism and Fluid Compartment Volumes in Humans at Altitude. A Compendium of Research (1914 - 1996)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, J. L.; Stad, N. J.; Gay, E.; West, G. I.; Barnes, P. R.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    This compendium includes abstracts and synopses of clinical observations and of more basic studies involving physiological mechanisms concerning interaction of water metabolism and fluid compartment volumes in humans during altitude exposure. If the author's abstract or summary was appropriate, it was included. In other cases a more detailed synopsis of the paper was prepared under the subheadings Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions. Author and subject indices are provided, plus an additional selected bibliography of related work of those papers received after the volume was being prepared for publication. This volume includes material published from 1914 through 1995.

  6. How do sock ply changes affect residual limb fluid volume in people with trans-tibial amputation?

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, JE; Harrison, DS; Allyn, KJ; Myers, TR; Ciol, MA; Tsai, EC

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of sock addition and sock removal on residual limb fluid volume in people using prosthetic limbs. We used bioimpedance analysis to measure residual limb extracellular fluid volume on 28 transtibial amputee subjects during 30-minute test sessions. Upon addition of a 1-ply polyester sock, residual limb fluid volume changes ranged from −4.0% to 0.8% (mean −0.9% (s.d.=1.3%)) of the initial limb fluid volume. Changes for sock removal ranged from −1.2% to 2.8% (mean 0.5% (s.d.=0.8%)). Subjects who reduced in fluid volume with both addition and removal of a sock and subjects with high positive ratios between the fluid volume loss upon sock addition and the gain upon sock removal (high Add/Remove(AR) ratios) tended to have arterial disease, were obese and smokers. Subjects with low positive AR ratios, subjects who increased in fluid volume both with sock addition and removal, and a single subject who increased in fluid volume with sock addition and decreased with sock removal tended to be non-smokers and either healthy individuals without complications or individuals without arterial problems. Results are relevant towards anticipating limb volume changes during prosthetic fitting and towards the design of adjustable-socket technologies. PMID:22773526

  7. Development of single fluid volume element method for simulation of transient fluid flow in self-siphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viridi, S.; Novitrian, Nurhayati, Hidayat, W.; Latief, F. D. E.; Zen, F. P.

    2014-09-01

    A simple model for transient flow in a narrow pipe is presented in this work. The model is simply derived from Newton's second law of motion. As an example it is used to predict flow occurrence in two forms of self-siphon, which are inverted-U and M-like forms. Simulation for system consists only a vertical pipe is also presented since it is actually part of the both siphon systems. For the simple systems the model can have good predictions but for the complex system it can only have 89.6 % good prediction. Its simplicity can be used to illustrate how the interface between fluid and air, single fluid volume element (SFVE) moves along the siphon. The method itself is named as SFVE method.

  8. A Review of Electrical Impedance Spectrometry Methods for Parametric Estimation of Physiologic Fluid Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewberry, B.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectrometry involves measurement of the complex resistance of a load at multiple frequencies. With this information in the form of impedance magnitude and phase, or resistance and reactance, basic structure or function of the load can be estimated. The "load" targeted for measurement and estimation in this study consisted of the water-bearing tissues of the human calf. It was proposed and verified that by measuring the electrical impedance of the human calf and fitting this data to a model of fluid compartments, the lumped-model volume of intracellular and extracellular spaces could be estimated, By performing this estimation over time, the volume dynamics during application of stimuli which affect the direction of gravity can be viewed. The resulting data can form a basis for further modeling and verification of cardiovascular and compartmental modeling of fluid reactions to microgravity as well as countermeasures to the headward shift of fluid during head-down tilt or spaceflight.

  9. High-Volume Airborne Fluids Handling Technologies to Fight Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, Mark; Cox, Timothy; Hale, Cliff; Hatton, Rick

    2010-01-01

    specific wildfire situation. The system was manufactured by Jordan Air of Central Point, OR, and was installed by Victorville Aerospace in Victorville, CA. It can deliver 12,000 gallons (45.4 kL) of retardant in as little as eight seconds. The aircraft can deliver a partial load of retardant and make multiple drops on the same flight, or the entire load can be rapidly delivered in one pass if required for maximum coverage. The Evergreen 747 uses internal tankage and a pressurized delivery system to enable volume and coverage levels that also meet USFS requirements, but enables computer control of flow for desired precision. This system was designed and built by Adaptive Aerospace of Tehachapi, CA and can deliver about 20,000 gallons (75.7 kL) of retardant in approximately ten seconds. The 747 can also make multiple independent drops, or deliver the entire load at once. NASA found that both of these VLAT aircraft are compatible with the wildfire suppression mission when used to supplement other aerial retardant delivery platforms. The major recommendations for deployment that resulted from this study relate to terrain clearance, the type of terrain in the drop area, availability of qualified lead planes to guide the VLAT approach to the drop area, and low-altitude maneuvering limitations. NASA s analysis suggests that with the appropriate flight procedures, these aircraft will provide a powerful set of tools to fight wildfires.

  10. Partitioned fluid-structure interaction scheme for bodies with high flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Timothy; Vanella, Marcos; Balaras, Elias; Balachandran, Balakumar

    2013-11-01

    There are many interesting problems involving fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems such as flapping wings in micro-air-vehicles. In order to better understand these systems, high-fidelity simulation tools are needed to do the following: (i) fully capture the physics and (ii) provide a basis to construct low-fidelity models used in design. Here, a novel FSI strategy is introduced, through which a large scale fluids solver is combined with a solver for solids with high flexibility. The Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow are discretized by using standard central finite differences on a staggered mesh. The fluid domain is spatially decomposed through the use of the FLASH modeling framework. The solid body is discretized via geometrically exact Total Lagrangian finite elements. A novel hyperelastic material law that extends the engineering stress-strain law to finite deformations and arbitrary rotations is also implemented. The Lagrangian body is embedded in the Cartesian fluid grid by immersed boundary methods. The time marching predictor-corrector coupling procedure is based on the use of Adams methods for the fluid and the Generalized- α method for the body. We will present examples of flexible oscillating plates and a flapping Manduca Sexta wing.

  11. Fluids, rivers, and vessels: metaphors and body concepts in Mesopotamian gynaecological texts.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the peculiar disease condition of "locked fluids" found in a number of gynaecological texts from 2(nd) and 1(st) millennium BCE Mesopotamia. To venture an interpretation of the underlying disease concept, the condition of "locked fluids" is first examined in the context of related and contrasting symptoms and female health problems connected to body fluids within the gynaecological corpus. The second part of this article turns to the physiological concepts of the (female) body linked to the disease condition of "locked fluids". The author highlights metaphors and comparisons with objects from daily life and the natural environment, which can be found in medical incantations and therapeutic rituals used to combat gynaecological disorders, as a key to indigenous concepts of physiology. The use of the same metaphors in connection with intestinal disorders points to an intuitive understanding of different processes within the body on the basis of comparisons and equations stemming from daily-life experiences. The last section presents similar notions to the Mesopotamian disease concept of "locked fluids", which are contained in gynaecological treatises of other cultures and times. PMID:24109494

  12. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4–6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions. PMID:26543849

  13. Self-similar evolution of a body eroding in a fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Matthew N. J.; Ristroph, Leif; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Shelley, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Erosion of solid material by flowing fluids plays an important role in shaping landforms, and in this natural context is often dictated by processes of high complexity. Here, we examine the coupled evolution of solid shape and fluid flow within the idealized setting of a cylindrical body held against a fast, unidirectional flow, and eroding under the action of fluid shear stress. Experiments and simulations both show self-similar evolution of the body, with an emerging quasi-triangular geometry that is an attractor of the shape dynamics. Our fluid erosion model, based on Prandtl boundary layer theory, yields a scaling law that accurately predicts the body's vanishing rate. Further, a class of exact solutions provides a partial prediction for the body's terminal form as one with a leading surface of uniform shear stress. Our simulations show this predicted geometry to emerge robustly from a range of different initial conditions, and allow us to explore its local stability. The sharp, faceted features of the terminal geometry defy the intuition of erosion as a globally smoothing process.

  14. Components of paint thinner in body fluids clearly detected using the salting-out technique.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Nagata, T; Kimura, K; Kudo, K; Imamura, T; Noda, M

    1990-01-01

    For a more sensitive detection of paint thinner components in body fluids, we made use of a salting-out technique, with sodium chloride added to blood samples followed by gas chromatography, using the headspace method. The detection of ethyl acetate and isobutanol was considerably enhanced using these approaches. PMID:2303209

  15. Rapid Identification of Microorganisms from Sterile Body Fluids by Use of FilmArray

    PubMed Central

    Altun, Osman; Almuhayawi, Mohammed; Ullberg, Måns

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical performance of the FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel in the identification of microorganisms from positive blood culture bottles inoculated with sterile body fluids. All organisms included in the FA BCID panel were accurately identified in 84/84 (100%) and 18/24 (75%) samples with mono- and polymicrobial growth, respectively. PMID:25520440

  16. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on body temperature during arthroscopic elbow surgery in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, K.R.; MacFarlane, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    This prospective randomised clinical trial evaluated the effect of warmed irrigation fluid on body temperature in anaesthetised dogs undergoing arthroscopic elbow surgery. Nineteen dogs undergoing elbow arthroscopy were included in the study and were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Group RT received irrigation fluid at room temperature (RT) while dogs in group W received warmed (W) irrigation fluid (36°C). A standardised patient management and anaesthetic protocol was used and body temperature was measured at four time points; (T1) pre-anaesthetic examination, (T2) arrival into theatre, (T3) end of surgery and (T4) arrival into recovery. There was no significant difference in body temperature at any time point between the groups. The mean overall decrease in body temperature between pre-anaesthetic examination (T1) and return to the recovery suite (T4) was significant in both groups, with a fall of 1.06±0.58°C (p<0.001) in group RT and 1.53±0.76°C (p<0.001) group W. There was no significant difference between the groups. At the end of surgery (T3) 4/19 (21.1%) of dogs were hypothermic (<37°C). The addition of warmed irrigation fluids to a temperature management protocol in dogs undergoing elbow arthroscopy during general anaesthesia did not lead to decreased temperature losses. PMID:26623323

  17. On the calculation of potential flow about a body in an unbounded fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblesse, F.; Triantafyllou, G.

    1980-09-01

    This study is concerned with the problem of calculating potential flow about a nonlifting body in an unbounded fluid. Several simple explicit approximations for the velocity potential are obtained and investigated numerically. Results of calculations are presented for the simple cases of potential flows due to translations of ellipsoids and ogives.

  18. Apparatus and method for collection and concentration of respirable particles into a small fluid volume

    DOEpatents

    Simon, Jonathan N.; Brown, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the collection of respirable particles and concentration of such particles into a small fluid volume. The apparatus captures and concentrates small (1-10 .mu.m) respirable particles into a sub-millileter volume of fluid. The method involves a two step operation, collection and concentration: wherein collection of particles is by a wetted surface having small vertical slits that act as capillary channels; and concentration is carried out by transfer of the collected particles to a small volume (sub-milliliter) container by centrifugal force whereby the particles are forced through the vertical slits and contact a non-wetted wall surface, and are deflected to the bottom where they are contained for analysis, such as a portable flow cytometer or a portable PCR DNA analysis system.

  19. Comparative study of the biodegradability of porous silicon films in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Peckham, J; Andrews, G T

    2015-01-01

    The biodegradability of oxidized microporous, mesoporous and macroporous silicon films in a simulated body fluid with ion concentrations similar to those found in human blood plasma were studied using gravimetry. Film dissolution rates were determined by periodically weighing the samples after removal from the fluid. The dissolution rates for microporous silicon were found to be higher than those for mesoporous silicon of comparable porosity. The dissolution rate of macroporous silicon was much lower than that for either microporous or mesoporous silicon. This is attributed to the fact that its specific surface area is much lower than that of microporous and mesoporous silicon. Using an equation adapted from [Surf. Sci. Lett. 306 (1994), L550-L554], the dissolution rate of porous silicon in simulated body fluid can be estimated if the film thickness and specific surface area are known. PMID:25585985

  20. A study analysis of cable-body systems totally immersed in a fluid stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaurier, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A general stability analysis of a cable-body system immersed in a fluid stream is presented. The analytical portion of this analysis treats the system as being essentially a cable problem, with the body dynamics giving the end conditions. The mathematical form of the analysis consists of partial differential wave equations, with the end and auxiliary conditions being determined from the body equations of motion. The equations uncouple to give a lateral problem and a longitudinal problem as in first order airplane dynamics. A series of tests on a tethered wind tunnel model provide a comparison of the theory with experiment.

  1. Endocrine and fluid metabolism in males and females of different ages after bedrest, acceleration and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Krauhs, J. M.; Sandler, H.

    1985-01-01

    Space shuttle flight simulations were conducted to determine the effects of weightlessness, lower body negative pressure (LBNP), and acceleration of fluid and electrolyte excretion and the hormones that control it. Measurements were made on male and female subjects of different ages before and after bedrest. After admission to a controlled environment, groups of 6 to 14 subjects in the age ranges 25 to 35, 35 to 45, 45 to 55 to 65 years were exposed to +3 G sub z for 15 minutes (G1) and to LBNP (LBNP1) on different days. On 3 days during this prebedrest period, no tests were conducted. Six days of bedrest followed, and the G sub z (G2) and LBNP (LBNP2) tests were run again. Hormones, electrolytes, and other parameters were measured in 24-hour urine pools throughout the experiment. During bedrest, cortisol and aldosterone excretion increased. Urine volume decreased, and specific gravity and osmolality increased. Urinary electrolytes were statistically unchanged from levels during the non-stress control period. During G2, cortisol increased significantly over its control and bedrest levels. Urine volume, sodium, and chloride were significantly lower; specific gravity and osmolality were higher during the control period or bedrest. The retention of fluids and electrolytes after +G sub z may at least partially explain decreased urine volume and increased osmolality observed during bedrest in this study. There were some who indicated that space flight would not affect the fluid and electrolyte metabolism of females or older males any more severely than it has affected that of male astronauts.

  2. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  3. Pharmacokinetics of orbifloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and in endometrial tissues of mares.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, G R; Brown, M P; Gronwall, R R; Merritt, K A; Baltzley, L K

    2001-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics and distribution of orbifloxacin into body fluids and endometrium was studied in 6 mares after intragastric (IG) administration at a single dose rate of 7.5 mg/kg body weight. Orbifloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, synovial fluid, peritoneal fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrial tissues over 24 hours. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of orbifloxacin were determined for 120 equine pathogens over an 11-month period. The mean peak serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.41+/-0.30 microg/mL at 1.5 hours after administration and decreased to 0.17+/-0.01 microg/mL (Cmin) at 24 hours. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 9.06+/-1.33 hours and area under the serum concentration vs time curve (AUC) was 20.54+/-1.70 mg h/L. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 2.15+/-0.49 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.17+/-0.28 microg/mL at 4 hours. Highest mean urine concentration was 536.67+/-244.79 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.72+/-0.23 microg/g at 1.5 hours. Mean CSF concentration was 0.46+/-0.55 microg/mL at 3 hours. The minimum inhibitory concentration of orbifloxacin required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90) ranged from < or = 0.12 to > 8.0 microg/mL, with gram-negative organisms being more sensitive than gram-positive organisms. Orbifloxacin was uniformly absorbed in the 6 mares and was well distributed into body fluids and endometrial tissue. At a dosage of 7.5 mg/kg once a day, many gram-negative pathogens, such as Actinobacillus equuli, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella spp., and Salmonella spp. would be expected to be susceptible to orbifloxacin. PMID:11480524

  4. Pharmacokinetics of orbifloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and in endometrial tissues of mares.

    PubMed

    Haines, G R; Brown, M P; Gronwall, R R; Merritt, K A; Baltzley, L K

    2001-07-01

    Pharmacokinetics and distribution of orbifloxacin into body fluids and endometrium was studied in 6 mares after intragastric (IG) administration at a single dose rate of 7.5 mg/kg body weight. Orbifloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, synovial fluid, peritoneal fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrial tissues over 24 hours. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of orbifloxacin were determined for 120 equine pathogens over an 11-month period. The mean peak serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.41+/-0.30 microg/mL at 1.5 hours after administration and decreased to 0.17+/-0.01 microg/mL (Cmin) at 24 hours. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 9.06+/-1.33 hours and area under the serum concentration vs time curve (AUC) was 20.54+/-1.70 mg h/L. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 2.15+/-0.49 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.17+/-0.28 microg/mL at 4 hours. Highest mean urine concentration was 536.67+/-244.79 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.72+/-0.23 microg/g at 1.5 hours. Mean CSF concentration was 0.46+/-0.55 microg/mL at 3 hours. The minimum inhibitory concentration of orbifloxacin required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90) ranged from < or = 0.12 to > 8.0 microg/mL, with gram-negative organisms being more sensitive than gram-positive organisms. Orbifloxacin was uniformly absorbed in the 6 mares and was well distributed into body fluids and endometrial tissue. At a dosage of 7.5 mg/kg once a day, many gram-negative pathogens, such as Actinobacillus equuli, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella spp., and Salmonella spp. would be expected to be susceptible to orbifloxacin. PMID:11480524

  5. Changes in foot volume, body composition, and hydration status in male and female 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of running and cycling on changes in hydration status and body composition during a 24-hour race have been described previously, but data for 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers are missing. The present study investigated changes in foot volume, body composition, and hydration status in male and female 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers. Methods We compared in 49 (37 men and 12 women) 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers (ultra-MTBers) changes (Δ) in body mass (BM). Fat mass (FM), percent body fat (%BF) and skeletal muscle mass (SM) were estimated using anthropometric methods. Changes in total body water (TBW), extracellular fluid (ECF) and intracellular fluid (ICF) were determined using bioelectrical impedance and changes in foot volume using plethysmography. Haematocrit, plasma [Na+], plasma urea, plasma osmolality, urine urea, urine specific gravity and urine osmolality were measured in a subgroup of 25 ultra-MTBers (16 men and 9 women). Results In male 24-hour ultra-MTBers, BM (P < 0.001), FM (P < 0.001), %BF (P < 0.001) and ECF (P < 0.05) decreased whereas SM and TBW did not change (P > 0.05). A significant correlation was found between post-race BM and post-race FM (r = 0.63, P < 0.001). In female ultra-MTBers, BM (P < 0.05), %BF (P < 0.05) and FM (P < 0.001) decreased, whereas SM, ECF and TBW remained stable (P > 0.05). Absolute ranking in the race was related to Δ%BM (P < 0.001) and Δ%FM in men (P < 0.001) and to Δ%BM (P < 0.05) in women. In male ultra-MTBers, increased post-race plasma urea (P < 0.001) was negatively related to absolute ranking in the race, Δ%BM, post-race FM and Δ%ECF (P < 0.05). Foot volume remained stable in both sexes (P > 0.05). Conclusions Male and female 24-hour ultra-MTBers experienced a significant loss in BM and FM, whereas SM remained stable. Body weight changes and increases in plasma urea do not reflect a change in body hydration status. No oedema

  6. Handling and storage of human body fluids for analysis of extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Yuana, Yuana; Böing, Anita N.; Grootemaat, Anita E.; van der Pol, Edwin; Hau, Chi M.; Cizmar, Petr; Buhr, Egbert; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Because procedures of handling and storage of body fluids affect numbers and composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs), standardization is important to ensure reliable and comparable measurements of EVs in a clinical environment. We aimed to develop standard protocols for handling and storage of human body fluids for EV analysis. Conditions such as centrifugation, single freeze–thaw cycle, effect of time delay between blood collection and plasma preparation and storage were investigated. Plasma is the most commonly studied body fluid in EV research. We mainly focused on EVs originating from platelets and erythrocytes and investigated the behaviour of these 2 types of EVs independently as well as in plasma samples of healthy subjects. EVs in urine and saliva were also studied for comparison. All samples were analysed simultaneously before and after freeze–thawing by resistive pulse sensing, nanoparticle tracking analysis, conventional flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission (scanning) electron microscopy. Our main finding is that the effect of centrifugation markedly depends on the cellular origin of EVs. Whereas erythrocyte EVs remain present as single EVs after centrifugation, platelet EVs form aggregates, which affect their measured concentration in plasma. Single erythrocyte and platelet EVs are present mainly in the range of 100–200 nm, far below the lower limit of what can be measured by conventional FCM. Furthermore, the effects of single freeze–thaw cycle, time delay between blood collection and plasma preparation up to 1 hour and storage up to 1 year are insignificant (p>0.05) on the measured concentration and diameter of EVs from erythrocyte and platelet concentrates and EVs in plasma, urine and saliva. In conclusion, in standard protocols for EV studies, centrifugation to isolate EVs from collected body fluids should be avoided. Freezing and storage of collected body fluids, albeit their insignificant effects, should be performed identically for

  7. Effects of Intense Physical Activity with Free Water Replacement on Bioimpedance Parameters and Body Fluid Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, E. B.; Ulbricht, L.; Krueger, E.; Romaneli, E. F. R.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Authors have emphasized the need for previous care in order to perform reliable bioimpedance acquisition. Despite of this need some authors have reported that intense physical training has little effect on Bioimpedance Analysis (BIA), while other ones have observed significant effects on bioimpedance parameters in the same condition, leading to body composition estimates considered incompatible with human physiology. The aim of this work was to quantify the changes in bioimpedance parameters, as well as in body fluids estimates by BIA, after four hours of intense physical activity with free water replacement in young males. Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment was used to acquire bioimpedance data before and immediately after the physical training. After data acquisition body fluids were estimates from bioimpedance parameters. Height and weight of all subjects were also acquired to the nearest 0.1 cm and 0.1 kg, respectively. Results point that among the bioimpedance parameter, extracellular resistance presented the most coherent behavior, leading to reliable estimates of the extracellular fluid and part of the total body water. Results also show decreases in height and weight of the participants, which were associated to the decrease in body hydration and in intervertebral discs.

  8. [Differentiation of human amniotic fluid stem cells into cardiomyocytes through embryonic body formation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Shuai; Cheng, Xiang; Dou, Zhongying; Wang, Huayan

    2008-09-01

    To isolate human amniotic fluid stem cells (hASCs) and induce hASCs into cardiomyocytes after forming the embryonic bodies. We cultivated hASCs isolated from the amniotic fluid continually for over 42 passages. The biological characteristics of hASCs were detected by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and flow cytometer, hASCs at 10-15th passage were suspension cultured to form embryonic bodies that were induced to cardiomyocytes. Fibroblastoid-type hASCs were obtained. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that hASCs were positive for some specific makers of the embryonic stem cell. hASCs could form embryonic bodies that were alkaline-phosphatase positive and expressed fgf5, zeta-globin and alpha-fetoprotein. The embryonic bodies could differentiate into cardiomyocytes showing alpha-actin positive and Tbx5, Nkx2.5, GATA4 and alpha-MHC positive. We conclued that hASCs obtained from human amniotic fluid could differentiate into cardiomyocytes through the formation of embryonic bodies. PMID:19160841

  9. Flow and Force Equations for a Body Revolving in a Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    A general method for finding the steady flow velocity relative to a body in plane curvilinear motion, whence the pressure is found by Bernoulli's energy principle is described. Integration of the pressure supplies basic formulas for the zonal forces and moments on the revolving body. The application of the steady flow method for calculating the velocity and pressure at all points of the flow inside and outside an ellipsoid and some of its limiting forms is presented and graphs those quantities for the latter forms. In some useful cases experimental pressures are plotted for comparison with theoretical. The pressure, and thence the zonal force and moment, on hulls in plane curvilinear flight are calculated. General equations for the resultant fluid forces and moments on trisymmetrical bodies moving through a perfect fluid are derived. Formulas for potential coefficients and inertia coefficients for an ellipsoid and its limiting forms are presented.

  10. Locomotion and Control of a Self-Propelled Shape-Changing Body in a Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambrion, Thomas; Munnier, Alexandre

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we study the locomotion of a shape-changing body swimming in a two-dimensional perfect fluid of infinite extent. The shape changes are prescribed as functions of time satisfying constraints ensuring that they result from the work of internal forces only: conditions necessary for the locomotion to be termed self-propelled. The net rigid motion of the body results from the exchange of momentum between these shape changes and the surrounding fluid. The aim of this paper is three-fold. First, it describes a rigorous framework for the study of animal locomotion in fluid. Our model differs from previous ones mostly in that the number of degrees of freedom related to the shape changes is infinite. The Euler-Lagrange equation is obtained by applying the least action principle to the system body fluid. The formalism of Analytic Mechanics provides a simple way to handle the strong coupling between the internal dynamics of the body causing the shape changes and the dynamics of the fluid. The Euler-Lagrange equation takes the form of a coupled system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and partial differential equations (PDEs). The existence and uniqueness of solutions for this system are rigorously proved. Second, we are interested in making clear the connection between shape changes and internal forces. Although classical, it can be quite surprising to select the shape changes to play the role of control because the internal forces they are due to seem to be a more natural and realistic choice. We prove that, when the number of degrees of freedom relating to the shape changes is finite, both choices are actually equivalent in the sense that there is a one-to-one relation between shape changes and internal forces. Third, we show how the control problem, consisting in associating with each shape change the resulting trajectory of the swimming body, can be analysed within the framework of geometric control theory. This allows us to take advantage of the

  11. Cerebral blood flow velocity and cranial fluid volume decrease during +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Puma, S. C.; Hargens, A. R.; Murthy, G.; Warkander, D.; Lundgren, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity and cranial fluid volume, which is defined as the total volume of intra- and extracranial fluid, were measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and rheoencephalography, respectively, in humans during graded increase of +Gz acceleration (onset rate: 0.1 G/s) without straining maneuvers. Gz acceleration was terminated when subjects' vision decreased to an angle of less than or equal to 60 degrees, which was defined as the physiological end point. In five subjects, mean CBF velocity decreased 48% from a baseline value of 59.4 +/- 11.2 cm/s to 31.0 +/- 5.6 cm/s (p<0.01) with initial loss of peripheral vision at 5.7 +/- 0.9 Gz. On the other hand, systolic CBF velocity did not change significantly during increasing +Gz acceleration. Cranial impedance, which is proportional to loss of cranial fluid volume, increased by 2.0 +/- 0.8% above the baseline value at the physiological end point (p<0.05). Both the decrease of CBF velocity and the increase of cranial impedance correlated significantly with Gz. These results suggest that +Gz acceleration without straining maneuvers decreases CBF velocity to half normal and probably causes a caudal fluid shift from both intra- and extracranial tissues.

  12. Role of lung fluid volume in growth and maturation of the fetal sheep lung.

    PubMed Central

    Moessinger, A C; Harding, R; Adamson, T M; Singh, M; Kiu, G T

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of alterations in lung fluid volume on growth and maturation of the fetal lung. In a chronic fetal sheep preparation, right fetal lung volume was decreased by drainage of lung fluid while the volume of the left lung was expanded by mainstem bronchus ligation leading to lung fluid retention. After an experimental period of 25 d (from 105 to 129 d of gestation, term = 145 d), the right (deflated) lung was significantly hypoplastic and contained less DNA than the controls; 175.15 +/- 55.18 vs. 346.77 +/- 61.97 mg, respectively; P less than 0.001. In contrast, the left (expanded) lung was significantly hyperplastic and contained more DNA than the controls; 390.74 +/- 103.53 vs. 238.85 +/- 33.32 mg, respectively; P = 0.001. Biochemical indices of lung maturation, including total phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine, and disaturated phosphatidylcholine content expressed per unit of tissue DNA, were no different when comparing the hypoplastic, hyperplastic, and control lungs. These findings demonstrate that fetal lung cell multiplication is influenced by local distension with lung fluid, while the biochemical maturation of fetal lung surfactant is under systemic control. Images PMID:2212011

  13. Influence of fluid and volume state on PaO2 oscillations in mechanically ventilated pigs.

    PubMed

    Bodenstein, Marc; Bierschock, Stephan; Boehme, Stefan; Wang, Hemei; Vogt, Andreas; Kwiecien, Robert; David, Matthias; Markstaller, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Varying pulmonary shunt fractions during the respiratory cycle cause oxygen oscillations during mechanical ventilation. In artificially damaged lungs, cyclical recruitment of atelectasis is responsible for varying shunt according to published evidence. We introduce a complimentary hypothesis that cyclically varying shunt in healthy lungs is caused by cyclical redistribution of pulmonary perfusion. Administration of crystalloid or colloid infusions would decrease oxygen oscillations if our hypothesis was right. Therefore, n=14 mechanically ventilated healthy pigs were investigated in 2 groups: crystalloid (fluid) versus no-fluid administration. Additional volume interventions (colloid infusion, blood withdrawal) were carried out in each pig. Intra-aortal PaO2 oscillations were recorded using fluorescence quenching technique. Phase shift of oxygen oscillations during altered inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ventilation ratio and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) served as control methods to exclude that recruitment of atelectasis is responsible for oxygen oscillations. In hypovolemia relevant oxygen oscillations could be recorded. Fluid and volume state changed PaO2 oscillations according to our hypothesis. Fluid administration led to a mean decline of 105.3 mmHg of the PaO2 oscillations amplitude (P<0.001). The difference of the amplitudes between colloid administration and blood withdrawal was 62.4 mmHg in pigs not having received fluids (P=0.0059). Fluid and volume state also changed the oscillation phase during altered I:E ratio. EIT excluded changes of regional ventilation (i.e., recruitment of atelectasis) to be responsible for these oscillations. In healthy pigs, cyclical redistribution of pulmonary perfusion can explain the size of respiratory-dependent PaO2 oscillations. PMID:23320977

  14. Strongly coupled dynamics of fluids and rigid-body systems with the immersed boundary projection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengjie; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2015-08-01

    A strong coupling algorithm is presented for simulating the dynamic interactions between incompressible viscous flows and rigid-body systems in both two- and three-dimensional problems. In this work, the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow are solved on a uniform Cartesian grid by the vorticity-based immersed boundary projection method of Colonius and Taira. Dynamical equations for arbitrary rigid-body systems are also developed. The proposed coupling method attempts to unify the treatment of constraints in the fluid and structure-the incompressibility of the fluid, the linkages in the rigid-body system, and the conditions at the interface-through the use of Lagrange multipliers. The resulting partitioned system of equations is solved with a simple relaxation scheme, based on an identification of virtual inertia from the fluid. The scheme achieves convergence in only 2 to 5 iterations per time step for a wide variety of mass ratios. The formulation requires that only a subset of the discrete fluid equations be solved in each iteration. Several two- and three-dimensional numerical tests are conducted to validate and demonstrate the method, including a falling cylinder, flapping of flexible wings, self-excited oscillations of a system of many linked plates in a free stream, and passive pivoting of a finite aspect ratio plate under the influence of gravity in a free stream. The results from the current method are compared with previous experimental and numerical results and good agreement is achieved.

  15. A Biodegradation Study of SBA-15 Microparticles in Simulated Body Fluid and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngjin; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Jung Heon; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jaeyun

    2015-06-16

    Mesoporous silica has received considerable attention as a drug delivery vehicle because of its large surface area and large pore volume for loading drugs and large biomolecules. Recently, mesoporous silica microparticles have shown potential as a three-dimensional vaccine platform for modulating dendritic cells via spontaneous assembly of microparticles in a specific region after subcutaneous injection. For further in vivo applications, the biodegradation behavior of mesoporous silica microparticles must be studied and known. Until now, most biodegradation studies have focused on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs); here, we report the biodegradation of hexagonally ordered mesoporous silica, SBA-15, with micrometer-sized lengths (∼32 μm with a high aspect ratio). The degradation of SBA-15 microparticles was investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in mice by analyzing the structural change over time. SBA-15 microparticles were found to degrade in SBF and in vivo. The erosion of SBA-15 under biological conditions led to a loss of the hysteresis loop in the nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm and fingerprint peaks in small-angle X-ray scattering, specifically indicating a degradation of ordered mesoporous structure. Via comparison to previous results of degradation of MSNs in SBF, SBA-15 microparticles degraded faster than MCM-41 nanoparticles presumably because SBA-15 microparticles have a pore size (∼8 nm) and a pore volume larger than those of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. The surface functional groups, the residual amounts of organic templates, and the hydrothermal treatment during the synthesis could affect the rate of degradation of SBA-15. In in vivo testing, previous studies focused on the evaluation of toxicity of mesoporous silica particles in various organs. In contrast, we studied the change in the physical properties of SBA-15 microparticles depending on the duration after subcutaneous injection. The pristine SBA-15 microparticles injected

  16. Non-linear evolution of tidally forced inertial waves in rotating fluid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, B.; Barker, A. J.; Baruteau, C.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2014-03-01

    We perform one of the first studies into the non-linear evolution of tidally excited inertial waves in a uniformly rotating fluid body, exploring a simplified model of the fluid envelope of a planet (or the convective envelope of a solar-type star) subject to the gravitational tidal perturbations of an orbiting companion. Our model contains a perfectly rigid spherical core, which is surrounded by an envelope of incompressible uniform density fluid. The corresponding linear problem was studied in previous papers which this work extends into the non-linear regime, at moderate Ekman numbers (the ratio of viscous to Coriolis accelerations). By performing high-resolution numerical simulations, using a combination of pseudo-spectral and spectral element methods, we investigate the effects of non-linearities, which lead to time-dependence of the flow and the corresponding dissipation rate. Angular momentum is deposited non-uniformly, leading to the generation of significant differential rotation in the initially uniformly rotating fluid, i.e. the body does not evolve towards synchronism as a simple solid body rotator. This differential rotation modifies the properties of tidally excited inertial waves, changes the dissipative properties of the flow and eventually becomes unstable to a secondary shear instability provided that the Ekman number is sufficiently small. Our main result is that the inclusion of non-linearities eventually modifies the flow and the resulting dissipation from what linear calculations would predict, which has important implications for tidal dissipation in fluid bodies. We finally discuss some limitations of our simplified model, and propose avenues for future research to better understand the tidal evolution of rotating planets and stars.

  17. Octupolar approximation for the excluded volume of axially symmetric convex bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piastra, Marco; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a simply computable formula for the excluded volume of convex, axially symmetric bodies, based on the classical Brunn-Minkoski theory for convex bodies, which is briefly outlined in an Appendix written in a modern mathematical language. This formula is applied to cones and spherocones, which are regularized cones; a shape-reconstruction algorithm is able to generate the region in space inaccessible to them and to compute their excluded volume, which is found to be in good agreement with our approximate analytical formula. Finally, for spherocones with an appropriately tuned amplitude, we predict the occurrence of a relative deep minimum of the excluded volume in a configuration lying between the parallel alignment (where the excluded volume is maximum) and the antiparallel alignment (where the excluded volume is minimum).

  18. Body weight changes and voluntary fluid intakes of beach volleyball players during an official tournament.

    PubMed

    Zetou, E; Giatsis, G; Mountaki, F; Komninakidou, A

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate sweat rates (measured by weight changes), voluntary fluid intakes, and fluid balance of beach volleyball players during a tournament. Data was collected during the 3 days of the tournament for male players (n=47) age M=26.17 (S.D.=5.12) years old. Participants were weighed before the warm up and they reweighed immediately after the game. The differences in body weight were calculated in grams. The voluntary fluid intake of players during the game was also recorded by observers, whose inter and intra reliability were evaluated (inter r=.89 and intra reliability r=.93). Fifty matches took place with a M=42.2min duration per match. A wide individual variation appeared in fluid intake and sweat loss. The calculated average sweat rate, fluid intake rate and fluid balance of players during each match were M=1440ml, M=731ml and M=-0.8%, respectively. Air temperature ranged from 26 degrees to 38 degrees C (M=33.58 degrees C, S.D.=2.8) and humidity from 42% to 75% (M=56.04%, S.D.=8.7) and both were measured in each day of tournament, at the beginning and at the end of each game. Although players' dehydration (-0.8%) was of mild level, it was more or less the same as it was reported in other team sports studies. ANOVA did not prove differences between elite and non-elite athletes in sweat loss and fluid intake (p>.01). Sweat rate was associated only with humidity (r=.99, p<.01) and with fluid intake (r=.315, p<.05). The athletes should be aware of the great significance of fluids and to intake greater quantities in order to prevent weight loss and at the same time loss of vital elements that would cause their performance to decline. PMID:17363327

  19. Trapped modes around freely floating bodies in a two-layer fluid channel

    PubMed Central

    Cal, Filipe S.; Dias, Gonçalo A. S.; Videman, Juha H.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike the trapping of time-harmonic water waves by fixed obstacles, the oscillation of freely floating structures gives rise to a complex nonlinear spectral problem. Still, through a convenient elimination scheme the system simplifies to a linear spectral problem for a self-adjoint operator in a Hilbert space. Under symmetry assumptions on the geometry of the fluid domain, we present conditions guaranteeing the existence of trapped modes in a two-layer fluid channel. Numerous examples of floating bodies supporting trapped modes are given. PMID:25294970

  20. Exposure measurement of aflatoxins and aflatoxin metabolites in human body fluids. A short review.

    PubMed

    Leong, Yin-Hui; Latiff, Aishah A; Ahmad, Nurul Izzah; Rosma, Ahmad

    2012-05-01

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic secondary fungal metabolites mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Human exposure to aflatoxins may result directly from ingestion of contaminated foods, or indirectly from consumption of foods from animals previously exposed to aflatoxins in feeds. This paper focuses on exposure measurement of aflatoxins and aflatoxin metabolites in various human body fluids. Research on different metabolites present in blood, urine, breast milk, and other human fluids or tissues including their detection techniques is reviewed. The association between dietary intake of aflatoxins and biomarker measurement is also highlighted. Finally, aspects related to the differences between aflatoxin determination in food versus the biomarker approach are discussed. PMID:23606045

  1. A comparison of hydration effect on body fluid and temperature regulation between Malaysian and Japanese males exercising at mild dehydration in humid heat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effect of hydration differences on body fluid and temperature regulation between tropical and temperate indigenes exercising in the heat. Methods Ten Japanese and ten Malaysian males with matched physical characteristics (height, body weight, and peak oxygen consumption) participated in this study. Participants performed exercise for 60 min at 55% peak oxygen uptake followed by a 30-min recovery at 32°C and 70% relative air humidity with hydration (4 times each, 3 mL per kg body weight, 37°C) or without hydration. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, skin blood flow, and blood pressure were measured continuously. The percentage of body weight loss and total sweat loss were calculated from body weight measurements. The percentage change in plasma volume was estimated from hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit. Results Malaysian participants had a significantly lower rectal temperature, a smaller reduction in plasma volume, and a lower heart rate in the hydrated condition than in the non-hydrated condition at the end of exercise (P <0.05), whereas Japanese participants showed no difference between the two hydration conditions. Hydration induced a greater total sweat loss in both groups (P <0.05), and the percentage of body weight loss in hydrated Malaysians was significantly less than in hydrated Japanese (P <0.05). A significant interaction between groups and hydration conditions was observed for the percentage of mean cutaneous vascular conductance during exercise relative to baseline (P <0.05). Conclusions The smaller reduction in plasma volume and percentage body weight loss in hydrated Malaysians indicated an advantage in body fluid regulation. This may enable Malaysians to reserve more blood for circulation and heat dissipation and thereby maintain lower rectal temperatures in a hydrated condition. PMID:24490869

  2. Physiological and behavioral effects of tilt-induced body fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Tjernstrom, O.; Ivarsson, A.; Gulledge, W. L.; Poston, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper addresses the 'fluid shift theory' of space motion sickness. The primary purpose of the research was the development of procedures to assess individual differences in response to rostral body fluid shifts on earth. Experiment I examined inner ear fluid pressure changes during head-down tilt in intact human beings. Tilt produced reliable changes. Differences among subjects and between ears within the same subject were observed. Experiment II examined auditory threshold changes during tilt. Tilt elicited increased auditory thresholds, suggesting that sensory depression may result from increased inner ear fluid pressure. Additional observations on rotation magnitude estimation during head-down tilt, which indicate that rostral fluid shifts may depress semicircular canal activity, are briefly described. The results of this research suggest that the inner ear pressure and auditory threshold shift procedures could be used to assess individual differences among astronauts prior to space flight. Results from the terrestrial observations could be related to reported incidence/severity of motion sickness in space and used to evaluate the fluid shift theory of space motion sickness.

  3. Tensorial density functional theory for non-spherical hard-body fluids.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Mecke, Klaus

    2010-09-15

    In a recent publication (Hansen-Goos and Mecke 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 018302) we constructed a free energy functional for the inhomogeneous hard-body fluid, which reduces to Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory (Rosenfeld 1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 980) when applied to hard spheres. The new functional is able to yield the isotropic-nematic transition for the hard-spherocylinder fluid in contrast to Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory for non-spherical particles (Rosenfeld 1994 Phys. Rev. E 50 R3318). The description of inhomogeneous isotropic fluids is also improved when compared with data from Monte Carlo simulations for hard spherocylinders in contact with a planar hard wall. However, the new functional for the inhomogeneous fluid in general does not comply with the exact second order virial expansion. We introduced the ζ correction in order to minimize the deviation from Onsager's exact result in the isotropic bulk fluid. In this article we give a detailed account of the construction of the new functional. An extension of the ζ correction makes the latter better suited for non-isotropic particle distributions. The extended ζ correction is shown to improve the description of the isotropic-nematic bulk phase diagram while it has little effect on the results for the isotropic but inhomogeneous hard-spherocylinder fluid. We argue that the gain from using higher order tensorial weighted densities in the theory is likely to be inferior to the associated increase in complexity. PMID:21386523

  4. Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofalo, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  5. Precision metering of microliter volumes of biological fluids in micro-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Columbus, Richard L.; Palmer, Harvey J.; Mckinley, B. A.; Norfleet, William T.; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    Concepts were demonstrated and investigated for transferring accurately known and reproducible microliter volumes of biological fluids from sample container onto dry chemistry slides in microgravity environment. Specific liquid transfer tip designs were compared. Information was obtained for design of a liquid sample handling system to enable clinical chemical analysis in microgravity. Disposable pipet tips and pipet devices that were designed to transfer microliter volumes of biological fluid from a (test tube) sample container in 1-G environment were used during microgravity periods of parabolic trajectories of the KC-135 aircraft. The transfer process was recorded using charge coupled device camera and video cassette equipment. Metering behavior of water, a synthetic aqueous protein solution, and anticoagulated human blood was compared. Transfer of these liquids to 2 substrate materials representative of rapidly wettable and slowly wettable dry chemistry slide surface was compared.

  6. Fluid Vessel Quantity Using Non-invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofalo, Anthony A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  7. An incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the motion of rigid bodies in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofighi, N.; Ozbulut, M.; Rahmat, A.; Feng, J. J.; Yildiz, M.

    2015-09-01

    A two-dimensional incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics scheme is presented for simulation of rigid bodies moving through Newtonian fluids. The scheme relies on combined usage of the rigidity constraints and the viscous penalty method to simulate rigid body motion. Different viscosity ratios and interpolation schemes are tested by simulating a rigid disc descending in quiescent medium. A viscosity ratio of 100 coupled with weighted harmonic averaging scheme has been found to provide satisfactory results. The performance of the resulting scheme is systematically tested for cases with linear motion, rotational motion and their combination. The test cases include sedimentation of a single and a pair of circular discs, sedimentation of an elliptic disc and migration and rotation of a circular disc in linear shear flow. Comparison with previous results at various Reynolds numbers indicates that the proposed method captures the motion of rigid bodies driven by flow or external body forces accurately.

  8. Squeeze behavior of magnetorheological fluids under constant volume and uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chaoyang; Gong, Xinglong; Xuan, Shouhu; Yan, Qifan; Ruan, Xiaohui

    2013-04-01

    In this work the experimental investigation of magnetorheological fluids in squeeze mode has been carried out under constant volume with a self-developed device. The magnetorheological fluids were forced to move in all directions in a horizontal plane as the two flat surfaces came together. A pair of Helmholtz coils was used to generate a uniform magnetic field in the compression gap. The normal forces within the gap were systematically studied for different magnetic field, squeeze velocity, particle concentration, viscosity of carrier fluid and initial gap distance. Two regions of behavior were obtained from the normal force versus gap distance curve: elastic deformation and plastic flow. A power law fitting was appropriate for the relation between the normal force and the gap in the plastic flow. The index of the power law was smaller than that predicted by the continuum theory, possibly due to the squeeze strengthening effect and the sealing effect.

  9. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    DOEpatents

    Sreepada, Sastry R.; Rippel, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  10. Cell-free microRNAs in blood and other body fluids, as cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) in serum, plasma and other body fluids has yielded an invaluable potential source of non-invasive biomarkers for cancer and other non-malignant diseases. miRNAs in the blood and other body fluids are highly stable in biological samples and are resistant to environmental conditions, such as freezing, thawing or enzymatic degradation, which makes them convenient as potential biomarkers. In addition, they are more easily sampled than tissue miRNAs. Altered levels of cell-free miRNAs have been found in every type of cancer analysed, and increasing evidence indicates that they may participate in carcinogenesis by acting as cell-to-cell signalling molecules. This review summarizes the biological characteristics and mechanisms of release of cell-free miRNAs that make them promising candidates as non-invasive biomarkers of cancer. PMID:27218664